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Sample records for investigate molecular structure

  1. Theoretical investigation of the molecular structure of the isoquercitrin molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornard, J. P.; Boudet, A. C.; Merlin, J. C.

    1999-09-01

    Isoquercitrin is a glycosilated flavonoid that has received a great deal of attention because of its numerous biological effects. We present a theoretical study on isoquercitrin using both empirical (Molecular Mechanics (MM), with MMX force field) and quantum chemical (AM1 semiempirical method) techniques. The most stable structures of the molecule obtained by MM calculations have been used as input data for the semiempirical treatment. The position and orientation of the glucose moiety with regard to the remainder of the molecule have been investigated. The flexibility of isoquercitrin principally lies in rotations around the inter-ring bond and the sugar link. In order to know the structural modifications generated by the substitution by a sugar, geometrical parameters of quercetin (aglycon) and isoquercitrin have been compared. The good accordance between theoretical and experimental electronic spectra permits to confirm the reliability of the structural model.

  2. Optical investigation of molecular structure of sophisticated materials for photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyba, Marcin; Keraenen, Mikko

    2003-10-01

    Permanent development of photonics stimulates a searching for new materials, which have better optical, mechanical and electrical properties. One of the new classes of materials with large application and development potential are hybrid polymers, synthesized in sol-gel technology. Thanks to incorporation of organic components into an in organic network, a combination of advantages of both class of materials became available. Properties of hybrids may be formed in wide range. These materials can be used in photonics to produce planar waveguides, lenses, Bragg gratings and components for integrated optics. Moreover, dielectric layers, coatings and packaging are made from hybrids. Additionally, research to apply them in optical fiber sensors (including bio-sensors) and solid state lasers is underway. However, to obtain a high quality product, a strict control of its molecular structure must be ensured. This is a very difficult task, because of a sophisticated structure of hybrid polymers. To address these problems, optical, non-destructive measurement techniques such as Raman and infrared spectroscopy were used. They are compementary methods, so their simultaneous application, as it was shown in this paper, can significantly increase the amoung of information about molecular structure of materials and process of their synthesis.

  3. Molecular tools for investigating ANME community structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, Steven J.; Page, Antoine P.; Constan, Lea; Song, Young C.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Brewer, Heather M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-05-20

    Methane production and consumption in anaerobic marine sediments 1 is catalyzed by a series of reversible tetramethanopterin (H4MPT)-linked C1 transfer reactions. Although many of these reactions are conserved between one-carbon compound utilizing microorganisms, two remain diagnostic for archaeal methane metabolism. These include reactions catalyzed by N5-methyltetrahydromethanopterin: coenzyme M methyltransferase and methyl coenzyme M reductase. The latter enzyme is central to C-H bond formation and cleavage underlying methanogenic and reverse methanogenic phenotypes. Here we describe a set of novel tools for the detection and functional analysis of H4MPT-linked C1 transfer reactions mediated by uncultivated anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME). These tools include polymerase chain reaction primers targeting ANME methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A subgroups and protein extraction methods from marine sediments compatible with high-resolution mass spectrometry for profiling population structure and functional dynamics. [910, 1,043

  4. Teaching Structure-Property Relationships: Investigating Molecular Structure and Boiling Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    A concise, well-organized table of the boiling points of 392 organic compounds has facilitated inquiry-based instruction in multiple scientific principles. Many individual or group learning activities can be derived from the tabulated data of molecular structure and boiling point based on the instructor's education objectives and the students'…

  5. Teaching Structure-Property Relationships: Investigating Molecular Structure and Boiling Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    A concise, well-organized table of the boiling points of 392 organic compounds has facilitated inquiry-based instruction in multiple scientific principles. Many individual or group learning activities can be derived from the tabulated data of molecular structure and boiling point based on the instructor's education objectives and the students'…

  6. Investigating molecular structures: Rapidly examining molecular fingerprints through fast passage broadband fourier transform microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubbs, Garry Smith Smitty, II

    Microwave spectroscopy is a gas phase technique typically geared toward measuring the rotational transitions of molecules. The information contained in this type of spectroscopy pertains to a molecules structure, both geometric and electronic, which give insight into a molecule's chemistry. Typically this type of spectroscopy is high resolution, but narrowband ≤1 MHz in frequency. This is achieved by tuning a cavity, exciting a molecule with electromagnetic radiation in the microwave region, turning the electromagnetic radiation off, and measuring a signal from the molecular relaxation in the form of a free induction decay (FID). The FID is then Fourier transformed to give a frequency of the transition. "Fast passage" is defined as a sweeping of frequencies through a transition at a time much shorter (≤10 mus) than the molecular relaxation (≈100 mus). Recent advancements in technology have allowed for the creation of these fast frequency sweeps, known as "chirps", which allow for broadband capabilities. This work presents the design, construction, and implementation of one such novel, high-resolution microwave spectrometer with broadband capabilities. The manuscript also provides the theory, technique, and motivations behind building of such an instrument. In this manuscript it is demonstrated that, although a gas phase technique, solids, liquids, and transient species may be studied with the spectrometer with high sensitivity, making it a viable option for many molecules wanting to be rotationally studied. The spectrometer has a relative correct intensity feature that, when coupled with theory, may ease the difficulty in transition assignment and facilitate dynamic chemical studies of the experiment. Molecules studied on this spectrometer have, in turn, been analyzed and assigned using common rotational spectroscopic analysis. Detailed theory on the analysis of these molecules has been provided. Structural parameters such as rotational constants and

  7. Using solvents with different molecular sizes to investigate the structure of Antheraea pernyi silk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Porter, David; Shao, Zhengzhong

    2013-11-11

    The interaction between silk and polar solvents of different molecular size can be an important tool for understanding the structural features of natural silk; in particular, the disordered regions associated with the key property of mechanical toughness. In this work, we investigate the transitions induced in the tensile performance and structure of as-reeled Antheraea pernyi silks from different silkworms by a range of solvents that can only soften the protein chains in the amorphous regions. The results indicate that polar solvents with different molecular sizes affect the silk to different degrees, and silks with slightly different structures display significantly different tensile performance in the same solvent. The solvent molecular size is quantitatively correlated with the accessible volume in the amorphous regions before and after the yield point, which suggests that the volume accessible to the solvent molecules decreases as the solvent radius increases. Moreover, silks with more ordered structure (less free volume) in the amorphous regions are less sensitive to solvents than those with more disordered structures. However, silks with higher free volume have higher toughness due to the greater strain to failure.

  8. First principles investigations of electronic structure and transport properties of graphitic structures and single molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jonathan R.

    properties of the IV curves of single molecule nano-junctions. Specifically, these systems consist of a zinc-porphyrin molecule coupled between two gold electrodes, i.e., a nano-gap. The first observation we want to explain is the asymmetric nature of the experimental IV curve for this porphyrin system, where the IV curve is skewed heavily to the negative bias region. Using a plane-wave DFT calculation, we present the density of states of the porphyrin molecule (both in the presence and absence of the electrodes) and indeed see highly delocalized states (as confirmed by site-projection of the DOS) only in the negative bias region, meaning that the channels with high transmission probability reside there, in agreement with experimental observation. The next problem studied pertains to observed switching in an experimentally-measured IV curve, this time of a longer zinc porphyrin molecule, still within a gold nano-gap. The switching behavior is observed only at 300K, not at 4.2K. The temperature-dependance of this problem renders our previous toolset of DFT calculations void; DFT is a ground-state theory. Instead, we employ a density functional-based tight-binding (DFTB) approach in a molecular dynamics simulation. Basically, the structural configuration evaluated at each time step is based on a tight-binding electronic structure calculation, instead of a typical MD force field. Trajectories are presented at varying temperatures and electric field strengths. Indeed, we observe a conformation of the porphyrin molecule between two configurations of the dihedral angle of the central nitrogen ring, ±15. {o} at 300K, but not 4.2K. These confirmations are equally likely, i.e., the structure assumes these configurations an equal number of teams, meaning the average structure has an angle of 0. {o}. After computing the DOS of all three aforementioned configurations (0. {text{o}} and ±15. {text{o}}), we indeed see a difference between the DOS curves at ±15. {text{o}} (which are

  9. Investigation of Terminal Group Effect on Electron Transport Through Open Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C. Preferencial, Kala; P. Aruna, Priya; John Thiruvadigal, D.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of terminal groups on the electron transport through metal-molecule-metal system has been investigated using nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism combined with extended Huckel theory (EHT). Au-molecule-Au junctions are constructed with borazine and BCN unit structure as core molecule and sulphur (S), oxygen (O), selenium (Se) and cyano-group (CN) as terminal groups. The electron transport characteristics of the borazine and BCN molecular systems are analyzed through the transmission spectra and the current-voltage curve. The results demonstrate that the terminal groups modifying the transport behaviors of these systems in a controlled way. Our result shows that, selenium is the best linker to couple borazine to Au electrode and oxygen is the best one to couple BCN to Au electrode. Furthermore, the results of borazine systems are compared with that of BCN molecular systems and are discussed. Simulation results show that the conductance through BCN molecular systems is four times larger than the borazine molecular systems. Negative differential resistance behavior is observed with borazine-CN system and the saturation feature appears in BCN systems.

  10. Molecular structure and spectral investigations of 3,5-Di-tert-butyl-o-benzoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, M.; Aydin, B.; Dogan, O.; Dereli, O.

    2017-01-01

    Conformational analysis of 3,5-Di-tert-butyl-o-benzoquinone molecule was performed and two stable conformers were determined by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p). Using the most stable one, molecular structural parameters, vibrational frequencies were calculated by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31G(d) and BLYP/6-31G(d,p) levels of theory. The FT-IR spectrum of the compound was recorded in the region 4000-550 cm-1. The Raman spectrum was also recorded in the region 3500-100 cm-1. Calculated results were compared with experimental counterparts. The best results were obtained from B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) calculations. Experimental 13C and 1H NMR data of tittle compound were taken from literature and the calculated results compared with these data. Vibrational and NMR band assignments were performed. HOMO-LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potentials and thermodynamic properties were also given for further investigations of our structure.

  11. On the structure of Ce-containing silicophosphate glasses: a core-shell molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Gambuzzi, Elisa; Pedone, Alfonso

    2014-10-21

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the local and medium range structure of Ce-containing silicophosphate glasses widely used in optical and photonic devices because of their enhanced UV absorption and radiation damage resistance properties. New Ce(3+)-O and Ce(4+)-O parameters for a force-field based on the core-shell model were developed by fitting on the crystalline structures of Ce-containing crystal phases, and used to get insights into the structure of five silicophosphate glasses with increasing Ce2O3 and P2O5 content. An excellent agreement between experimental and computational data was found for the local environment around cerium ions and network former cations. The Ce(3+)-O bond lengths are generally longer than Ce(4+)-O, which shows higher coordination numbers. Both P and Si are four-fold coordinated; their allocation in the network is not uniform: the increasing Ce content leads to the formation of silica-rich domains and phosphate-rich domains, which entrap Ce cations increasing their solubility in the glass. We found that both the Q(n) distributions of phosphorous and Ce clustering depend on the Ce/P ratio in the glass. In particular, Ce clustering begins for Ce/P ratios between 0.17 and 0.29 in the glass series investigated.

  12. Nanoindentation-induced phase transformation and structural deformation of monocrystalline germanium: a molecular dynamics simulation investigation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the nanoindentation of monocrystalline germanium. The path of phase transformation and distribution of transformed region on different crystallographic orientations were investigated. The results indicate the anisotropic behavior of monocrystalline germanium. The nanoindentation-induced phase transformation from diamond cubic structure to β-tin-Ge was found in the subsurface region beneath the tool when indented on the (010) plane, while direct amorphization was observed in the region right under the indenter when the germanium was loaded along the [101] and [111] directions. The transformed phases extend along the < 110 > slip direction of germanium. The depth and shape of the deformed layers after unloading are quite different according to the crystal orientation of the indentation plane. The study results suggest that phase transformation is the dominant mechanism of deformation of monocrystalline germanium film in nanoindentation. PMID:23947487

  13. Structural analysis and investigation of molecular properties of Cefpodoxime acid, a third generation antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganthi, S.; Balu, P.; Sathyanarayanamoorthi, V.; Kannappan, V.; Kamil, M. G. Mohamed; Kumar, R.

    2016-03-01

    Extensive quantum mechanical studies are carried out on Cefpodoxime acid (CA), a new generation drug by Hartree-Fock (HF) and B3LYP methods to understand the structural and spectral characteristics of the molecule. The most stable geometry of the molecule was optimized and the bond parameters were reported. The spectroscopic properties of this pharmaceutically important compound were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and 1H NMR techniques. The scaled vibrational frequencies of CA in the ground state are calculated by HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set and compared with the observed FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The vibrational spectral analysis indicates the presence of two intra molecular hydrogen bonds in the molecule which is supported by theoretical study. 1H NMR chemical shifts (δ) were calculated for the CA molecule and compared with the experimental values. The theoretical electronic absorption spectral data in water and ethanol solvents were computed by TD-DFT method. UV-Vis absorption spectra of CA are recorded in these two solvents and compared with theoretical spectra. The spectral data and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis confirm the occurrence of intra molecular interactions in CA. The electronic distribution, in conjunction with electrophilicity index of CA was used to establish the active site and type of interaction between CA and beta lactamases. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also carried out and thermodynamic properties of the title compound are calculated.

  14. Investigation of frayed edge site formation in high structural charge clay minerals by Molecular Dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulasinski, K.; Bourg, I. C.; Lammers, L. N.

    2016-12-01

    The 2:1 clay minerals contribute a significant fraction of the ion exchange capacity in soils and are characterized by their layered structure with negative net charge. The edge regions of relatively high structural charge or "micaceous" clays (e.g. illites) exhibit a high affinity for radiocesium ions, which are a major environmental contaminant. Previous studies showed a clear (but unexplained) dependence of ion accessibility to edge sites on the aqueous solution composition, which may be related to the influence of interlayer thickness (d-spacing) on the kinetics of ion exchange at the edge. In particular, the presence of aqueous Ca2+ increases the availability of high-affinity frayed edge sites. We use atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate in detail the impact of solution composition on the structure and energetics of frayed edges in micaceous clay. Our MD model is a several nm-wide K-illite particle immersed in NaCl or CaCl2 electrolyte solutions (Fig. 1a). Unconstrained MD simulations show that the near-edge d-spacing does not depend on salinity but does depend on the valence of solvated cations adsorbed at basal surfaces due to additional Coulombic repulsion. Steered MD simulations (Umbrella Sampling, Potential of Mean Force) were used to investigate the mechanism of frayed edge site formation. We find that the energy barrier for Ca2+ to enter the edge (Fig. 1b) strongly depends on the configuration of neighboring cations. Additionally, we observe the spontaneous hydration of interlayer Ca ions inserted near the edge. Exchange of hydrated ions in the near-edge region of otherwise anhydrous clay minerals makes the d-spacing increase, creating the wedge region characteristic of a frayed edge site. This exchange increases the accessibility of the interlayer to subsequent K-Cs exchange. In short, our simulations provide molecular scale insight into the formation of frayed edge sites and its dependence on solution chemistry, particularly on

  15. Theoretical investigation of the molecular structures and excitation spectra of triphenylamine and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumimoto, Michinori; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Komeda, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Hidetoshi; Hori, Kenji; Fujimoto, Hitoshi

    2011-10-01

    The molecular geometries, electronic structures, and excitation energies of NPh 3, NPh 2Me, NPhMe 2, and NMe 3, were investigated using DFT and post-Hartree Fock methods. When the structural stabilities of these compounds were compared to results obtained by using MP4(SDQ) method, it was confirmed that the optimized geometries by using MP2 method were sufficiently reliable. The excited states with large oscillator strengths consisted of transition components from the HOMO. It should be noted that the orbitals of the nitrogen atom mix with the π-orbital of the phenyl group in an anti-bonding way in the HOMO, and the orbital energy increases with this mixing. The unoccupied orbitals are generated from bonding and anti-bonding type interactions between the π-orbitals of the phenyl groups; therefore, the number of phenyl groups strongly affects the energy diagram of the compounds studied. The differences in the energy diagram cause a spectral change in these compounds in the ultraviolet region.

  16. Theoretical investigation of the molecular structures and excitation spectra of triphenylamine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sumimoto, Michinori; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Komeda, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Hidetoshi; Hori, Kenji; Fujimoto, Hitoshi

    2011-10-15

    The molecular geometries, electronic structures, and excitation energies of NPh(3), NPh(2)Me, NPhMe(2), and NMe(3), were investigated using DFT and post-Hartree Fock methods. When the structural stabilities of these compounds were compared to results obtained by using MP4(SDQ) method, it was confirmed that the optimized geometries by using MP2 method were sufficiently reliable. The excited states with large oscillator strengths consisted of transition components from the HOMO. It should be noted that the orbitals of the nitrogen atom mix with the π-orbital of the phenyl group in an anti-bonding way in the HOMO, and the orbital energy increases with this mixing. The unoccupied orbitals are generated from bonding and anti-bonding type interactions between the π-orbitals of the phenyl groups; therefore, the number of phenyl groups strongly affects the energy diagram of the compounds studied. The differences in the energy diagram cause a spectral change in these compounds in the ultraviolet region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular structure activity on pharmaceutical applications of Phenacetin using spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madanagopal, A.; Periandy, S.; Gayathri, P.; Ramalingam, S.; Xavier, S.

    2017-01-01

    The pharmaceutical compound; Phenacetin was investigated by analyzing FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H &13C NMR spectra. The hybrid efficient computational calculations performed for computing physical and chemical parameters. The cause of pharmaceutical activity due to the substitutions; carboxylic, methyl and amine groups in appropriate positions on the pedestal compound was deeply investigated. Moreover, 13C NMR and 1H NMR chemical shifts correlated with TMS standard to explain the truth of compositional ratio of base and ligand groups. The bathochromic shift due to chromophores over the energy levels in UV-Visible region was strongly emphasized the Anti-inflammatory chemical properties. The chemical stability was pronounced by the strong kubo gap which showed the occurring of charge transformation within the molecule. The occurrence of the chemical reaction was feasibly interpreted by Gibbs free energy profile. The standard vibrational analysis stressed the active participation of composed ligand groups for the existence of the analgesic as well as antipyretic properties of the Phenacetin compound. The strong dipole interaction energy utilization for the transition among non-vanishing donor and acceptor for composition of the molecular structure was interpreted.

  18. Mechanism of allosteric propagation across a β‐sheet structure investigated by molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Wendy E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial adhesin FimH consists of an allosterically regulated mannose‐binding lectin domain and a covalently linked inhibitory pilin domain. Under normal conditions, the two domains are bound to each other, and FimH interacts weakly with mannose. However, under tensile force, the domains separate and the lectin domain undergoes conformational changes that strengthen its bond with mannose. Comparison of the crystallographic structures of the low and the high affinity state of the lectin domain reveals conformational changes mainly in the regulatory inter‐domain region, the mannose binding site and a large β sheet that connects the two distally located regions. Here, molecular dynamics simulations investigated how conformational changes are propagated within and between different regions of the lectin domain. It was found that the inter‐domain region moves towards the high affinity conformation as it becomes more compact and buries exposed hydrophobic surface after separation of the pilin domain. The mannose binding site was more rigid in the high affinity state, which prevented water penetration into the pocket. The large central β sheet demonstrated a soft spring‐like twisting. Its twisting motion was moderately correlated to fluctuations in both the regulatory and the binding region, whereas a weak correlation was seen in a direct comparison of these two distal sites. The results suggest a so called “population shift” model whereby binding of the lectin domain to either the pilin domain or mannose locks the β sheet in a rather twisted or flat conformation, stabilizing the low or the high affinity state, respectively. Proteins 2016; 84:990–1008. © 2016 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090060

  19. In situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement for the investigation of molecular orientation in organic amorphous multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Daisuke; Adachi, Chihaya

    2010-06-01

    To investigate molecular orientation in organic amorphous films, in situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were performed during vacuum deposition. Three materials with different molecular shapes were adopted to confirm the generality of the molecular orientation. In all three cases, more than 200 000 values for the ellipsometric parameters measured during deposition were well simulated simultaneously over the entire spectral range and measurement period using a simple model where the films possessed homogeneous optical anisotropy. This demonstrated the homogeneity of the molecular orientation in the direction of film thickness. The molecular orientation can be controlled by the substrate temperature even in multilayer structures. It is also demonstrated that a "multilayer structure" can be fabricated using only one material, where each layer has different optical and electrical properties.

  20. Molecular structure and spectral (FT-IR, Raman) investigations of 3-aminocoumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, Ömer

    2016-05-01

    The molecular structure of 3-Aminocoumarin was determined by conformational analysis. Conformational space was scanned by conformer distribution option of Spartan 08 program package using Merck Molecular Force Field (MMFF) method. Then obtained conformers were optimized by B3LYP/6-311++ G( d, p) and B3LYP/6-311 G( d, p) levels of Density Functional Theory. As a result of these calculations, only one conformer was determined. Vibrational frequencies of this conformer were calculated by Gaussian 03 program package using the same levels of geometry optimizations. The FT-IR and Raman spectra of 3-Aminocoumarin were recorded and compared with the calculated values. Consequently, a good agreement between experimental and the calculated values were founded. Molecular electrostatic potentials (MEPs), HOMO-LUMO energies, thermodynamic properties and Mulliken atomic charges were also covered in this study.

  1. Molecular polymorphism: microwave spectra, equilibrium structures, and an astronomical investigation of the HNCS isomeric family.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Brett A; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Thorwirth, Sven; Brünken, Sandra; Lattanzi, Valerio; Neill, Justin L; Spezzano, Silvia; Yu, Zhenhong; Zaleski, Daniel P; Remijan, Anthony J; Pate, Brooks H; McCarthy, Michael C

    2016-08-10

    The rotational spectra of thioisocyanic acid (HNCS), and its three energetic isomers (HSCN, HCNS, and HSNC) have been observed at high spectral resolution by a combination of chirped-pulse and Fabry-Pérot Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy between 6 and 40 GHz in a pulsed-jet discharge expansion. Two isomers, thiofulminic acid (HCNS) and isothiofulminic acid (HSNC), calculated here to be 35-37 kcal mol(-1) less stable than the ground state isomer HNCS, have been detected for the first time. Precise rotational, centrifugal distortion, and nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants have been determined for the normal and rare isotopic species of both molecules; all are in good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained at the coupled cluster level of theory. On the basis of isotopic spectroscopy, precise molecular structures have been derived for all four isomers by correcting experimental rotational constants for the effects of rotation-vibration interaction calculated theoretically. Formation and isomerization pathways have also been investigated; the high abundance of HSCN relative to ground state HNCS, and the detection of strong lines of SH using CH3CN and H2S, suggest that HSCN is preferentially produced by the radical-radical reaction HS + CN. A radio astronomical search for HSCN and its isomers has been undertaken toward the high-mass star-forming region Sgr B2(N) in the Galactic Center with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. While we find clear evidence for HSCN, only a tentative detection of HNCS is proposed, and there is no indication of HCNS or HSNC at the same rms noise level. HSCN, and tentatively HNCS, displays clear deviations from a single-excitation temperature model, suggesting weak masing may be occurring in some transitions in this source.

  2. Molecular dynamics investigation of the structure of a fully hydrated gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, K; Tobias, D J; Blasie, J K; Klein, M L

    1996-01-01

    We report the results of a constant pressure and temperature molecular dynamics simulation of a gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer with nw = 11.8 water molecules/lipid at 19 degrees C. The results of the simulation were compared in detail with a variety of x-ray and neutron diffraction data. The average positions of specific carbon atoms along the bilayer normal and the interlamellar spacing and electron density profile were in very good agreement with neutron and x-ray diffraction results. The area per lipid and the details of the in-plane hydrocarbon chain structure were in excellent agreement with wide-angle x-ray diffraction results. The only significant deviation is that the chains met in a pleated arrangement at the bilayer center, although they should be parallel. Novel discoveries made in the present work include the observation of a bimodal headgroup orientational distribution. Furthermore, we found that there are a significant number of gauche conformations near the ends of the hydrocarbon chains and, in addition to verifying a previous suggestion that there is partial rotational ordering in the hydrocarbon chains, that the two chains in a given molecule are inequivalent with respect to rotations. Finally, we have investigated the lipid/water interface and found that the water penetrates beneath the headgroups, but not as far as the carbonyl groups, that the phosphates are strongly hydrated almost exclusively at the nonesterified oxygen atoms, and that the hydration of the ammonium groups is more diffuse, with some water molecules concentrated in the grooves between the methyl groups. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 16 PMID:8789079

  3. Molecular structural investigation of adenosine using spectroscopic and quantum computational calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, D.; Periandy, S.; Xavier, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this study; spectroscopic investigation of adenosine having clinical importance was studied computationally and obtained results were compared with experimental ones. In this scope, geometric optimization and conformational analysis were studied and vibrational spectroscopic properties were studied on the most stable form. NMR and TD-DFT studies on the title compound were conducted with its experimental data. In addition atomic charge distribution, NBO, frontier molecular analysis, thermodynamic analysis and hyperpolarization features were studied.

  4. Molecular Modeling of Myrosinase from Brassica oleracea: A Structural Investigation of Sinigrin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Park, Jong-In; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Myrosinase, which is present in cruciferous plant species, plays an important role in the hydrolysis of glycosides such as glucosinolates and is involved in plant defense. Brassicaceae myrosinases are diverse although they share common ancestry, and structural knowledge about myrosinases from cabbage (Brassica oleracea) was needed. To address this, we constructed a three-dimensional model structure of myrosinase based on Sinapis alba structures using Iterative Threading ASSEmbly Refinement server (I-TASSER) webserver, and refined model coordinates were evaluated with ProQ and Verify3D. The resulting model was predicted with β/α fold, ten conserved N-glycosylation sites, and three disulfide bridges. In addition, this model shared features with the known Sinapis alba myrosinase structure. To obtain a better understanding of myrosinase–sinigrin interaction, the refined model was docked using Autodock Vina with crucial key amino acids. The key nucleophile residues GLN207 and GLU427 were found to interact with sinigrin to form a hydrogen bond. Further, 20-ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to examine myrosinase–sinigrin complex stability, revealing that residue GLU207 maintained its hydrogen bond stability throughout the entire simulation and structural orientation was similar to that of the docked state. This conceptual model should be useful for understanding the structural features of myrosinase and their binding orientation with sinigrin. PMID:26703735

  5. Sites of metabolic substitution: investigating metabolite structures utilising ion mobility and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Dear, Gordon J; Munoz-Muriedas, Jordi; Beaumont, Claire; Roberts, Andrew; Kirk, Jayne; Williams, Jonathan P; Campuzano, Iain

    2010-11-15

    Drug metabolism is an integral part of the drug development and drug discovery process. It is required to validate the toxicity of metabolites in support of safety testing and in particular provide information on the potential to form pharmacologically active or toxic metabolites. The current methodologies of choice for metabolite structural elucidation are liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. There are, in certain cases, examples of metabolites whose sites of metabolism cannot be unequivocally identified by MS/MS alone. Utilising commercially available molecular dynamics packages and known quantum chemistry basis sets, an ensemble of lowest energy structures were generated for a group of aromatic hydroxylated metabolites of the model compound ondansetron. Theoretical collision cross-sections were calculated for each structure. Travelling-wave ion mobility (IMS) measurements were also performed on the compounds, thus enabling experimentally derived collision cross-sections to be calculated. A comparison of the theoretical and experimentally derived collision cross-sections were utilised for the accurate assignment of isomeric drug metabolites. The UPLC/IMS-MS method, described herein, demonstrates the ability to measure reproducibly by ion mobility, metabolite structural isomers, which differ in collision cross-section, both theoretical and experimentally derived, by less than 1 Å(2). This application has the potential to supplement and/or complement current methods of metabolite structural characterisation. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Structure of Penta-Alanine Investigated by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Huang, Jing; Kim, Seongheun; Shim, Ji Hyun; MacKerell, Alexander D; Ge, Nien-Hui

    2016-06-23

    We have studied the structure of (Ala)5, a model unfolded peptide, using a combination of 2D IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two different isotopomers, each bis-labeled with (13)C═O and (13)C═(18)O, were strategically designed to shift individual site frequencies and uncouple neighboring amide-I' modes. 2D IR spectra taken under the double-crossed ⟨π/4, -π/4, Y, Z⟩ polarization show that the labeled four-oscillator systems can be approximated by three two-oscillator systems. By utilizing the different polarization dependence of diagonal and cross peaks, we extracted the coupling constants and angles between three pairs of amide-I' transition dipoles through spectral fitting. These parameters were related to the peptide backbone dihedral angles through DFT calculated maps. The derived dihedral angles are all located in the polyproline-II (ppII) region of the Ramachandran plot. These results were compared to the conformations sampled by Hamiltonian replica-exchange MD simulations with three different CHARMM force fields. The C36 force field predicted that ppII is the dominant conformation, consistent with the experimental findings, whereas C22/CMAP predicted similar population for α+, β, and ppII, and the polarizable Drude-2013 predicted dominating β structure. Spectral simulation based on MD representative conformations and structure ensembles demonstrated the need to include multiple 2D spectral features, especially the cross-peak intensity ratio and shape, in structure determination. Using 2D reference spectra defined by the C36 structure ensemble, the best spectral simulation is achieved with nearly 100% ppII population, although the agreement with the experimental cross-peak intensity ratio is still insufficient. The dependence of population determination on the choice of reference structures/spectra and the current limitations on theoretical modeling relating peptide structures to spectral parameters are discussed. Compared

  7. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for nucleobases: A combined computational - microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier Transform Microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental – computational study allowed us to determine accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for the title molecule, but more important, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules. PMID:24002739

  8. Molecular structure and conformational composition of methyl chloroacetate: An electron-diffraction and ab initio molecular orbital investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarset, Kirsten; Boldermo, Kjell Gunnar; Hagen, Kolbjørn

    2010-08-01

    The molecular structure and conformational composition of methyl chloroacetate, H 2ClC sbnd C( dbnd O) sbnd O sbnd CH 3, have been determined by gas-phase electron-diffraction (GED), using results from ab initio molecular orbital calculations (HF, MP2 and MP3/6-311+G(d,p)) to obtain constraints on some of the structural parameters. The molecules exist in the gas-phase at 25 °C as a mixture of two stable conformers: syn with C sbnd Cl eclipsing C dbnd O and gauche with C sbnd H approximately eclipsing C dbnd O. In both of these conformers O sbnd CH 3 is also eclipsing C dbnd O. The experimentally observed conformational composition at 25 °C was 36(8)% syn and 64(8)% gauche (parenthesised values are 2 σ), corresponding to a free energy difference between conformers of ΔGexp° = 1.4(9) kJ/mol. The corresponding theoretical values obtained for Δ G° are 1.1 kJ/mol (HF), 2.3 kJ/mol (MP2), and 2.4 kJ/mol (MP3). The results for the principal distances ( rh1) and angles ( ∠h1) for the major gauche conformer obtained from the combined GED/ ab initio study (2 σ uncertainties) are r(CO sbnd CCl) = 1.502(9) Å, r(C sbnd H) = 1.084(6) Å (average value), r(C sbnd Cl) = 1.782(4) Å, r(C dbnd O) = 1.213(4) Å, r(CO sbnd O) = 1.346(4) Å, r(CH 3sbnd O) = 1.468(10) Å, ∠C sbnd C sbnd Cl = 110.0(6)°, ∠C sbnd C dbnd O = 124.7(6)°, ∠C sbnd C sbnd O = 108.3(10)°, ∠C sbnd O sbnd C = 115.9(8)°, ϕ(Cl sbnd C sbnd C dbnd O) = 111(2)°, ϕ(C sbnd O sbnd C dbnd O) = 3(3)°.

  9. Investigation on critical structural motifs of ligands for triggering glucocorticoid receptor nuclear migration through molecular docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Lin; Jang, Soonmin; Wang, Shih-Min; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Li, Feng-Yin

    2016-06-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a transcription factor regulating gene expression in a ligand-dependent fashion, is known for flexibility in adapting various ligands with their structures ranging from steroid to non-steroid. However, in our previous study, GR shows a stringent discrimination against a set of steroid ligands with highly similar structures for triggering its nuclear migration. In order to resolve this puzzle, we employed molecular docking simulations to investigate the origin of this structural discrimination. By analyzing the docking orientations and the related ligand-GR interaction patterns, we found that the hydrophilicity mismatch between the docking ligand and the GR ligand-binding site is the main cause combined with the steric hindrance and structural rigidness of these steroid ligands. Furthermore, we utilized this knowledge to rationalize how the structure-binding interaction of non-steroid ligands triggers GR nuclear migration with their structures available in Protein Data Bank.

  10. Investigation of Molecular Structure and Thermal Properties of Thermo-Oxidative Aged SBS in Blends and Their Relations

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiong; Yu, Jianying; Xue, Lihui; Zhang, Canlin; Zha, Yagang; Gu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Tri-block copolymer styrene–butadiene (SBS) is extensively applied in bituminous highway construction due to its high elasticity and excellent weather resistance. With the extension of time, tri-block structural SBS automatically degrades into bi-block structural SB- with some terminal oxygen-containing groups under the comprehensive effects of light, heat, oxygen, etc. In this paper, the effects of aging temperature, aging time and oxygen concentration on the molecular structure of thermo-oxidative aged SBS were mainly investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the correlation between oxygen-containing groups and thermal properties (TG–DTG) was further discussed. The FTIR and XPS results show that rapid decomposition of SBS will occur with increments of aging temperature, aging time and oxygen concentration, and a large number of oxygen-containing groups such as –OH, C=O, –COOH, etc. will be formed during thermo-oxidative aging. In short-term aging, changes in aging temperature and oxygen concentration have a significant impact on the structural damage of SBS. However, in long-term aging, it has no further effect on the molecular structure of SBS or on increasing oxygen concentration. The TG and DTG results indicate that the concentration of substances with low molecular weight gradually increases with the improvement of the degree of aging of the SBS, while the initial decomposition rate increases at the beginning of thermal weightlessness and the decomposition rate slows down in comparison with neat SBS. From the relation between the XPS and TG results, it can be seen that the initial thermal stability of SBS rapidly reduces as the relative concentration of the oxygen-containing groups accumulates around 3%, while the maximum decomposition temperature slowly decreases when the relative concentration of the oxygen-containing groups is more than 3%, due to the difficult damage to strong

  11. Chemical and structural investigation of lipid nanoparticles: drug-lipid interaction and molecular distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantachaisilp, Suranan; Meejoo Smith, Siwaporn; Treetong, Alongkot; Pratontep, Sirapat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Rungsardthong Ruktanonchai, Uracha

    2010-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are a promising alternative to existing carriers in chemical or drug delivery systems. A key challenge is to determine how chemicals are incorporated and distributed inside nanoparticles, which assists in controlling chemical retention and release characteristics. This study reports the chemical and structural investigation of γ-oryzanol loading inside a model lipid nanoparticle drug delivery system composed of cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and Miglyol 812® as liquid lipid. The lipid nanoparticles were prepared by high pressure homogenization at varying liquid lipid content, in comparison with the γ-oryzanol free systems. The size of the lipid nanoparticles, as measured by the photon correlation spectroscopy, was found to decrease with increased liquid lipid content from 200 to 160 nm. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements of the medium chain triglyceride of the liquid lipid has confirmed successful incorporation of the liquid lipid in the lipid nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder x-ray diffraction measurements provide complementary results to the 1H-NMR, whereby the crystallinity of the lipid nanoparticles diminishes with an increase in the liquid lipid content. For the distribution of γ-oryzanol inside the lipid nanoparticles, the 1H-NMR revealed that the chemical shifts of the liquid lipid in γ-oryzanol loaded systems were found at rather higher field than those in γ-oryzanol free systems, suggesting incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid lipid. In addition, the phase-separated structure was observed by atomic force microscopy for lipid nanoparticles with 0% liquid lipid, but not for lipid nanoparticles with 5 and 10% liquid lipid. Raman spectroscopic and mapping measurements further revealed preferential incorporation of γ-oryzanol in the liquid part rather than the solid part of in the lipid nanoparticles. Simple models representing the distribution of γ-oryzanol and

  12. Investigation of mechanical strength of 2D nanoscale structures using a molecular dynamics based computational intelligence approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, A.; Vijayaraghavan, V.; Wong, C. H.; Tai, K.; Singru, Pravin M.; Mahapatra, S. S.; Sangwan, K. S.

    2015-09-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) based computational intelligence (CI) approach is proposed to investigate the Young modulus of two graphene sheets: Armchair and Zigzag. In this approach, the effect of aspect ratio, the temperature, the number of atomic planes and the vacancy defects on the Young modulus of two graphene sheets are first analyzed using the MD simulation. The data obtained using the MD simulation is then fed into the paradigm of a CI cluster comprising of genetic programming, which was specifically designed to formulate the explicit relationship of Young modulus of two graphene structures. We find that the MD-based-CI model is able to model the Young modulus of two graphene structures very well, which compiles in good agreement with that of experimental results obtained from the literature. Additionally, we also conducted sensitivity and parametric analysis and found that the number of defects has the most dominating influence on the Young modulus of two graphene structures.

  13. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, V; Raugei, S

    2009-12-14

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  14. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.

    2009-12-14

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An accurate structural analysis unveils subtle, yet statistically significant, differences which are discussed in connection to the significant electronic density charge transfer occurring between the solute and the surrounding water molecules.

  15. Synthesis, molecular structure investigations and antimicrobial activity of 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Assem; Al-Najjar, Hany J.; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Soliman, Saied M.; Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H. M.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2015-02-01

    A variety of 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one derivatives were prepared and their in vitro antimicrobial activities were studied. Most of these compounds showed significant antibacterial activity specifically against Gram-positive bacteria, among which compounds 4a,e,g, 5b,e,g,h and 6f exhibit high levels of antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 10400 with Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) value of 16 μg/mL. All compounds have antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Unfortunately, however, none of the compounds were active against Gram-negative bacteria. The chemical structure of 3 was confirmed by X-ray single crystal diffraction technique. DFT calculations of 3 have been performed on the free C10H7Cl2NO2S2, 3a and the H-bonded complex, C10H7Cl2NO2S2·H2O, 3b to explore the effect of the H-bonding interactions on the geometric and electronic properties of the studied systems. A small increase in bond length was observed in the C12-O6 due to the H-bonding interactions between 3a and water molecule. MEP study has been used to recognize the most reactive sites towards electrophilic and nucleophilic attacks as well as the possible sites for the H-bonding interactions. The TD-DFT calculations have been used to predict theoretically the electronic spectra of the studied compound. The most intense transition band is predicted at 283.9 nm due to the HOMO-2/HOMO-1 to LUMO transitions. NBO analyses were carried out to investigate the stabilization energy of the various intramolecular charge transfer interactions within the studied molecules.

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Urea/Water Mixtures Investigated by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Carr, J. K.; Buchanan, L. E.; Schmidt, J. R.; Zanni, M. T.; Skinner, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Urea/water is an archetypical “biological” mixture, and is especially well known for its relevance to protein thermodynamics, as urea acts as a protein denaturant at high concentration. This behavior has given rise to an extended debate concerning urea’s influence on water structure. Based on a variety of methods and of definitions of water structure, urea has been variously described as a structure-breaker, a structure-maker, or as remarkably neutral towards water. Because of its sensitivity to microscopic structure and dynamics, vibrational spectroscopy can help resolve these debates. We report experimental and theoretical spectroscopic results for the OD stretch of HOD/H2O/urea mixtures (linear IR, 2DIR, and pump-probe anisotropy decay) and for the CO stretch of urea-D4/D2O mixtures (linear IR only). Theoretical results are obtained using existing approaches for water, and a modification of a frequency map developed for acetamide. All absorption spectra are remarkably insensitive to urea concentration, consistent with the idea that urea only very weakly perturbs water structure. Both this work and experiments by Rezus and Bakker, however, show that water’s rotational dynamics are slowed down by urea. Analysis of the simulations casts doubt on the suggestion that urea immobilizes particular doubly hydrogen bonded water molecules. PMID:23841646

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics investigation of structural, dynamic and spectroscopic aspects of Se(vi) species in the aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Borah, Sangkha; Padma Kumar, P

    2016-06-07

    Microscopic investigation of solvation of selenic acid (H2SeO4) in the aqueous environment has been carried out using the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation technique. The species deprotonates to HSeO4(-) in a few picoseconds owing to its low pKa1 value of -3.0. A dynamic equilibrium between HSeO4(-) and SeO4(2-), is observed in qualitative agreement with the reported pKa2 value of 1.70. The governing deprotonation mechanism and the structural and dynamic evolutions of the system, particularly the nature of hydrogen bonding, their strengths and lifetimes are investigated comprehensively. A comparison of the vibrational spectra of the species recorded in the gas phase and in the aqueous environment provides further insights on the nature of the interaction between the solute species and water. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and other recent computational studies.

  18. Investigating the Interaction Pattern and Structural Elements of a Drug-Polymer Complex at the Molecular Level.

    PubMed

    Nie, Haichen; Mo, Huaping; Zhang, Mingtao; Song, Yang; Fang, Ke; Taylor, Lynne S; Li, Tonglei; Byrn, Stephen R

    2015-07-06

    Strong associations between drug and polymeric carriers are expected to contribute to higher drug loading capacities and better physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions. However, molecular details of the interaction patterns and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In the present study, a series of amorphous solid dispersions of clofazimine (CLF), an antileprosy drug, were prepared with different polymers by applying the solvent evaporation method. When using hypromellose phthalate (HPMCP) as the carrier, the amorphous solid dispersion system exhibits not only superior drug loading capacity (63% w/w) but also color change due to strong drug-polymer association. In order to further explain these experimental observations, the interaction between CLF and HPMCP was investigated in a nonpolar volatile solvent system (chloroform) prior to forming the solid dispersion. We observed significant UV/vis and (1)H NMR spectral changes suggesting the protonation of CLF and formation of ion pairs between CLF and HPMCP in chloroform. Furthermore, nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and diffusion order spectroscopy (DOSY) were employed to evaluate the strength of associations between drug and polymers, as well as the molecular mobility of CLF. Finally, by correlating the experimental values with quantum chemistry calculations, we demonstrate that the protonated CLF is binding to the carboxylate group of HPMCP as an ion pair and propose a possible structural model of the drug-polymer complex. Understanding the drug and carrier interaction patterns from a molecular perspective is critical for the rational design of new amorphous solid dispersions.

  19. A molecular dynamics investigation of the influence of water structure on ion conduction through a carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Patey, G. N.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate pressure-driven water and ion transport through a (9,9) carbon nanotube (CNT). We consider NaCl solutions modeled with both the TIP3P and TIP4P/2005 water models. Concentrations range from 0.25 to 2.8 mol l-1 and temperatures from 260 to 320 K are considered. We discuss the influences on flow rates of continuum hydrodynamic considerations and molecular structural effects. We show that the flow rate of water, sodium, and chloride ions through the CNT is strongly model dependent, consistent with earlier simulations of pure water conduction. To remove the effects of different water flow rates, and clearly expose the influence of other factors on ion flow, we calculate ion transport efficiencies. Ion transport efficiencies are much smaller for TIP4P/2005 solutions than for those using the TIP3P model. Particularly at lower temperatures, the ion transport efficiencies for the TIP4P/2005 model are small, despite the fact that the nanotube conducts water at a significant rate. We trace the origin of small ion transport efficiencies to the presence of ring-like water structures within the CNT. Such structures occur commonly for the TIP4P/2005 model, but less frequently for TIP3P. The water structure acts to reduce ion "solvation" within the CNT, posing an additional barrier to ion entry and transport. Our results demonstrate that increasing the water structure within the CNT by decreasing the temperature strongly inhibits ion conduction, while still permitting significant water transport.

  20. A molecular dynamics investigation of the influence of water structure on ion conduction through a carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Patey, G N

    2017-02-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate pressure-driven water and ion transport through a (9,9) carbon nanotube (CNT). We consider NaCl solutions modeled with both the TIP3P and TIP4P/2005 water models. Concentrations range from 0.25 to 2.8 mol l(-1) and temperatures from 260 to 320 K are considered. We discuss the influences on flow rates of continuum hydrodynamic considerations and molecular structural effects. We show that the flow rate of water, sodium, and chloride ions through the CNT is strongly model dependent, consistent with earlier simulations of pure water conduction. To remove the effects of different water flow rates, and clearly expose the influence of other factors on ion flow, we calculate ion transport efficiencies. Ion transport efficiencies are much smaller for TIP4P/2005 solutions than for those using the TIP3P model. Particularly at lower temperatures, the ion transport efficiencies for the TIP4P/2005 model are small, despite the fact that the nanotube conducts water at a significant rate. We trace the origin of small ion transport efficiencies to the presence of ring-like water structures within the CNT. Such structures occur commonly for the TIP4P/2005 model, but less frequently for TIP3P. The water structure acts to reduce ion "solvation" within the CNT, posing an additional barrier to ion entry and transport. Our results demonstrate that increasing the water structure within the CNT by decreasing the temperature strongly inhibits ion conduction, while still permitting significant water transport.

  1. Molecular tools for investigating microbial community structure and function in oxygen-deficient marine waters.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Alyse K; Kheirandish, Sam; Mueller, Andreas; Leung, Hilary T C; Norbeck, Angela D; Brewer, Heather M; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Water column oxygen (O2)-deficiency shapes food-web structure by progressively directing nutrients and energy away from higher trophic levels into microbial community metabolism resulting in fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Although respiratory O2 consumption during organic matter degradation is a natural outcome of a productive surface ocean, global-warming-induced stratification intensifies this process leading to oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) expansion. Here, we describe useful tools for detection and quantification of potential key microbial players and processes in OMZ community metabolism including quantitative polymerase chain reaction primers targeting Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota, SUP05, Arctic96BD-19, and SAR324 small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes and protein extraction methods from OMZ waters compatible with high-resolution mass spectrometry for profiling microbial community structure and functional dynamics.

  2. Structural basis of type 2A von Willebrand disease investigated by molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Interlandi, Gianluca; Ling, Minhua; Tu, An Yue; Chung, Dominic W; Thomas, Wendy E

    2012-01-01

    The hemostatic function of von Willebrand factor is downregulated by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13, which cleaves at a unique site normally buried in the A2 domain. Exposure of the proteolytic site is induced in the wild-type by shear stress as von Willebrand factor circulates in blood. Mutations in the A2 domain, which increase its susceptibility to cleavage, cause type 2A von Willebrand disease. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the A2 domain unfolds under tensile force progressively through a series of steps. The simulation results also indicated that three type 2A mutations in the C-terminal half of the A2 domain, L1657I, I1628T and E1638K, destabilize the native state fold of the protein. Furthermore, all three type 2A mutations lowered in silico the tensile force necessary to undock the C-terminal helix α6 from the rest of the A2 domain, the first event in the unfolding pathway. The mutations F1520A, I1651A and A1661G were also predicted by simulations to destabilize the A2 domain and facilitate exposure of the cleavage site. Recombinant A2 domain proteins were expressed and cleavage assays were performed with the wild-type and single-point mutants. All three type 2A and two of the three predicted mutations exhibited increased rate of cleavage by ADAMTS13. These results confirm that destabilization of the helix α6 in the A2 domain facilitates exposure of the cleavage site and increases the rate of cleavage by ADAMTS13.

  3. Complementarity of real-time neutron and synchrotron radiation structural investigations in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, V. L.; Kiselev, M. A.

    2010-12-15

    General problems of the complementarity of different physical methods and specific features of the interaction between neutron and matter and neutron diffraction with respect to the time of flight are discussed. The results of studying the kinetics of structural changes in lipid membranes under hydration and self-assembly of the lipid bilayer in the presence of a detergent are reported. The possibilities of the complementarity of neutron diffraction and X-ray synchrotron radiation and developing a free-electron laser are noted.

  4. Structural and thermodynamic investigations on the aggregation and folding of acylphosphatase by molecular dynamics simulations and solvation free energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Chong, Song-Ho; Lee, Chewook; Kang, Guipeun; Park, Mirae; Ham, Sihyun

    2011-05-11

    Protein engineering method to study the mutation effects on muscle acylphosphatase (AcP) has been actively applied to describe kinetics and thermodynamics associated with AcP aggregation as well as folding processes. Despite the extensive mutation experiments, the molecular origin and the structural motifs for aggregation and folding kinetics as well as thermodynamics of AcP have not been rationalized at the atomic resolution. To this end, we have investigated the mutation effects on the structures and thermodynamics for the aggregation and folding of AcP by using the combination of fully atomistic, explicit-water molecular dynamics simulations, and three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory. The results indicate that the A30G mutant with the fastest experimental aggregation rate displays considerably decreased α1-helical contents as well as disrupted hydrophobic core compared to the wild-type AcP. Increased solvation free energy as well as hydrophobicity upon A30G mutation is achieved due to the dehydration of hydrophilic side chains in the disrupted α1-helix region of A30G. In contrast, the Y91Q mutant with the slowest aggregation rate shows a non-native H-bonding network spanning the mutation site to hydrophobic core and α1-helix region, which rigidifies the native state protein conformation with the enhanced α1-helicity. Furthermore, Y91Q exhibits decreased solvation free energy and hydrophobicity compared to wild type due to more exposed and solvated hydrophilic side chains in the α1-region. On the other hand, the experimentally observed slower folding rates in both mutants are accompanied by decreased helicity in α2-helix upon mutation. We here provide the atomic-level structures and thermodynamic quantities of AcP mutants and rationalize the structural origin for the changes that occur upon introduction of those mutations along the AcP aggregation and folding processes.

  5. Molecular monolayer structures formed on vicinal surfaces as investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Bront, Lynna Gabriela

    The increasing demand for efficient cancer treatment inspired the researchers for new investigations about an alternative treatment of cancer. Microwave ablation is the newest ablation technique to cure cancer. This method is minimally noninvasive and inexpensive compared to the other methods. However, current microwave ablation systems suffer due to narrow band nature of the antenna (dipole or slot) placed at the tip of the probe. Therefore, this study developed an ultra-wide band ablation probe that operates from 300 MHz to 10 GHz. For this purpose, a small wide band antenna is designed to place at the tip of the probe and fabricated. These probes are tested at ISM frequencies (2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz) in skin mimicking gels and pig liver. Microwave ablation probe design, simulation results, and experiment results are provided in this thesis.

  6. Investigation of the local structure in sub and supercritical ammonia using the nearest neighbor approach: a molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Vyalov, I; Kiselev, M; Tassaing, T; Soetens, J C; Idrissi, A

    2010-11-25

    Molecular dynamics simulations of ammonia were performed in the (N,P,T) ensemble along the isobar 135 bar and in the temperature range between 250 and 500 K that encompasses the sub and supercritical states of ammonia. Six simple interaction potential models (Lennard-Jones pair potential between the atomic sites, plus a Coulomb interaction between atomic partial charges) of ammonia reported in the literature were analyzed. Liquid-gas coexistence curve, critical temperature, and structural data (radial distribution functions) have been calculated for all models and compared with the corresponding experimental data. After choosing the appropriate potential model, we have investigated the local structure by analyzing the nearest neighbor radial, mutual orientation, and interaction energy distributions. The change in the local structure was traced back to the change of the nonlinear behavior (which is more pronounced at low temperatures) of the average distance between a reference ammonia molecule and its subsequent nearest neighbor. Our results suggest to use the position of the maximum in the fluctuation of the average distance to define the border of the first solvation shell (particularly at high temperature when the minimum of the radial distribution is not well-defined). Indeed, the effect of the temperature on the position of this maximum shows clearly that the spatial extent of the solvation shell increases with a concomitant decrease of the involved number of ammonia molecules. Furthermore, our results show that the signature of the hydrogen bonding is mainly observed for temperature below 300 K. This signature is quantified by a short distance contribution to the closest radial nearest neighbor distribution, by a strong mutual orientation (defined by the angles between the axis joining the nitrogen atoms and the molecular axes) and by a strong attractive character of the total interaction energy.

  7. Structure investigation of three hydrazones Schiff's bases by spectroscopic, thermal and molecular orbital calculations and their biological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belal, Arafa A. M.; Zayed, M. A.; El-Desawy, M.; Rakha, Sh. M. A. H.

    2015-03-01

    Three Schiff's bases AI (2(1-hydrazonoethyl)phenol), AII (2, 4-dibromo 6-(hydrazonomethyl)phenol) and AIII (2(hydrazonomethyl)phenol) were prepared as new hydrazone compounds via condensation reactions with molar ratio (1:1) of reactants. Firstly by reaction of 2-hydroxy acetophenone solution and hydrazine hydrate; it gives AI. Secondly condensation between 3,5-dibromo-salicylaldehyde and hydrazine hydrate gives AII. Thirdly condensation between salicylaldehyde and hydrazine hydrate gives AIII. The structures of AI-AIII were characterized by elemental analysis (EA), mass (MS), FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra, and thermal analyses (TG, DTG, and DTA). The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, ΔE∗, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ were calculated from the TG curves using Coats-Redfern method. It is important to investigate their molecular structures to know the active groups and weak bond responsible for their biological activities. Consequently in the present work, the obtained thermal (TA) and mass (MS) practical results are confirmed by semi-empirical MO-calculations (MOCS) using PM3 procedure. Their biological activities have been tested in vitro against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillissubtilies and Staphylococcus aurous bacteria in order to assess their anti-microbial potential.

  8. Structure investigation of three hydrazones Schiff's bases by spectroscopic, thermal and molecular orbital calculations and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Belal, Arafa A M; Zayed, M A; El-Desawy, M; Rakha, Sh M A H

    2015-03-05

    Three Schiff's bases AI (2(1-hydrazonoethyl)phenol), AII (2, 4-dibromo 6-(hydrazonomethyl)phenol) and AIII (2(hydrazonomethyl)phenol) were prepared as new hydrazone compounds via condensation reactions with molar ratio (1:1) of reactants. Firstly by reaction of 2-hydroxy acetophenone solution and hydrazine hydrate; it gives AI. Secondly condensation between 3,5-dibromo-salicylaldehyde and hydrazine hydrate gives AII. Thirdly condensation between salicylaldehyde and hydrazine hydrate gives AIII. The structures of AI-AIII were characterized by elemental analysis (EA), mass (MS), FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectra, and thermal analyses (TG, DTG, and DTA). The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, ΔE(∗), ΔH(∗), ΔS(∗) and ΔG(∗) were calculated from the TG curves using Coats-Redfern method. It is important to investigate their molecular structures to know the active groups and weak bond responsible for their biological activities. Consequently in the present work, the obtained thermal (TA) and mass (MS) practical results are confirmed by semi-empirical MO-calculations (MOCS) using PM3 procedure. Their biological activities have been tested in vitro against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillissubtilies and Staphylococcus aurous bacteria in order to assess their anti-microbial potential.

  9. Ionic strength effect on molecular structure of hyaluronic acid investigated by flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bitnara; Woo, Sohee; Park, Young-Soo; Hwang, Euijin; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the effect of ionic strength on the molecular structure of hyaluronic acid (HA) in an aqueous solution using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FlFFF-MALS). Sodium salts of HA (NaHA) raw materials (∼2 × 10(6) Da) dispersed in different concentrations of NaCl prepared by repeated dilution/ultrafiltration procedures were examined in order to study conformational changes in terms of the relationship between the radius of gyration and molecular weight (MW) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of NaHA in solution. This was achieved by varying the ionic strength of the carrier solution used in a frit-inlet asymmetrical FlFFF (FIAF4) channel. Experiments showed that the average MW of NaHA increased as the ionic strength of the NaHA solution decreased due to enhanced entanglement or aggregation of HA molecules. Relatively large molecules (greater than ∼5 MDa) did not show a large increase in RMS radius value as the NaCl concentration decreased. Conversely, smaller species showed larger changes, suggesting molecular expansion at lower ionic strengths. When the ionic strength of the FlFFF carrier solution was decreased, the HA species in a salt-rich solution (0.2 M NaCl) underwent rapid molecular aggregation during FlFFF separation. However, when salt-depleted HA samples (I = 4.66∼0.38 mM) were analyzed with FFF carrier solutions of a high ionic strength, the changes in both molecular structure and size were somewhat reversible, although there was a delay in correction of the molecular structure.

  10. Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    R. James Kirkpatrick; Andrey G. Kalinichev

    2008-11-25

    significantly larger systems. These calculations have allowed us, for the first time, to study the effects of metal cations with different charges and charge density on the NOM aggregation in aqueous solutions. Other computational work has looked at the longer-time-scale dynamical behavior of aqueous species at mineral-water interfaces investigated simultaneously by NMR spectroscopy. Our experimental NMR studies have focused on understanding the structure and dynamics of water and dissolved species at mineral-water interfaces and in two-dimensional nano-confinement within clay interlayers. Combined NMR and MD study of H2O, Na+, and Cl- interactions with the surface of quartz has direct implications regarding interpretation of sum frequency vibrational spectroscopic experiments for this phase and will be an important reference for future studies. We also used NMR to examine the behavior of K+ and H2O in the interlayer and at the surfaces of the clay minerals hectorite and illite-rich illite-smectite. This the first time K+ dynamics has been characterized spectroscopically in geochemical systems. Preliminary experiments were also performed to evaluate the potential of 75As NMR as a probe of arsenic geochemical behavior. The 75As NMR study used advanced signal enhancement methods, introduced a new data acquisition approach to minimize the time investment in ultra-wide-line NMR experiments, and provides the first evidence of a strong relationship between the chemical shift and structural parameters for this experimentally challenging nucleus. We have also initiated a series of inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements of water dynamics in the interlayers of clays and layered double hydroxides. The objective of these experiments is to probe the correlations of water molecular motions in confined spaces over the scale of times and distances most directly comparable to our MD simulations and on a time scale different than that probed by NMR. This work is being done

  11. Molecular-scale investigations of structures and surface charge distribution of surfactant aggregates by three-dimensional force mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Oyabu, Noriaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei

    2014-02-07

    Surface charges on nanoscale structures in liquids, such as biomolecules and nano-micelles, play an essentially important role in their structural stability as well as their chemical activities. These structures interact with each other through electric double layers (EDLs) formed by the counter ions in electrolyte solution. Although static-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) including colloidal-probe AFM is a powerful technique for surface charge density measurements and EDL analysis on a submicron scale in liquids, precise surface charge density analysis with single-nanometer resolution has not been made because of its limitation of the resolution and the detection sensitivity. Here we demonstrate molecular-scale surface charge measurements of self-assembled micellar structures, molecular hemicylinders of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), by three-dimensional (3D) force mapping based on frequency modulation AFM. The SDS hemicylindrical structures with a diameter of 4.8 nm on a graphite surface were clearly imaged. We have succeeded in visualizing 3D EDL forces on the SDS hemicylinder surfaces and obtaining the molecular-scale charge density for the first time. The results showed that the surface charge on the trench regions between the hemicylinders was much smaller than that on the hemicylinder tops. The method can be applied to a wide variety of local charge distribution studies, such as spatial charge variation on a single protein molecule.

  12. Investigation of size effects on the structure of liquid GeSe2 calculated via first-principles molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Micoulaut, Matthieu; Le Roux, Sébastien; Massobrio, Carlo

    2012-06-14

    The structural properties of liquid GeSe(2) have been calculated by first-principles molecular dynamics by using a periodic simulation box containing N = 480 atoms. This has allowed a comparison with previous results obtained on a smaller system size (N = 120) [M. Micoulaut, R. Vuilleumier, and C. Massobrio, Phys. Rev. B 79, 214205 (2009)]. In the domain of first-principles molecular dynamics, we obtain an assessment of system size effects of unprecedented quality. Overall, no drastic differences are found between the two sets of results, confirming that N = 120 is a suitable size to achieve a realistic description of this prototypical disordered network. However, for N = 480, short range properties are characterized by an increase of chemical order, the number of Ge tetrahedra coordinated to four Se atoms being larger. At the intermediate range order level, size effect mostly modify the low wavevector region (k ~1 Å(-1)) in the concentration-concentration partial structure factor.

  13. Structure and Transformation of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate: A Solid-State 43Ca NMR and Computational Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Jared W.; Yazaydin, A. O.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.; Bowers, Geoffrey M.

    2012-05-22

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable precursor to crystalline CaCO{sub 3} phases that precipitates by aggregation of ion pairs and prenucleation clusters. We use {sup 43}Ca solid-state NMR spectroscopy to probe the local structure and transformation of ACC synthesized from seawater-like solutions with and without Mg{sup 2+} and computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to provide more detailed molecular-scale understanding of the ACC structure. The {sup 43}Ca NMR spectra of ACC collected immediately after synthesis consist of broad, featureless resonances with Gaussian line shapes (FWHH = 27.6 {+-} 1 ppm) that do not depend on Mg{sup 2+} or H{sub 2}O content. A correlation between {sup 43}Ca isotropic chemical shifts and mean Ca-O bond distances for crystalline hydrous and anhydrous calcium carbonate phases indicates indistinguishable maximum mean Ca-O bond lengths of {approx}2.45 {angstrom} for all our samples. This value is near the upper end of the published Ca-O bond distance range for biogenic and synthetic ACCs obtained by Ca-X-ray absorption spectroscopy. It is slightly smaller than the values from the structural model of Mgfree ACC by Goodwin et al. obtained from reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling of X-ray scattering data and our own computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on this model. An MD simulation starting with the atomic positions of the Goodwin et al. RMC model using the force field of Raiteri and Gale shows significant structural reorganization during the simulation and that the interconnected carbonate/water-rich channels in the Goodwin et al. model shrink in size over the 2 ns simulation time. The distribution of polyhedrally averaged Ca-O bond distances from the MD simulation is in good agreement with the {sup 43}Ca NMR peak shape, suggesting that local structural disorder dominates the experimental line width of ACC.

  14. Investigation of solvent polarity effect on molecular structure and vibrational spectrum of xanthine with the aid of quantum chemical computations.

    PubMed

    Polat, Turgay; Yıldırım, Gurcan

    2014-04-05

    The main scope of this study is to determine the effects of 8 solvents on the geometric structure and vibrational spectra of the title compound, xanthine, by means of the DFT/B3LYP level of theory in the combination with the polarizable conductor continuum model (CPCM) for the first time. After determination of the most-steady state (favored structure) of the xanthine molecule, the role of the solvent polarity on the SCF energy (for the molecule stability), atomic charges (for charge distribution) and dipole moments (for molecular charge transfer) belonging to tautomer is discussed in detail. The results obtained indicate not only the presence of the hydrogen bonding and strong intra-molecular charge transfer (ICT) in the compound but the increment of the molecule stability with the solvent polarity, as well. Moreover, it is noted that the optimized geometric parameters and the theoretical vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the available experimental results found in the literature. In fact, the correlations between the experimental and theoretical findings for the molecular structures improve with the enhancement of the solvent polarity. At the same time, the dimer forms of the xanthine compound are simulated to describe the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies. It is found that the CO and NH stretching vibrations shift regularly to lower frequency value with higher IR intensity as the dielectric medium enhances systematically due to the intermolecular NH⋯O hydrogen bonds. Theoretical vibrational spectra are also assigned based on the potential energy distribution (PED) using the VEDA 4 program.

  15. A Combination of Hand-Held Models and Computer Imaging Programs Helps Students Answer Oral Questions about Molecular Structure and Function: A Controlled Investigation of Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Michelle A.; Peck, Ronald F.; Colton, Shannon; Morris, Jennifer; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Kallio, Julie

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a controlled investigation to examine whether a combination of computer imagery and tactile tools helps introductory cell biology laboratory undergraduate students better learn about protein structure/function relationships as compared with computer imagery alone. In all five laboratory sections, students used the molecular imaging…

  16. Spectroscopic and molecular structure investigation of 2-furanacrylic acid monomer and dimer using HF and DFT methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalla, H.; Issaoui, N.; Govindarajan, M.; Flakus, H. T.; Jamroz, M. H.; Oujia, B.

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, we reported a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 2-furanacrylic acid (abbreviated as 2FAA). The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2FAA have been recorded in the regions 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1. The spectra were interpreted in terms of fundamentals modes, combination and overtone bands. The monomer and dimer structures of the title molecule have been obtained from Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) as basis set calculations. The vibrational frequencies were calculated by DFT method and compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. Intermolecular OH⋯O hydrogen bonds are discussed in dimer structure of the molecule. The infrared and Raman spectra were also predicted from the calculated intensities. The polarizability and first order hyperpolarizabilty of the title molecule were calculated and interpreted. A study on the electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, are performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. In addition, Milliken atomic charges, possible charge transfer, natural bond orbital (NBO) and AIM topological analysis were performed. Moreover, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and the thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated in gas phase.

  17. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  18. INVESTIGATION OF MOLECULAR CLOUD STRUCTURE AROUND INFRARED BUBBLES: CARMA OBSERVATIONS OF N14, N22, AND N74

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Reid A.

    2012-11-20

    We present CARMA observations in 3.3 mm continuum and several molecular lines of the surroundings of N14, N22, and N74, three infrared bubbles from the GLIMPSE catalog. We have discovered 28 compact continuum sources and confirmed their associations with the bubbles using velocity information from HCO{sup +} and HCN. We have also mapped small-scale structures of N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission in the vicinity of the bubbles. By combining our data with survey data from GLIMPSE, MIPSGAL, BGPS, and MAGPIS, we establish about half of our continuum sources as star-forming cores. We also use survey data with the velocity information from our molecular line observations to describe the morphology of the bubbles and the nature of the fragmentation. We conclude from the properties of the continuum sources that N74 likely is at the near kinematic distance, which was previously unconfirmed. We also present tentative evidence of molecular clouds being more fragmented on bubble rims compared to dark clouds, suggesting that triggered star formation may occur, though our findings do not conform to a classic collect-and-collapse model.

  19. Structural investigations of E. Coli dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in solution: Small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadinova, L. A.; Rodina, E. V.; Vorobyeva, N. N.; Kurilova, S. A.; Nazarova, T. I.; Shtykova, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli (LpD) is a bacterial enzyme that is involved in the central metabolism and shared in common between the pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. In the crystal structure, E. coli LpD is known to exist as a dimer. The present work is focused on analyzing the solution structure of LpD by small-angle X-ray scattering, molecular docking, and analytical ultracentrifugation. It was shown that in solution LpD exists as an equilibrium mixture of a dimer and a tetramer. The presence of oligomeric forms is determined by the multifunctionality of LpD in the cell, in particular, the required stoichiometry in the complexes.

  20. Validity assessment of the detection method of maize event Bt10 through investigation of its molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Milcamps, Anne; Rabe, Scott; Cade, Rebecca; De Framond, Anic J; Henriksson, Peter; Kramer, Vance; Lisboa, Duarte; Pastor-Benito, Susana; Willits, Michael G; Lawrence, David; Van den Eede, Guy

    2009-04-22

    In March 2005, U.S. authorities informed the European Commission of the inadvertent release of unauthorized maize GM event Bt10 in their market and subsequently the grain channel. In the United States measures were taken to eliminate Bt10 from seed and grain supplies; in the European Union an embargo for maize gluten and brewer's grain import was implemented unless certified of Bt10 absence with a Bt10-specific PCR detection method. With the aim of assessing the validity of the Bt10 detection method, an in-depth analysis of the molecular organization of the genetic modification of this event was carried out by both the company Syngenta, who produced the event, and the European Commission Joint Research Centre, who validated the detection method. Using a variety of molecular analytical tools, both organizations found the genetic modification of event Bt10 to be very complex in structure, with rearrangements, inversions, and multiple copies of the structural elements (cry1Ab, pat, and the amp gene), interspersed with small genomic maize fragments. Southern blot analyses demonstrated that all Bt10 elements were found tightly linked on one large fragment, including the region that would generate the event-specific PCR amplicon of the Bt10 detection method. This study proposes a hypothetical map of the insert of event Bt10 and concludes that the validated detection method for event Bt10 is fit for its purpose.

  1. Molecular Investigations of the Structure and Function of the Protein Phosphatase 1-Spinophilin-Inhibitor 2 Heterotrimeric Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Dancheck, B.; Allaire, M.; Ragusa, M.J.; Nairn, A.C.; Page, R.; Peti, W.

    2011-01-06

    Regulation of the major Ser/Thr phosphatase protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is controlled by a diverse array of targeting and inhibitor proteins. Though many PP1 regulatory proteins share at least one PP1 binding motif, usually the RVxF motif, it was recently discovered that certain pairs of targeting and inhibitor proteins bind PP1 simultaneously to form PP1 heterotrimeric complexes. To date, structural information for these heterotrimeric complexes and, in turn, how they direct PP1 activity is entirely lacking. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy, biochemistry, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we show that major structural rearrangements in both spinophilin (targeting) and inhibitor 2 (I-2, inhibitor) are essential for the formation of the heterotrimeric PP1-spinophilin-I-2 (PSI) complex. The RVxF motif of I-2 is released from PP1 during the formation of PSI, making the less prevalent SILK motif of I-2 essential for complex stability. The release of the I-2 RVxF motif allows for enhanced flexibility of both I-2 and spinophilin in the heterotrimeric complex. In addition, we used inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy to show that PP1 contains two metals in both heterodimeric complexes (PP1-spinophilin and PP1-I-2) and PSI, demonstrating that PSI retains the biochemical characteristics of the PP1-I-2 holoenzyme. Finally, we combined the NMR and biochemical data with SAXS and molecular dynamics simulations to generate a structural model of the full heterotrimeric PSI complex. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular events that enable PP1 heterotrimeric complexes to exploit both the targeting and inhibitory features of the PP1-regulatory proteins to form multifunctional PP1 holoenzymes.

  2. A nuclear Overhauser effect investigation of the molecular and electronic structure of the heme crevice in lactoperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Thanabal, V.; La Mar, G.N. )

    1989-08-22

    The proton homonuclear nuclear Overhauser effect, NOE, in conjunction with paramagnetic-induced dipolar relaxation, is utilized to assign resonances and to probe the molecular and electronic structures of the heme cavity in the low-spin cyanide complex of resting-state bovine lactoperoxidase, LPO-CN. Predominantly primary NOEs were detected in spite of the large molecular weight of the enzyme, which demonstrates again the advantage of paramagnetism suppressing spin diffusion in large proteins. Both of the nonlabile ring protons of a coordinated histidine are located at resonance positions consistent with a deprotonated imidazole. Several methylene proton pairs are identified, of which the most strongly hyperfine-shifted pair is assigned to the unusual chemically functionalized 8-(mercaptomethylene) group of the prosthetic group. The large 8-(mercaptomethylene) proton contact shifts relative to that of the only resolved heme methyl signal are rationalized by the additive perturbations on the rhombic asymmetry of the functionalization of the 8-position and the alignment of the axial histidyl imidazole projection along a vector passing through pyrrole A and C of the prosthetic group. Such a stereochemistry is consistent with the resolution of only a single heme methyl group, 3-CH{sub 3}, as observed. A pair of hyperfine-shifted methylene protons, as well as a low-field hyperfine-shifted labile proton signal, exhibit dipolar connectivities similar to those previously reported for the distal arginine and histidine, respectively, of horseradish peroxidase suggesting that these catalytically relevant residues may also exist in LPO.

  3. Investigation of gamma-ray irradiation on molecular structure, optical properties and mass attenuation coefficients of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Z.; Vejdani Noghreiyan, A.; Nadafan, M.; Majles Ara, M. H.

    2017-08-01

    In this research, colloidal gold NPs were synthesized by turkevich method. XRD spectrum after irradiation showed the different peaks but the most important distinctive was related to (111) peaks at (2θ = 38.41°) which give an indication that the structure is cubic. The Raman spectroscopy results indicated that the intensity of peaks with the wave number of 3450 cm-1was increased in the colloidal gold NPs irradiated due to improvement of the crystalline properties of colloidal gold NPs. SEM images showed significant changes in the morphology and size of gamma irradiated colloidal gold NPs. For 10 kGy dose, gamma-ray irradiated crystals, the optical absorption increases compared to that of before irradiation which may be the consequence of the formation of point defects due to gamma-rays. Comparing nonlinear studies, the magnitude of nonlinear refraction index, n2 and nonlinear absorption coefficient, β increase after gamma-ray irradiation. The measurement of mass attenuation coefficients result shows that the gamma-ray irradiation has an influence on radiation absorption coefficients of colloidal gold NPs. It is an evidence which shows that in addition to the atomic mass number of elements, the molecular structure may affect on the attenuation coefficients and nonlinear optical properties.

  4. Molecular-level investigation into copper complexes on vermiculite: effect of reduction of structural iron on copper complexation.

    PubMed

    Furnare, Luca J; Vailionis, Arturas; Strawn, Daniel G

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we present results that describe the speciation of Cu sorbed to the clay mineral vermiculite, with special attention to the effects of reduction on Cu sorption complexes. Sorption complexes were studied using powdered extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, polarized EXAFS spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ionic strength (I), background ion, and clay reduction (structural iron) were varied in the sorption samples. At low I EXAFS results indicate that Cu was surrounded by up to six water molecules sorbed in the interlayer of reduced vermiculite. EXAFS results from Cu-equilibrated reduced vermiculite with high I Ca background electrolyte revealed that Cu was surrounded by 4 O atoms at 1.95 Angatroms and 8 second shell O atoms at 3.14 Angstroms. Angular dependence of the second shell O atoms interpreted from the polarized-EXAFS spectra indicated that the atoms are out of plane from the basal plane of the vermiculite (inclined approximately 25 degrees from the ab plane). The local atomic environment and angular dependence of the EXAFS spectra suggest that the Cu atoms are adsorbed above the hexagonal cavities of the reduced clay mineral and form a Cu dimer in the interlayer. This adsorption mechanism was not observed in the non-reduced vermiculite under identical equilibration conditions. Our results provide molecular level evidence that Cu sorption mechanisms on vermiculite are dependent on solution conditions, such as redox potential and background electrolyte. These results can be used to develop better models of Cu sorption mechanisms on clay mineral surfaces.

  5. Testing the limits of sensitivity in a solid-state structural investigation by combined X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state NMR, and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Borodi, Gheorghe; Filip, Claudiu

    2011-10-28

    A solid state structural investigation of ethoxzolamide is performed on microcrystalline powder by using a multi-technique approach that combines X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data analysis based on direct space methods with information from (13)C((15)N) solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) and molecular modeling. Quantum chemical computations of the crystal were employed for geometry optimization and chemical shift calculations based on the Gauge Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method, whereas a systematic search in the conformational space was performed on the isolated molecule using a molecular mechanics (MM) approach. The applied methodology proved useful for: (i) removing ambiguities in the XRPD crystal structure determination process and further refining the derived structure solutions, and (ii) getting important insights into the relationship between the complex network of non-covalent interactions and the induced supra-molecular architectures/crystal packing patterns. It was found that ethoxzolamide provides an ideal case study for testing the accuracy with which this methodology allows to distinguish between various structural features emerging from the analysis of the powder diffraction data.

  6. Impact of C5-cytosine methylation on the solution structure of d(GAAAACGTTTTC)2. An NMR and molecular modelling investigation.

    PubMed

    Marcourt, L; Cordier, C; Couesnon, T; Dodin, G

    1999-11-01

    The solution structures of d(GAAAACGTTTTC)2 and of its methylated derivative d(GAAAAMe5CGTTTTC)2 have been determined by NMR and molecular modelling in order to examine the impact of cytosine methylation on the central CpG conformation. Detailed 1H NMR and 31P NMR investigation of the two oligomers includes quantitative NOESY, 2D homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn spectroscopy, double-quantum-filtered COSY and heteronuclear 1H-31P correlation. Back-calculations of NOESY spectra and simulations of double-quantum-filtered COSY patterns were performed to gain accurate information on interproton distances and sugar phase angles. Molecular models under experimental constraints were generated by energy minimization by means of the molecular mechanics program JUMNA. The MORASS software was used to iteratively refine the structures obtained. After methylation, the oligomer still has a B-DNA conformation. However, there are differences in the structural parameters and the thermal stability as compared to the unmethylated molecule. Careful structural analysis shows that after methylation CpG departs from the usual conformation observed in other ACGT tetramers with different surroundings. Subtle displacements of bases, sugars and backbone imposed by the steric interaction of the two methyl groups inside the major groove are accompanied by severe pinching of the minor groove at the C-G residues.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Local Structural Characteristics of DNA Oligonucleotides: Studies of Helical Axis Deformations, Conformational Sequence Dependence and Modified Nucleoside Perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise-May, Shirley

    The present DNA studies investigate the local structure of DNA oligonucleotides in order to characterize helical axis deformations, sequence dependent fine structure and modified nucleoside perturbations of selected oligonucleotide sequences. The molecular dynamics method is used to generate an ensemble of energetically feasible DNA conformations which can then be analyzed for dynamical conformational properties, some of which can be compared to experimentally derived values. A theory and graphical presentation for the analysis of helical deformations of DNA based on the configurational statistics of polymers, called "Persistence Analysis", was designed. The results of the analysis on prototype forms, static crystal structures and two solvated MD simulations of the sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) indicate that all of the expected features of bending can be sensitively and systematically identified by this approach. Comparison of the relative performance of three molecular dynamics potential functions commonly used for dynamical modeling of biological macromolecules; CHARMm, AMBER and GROMOS was investigated via in vacuo MD simulations on the dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG)_2 with respect to the conformational properties of each dynamical model and their ability to support A and B families of DNA. Vacuum molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMm force field carried out on simple homo- and heteropolymers of DNA led to the conclusion that sequence dependent fine structure appears to be well defined for adenine-thymine rich sequences both at the base pair and base step level whereas much of the the fine structure found in cytosine -guanine rich sequences appears to be context dependent. The local conformational properties of the homopolymer poly (dA) -poly (dT) revealed one dynamical model which was found in general agreement with fiber models currently available. Investigation of the relative structural static and dynamical effect of the misincorporation of

  8. A Theoretical Investigation of the Structure and Reactivity of the Molecular Constituents of Oil Sand and Oil Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Carol A.

    2016-11-28

    We used a variety of small organic models of asphaltenes to investigate the molecular mechanism for the high temperature decomposition that would take place as part of the oil refinery process. We determined that the decomposition is initiated via four different types of hydrogen migration reactions. According to the energetics of the reactions, the dominant 1,2-H shift mechanism involves two competitive product channels, namely, C2H2 + CH2CS and CS + CH3CCH. The minor channels include the formation of CS + CH2CCH2, H2S + C4H2, HCS + CH2CCH, CS + CH2CHCH, H + C4H3S, and HS + C4H3. We also investigated the alkyl substitution effect by exploring the decomposition pathways of models with alkyl arms. The energetics of such systems were very similar to that for unsubstituted model compounds, which suggests that asphaltene alkylation may not play a significant role in the decomposition of asphaltene compounds. This work was published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A 2011, 115, 2882-2891. A MECHANISTIC STUDY OF THE 2-THIENYLMETHYL + HO2 RADICAL RECOMBINATION REACTION Radicals are molecules which contain single electrons. They are very reactive. Radical recombination reactions are important in the combustion of fuel oils. Shale oil contains radicals. We used quantum mechanics to explore the reactivity of shale oil model radical compounds. Seventeen product channels corresponding to either addition/elimination or direct hydrogen abstraction were characterized. Direct hydrogen abstraction proceeds via a weakly bonded complex, which leads to 2-methylthiophene, 2-methylene-2,3-dihydrothiophene or 2-methylene-2,5-dihydrothiophene depending upon the 2-thienylmethyl radical reaction site. The addition pathway for the two radical reactants is barrierless with the formation of three adducts, as distinguished by HO

  9. Investigation of the molecular structure of the human stratum corneum ceramides [NP] and [EOS] by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hinder, A; Schmelzer, C E H; Rawlings, A V; Neubert, R H H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the two ceramide (CER) subclasses CER[NP] and CER[EOS] of human stratum corneum and to identify the chemical structures of their subspecies. High-performance thin-layer chromatography and normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography were used for the separation of CER fractions, whereas nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was applied to investigate the chemical structures in detail. Thus, CER[EOS] fragmentation revealed that in addition to linoleic acid other esterified fatty acids occur in the ω-position. Of particular interest is the identification of a 17:2 fatty acid located in this part of the molecule. Several subspecies of CER[NP], including subspecies with odd numbers of carbon atoms in both chains, the non-α-hydroxylated fatty acid moiety (part N) and the phytosphingosine (part P), were identified. Furthermore, it was found that 12% of CER[NP] subspecies have an odd number of carbon atoms in both chains of the molecule. Similar results were obtained for CER[EOS]. Both the esterified fatty acid (part E) and the sphingosine base (part S) were found to contain odd-numbered chain lengths. These results underline the heterogeneity of the CER composition in the stratum corneum lipid bilayer. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Structure investigation of codeine drug using mass spectrometry, thermal analyses and semi-emperical molecular orbital (MO) calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, M. A.; Hawash, M. F.; Fahmey, M. A.

    2006-05-01

    Codeine is an analgesic with uses similar to morphine, but it has a mild sedative effect. It is preferable used as phosphate form and it is often administrated by mouth with aspirin or paracetamol. Therefore, it is important to investigate its structure to know the active groups and weak bonds responsible for its medical activity. Consequently in the present work, codeine was investigated by mass spectrometry and thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA) and confirming by semi-empirical MO-calculation (PM3 method) in the neutral and positively charged forms of the drug. Some results of studying the d-block element complexes of codeine were used to declare the relationship between drug structure and its chemical reactivity in vitro system. The mass spectra and thermal analyses fragmentation pathways were proposed and compared to each other to select the most suitable scheme representing the correct fragmentation of this drug. From EI mass spectra, the main primary cleavage site of the charged drug molecule is that due to β-cleavage to nitrogen atom in its skeleton. It occurs in two parallel mechanisms with the same possibility, i.e. no difference in appearance activation energy between them. In the neutral drug form the primary site cleavage is that occurs in the ether ring. Thermal analyses of the neutral form of the drug revealed the high response of the drug to the temperature variation with very fast rate. It decomposed in several sequential steps in the temperature range 200-600 °C. The initial thermal fragments are very similar to that obtained by mass spectrometric fragmentation. Therefore, comparison between mass and thermal helps in selection of the proper pathway representing the fragmentation of this drug. This comparison successfully confirmed by MOC. These calculations give the bond order, charge distribution, heat of formation and possible hybridization of some atoms in different position of the drug skeleton. This helps the successful choice of the weakest

  11. Structure investigation of codeine drug using mass spectrometry, thermal analyses and semi-emperical molecular orbital (MO) calculations.

    PubMed

    Zayed, M A; Hawash, M F; Fahmey, M A

    2006-05-15

    Codeine is an analgesic with uses similar to morphine, but it has a mild sedative effect. It is preferable used as phosphate form and it is often administrated by mouth with aspirin or paracetamol. Therefore, it is important to investigate its structure to know the active groups and weak bonds responsible for its medical activity. Consequently in the present work, codeine was investigated by mass spectrometry and thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA) and confirming by semi-empirical MO-calculation (PM3 method) in the neutral and positively charged forms of the drug. Some results of studying the d-block element complexes of codeine were used to declare the relationship between drug structure and its chemical reactivity in vitro system. The mass spectra and thermal analyses fragmentation pathways were proposed and compared to each other to select the most suitable scheme representing the correct fragmentation of this drug. From EI mass spectra, the main primary cleavage site of the charged drug molecule is that due to beta-cleavage to nitrogen atom in its skeleton. It occurs in two parallel mechanisms with the same possibility, i.e. no difference in appearance activation energy between them. In the neutral drug form the primary site cleavage is that occurs in the ether ring. Thermal analyses of the neutral form of the drug revealed the high response of the drug to the temperature variation with very fast rate. It decomposed in several sequential steps in the temperature range 200-600 degrees C. The initial thermal fragments are very similar to that obtained by mass spectrometric fragmentation. Therefore, comparison between mass and thermal helps in selection of the proper pathway representing the fragmentation of this drug. This comparison successfully confirmed by MOC. These calculations give the bond order, charge distribution, heat of formation and possible hybridization of some atoms in different position of the drug skeleton. This helps the successful choice of the

  12. An investigations on the molecular structure, FT-IR, FT-Raman and NMR spectra of 1-(p-tolylsulfonyl) pyrrole by theoretical and experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Erdogdu, Y; Saglam, S; Gulluoglu, M T

    2015-07-05

    Fourier-Transform-Infrared, Fourier-Transform-Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Rezonans spectra of 1-(p-tolylsulfonyl) pyrrole molecule have been recorded. In the powder form, vibrational spectra of 1-(p-tolylsulfonyl) pyrrol molecule were investigated in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1), respectively. The conformational analysis, geometrical structure, molecular electrostatic potential map, HOMO-LUMO and vibrational spectroscopic properties of the isolated 1-(p-tolylsulfonyl) pyrrole molecule have also been carried out at the Molecular Mechanic and Density Functional Theory approaches. Density Functional Theory results have been associated with Scaled Quantum Mechanics Force Field for fitting between the theoretical and the experimental frequencies.

  13. Spectra, electronic structure and molecular docking investigations on 3-(phenyl(p-tolylamino)methyl)naphthalen-2-ol - An experimental and computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeepa, S. Jone; Boobalan, Maria Susai; Tamilvendan, D.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Sebastian, S.; Qian, Kun

    2017-05-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study on synthesis, molecular structure, vibrational analysis, natural bond orbitals, electronic structure, hyperpolarizability, thermochemical properties has been reported for 3-(phenyl(p-tolylamino)methyl) naphthalen-2-ol (PTMN). The FT-IR spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-400 cm-1 and FT-Raman spectrum was recorded in the range 4000-50 cm-1. Sadlej pVTZ basis set was used to calculate the molecular geometry and the vibrational spectra. Natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) were calculated for PTMN using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) model chemistry. The potential energy distribution (PED) was derived to deepen the understanding on different modes of vibrations which are contributed by respective wavenumber. The molecular structure of PTMN was confirmed also with the simulation of NMR spectrum was performed using GIAO strategy by using B3LYP/6-311G(d,p). The non-linear nature of PTMN was confirmed by hyperpolarizabilty examination. The docking results suggest that the PTMN might exhibit inhibitory activity against protein induce Alopecia disease. The experimental UV-Visible spectra was recorded in the region of 600-200 nm and correlated with simulated spectra by suitable solvated PBEPBE/6-311G(d,p) model. The properties of HOMO-LUMO energies were measured by DFT approaches. In addition, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was computed and investigated. Thermal properties are theoretically calculated that are obtained from the thermochemistry results against a range of temperatures.

  14. Molecular structure investigation and spectroscopic studies on 2,3-difluorophenylboronic acid: A combined experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet; Ali Cipiloglu, M.; Kurt, Mustafa

    2012-11-01

    This work presents the characterization of 2,3-difluorophenylboronic acid (abbreviated as 2,3-DFPBA, C6H3B(OH)2F2) by quantum chemical calculations and spectral techniques. The spectroscopic properties were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman UV-Vis, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The FT-IR spectrum (4000-400 cm-1) and the FT-Raman spectrum (3500-10 cm-1) in the solid phase were recorded for 2,3-DFPBA. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the 2,3-DFPBA that dissolved in water and ethanol were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm. There are four possible conformers for this molecule. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of the 2,3-DFPBA as the trans-cis form. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule were obtained for all four conformers from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G (d,p) basis set calculations. The theoretical wavenumbers were scaled and compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method, interpreted in terms of fundamental modes. We obtained good consistency between experimental and theoretical spectra. 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, absorption wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. Finally the calculation results were analyzed to simulate infrared, Raman, NMR and UV spectra of the 2,3-DFPBA which show good agreement with observed spectra.

  15. Electrostatic guidelines and molecular tailoring for density functional investigation of structures and energetics of (Li)n clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K. V., Jovan Jose; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2008-10-01

    A molecular electrostatic potential (MESP)-guided method for building metal aggregates is proposed and tested on prototype lithium (Li)n clusters from n =4 to 58. The smaller clusters are subsequently subjected to direct density functional theory based geometry optimization, while the larger ones are optimized via molecular tailoring approach (MTA). The calculations are performed using PW91-PW91 as well as B3LYP functionals, and the trends in the interaction energies are found to be similar. The MESP-guided model for building metal clusters is validated by comparing the resulting cluster geometries with the ones reported in the literature up to n =20. A comparison of the ionization potential and polarizability (up to n =22) with their experimental counterparts shows a fairly good agreement. A new MTA-based scheme for calculating the ionization potential and polarizability values of large metal clusters is proposed and tested on Li40 and Li58 clusters. Further, the existence of "magic numbered clusters" up to n =22 is justified in terms of "maximum hardness principle" as well based on molecular electron density topography and distance descriptors.

  16. Investigation of the local structure of mixtures of an ionic liquid with polar molecular species through molecular dynamics: cluster formation and angular distributions.

    PubMed

    Carrete, Jesús; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Cabeza, Óscar; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2012-05-24

    In this work, we used molecular dynamics simulations to analyze in detail the spatial distributions of the different constituents in mixtures of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate with three polar molecular species: water and two alcohols of different chain lengths (methanol and ethanol). In particular, we report results regarding the influence of the chosen species and its concentration on the formation of ionic and molecular clusters over the whole miscibility range, as well as on the angular distribution of polar molecules around the anion and the cation in these systems. Both analyses showed that addition of a molecular species breaks down the polar network of the pure ionic liquid in clusters whose mean size decreases progressively as more molecules are added. At very high concentrations of the molecular species, the ions are found to be isolated in mixtures with water and methanol, but they tend to form pairs in ethanol. In mixtures with water we identified large clusters that form a water network at very high water concentrations, while at low water concentrations polar molecules tend to form smaller aggregates. In contrast, in mixtures with alkanols there is no evidence of the formation of large alcohol clusters at any concentration. Spatial order in alcohol was also studied by means of the Kirkwood G factor, reaching the conclusion that the angular correlations which appear in pure alcohols due to dipole interactions are destroyed by the ionic liquid, even when present only in tiny amounts.

  17. Effect of the deletion of the C region on the structure and hydration of insulin-like growth factor 1: a molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degreve, Leo; Silva, Luciene B.

    The structure and hydration of insulin-like growth factor 1 and an inactive mutant lacking the C region have been investigated in aqueous solution by molecular dynamics simulation. The overall structures of the two polypeptide resemble those determined by NMR spectroscopy. The deletion of the C region in the wild polypeptide introduces structural stability in the mutant, leading to a better definition of the secondary structure elements. A detailed hydration analysis was performed using the radial distribution functions and energy distributions. The backbone of the mutant is in general more solvent accessible than the wild polypeptide backbone. The structural rearrangements induced in the mutant led to changes in the solvent exposition of Tyr24 and Tyr60, which are residues important for ligand-receptor complex formation. Tyr24 exhibited a similar degree of solvent exposition in both IGF-1 and in the mutant; however, its hydroxyl group in the wild polypeptide is better solvated than in the mutant. Tyr60 was found to be solvent exposed in the wild protein, while in the mutant the involvement of its hydroxyl group in intramolecular hydrogen bonds led to it being buried away from the solvent.

  18. Molecular structure and spectroscopic investigations combined with hypoglycemic/anticancer and docking studies of a new barbituric acid derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Assem; Soliman, Saied M.; Elshaier, Yaseen A. M. M.; Ali, M.; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Ghabbour, Hazem A.

    2017-04-01

    The one-pot synthesis reaction of barbituric acid derivative, 1,3-cyclohexandione, and 4-fluorobenzaldehyde in water mediated by NHEt2 as base afforded 4 with excellent yield. The synthesized compound was characterized by spectrophotometric tools as well as X-ray single crystal diffraction technique. The stability of the nine possible isomers of the synthesized compound was studied using the B3LYP method and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The electronic and spectroscopic properties of the most stable isomer were predicted. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum displayed two bands at 203 and 257 nm in the solvent chloroform. The latter was calculated at 235.6 nm (f = 0.1995) in the gas phase due to H-2→L (42%) and H-1→L+2 (14%) excitations. In solution, using chloroform as a solvent, a slight bathochromic shift to 237.6 nm with an increase in the absorption intensity (f = 0.2898) was predicted. The molecular orbital energy level diagram of this transition band was characterized mainly by π-π* transitions. The 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts correlated well with the experimental data. The correlations had higher correlation coefficients (R2) when solvent effects were considered. The atomic charges were calculated using natural population analysis and the charged regions were presented using a molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) map. The synthesized compound was examined as a hypoglycemic agent via inhibition of α-glucosidase and β-glucuronidase enzymes. Its inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase was 10 times greater than the inhibitory activity of the standard drug acarbose (IC50 77.9 ± 0.3 μM and 840 ± 1.73 μM, respectively). Moreover, the target compound was evaluated for anticancer activity against MCF-7, H460, 3T3, and Hela cell lines. It demonstrated inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 and H460 cell lines with IC50 5.80 ± 0.12 and 19.6 ± 0.5 μM, respectively, in comparison to doxorubicin. The docking study was performed using the OpenEye program.

  19. A dynamic structural model of expanded RNA CAG repeats: a refined X-ray structure and computational investigations using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Disney, Matthew D; Schatz, George C

    2013-03-06

    One class of functionally important RNA is repeating transcripts that cause disease through various mechanisms. For example, expanded CAG repeats can cause Huntington's and other disease through translation of toxic proteins. Herein, a crystal structure of r[5'UUGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, a model of CAG expanded transcripts, refined to 1.65 Å resolution is disclosed that shows both anti-anti and syn-anti orientations for 1 × 1 nucleotide AA internal loops. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using AMBER force field in explicit solvent were run for over 500 ns on the model systems r(5'GCGCAGCGC)2 (MS1) and r(5'CCGCAGCGG)2 (MS2). In these MD simulations, both anti-anti and syn-anti AA base pairs appear to be stable. While anti-anti AA base pairs were dynamic and sampled multiple anti-anti conformations, no syn-anti ↔ anti-anti transformations were observed. Umbrella sampling simulations were run on MS2, and a 2D free energy surface was created to extract transformation pathways. In addition, an explicit solvent MD simulation over 800 ns was run on r[5'GGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, which closely represents the refined crystal structure. One of the terminal AA base pairs (syn-anti conformation), transformed to anti-anti conformation. The pathway followed in this transformation was the one predicted by umbrella sampling simulations. Further analysis showed a binding pocket near AA base pairs in syn-anti conformations. Computational results combined with the refined crystal structure show that global minimum conformation of 1 × 1 nucleotide AA internal loops in r(CAG) repeats is anti-anti but can adopt syn-anti depending on the environment. These results are important to understand RNA dynamic-function relationships and to develop small molecules that target RNA dynamic ensembles.

  20. A dynamic structural model of expanded RNA CAG repeats: A refined X-ray structure and computational investigations using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, Hajeung; Disney, Matthew D.; Schatz, George C.

    2013-01-01

    One class of functionally important RNA is repeating transcripts that cause disease through various mechanisms. For example, expanded r(CAG) repeats can cause Huntington’s and other disease through translation of toxic proteins. Herein, crystal structure of r[5ʹUUGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, a model of CAG expanded transcripts, refined to 1.65 Å resolution is disclosed that show both anti-anti and syn-anti orientations for 1×1 nucleotide AA internal loops. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using Amber force field in explicit solvent were run for over 500 ns on model systems r(5ʹGCGCAGCGC)2 (MS1) and r(5ʹCCGCAGCGG)2 (MS2). In these MD simulations, both anti-anti and syn-anti AA base pairs appear to be stable. While anti-anti AA base pairs were dynamic and sampled multiple anti-anti conformations, no syn-anti↔anti-anti transformations were observed. Umbrella sampling simulations were run on MS2, and a 2D free energy surface was created to extract transformation pathways. In addition, over 800 ns explicit solvent MD simulation was run on r[5ʹGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, which closely represents the refined crystal structure. One of the terminal AA base pairs (syn-anti conformation), transformed to anti-anti conformation. The pathway followed in this transformation was the one predicted by umbrella sampling simulations. Further analysis showed a binding pocket near AA base pairs in syn-anti conformations. Computational results combined with the refined crystal structure show that global minimum conformation of 1×1 nucleotide AA internal loops in r(CAG) repeats is anti-anti but can adopt syn-anti depending on the environment. These results are important to understand RNA dynamic-function relationships and develop small molecules that target RNA dynamic ensembles. PMID:23441937

  1. Structural investigation of zymogenic and activated forms of human blood coagulation factor VIII: a computational molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human blood coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is a large plasma glycoprotein with sequential domain arrangement in the order A1-a1-A2-a2-B-a3-A3-C1-C2. The A1, A2 and A3 domains are interconnected by long linker peptides (a1, a2 and a3) that possess the activation sites. Proteolysis of fVIII zymogen by thrombin or factor Xa results in the generation of the activated form (fVIIIa) which serves as a critical co-factor for factor IXa (fIXa) enzyme in the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Results In our efforts to elucidate the structural differences between fVIII and fVIIIa, we developed the solution structural models of both forms, starting from an incomplete 3.7 Å X-ray crystal structure of fVIII zymogen, using explicit solvent MD simulations. The full assembly of B-domainless single-chain fVIII was built between the A1-A2 (Ala1-Arg740) and A3-C1-C2 (Ser1669-Tyr2332) domains. The structural dynamics of fVIII and fVIIIa, simulated for over 70 ns of time scale, enabled us to evaluate the integral motions of the multi-domain assembly of the co-factor and the possible coordination pattern of the functionally important calcium and copper ion binding in the protein. Conclusions MD simulations predicted that the acidic linker peptide (a1) between the A1 and A2 domains is largely flexible and appears to mask the exposure of putative fIXa enzyme binding loop (Tyr555-Asp569) region in the A2 domain. The simulation of fVIIIa, generated from the zymogen structure, predicted that the linker peptide (a1) undergoes significant conformational reorganization upon activation by relocating completely to the A1-domain. The conformational transition led to the exposure of the Tyr555-Asp569 loop and the surrounding region in the A2 domain. While the proposed linker peptide conformation is predictive in nature and warrants further experimental validation, the observed conformational differences between the zymogen and activated forms may explain and support the large body of

  2. Structural investigations into the binding mode of novel neolignans Cmp10 and Cmp19 microtubule stabilizers by in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shubhandra; Kumar, Akhil; Kumar, B Sathish; Negi, Arvind S; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Microtubule stabilizers provide an important mode of treatment via mitotic cell arrest of cancer cells. Recently, we reported two novel neolignans derivatives Cmp10 and Cmp19 showing anticancer activity and working as microtubule stabilizers at micromolar concentrations. In this study, we have explored the binding site, mode of binding, and stabilization by two novel microtubule stabilizers Cmp10 and Cmp19 using in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and binding free energy calculations. Molecular docking studies were performed to explore the β-tubulin binding site of Cmp10 and Cmp19. Further, MD simulations were used to probe the β-tubulin stabilization mechanism by Cmp10 and Cmp19. Binding affinity was also compared for Cmp10 and Cmp19 using binding free energy calculations. Our docking results revealed that both the compounds bind at Ptxl binding site in β-tubulin. MD simulation studies showed that Cmp10 and Cmp19 binding stabilizes M-loop (Phe272-Val288) residues of β-tubulin and prevent its dynamics, leading to a better packing between α and β subunits from adjacent tubulin dimers. In addition, His229, Ser280 and Gln281, and Arg278, Thr276, and Ser232 were found to be the key amino acid residues forming H-bonds with Cmp10 and Cmp19, respectively. Consequently, binding free energy calculations indicated that Cmp10 (-113.655 kJ/mol) had better binding compared to Cmp19 (-95.216 kJ/mol). This study provides useful insight for better understanding of the binding mechanism of Cmp10 and Cmp19 and will be helpful in designing novel microtubule stabilizers.

  3. Basic amphipathic model peptides: Structural investigations in solution, studied by circular dichroism, fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangavel, C.; Sy, D.; Reynaud, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    A twenty amino acid residue long amphipathic peptide made of ten leucine and ten lysine residues and four derivatives, in which a tryptophan, as a fluorescent probe, is substituted for a leucine, are studied. The peptides in water are mainly in an unordered conformation (~90%), and undergo a two state reversible transition upon heating, leading to a partially helical conformation (cold denaturation). Time resolved fluorescence results show that fluorescence decay for the four Trp containing peptides is best described by triple fluorescence decay kinetics. In TFE/water mixture, peptides adopt a single α-helix conformation but the Leu-Trp9 substitution leads to an effective helix destabilizing effect. In salted media, the peptides are fully helical and present a great tendency to self associate by bringing the hydrophobic faces of helices into close contact. This proceeds in non-cooperative multisteps leading to the formation of α helix aggregates with various degrees of complexation. Using modelling, the relative hydrophobic surface areas accessible to water molecules in n-mer structures are calculated and discussed. Nous avons étudié un peptide amphipathique composé de dix lysine et dix leucine, ainsi que quatre dérivés comportant un résidu tryptophane pour les études par fluorescence. Dans l'eau, les peptides ne sont pas structurés (~90%), et se structurent partiellement en hélice α par chauffage (dénaturation froide). Les mesures de déclin de fluorescence font apparaître une cinétique à trois temps de vie. Dans un mélange eau/TFE, les peptides adoptent une conformation en hélice α, mais la substitution Leu-Trp9 possède un effet déstabilisant. En mileu salin, les peptides sont totalement hélicoïdaux et ont tendance à s'agréger de façon à regrouper leur face hydrophobe. Ce processus se fait en plusieurs étapes avec des agrégats de taille variable. L'existence de tels agrégats est discutée sur la base de la modélisation mol

  4. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral investigations, DFT computations and molecular dynamics and docking study of 4-benzyl-5-oxomorpholine-3-carbamide, a potential bioactive agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, P. Krishna; Sheena Mary, Y.; Shyma Mary, Y.; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Suneetha, V.; Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J.; Van Alsenoy, C.; Suchetan, P. A.

    2017-04-01

    4-benzyl-5-oxomorpholine-3-carbamide has been synthesized; single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H-NMR. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n. The molecular geometry of the compound was optimized by using Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in the ground state and geometric parameters are in agreement with the X-ray analysis results of the structure. The experimental vibrational spectra were compared with the calculated spectra and each vibrational wave number was assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The electronic and charge transfer properties have been explained on the basis of highest occupied molecular orbital's (HOMOs) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital's (LUMOs). Besides molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbital's (FMOs), some global reactivity descriptors, thermodynamic properties, non-linear optical (NLO) behavior and Mullikan charge analysis of the title compound were computed with the same method in gas phase, theoretically. Potential reactive sites of the title compound have been identified by average local ionization energy and Fukui functions, both mapped to the electron density surface. Bond dissociation energies for all single acyclic bonds have been calculated in order to investigate autoxidation and degradation properties of the title compound. Atoms with pronounced interactions with water molecules have been detected by calculations of radial distribution functions after molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical calculations using DFT methods for the fortification of the paper. Further the docking studies revealed that the title compound as a docked ligand forms a stable complex with pyrrole inhibitor with a binding affinity value of -7.5 kcal/mol. This

  6. Spectroscopic and molecular structure investigation of the phosphorus-containing G‧2 dendrimer with terminal aldehyde groups using DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2015-02-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the second generation dendrimer G‧2 built from thiophosphoryl core with terminal aldehyde groups have been recorded. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for model compound C, consisting of thiophosphoryl core, one branch with three repeated units, and four 4-oxybenzaldehyde terminal groups on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT) at the PBE/TZ2P level. The vibrational frequencies, infrared and Raman intensities for the t,g,g- and t,-g,g-conformers of the terminal groups were calculated. The t,g,g-conformer is 2.0 kcal/mol less stable compared to t,-g,g-conformer. A reliable assignment of the fundamental bands observed in the experimental IR and Raman spectra of dendrimer was achieved. For the low generations (G‧1 to G‧3) the disk form of studied dendrimer molecules is the most probable. For higher generations, the shape of dendrimer molecules will be that of a cauliflower.

  7. Theoretical investigations on molecular structure, vibrational spectra, HOMO, LUMO, NBO analysis and hyperpolarizability calculations of thiophene-2-carbohydrazide.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, V; Janaki, A; Nataraj, A

    2014-01-24

    The Fourier-Transform infrared and Fourier-Transform Raman spectra of thiophene-2-carbohydrazide (TCH) was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-100 cm(-1). Quantum chemical calculations of energies, geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers of TCH were carried out by DFT (B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) as basis set. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. UV spectrum was measured in different solvent. The energy and oscillator strength are calculated by Time Dependant Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) results. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies also confirm that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Finally the theoretical FT-IR, FT-Raman, and UV spectra of the title molecule have also been constructed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multinuclear NMR and molecular modelling investigations on the structure and equilibria of complexes that form in aqueous solutions of Ca(2+) and gluconate.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Attila; Sebok, Pál; Forgó, Péter; Jakusch, Tamás; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2010-09-03

    Complexation of d-gluconate (Gluc(-)) with Ca(2+) has been investigated via (1)H, (13)C and (43)Ca NMR spectroscopy in aqueous solutions in the presence of high concentration background electrolytes (1MI4M (NaCl) ionic strength). From the ionic strength dependence of its formation constant, the stability constant at 6pH11 and at I-->0M has been derived (logK(1,1)(0)=1.8+/-0.1). The protonation constant of Gluc(-) at I=1M (NaCl) ionic strength was also determined and was found to be logK(a)=3.24+/-0.01 ((13)C NMR) and logK(a)=3.23+/-0.01 ((1)H NMR). It was found that (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts upon complexation (both with H(+) and with Ca(2+)) do not vary in an unchanging way with the distance from the Ca(2+)/H(+) binding site. From 2D (1)H-(43)Ca NMR spectra, simultaneous binding of Ca(2+) to the alcoholic OH on C2 and C3 was deduced. Molecular modelling results modulated this picture by revealing structures in which the Gluc(-) behaves as a multidentate ligand. The five-membered chelated initial structure was found to be thermodynamically more stable than that derived from a six-membered chelated initial structure.

  9. Probing the molecular and electronic structure of norhipposudoric and hipposudoric acids from the red sweat of Hippopotamus amphibius: a DFT investigation.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Vinicio; Pichierri, Fabio

    2009-03-19

    Molecular structure and tautomeric/conformational preferences of norhipposudoric and hipposudoric acids, the recently isolated pigments of the Hippopotamus amphibius' sweat, were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) PBE0 formalism. Among a large variety of possible structures, two similar keto-enol tautomer/conformers are nearly isoenergetic and markedly more stable than the others both in the gas phase and aqueous solution. The bulk solvent effect was accounted for with the polarizable continuum model (PCM). A distinctive structural feature is the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the keto-enol O-H...O bridge, as shown by analysis of the atoms-in-molecules topological properties of the electron density. To elucidate the claimed strong acidity of these pigments, the site-specific microscopic dissociation constants were also calculated using the cluster-continuum model, a hybrid approach based on inclusion of explicit solvent molecules and solvation of the cluster by the dielectric continuum. Notably, the first deprotonation should occur predominantly from the enolic group with a remarkably low pk(i) value. This factor could play an important role in the potent antibiotic activity of the pigments. The absorption spectra of the undissociated and dissociated compounds in aqueous solution were interpreted with time-dependent DFT/PCM calculations. The pi-pi* diquinoid excitations, mainly occurring in the fluorenoid nucleus, are the major contributors to the color and strong absorption bands in the UVA and UVB regions, which are closely related to the efficient sunscreen activity exerted by the pigments.

  10. Structural changes of humic acids from sinking organic matter and surface sediments investigated by advanced solid-state NMR: Insights into sources, preservation and molecularly uncharacterized components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jingdong; Tremblay, Luc; Gagné, Jean-Pierre

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the structural changes that particulate organic matter (POM) undergoes in natural systems is essential for determining its reactivity and fate. In the present study, we used advanced solid-state NMR techniques to investigate the chemical structures of sinking particulate matter collected at different depths as well as humic acids (HAs) extracted from these samples and underlying sediments from the Saguenay Fjord and the St. Lawrence Lower Estuary (Canada). Compared to bulk POM, HAs contain more non-polar alkyls, aromatics, and aromatic C-O, but less carbohydrates (or carbohydrate-like structures). In the two locations studied, the C and N contents of the samples (POM and HAs) decreased with depth and after deposition onto sediments, leaving N-poor but O-enriched HAs and suggesting the involvement of partial oxidation reactions during POM microbial degradation. Advanced NMR techniques revealed that, compared to the water-column HAs, sedimentary HAs contained more protonated aromatics, non-protonated aromatics, aromatic C-O, carbohydrates (excluding anomerics), anomerics, OC q, O-C q-O, OCH, and OCH 3 groups, but less non-polar alkyls, NCH, and mobile CH 2 groups. These results are consistent with the relatively high reactivity of lipids and proteins or peptides. In contrast, carbohydrate-like structures were selectively preserved and appeared to be involved in substitution and copolymerization reactions. Some of these trends support the selective degradation (or selective preservation) theory. The results provide insights into mechanisms that likely contribute to the preservation of POM and the formation of molecules that escape characterization by traditional methods. Despite the depletion of non-polar alkyls with depth in HAs, a significant portion of their general structure survived and can be assigned to a model phospholipid. In addition, little changes in the connectivities of different functional groups were observed. Substituted and copolymerized

  11. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-05

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the η(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the FeCH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions.

  12. Structural and electronic properties of Sin, Sin+, and AlSin-1 (n=2-13) clusters: Theoretical investigation based on ab initio molecular orbital theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Sandeep; Majumder, Chiranjib; Kulshreshtha, S. K.

    2004-10-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of Sin, Sin+, and AlSin-1 clusters (2⩽n⩽13) have been investigated using the ab initio molecular orbital theory under the density functional theory formalism. The hybrid exchange-correlation energy function (B3LYP) and a standard split-valence basis set with polarization functions [6-31G(d)] were employed for this purpose. Relative stabilities of these clusters have been analyzed based on their binding energies, second difference in energy (Δ 2E) and fragmentation behavior. The equilibrium geometry of the neutral and charged Sin clusters show similar structural growth. However, significant differences have been observed in the electronic structure leading to their different stability pattern. While for neutral clusters, the Si10 is magic, the extra stability of the Si11+ cluster over the Si10+ and Si12+ bears evidence for the magic behavior of the Si11+ cluster, which is in excellent agreement with the recent experimental observations. Similarly for AlSin-1 clusters, which is isoelectronic with Sin+ clusters show extra stability of the AlSi10 cluster suggesting the influence of the electronic structures for different stabilities between neutral and charged clusters. The ground state geometries of the AlSin-1 clusters show that the impurity Al atom prefers to substitute for the Si atom, that has the highest coordination number in the host Sin cluster. The fragmentation behavior of all these clusters show that while small clusters prefers to evaporate monomer, the larger ones dissociate into two stable clusters of smaller size.

  13. Synthesis, crystal and molecular-electronic structure, and kinetic investigation of two new sterically hindered isomeric forms of the dimethyl[methyl(phenylsulfonyl)amino]benzenesulfonyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rublova, L.; Zarychta, B.; Olijnyk, V.; Mykhalichko, B.

    2017-06-01

    Two new structural isomers - 2,4-dimethyl-5-[methyl(phenylsulfonyl)amino]benzenesulfonyl chloride (1) and 2,4-dimethyl-3-[methyl(phenylsulfonyl)amino]benzenesulfonyl chloride (2) were synthesized by interaction of N-(2,4-dimethylphenyl)-N-methyl-benzenesulfonamide or N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-methylbenzenesulfonamide with chlorosulfonic acid. Both compounds have been structurally characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction at 100 K. The crystals of 1 are triclinic: space group P 1 bar , a = 8.1542(2), b = 11.0728(3), c = 11.2680(3) Å, α = 116.557(3), β = 95.155(2), γ = 108.258(2)°, V = 831.97(4) Å3, Z = 2, R = 0.0251 for 2429 reflections; the crystals of 2 are monoclinic: space group P21/c, a = 11.7428(2), b = 11.3518(2), c = 12.5886(2) Å, β = 93.659(2)°, V = 1674.66(5) Å3, Z = 4, R = 0.0269 for 2622 reflections. The structure of both isomers is organized as molecular crystals. These sterically hindered organic molecules are cross-linked into framework by means of hydrogen bonds of Csbnd H⋯O type (H⋯O distances are in range 2.27(2)-2.76(2) Å). The ab initio quantum-chemical calculations of an electronic structure of the isomeric molecules of 1 and 2 have been performed using the restricted Hartree-Fock method with a 6-31G* basis set. The calculated values of charge density concentrated on the electronegative atoms of the sterically hindered molecules are in good agreement with parameters of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The obtained data of the kinetic investigations of the substitution reactions in aqueous solution well correlate with stereo-chemical characteristics of the both molecules of the dimethyl[methyl(phenylsulfonyl)amino]-benzenesulfonyl chloride.

  14. Structural investigation of nanocrystalline graphene grown on (6√3 × 6√3)R30°-reconstructed SiC surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, T.; Dubslaff, M.; Oliveira, M. H., Jr.; Hanke, M.; Fromm, F.; Seyller, T.; Nemec, L.; Blum, V.; Scheffler, M.; Lopes, J. M. J.; Riechert, H.

    2013-12-01

    Growth of nanocrystalline graphene films on (6√3 × 6√3)R30°-reconstructed SiC surfaces was achieved by molecular beam epitaxy, enabling the investigation of quasi-homoepitaxial growth. The structural quality of the graphene films, which is investigated by Raman spectroscopy, increases with growth time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy proves that the SiC surface reconstruction persists throughout the growth process and that the synthesized films consist of sp2-bonded carbon. Interestingly, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements show that the graphene domains possess one single in-plane orientation, are aligned to the substrate, and offer a noticeably contracted lattice parameter of 2.450 Å. We correlate this contraction with theoretically calculated reference values (all-electron density functional calculations based on the van der Waals corrected Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional) for the lattice parameter contraction induced in ideal, free-standing graphene sheets by: substrate-induced buckling, the edges of limited-size flakes and typical point defects (monovacancies, divacancies, Stone-Wales defects).

  15. A molecular dynamics investigation of the structural and dynamic properties of the ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Maginn, Edward

    2011-09-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the structure and dynamics of the ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C(4)mim][Tf(2)N]) in the temperature range of 283-460 K. Extensive analysis was carried out to characterize a number of structural and dynamic features. Transport properties were computed using a variety of equilibrium methods that employed the Green-Kubo and Einstein formulations. Nonequilibrium techniques were also used. In general, different methods mostly yielded consistent results, although some differences were observed. Computed self-diffusivities and ionic conductivities tended to be slightly lower than experimental values, while computed viscosities were significantly higher than experiment. Computed thermal conductivities agreed reasonably well with experimental data. Despite these discrepancies, the simulations capture the experimental temperature-dependent trends for all these transport properties. Single ion dynamics were studied by examining diffusional anisotropy, the self-part of the van Hove function, non-Gaussian parameters, and incoherent intermediate scattering functions. It is found that cations diffuse faster than anions and are more dynamically heterogeneous. A clear anisotropy is revealed in cation displacement, with the motion normal to the imidazolium ring plane being the most hindered and the motion along the alkyl chain in the plane of the ring being the most facile. Cations structurally relax faster than anions but they rotationally relax slower than anions. There is a pronounced temperature dependence to the rotational anisotropy of the cations, but only a weak temperature dependence for the anions. The ionic conductivity deviates from the Nernst-Einstein relation due to the correlated motion of cations and anions. The results suggest that the dynamical behavior of this and related ionic liquids is extremely complex and consists of many different modes with

  16. A molecular dynamics investigation of the structural and dynamic properties of the ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjun; Maginn, Edward

    2011-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the structure and dynamics of the ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C4mim][Tf2N]) in the temperature range of 283-460 K. Extensive analysis was carried out to characterize a number of structural and dynamic features. Transport properties were computed using a variety of equilibrium methods that employed the Green-Kubo and Einstein formulations. Nonequilibrium techniques were also used. In general, different methods mostly yielded consistent results, although some differences were observed. Computed self-diffusivities and ionic conductivities tended to be slightly lower than experimental values, while computed viscosities were significantly higher than experiment. Computed thermal conductivities agreed reasonably well with experimental data. Despite these discrepancies, the simulations capture the experimental temperature-dependent trends for all these transport properties. Single ion dynamics were studied by examining diffusional anisotropy, the self-part of the van Hove function, non-Gaussian parameters, and incoherent intermediate scattering functions. It is found that cations diffuse faster than anions and are more dynamically heterogeneous. A clear anisotropy is revealed in cation displacement, with the motion normal to the imidazolium ring plane being the most hindered and the motion along the alkyl chain in the plane of the ring being the most facile. Cations structurally relax faster than anions but they rotationally relax slower than anions. There is a pronounced temperature dependence to the rotational anisotropy of the cations, but only a weak temperature dependence for the anions. The ionic conductivity deviates from the Nernst-Einstein relation due to the correlated motion of cations and anions. The results suggest that the dynamical behavior of this and related ionic liquids is extremely complex and consists of many different modes with

  17. Nanogap structures for molecular nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Motto, Paolo; Dimonte, Alice; Rattalino, Ismael; Demarchi, Danilo; Piccinini, Gianluca; Civera, Pierluigi

    2012-02-09

    This study is focused on the realization of nanodevices for nano and molecular electronics, based on molecular interactions in a metal-molecule-metal (M-M-M) structure. In an M-M-M system, the electronic function is a property of the structure and can be characterized through I/V measurements. The contact between the metals and the molecule was obtained by gold nanogaps (with a dimension of less than 10 nm), produced with the electromigration technique. The nanogap fabrication was controlled by a custom hardware and the related software system. The studies were carried out through experiments and simulations of organic molecules, in particular oligothiophenes.

  18. Nanogap structures for molecular nanoelectronics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study is focused on the realization of nanodevices for nano and molecular electronics, based on molecular interactions in a metal-molecule-metal (M-M-M) structure. In an M-M-M system, the electronic function is a property of the structure and can be characterized through I/V measurements. The contact between the metals and the molecule was obtained by gold nanogaps (with a dimension of less than 10 nm), produced with the electromigration technique. The nanogap fabrication was controlled by a custom hardware and the related software system. The studies were carried out through experiments and simulations of organic molecules, in particular oligothiophenes. PMID:22321736

  19. Investigation of the retention behavior of structurally diverse drugs on alpha(1) acid glycoprotein column: insight on the molecular factors involved and correlation with protein binding data.

    PubMed

    Chrysanthakopoulos, Marios; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Giaginis, Costas; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2014-08-18

    Retention of 49 structurally diverse drugs on alpha1 acid glycoprotein column was investigated under different chromatographic conditions. Acetonitrile and 2-propanol were used as organic modifiers at different percentages and the pH was adjusted at 7.0 using PBS. Analysis of extrapolated and isocratic retention in terms of lipophilicity and electrostatic interactions revealed significant effect of the nature and percentage of organic modifier, which was attributed to the different shielding degree of the charged sites on the stationary phase by the buffer constituents. AGP retention factors were compared to HSA retention factors analyzed previously. Application of LSER analysis, extended to incorporate fractions ionized, demonstrated hydrogen bond acidity, dipolarity/polarizability and excess molar refraction as the most significant parameters for all AGP chromatographic indices, elucidating the differentiation of AGP retention from octanol-water partitioning and HSA retention. An attempt to correlate AGP chromatographic indices to AGP association constants, available in literature, supported the importance of stationary shielding in retention mechanism. Thus, isocratic retention factors logk10(ACN)(AGP) show a moderate but still better performance than lipophilicity in the case of A variant and may be a useful tool for the estimation of relevant association constants. For F1/S binding simulation lower stationary phase shielding is needed to obtain a significant two term regression equation, where logk20(ACN)(AGP) exerts a secondary contribution next to the most important bulk effect expressed by molecular weight.

  20. [Investigation the role of mutations M182T and Q39K in structure of beta-lactamase TEM-72 by molecular dynamics method].

    PubMed

    Shcherbinin, D S; Rubtsova, M Yu; Grigorenko, V G; Uporov, I V; Veselovsky, A V; Egorov, A M

    2016-07-01

    Synthesis of b-lactamases is one of the common mechanisms of bacterial resistance to b-lactam antibiotics including penicillins and cephalosporins. The widespread use of antibiotics results in appearance of numerous extended-spectrum b-lactamase variants or resistance to inhibitors. Mutations of 92 residues of TEM type were found. Several mutations are the key mutations that determine the extension of spectrum of substrates. However, roles of the most associated mutations, located far from active site, remain unknown. We have investigated the role of associated mutations in structure of b-lactamase TEM-72, which contain two key mutation (G238S, E240K) and two associated mutations (Q39K, M182T) by means of simulation of molecular dynamics. The key mutation lead to destabilization of the protein globule, characterized by increased mobility of amino acid residues at high temperature of modelling. Mutation M182T lead to stabilization protein, whereas mutation Q39K is destabilizing mutation. It seems that the last mutation serves for optimization of conformational mobility of b-lactamase and may influence on enzyme activity.

  1. A Combination of Hand-held Models and Computer Imaging Programs Helps Students Answer Oral Questions about Molecular Structure and Function: A Controlled Investigation of Student Learning

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Ronald F.; Colton, Shannon; Morris, Jennifer; Chaibub Neto, Elias; Kallio, Julie

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a controlled investigation to examine whether a combination of computer imagery and tactile tools helps introductory cell biology laboratory undergraduate students better learn about protein structure/function relationships as compared with computer imagery alone. In all five laboratory sections, students used the molecular imaging program, Protein Explorer (PE). In the three experimental sections, three-dimensional physical models were made available to the students, in addition to PE. Student learning was assessed via oral and written research summaries and videotaped interviews. Differences between the experimental and control group students were not found in our typical course assessments such as research papers, but rather were revealed during one-on-one interviews with students at the end of the semester. A subset of students in the experimental group produced superior answers to some higher-order interview questions as compared with students in the control group. During the interview, students in both groups preferred to use either the hand-held models alone or in combination with the PE imaging program. Students typically did not use any tools when answering knowledge (lower-level thinking) questions, but when challenged with higher-level thinking questions, students in both the control and experimental groups elected to use the models. PMID:19255134

  2. Photophysical investigations on determination of molecular structure and binding strength of supramolecular complexation between fulleropyrrolidine and a designed bisporphyrin in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sibayan; Bauri, Ajoy K.; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2013-05-01

    The present article reports, for the first time, the photophysical aspects of non-covalent interaction of a fullerene derivative, namely, C60 pyrrolidine tris-acid ethyl ester (PyC60) with a designed bisporphyrin (1) (having carbazole spacer unit) in toluene. Absorption spectrophotometric studies reveal that decrease in the absorption intensity of the Soret absorption band of 1 takes in presence of PyC60 in the solvent studied. Steady state fluorescence studies reveal efficient quenching of fluorescence intensity of 1 in presence of PyC60. Static quenching model explores a binding constant (KS) value of 2,910 dm3 mol-1 in toluene. Time resolved emission study establishes static quenching mechanism for the investigated supramolecule in non-polar solvent. Molecular mechanics calculations in vacuo evoke the single projection structure of the PyC60-1 complex and interpret the geometrical arrangement of both PyC60 and 1 during non-covalent complexation.

  3. A combination of hand-held models and computer imaging programs helps students answer oral questions about molecular structure and function: a controlled investigation of student learning.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michelle A; Peck, Ronald F; Colton, Shannon; Morris, Jennifer; Chaibub Neto, Elias; Kallio, Julie

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a controlled investigation to examine whether a combination of computer imagery and tactile tools helps introductory cell biology laboratory undergraduate students better learn about protein structure/function relationships as compared with computer imagery alone. In all five laboratory sections, students used the molecular imaging program, Protein Explorer (PE). In the three experimental sections, three-dimensional physical models were made available to the students, in addition to PE. Student learning was assessed via oral and written research summaries and videotaped interviews. Differences between the experimental and control group students were not found in our typical course assessments such as research papers, but rather were revealed during one-on-one interviews with students at the end of the semester. A subset of students in the experimental group produced superior answers to some higher-order interview questions as compared with students in the control group. During the interview, students in both groups preferred to use either the hand-held models alone or in combination with the PE imaging program. Students typically did not use any tools when answering knowledge (lower-level thinking) questions, but when challenged with higher-level thinking questions, students in both the control and experimental groups elected to use the models.

  4. Investigation of the solution structure of the human parathyroid hormone fragment (1-34) by sup 1 H NMR spectroscopy, distance geometry, and molecular dynamics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Klaus, W.; Dieckmann, T.; Wray, V.; Schomburg, D.; Wingender, E.; Mayer, H. )

    1991-07-16

    The structure of human parathyroid hormone fragment (1-34) in a solvent mixture of water and trifluoroethanol has been determined by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a combination of distance geometry and molecular dynamic simulations. After complete assignment of the {sup 1}H signals, the nuclear Overhauser enhancement data imply the existence of two {alpha}-helics, comprising residues 3-9 and 17-28, joined by a nonstructured region. The absence of any long-range NOEs and the relative magnitudes of the sequential NOEs and the {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub alpha}) values reflect an inherent flexibility within the entire fragment. The final structures refined by molecular dynamics further support the above results and allow discussion of structural-activity relationships.

  5. Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferk, Vesna; Vrtacnik, Margareta; Blejec, Andrej; Gril, Alenka

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the meanings attached by students to the different kinds of molecular structure representations used in chemistry teaching. The students (n = 124) were from primary (aged 13-14 years) and secondary (aged 17-18 years) schools and a university (aged 21-25 years). A computerised "Chemical…

  6. Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferk, Vesna; Vrtacnik, Margareta; Blejec, Andrej; Gril, Alenka

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the meanings attached by students to the different kinds of molecular structure representations used in chemistry teaching. The students (n = 124) were from primary (aged 13-14 years) and secondary (aged 17-18 years) schools and a university (aged 21-25 years). A computerised "Chemical…

  7. Investigations of Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, Demetrios; Reviol, W.

    2015-07-15

    The proposal addresses studies of nuclear structure at low-energies and development of instrumentation for that purpose. The structure studies deal with features of neutron-rich nuclei with unexplored shapes (football- or pear-shaped nuclei). The regions of interest are: neutron rich nuclei like 132-138Sn, or 48-54Ca, and the Zr, Mo, and Ru isotopes. The tools used can be grouped as follows: either Gammasphere or Gretina multi-gamma detector arrays and auxiliary detectors (Microball, Neutron Shell, and the newly completed Phoswich Wall).The neutron-rich nuclei are accessed by radioactive-beam binary reactions or by 252Cf spontaneous fission. The experiments with heavy radioactive beams aim at exciting the beam nuclei by pick-up or transfer a neutron or a proton from a light target like 13C, 9Be, 11B or 14N .For these binary-reaction studies the Phoswich Wall detector system is essential. It is based on four multi-anode photomultiplier tubes on which CsI and thin fast-timing plastic scintillators are attached. Their signals are digitized with a high density microchip system.

  8. Trigonal Mn3 and Co3 clusters supported by weak-field ligands: a structural, spectroscopic, magnetic, and computational investigation into the correlation of molecular and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Fout, Alison R; Xiao, Dianne J; Zhao, Qinliang; Harris, T David; King, Evan R; Eames, Emily V; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Betley, Theodore A

    2012-10-01

    Transamination of divalent transition metal starting materials (M(2)(N(SiMe(3))(2))(4), M = Mn, Co) with hexadentate ligand platforms (R)LH(6) ((R)LH(6) = MeC(CH(2)NPh-o-NR)(3) where R = H, Ph, Mes (Mes = Mesityl)) or (H,Cy)LH(6) = 1,3,5-C(6)H(9)(NHPh-o-NH(2))(3) with added pyridine or tertiary phosphine coligands afforded trinuclear complexes of the type ((R)L)Mn(3)(py)(3) and ((R)L)Co(3)(PMe(2)R')(3) (R' = Me, Ph). While the sterically less encumbered ligand varieties, (H)L or (Ph)L, give rise to local square-pyramidal geometries at each of the bound metal atoms, with four anilides forming an equatorial plane and an exogenous pyridine or phosphine in the apical site, the mesityl-substituted ligand ((Mes)L) engenders local tetrahedral coordination. Both the neutral Mn(3) and Co(3) clusters feature S = (1)/(2) ground states, as determined by direct current (dc) magnetometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Within the Mn(3) clusters, the long internuclear Mn-Mn separations suggest minimal direct metal-metal orbital overlap. Accordingly, fits to variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data reveal the presence of weak antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions through the bridging anilide ligands with exchange couplings ranging from J = -16.8 to -42 cm(-1). Conversely, the short Co-Co interatomic distances suggest a significant degree of direct metal-metal orbital overlap, akin to the related Fe(3) clusters. With the Co(3) series, the S = (1)/(2) ground state can be attributed to population of a single molecular orbital manifold that arises from mixing of the metal- and o-phenylenediamide (OPDA) ligand-based frontier orbitals. Chemical oxidation of the neutral Co(3) clusters affords diamagnetic cationic clusters of the type [((R)L)Co(3)(PMe(2)R)(3)](+). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the neutral (S = (1)/(2)) and cationic (S = 0) Co(3) clusters reveal that oxidation occurs at an

  9. Emerging molecular methods for male infertility investigation.

    PubMed

    Benkhalifa, Moncef; Montjean, Debbie; Belloc, Stephanie; Dalleac, Alain; Ducasse, Michel; Boyer, Pierre; Merviel, Philippe; Copin, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Male factors account for approximately 50% of reproductive pathology. Different disorders, including urogenital and endocrine system development abnormalities, lead to testicular and gametogenesis defects. Parallely, studies have reported that somatic and germ cell genome decay are a major cause of male infertility. It has been shown that in somatic karyotype, there is a higher incidence of chromosomal aberrations in infertile men than neonatal population and significant chromosome Y microdeletion or specific gene alterations in affected spermatogenesis. Karyotyping and FISH application at somatic and germ cell levels are no longer sufficient to investigate the potential contribution of genome disorders on male infertility. A wide range of molecular methods are required for better understanding of male infertility causes. Molecular omes and omics techniques have become a great tool to investigate male infertility from chromosome to protein. This review reports different molecular tests and methods that can be offered for male infertility investigation.

  10. Pressure-induced structural changes in the network-forming isostatic glass GeSe4: An investigation by neutron diffraction and first-principles molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzid, Assil; Pizzey, Keiron J.; Zeidler, Anita; Ori, Guido; Boero, Mauro; Massobrio, Carlo; Klotz, Stefan; Fischer, Henry E.; Bull, Craig L.; Salmon, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    The changes to the topological and chemical ordering in the network-forming isostatic glass GeSe4 are investigated at pressures up to ˜14.4 GPa by using a combination of neutron diffraction and first-principles molecular dynamics. The results show a network built from corner- and edge-sharing Ge(Se1 /2)4 tetrahedra, where linkages by Se2 dimers or longer Sen chains are prevalent. These linkages confer the network with a local flexibility that helps to retain the network connectivity at pressures up to ˜8 GPa, corresponding to a density increase of ˜37 % . The network reorganization at constant topology maintains a mean coordination number n ¯≃2.4 , the value expected from mean-field constraint-counting theory for a rigid stress-free network. Isostatic networks may therefore remain optimally constrained to avoid stress and retain their favorable glass-forming ability over a large density range. As the pressure is increased to around 13 GPa, corresponding to a density increase of ˜49 % , Ge(Se1 /2)4 tetrahedra remain as the predominant structural motifs, but there is an appearance of 5-fold coordinated Ge atoms and homopolar Ge-Ge bonds that accompany an increase in the fraction of 3-fold coordinated Se atoms. The band gap energy decreases with increasing pressure, and midgap states appear at pressures beyond ˜6.7 GPa. The latter originate from undercoordinated Se atoms that terminate broken Sen chains.

  11. Using Carbon-14 Isotope Tracing to Investigate Molecular Structure Effects of the Oxygenate Dibutyl Maleate on Soot Emissions from a DI Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Upatnieks, A; Martin, G C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2004-01-07

    The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot emissions from a DI diesel engine was examined using carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) isotope tracing. Carbon atoms in three distinct chemical structures within the diesel oxygenate dibutyl maleate (DBM) were labeled with {sup 14}C. The {sup 14}C from the labeled DBM was then detected in engine-out particulate matter (PM), in-cylinder deposits, and CO{sub 2} emissions using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The results indicate that molecular structure plays an important role in determining whether a specific carbon atom either does or does not form soot. Chemical-kinetic modeling results indicate that structures that produce CO{sub 2} directly from the fuel are less effective at reducing soot than structures that produce CO before producing CO{sub 2}. Because they can follow individual carbon atoms through a real combustion process, {sup 14}C isotope tracing studies help strengthen the connection between actual engine emissions and chemical-kinetic models of combustion and soot formation/oxidation processes.

  12. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods.

  13. Electronic structure investigation of biphenylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, R.; Grazioli, C.; Zhang, T.; Bidermane, I.; Lüder, J.; de Simone, M.; Coreno, M.; Brena, B.; Lozzi, L.; Puglia, C.

    2017-02-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PS) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy have been used to investigate the occupied and empty density of states of biphenylene films of different thicknesses, deposited onto a Cu(111) crystal. The obtained results have been compared to previous gas phase spectra and single molecule Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to get insights into the possible modification of the molecular electronic structure in the film induced by the adsorption on a surface. Furthermore, NEXAFS measurements allowed characterizing the variation of the molecular arrangement with the film thickness and helped to clarify the substrate-molecule interaction.

  14. Vibrational, structural and electronic properties investigation by DFT calculations and molecular docking studies with DNA topoisomerase II of strychnobrasiline type alkaloids: A theoretical approach for potentially bioactive molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Renyer A.; Oliveira, Kelson M. T.; Costa, Emmanoel Vilaça; Pinheiro, Maria L. B.

    2017-10-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical DFT study of the structural, vibrational and electronic properties of strychnobrasiline and 12-hydroxy-10,11-dimethoxystrychnobrasiline is presented using the Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr function (B3LYP) and 6-311G(2d,p) basis set. The theoretical geometry optimization data were compared with the X-ray data for a similar structure in the associated literature, showing close values. The calculated HOMO-LUMO gap values showed that the presence of substituents in the benzene ring influences the quantum properties which are directly related to the reactive properties. Theoretical UV spectra agreed well with the measured experimental data, with bands assigned. In addition, Natural Bond Orbitals (NBOs), Mapped molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS) and NLO calculations were also performed at the same theory level. The theoretical vibrational analysis revealed several characteristic vibrations that may be used as a diagnostic tool for other strychnobrasiline type alkaloids, simplifying their identification and structural characterization. Molecular docking calculations with DNA Topoisomerase II-DNA complex showed binding free energies values of -8.0 and -9.5 kcal/mol for strychnobrasiline and 12-hydroxy-10,11-dimethoxystrychnobrasiline respectively, while for amsacrine, used for the treatment of leukemia, the binding free energy ΔG presented a value of -10.0 kcal/mol, suggesting that strychnobrasiline derivative alkaloids might exhibit an antineoplastic activity.

  15. Molecular crime scene investigation - dusting for fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Jürgen Bajorath

    2013-12-01

    In chemoinformatics and drug design, fingerprints (FPs) are defined as string representations of molecular structure and properties and are popular descriptors for similarity searching. FPs are generally characterized by the simplicity of their design and ease of use. Despite a long history in chemoinformatics, the potential and limitations of FP searching are often not well under- stood. Standard FPs can also be subjected to engineering techniques to tune them for specific search applications.

  16. Employment of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers to High-Throughput Screen nNOS-PSD-95 Interruptions: Structure and Dynamics Investigations on Monomer-Template Complexation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongwei; Zhao, Ting; Dai, Peng; Jiang, Nan; Li, Fei

    2016-03-16

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are employed to screen nNOS-PSD-95 (neuronal nitric oxide synthase post-synaptic density protein-95) interruptions. 5-(3,5-Dichloro-2-hydroxybenzylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (ZL006; a potential drug candidate for the treatment of stroke, depression, and pain) is employed as a template. Four kinds of functional monomers (2-VP: 2-vinylpyridine; 4-VP: 4-vinylpyridine; MMA: methyl methacrylate; and MAAM: methacrylamide) are designed, and their complexation with ZL006 in various solvents (methanol, acetonitrile, toluene, chloroform) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics calculations. Both 4-VP and MAAM have stronger interactions with ZL006 than those of 2-VP and MMA. The appropriate ratio of monomer to template is 3:1. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds play a dominant role in monomer-template complexation. Ideal solvents are toluene and chloroform, and the solvation effect on monomer-template complexation is revealed. Both molecular modeling and adsorption experiments demonstrate that as-synthesized ZL006-MIP with 4-VP as a monomer has better selectivity than that employing MAAM to screen for nNOS-PSD-95 interruptions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  18. FT-IR and FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopic investigation and hybrid computational (HF and DFT) analysis on the molecular structure of mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, E.; Atac, A.; Karabacak, M.; Nagabalasubramanian, P. B.; Asiri, A. M.; Periandy, S.

    2013-12-01

    The spectroscopic properties of mesitylene were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR techniques. The geometrical parameters and energies have been obtained from density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method and Hartree-Fock (HF) method with 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. Reduced density gradient (RDG) of the mesitylene was also given to investigate interactions of the molecule.

  19. FT-IR and FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectroscopic investigation and hybrid computational (HF and DFT) analysis on the molecular structure of mesitylene.

    PubMed

    Kose, E; Atac, A; Karabacak, M; Nagabalasubramanian, P B; Asiri, A M; Periandy, S

    2013-12-01

    The spectroscopic properties of mesitylene were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, (1)H and (13)C NMR techniques. The geometrical parameters and energies have been obtained from density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method and Hartree-Fock (HF) method with 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The results of the calculations were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. Besides, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. Reduced density gradient (RDG) of the mesitylene was also given to investigate interactions of the molecule.

  20. Conformational analysis of the antiulcer drug pirenzepine. X-ray investigations, molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical calculations and comparisons with structurally or pharmacologically related compounds.

    PubMed

    Trummlitz, G; Schmidt, G; Wagner, H U; Luger, P

    1984-01-01

    The crystal structures of the antiulcer drug 5,11-dihydro-11-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl) acetyl]-6H-pyrido[2,3-b] [1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one dihydrochloride (pirenzepine dihydrochloride, L-S 519 CL 2, Gastrozepin) and its monoprotonated form (pirenzepine monohydrochloride, L-S 519 CL) were determined by X-ray analysis. Molecular mechanics (MMPI) and semiempirical quantum chemical (MNDO) calculations showed that the calculated minimum energy conformations of the tricycle and of the exocyclic amide group are in agreement with the crystal structures. The conformational energies of pirenzepine as a function of four important torsional angles were calculated using different semiempirical quantum chemical methods with the CNDO/2 (complete neglect of differential overlap)-, MNDO (modified neglect of diatomic overlap)- and PCILO (perturbative configuration interaction using localized orbitals)-approximations. The conformation of one local energy minimum corresponds closely to the crystal structure of pirenzepine monohydrochloride. This conformation has a spatial arrangement which is analogous to a single consistent conformation known from the literature of 24 anticholinergic agents determined from their crystal structures by a computer graphics analysis. On the other hand there are no structural relationships of any low energy conformation of pirenzepine to conformations of other classes of tricyclic compounds which could rationalize their antidepressant, neuroleptic or antihistaminic activity. This finding explains the absence of any central effect of pirenzepine following intracerebral application. The computational elucidation of the conformational requirements for the interaction with the muscarinic receptors may be helpful for the interpretation of the selectivity of pirenzepine within the muscarinic system.

  1. Molecular dynamics investigations on the effect of D amino acid substitution in a triple-helix structure and the stability of collagen.

    PubMed

    Punitha, V; Raman, S Sundar; Parthasarathi, R; Subramanian, V; Rao, J Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, T

    2009-07-02

    Studies on the structure and stability of peptides and proteins during l-->d configurational change are certainly important for the designing of peptides with new biological activity and protein engineering. The l-->d amino acid (d AA) changes have been observed in aged proteins such as collagen. Hence, in this study, an attempt has been made to explore the effect of the replacement of l amino acid (l AA) in the model collagen-like peptides with d AA and the origin of structural stability (destability) has been traced using the molecular dynamics (MD) method employing the AMBER force field. Our results reveal that the substitution of d AA produces a large local disruption to the triple-helical structure. Formation of a kink (bulge) at the site of substitution is observed from the detailed analysis of MD trajectory. However, this local perturbation of kinked helix changes the direction of the helices and affects the relative orientation of the respective AA residues for helix-helix interaction, enough to affect the overall stability of the model collagen-like peptide. The destabilization energy per d Ala substitution is 7.87 kcal/mol, which is similar to the value for the Gly-->Ala mutation in collagen. Since the Gly-->Ala mutation is involved in genetic disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), the l-->d configurational change may produce a similar effect on collagen.

  2. The influence of the substitution pattern on the molecular conformation of ureido-1,2,5-oxadiazoles, related to STAT3 inhibitors: chemical behavior and structural investigation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Stefania; Masciocchi, Daniela; Gelain, Arianna; Meneghetti, Fiorella

    2012-07-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a protein constitutively activated by aberrant upstream tyrosine kinase activities in a broad spectrum of human solid and blood tumors. Therefore, the availability of drugs affecting STAT3 may have important therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer. Pursuing our efforts in exploring the influence of the substitution pattern of the ureido 1,2,5-oxadiazole moiety on the molecular conformation, new compounds substituted at positions 3 and 4 on the furazane ring were synthesized. The inhibition properties vs. STAT3 of the novel compounds were evaluated in a dual-luciferase assay, using HCT-116 cells, and the results evidenced a moderate activity only for the compounds endowed with a planar arrangement. Crystallographic studies of the new derivatives were performed in order to evidence the peculiar chemical behavior and to evaluate how structural modulations affected the biological properties.

  3. 8B structure in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, K. R.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.

    2015-04-01

    The structure of the light exotic nucleus 8B is investigated in the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model. The decay of 8B is responsible for almost the entire high- energy solar-neutrino flux, making structure calculations of 8B important for determining the solar core temperature. 8B is a proton halo candidate thought to exhibit clustering. FMD uses a wave-packet basis and is well-suited for modelling clustering and halos. For a multiconfiguration treatment we construct the many-body Hilbert space from antisymmetrised angular-momentum projected 8-particle states. First results show formation of a proton halo.

  4. Laboratory investigation of the contribution of complex aromatic/aliphatic polycyclic hybrid molecular structures to interstellar ultraviolet extinction and infrared emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoult, K. M.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Beegle, L. W.

    2000-01-01

    , provide insight into possible molecular structure details of newly formed hydrocarbon-rich interstellar dust and its transformation into aged material that becomes resident in the interstellar medium. Specifically the presence of naphthalene-like and butadiene-like conjugated structures as chromophores for the 2175 angstroms ultraviolet extinction feature is indicated.

  5. Laboratory investigation of the contribution of complex aromatic/aliphatic polycyclic hybrid molecular structures to interstellar ultraviolet extinction and infrared emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoult, K. M.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Beegle, L. W.

    2000-01-01

    , provide insight into possible molecular structure details of newly formed hydrocarbon-rich interstellar dust and its transformation into aged material that becomes resident in the interstellar medium. Specifically the presence of naphthalene-like and butadiene-like conjugated structures as chromophores for the 2175 angstroms ultraviolet extinction feature is indicated.

  6. Theoretical investigations on the molecular structure, vibrational spectra, thermodynamics, HOMO-LUMO, NBO analyses and paramagnetic susceptibility properties of p-(p-hydroxyphenoxy)benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, V; Lalitha, S; Rajeswari, S; Rastogi, V K

    2014-01-01

    The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman (3500-100 cm(-1)) spectra of p-(p-hydroxyphenoxy) benzoic acid have been recorded. Quantum chemical calculations of energies, geometries, and vibrational wavenumbers of p-(p-hydroxyphenoxy) benzoic acid (PPHPBA) are carried out using HF and DFT/B3LYP methods with 6-311G (d,p) basis set. The optimized geometrical parameters obtained by B3LYP method show a good agreement with experimental data. The difference between the observed and scaled wave number values of most of the fundamentals is very small. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated with scaled quantum mechanical method. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies allow the calculation of atomic and molecular properties and they also show that charge transfer occurs in the molecule. A detailed molecular picture of PPHPBA and its intermolecular interactions were obtained from NBO analysis. The temperature dependence of various thermodynamic parameters was also studied. The paramagnetic behavior of the molecule under consideration has been investigated and the variation of paramagnetic susceptibility with temperature has been studied. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and quantum chemical investigation of molecular structure and vibrational spectra of 2,5-dichloro-3,6-bis-(methylamino)1,4-benzoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Bhanu Pratap Singh; Srivastava, Mayuri; Prasad, R. L.; Yadav, R. A.

    2014-08-01

    2,5-Dichloro-3,6-bis-methylamino-[1,4]benzoquinone has been synthesized by condensing methyl amine hydrochloride with chloranil in presence of condensing agent sodium acetate. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman (4000-400 cm-1) spectral measurements of dmdb have been done. Ab initio and DFT (B3LYP/6-311+G**) calculations have been performed giving energies, optimized structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman activities. The optimized molecular structure of the compound is found to possess C2h point group symmetry. A detailed interpretation of the observed IR and Raman spectra of dmdb is reported on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The HOMO and LUMO energy gap reveals that the energy gap reflects the chemical activity of the molecule. The thermodynamic functions of the title compound have also been computed.

  8. Molecular dynamics investigation of the influence of anionic and zwitterionic interfaces on antimicrobial peptides’ structure: Implications for peptide toxicity and activity

    PubMed Central

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of three related helical antimicrobial peptides have been carried out in zwitterionic diphosphocholine (DPC) micelles and anionic sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles. These systems can be considered as model mammalian and bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively. The goal of this study is to dissect the differences in peptide composition which make the mutant peptides (novispirin-G10 and novispirin-T7) less toxic than the parent peptide ovispirin (OVIS), although all three peptides have highly antibacterial properties. Compared to G10 and T7, OVIS inserts deepest into the DPC micelle. This correlates well with the lesser toxicity of G10 and T7. There is strong evidence which suggests that synergistic binding of hydrophobic residues drives binding of OVIS to the micelle. The helical content of G10 and T7 is reduced in the presence of DPC, and this leads to less amphipathic peptide structures, which bind weakly to the micelle. Simulations in SDS were carried out to compare the influence of membrane electrostatics on peptide structure. All three peptides bound strongly to SDS, and retained helical form. This corresponds well with their equally potent antibacterial properties. Based on the simulations, we argue that secondary structure stability often leads to toxic properties. We also propose that G10 and T7 operate by the carpet mechanism of cell lysis. Toxicity of peptides operating by the carpet mechanism can be attenuated by reducing the peptide helical content. The simulations successfully capture experimental binding states, and the different depths of binding of the three peptides to the two micelles correlate with their antibacterial and toxic properties. PMID:16325306

  9. Investigating Evolutionary Questions Using Online Molecular Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puterbaugh, Mary N.; Burleigh, J. Gordon

    2001-01-01

    Recommends using online molecular databases as teaching tools to illustrate evolutionary questions and concepts while introducing students to public molecular databases. Provides activities in which students make molecular comparisons between species. (YDS)

  10. Theoretical investigation of the molecular, electronic structures and vibrational spectra of a series of first transition metal phthalocyanines by Z. Liu et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumimoto, Michinori; Kawashima, Yukio; Hori, Kenzi; Fujimoto, Hitoshi

    2008-11-01

    A recent papar by Lui et al. [Z. Liu, X. Zhang, Y. Zhang, J. Jiang, Spectrochim. Acta A 67 (2007) 1232] reported on the theoretical investigations of the fully optimized geometries and electronic structures of iron (II) phthalocyanine (FePc) with the singlet spin state carried out with the restricted density functional theory (DFT) method, where the B3LYP functional was adopted for the exchange-correlation term; however, the triplet spin state was experimentally reported, and we also obtained the triplet spin state by the unrestricted DFT calculations.

  11. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectral investigation on (E)-1-(4-bromophenyl)-3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)prop-2-en-1-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, A. M.; Karabacak, M.; Sakthivel, S.; Al-youbi, A. O.; Muthu, S.; Hamed, S. A.; Renuga, S.; Alagesan, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an organic nonlinear optical material (E)-1-(4-bromophenyl)-3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (C17H16NOBr) was synthesized by reacting 4-bromoacetophenone and N,N-dimethyl benzaldehyde in ethanol in the presence of sodium hydroxide. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-500 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated by using density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. The infrared and Raman spectra were also predicted from the calculated intensities. 1H NMR spectrum was recorded in CDCl3 and 1H NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was recorded in water in the range of 200-800 nm and the electronic properties were calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach. Besides, Mulliken atomic charges, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were performed. Nonlinear optical features and thermodynamic properties were also outlined theoretically. The geometric parameters, energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, chemical shifts and absorption wavelengths were compared with the available experimental data of the molecule. Comprehensive theoretical and experimental structural studies on the molecule were carried out by FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectrometry.

  12. Evaluating Agronomic Performance and Investigating Molecular Structure of Drought and Heat Tolerant Wild Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Collection from the Southeastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Basbag, Mehmet; Aydin, Ali; Sakiroglu, Muhammet

    2017-02-01

    Drought is a major stress factor for agricultural production including alfalfa production. One way to counterbalance the yield losses is the introgression of drought tolerant germplasm into breeding programs. As an effort to exploit such germplasm, 16 individual plants were selected from the Southeastern Turkey from their natural habitat and clonally propagated in field trials with an ultimate goal to use the germplasm as parents for releasing a synthetic cultivar. Forage yield and forage quality traits were evaluated and molecular genetic diversity among genotypes were determined using inter simple sequence repeat markers. Genotypes showed a variation from growth habit to yield and quality traits indicating sufficient phenotypic variation for diverse breeding efforts (for grazing or harvesting) and long term selection schemes. A large amount of genetic variation was observed even with a limited number of marker and genotypes. However, no pattern of spatial genetic structure was observed for the scale of the study when genetic variation is linked to the geographic origin. We conclude that ex situ natural variation provides a wealth of germplasm that could be incorporated into breeding programs aiming to improve drought tolerance. We also suggest an extensive collection of seeds/plant tissue from unique plants with desirable traits rather than putting more efforts to create a spatial germplasm sampling efforts in narrow regions.

  13. Theoretical and experimental investigations on molecular structure of 7-Chloro-9-phenyl-2,3-dihydroacridin-4(1H)-one with cytotoxic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheeshkumar, Rajendran; Shankar, Ramasamy; Kaminsky, Werner; Kalaiselvi, Sivalingam; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Rajendra Prasad, Karnam Jayarampillai

    2016-04-01

    7-Chloro-9-phenyl-2,3-dihydroacridin-4(1H)-one (3) is synthesized from 2-amino-5-chlorobenzophenone (1) and 1,2-cyclohexanedione (2) in the presence of catalyst InCl3. FT-IR, FT-Raman and FT-NMR spectra of molecule 3 have been recorded and the structure was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. CDCl3 and DMSO-d6 FT-NMR spectra and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been measured in molecule 3 and calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) and MO6-2x/6-311G (d,p) levels of theory. Similarly calculated vibrational frequencies were found in good agreement with experimental findings. The optimized geometry of molecule 3 was compared with experimental XRD values. DFT calculations of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and HOMO - LUMO frontier orbitals identified chemically active sites of molecule 3 responsible for its bioactivity. The title compound, 3 exhibits higher cytotoxicity in Human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) compared to human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549).

  14. Polydopamine and eumelanin molecular structures investigated with ab initio calculations† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc04692d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Teh; Martin-Martinez, Francisco J.; Jung, Gang Seob

    2017-01-01

    A set of computational methods that contains a brute-force algorithmic generation of chemical isomers, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations is reported and applied to investigate nearly 3000 probable molecular structures of polydopamine (PDA) and eumelanin. All probable early-polymerized 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) oligomers, ranging from dimers to tetramers, have been systematically analyzed to find the most stable geometry connections as well as to propose a set of molecular models that represents the chemically diverse nature of PDA and eumelanin. Our results indicate that more planar oligomers have a tendency to be more stable. This finding is in good agreement with recent experimental observations, which suggested that PDA and eumelanin are composed of nearly planar oligomers that appear to be stacked together via π–π interactions to form graphite-like layered aggregates. We also show that there is a group of tetramers notably more stable than the others, implying that even though there is an inherent chemical diversity in PDA and eumelanin, the molecular structures of the majority of the species are quite repetitive. Our results also suggest that larger oligomers are less likely to form. This observation is also consistent with experimental measurements, supporting the existence of small oligomers instead of large polymers as main components of PDA and eumelanin. In summary, this work brings an insight into the controversial structure of PDA and eumelanin, explaining some of the most important structural features, and providing a set of molecular models for more accurate modeling of eumelanin-like materials. PMID:28451292

  15. A New Approach for Investigating the Molecular Recognition of Protein: Toward Structure-Based Drug Design Based on the 3D-RISM Theory.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Yasuomi; Yoshida, Norio; Hirata, Fumio

    2011-11-08

    A new approach to investigate a molecular recognition process of protein is presented based on the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory, a statistical mechanics theory of molecular liquids. Numerical procedure for solving the conventional 3D-RISM equation consists of two steps. In step 1, we solve ordinary RISM (or 1D-RISM) equations for a solvent mixture including target ligands in order to obtain the density pair correlation functions (PCF) among molecules in the solution. Then, we solve the 3D-RISM equation for a solute-solvent system to find three-dimensional density distribution functions (3D-DDF) of solvent species around a protein, using PCF obtained in the first step. A key to the success of the method was to regard a target ligand as one of "solvent" species. However, the success is limited due to a difficulty of solving the 1D-RISM equation for a solvent mixture, including large ligand molecules. In the present paper, we propose a method which eases the limitation concerning solute size in the conventional method. In this approach, we solve a solute-solute 3D-RISM equations for a protein-ligand system in which both proteins and ligands are regarded as "solutes" at infinite dilution. The 3D- and 1D-RISM equations are solved for protein-solvent and ligand-solvent systems, respectively, in order to obtain the 3D- and 1D-DDF of solvent around the solutes, which are required for solving the solute-solute 3D-RISM equation. The method is applied to two practical and noteworthy examples concerning pharmaceutical design. One is an odorant binding protein in the Drosophila melanogaster , which binds an ethanol molecule. The other is phospholipase A2, which is known as a receptor of acetylsalicylic acid or aspirin. The result indicates that the method successfully reproduces the binding mode of the ligand molecules in the binding sites measured by the experiments.

  16. Molecular dynamics investigation of radiation damage in semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a molecular dynamics investigation of the effects of radiation damage on the crystallographic structure of semiconductors are reported. Particular cosiderastion is given to the formation of point defects and small defect complexes in silicon at the end of a radiation-damage cascade. The calculations described make use of the equivalent crystal theory of Smith and Banerjea (1988). Results on the existence of an atomic displacement threshold, the defect formation energy, and some crystallographic information on the defects observed are reported.

  17. Development of molecular markers and preliminary investigation of the population structure and mating system in one lineage of black morel (Morchella elata) in the Pacific Northwestern USA.

    PubMed

    Pagliaccia, Deborah; Douhan, Greg W; Douhan, LeAnn; Peever, Tobin L; Carris, Lori M; Kerrigan, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of LSU/ITS sequence data revealed two distinct lineages among 44 morphologically similar fruiting bodies of natural black morels (Morchella elata group) sampled at three non-burn locations in the St Joe and Kanisku National Forests in northern Idaho. Most of the sampled isolates (n = 34) represented a dominant LSU/ITS haplotype present at all three sites and identical to the Mel-12 phylogenetic lineage (GU551425) identified in a previous study. Variation at 1-3 nucleotide sites was detected among a small number of isolates (n = 6) within this well supported clade (94%). Four isolates sampled from a single location were in a well supported clade (97%) distinct from the dominant haplotypes and may represent a previously un-sampled, cryptic phylogenetic species. Species-specific SNP and SCAR markers were developed for Mel-12 lineage isolates by cloning and sequencing AFLP amplicons, and segregation of AFLP markers were studied from single ascospore isolates from individual fruiting bodies. Based on the segregation of AFLP markers within single fruiting bodies, split decomposition analyses of two SCAR markers, and population genetic analyses of SNP, SCAR, and AFLP markers, it appears that members of the Morchella sp. Mel-12 phylogenetic lineage are heterothallic and outcross in nature similar to yellow morels. This is the first set of locus-specific molecular markers that has been developed for any Morchella species, to our knowledge. These markers will prove to be valuable tools to study mating system, gene flow and genetic structure of black morels at various spatial scales with field-collected fruiting bodies and eliminate the need to culture samples in vitro.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the molecular structure, conformational stability, hyperpolarizability, electrostatic potential, thermodynamic properties and NMR spectra of pharmaceutical important molecule: 4‧-Methylpropiophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, V.; Balachandran, V.

    2014-07-01

    Combined experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the structure and vibrational spectra (IR and Raman spectra) of 4‧-methylpropiophenone (MPP). The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4‧-methylpropiophenone (MPP) have been recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-100 cm-1, respectively. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of MPP are also reported based on total energy distribution (TED). The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been calculated by Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p). The natural bond orbital (NBO), natural hybrid orbital (NHO) analysis and electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by DFT approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) of the novel molecular system and related properties (βtot, α0 and Δα) of MPP are calculated using DFT/6-311++G(d,p) method on the finite-field approach. The Mulliken charges, the values of electric dipole moment (μ) of the molecule were computed using DFT calculations. The thermodynamic functions of the title compound were also performed at the above method and basis set.

  19. Molecular structure investigation of neutral, dimer and anion forms of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Atac, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the structural and vibrational analysis of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (3,4-PDCA) are presented using experimental techniques as FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV and quantum chemical calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid in the solid phase are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies of all different and possible monomer, dimer, anion-1 and anion-2 conformers of 3,4-PDCA are obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. There are sixteen conformers (C1sbnd C16) for this molecule (neutral form). The most stable conformer of 3,4-PDCA is the C1 conformer. The complete assignments are performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. 1H and 13C NMR spectra are recorded and the chemical shifts are calculated by using DFT/B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The UV absorption spectrum of the studied compound is recorded in the range of 200-400 nm by dissolved in ethanol. The optimized geometric parameters were compared with experimental data via the X-ray results derived from complexes of this molecule. In addition these, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic and electronic properties, HOMO-LUMO energies and Mulliken atomic charges, are performed.

  20. Molecular structure investigation of neutral, dimer and anion forms of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Bilgili, Sibel; Atac, Ahmet

    2015-01-25

    In this study, the structural and vibrational analysis of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (3,4-PDCA) are presented using experimental techniques as FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV and quantum chemical calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid in the solid phase are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1), respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies of all different and possible monomer, dimer, anion(-1) and anion(-2) conformers of 3,4-PDCA are obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. There are sixteen conformers (C1C16) for this molecule (neutral form). The most stable conformer of 3,4-PDCA is the C1 conformer. The complete assignments are performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra are recorded and the chemical shifts are calculated by using DFT/B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The UV absorption spectrum of the studied compound is recorded in the range of 200-400 nm by dissolved in ethanol. The optimized geometric parameters were compared with experimental data via the X-ray results derived from complexes of this molecule. In addition these, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic and electronic properties, HOMO-LUMO energies and Mulliken atomic charges, are performed.

  1. A high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure investigation of the molecular orientation in the pentacene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) pentacene/system.

    PubMed

    Casu, M B; Cosseddu, P; Batchelor, D; Bonfiglio, A; Umbach, E

    2008-01-07

    We present x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and highly resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements taken on pentacene thin films of different thicknesses deposited on a spin coated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) substrate. Thin films of pentacene were prepared by using organic molecular beam deposition in situ using strictly controlled evaporation conditions. Our investigations show that pentacene thin films on PEDOT:PSS are characterized by upright standing molecules. Due to the strong dichroic behavior, the calculated values of the molecular orientation give a clear indication not only of the real molecular arrangement in the films but also of a high orientational order. This high degree of molecular orientation order is a characteristic already of the first layer. The films show the tendency to grow on the PEDOT:PSS substrate following an island-fashion mode, with a relatively narrow intermixing zone at the interface between the pentacene and the polymer blend. The peculiarity of the growth of pentacene on PEDOT:PSS is due to the fact that the substrate does not offer any template for the nucleated films and thus exerts a lateral order toward the crystal structure arrangement. Under these conditions, the upright orientation of the molecules in the films minimizes the energy required for the system stability.

  2. Preparation and structure investigation of novel Schiff bases using spectroscopic, thermal analyses and molecular orbital calculations and studying their biological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, Ehab M.; Zayed, M. A.; El-Desawy, M.

    2015-01-01

    Two novel Schiff's bases (EB1 and L1) as new macrocyclic compounds were prepared via condensation reactions between bisaldehyde (2,2‧-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))dibenzaldehyde): firstly with hydrazine carbothioamide to give (EB1), secondly with 4,6-diaminopyrimidine-2-thiol to give (L1). EB1 has a general formula C18H20N6O2S2 of mole mass = 416.520, and IUPAC name ((N,N‧Z,N,N‧E)-N,N‧-(((ethane1,2diylbis(oxy))bis(2,1phenylene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(1hydrazinylmethanethioamide). L1 has a general formula C20H16N4O2S of mole mass = 376.10; and IUPAC name 1,2-bis(2-vinylphenoxy)ethane4,6-diaminopyrimidine-2-thiol). The structures of the compounds obtained were characterized based on elemental analysis, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra, mass, and thermogravimetric analysis (TG, DTG). The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, ΔE*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were calculated from the TG curves using Coats-Redfern method. It is important to investigate their structures to know the active groups and weak bond responsible for their biological activities. The obtained thermal (TA) and mass (MS) practical results are confirmed by semi-empirical MO-calculation using PM3 procedure, on the neutral and positively charged forms of these novel Schiff bases. Therefore, comparison between MS and TA helps in selection of the proper pathway representing the decomposition of these compounds to give indication about their structures and consequently their biological activities. Their biological activities have been tested in vitro against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillissubtilies and Staphylococcus aurous bacteria in order to assess their antimicrobial potential.

  3. Preparation and structure investigation of novel Schiff bases using spectroscopic, thermal analyses and molecular orbital calculations and studying their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Ehab M; Zayed, M A; El-Desawy, M

    2015-01-05

    Two novel Schiff's bases (EB1 and L1) as new macrocyclic compounds were prepared via condensation reactions between bisaldehyde (2,2'-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))dibenzaldehyde): firstly with hydrazine carbothioamide to give (EB1), secondly with 4,6-diaminopyrimidine-2-thiol to give (L1). EB1 has a general formula C₁₈H₂₀N₆O₂S₂ of mole mass=416.520, and IUPAC name ((N,N'Z,N,N'E)-N,N'-(((ethane1,2diylbis(oxy))bis(2,1phenylene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(1hydrazinylmethanethioamide). L1 has a general formula C₂₀H₁₆N₄O₂S of mole mass=376.10; and IUPAC name 1,2-bis(2-vinylphenoxy)ethane4,6-diaminopyrimidine-2-thiol). The structures of the compounds obtained were characterized based on elemental analysis, FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectra, mass, and thermogravimetric analysis (TG, DTG). The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, ΔE(*), ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were calculated from the TG curves using Coats-Redfern method. It is important to investigate their structures to know the active groups and weak bond responsible for their biological activities. The obtained thermal (TA) and mass (MS) practical results are confirmed by semi-empirical MO-calculation using PM3 procedure, on the neutral and positively charged forms of these novel Schiff bases. Therefore, comparison between MS and TA helps in selection of the proper pathway representing the decomposition of these compounds to give indication about their structures and consequently their biological activities. Their biological activities have been tested in vitro against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillissubtilies and Staphylococcus aurous bacteria in order to assess their antimicrobial potential.

  4. Investigation of glassy state molecular motions in thermoset polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jianwei

    This dissertation presents the investigation of the glassy state molecular motions in isomeric thermoset epoxies by means of solid-state deuterium (2H) NMR spectroscopy technique. The network structure of crosslinked epoxies was altered through monomer isomerism; specifically, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) was cured with isomeric amine curatives, i.e., the meta-substituted diaminodiphenylsulfone (33DDS) and para-substituted diaminodiphenylsulfone (44DDS). The use of structural isomerism provided a path way for altering macroscopic material properties while maintaining identical chemical composition within the crosslinked networks. The effects of structural isomerism on the glassy state molecular motions were studied using solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy, which offers unrivaled power to monitor site-specific molecular motions. Three distinctive molecular groups on each isomeric network, i.e., the phenylene rings in the bisphenol A structure (BPA), the phenylene rings in the diaminodiphenylsulfone structure (DDS), and the hydroxypropoyl ether group (HPE) have been selectively deuterated for a comprehensive study of the structure-dynamics- property relationships in thermoset epoxies. Quadrupolar echo experiments and line shape simulations were employed as the main research approach to gain both qualitative and quantitative motional information of the epoxy networks in the glassy state. Quantitative information on the geometry and rate of the molecular motions allows the elucidation of the relationship between molecular motions and macro physical properties and the role of these motions in the mechanical relaxation. Specifically, it is revealed that both the BPA and HPE moieties in the isomeric networks have almost identical behaviors in the deep glassy state, which indicates that the molecular motions in the glassy state are localized, and the correlation length of the motions does not exceed the length of the DGEBA repeat unit. BPA ring motions contribute

  5. Structural investigations into microtubule-MAP complexes.

    PubMed

    Hoenger, Andreas; Gross, Heinz

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules interact with a large variety of factors commonly referred to as either molecular motors (kinesins, dyneins) or structural microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). MAPs do not exhibit motor activity, but regulate microtubule dynamics and their interactions with molecular motors, and organelles such as kinetochores or centrosomes. Structural investigations into microtubule-kinesin motor complexes are quite advanced today and by helical three-dimensional (3-D) analysis reveal a resolution of the motor-tubulin interface at <1.0 nm. However, due to their flexible structure MAPs like tau or MAP2C cannot be visualized in the same straightforward manner. Helical averaging usually reveals only the location of strong binding sites while the overall structure of the MAP remains unsolved. Other MAPs such as EB1 bind very selectively only to some parts of the microtubule lattice such as the lattice seam. Thus, they do not reveal a stoichiometric tubulin:MAP-binding ratio that would allow for a quantitative helical 3-D analysis. Therefore, to get a better view on the structure of microtubule-MAP complexes we often used a strategy that combined cryo-electron microscopy and helical or tomographic 3-D analysis with freeze-drying and high-resolution unidirectional surface shadowing. 3-D analysis of ice-embedded specimens reveals their full 3-D volume. This relies either on a repetitive structure following a helical symmetry that can be used for averaging or suffers from the limited resolution that is currently achievable with cryotomography. Surface metal shadowing exclusively images surface-exposed features at very high contrast, adding highly valuable information to 2-D or 3-D data of vitrified structures.

  6. The Molecular Structure of Monofluorobenzaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozada, Issiah Byen; Sun, Wenhao; van Wijngaarden, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The pure rotational spectra of 2- and 3-fluorobenzaldehyde have been investigated using a chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer in the range of 8-18 GHz and a Balle-Flygare FTMW spectrometer in the range of 4-26 GHz. As in a previous study of monofluorobenzaldehydes, only transitions due to a single planar conformer were observed for 2-fluorobenzaldehyde (O-trans) whereas two planar conformers (O-trans and O-cis) of 3-fluorobenzaldehydes were confirmed. Transitions due to the seven unique ^{13}C isotopologues of each of the three molecules have been observed for the first time. Their rotational constants were used to derive the effective ground state (r_{0}) and substitution (r_{s}) structures. The results compare favourably with the equilibrium (r_{e}) geometries which were determined following geometry optimization at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. José L. Alonso and Rosa M. Villamañán, J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 2, 1989, 85(2), 137-149

  7. Molecular structure investigation of organic cocrystals of 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione with aryloxyacetic acid: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, G S; Muthu Prabhu, A Antony; Bhuvanesh, N; Ronica, X A V; Kumaresan, S

    2014-11-11

    Two organic cocrystals namely, 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione:2-naphthoxyacetic acid [(phendione)(2-naa)] (1) and 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione:2-formylphenoxyacetic acid [(phendione)(2-fpaa)] (2) were synthesized and studied by single crystal XRD, FT-IR, NMR, thermogravimetric, and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The molecular properties of cocrystals were studied using density functional theory (DFT), basis set B3LYP/6-31G(d,p). Both cocrystals are stabilized through intermolecular hydrogen bonding (OH⋯N). The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the cocrystals were constructed by NBO analysis using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method to display the electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO was measured for both cocrystals.

  8. Molecular structure investigation of organic cocrystals of 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione with aryloxyacetic acid: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Kumar, G. S.; Antony Muthu Prabhu, A.; Bhuvanesh, N.; Ronica, X. A. V.; Kumaresan, S.

    2014-11-01

    Two organic cocrystals namely, 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione:2-naphthoxyacetic acid [(phendione)(2-naa)] (1) and 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione:2-formylphenoxyacetic acid [(phendione)(2-fpaa)] (2) were synthesized and studied by single crystal XRD, FT-IR, NMR, thermogravimetric, and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The molecular properties of cocrystals were studied using density functional theory (DFT), basis set B3LYP/6-31G(d,p). Both cocrystals are stabilized through intermolecular hydrogen bonding (Osbnd H⋯N). The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the cocrystals were constructed by NBO analysis using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method to display the electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO was measured for both cocrystals.

  9. Structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Li, Wei; Zhao, Song-Feng

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory (so called MO-ADK theory) for 22 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model.

  10. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-08-14

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation--a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation.

  11. Investigation of superlattice device structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gergis, I. S.; Manasevit, H. M.; Lin, A. L.; Jones, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the investigation of growth properties, and the structure of epitaxial multilayer Si(Si(1x)Ge(x)) films grown on bulk Silicon Substrates. It also describes the fabrication and characterization of MOSFET and MESFET devices made on these epitaxial films. Films were grown in a CVD reactor using hydrides of Si and Ge with H2 and He as carrier gases. Growth temperatures were between 900 C and 1050 C with most films grown at 1000 C. Layer thickness was between 300A and 2000A and total film thickness was between 0.25 micro m and 7 micro m. The Ge content (X) in the alloy layers was between .05 and 0.2. N-type multilayer films grown on (100) p-type Si showed Hall mobility in the range 1000 to 1500 sq cm/v for an average carrier concentration of approx. 10 to the 16th power/cu cm. This is up to 50% higher than the Hall mobility observed in epitaxial Si films grown under the same conditions and with the same average carrier concentration. The mobility enhancement occurred in films with average carrier concentration (n) from 0.7 x 10 to the 16th power to 2 x 10 to the 17th power/cu cm, and total film thickness greater than 1.0 micro m. No mobility enhancement was seen in n-type multilayer films grown on (111) Si or in p-type multilayer films. The structure of the films was investigated was using SEM, TEM, AES, SIMS, and X-ray double crystal diffraction techniques. The film composition profile (AES, SIMS) showed that the transition region between layers is of the order of about 100A. The TEM examination revealed a well defined layered structure with fairly sharp interfaces and good crystalline quality. It also showed that the first few layers of the film (closest to the substrate) are uneven, most probably due to the initial growth pattern of the epitaxial film where growth occurs first in isolated islands that eventually growth and coalesce. The X-ray diffraction measurement determined the elastic strain and strain relief in the alloy layers of the film

  12. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  13. Investigation of PDE5/PDE6 and PDE5/PDE11 selective potent tadalafil-like PDE5 inhibitors using combination of molecular modeling approaches, molecular fingerprint-based virtual screening protocols and structure-based pharmacophore development.

    PubMed

    Kayık, Gülru; Tüzün, Nurcan Ş; Durdagi, Serdar

    2017-12-01

    The essential biological function of phosphodiesterase (PDE) type enzymes is to regulate the cytoplasmic levels of intracellular second messengers, 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and/or 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). PDE targets have 11 isoenzymes. Of these enzymes, PDE5 has attracted a special attention over the years after its recognition as being the target enzyme in treating erectile dysfunction. Due to the amino acid sequence and the secondary structural similarity of PDE6 and PDE11 with the catalytic domain of PDE5, first-generation PDE5 inhibitors (i.e. sildenafil and vardenafil) are also competitive inhibitors of PDE6 and PDE11. Since the major challenge of designing novel PDE5 inhibitors is to decrease their cross-reactivity with PDE6 and PDE11, in this study, we attempt to identify potent tadalafil-like PDE5 inhibitors that have PDE5/PDE6 and PDE5/PDE11 selectivity. For this aim, the similarity-based virtual screening protocol is applied for the "clean drug-like subset of ZINC database" that contains more than 20 million small compounds. Moreover, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of selected hits complexed with PDE5 and off-targets were performed in order to get insights for structural and dynamical behaviors of the selected molecules as selective PDE5 inhibitors. Since tadalafil blocks hERG1 K channels in concentration dependent manner, the cardiotoxicity prediction of the hit molecules was also tested. Results of this study can be useful for designing of novel, safe and selective PDE5 inhibitors.

  14. An integrated experimental and theoretical investigation of the vibrational modes and molecular structure of a chelate, tetraaqua cysteine aluminum(III).

    PubMed

    Tenório, Thaís; Tenório, André

    2015-03-05

    The complex formed by Al(3+) and cysteine in aqueous solution has been studied by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations (DFT:B3LYP/6-311++G(∗∗)). Atomic charges, frontier molecular orbitals, electrostatic potential contour surface, electrostatic potential map and donor-acceptor second order perturbative energies were examined. The [Al(Cys)(H2O)4](2+) complex adopts a distorted octahedral geometry. Cysteine should act as a bidentate ligand through the oxygen of the carboxylate and the nitrogen of the amino group. The molecule has high HOMO-LUMO energy gap, intense intramolecular charge transfer and positive electrostatic potential.

  15. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-10-01

    The chemical structure of penicillin was determined between 1942 and 1945 under conditions of secrecy established by the U.S. and U.K. governments. The evidence was not published in the open literature but as a monograph. This complex volume does not present a structure proof that can be readily comprehended by a student. In this article, a basic structural proof for the penicillin molecule is provided, emphasizing the chemical work. The stereochemistry of penicillin is also described, and various rearrangements are considered on the basis of the accepted β-lactam structure.

  16. One Pot Selective Arylation of 2-Bromo-5-Chloro Thiophene; Molecular Structure Investigation via Density Functional Theory (DFT), X-ray Analysis, and Their Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Nasir; Kanwal, Aqsa; Rasheed, Tehmina; Ain, Quratulain; Mahmood, Tariq; Ayub, Khurshid; Zubair, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; M. Asiri, Abdullah; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of 2,5-bisarylthiophenes was accomplished by sequential Suzuki cross coupling reaction of 2-bromo-5-chloro thiophenes. Density functional theory (DFT) studies were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) level of theory to compare the geometric parameters of 2,5-bisarylthiophenes with those from X-ray diffraction results. The synthesized compounds are screened for in vitro bacteria scavenging abilities. At the concentration of 50 and 100 μg/mL, compounds 2b, 2c, 2d, 3c, and 3f with IC50-values of 51.4, 52.10, 58.0, 56.2, and 56.5 μg/mL respectively, were found most potent against E. coli. Among all the synthesized compounds 2a, 2d, 3c, and 3e with the least values of IC50 77, 76.26, 79.13 μg/mL respectively showed significant antioxidant activities. Almost all of the compounds showed good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas 2-chloro-5-(4-methoxyphenyl) thiophene (2b) was found most active among all synthesized compound with an IC50 value of 51.4 μg/mL. All of the synthesized compounds were screened for nitric oxide scavenging activity as well. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and molecular electrostatic potentials of the target compounds were also studied theoretically to account for their relative reactivity PMID:27367666

  17. One Pot Selective Arylation of 2-Bromo-5-Chloro Thiophene; Molecular Structure Investigation via Density Functional Theory (DFT), X-ray Analysis, and Their Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Nasir; Kanwal, Aqsa; Rasheed, Tehmina; Ain, Quratulain; Mahmood, Tariq; Ayub, Khurshid; Zubair, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; M Asiri, Abdullah; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2016-06-28

    Synthesis of 2,5-bisarylthiophenes was accomplished by sequential Suzuki cross coupling reaction of 2-bromo-5-chloro thiophenes. Density functional theory (DFT) studies were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) level of theory to compare the geometric parameters of 2,5-bisarylthiophenes with those from X-ray diffraction results. The synthesized compounds are screened for in vitro bacteria scavenging abilities. At the concentration of 50 and 100 μg/mL, compounds 2b, 2c, 2d, 3c, and 3f with IC50-values of 51.4, 52.10, 58.0, 56.2, and 56.5 μg/mL respectively, were found most potent against E. coli. Among all the synthesized compounds 2a, 2d, 3c, and 3e with the least values of IC50 77, 76.26, 79.13 μg/mL respectively showed significant antioxidant activities. Almost all of the compounds showed good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas 2-chloro-5-(4-methoxyphenyl) thiophene (2b) was found most active among all synthesized compound with an IC50 value of 51.4 μg/mL. All of the synthesized compounds were screened for nitric oxide scavenging activity as well. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and molecular electrostatic potentials of the target compounds were also studied theoretically to account for their relative reactivity.

  18. Molecular Contamination Investigation Facility (MCIF) Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soules, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This facility was used to guide the development of ASTM E 1559 center dot Multiple Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), large sample and spectral effects capability center dot Several instrumented, high vacuum chamber systems are used to evaluate the molecular outgassing characteristics of materials, flight components and other sensitive surfaces. Test materials for spacecraft/instrument selection center.Test flight components for acceptable molecular outgas levels center dot Determine time/temperature vacuum bake-out requirements center. Data used to set limits for use of materials and specific components center. Provide Input Data to Contamination Transport Models -Applied to numerous flight projects over the past 20 years.

  19. Molecular Contamination Investigation Facility (MCIF) Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soules, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This facility was used to guide the development of ASTM E 1559 center dot Multiple Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), large sample and spectral effects capability center dot Several instrumented, high vacuum chamber systems are used to evaluate the molecular outgassing characteristics of materials, flight components and other sensitive surfaces. Test materials for spacecraft/instrument selection center.Test flight components for acceptable molecular outgas levels center dot Determine time/temperature vacuum bake-out requirements center. Data used to set limits for use of materials and specific components center. Provide Input Data to Contamination Transport Models -Applied to numerous flight projects over the past 20 years.

  20. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  1. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  2. Adaptive modelling of structured molecular representations for toxicity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetto, Carlo; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Solaro, Roberto; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of modelling structure-toxicity relationships by direct treatment of the molecular structure (without using descriptors) through an adaptive model able to retain the appropriate structural information. With respect to traditional descriptor-based approaches, this provides a more general and flexible way to tackle prediction problems that is particularly suitable when little or no background knowledge is available. Our method employs a tree-structured molecular representation, which is processed by a recursive neural network (RNN). To explore the realization of RNN modelling in toxicological problems, we employed a data set containing growth impairment concentrations (IGC50) for Tetrahymena pyriformis.

  3. Molecular interactions investigated with DFT calculations of QTAIM and NBO analyses: An application to dimeric structures of rice α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astani, Elahe K.; Hadipour, Nasser L.; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2017-03-01

    Characterization of the dimer interactions at the dimeric interface of the crystal structure of rice α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (RASI) were performed using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and natural bonding orbital (NBO) analyses at the density-functional theory (DFT) level. The results revealed that Gly27 and Arg151 of chain A are the main residues involved in hydrogen bonds, dipole-dipole, and charge-dipole interactions with Gly64, Ala66, Ala67 and Arg81 of chain B at the dimeric interface. Calcium ion of chain A plays the significant role in the stability of the dimeric structure through a strong charge-charge interaction with Ala66.

  4. Molecular and Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopthy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopthy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopthy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of CTE will be performed

  5. Structured Molecular Gas Reveals Galactic Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 13CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  6. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Koda, Jin

    2012-11-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  7. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  8. Investigation of the dominant hydration structures among the ionic species in aqueous solution: Novel quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations combined with the theory of energy representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Ohno, Hajime; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kishi, Ryohei; Furukawa, Shin-ichi; Nakano, Masayoshi; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2008-02-01

    In the present work, we have performed quantum chemical calculations to determine preferable species among the ionic complexes that are present in ambient water due to the autodissociation of water molecule. First, we have formulated the relative population of the hydrated complexes with respect to the bare ion (H3O+ or OH -) in terms of the solvation free energies of the relevant molecules. The solvation free energies for various ionic species (H3O+, H5O2+, H7O3+, H9O4+ or OH -, H3O2-, H5O3-, H7O4-, H9O5-), categorized as proton or hydroxide ion in solution, have been computed by employing the QM/MM-ER method recently developed by combining the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach with the theory of energy representation (ER). Then, the computed solvation free energies have been used to evaluate the ratio of the populations of the ionic complexes to that of the bare ion (H3O+ or OH -). Our results suggest that the Zundel form, i.e., H5O2+, is the most preferable in the solution among the cationic species listed above though the Eigen form (H9O4+) is very close to the Zundel complex in the free energy, while the anionic fragment from water molecules mostly takes the form of OH -. It has also been found that the loss of the translational entropy of water molecules associated with the formation of the complex plays a role in determining the preferable size of the cluster.

  9. NBO, NMR, UV, FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra and molecular structure (monomeric and dimeric structures) investigation of 4-Chloro-3,5-Xylenol: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, M.; Gayathri, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, a joint experimental (FTIR and FT-Raman) and theoretical (DFT and ab initio) study on the structure and the vibrations of 4-Chloro-3,5-Xylenol (CXL) are compared and analyzed. CXL is a chlorinated phenolic antiseptic which is a bactericide against most gram-positive bacteria. The first hyperpolarizability (β0) of this novel molecular system and related non-linear properties of CXL are calculated using HF/6-311++G(d,p) method on the finite-field approach. The energy and oscillator strength calculated using absorption spectra (UV-Vis spectrum), this spectral analysis confirms the charge transfer of the molecule. The theoretical 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method, to analyze the molecular environment as well as the delocalization activities of electron clouds. The directly calculated ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), electronegativity (χ), chemical hardness (η), first electron excitation energy (τ) and electrophilicity index (ω) as well as local reactivity (S) analyzed using HOMO and LUMO energies; the energy band gap are also determined. NBO analysis shows that charge in electron density(ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and E(2) energies confirms the occurrence of ICT (Intramolecular Charge Transfer) within the molecule. Inter molecular hydrogen bonds exist between -OH group, give the evidence for the formation of dimer entities in the title molecule. The influences of chlorine atom, hydroxyl group and methyl group on the geometry of benzene and its normal modes of vibrations (monomer and dimer of CXL) have also been discussed. Finally the calculated results were applied to simulate Infrared and Raman spectra of the title molecule which show good agreement with observed spectra.

  10. NBO, NMR, UV, FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra and molecular structure (monomeric and dimeric structures) investigation of 4-Chloro-3,5-Xylenol: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Arivazhagan, M; Gayathri, R

    2013-12-01

    In this work, a joint experimental (FTIR and FT-Raman) and theoretical (DFT and ab initio) study on the structure and the vibrations of 4-Chloro-3,5-Xylenol (CXL) are compared and analyzed. CXL is a chlorinated phenolic antiseptic which is a bactericide against most gram-positive bacteria. The first hyperpolarizability (β0) of this novel molecular system and related non-linear properties of CXL are calculated using HF/6-311++G(d,p) method on the finite-field approach. The energy and oscillator strength calculated using absorption spectra (UV-Vis spectrum), this spectral analysis confirms the charge transfer of the molecule. The theoretical (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method, to analyze the molecular environment as well as the delocalization activities of electron clouds. The directly calculated ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), electronegativity (χ), chemical hardness (η), first electron excitation energy (τ) and electrophilicity index (ω) as well as local reactivity (S) analyzed using HOMO and LUMO energies; the energy band gap are also determined. NBO analysis shows that charge in electron density(ED) in the σ(*) and π(*) antibonding orbitals and E((2)) energies confirms the occurrence of ICT (Intramolecular Charge Transfer) within the molecule. Inter molecular hydrogen bonds exist between -OH group, give the evidence for the formation of dimer entities in the title molecule. The influences of chlorine atom, hydroxyl group and methyl group on the geometry of benzene and its normal modes of vibrations (monomer and dimer of CXL) have also been discussed. Finally the calculated results were applied to simulate Infrared and Raman spectra of the title molecule which show good agreement with observed spectra. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental Investigations of Transport and Optical Properties of III-V Quantum Well Structures Grown Via Molecular Beam Epitaxy Under Optimal Growth Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    March, 1988, Newport Beach Mariott Hotel , CA). 4. W.C Tang, Pudong Lao, and A. Madhukar, "Optical Investigation of Resonant Mixing Between Electronic...and Device Applications", (13-18 March, 1988, Newport Beach Mariott Hotel , CA). III. ST JDENTS/POST-DO CS TRAINED: 1. Mr. Nam-Min Cho (Ph.D. Oct. 1988...Semiconductors and Superconductors: Physics and Device Applications" (13-18 March, 1988, Newport Beach Mario« Hotel , CA), SPIE Vol. 946, p.150 (1988

  12. ESR and X-ray Structure Investigations on the Binding and Mechanism of Inhibition of the Native State of Myeloperoxidase with Low Molecular Weight Fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Chavali, Balagopalakrishna; Masquelin, Thierry; Nilges, Mark J.; Timm, David E.; Stout, Stephanie L.; Matter, William F.; Jin, Najia; Jadhav, Prabhakar K.; Deng, Gary G.

    2015-05-19

    As an early visitor to the injured loci, neutrophil-derived human Myeloperoxidase (hMPO) offers an attractive protein target to modulate the inflammation of the host tissue through suitable inhibitors. We describe a novel methodology of using low temperature ESR spectroscopy (6 K) and FAST™ technology to screen a diverse series of small molecules that inhibit the peroxidase function through reversible binding to the native state of MPO. Also, our initial efforts to profile molecules on the inhibition of MPO-initiated nitration of the Apo-A1 peptide (AEYHAKATEHL) assay showed several potent (with sub-micro molar IC50s) but spurious inhibitors that either do not bind to the heme pocket in the enzyme or retain high (>50 %) anti oxidant potential. Such molecules when taken forward for X-ray did not yield inhibitor-bound co-crystals. We then used ESR to confirm direct binding to the native state enzyme, by measuring the binding-induced shift in the electronic parameter g to rank order the molecules. Molecules with a higher rank order—those with g-shift Rrelative ≥15—yielded well-formed protein-bound crystals (n = 33 structures). The co-crystal structure with the LSN217331 inhibitor reveals that the chlorophenyl group projects away from the heme along the edges of the Phe366 and Phe407 side chain phenyl rings thereby sterically restricting the access to the heme by the substrates like H2O2. Both ESR and antioxidant screens were used to derive the mechanism of action (reversibility, competitive substrate inhibition, and percent antioxidant potential). In conclusion, our results point to a viable path forward to target the native state of MPO to tame local inflammation.

  13. ESR and X-ray Structure Investigations on the Binding and Mechanism of Inhibition of the Native State of Myeloperoxidase with Low Molecular Weight Fragments

    DOE PAGES

    Chavali, Balagopalakrishna; Masquelin, Thierry; Nilges, Mark J.; ...

    2015-05-19

    As an early visitor to the injured loci, neutrophil-derived human Myeloperoxidase (hMPO) offers an attractive protein target to modulate the inflammation of the host tissue through suitable inhibitors. We describe a novel methodology of using low temperature ESR spectroscopy (6 K) and FAST™ technology to screen a diverse series of small molecules that inhibit the peroxidase function through reversible binding to the native state of MPO. Also, our initial efforts to profile molecules on the inhibition of MPO-initiated nitration of the Apo-A1 peptide (AEYHAKATEHL) assay showed several potent (with sub-micro molar IC50s) but spurious inhibitors that either do not bindmore » to the heme pocket in the enzyme or retain high (>50 %) anti oxidant potential. Such molecules when taken forward for X-ray did not yield inhibitor-bound co-crystals. We then used ESR to confirm direct binding to the native state enzyme, by measuring the binding-induced shift in the electronic parameter g to rank order the molecules. Molecules with a higher rank order—those with g-shift Rrelative ≥15—yielded well-formed protein-bound crystals (n = 33 structures). The co-crystal structure with the LSN217331 inhibitor reveals that the chlorophenyl group projects away from the heme along the edges of the Phe366 and Phe407 side chain phenyl rings thereby sterically restricting the access to the heme by the substrates like H2O2. Both ESR and antioxidant screens were used to derive the mechanism of action (reversibility, competitive substrate inhibition, and percent antioxidant potential). In conclusion, our results point to a viable path forward to target the native state of MPO to tame local inflammation.« less

  14. Structure investigations on oxygen fluorides.

    PubMed

    Marx, Rupert; Seppelt, Konrad

    2015-12-07

    The crystal structure of O2F2 is obtained at -180 °C. In the solid state the molecule has the typical hydrogen peroxide structure that has been established long ago by electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy. OF2 melts at -223.8 °C, so its structure is determined by powder X-ray data. The structure differs from the solid state structures of ozone and Br2O. O2F in its dissolved form as O2(+) HnFn+1(-) oxidizes palladium to the four valence state, as found some time ago. The first product formed at low temperatures is (O2(+)H3Pd2F12(-))n.

  15. Structures in Molecular Clouds: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D

    2006-04-20

    We attempt to predict the observed morphology, column density and velocity gradient of Pillar II of the Eagle Nebula, using Rayleigh Taylor (RT) models in which growth is seeded by an initial perturbation in density or in shape of the illuminated surface, and cometary models in which structure is arises from a initially spherical cloud with a dense core. Attempting to mitigate suppression of RT growth by recombination, we use a large cylindrical model volume containing the illuminating source and the self-consistently evolving ablated outflow and the photon flux field, and use initial clouds with finite lateral extent. An RT model shows no growth, while a cometary model appears to be more successful at reproducing observations.

  16. Structure investigations of group 13 organometallic carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Justyniak, Iwona; Prochowicz, Daniel; Tulewicz, Adam; Bury, Wojciech; Goś, Piotr; Lewiński, Janusz

    2017-01-17

    The octet-compliant group 13 organometallics with highly polarized bonds in the metal coordination sphere exhibit a significant tendency to maximize their coordination number through the formation of adducts with a wide range of neutral donor ligands or by self-association to give aggregates containing tetrahedral and higher coordinated aluminium centres, and even in some cases molecular complexes equilibrate with ionic species of different coordination numbers of the metal centre. This work provides a comprehensive overview of the structural chemistry landscape of the group 13 carboxylates. Aside from a more systematic approach to the general structural chemistry of the title compounds, the structure investigations of [R2M(μ-O2CPh)]2-type benzoate complexes (where M = B, Al and Ga) and their Lewis acid-base adducts [(R2M)(μ-O2CPh)(py-Me)] are reported. DFT calculations were also performed to obtain a more in-depth understanding of both the changes in the bonding of group 13 organometallic carboxylate adducts with a pyridine ligand.

  17. A molecular phylogenetic investigation of zoothamnium (ciliophora, peritrichia, sessilida).

    PubMed

    Clamp, John C; Williams, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The gene coding for 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssu rRNA) was sequenced in seven free-living, marine species of the sessiline peritrich genus Zoothamnium. These were Zoothamnium niveum, Zoothamnium alternans, Zoothamnium pelagicum, and four unidentified species. The ssu rRNA gene also was sequenced in Vorticella convallaria, Vorticella microstoma, and in an unidentified, freshwater species of Vorticella. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using these new sequences to test a previously published phylogenetic association between Zoothamnium arbuscula, currently in the family Zoothamniidae, and peritrichs in the family Vorticellidae. Trees constructed by means of neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference methods all had similar topologies. The seven new sequences of Zoothamnium species grouped into three well-supported clades, each of which contained a diversity of morphological types. The three clades formed a poorly supported, larger clade that was deeply divergent from Z. arbuscula, which remained more closely associated with vorticellid peritrichs. It is apparent that Zoothamnium is a richly diverse genus and that a much more intensive investigation, involving both morphological and molecular data and a wider selection of species, will be necessary to resolve its phylogeny. A greater amount of molecular diversity than is predicted by morphological data exists within all major clades of sessiline peritrichs that have been included in molecular phylogenies, indicating that characteristics of stalk and peristomial structure traditionally used to differentiate taxa at the generic level and above may not be uniformly reliable.

  18. On the emergence of molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matyus, Edit; Reiher, Markus; Hutter, Juerg; Mueller-Herold, Ulrich

    2011-05-15

    The structure of (a{sup {+-}},a{sup {+-}},b{sup {+-}})-type Coulombic systems is characterized by the effective ground-state density of the a-type particles, computed via nonrelativistic quantum mechanics without introduction of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A structural transition is observed when varying the relative mass of the a- and b-type particles, e.g., between atomic H{sup -} and molecular H{sub 2}{sup +}. The particle-density profile indicates a molecular-type behavior for the positronium ion, Ps{sup -}.

  19. Reverse engineering chemical structures from molecular descriptors : how many solutions?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-06-01

    Physical, chemical and biological properties are the ultimate information of interest for chemical compounds. Molecular descriptors that map structural information to activities and properties are obvious candidates for information sharing. In this paper, we consider the feasibility of using molecular descriptors to safely exchange chemical information in such a way that the original chemical structures cannot be reverse engineered. To investigate the safety of sharing such descriptors, we compute the degeneracy (the number of structure matching a descriptor value) of several 2D descriptors, and use various methods to search for and reverse engineer structures. We examine degeneracy in the entire chemical space taking descriptors values from the alkane isomer series and the PubChem database. We further use a stochastic search to retrieve structures matching specific topological index values. Finally, we investigate the safety of exchanging of fragmental descriptors using deterministic enumeration.

  20. Speculations on the molecular structure of eumelanin.

    PubMed

    Swift, J A

    2009-04-01

    Eumelanin is the polymeric black pigment commonly found in hair and skin. Its chemical intractability, to all but vigorous oxidizing agents, has hindered satisfactory understanding of its molecular structure. It is well-established that the immediate precursor to polymerization, indole-5,6-quinone (IQ), is biosynthesized from the amino acid tyrosine. Current views are that the polymer consists of single bond connections between random indole and degraded indole units. In this paper, an alternative chemical scheme for the polymerization of IQ is proposed based upon the original suggestion by Horner in 1949 that a Diels-Alder (D-A) reaction might be involved. The proposed basic chemical scheme for eumelanin formation is that D-A addition occurs specifically between the 2- and 3-positions of one IQ molecule and the 7- and 4- positions respectively of a second IQ molecule, that the ensuing diketo bridge is oxidized to carboxyl groups and that, by decarboxylation and aromatization, a fused indole dimer is produced. It is envisaged that, by further D-A addition of more IQ molecules, oligomers of greater molecular mass are produced. Calculations based on published bond lengths and angles for the indole nucleus show that oligomeric units containing a total of up to 11 fused indoles could be packed into a flat circular disc of 20 A diameter. The discs of the extensively conjugated polymer are envisaged to be stacked above each other by pi-pi interaction and with a spacing of 3.4 A to produce cylindrical units, the mass density of which is calculated to be 1.54 gm cm(-3); approximating with actual physical measurements. The size and shape of the predicted cylinders are in concordance with those observed in atomic force microscope investigations of eumelanin proto-particles. The model is also in agreement with published experimental data that 2/3rds of the carbon dioxide liberated during eumelanin formation derives from positions 5- and 6- of the IQ molecule.

  1. Molecular docking to ensembles of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Knegtel, R M; Kuntz, I D; Oshiro, C M

    1997-02-21

    Until recently, applications of molecular docking assumed that the macromolecular receptor exists in a single, rigid conformation. However, structural studies involving different ligands bound to the same target biomolecule frequently reveal modest but significant conformational changes in the target. In this paper, two related methods for molecular docking are described that utilize information on conformational variability from ensembles of experimental receptor structures. One method combines the information into an "energy-weighted average" of the interaction energy between a ligand and each receptor structure. The other method performs the averaging on a structural level, producing a "geometry-weighted average" of the inter-molecular force field score used in DOCK 3.5. Both methods have been applied in docking small molecules to ensembles of crystal and solution structures, and we show that experimentally determined binding orientations and computed energies of known ligands can be reproduced accurately. The use of composite grids, when conformationally different protein structures are available, yields an improvement in computational speed for database searches in proportion to the number of structures.

  2. Investigation of polycapillary structures transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertov, Yuri P.

    2002-07-01

    For technological proces of polycapillary produciotn and for their further use it is necessary to know x-ray radiation transmission by polycapillary structures and its dependence on quanta energy. For this purpose special installation was assembled, technique was worked out and measurements were carried out. This paper incldues a description of the set-up, details the process of measurement and covers the outcome results.

  3. Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziatdinov, Maxim; Maksov, Artem; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in high resolution scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have allowed researchers to perform measurements of materials structural parameters and functional properties in real space with a picometre precision. In many technologically relevant atomic and/or molecular systems, however, the information of interest is distributed spatially in a non-uniform manner and may have a complex multi-dimensional nature. One of the critical issues, therefore, lies in being able to accurately identify (`read out') all the individual building blocks in different atomic/molecular architectures, as well as more complex patterns that these blocks may form, on a scale of hundreds and thousands of individual atomic/molecular units. Here we employ machine vision to read and recognize complex molecular assemblies on surfaces. Specifically, we combine Markov random field model and convolutional neural networks to classify structural and rotational states of all individual building blocks in molecular assembly on the metallic surface visualized in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We show how the obtained full decoding of the system allows us to directly construct a pair density function—a centerpiece in analysis of disorder-property relationship paradigm—as well as to analyze spatial correlations between multiple order parameters at the nanoscale, and elucidate reaction pathway involving molecular conformation changes. The method represents a significant shift in our way of analyzing atomic and/or molecular resolved microscopic images and can be applied to variety of other microscopic measurements of structural, electronic, and magnetic orders in different condensed matter systems.

  4. Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision

    DOE PAGES

    Ziatdinov, Maxim; Maksov, Artem; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-08-10

    Recent advances in high resolution scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have allowed researchers to perform measurements of materials structural parameters and functional properties in real space with a picometre precision. In many technologically relevant atomic and/or molecular systems, however, the information of interest is distributed spatially in a non-uniform manner and may have a complex multi-dimensional nature. One of the critical issues, therefore, lies in being able to accurately identify (‘read out’) all the individual building blocks in different atomic/molecular architectures, as well as more complex patterns that these blocks may form, on a scale of hundreds andmore » thousands of individual atomic/molecular units. Here we employ machine vision to read and recognize complex molecular assemblies on surfaces. Specifically, we combine Markov random field model and convolutional neural networks to classify structural and rotational states of all individual building blocks in molecular assembly on the metallic surface visualized in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We show how the obtained full decoding of the system allows us to directly construct a pair density function—a centerpiece in analysis of disorder-property relationship paradigm—as well as to analyze spatial correlations between multiple order parameters at the nanoscale, and elucidate reaction pathway involving molecular conformation changes. Here, the method represents a significant shift in our way of analyzing atomic and/or molecular resolved microscopic images and can be applied to variety of other microscopic measurements of structural, electronic, and magnetic orders in different condensed matter systems.« less

  5. Investigation of coal structure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Masaharu

    1994-03-01

    A better understanding of coal structure is the first step toward more effective utilization of the most abundant hydrocarbon resource. Detailed characterization of coal structure is very difficult, even with today`s highly developed analytical techniques. This is primarily due to the amorphous nature of these high-molecular-weight mixtures. Coal has a polymeric character and has been popularly represented as a three-dimensional cross-linked network. There is, however, little or no information which positively verifies this model. The principal objective of this research was to further investigate the physical structure of coal and to determine the extent to which coal molecules may be covalently cross-linked and/or physically associated. Two common characterization methods, swellability and extractability, were used. A technique modifying the conventional swelling procedure was established to better determine network or associated model conformation. A new method for evaluating coal swelling involving laser scattering has also been developed. The charge-transfer interaction is relatively strong in high-volatile bituminous coal. Soaking in the presence of electron donors and acceptors proved effective for solubilizing the coal, but temperatures in excess of 200 C were required. More than 70 wt% of the coal was readily extracted with pyridine after soaking. Associative/dissociative equilibria of coal molecules were observed during soaking. From these results, the associated model has gained credibility over the network model as the representative structure of coal. Significant portions of coal molecules are unquestionably physically associated, but the overall extent is not known at this time.

  6. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  7. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  8. How We Teach Molecular Structure to Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Michael O.

    2002-01-01

    Currently molecular structure is taught in general chemistry using three theories, this being based more on historical development rather than logical pedagogy. Electronegativity is taught with a confusing mixture of definitions that do not correspond to modern practice. Valence bond theory and VSEPR are used together in a way that often confuses…

  9. Structural investigation of hybrid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Celso, F.; Triolo, A.; Negroni, F.; Hainbuchner, M.; Baron, M.; Strunz, P.; Rauch, H.; Triolo, R.

    Ultra small (USANS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques were employed to study an elastomer styrene-butadiene, where two kinds of silica fillers have been added in different amounts. Small silica-particle fillers are expected to modify morphological and mechanical properties when dispersed in the copolymer matrix. The USANS and SANS techniques can span a wide range of momentum transfer, investigating morphological properties of the filled elastomer over a number of decades in length scale. Surface and mass fractal behavior has been observed over different length scales.

  10. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  11. Electronic structure investigations of quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, E.; Theis, W.; Horn, K.

    2004-08-01

    We present a review of the determination of density of states (DOS) of quasicrystals using valence band photoemission spectroscopy. The absence of fine or spiky structure in the angle-integrated DOS of quasicrystals suggests the possibility of delocalized electronic states. These were confirmed with angle-resolved photoemission studies, which clearly establish the presence of dispersing features attributed to momentum-dependent bandstructure. Such dispersing states are observed not only for deeper-lying sp states, but also for d-derived bands near the Fermi level. Data from three different high symmetry surfaces of decagonal Al-Ni-Co, an ideal model system, are presented. We find that only a few dominant reciprocal lattice vectors are sufficient to describe the quasiperiodic potential, and the implications for electronic properties are discussed.

  12. Quantum-chemical investigations of small molecular anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botschwina, P.; Seeger, S.; Mladenović, M.; Schulz, B.; Horn, M.; Schmatz, S.; Flügge, J.; Oswald, R.

    Dedicated to Dr Gerhard Herzberg on the occasion of his 90th birthday Recent large-scale ab initio calculations for small negative molecular ions are reviewed. Accurate equilibrium geometries are established for several species like NH2-, HCC-, NO2-, CH2N- C5- and C6-. Predictions are made for various spectroscopic properties like vibrational frequencies, rotational constants and infrared intensities. The effects of a shallow energy minimum in the T-shaped configuration on the rovibrational term energies of HCC - are investigated. The calculated vibrational structures of the photoelectron spectra of SiH3- and CH2N - are in very good agreement with the experiment. The present calculations support the assignment of an absorption observed at 608 nm in a neon matrix to the

  13. Structural and electronic properties of Si n, Si n+, and AlSi n-1 (n=2-13) clusters: theoretical investigation based on ab initio molecular orbital theory.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Sandeep; Majumder, Chiranjib; Kulshreshtha, S K

    2004-10-22

    The geometric and electronic structures of Si(n), Si(n) (+), and AlSi(n-1) clusters (2< or =n< or =13) have been investigated using the ab initio molecular orbital theory under the density functional theory formalism. The hybrid exchange-correlation energy function (B3LYP) and a standard split-valence basis set with polarization functions [6-31G(d)] were employed for this purpose. Relative stabilities of these clusters have been analyzed based on their binding energies, second difference in energy (Delta (2)E) and fragmentation behavior. The equilibrium geometry of the neutral and charged Si(n) clusters show similar structural growth. However, significant differences have been observed in the electronic structure leading to their different stability pattern. While for neutral clusters, the Si(10) is magic, the extra stability of the Si(11) (+) cluster over the Si(10) (+) and Si(12) (+) bears evidence for the magic behavior of the Si(11) (+) cluster, which is in excellent agreement with the recent experimental observations. Similarly for AlSi(n-1) clusters, which is isoelectronic with Si(n) (+) clusters show extra stability of the AlSi(10) cluster suggesting the influence of the electronic structures for different stabilities between neutral and charged clusters. The ground state geometries of the AlSi(n-1) clusters show that the impurity Al atom prefers to substitute for the Si atom, that has the highest coordination number in the host Si(n) cluster. The fragmentation behavior of all these clusters show that while small clusters prefers to evaporate monomer, the larger ones dissociate into two stable clusters of smaller size.

  14. Synthesis, molecular structure, FT-IR, Raman, XRD and theoretical investigations of (2E)-1-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidan Kumar, Chandraju Sadolalu; Fun, Hoong Kun; Parlak, Cemal; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Tursun, Mahir; Chandraju, Siddegowda; Quah, Ching Kheng

    2014-11-01

    A novel (2E)-1-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one [C17H11ClOS] compound has been synthesized and its structure has been characterized by FT-IR, Raman and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The isomers, optimized geometrical parameters, normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments of the compound have been examined by means of the density functional theory method, employing, the Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and the 6-311+G(3df,p) basis set. Reliable vibrational assignments and molecular orbitals have been investigated by the potential energy distribution and natural bonding orbital analyses, respectively. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with the unit cell parameters a = 5.7827(8) Å, b = 14.590(2) Å, c = 16.138(2) Å and β = 89.987 (°). The Cdbnd C bond of the central enone group adopts an E configuration. There is a good agreement between the theoretically predicted structural parameters and vibrational frequencies and those obtained experimentally.

  15. Synthesis, molecular structure, FT-IR, Raman, XRD and theoretical investigations of (2E)-1-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one.

    PubMed

    Chidan Kumar, Chandraju Sadolalu; Fun, Hoong Kun; Parlak, Cemal; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Tursun, Mahir; Chandraju, Siddegowda; Quah, Ching Kheng

    2014-11-11

    A novel (2E)-1-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one [C17H11ClOS] compound has been synthesized and its structure has been characterized by FT-IR, Raman and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The isomers, optimized geometrical parameters, normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments of the compound have been examined by means of the density functional theory method, employing, the Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and the 6-311+G(3df,p) basis set. Reliable vibrational assignments and molecular orbitals have been investigated by the potential energy distribution and natural bonding orbital analyses, respectively. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2₁/c with the unit cell parameters a=5.7827(8)Å, b=14.590(2)Å, c=16.138(2)Å and β=89.987 (°). The CC bond of the central enone group adopts an E configuration. There is a good agreement between the theoretically predicted structural parameters and vibrational frequencies and those obtained experimentally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. S.; Cong, H.; Dame, T. M.; Thaddeus, P.

    1980-01-01

    Two large-scale 2.6 mm CO surveys of the galactic plane, one in the first quadrant (l = 12 to 60 deg, b = -1 to +1 deg), the other in the second (l = 105 to 139 deg, b = -3 to +3 deg), have provided evidence that, contrary to previous findings, molecular clouds constitute a highly specific tracer of spiral structure. Molecular counterparts of five of the classical 21-cm spiral arms have been identified: the Perseus arm, the local arm (including Lindblad's local expanding ring), the Sagittarius arm, the Scutum arm, and the 4-kpc arm. The region between the local arm and the Perseus arm is apparently devoid of molecular clouds, and the interarm regions of the inner Galaxy appear largely so. CO spiral structure implies that the mean lifetime of molecular clouds cannot be greater than 100 million years, the time required for interstellar matter to cross a spiral arm. Conservation of mass then sets a limit on the fraction of the interstellar medium in the form of molecular clouds: it cannot exceed one-half at any distance from the galactic center in the range 4-12 kpc.

  17. The Global Coronal Structure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1998-01-01

    During the past year we have completed the changeover from the NIXT program to the new TXI sounding rocket program. The NIXT effort, aimed at evaluating the viability of the remaining portions of the NIXT hardware and design, has been finished and the portions of the NIXT which are viable and flightworthy, such as filters, mirror mounting hardware, electronics and telemetry interface systems, are now part of the new rocket payload. The backup NIXT multilayer-coated x-ray telescope and its mounting hardware have been completely fabricated and are being stored for possible future use in the TXI rocket. The H-alpha camera design is being utilized in the TXI program for real-time pointing verification and control via telemetry. A new H-alpha camera has been built, with a high-resolution RS170 CCD camera output. Two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, have been written and published this year: 1. "The Solar X-ray Corona," by L. Golub, Astrophysics and Space Science, 237, 33 (1996). 2. "Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure," Keynote Paper, Proceedings STEPWG1 Workshop on Measurements and Analyses of the Solar 3D Magnetic Field, Solar Physics, 174, 99 (1997).

  18. How We Teach Molecular Structure to Freshmen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Michael O.

    2002-06-01

    Currently molecular structure is taught in general chemistry using three theories, this being based more on historical development rather than logical pedagogy. Electronegativity is taught with a confusing mixture of definitions that do not correspond to modern practice. Explaining bond type with electronegativity is also done poorly. Teaching of valence bond theory and molecular orbital theory should be left to upper-level classes where it will be used. Currently, valence bond theory and VSEPR are used together in a way that often confuses the students about the difference between the different theories.

  19. Structural effects in molecular metal halides.

    PubMed

    Hargittai, Magdolna

    2009-03-17

    Metal halides are a relatively large class of inorganic compounds that participate in many industrial processes, from halogen metallurgy to the production of semiconductors. Because most metal halides are ionic crystals at ambient conditions, the term "molecular metal halides" usually refers to vapor-phase species. These gas-phase molecules have a special place in basic research because they exhibit the widest range of chemical bonding from the purely ionic to mostly covalent bonding through to weakly interacting systems. Although our focus is basic research, knowledge of the structural and thermodynamic properties of gas-phase metal halides is also important in industrial processes. In this Account, we review our most recent work on metal halide molecular structures. Our studies are based on electron diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, and increasingly, we have augmented our experimental work with quantum chemical computations. Using both experimental and computational techniques has enabled us to determine intriguing structural effects with better accuracy than using either technique alone. We loosely group our discussion based on structural effects including "floppiness", relativistic effects, vibronic interactions, and finally, undiscovered molecules with computational thermodynamic stability. Floppiness, or serious "nonrigidity", is a typical characteristic of metal halides and makes their study challenging for both experimentalists and theoreticians. Relativistic effects are mostly responsible for the unique structure of gold and mercury halides. These molecules have shorter-than-expected bonds and often have unusual geometrical configurations. The gold monohalide and mercury dihalide dimers and the molecular-type crystal structure of HgCl(2) are examples. We also examined spin-orbit coupling and the possible effect of the 4f electrons on the structure of lanthanide trihalides. Unexpectedly, we found that the geometry of their dimers depends on the f

  20. Structural and electronic properties of Si(n), Si(n)-, and PSi(n-1) clusters (2 < or = n < or = 13): Theoretical investigation based on ab initio molecular orbital theory.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Sandeep; Majumder, Chiranjib; Kulshreshtha, S K

    2006-08-21

    The geometric and electronic structures of Si(n), Si(n)-, and PSi(n-1) clusters (2 < or = n < or = 13) have been investigated using the ab initio molecular orbital theory formalism. The hybrid exchange-correlation energy functional (B3LYP) and a standard split-valence basis set with polarization functions (6-31+G(d)) were employed to optimize geometrical configurations. The total energies of the lowest energy isomers thus obtained were recalculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. Unlike positively charged clusters, which showed similar structural behavior as that of neutral clusters [Nigam et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 7756 (2004)], significant geometrical changes were observed between Si(n) and Si(n)- clusters for n = 6, 8, 11, and 13. However, the geometries of P substituted silicon clusters show similar growth as that of negatively charged Si(n) clusters with small local distortions. The relative stability as a function of cluster size has been verified based on their binding energies, second difference in energy (Delta2 E), and fragmentation behavior. In general, the average binding energy of Si(n)- clusters is found to be higher than that of Si(n) clusters. For isoelectronic PSi(n-1) clusters, it is found that although for small clusters (n < 4) substitution of P atom improves the binding energy of Si(n) clusters, for larger clusters (n > or = 4) the effect is opposite. The fragmentation behavior of these clusters reveals that while small clusters prefer to evaporate monomer, the larger ones dissociate into two stable clusters of smaller size. The adiabatic electron affinities of Si(n) clusters and vertical detachment energies of Si(n)- clusters were calculated and compared with available experimental results. Finally, a good agreement between experimental and our theoretical results suggests good prediction of the lowest energy isomeric structures for all clusters calculated in the present study.

  1. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Zanoni, R.; Stranges, S.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-04-07

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the {sigma}/{pi} hyperconjugation in EtFC and the {pi}-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  2. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Stranges, S.; Zanoni, R.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the σ/π hyperconjugation in EtFC and the π-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  3. Creep rupture of fiber bundles: A molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Linga, G; Ballone, P; Hansen, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The creep deformation and eventual breaking of polymeric samples under a constant tensile load F is investigated by molecular dynamics based on a particle representation of the fiber bundle model. The results of the virtual testing of fibrous samples consisting of 40000 particles arranged on Nc=400 chains reproduce characteristic stages seen in the experimental investigations of creep in polymeric materials. A logarithmic plot of the bundle lifetime τ versus load F displays a marked curvature, ruling out a simple power-law dependence of τ on F. A power law τ∼F-4, however, is recovered at high load. We discuss the role of reversible bond breaking and formation on the eventual fate of the sample and simulate a different type of creep testing, imposing a constant stress rate on the sample up to its breaking point. Our simulations, relying on a coarse-grained representation of the polymer structure, introduce new features into the standard fiber bundle model, such as real-time dynamics, inertia, and entropy, and open the way to more detailed models, aiming at material science aspects of polymeric fibers, investigated within a sound statistical mechanics framework.

  4. Creep rupture of fiber bundles: A molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga, G.; Ballone, P.; Hansen, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The creep deformation and eventual breaking of polymeric samples under a constant tensile load F is investigated by molecular dynamics based on a particle representation of the fiber bundle model. The results of the virtual testing of fibrous samples consisting of 40 000 particles arranged on Nc=400 chains reproduce characteristic stages seen in the experimental investigations of creep in polymeric materials. A logarithmic plot of the bundle lifetime τ versus load F displays a marked curvature, ruling out a simple power-law dependence of τ on F . A power law τ ˜F-4 , however, is recovered at high load. We discuss the role of reversible bond breaking and formation on the eventual fate of the sample and simulate a different type of creep testing, imposing a constant stress rate on the sample up to its breaking point. Our simulations, relying on a coarse-grained representation of the polymer structure, introduce new features into the standard fiber bundle model, such as real-time dynamics, inertia, and entropy, and open the way to more detailed models, aiming at material science aspects of polymeric fibers, investigated within a sound statistical mechanics framework.

  5. Structure and dynamics of layered molecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Jennifer Conrad

    This dissertation focuses on the goal of understanding and controlling layered material properties from a molecular perspective. With this understanding, materials can be synthetically tailored to exhibit predetermined bulk properties. This investigation describes the optical response of a family of metal-phosphonate (MP) monolayers and multilayers, materials that are potentially useful because the films are easy to synthesize and are chemically and thermally stable. MP films have shown potential in a variety of chemical sensing and optical applications, and in this dissertation, the suitability of MP films for optical information storage is explored For this application, the extent of photonic energy transport within and between optically active layers is an important factor in determining the stability and specificity of optical modifications made to a material. Intralayer and interlayer energy transport processes can be studied selectively in MP films because the composition, and thus the properties, of each layer are controlled synthetically. It was determined by fluorescence relaxation dynamics in conjunction with atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the substrate and layer morphologies are key factors in determining the layer optical and physical properties. The initial MP layers in a multilayer are structurally heterogeneous, characterized by randomly distributed islands that are ~50 A in diameter. The population dynamics measured for these layers are non-exponential, chromophore concentration-independent, and identical for two different chromophores. The data is explained in the context of an excitation hopping model in a system where the surface is characterized by islands of aggregated chromophores as well as non-aggregated monomers. Within a MP monolayer, the dynamics are dominated by intra-island excitation hopping. Forster (dipolar) energy transfer between the energetically overlapped chromophores does not play a significant role in determining the

  6. Investigating the Structure of X(4140) in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dağ, H.; Türkan, A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the masses of the ground states coupling to molecular or tetraquark currents with JPC = 0++, 1++, 2++ are studied to investigate the structure of X(4140) exotic meson observed at J/ψϕ invariant mass spectrum. We found that all currents predict ground states with masses of the same magnitude, which might be inter-pereted as the existance of at least three exotic structures with degenerate mass.

  7. Investigation of high hole mobility In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Juan; Xing, Jun-Liang; Xiang, Wei; Wang, Guo-Wei; Xu, Ying-Qiang; Ren, Zheng-Wei; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-02-03

    Modulation-doped In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb quantum-well (QW) structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies show high crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology. X-ray diffraction investigations confirm 1.94% compressive strain within In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb channel. High room temperature hole mobility with high sheet density of 1000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 0.877 × 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}, and 965 cm{sup 2}/Vs, 1.112 × 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} were obtained with different doping concentrations. Temperature dependent Hall measurements show different scattering mechanisms on hole mobility at different temperature range. The sheet hole density keeps almost constantly from 300 K to 77 K. This study shows great potential of In{sub 0.41}Ga{sub 0.59}Sb/Al{sub 0.91}Ga{sub 0.09}Sb QW for high-hole-mobility device applications.

  8. Investigation of Ribosomes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation Methods.

    PubMed

    Makarov, G I; Makarova, T M; Sumbatyan, N V; Bogdanov, A A

    2016-12-01

    The ribosome as a complex molecular machine undergoes significant conformational changes while synthesizing a protein molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used as complementary approaches to X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy, as well as biochemical methods, to answer many questions that modern structural methods leave unsolved. In this review, we demonstrate that all-atom modeling of ribosome molecular dynamics is particularly useful in describing the process of tRNA translocation, atomic details of behavior of nascent peptides, antibiotics, and other small molecules in the ribosomal tunnel, and the putative mechanism of allosteric signal transmission to functional sites of the ribosome.

  9. Structures of High Density Molecular Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, B; Cynn, H; Iota, V; Yoo, C-S

    2002-02-01

    The goal of this proposal is to develop an in-situ probe for high density molecular fluids. We will, therefore, use Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) applied to laser heated samples in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) to investigate molecular fluids at simultaneous conditions of high temperatures (T > 2000K) and high pressures (P > 10 GPa.) Temperatures sufficient to populate vibrational levels above the ground state will allow the vibrational potential to be mapped by CARS. A system capable of heating and probing these samples will be constructed. Furthermore, the techniques that enable a sample to be sufficiently heated and probed while held at static high pressure in a diamond-anvil-cell will be developed. This will be an in-situ investigation of simple molecules under conditions relevant to the study of detonation chemistry and the Jovain planet interiors using state of the art non-linear spectroscopy, diamond-anvil-cells, and laser heating technology.

  10. Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Ward, IV

    Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack on both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of the probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced in the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring the concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and measuring the infrared absorption spectra before and after the laser exposure. This investigation yielded results pertaining to both the methods and mechanisms of laser tissue welding. The combination of two-color infrared thermometry to obtain accurate surface temperatures free from emissivity bias and computer modeling illustrated the importance of including evaporation in the simulations, which effectively serves as an inherent cooling mechanism during laser irradiation. Moreover, the hydration state predicted by the model was useful in assessing the role of electrostatic versus covalent bonding in the fusion. These tools also helped elicit differences between dye- enhanced liquid solders and solid-matrix patches in laser-assisted tissue welding, demonstrating the significance of repeatable energy delivery. Surprisingly, covalent bonds

  11. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  12. Molecular Structure of a Functional Drosophila Centromere

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; Wahlstrom, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Summary Centromeres play a critical role in chromosome inheritance but are among the most difficult genomic components to analyze in multicellular eukaryotes. Here, we present a highly detailed molecular structure of a functional centromere in a multicellular organism. The centromere of the Drosophila minichromosome Dp1187 is contained within a 420 kb region of centric heterochromatin. We have used a new approach to characterize the detailed structure of this centromere and found that it is primarily composed of satellites and single, complete transposable elements. In the rest of the Drosophila genome, these satellites and transposable elements are neither unique to the centromeres nor present at all centromeres. We discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of heterochromatin structure and on the determinants of centromere identity and function. PMID:9428523

  13. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  14. Structure investigations on assembled astaxanthin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köpsel, Christian; Möltgen, Holger; Schuch, Horst; Auweter, Helmut; Kleinermanns, Karl; Martin, Hans-Dieter; Bettermann, Hans

    2005-08-01

    The carotenoid r,r-astaxanthin (3R,3‧R-dihydroxy-4,4‧-diketo-β-carotene) forms different types of aggregates in acetone-water mixtures. H-type aggregates were found in mixtures with a high part of water (e.g. 1:9 acetone-water mixture) whereas two different types of J-aggregates were identified in mixtures with a lower part of water (3:7 acetone-water mixture). These aggregates were characterized by recording UV/vis-absorption spectra, CD-spectra and fluorescence emissions. The sizes of the molecular assemblies were determined by dynamic light scattering experiments. The hydrodynamic diameter of the assemblies amounts 40 nm in 1:9 acetone-water mixtures and exceeds up to 1 μm in 3:7 acetone-water mixtures. Scanning tunneling microscopy monitored astaxanthin aggregates on graphite surfaces. The structure of the H-aggregate was obtained by molecular modeling calculations. The structure was confirmed by calculating the electronic absorption spectrum and the CD-spectrum where the molecular modeling structure was used as input.

  15. Ab initio study of structural and mechanical property of solid molecular hydrogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yingting; Yang, Li; Yang, Tianle; Nie, Jinlan; Peng, Shuming; Long, Xinggui; Zu, Xiaotao; Du, Jincheng

    2015-06-01

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to investigate the structural and the elastic properties of solid molecular hydrogens (H2). The influence of molecular axes of H2 on structural relative stabilities of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and face-centered cubic (fcc) structured hydrogen molecular crystals were systematically investigated. Our results indicate that for hcp structures, disordered hydrogen molecule structure is more stable, while for fcc structures, Pa3 hydrogen molecular crystal is most stable. The cohesive energy of fcc H2 crystal was found to be lower than hcp. The mechanical properties of fcc and hcp hydrogen molecular crystals were obtained, with results consistent with previous theoretical calculations. In addition, the effects of zero point energy (ZPE) and van der Waals (vdW) correction on the cohesive energy and the stability of hydrogen molecular crystals were systematically studied and discussed.

  16. [Molecular genetic investigation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)].

    PubMed

    Butorina, A K; Kornienko, A V

    2011-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are reviewed as a basis for the development of genomics of this species. The methods used to study structural and functional genomics are considered. The results and their application to increase the efficiency of sugar beet breeding are discussed.

  17. Molecular, Functional, and Structural Imaging of Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Yunqi; Zhu, Yuankai; Wu, Shuang; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Caiyun; Zhang, Hong; Hayashi, Takuya; Tian, Mei

    2016-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, correlating with genetic susceptibility and environmental risk factors. Molecular, functional, and structural imaging approaches have been increasingly used to detect neurobiological changes, analyze neurochemical correlates, and parse pathophysiological mechanisms underlying MDD. We reviewed recent neuroimaging publications on MDD in terms of molecular, functional, and structural alterations as detected mainly by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography. Altered structure and function of brain regions involved in the cognitive control of affective state have been demonstrated. An abnormal default mode network, as revealed by resting-state functional MRI, is likely associated with aberrant metabolic and serotonergic function revealed by radionuclide imaging. Further multi-modal investigations are essential to clarify the characteristics of the cortical network and serotonergic system associated with behavioral and genetic variations in MDD.

  18. Mechanical properties of borophene films: a reactive molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quy Le, Minh; Mortazavi, Bohayra; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-11-01

    The most recent experimental advances could provide ways for the fabrication of several atomic thick and planar forms of boron atoms. For the first time, we explore the mechanical properties of five types of boron films with various vacancy ratios ranging from 0.1-0.15, using molecular dynamics simulations with ReaxFF force field. It is found that the Young’s modulus and tensile strength decrease with increasing the temperature. We found that boron sheets exhibit an anisotropic mechanical response due to the different arrangement of atoms along the armchair and zigzag directions. At room temperature, 2D Young’s modulus and fracture stress of these five sheets appear in the range 63-136 N m-1 and 12-19 N m-1, respectively. In addition, the strains at tensile strength are in the ranges of 9%-14%, 11%-19%, and 10%-16% at 1, 300, and 600 K, respectively. This investigation not only reveals the remarkable stiffness of 2D boron, but establishes relations between the mechanical properties of the boron sheets to the loading direction, temperature and atomic structures.

  19. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: integrated molecular dynamics--statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach.

    PubMed

    Ilk Capar, M; Nar, A; Ferrarini, A; Frezza, E; Greco, C; Zakharov, A V; Vakulenko, A A

    2013-03-21

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio.

  20. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: Integrated molecular dynamics—Statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capar, M. Ilk; Nar, A.; Ferrarini, A.; Frezza, E.; Greco, C.; Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio.

  1. Isotope effects in water as investigated by neutron diffraction and path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, Anita; Salmon, Philip S.; Fischer, Henry E.; Neuefeind, Jörg C.; Simonson, J. Mike; Markland, Thomas E.

    2012-07-01

    The structures of heavy and light water at 300 K were investigated by using a joint approach in which the method of neutron diffraction with oxygen isotope substitution was complemented by path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The diffraction results, which give intra-molecular O-D and O-H bond distances of 0.985(5) and 0.990(5) Å, were found to be in best agreement with those obtained by using the flexible anharmonic TTM3-F water model. Both techniques show a difference of ≃ 0.5% between the O-D and O-H intra-molecular bond lengths, and the results support a competing quantum effects model for water in which its structural and dynamical properties are governed by an offset between intra-molecular and inter-molecular quantum contributions. Further consideration of the O-O correlations is needed in order to improve agreement with experiment.

  2. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M; Prates, Luciana L; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-05

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HEDN/OM), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M.; Prates, Luciana L.; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HEDN/OM), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions.

  4. [Molecular structure and fractal analysis of oligosaccharide].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-long; Wang, Lu-man; He, Dong-qi; Zhang, Tian-lan; Gou, Bao-di; Li, Qing

    2014-10-18

    To propose a calculation method of oligosaccharides' fractal dimension, and to provide a new approach to studying the drug molecular design and activity. By using the principle of energy optimization and computer simulation technology, the steady structures of oligosaccharides were found, and an effective way of oligosaccharides fractal dimension's calculation was further established by applying the theory of box dimension to the chemical compounds. By using the proposed method, 22 oligosaccharides' fractal dimensions were calculated, with the mean 1.518 8 ± 0.107 2; in addition, the fractal dimensions of the two activity multivalent oligosaccharides which were confirmed by experiments, An-2 and Gu-4, were about 1.478 8 and 1.516 0 respectively, while C-type lectin-like receptor Dectin-1's fractal dimension was about 1.541 2. The experimental and computational results were expected to help to find a class of glycoside drugs whose target receptor was Dectin-1. Fractal dimension, differing from other known macro parameters, is a useful tool to characterize the compound molecules' microscopic structure and function, which may play an important role in the molecular design and biological activity study. In the process of oligosaccharides drug screening, the fractal dimension of receptor and designed oligosaccharides or glycoclusters can be calculated respectively. The oligosaccharides with fractal dimension close to that of target receptor should then take priority compared with others, to get the drug molecules with latent activity.

  5. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  6. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  7. Molecular and electronic structure of electroactive self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; de la Llave, Ezequiel; Scherlis, Damián; Williams, Federico J.

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing electroactive functional groups are excellent model systems for the formation of electronic devices by self-assembly. In particular ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol SAMs have been extensively studied in the past. However, there are still open questions related with their electronic structure including the influence of the ferrocene group in the SAM-induced work function changes of the underlying metal. We have thus carried out a thorough experimental and theoretical investigation in order to determine the molecular and electronic structure of ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol SAMs on Au surfaces. In agreement with previous studies we found that the Fc-containing alkanethiol molecules adsorb forming a thiolate bond with the Au surface with a molecular geometry 30° tilted with respect to the surface normal. Measured surface coverages indicate the formation of a compact monolayer. We found for the first time that the ferrocene group has little influence on the observed work function decrease which is largely determined by the alkanethiol. Furthermore, the ferrocene moiety lies 14 Å above the metal surface covalently bonded to the alkanethiol SAM and its HOMO is located at -1.6 eV below the Fermi level. Our results provide new valuable insight into the molecular and electronic structure of electroactive SAMs which are of fundamental importance in the field of molecular electronics.

  8. Molecular and electronic structure of electroactive self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Méndez De Leo, Lucila P; de la Llave, Ezequiel; Scherlis, Damián; Williams, Federico J

    2013-03-21

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing electroactive functional groups are excellent model systems for the formation of electronic devices by self-assembly. In particular ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol SAMs have been extensively studied in the past. However, there are still open questions related with their electronic structure including the influence of the ferrocene group in the SAM-induced work function changes of the underlying metal. We have thus carried out a thorough experimental and theoretical investigation in order to determine the molecular and electronic structure of ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol SAMs on Au surfaces. In agreement with previous studies we found that the Fc-containing alkanethiol molecules adsorb forming a thiolate bond with the Au surface with a molecular geometry 30° tilted with respect to the surface normal. Measured surface coverages indicate the formation of a compact monolayer. We found for the first time that the ferrocene group has little influence on the observed work function decrease which is largely determined by the alkanethiol. Furthermore, the ferrocene moiety lies 14 Å above the metal surface covalently bonded to the alkanethiol SAM and its HOMO is located at -1.6 eV below the Fermi level. Our results provide new valuable insight into the molecular and electronic structure of electroactive SAMs which are of fundamental importance in the field of molecular electronics.

  9. Viewpoint 9--molecular structure of aqueous interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    In this review we summarize recent progress in our understanding of the structure of aqueous interfaces emerging from molecular level computer simulations. It is emphasized that the presence of the interface induces specific structural effects which, in turn, influence a wide variety of phenomena occurring near the phase boundaries. At the liquid-vapor interface, the most probable orientations of a water molecule is such that its dipole moment lies parallel to the interface, one O-H bond points toward the vapor and the other O-H bond is directed toward the liquid. The orientational distributions are broad and slightly asymmetric, resulting in an excess dipole moment pointing toward the liquid. These structural preferences persist at interfaces between water and nonpolar liquids, indicating that the interactions between the two liquids in contact are weak. It was found that liquid-liquid interfaces are locally sharp but broadened by capillary waves. One consequence of anisotropic orientations of interfacial water molecules is asymmetric interactions, with respect to the sign of the charge, of ions with the water surface. It was found that even very close to the surface ions retain their hydration shells. New features of aqueous interfaces have been revealed in studies of water-membrane and water-monolayer systems. In particular, water molecules are strongly oriented by the polar head groups of the amphiphilic phase, and they penetrate the hydrophilic head-group region, but not the hydrophobic core. At infinite dilution near interfaces, amphiphilic molecules exhibit behavior different from that in the gas phase or in bulk water. This result sheds new light on the nature of hydrophobic effect in the interfacial regions. The presence of interfaces was also shown to affect both equilibrium and dynamic components of rates of chemical reactions. Applications of continuum models to interfacial problems have been, so far, unsuccessful. This, again, underscores the

  10. Viewpoint 9--molecular structure of aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pohorille, A; Wilson, M A

    1993-01-01

    In this review we summarize recent progress in our understanding of the structure of aqueous interfaces emerging from molecular level computer simulations. It is emphasized that the presence of the interface induces specific structural effects which, in turn, influence a wide variety of phenomena occurring near the phase boundaries. At the liquid-vapor interface, the most probable orientations of a water molecule is such that its dipole moment lies parallel to the interface, one O-H bond points toward the vapor and the other O-H bond is directed toward the liquid. The orientational distributions are broad and slightly asymmetric, resulting in an excess dipole moment pointing toward the liquid. These structural preferences persist at interfaces between water and nonpolar liquids, indicating that the interactions between the two liquids in contact are weak. It was found that liquid-liquid interfaces are locally sharp but broadened by capillary waves. One consequence of anisotropic orientations of interfacial water molecules is asymmetric interactions, with respect to the sign of the charge, of ions with the water surface. It was found that even very close to the surface ions retain their hydration shells. New features of aqueous interfaces have been revealed in studies of water-membrane and water-monolayer systems. In particular, water molecules are strongly oriented by the polar head groups of the amphiphilic phase, and they penetrate the hydrophilic head-group region, but not the hydrophobic core. At infinite dilution near interfaces, amphiphilic molecules exhibit behavior different from that in the gas phase or in bulk water. This result sheds new light on the nature of hydrophobic effect in the interfacial regions. The presence of interfaces was also shown to affect both equilibrium and dynamic components of rates of chemical reactions. Applications of continuum models to interfacial problems have been, so far, unsuccessful. This, again, underscores the

  11. Molecular investigations of development and diseases of the brain of higher mammals using the ferret.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The brains of higher mammals such as primates and carnivores contain well-developed unique brain structures. Uncovering the physiological functions, developmental mechanisms and evolution of these brain structures would greatly facilitate our understanding of the human brain and its diseases. Although the anatomical and electrophysiological features of these brain structures have been intensively investigated, our knowledge about their molecular bases is still limited. To overcome this limitation, genetic techniques for the brains of carnivores and primates have been established, and molecules whose expression patterns correspond to these brain structures were identified recently. To investigate the functional roles of these molecules, rapid and efficient genetic manipulation methods for higher mammals have been explored. In this review, recent advances in molecular investigations of the brains of higher mammals are discussed, mainly focusing on ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

  12. Molecular investigations of development and diseases of the brain of higher mammals using the ferret

    PubMed Central

    KAWASAKI, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The brains of higher mammals such as primates and carnivores contain well-developed unique brain structures. Uncovering the physiological functions, developmental mechanisms and evolution of these brain structures would greatly facilitate our understanding of the human brain and its diseases. Although the anatomical and electrophysiological features of these brain structures have been intensively investigated, our knowledge about their molecular bases is still limited. To overcome this limitation, genetic techniques for the brains of carnivores and primates have been established, and molecules whose expression patterns correspond to these brain structures were identified recently. To investigate the functional roles of these molecules, rapid and efficient genetic manipulation methods for higher mammals have been explored. In this review, recent advances in molecular investigations of the brains of higher mammals are discussed, mainly focusing on ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). PMID:28496051

  13. Structural and spectroscopic investigation of glycinium oxalurate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, T.; Pasupathi, G.; Marchewka, M. K.; Anbalagan, G.; Kanagathara, N.

    2017-09-01

    Glycinium oxalurate (GO) single crystals has been synthesized and grown by the slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that GO crystal crystallizes in the monoclinic system with centrosymmetric space group P121/c1. The grown crystals are built up from single protonated glycinium residues and single dissociated oxalurate anions. A combination of ionic and donor-acceptor hydrogen-bond interactions linking together the glycine and oxaluric acid residues forms a three-dimensional network. Hydrogen bonded network present in the crystal gives notable vibrational effect. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands have been interpreted with the aid of structure optimization based on HF and density functional theory B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Frontier molecular orbital energies and other related electronic properties are calculated. The natural bonding orbital (NBO) charges have been calculated and interpreted. The molecular electrostatic potential map has been constructed and discussed in detail.

  14. Rheological investigation of highly filled polymers: Effect of molecular weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatkova, Eva; Hausnerova, Berenika; Hales, Andrew; Jiranek, Lukas; Vera, Juan Miguel Alcon

    2015-04-01

    The paper deals with rheological properties of highly filled polymers used in powder injection molding. Within the experimental framework seven PIM feedstocks based on superalloy Inconel 718 powder were prepared. Each feedstock contains the fixed amount of powder loading and the same composition of binder system consisting of three components: polyethylene glycol (PEG) differing in molecular weight, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and stearic acid (SA). The aim is to investigate the influence of PEG's molecular weight on the flow properties of feedstocks. Non-Newtonian indices, representing the shear rate sensitivity of the feedstocks, are obtained from a polynomial fit, and found to vary within measured shear rates range from 0.2 to 0.8. Temperature effect is considered via activation energies, showing decreasing trend with increasing of molecular weight of PEG (except of feedstock containing 1,500 g.mol-1 PEG).

  15. Molecular structure of the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Barbara; Persikov, Anton V

    2005-01-01

    The molecular conformation of the collagen triple helix confers strict amino acid sequence constraints, requiring a (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating pattern and a high content of imino acids. The increasing family of collagens and proteins with collagenous domains shows the collagen triple helix to be a basic motif adaptable to a range of proteins and functions. Its rodlike domain has the potential for various modes of self-association and the capacity to bind receptors, other proteins, GAGs, and nucleic acids. High-resolution crystal structures obtained for collagen model peptides confirm the supercoiled triple helix conformation, and provide new information on hydrogen bonding patterns, hydration, sidechain interactions, and ligand binding. For several peptides, the helix twist was found to be sequence dependent, and such variation in helix twist may serve as recognition features or to orient the triple helix for binding. Mutations in the collagen triple-helix domain lead to a variety of human disorders. The most common mutations are single-base substitutions that lead to the replacement of one Gly residue, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern. A single Gly substitution destabilizes the triple helix through a local disruption in hydrogen bonding and produces a discontinuity in the register of the helix. Molecular information about the collagen triple helix and the effect of mutations will lead to a better understanding of function and pathology.

  16. Investigating the Web Structure by Isolated Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Yushi; Ota, Yoshinobu; Uemichi, Akio

    The link structure of the Web is generally represented by the webgraph, and it is often used for web structure mining that mainly aims to find hidden communities on the Web. In this paper, we identify a common frequent substructure and give it a formal graph definition, which we call an isolated star (i-star), and propose an efficient enumeration algorithm of i-stars. We then investigate the structure of the Web by enumerating i-stars from real web data. As a result, we observed that most i-stars correspond to index structures in single domains, while some of them are verified to be candidates of communities, which implies the validity of i-stars as useful substructure for web structure mining and link spam detecting. We also observed that the distributions of i-star sizes show power-law, which is another new evidence of the scale-freeness of the webgraph.

  17. Theoretical investigations on the molecular structure, vibrational spectra, HOMO-LUMO analyses and NBO study of 1-[(Cyclopropylmethoxy)methyl]-5-ethyl-6-(4-methylbenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-2,4-dione.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdullah, Ebtehal S; Mary, Y Sheena; Panicker, C Yohannan; El-Brollosy, Nasser R; El-Emam, Ali A; Van Alsenoy, Christian; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A

    2014-12-10

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 1-[(Cyclopropylmethoxy)methyl]-5-ethyl-6-(4-methylbenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-2,4-dione were recorded. In this work, experimental and theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational wavenumbers of the title compound are presented. The vibrational wavenumbers were obtained theoretically at the DFT level and were compared with the experimental results. The study is extended to calculate the HOMO-LUMO energy gap, NBO, mapped molecular electrostatic potential and first hyperpolarizability. The calculated first hyperpolarizability of the title compound is 9.15 times that of urea and hence the title compound and the series of compounds it represents are attractive candidates for further studies in non linear optical applications. In the title compound, the HOMO of π nature is delocalized over the phenyl ring while the LUMO is located over the pyrimidine ring. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonding at O7 and N1H25 positions in each monomer give rise to a C2-symmetry dimer which is predicted to be about 10kcalmol(-1) more stable than the monomeric form.

  18. Theoretical investigations on the molecular structure, vibrational spectra, HOMO-LUMO analyses and NBO study of 1-[(Cyclopropylmethoxy)methyl]-5-ethyl-6-(4-methylbenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-2,4-dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abdullah, Ebtehal S.; Mary, Y. Sheena; Panicker, C. Yohannan; El-Brollosy, Nasser R.; El-Emam, Ali A.; Van Alsenoy, Christian; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2014-12-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 1-[(Cyclopropylmethoxy)methyl]-5-ethyl-6-(4-methylbenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-2,4-dione were recorded. In this work, experimental and theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational wavenumbers of the title compound are presented. The vibrational wavenumbers were obtained theoretically at the DFT level and were compared with the experimental results. The study is extended to calculate the HOMO-LUMO energy gap, NBO, mapped molecular electrostatic potential and first hyperpolarizability. The calculated first hyperpolarizability of the title compound is 9.15 times that of urea and hence the title compound and the series of compounds it represents are attractive candidates for further studies in non linear optical applications. In the title compound, the HOMO of π nature is delocalized over the phenyl ring while the LUMO is located over the pyrimidine ring. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonding at O7 and N1sbnd H25 positions in each monomer give rise to a C2-symmetry dimer which is predicted to be about 10 kcal mol-1 more stable than the monomeric form.

  19. Growth mechanism, electronic spectral investigation and molecular orbital studies of L-prolinium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Sun, Xin; Xu, Xijin; Sun, Ping

    2015-01-01

    By using atomic force microscopy, birth and spread has proved to be the primary growth mechanism for L-prolinium phosphate (LPP). The phenomenon of newly formed islands expanding to the edge of the preceding terrace was observed. The optimized molecular structure and the molecular properties were calculated by density functional theory method. Natural bond orbital analysis was carried out to demonstrate the various inter and intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of LPP leading to high NLO activity. Molecular electrostatic potential, frontier molecular orbital analysis and thermodynamic properties were investigated to get a better insight of the molecular properties. Global and local reactivity descriptors were computed to predict the reactivity and reactive sites on the molecules. Non-linear optical (NLO) properties such as the total dipole moment (μ) and first order hyperopolarizability (β) were also calculated to predict NLO behavior.

  20. Structures of the substrate-free and product-bound forms of HmuO, a heme oxygenase from corynebacterium diphtheriae: x-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Unno, Masaki; Ardèvol, Albert; Rovira, Carme; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2013-11-29

    Heme oxygenase catalyzes the degradation of heme to biliverdin, iron, and carbon monoxide. Here, we present crystal structures of the substrate-free, Fe(3+)-biliverdin-bound, and biliverdin-bound forms of HmuO, a heme oxygenase from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, refined to 1.80, 1.90, and 1.85 Å resolution, respectively. In the substrate-free structure, the proximal and distal helices, which tightly bracket the substrate heme in the substrate-bound heme complex, move apart, and the proximal helix is partially unwound. These features are supported by the molecular dynamic simulations. The structure implies that the heme binding fixes the enzyme active site structure, including the water hydrogen bond network critical for heme degradation. The biliverdin groups assume the helical conformation and are located in the heme pocket in the crystal structures of the Fe(3+)-biliverdin-bound and the biliverdin-bound HmuO, prepared by in situ heme oxygenase reaction from the heme complex crystals. The proximal His serves as the Fe(3+)-biliverdin axial ligand in the former complex and forms a hydrogen bond through a bridging water molecule with the biliverdin pyrrole nitrogen atoms in the latter complex. In both structures, salt bridges between one of the biliverdin propionate groups and the Arg and Lys residues further stabilize biliverdin at the HmuO heme pocket. Additionally, the crystal structure of a mixture of two intermediates between the Fe(3+)-biliverdin and biliverdin complexes has been determined at 1.70 Å resolution, implying a possible route for iron exit.

  1. A molecular investigation of adsorption onto mineral pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninness, Brian J.

    Pigment suspensions are important in several processes such as ceramics, paints, inks, and coatings. In the wet state, pigments are combined with a variety of chemical species such as polymers, surfactants, and polyelectrolytes which produce a complex colloidal system. The adsorption, desorption, and redistribution of these species at the pigment-aqueous solution interface can have an impact on the behavior in both the wet state or its final dried state. The goal of this work is to establish a molecular picture of the adsorption properties of these pigmented systems. A novel in situ infrared technique has been developed which allows the detection of adsorbed surface species on pigment particles in an aqueous environment. The technique involves the use of a polymeric binder to anchor the colloidal pigment particles to the surface of an internal reflection element (IRE). The binder only weakly perturbs about 25% of the reactive surface sites (hydroxyl groups) on silica. The reaction of succinic anhydride with an aminosilanized silica surface has been quantified using this technique. The adsorption dynamics of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) at the TiO2-aqueous solution interface has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and electrokinetic analysis. At low bulk concentrations, C16TAB is shown to adsorb as isolated islands with a "defective" bilayer structure. Anionic probe molecules are shown to effectively "tune" the adsorbed surfactant microstructure. The results indicate that the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer, and not the amount of adsorbed surfactant, dictates the subsequent adsorption behavior of the system. Atomic Layer Deposition is used to deposit a TiO2 layer onto the surfaces of silica and kaolin pigments. The process involves the cyclic reaction sequence of the vapors of TiCl4 and H2O. Three complete deposition cycles are needed before the surfaces

  2. Molecular investigations of the brain of higher mammals using gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    The brains of mammals such as carnivores and primates contain developed structures not found in the brains of mice. Uncovering the physiological importance, developmental mechanisms and evolution of these structures using carnivores and primates would greatly contribute to our understanding of the human brain and its diseases. Although the anatomical and physiological properties of the brains of carnivores and primates have been intensively examined, molecular investigations are still limited. Recently, genetic techniques that can be applied to carnivores and primates have been explored, and molecules whose expression patterns correspond to these structures were reported. Furthermore, to investigate the functional importance of these molecules, rapid and efficient genetic manipulation methods were established by applying electroporation to gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets. In this article, I review recent advances in molecular investigations of the brains of carnivores and primates, mainly focusing on ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients.

    PubMed

    Nimon, Kim F; Zientek, Linda R; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients.

  4. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients. PMID:26217273

  5. Investigation of Chiral Molecular Micelles by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin F.; Billiot, Eugene J.; Billiot, Fereshteh H.; Lipkowitz, Kenny B.; Southerland, William M.; Fang, Yayin

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analyses of the chiral molecular micelles poly-(sodium undecyl-(L,L)-leucine-valine) (poly-SULV) and poly-(sodium undecyl-(L,L)- valine-leucine) (poly-(SUVL)) are reported. Both molecular micelles are used as chiral selectors in electrokinetic chromatography and each consists of covalently linked surfactant chains with chiral dipeptide headgroups. To provide experimental support for the structures from MD simulations, NOESY spectra were used to identify protons in close spatial proximity. Results from the NOESY analyses were then compared to radial distribution functions from MD simulations. In addition, the hydrodynamic radii of both molecular micelles were calculated from NMR-derived diffusion coefficients. Corresponding radii from the MD simulations were found to be in agreement with these experimental results. NMR diffusion experiments were also used to measure association constants for polar and non-polar binaphthyl analytes binding to both molecular micelles. Poly(SUVL) was found to bind the non-polar analyte enantiomers more strongly, while the more polar analyte enantiomers interacted more strongly with poly(SULV). MD simulations in tum showed that poly(SUL V) had a more open structure that gave greater access for water molecules to the dipeptide headgroup region. PMID:23991355

  6. Molecular structure, spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT Raman, UV, NMR and THz) investigation and hyperpolarizability studies of 3-(2-Chloro-6-fluorophenyl)-1-(2-thienyl) prop-2-en-1-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Amit; Deval, Vipin; Gupta, Archana; Tandon, Poonam; Patil, P. S.; Deshmukh, Prathmesh; Chaturvedi, Deepika; Watve, J. G.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, a combined experimental and theoretical study on ground state molecular structure, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of the chalcone derivative 3-(2-Chloro-6-fluorophenyl)-1-(2-thienyl) prop-2-en-1-one (2C6F2SC) is reported. Initial geometry generated from single crystal X-ray diffraction parameters was minimized at DFT level employing B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) without any constraint to the potential energy surface. The molecule has been characterized using various experimental techniques FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, TD-THz and the spectroscopic data have been analyzed theoretically by Density Functional Theory (DFT) method. Harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated theoretically using the optimized ground state geometry and the spectra were interpreted by means of potential energy distribution. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) has been used to calculate energies, absorption wavelengths, oscillator strengths of electronic singlet-singlet transitions. The calculated energy and oscillator strength complement with the experimental findings. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap explains the charge interaction taking place within the molecule. Good correlations between the experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts and calculated GIAO shielding tensors were found. Stability of the molecule, hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β) of this molecular system and related properties (μ, <α> and Δα) have been calculated using the finite-field approach.

  7. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-02-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  8. MOLECULAR INTERACTION POTENTIALS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    One reasonable approach to the analysis of the relationships between molecular structure and toxic activity is through the investigation of the forces and intermolecular interactions responsible for chemical toxicity. The interaction between the xenobiotic and the bio...

  9. State of water, molecular structure, and cytotoxicity of silk hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Katashima, Takuya; Sakai, Takamasa

    2011-06-13

    A novel technique was developed to regulate the bulk water content of silk hydrogels by adjusting the concentrations of silk proteins, which is helpful to investigate the effects of the state of water in polymeric hydrogel on its biological functions, such as cytotoxicity. Gelation of the silk hydrogel was induced with ethanol and its gelation behavior was analyzed by rheometry. The silk hydrogels prepared at various silk concentrations were characterized with respect to their water content, molecular and network structures, state of water, mechanical properties, and cytotoxicity to human mesenchymal stem cells. The network structure of silk hydrogel was heterogeneous with β-sheet and fibrillar structures. The influence of the state of water in the silk hydrogel on the cytotoxicity was recognized by means of differential scanning calorimetry and cell proliferation assay, which revealed that the bound water will support cell-adhesion proteins in the cellular matrix to interact with the surface of the silk hydrogels.

  10. Optical properties and structural investigations of (11-22)-oriented GaN/Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosales, Daniel; Gil, Bernard; Bretagnon, Thierry; Brault, Julien; Vennéguès, Philippe; Nemoz, Maud; Mierry, Philippe de; Damilano, Benjamin; Massies, Jean; Bigenwald, Pierre

    2015-07-14

    We have grown (11-22)-oriented GaN/Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N quantum wells (QWs) using molecular beam epitaxy on GaN (11-22)-oriented templates grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on m-plane oriented sapphire substrates. The performance of epitaxial growth of GaN/Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N heterostructures on the semi-polar orientation (11-22) in terms of surface roughness and structural properties, i.e., strain relaxation mechanisms is discussed. In addition, high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals very smooth QW interfaces. The photoluminescence of such samples are strictly originating from radiative recombination of free excitons for temperatures above 100 K. At high temperature, the population of localized excitons, moderately trapped (5 meV) at low temperature, is negligible.

  11. Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A large scale 13CO map (containing 33,000 spectra) of the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of Orion is presented which contains the Orion Nebula, NGC1977, and the LI641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. This morphology may result from the effects of star formation in the region or embedded magnetic fields in the cloud. We suggest a simple picture for the evolution of the Orion-A cloud and the formation of the major filament. A rotating proto-cloud (counter rotating with respect to the galaxy) contians a b-field aligned with the galaxtic plane. The northern protion of this cloud collapsed first, perhaps triggered by the pressure of the Ori I OB association. The magnetic field combined with the anisotropic pressure produced by the OB-association breaks the symmetry of the pancake instability, a filament rather than a disc is produced. The growth of instabilities in the filament formed sub-condensations which are recent sites of star formation.

  12. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Structural investigation of californium under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heathman, S.; Le Bihan, T.; Yagoubi, S.; Johansson, B.; Ahuja, R.

    2013-06-01

    The high-pressure structural behavior of californium has been studied experimentally and theoretically up to 100 GPa. A valence change from divalent to trivalent forms was observed under modest pressure revealing californium to be the only actinide to exhibit more than one metallic valence at near to ambient conditions as is the case for cerium in the lanthanide series. Three metallic valencies and four different crystallographic phases were observed in californium as a function of pressure. High-pressure techniques, synchrotron radiation, and ab initio electronic structure calculations of total energies were used to investigate the material and to determine the role which californium's 5f electrons play in influencing these transitions. The crystallographic structures observed are similar to those found in the preceding actinide elements, curium and americium, with the initially localized 5f states becoming completely delocalized under the influence of high pressure.

  14. The Determination of Molecular Structure from Rotational Spectra

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laurie, V. W.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-07-01

    An analysis is presented concerning the average molecular configuration variations and their effects on molecular structure determinations. It is noted that the isotopic dependence of the zero-point is often primarily governed by the isotopic variation of the average molecular configuration. (J.R.D.)

  15. Polymorphism and disorder in caffeine: Dielectric investigation of molecular mobilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, M.; Decroix, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Using dielectric relaxation data we have characterized the molecular mobilities of caffeine both in phase I (stable and metastable) and in phase II. In phase I effects of sublimation and phase transformation kinetics were carefully considered. In plane rotational motions were followed on a wide temperature range. A noticeable antiferroelectric short range order developing at the approach of the glass-like transition is characterized. Condition for occurrence of a critical-like behaviour is discussed. At high temperature the emergence of an additional ultra slow relaxation process is highlighted. Possible molecular mechanisms are proposed for both processes. In phase II the existence of a less intense relaxation process is confirmed. Close similarity with the main process developing in phase I hints at a common origin of the dipolar motions. Careful consideration of recent structure determinations leads to suggest that this process is associated to similar molecular in plane rotations but developing at the surface of crystalline samples. Lower cooperativity at the surface is reflected in the smaller activation entropy of the relaxation.

  16. Local structure in anisotropic systems determined by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolkin, Andrei V.; Maliniak, Arnold

    In the present communication we describe the investigation of local structure using a new visualization technique. The approach is based on two-dimensional pair correlation functions derived from a molecular dynamics computer simulation. We have used this method to analyse a trajectory produced in a simulation of a nematic liquid crystal of 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) (Komolkin et al., 1994, J. chem. Phys., 101, 4103). The molecule is assumed to have cylindrical symmetry, and the liquid crystalline phase is treated as uniaxial. The pair correlation functions or cylindrical distribution functions (CDFs) are calculated in the molecular (m) and laboratory (l) frames, gm2(z1 2, d1 2) and g12(Z1 2, D1 2). Anisotropic molecular organization in the liquid crystal is reflected in laboratory frame CDFs. The molecular excluded volume is determined and the effect of the fast motion in the alkyl chain is observed. The intramolecular distributions are included in the CDFs and indicate the size of the motional amplitude in the chain. Absence of long range order was confirmed, a feature typical for a nematic liquid crystal.

  17. Molecular cloning of chicken aggrecan. Structural analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, L; Tanzer, M L

    1992-01-01

    The large, aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of cartilage, aggrecan, has served as a generic model of proteoglycan structure. Molecular cloning of aggrecans has further defined their amino acid sequences and domain structures. In this study, we have obtained the complete coding sequence of chicken sternal cartilage aggrecan by a combination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. The composite sequence is 6117 bp in length, encoding 1951 amino acids. Comparison of chicken aggrecan protein primary structure with rat, human and bovine aggrecans has disclosed both similarities and differences. The domains which are most highly conserved at 70-80% identity are the N-terminal domains G1 and G2 and the C-terminal domain G3. The chondroitin sulphate domain of chicken aggrecan is smaller than that of rat and human aggrecans and has very distinctive repeat sequences. It has two separate sections, one comprising 12 consecutive Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 20 amino acids each, adjacent to the other which has 23 discontinuous Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 10 amino acids each; this latter region, N-terminal to the former one, appears to be unique to chicken aggrecan. The two regions contain a total of 94 potential chondroitin sulphate attachment sites. Genomic comparison shows that, although chicken exons 11-14 are identical in size to the rat and human exons, chicken exon 10 is the smallest of the three species. This is also reflected in the size of its chondroitin sulphate coding region and in the total number of Ser-Gly pairs. The putative keratan sulphate domain shows 31-45% identity with the other species and lacks the repetitive sequences seen in the others. In summary, while the linear arrangement of specific domains of chicken aggrecan is identical to that in the aggrecans of other species, and while there is considerable identity of three separate domains, chicken aggrecan demonstrates unique features, notably in its chondroitin sulphate domain and its keratan sulphate

  18. Investigations of ice nanoparticles and aerosols in molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnik, Michal

    2015-03-01

    We have recently set up a versatile experiment which allows for different experiments with molecular clusters and nanoparticles in molecular beams. Here we concentrate on the experiments with ice nanoparticles (large water clusters (H2O)N, N ~ 102-103) doped with atmospherically relevant molecules, e.g., hydrogen halides, CFCs, nitric acid, NxOy, etc. Such species are relevant to ozone depletion and other atmospheric processes. We investigate (1) the UV-photochemistry using velocity map imaging techniques, and (2) the uptake cross section for the molecules on the ice nanoparticles from velocity measurements. In addition, we record (3) mass spectra of the particles implementing different ionization methods: electron ionization (EI) at variable electron energies, photoionization, and special method of electron photodetachment after Na-doping (NaPI). The unique combination of all these different methods performed with the same nanoparticles provides detailed molecular level information about the studied species and their (photo)physics and chemistry. In particular, an investigation of mixed water-nitric acid particles by means of EI and NaPI revealed the prominent role of the HNO3 molecule as the condensation nuclei. The uptake of atmospheric molecules by ice nanoparticles has been studied, and the pickup cross sections for some molecules exceed significantly the geometrical sizes of the ice nanoparticles. It has been argued that the large particles composed of several hundred water molecules which grow in the supersonic expansions tend to have highly irregular shapes -nanosnowflakes. Photodissociation of hydrogen halides on ice nanoparticles has been investigated, and shown to proceed via excitation of acidically dissociated ion pair and subsequent biradical generation and H3O dissociation. The photodissociation of CF2Cl2 molecules in clusters leads to efficient Cl-fragment caging caused by formation of halogen bond. Grant agency of the Czech Republic, Grant No.: 14

  19. Identification of a conserved 8 aa insert in the PIP5K protein in the Saccharomycetaceae family of fungi and the molecular dynamics simulations and structural analysis to investigate its potential functional role.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Bijendra; Gupta, Radhey S

    2017-08-01

    Homologs of the phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-5-kinase (PIP5K), which controls a multitude of essential cellular functions, contain a 8 aa insert in a conserved region that is specific for the Saccharomycetaceae family of fungi. Using structures of human PIP4K proteins as templates, structural models were generated of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human PIP5K proteins. In the modeled S. cerevisiae PIP5K, the 8 aa insert forms a surface exposed loop, present on the same face of the protein as the activation loop of the kinase domain. Electrostatic potential analysis indicates that the residues from 8 aa conserved loop form a highly positively charged surface patch, which through electrostatic interaction with the anionic portions of phospholipid head groups, is expected to play a role in the membrane interaction of the yeast PIP5K. To unravel this prediction, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to examine the binding interaction of PIP5K, either containing or lacking the conserved signature insert, with two different membrane lipid bilayers. The results from MD studies provide insights concerning the mechanistic of interaction of PIP5K with lipid bilayer, and support the contention that the identified 8 aa conserved insert in fungal PIP5K plays an important role in the binding of this protein with membrane surface. Proteins 2017; 85:1454-1467. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Investigating biological systems using first principles Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dal Peraro, Matteo; Ruggerone, Paolo; Raugei, Simone; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Carloni, Paolo

    2007-04-01

    Density functional theory (DFT)-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations describe the time evolution of molecular systems without resorting to a predefined potential energy surface. CPMD and hybrid molecular mechanics/CPMD schemes have recently enabled the calculation of redox properties of electron transfer proteins in their complex biological environment. They provided structural and spectroscopic information on novel platinum-based anticancer drugs that target DNA, also setting the basis for the construction of force fields for the metal lesion. Molecular mechanics/CPMD also lead to mechanistic hypotheses for a variety of metalloenzymes. Recent advances that increase the accuracy of DFT and the efficiency of investigating rare events are further expanding the domain of CPMD applications to biomolecules.

  1. Kinetic Effects of Aromatic Molecular Structures on Diffusion Flame Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Sang Hee; Dooley, S.; Dryer, F. L.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic effects of aromatic molecular structures for jet fuel surrogates on the extinction of diffusion flames have been investigated experimentally and numerically in the counterflow configuration for toluene, n-propylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. Quantitative measurement of OH concentration for aromatic fuels was conducted by directly measuring the quenching rate from the emission lifetimes of OH planar laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The kinetic models for toluene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were validated against the measurements of extinction strain rates and LIF measurements. A semi-detailed n-propylbenzene kinetic model was developed and tested. The experimental results showed that the extinction limits are ranked from highest to lowest as n-propylbenzene, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. The present models for toluene and n-propylbenzene agree reasonably well with the measurements, whereas the model for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene under-estimates extinction limits. Kinetic pathways of OH production and consumption were analyzed to investigate the impact of fuel fragmentation on OH formation. It was found that, for fuels with different molecular structures, the fuel decomposition pathways and their propagation into the formation of radical pool play an important role to determine the extinction limits of diffusion flames. Furthermore, OH concentrations were found to be representative of the entire radical pool concentration, the balance between chain branching and propagation/termination reactions and the balance between heat production from the reaction zone and heat losses to the fuel and oxidizer sides. Finally, a proposed “OH index,” was defined to demonstrate a linear correlation between extinction strain rate and OH index and fuel mole fraction, suggesting that the diffusion flame extinctions for the tested aromatic fuels can be determined by the capability of a fuel to establish a radical pool

  2. Biological spectra analysis: Linking biological activity profiles to molecular structure

    PubMed Central

    Fliri, Anton F.; Loging, William T.; Thadeio, Peter F.; Volkmann, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Establishing quantitative relationships between molecular structure and broad biological effects has been a longstanding challenge in science. Currently, no method exists for forecasting broad biological activity profiles of medicinal agents even within narrow boundaries of structurally similar molecules. Starting from the premise that biological activity results from the capacity of small organic molecules to modulate the activity of the proteome, we set out to investigate whether descriptor sets could be developed for measuring and quantifying this molecular property. Using a 1,567-compound database, we show that percent inhibition values, determined at single high drug concentration in a battery of in vitro assays representing a cross section of the proteome, provide precise molecular property descriptors that identify the structure of molecules. When broad biological activity of molecules is represented in spectra form, organic molecules can be sorted by quantifying differences between biological spectra. Unlike traditional structure–activity relationship methods, sorting of molecules by using biospectra comparisons does not require knowledge of a molecule's putative drug targets. To illustrate this finding, we selected as starting point the biological activity spectra of clotrimazole and tioconazole because their putative target, lanosterol demethylase (CYP51), was not included in the bioassay array. Spectra similarity obtained through profile similarity measurements and hierarchical clustering provided an unbiased means for establishing quantitative relationships between chemical structures and biological activity spectra. This methodology, which we have termed biological spectra analysis, provides the capability not only of sorting molecules on the basis of biospectra similarity but also of predicting simultaneous interactions of new molecules with multiple proteins. PMID:15625110

  3. Molecular investigations of β-thalassemic children in Erbil governorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Ahmad N.; Al-Attar, Mustafa S.

    2017-09-01

    The present work studies the molecular investigation of 40 thalassemic carriers using polymerase chain reaction. Forty thalassemic carriers who were registered and treated at Erbil thalassemic center and twenty apparently healthy children have been included in the present study. Ages of both groups ranged between 1-18 years. Four primers used to detect four different beta thalassemia mutations they were codon 8/9, codon 8, codon 41/42 and IVS-1-5. The two most common mutations detected among thalassemia group were Cd8/9 with 8 cases (20%) and Cd-8 with 6 cases (15%) followed by codon 41/42 with 4 cases (10%) which investigated and detected for the first time in Erbil governorate through the present study and finally IVS-1-5 with 3 cases (7.5%), while no any cases detected among control group.

  4. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barak, D; Shibata, M; Rein, R

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  5. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  6. Giant Molecular Cloud Structure and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David (Technical Monitor); Bodenheimer, P. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bodenheimer and Burkert extended earlier calculations of cloud core models to study collapse and fragmentation. The initial condition for an SPH collapse calculation is the density distribution of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere, with near balance between turbulent plus thermal energy and gravitational energy. The main parameter is the turbulent Mach number. For each Mach number several runs are made, each with a different random realization of the initial turbulent velocity field. The turbulence decays on a dynamical time scale, leading the cloud into collapse. The collapse proceeds isothermally until the density has increased to about 10(exp 13) g cm(exp -3). Then heating is included in the dense regions. The nature of the fragmentation is investigated. About 15 different runs have been performed with Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 3.5 (the typical value observed in molecular cloud cores is 0.7). The results show a definite trend of increasing multiplicity with increasing Mach number (M), with the number of fragments approximately proportional to (1 + M). In general, this result agrees with that of Fisher, Klein, and McKee who published three cases with an AMR grid code. However our results show that there is a large spread about this curve. For example, for M=0.3 one case resulted in no fragmentation while a second produced three fragments. Thus it is not only the value of M but also the details of the superposition of the various velocity modes that play a critical role in the formation of binaries. Also, the simulations produce a wide range of separations (10-1000 AU) for the multiple systems, in rough agreement with observations. These results are discussed in two conference proceedings.

  7. Investigation on the binding interaction between silybin and pepsin by spectral and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua-jin; You, Jing; Liang, Hui-li; Qi, Tingting; Yang, Ran; Qu, Ling-bo

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the binding mode of silybin with pepsin was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. Silybin can interact with pepsin to form a silybin-pepsin complex. The binding constant, number of binding sites and thermodynamic parameters were measured, which indicated that silybin could spontaneously bind with pepsin mainly through hydrophobic interaction with one binding site. Molecular docking results revealed that silybin bound into the pepsin cavity site. Synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence results provide data concerning conformational and some micro-environmental changes of pepsin. Furthermore, in order to reveal whether the binding process can inhibit the activity of pepsin in vivo, the effect of silybin on pepsin activity in rat was investigated. The present study provides direct evidence at a molecular level to show that exposure to silybin could induce changes in the enzyme pepsin structure and function.

  8. Structure investigations of PP-PA blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Jaroslaw; Wlochowicz, Andrzej; Slusarczyk, Czeslaw

    1997-02-01

    In the paper we have used the SAXS method in order to determine the supermolecular structure parameters, including the transition layer thickness, of polypropylene/polyamide-6 (PP/PA) blends. The transition layer thickness has been obtained by means of two methods elaborated by Koberstein and co-workers and by Ruland, respectively. Both these methods assume that changes of the electron density in the transition region can be described by a Gaussian function with a standard deviation (sigma) . The parameter (sigma) have been determined graphically from the appropriate plots. Then, the thickness of the phase boundary E was estimated as (root)12(sigma) . The investigated PP/PA blends are multiphase systems and the problem of determination of the boundary width is more complicated because the meaning of Porod's law must be considered with caution. This problem is discussed based on wide range of the investigated samples prepared over various pressure and crystallization temperature conditions.

  9. Imaging radar investigations of the Sudbury structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D.; Singhroy, V. H.; Slaney, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of airborne imaging radar studies of the Sudbury structure carried out in preparation for a CCRS European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) investigation. The data used were synthetic aperture radar (SAR) C-band (5.66 cm) images acquired from about 6 km altitude in 1987. They cover the Sudbury area in both wide and narrow swath modes, with east-west flight paths and north-south illumination directions. Narrow swath resolution is 6 m in range and azimuth; wide swath resolution is 20 m in range and 10 m in azimuth. The STAR imagery has proven highly effective for field use, providing excellent rendition of topography and topographically expressed structure. Reasons for this include the illumination geometry, notably the look azimuth normal to the long axis of the Sudbury structure and Penokean fold axes, the good spatial resolution, and the short wavelength. Forested areas in the Sudbury area tend to be uniformly rough at C-band wavelength, with backscatter dominated by local incidence angle (i.e., topography). Field work using the SAR imagery has to date been concentrated in the North Range and Superior Province as far north as the Benny greenstone belt. This area was chosen for initial investigation of the original size and shape of the Sudbury structure because the effects of the Penokean Orogeny were minimal there. Field work using SAR indicates that there has been little postimpact deformation of the North Range or adjacent Superior Province rock. There appears to be no evidence for an outer ring concentric with the North Range as indicated by early Landsat imagery. The apparent ring shown by Landsat is visible on the SAR imagery as the intersection of two regional fracture patterns not related to the Sudbury structure. There is no outer ring visible southwest of the structure. This can reasonably be explained by Penokean deformation, but there is no outer ring to the northeast cutting the relatively undeformed Huronian

  10. Metagenomic Investigation of the Microbial Community Structure and Diversity for Sentinel Coral Reefs and Urbanized Coastal Waters in Southeast Florida, and Molecular Microbial Source Tracking to Characterize Potential LBSP Microbial Contaminant Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigalliano, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs and recreational beaches provide critical ecosystem services. However, coastal waters of the Southeast Florida region receive anthropogenic discharges from highly urbanized watersheds via runoff, canals, coastal inlets, and treated wastewater outfalls. There is concern regarding the biological contaminants that enter the coastal zone from land-based sources, especially for viable pathogens and genetic elements that could confer virulence or resistance. Targeted molecular microbial source tracking (MST) by quantitative PCR allows the measurement of specific microbial contaminants such as host-specific fecal indicators. These fecal source markers can help track specific fecal contamination of public health concern in the coastal zone and may also help track exposure of coral reefs to such contamination. A range of pathogens associated with sewage/septic contamination have shown detrimental impact to coral communities, including changes to the biodiversity of coral microbiomes. High-throughput Next-Generation-Sequencing (NGS) and community genomic analysis can provide a comprehensive, culture-independent approach to investigate microbial community diversity in complex environmental samples. The combination of host-specific microbial source tracking by qPCR and metagenomic NGS can provide substantial enhancement to traditional methods of water quality assessment to better protect both environmental biodiversity and human health. Reported here is a multifaceted water quality assessment study of three coastal inlets, two treated wastewater outfalls, and four sentinel coral reef communities in the Southeast Florida coastal zone offshore of Miami-Dade and Broward Counties. This study utilized a combination of bi-monthly sampling for nutrients, fecal indicator bacteria, and human-source molecular source tracking to measure specific contaminants of ecosystem and public health concern. In addition, 16S metagenomic analysis using Illumina Next-Generation Sequencing

  11. Insights into molecular structure and digestion rate of oat starch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinchuan; Kuang, Qirong; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Sumei; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Xingxun; Wang, Shujun

    2017-04-01

    The in vitro digestibility of oat starch and its relationship with starch molecular structure was investigated. The in vitro digestion results showed that the first-order kinetic constant (k) of oat starches (OS-1 and OS-2) was lower than that of rice starch. The size of amylose chains, amylose content and degree of branching (DB) of amylopectin in oat starch were significantly higher than the corresponding parameters in rice starch. The larger molecular size of oat starch may account for its lower digestion rate. The fine structure of amylopectin showed that oat starch had less chains of DP 6-12 and DP>36, which may explain the small difference in digestion rate between oat and rice starch. The biosynthesis model from oat amylopectin fine structure data suggested a lower starch branching enzyme (SBE) activity and/or a higher starch synthase (SS) activity, which may decrease the DB of oat starch and increase its digestion rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular clouds and galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    Galactic CO line emission at 115 GHz was surveyed in order to study the distribution of molecular clouds in the inner galaxy. Comparison of this survey with similar H1 data reveals a detailed correlation with the most intense 21 cm features. To each of the classical 21 cm H1 spiral arms of the inner galaxy there corresponds a CO molecular arm which is generally more clearly defined and of higher contrast. A simple model is devised for the galactic distribution of molecular clouds. The modeling results suggest that molecular clouds are essentially transient objects, existing for 15 to 40 million years after their formation in a spiral arm, and are largely confined to spiral features about 300 pc wide.

  13. Similarity Measure for Molecular Structure: A Brief Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bero, S. A.; Muda, A. K.; Choo, Y. H.; Muda, N. A.; Pratama, S. F.

    2017-09-01

    Similarity or distance measures have been used widely to calculate the similarity or dissimilarity between two samples of dataset. Cheminformatics is known as the domain that dealing with chemical information and both similarity and distance coefficient have been an important role for matching, searching and classification of chemical information. There are various types of similarity/distance coefficient used in molecular structure similarity searching. Generally, the calculation using similarity/distance coefficient is focusing more on 2-dimensional (2D) rather than 3-dimensional (3D) structure. In this paper, the popular similarity/distance coefficients for molecular structure will be reviewed together with the review on 3D molecular structure.

  14. Investigation of ``shears'' structure in ^110In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, C. J.; Fossan, D. B.; Lafosse, D. R.; Schnare, H.; Vaska, P.; Frauendorf, S.; Mullins, S. M.; Hackman, G.; Prévost, D.; Waddington, J. C.; Janzen, V. P.; Radford, D. C.; Ward, D.; Wadsworth, R.; Paul, E. S.

    1997-04-01

    The high-spin structure of ^110In has been investigated using the ^96Zr(^19F,5n) reaction. A thin-target experiment using an 85 MeV beam provided by the Chalk River TASCC facility yielded 50 million γ-γ coincidence events with the 8π spectrometer. In addition, a backed-target experiment using a 72 MeV beam provided by the SUNY at Stony Brook LINAC facility yielded 150 million events with the Stony Brook BGO-suppressed Ge spectrometer. A partial level scheme has been established in which two new γ-ray sequences have been observed in ^110In in addition to extending collective structures from earlier studies(R. Béraud, et al., J. Phys. (Paris), Colloq C-10), 159 (1980). The ΔI=1 bands involving high-K g_9/2 proton-hole orbitals and low-K g_7/2 and h_11/2 proton and neutron orbitals have been investigated as possible ``shears bands'' and compared with calculations made using the Tilted Axis Cranking (TAC) theory(S. Frauendorf, Nucl. Phys. A557), 259c (1993).

  15. Ab initio investigation of benzene clusters: Molecular tailoring approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevi, A. Subha; Rahalkar, Anuja P.; Gadre, Shridhar R.; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2010-10-01

    An exhaustive study on the clusters of benzene (Bz)n, n =2-8, at MP2/6-31++G∗∗ level of theory is reported. The relative strengths of CH-π and π-π interactions in these aggregates are examined, which eventually govern the pattern of cluster formation. A linear scaling method, viz., molecular tailoring approach (MTA), is efficiently employed for studying the energetics and growth patterns of benzene clusters consisting up to eight benzene (Bz) units. Accuracy of MTA-based calculations is appraised by performing the corresponding standard calculations wherever possible, i.e., up to tetramers. For benzene tetramers, the error introduced in energy is of the order of 0.1 mH (˜0.06 kcal/mol). Although for higher clusters the error may build up, further corrections based on many-body interaction energy analysis substantially reduce the error in the MTA-estimate. This is demonstrated for a prototypical case of benzene hexamer. A systematic way of building up a cluster of n monomers (n-mer) which employs molecular electrostatic potential of an (n -1)-mer is illustrated. The trends obtained using MTA method are essentially identical to those of the standard methods in terms of structure and energy. In summary, this study clearly brings out the possibility of effecting such large calculations, which are not possible conventionally, by the use of MTA without a significant loss of accuracy.

  16. SNR analysis: molecular investigation of an anthrax epidemic

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Italy, anthrax is endemic but occurs sporadically. During the summer of 2004, in the Pollino National Park, Basilicata, Southern Italy, an anthrax epidemic consisting of 41 outbreaks occurred; it claimed the lives of 124 animals belonging to different mammal species. This study is a retrospective molecular epidemiological investigation carried out on 53 isolates collected during the epidemic. A 25-loci Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) MLVA was initially performed to define genetic relationships, followed by an investigation of genetic diversity between epidemic strains through Single Nucleotide Repeat (SNR) analysis. Results 53 Bacillus anthracis strains were isolated. The 25-loci MLVA analysis identified all of them as belonging to a single genotype, while the SNR analysis was able to detect the existence of five subgenotypes (SGTs), allowing a detailed epidemic investigation. SGT-1 was the most frequent (46/53); SGTs 2 (4/53), 3 (1/53) 4 (1/53) and 5 (1/53) were detected in the remaining seven isolates. Conclusions The analysis revealed the prevalent spread, during this epidemic, of a single anthrax clone. SGT-1 - widely distributed across the epidemic area and present throughout the period in question - may, thus, be the ancestral form. SGTs 2, 3 and 4 differed from SGT-1 at only one locus, suggesting that they could have evolved directly from the latter during the course of this epidemic. SGT-5 differed from the other SGTs at 2-3 loci. This isolate, thus, appears to be more distantly related to SGT-1 and may not be a direct descendant of the lineage responsible for the majority of cases in this epidemic. These data confirm the importance of molecular typing and subtyping methods for in-depth epidemiological analyses of anthrax epidemics. PMID:20187980

  17. Investigation of Y/SBA Composite Molecular Sieves Morphology Control and Catalytic Performance for n-Pentane Aromatization

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Li, Shuai; Bian, Xue; Zhao, Shan-lin; Pei, Ming-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Using Y molecular sieve as the core, Y/SBA-15 composite molecular sieves were prepared by different crystallization methods in the paper. The growth process and morphologies of the composite molecular sieves were controlled by adjusting the synthesis factors. The structures and acidity of two kinds of composite molecular sieves were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and NH3-TPD. The catalysis performances of the composite molecular sieves were investigated in the aromatization reaction of n-pentane. The results indicated that the desired core-shell composite molecular sieves were obtained when the crystallization conditions were 36 hours, 100 °C and secondary crystallization. The aromatization results showed that core-shell composite molecular sieves had better selectivity for producing high application value xylenes compared to mixed-crystal composite molecular sieves. PMID:27029526

  18. Investigation of Y/SBA Composite Molecular Sieves Morphology Control and Catalytic Performance for n-Pentane Aromatization.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Li, Shuai; Bian, Xue; Zhao, Shan-Lin; Pei, Ming-Yuan

    2016-03-31

    Using Y molecular sieve as the core, Y/SBA-15 composite molecular sieves were prepared by different crystallization methods in the paper. The growth process and morphologies of the composite molecular sieves were controlled by adjusting the synthesis factors. The structures and acidity of two kinds of composite molecular sieves were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and NH3-TPD. The catalysis performances of the composite molecular sieves were investigated in the aromatization reaction of n-pentane. The results indicated that the desired core-shell composite molecular sieves were obtained when the crystallization conditions were 36 hours, 100 °C and secondary crystallization. The aromatization results showed that core-shell composite molecular sieves had better selectivity for producing high application value xylenes compared to mixed-crystal composite molecular sieves.

  19. Investigation of Y/SBA Composite Molecular Sieves Morphology Control and Catalytic Performance for n-Pentane Aromatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Li, Shuai; Bian, Xue; Zhao, Shan-Lin; Pei, Ming-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Using Y molecular sieve as the core, Y/SBA-15 composite molecular sieves were prepared by different crystallization methods in the paper. The growth process and morphologies of the composite molecular sieves were controlled by adjusting the synthesis factors. The structures and acidity of two kinds of composite molecular sieves were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and NH3-TPD. The catalysis performances of the composite molecular sieves were investigated in the aromatization reaction of n-pentane. The results indicated that the desired core-shell composite molecular sieves were obtained when the crystallization conditions were 36 hours, 100 °C and secondary crystallization. The aromatization results showed that core-shell composite molecular sieves had better selectivity for producing high application value xylenes compared to mixed-crystal composite molecular sieves.

  20. Structural investigations of lead-strontium fluoroapatites

    SciTech Connect

    Badraoui, Bechir; Aissa, Abdallah; Bigi, Adriana; Debbabi, Mongi; Gazzano, Massimo . E-mail: gazzano@isof.cnr.it

    2006-10-15

    Solid solutions in the system Pb{sub (10-x)}Sr {sub x} (PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 2}, 0{<=}x{<=}10, were obtained as apatitic phases from aqueous medium. They were investigated by X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The results of the structural refinements indicated that the substitution of lead by strontium induces a regular decrease of the lattice constant 'a' and a preferential strontium distribution in site M(1). A progressive shift of the F{sup -} ion position along the apatitic channel was detected and confirmed by IR evidence. The different character of the M-F and M-O interactions was invoked to justify the structural differences observed as a function of composition. - Graphical abstract: The structural refinements carried out on five Pb{sub (10-x)}Sr {sub x} (PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 2} samples evidence preferential distribution of cations in metal sites and a progressive shift of the F{sup -} ion.

  1. Structural modifications of 4-aryl-4-oxo-2-aminylbutanamides and their acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Investigation of AChE-ligand interactions by docking calculations and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Vitorović-Todorović, Maja D; Koukoulitsa, Catherine; Juranić, Ivan O; Mandić, Ljuba M; Drakulić, Branko J

    2014-06-23

    Congeneric set of thirty-eight 4-aryl-4-oxo-2-(N-aryl/cycloalkyl)butanamides has been designed, synthesized and evaluated for acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Structural variations included cycloalkylamino group attached to C2 position of butanoyl moiety, and variation of amido moiety of molecules. Twelve compounds, mostly piperidino and imidazolo derivatives, inhibited AChE in low micromolar range, and were inactive toward BChE. Several N-methylpiperazino derivatives showed inhibition of BChE in low micromolar or submicromolar concentrations, and were inactive toward AChE. Therefore, the nature of the cycloalkylamino moiety governs the AChE/BChE selectivity profile of compounds. The most active AChE inhibitor showed mixed-type inhibition modality, indicating its binding to free enzyme and to enzyme-substrate complex. Thorough docking calculations of the seven most potent AChE inhibitors from the set, showed that the hydrogen bond can be formed between amide -NH- moiety of compounds and -OH group of Tyr 124. The 10 ns unconstrained molecular dynamic simulation of the AChE-compound 18 complex shows that this interaction is the most persistent. This is, probably, the major anchoring point for the binding.

  2. Molecular structures, charge distributions, and vibrational analyses of the tetracoordinate Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine investigated by density functional theory in comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    The Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine have been studied with B3LYP calculations by using def2-TZVP basis set at the metal atoms and using def2-TZVP and 6-311G+(d,p) basis sets at the remaining atoms. Both basis set combinations give analogous results, which validate the use of quickly converging 6-311G+(d,p) basis set in future studies. The molecular structures, atomic charge and spin distributions, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the complexes have been calculated. The Zn, Cd and Hg complexes have been found to have distorted tetrahedral environments around the metal atoms whereas Cu complex has a square planar geometry. The NBO charge analysis have been found more accurate and less misleading compared with the Mulliken scheme. The present vibrational spectra calculations allow accurate assignment of the vibrational bands, which otherwise assigned tentatively in previous experimental-only studies.

  3. Lewis Structures Are Models for Predicting Molecular Structure, Not Electronic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1999-07-01

    This article argues against a close relationship between Lewis dot structures and electron structure obtained from quantum mechanical calculations. Lewis structures are a powerful tool for structure prediction, though they are classical models of bonding and do not predict electronic structure. The "best" Lewis structures are those that, when combined with the VSEPR model, allow the accurate prediction of molecular properties, such as polarity, bond length, bond angle, and bond strength. These structures are achieved by minimizing formal charges within the molecule, even if it requires an expanded octet on atoms beyond the second period. Lewis structures that show an expanded octet do not imply full d-orbital involvement in the bonding. They suggest that the presence of low-lying d-orbitals is important in producing observed molecular structures. Based on this work, the presence of electron density, not a large separation in charge, is responsible for the short bond lengths and large angles in species containing nonmetal atoms from beyond the second period. This result contradicts results obtained from natural population analysis, a method that attempts to derive Lewis structures from molecular orbital calculations.

  4. A Survey of Quantitative Descriptions of Molecular Structure

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi; Willighagen, Egon

    2013-01-01

    Numerical characterization of molecular structure is a first step in many computational analysis of chemical structure data. These numerical representations, termed descriptors, come in many forms, ranging from simple atom counts and invariants of the molecular graph to distribution of properties, such as charge, across a molecular surface. In this article we first present a broad categorization of descriptors and then describe applications and toolkits that can be employed to evaluate them. We highlight a number of issues surrounding molecular descriptor calculations such as versioning and reproducibility and describe how some toolkits have attempted to address these problems. PMID:23110530

  5. A survey of quantitative descriptions of molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Guha, Rajarshi; Willighagen, Egon

    2012-01-01

    Numerical characterization of molecular structure is a first step in many computational analysis of chemical structure data. These numerical representations, termed descriptors, come in many forms, ranging from simple atom counts and invariants of the molecular graph to distribution of properties, such as charge, across a molecular surface. In this article we first present a broad categorization of descriptors and then describe applications and toolkits that can be employed to evaluate them. We highlight a number of issues surrounding molecular descriptor calculations such as versioning and reproducibility and describe how some toolkits have attempted to address these problems.

  6. Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding

    SciTech Connect

    Small, W., IV

    1998-06-01

    Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack oil both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub-surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of tile probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced In the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring tile concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and characterizing the Fourier-Transform infrared (FTIR) spectra before and after the laser exposure.

  7. Phenol-formaldehyde resins: A quantitative NMR study of molecular structure and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottenbourgs, Benjamin Tony

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins have been the subject of this work. 13C liquid-state and solid-state NMR has been used to investigate the molecular structure of mainly novolak and partially of resole resins. 1H wideline in combination with 13C solid-state NMR relaxometry has been applied to study the curing and the molecular dynamics of phenolic resins. It was the intention to provide an insight in the relationship between resin composition, resin structure and subsequent resin properties (by means of the molecular dynamics). An improved 13C liquid-state NMR quantification technique of novolaks in THF-CDCl3 solutions is demonstrated. Full quantitative 13C liquid-state spectra of phenol-formaldehyde resins with high signal- to-noise ratio were obtained by using chromium acetylacetonate under optimized spectral conditions within a few hours spectrometer time. Attached proton test (APT) spectra enabled proper peak assignments in the region with significant overlap. For several novolaks, prepared under different catalytic conditions, the degree of polymerization, degree of branching, number average molecular weight, isomeric distribution, and the number of unreacted ortho and para phenol ring positions was determined with a reduced margin of error, by analyzing and integrating the 13C spectra. The power of 13C solid-state NMR in the analysis of cured PF resins is shown. Particular importance was ascribed to the question of the quantifiability of the experiments when it was desired to measure the degree of conversion by means of a 13C CP/MAS contact time study. The network structure present, and thus also the mechanical properties, is critically dependent upon the final degree of conversion obtained after curing. The degree of conversion, which depended on the cure conditions (cure temperature, cure pressure and cure time), was limited by vitrification as was demonstrated by DSC experiments. Changes in the spin-lattice relaxation time T 1H were observed, providing

  8. Investigation of multilayer painting by means of molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadikova, I. F.; Grigorieva, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    The study of paintings' layer structure under microscope was implemented in the early XX century; since that time method of cross-section preparation as well as composition of embedded materials changed and capabilities of optical microscopy broadened. Nevertheless, until recently cross-sections were prepared only for analysis of paintings' layer-specific structure, morphological and technological features, tracks of restoration treatments. Examination of chemical composition required additional sampling as well as division of these samples layer by layer in order to determine pigments and binding media; these procedures didn't always lead to proper results. Micro-Raman and micro-FTIR spectroscopy allow carrying out investigation of painting cross-sections without any additional preliminary sampling; this is shown on example of investigation of a number of paintings.

  9. Investigation of multilayer painting by means of molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadikova, I. F.; Grigorieva, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    The study of paintings' layer structure under microscope was implemented in the early XX century; since that time method of cross-section preparation as well as composition of embedded materials changed and capabilities of optical microscopy broadened. Nevertheless, until recently cross-sections were prepared only for analysis of paintings' layer-specific structure, morphological and technological features, tracks of restoration treatments. Examination of chemical composition required additional sampling as well as division of these samples layer by layer in order to determine pigments and binding media; these procedures didn't always lead to proper results. Micro-Raman and micro-FTIR spectroscopy allow carrying out investigation of painting cross-sections without any additional preliminary sampling; this is shown on example of investigation of a number of paintings.

  10. An investigation of molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking: interaction of citrus flavonoids and bovine β-lactoglobulin in focus.

    PubMed

    Sahihi, M; Ghayeb, Y

    2014-08-01

    Citrus flavonoids are natural compounds with important health benefits. The study of their interaction with a transport protein, such as bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG), at the atomic level could be a valuable factor to control their transport to biological sites. In the present study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods were used to investigate the interaction of hesperetin, naringenin, nobiletin and tangeretin as citrus flavonoids and BLG as transport protein. The molecular docking results revealed that these flavonoids bind in the internal cavity of BLG and the BLG affinity for binding the flavonoids follows naringenin>hesperetin>tangeretin>nobiletin. The docking results also indicated that the BLG-flavonoid complexes are stabilized through hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bond interactions and π-π stacking interactions. The analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories showed that the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of various systems reaches equilibrium and fluctuates around the mean value at various times. Time evolution of the radius of gyration, total solvent accessible surface of the protein and the second structure of protein showed as well that BLG and BLG-flavonoid complexes were stable around 2500ps, and there was not any conformational change as for BLG-flavonoid complexes. Further, the profiles of atomic fluctuations indicated the rigidity of the ligand binding site during the simulation.

  11. Molecular Simulations of Hydrated Proton Exchange Membranes: the Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Gabriel; Bopp, Philippe A.; Spohr, Eckhard

    2013-02-01

    The structure of two hydrated proton exchange membranes for fuel cells (PEMFC), Nafion® (Dupont) and Hyflon® (Solvay), is studied by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Since the characteristic times of these systems are long compared to the times for which they can be simulated, several different, but equivalent, initial configurations with a large degree of randomness are generated for different water contents and then equilibrated and simulated in parallel. A more constrained structure, analog to the newest model proposed in the literature based on scattering experiments, is investigated in the same way. One might speculate that a limited degree of entanglement of the polymer chains is a key feature of the structures showing the best agreement with experiment. Nevertheless, the overall conclusion remains that the scattering experiments cannot distinguish between the several, in our view equally plausible, structural models. We thus find that the characteristic features of experimental scattering curves are, after equilibration, fairly well reproduced by all systems prepared with our method. We thus study in more detail some structural details. We attempt to characterize the spatial and size distribution of the water rich domains, which is where the proton diffusion mostly takes place, using several clustering algorithms.

  12. Adsorption of homopolypeptides on gold investigated using atomistic molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vila Verde, Ana; Beltramo, Peter J; Maranas, Janna K

    2011-05-17

    We investigate the role of dynamics on adsorption of peptides to gold surfaces using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. We choose six homopolypeptides [Ala(10), Ser(10), Thr(10), Arg(10), Lys(10), and Gln(10)], for which experimental surface coverages are not correlated with amino acid level affinities for gold, with the idea that dynamic properties may also play a role. To assess dynamics we determine both conformational movement and flexibility of the peptide within a given conformation. Low conformational movement indicates stability of a given conformation and leads to less adsorption than homopolypeptides with faster conformational movement. Likewise, low flexibility within a given conformation also leads to less adsorption. Neither amino acid affinities nor dynamic considerations alone predict surface coverage; rather both quantities must be considered in peptide adsorption to gold surfaces.

  13. Attosecond time-resolved imaging of molecular structure by photoelectron holography.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Bin; Bandrauk, André D

    2012-06-29

    Dynamic imaging of the molecular structure of H(2)(+) is investigated by attosecond photoelectron holography. The interference between direct (reference) and backward rescattered (signal) photoelectrons in attosecond photoelectron holography reveals the birth time of both channels and the spatial information of molecular structure. This is confirmed by simulations with a semiclassical model and numerical solutions of the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equation, suggesting an attosecond time-resolved way of imaging molecular structure obtained from laser induced rescattering of ionized electrons. It is shown that both short and long rescattered electron trajectories can be imaged from the momentum distribution.

  14. Numerical Investigation of Josephson Junction Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, I.; Dimova, S.; Boyadjiev, T.

    2009-10-29

    Multilayered long Josephson Junction Structures form an interesting physical system where both nonlinearity and interaction between subsystems play an important role. Such systems allow to study physical effects that do not occur in single Josephson junction.The Sakai-Bodin-Pedersen model--a system of perturbed sine-Gordon equations--is used to study the dynamic states of stacks of inductively coupled long Josephson Junctions (LJJs). The corresponding static problem is numerically investigated as well. In order to study the stability of possible static solutions a Sturm-Liouville problem is generated and solved.The transitions from static to dynamic state and the scenario of these transitions are analyzed depending on the model parameters. Different physical characteristics--current-voltage characteristics, individual instant voltages and internal magnetic fields, are calculated and interpreted.

  15. A First-principles Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Superionic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brandon; Marzari, Nicola

    2007-03-01

    Superionic materials---solids with liquid-like transport properties---have found widespread use in a variety of applications in fuel cells, switches, sensors, and batteries. However, reasons for fast-ion conduction in such materials, as well as the specific atomistic mechanisms involved, remain ill understood. Our work uses first-principles molecular dynamics to illuminate the mechanisms, pathways, and motivations for superionic conductivity in two materials representing different classes of ion conductors: α-AgI, an archetypal Type-I superionic; and CsHSO4, an anhydrous solid-state electrolyte candidate for hydrogen fuel cells. For α-AgI, we trace common pathways for silver ion conduction and discuss how a chemical signature in the electronic structure relates to enhanced silver ion mobility. We also characterize the dynamical lattice structure in the superionic phase and present the likely motivations for its existence. For CsHSO4, we isolate the dominant atomistic mechanisms involved in superprotonic conduction and discuss the effect of correlated diffusive events in enhancing proton transport. We also offer a detailed description of the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network topology in the course of proton diffusion and discuss the relevance of atomistic processes with competing timescales in facilitating proton transport.

  16. Structural investigation of Mimosa pudica Linn fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S. R.; Pattojoshi, P.; Tiwari, T. N.; Mallick, B.

    2017-04-01

    Sensitive plant ( Mimosa pudica Linn.) fibre is a natural fibre with electrically conductive property. Because of its electro-active sensing nature, it has been found very interesting among physicists, chemists, biologists, material scientists and technologists. So far as our knowledge is concerned; there is no report on the X-ray structure of M. pudica fibre using diffraction technique. In the present report, the M. pudica fibre has been extracted from the stem of the herb by sinking the stem in 10% NaOH solution for one week. The diffraction pattern of the fibre is found out to be cellulose-I. The effect of the fibre structure and its orientation due to different mounting have been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The I max of cellulose-I has been observed along (002) and (10\\overline{1)} for the perpendicular and parallel mounting of the native-fibre, respectively. Full width at half maxima of the diffraction profile turns out to be decreased with fibre orientation. Dimension of crystallite size D hkl estimated in the perpendicular mounting D_{hkl}^{ \\bot } is more as compared to that of the parallel mounting D_{hkl}^{{^{allel } }}. The smallest crystallite sizes observed in both parallel and perpendicular mounting are 18.78 and 30.78 Å respectively. It is expected that the present study may help to analyse the X-ray diffraction of fibre materials in general and natural fibres in particular.

  17. Structural investigation of Mimosa pudica Linn fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S. R.; Pattojoshi, P.; Tiwari, T. N.; Mallick, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica Linn.) fibre is a natural fibre with electrically conductive property. Because of its electro-active sensing nature, it has been found very interesting among physicists, chemists, biologists, material scientists and technologists. So far as our knowledge is concerned; there is no report on the X-ray structure of M. pudica fibre using diffraction technique. In the present report, the M. pudica fibre has been extracted from the stem of the herb by sinking the stem in 10% NaOH solution for one week. The diffraction pattern of the fibre is found out to be cellulose-I. The effect of the fibre structure and its orientation due to different mounting have been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The I max of cellulose-I has been observed along (002) and (10overline{1)} for the perpendicular and parallel mounting of the native-fibre, respectively. Full width at half maxima of the diffraction profile turns out to be decreased with fibre orientation. Dimension of crystallite size D hkl estimated in the perpendicular mounting D_{hkl}^{ bot } is more as compared to that of the parallel mounting D_{hkl}^{{^{allel } }} . The smallest crystallite sizes observed in both parallel and perpendicular mounting are 18.78 and 30.78 Å respectively. It is expected that the present study may help to analyse the X-ray diffraction of fibre materials in general and natural fibres in particular.

  18. The molecular structure of waxy maize starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Angellier-Coussy, Hélène; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Molina-Boisseau, Sonia; Dufresne, Alain; Bertoft, Eric; Perez, Serge

    2009-08-17

    The insoluble residues obtained by submitting amylopectin-rich native starch granules from waxy maize to a mild acid hydrolysis consist of polydisperse platelet nanocrystals that have retained the allomorphic type of the parent granules. The present investigation is a detailed characterization of their molecular composition. Two major groups of dextrins were found in the nanocrystals and were isolated. Each group was then structurally characterized using beta-amylase and debranching enzymes (isoamylase and pullulanase) in combination with anion-exchange chromatography. The chain lengths of the dextrins in both groups corresponded with the thickness of the crystalline lamellae in the starch granules. Only approximately 62 mol% of the group of smaller dextrins with an average degree of polymerization (DP) 12.2 was linear, whereas the rest consisted of branched dextrins. The group of larger dextrins (DP 31.7) apparently only consisted of branched dextrins, several of which were multiply branched molecules. It was shown that many of the branch linkages were resistant to the action of the debranching enzymes. The distribution of branched molecules in the two populations of dextrins suggested that the nanocrystals possessed a regular and principally homogeneous molecular structure.

  19. Structure, molecular evolution, and hydrolytic specificities of largemouth bass pepsins.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoko; Suzuki-Matsubara, Mieko; Kageyama, Takashi; Moriyama, Akihiko

    2016-02-01

    The nucleotide sequences of largemouth bass pepsinogens (PG1, 2 and 3) were determined after molecular cloning of the respective cDNAs. Encoded PG1, 2 and 3 were classified as fish pepsinogens A1, A2 and C, respectively. Molecular evolutionary analyses show that vertebrate pepsinogens are classified into seven monophyletic groups, i.e. pepsinogens A, F, Y (prochymosins), C, B, and fish pepsinogens A and C. Regarding the primary structures, extensive deletion was obvious in S'1 loop residues in fish pepsin A as well as tetrapod pepsin Y. This deletion resulted in a decrease in hydrophobic residues in the S'1 site. Hydrolytic specificities of bass pepsins A1 and A2 were investigated with a pepsin substrate and its variants. Bass pepsins preferred both hydrophobic/aromatic residues and charged residues at the P'1 sites of substrates, showing the dual character of S'1 sites. Thermodynamic analyses of bass pepsin A2 showed that its activation Gibbs energy change (∆G(‡)) was lower than that of porcine pepsin A. Several sites of bass pepsin A2 moiety were found to be under positive selection, and most of them are located on the surface of the molecule, where they are involved in conformational flexibility. The broad S'1 specificity and flexible structure of bass pepsin A2 are thought to cause its high proteolytic activity.

  20. Atomic scale structure investigations of epitaxial Fe/Cr multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kąc, M.; Morgiel, J.; Polit, A.; Zabila, Y.; Marszałek, M.

    2014-06-01

    Fe/Cr multilayers were deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on the MgO(1 0 0) substrate. Structural properties of the samples were analyzed by low energy electron diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), as well as by X-ray reflectivity, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and Auger electron spectroscopy. Investigations revealed multilayered system built of well-ordered Fe and Cr thin films with (1 0 0) orientation. A high geometrical perfection of the system, i.e. planar form of interfaces and reproducible thickness of layers, was also proven. Fe/Cr interface roughness was determined to be 2-3 atomic layers. CEMS studies allowed to analyze at atomic scale the structure of buried Fe/Cr interfaces, as well as to distinguish origin of interface roughness. Roughnesses resulting from interface corrugations and from the Fe-Cr interdiffusion at interfaces were observed. Fe/Cr multilayers showed strong antiferromagnetic coupling of Fe layers.

  1. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -} ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  2. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The solvation structures of Na^+, K^+, and Cl^- ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na^+, K^+, and Cl^-, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  3. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-), respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  4. Molecular road ecology: exploring the potential of genetics for investigating transportation impacts on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Balkenhol, Niko; Waits, Lisette P

    2009-10-01

    Transportation infrastructures such as roads, railroads and canals can have major environmental impacts. Ecological road effects include the destruction and fragmentation of habitat, the interruption of ecological processes and increased erosion and pollution. Growing concern about these ecological road effects has led to the emergence of a new scientific discipline called road ecology. The goal of road ecology is to provide planners with scientific advice on how to avoid, minimize or mitigate negative environmental impacts of transportation. In this review, we explore the potential of molecular genetics to contribute to road ecology. First, we summarize general findings from road ecology and review studies that investigate road effects using genetic data. These studies generally focus only on barrier effects of roads on local genetic diversity and structure and only use a fraction of available molecular approaches. Thus, we propose additional molecular applications that can be used to evaluate road effects across multiple scales and dimensions of the biodiversity hierarchy. Finally, we make recommendations for future research questions and study designs that would advance molecular road ecology. Our review demonstrates that molecular approaches can substantially contribute to road ecology research and that interdisciplinary, long-term collaborations will be particularly important for realizing the full potential of molecular road ecology.

  5. Molecular modeling and SPRi investigations of interleukin 6 (IL6) protein and DNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Rhinehardt, Kristen L; Vance, Stephen A; Mohan, Ram V; Sandros, Marinella; Srinivas, Goundla

    2017-06-22

    Interleukin 6 (IL6), an inflammatory response protein has major implications in immune-related inflammatory diseases. Identification of aptamers for the IL6 protein aids in diagnostic, therapeutic, and theranostic applications. Three different DNA aptamers and their interactions with IL6 protein were extensively investigated in a phosphate buffed saline (PBS) solution. Molecular-level modeling through molecular dynamics provided insights of structural, conformational changes and specific binding domains of these protein-aptamer complexes. Multiple simulations reveal consistent binding region for all protein-aptamer complexes. Conformational changes coupled with quantitative analysis of center of mass (COM) distance, radius of gyration (Rg), and number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in each IL6 protein-aptamer complex was used to determine their binding performance strength and obtain molecular configurations with strong binding. A similarity comparison of the molecular configurations with strong binding from molecular-level modeling concurred with Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) for these three aptamer complexes, thus corroborating molecular modeling analysis findings. Insights from the natural progression of IL6 protein-aptamer binding modeled in this work has identified key features such as the orientation and location of the aptamer in the binding event. These key features are not readily feasible from wet lab experiments and impact the efficacy of the aptamers in diagnostic and theranostic applications.

  6. Investigation of Changes in the Microscopic Structure of Anionic Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Acrylic acid) Microgels in the Presence of Cationic Organic Dyes toward Precisely Controlled Uptake/Release of Low-Molecular-Weight Chemical Compound.

    PubMed

    Kureha, Takuma; Shibamoto, Takahisa; Matsui, Shusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke

    2016-05-10

    Changes in a microscopic structure of an anionic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgel were investigated using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS). The scattering profiles of the microgels were analyzed in a wide scattering vector (q) range of 0.07 ≤ q/nm(-1) ≤ 20. In particular, the microscopic structure of the microgel in the presence of a cationic dye rhodamine 6G (R6G) was characterized in terms of its correlation length (ξ), which represents the length scale of the spatial correlation of the network density fluctuations, and characteristic distance (d*), which originated from the local packing of isopropyl groups of two neighboring chains. In the presence of cationic R6G, ξ exhibited a divergent-like behavior, which was not seen in the absence of R6G, and d* was decreased with decreasing the volume of the microgel upon increasing temperature. At the same time, the amount of R6G adsorbed per unit mass of the microgel increased upon heating. These results suggested that a coil-to-globule transition of the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) chains in the present anionic microgel occurred because of efficiently screened, thus, short ranged electrostatic repulsion between the charged groups, and hydrophobic interaction between the isopropyl groups in the presence of cationic R6G. The combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the cationic dye and the microgel affected the separation and volume transition behavior of the microgel.

  7. Molecular dynamics investigation on adsorption layer of alcohols at the air/brine interface.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong V; Phan, Chi M; Ang, Ha M; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu; Moroi, Yoshikiyo

    2015-01-01

    Alcohols are a significant group of surfactants which have been employed extensively in industry to improve the interfacial effects. Recently, the change in surface potential (ΔV) of two isomeric hexanols, methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) and 1-hexanol, was investigated by using an ionizing (241)Am electrode. It clearly showed the opposite effects between MIBC and 1-hexanol in the interfacial zone: one enhanced the presence of cations, whereas the other enhanced the presence of anions. This study employs molecular dynamics simulation to provide new insights into the interactions between alcohol molecules and ions as well as water at the molecular level. The results qualitatively agreed with the experimental data and verified the significance of MIBC branching structure on the molecular arrangement within the interfacial zone. The results also highlighted the role of the second water layer on the interfacial properties.

  8. Electronic and Magnetic Structure of Octahedral Molecular Sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey-Oppenheim, Aimee M.

    The major part of this research consists of magnetic and electronic studies of metal doped cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (KOMS-2). The second part of this study involves the magnetic characterization of cobalt doped MCM-41 before and after use in the synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes. Manganese oxides have been used widely as bulk materials in catalysis, chemical sensors, and batteries due to the wide range of possible stable oxidation states. The catalytic function of manganese oxides is further tuned by doping the material with numerous transition metals. It is of particular interest the oxidation states of Mn present after doping. New titrations to determine the oxidation state of Mn were investigated. To further examine the structure of KOMS-2, the magnetic contribution of dopant metals was also examined. The KOMS-2 structure having both diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions substitutions was studied. MCM-41 with the incorporation of cobalt into the structure was analyzed for its magnetic properties. The material undergoes significant structural change during the synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes. It was the focus of this portion of the research to do a complete magnetic profile of both the before and after reaction material.

  9. Investigations into the molecular size and shape of tomato extensin.

    PubMed Central

    Brownleader, M D; Byron, O; Rowe, A; Trevan, M; Welham, K; Dey, P M

    1996-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of soluble extensin from tomato have been investigated. An apparent molecular mass greater than 240 kDa has been previously observed with the shape-dependent method of gel-filtration chromatography [Brownleader and Dey (1993) Planta (Berlin) 191, 457-469]. Tomato extensin is a heavily glycosylated protein that does not migrate into SDS/polyacrylamide gels. This shape-dependent behaviour raises doubts about agreement between the observed apparent mass and the absolute value. The molecular mass measured with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was 72.3 kDa, with no evidence of any other species except a doubly charged ion. The sample was therefore considered to be monodisperse under the conditions used. Electron microscopy of soluble extensin showed the presence of particles 40-50 nm in length and 2.0-2.5 nm in width. A minority of these particles showed a central 'kink'. A number of smaller and generally wider particles (20 nm x 2-4 nm) were considered to be folded monomers and larger particles were thought to be dimers. Sedimentation analysis showed that extensin exists in a rapid monomer-dimer equilibrium in the concentration range and buffer used. Sedimentation equilibrium data gave a Kd of 8.5 microM and sedimentation velocity data generated a Kd between 1 and 10 microM. The concentration dependence of the measured sedimentation coefficient was used, together with hydrodynamic bead modelling, to define plausible shapes for monomer and dimer. This suggests that monomeric extensin is an elongated rod of length 40 nm and width 2 nm, which forms staggered dimers of average length 50 nm and width 3 nm. Extensin is an integral component of the primary cell wall. The physical characteristics (size, shape and form) of the rod-like extensin have been evaluated in this paper so that the role that extensin plays in primary cell wall architecture and during plant disease resistance can be

  10. Colour Chemistry, Part I, Principles, Colour, and Molecular Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallas, G.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses various topics in color chemistry, including the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorption and reflection of light, additive and subtractive color mixing, and the molecular structure of simple colored substances. (MLH)

  11. Colour Chemistry, Part I, Principles, Colour, and Molecular Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallas, G.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses various topics in color chemistry, including the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorption and reflection of light, additive and subtractive color mixing, and the molecular structure of simple colored substances. (MLH)

  12. Sculpting Molecular Potentials to Design Optimized Materials: The Inverse Design of New Molecular Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    REPORT Final Report on " Sculpting Molecular Potentials to Design Optimized Materials: The Inverse Design of New Molecular Structures" (Agreement...Beratan, Weitao Yang, Michael J. Therien, Koen Clays Duke University Office of Research Support Duke University Durham, NC 27705 - REPORT...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Jul-2009 Final Report on " Sculpting Molecular Potentials to Design Optimized Materials: The Inverse Design of New

  13. Molecular Modeling and Experimental Investigations of Nonlinear Optical Compounds Monosubstituted Derivatives of Dicyanovinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Antipin, Mikhail Yu.; Clark, Ronald D.; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1999-01-01

    A search for potential nonlinear optical compounds was performed using the Cambridge Structure Database and molecular modeling. We investigated a series of monosubstituted derivatives of dicyanovinylbenzene, since the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of such derivatives (o-methoxy-dicyanovinylbenzene, DIVA) were studied earlier. The molecular geometry of these compounds was investigated with x-ray analysis and discussed along with the results of molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The influence of crystal packing on the planarity of the molecules of this series has been revealed. Two new compounds from the series studied, ortho-F and para-Cl-dicyanovinylbenzene, according to powder measurements, were found to be NLO compounds in the crystal state about 10 times more active than urea. The peculiarities of crystal structure formation in the framework of balance between van der Waals and electrostatic interactions have been discussed. The crystal shape of DIVA and two new NLO compounds have been calculated on the basis of the known crystal structure.

  14. Molecular Modeling and Experimental Investigations of Nonlinear Optical Compounds Monosubstituted Derivatives of Dicyanovinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Antipin, Mikhail Yu.; Clark, Ronald D.; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1999-01-01

    A search for potential nonlinear optical compounds was performed using the Cambridge Structure Database and molecular modeling. We investigated a series of monosubstituted derivatives of dicyanovinylbenzene, since the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of such derivatives (o-methoxy-dicyanovinylbenzene, DIVA) were studied earlier. The molecular geometry of these compounds was investigated with x-ray analysis and discussed along with the results of molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The influence of crystal packing on the planarity of the molecules of this series has been revealed. Two new compounds from the series studied, ortho-F and para-Cl-dicyanovinylbenzene, according to powder measurements, were found to be NLO compounds in the crystal state about 10 times more active than urea. The peculiarities of crystal structure formation in the framework of balance between van der Waals and electrostatic interactions have been discussed. The crystal shape of DIVA and two new NLO compounds have been calculated on the basis of the known crystal structure.

  15. Diffusion and structure in silica liquid: a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, P. K.; Hong, N. V.; Vinh, L. T.

    2007-11-01

    Diffusion and structure in liquid silica under pressure have been investigated by a molecular dynamics model of 999 atoms with the inter-atomic potentials of van Beest, Kramer and van Santen. The simulation reveals that silica liquid is composed of the species SiO4, SiO5 and SiO6 with a fraction dependent on pressure. The density as well as volume of voids can be expressed as a linear function of the fraction of those species. Low-density liquid is mainly constructed of SiO4 and has a large number of O- and Si-voids and a large void tube. This tube contains most O-voids and is spread over the whole system. The anomalous diffusion behavior is observed and discussed.

  16. An investigation of the preparation of high molecular weight perfluorocarbon polyethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, R. O.; Tarrant, P.

    1972-01-01

    High molecular weight perfluorocarbon polyether gums were obtained by photolysis of perfluorodienes and discyl fluorides containing a perfluorocarbon polyether backbond. The materials obtained are represented by chemical formulas. A method was developed whereby reactive acyl fluoride and trifluorovinyl end groups are converted into inert structures. In order to investigate the possible preparation of difunctional molecules which may be useful in polymer synthesis, the reactions of hexafluoropropene oxide (HFPO) with Grignard and organolithium reagents have been studied. Reactions of various nucleophilic reagents with HFPO were also investigated.

  17. Yield and Failure Behavior Investigated for Cross-Linked Phenolic Resins Using Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Joshua D.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to fundamentally evaluate the yield and failure behavior of cross-linked phenolic resins at temperatures below the glass transition. Yield stress was investigated at various temperatures, strain rates, and degrees of cross-linking. The onset of non-linear behavior in the cross-linked phenolic structures was caused by localized irreversible molecular rearrangements through the rotation of methylene linkers followed by the formation or annihilation of neighboring hydrogen bonds. The yield stress results, with respect to temperature and strain rate, could be fit by existing models used to describe yield behavior of amorphous glasses. The degree of cross-linking only indirectly influences the maximum yield stress through its influence on glass transition temperature (Tg), however there is a strong relationship between the degree of cross-linking and the failure mechanism. Low cross-linked samples were able to separate through void formation, whereas the highly cross-linked structures exhibited bond scission.

  18. Molecular structure of the lecithin ripple phase.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Alex H; Yefimov, Serge; Mark, Alan E; Marrink, Siewert J

    2005-04-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lecithin lipid bilayers in water as they are cooled from the liquid crystalline phase show the spontaneous formation of rippled bilayers. The ripple consists of two domains of different length and orientation, connected by a kink. The organization of the lipids in one domain of the ripple is found to be that of a splayed gel; in the other domain the lipids are gel-like and fully interdigitated. In the concave part of the kink region between the domains the lipids are disordered. The results are consistent with the experimental information available and provide an atomic-level model that may be tested by further experiments.

  19. Molecular structure of the lecithin ripple phase

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Alex H.; Yefimov, Serge; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lecithin lipid bilayers in water as they are cooled from the liquid crystalline phase show the spontaneous formation of rippled bilayers. The ripple consists of two domains of different length and orientation, connected by a kink. The organization of the lipids in one domain of the ripple is found to be that of a splayed gel; in the other domain the lipids are gel-like and fully interdigitated. In the concave part of the kink region between the domains the lipids are disordered. The results are consistent with the experimental information available and provide an atomic-level model that may be tested by further experiments. PMID:15809443

  20. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  1. First Investigations on the Pantasma Structure (Nicaragua)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Beck, P.; Debaille, V.; Devouard, B.; Moustard, F.; Nomade, S.; Cornec, J.

    2016-08-01

    The 13 km diameter structure of Pantasma occurs in subhorizontal volcanics. Morphology, structure and deformation are compatible with a Quaternary impact. Recovered glass pebbles appear to be impact generated.

  2. Investigation of the Composition and Formation Constant of Molecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, R.; Loper, G. L.; Lin, S. H.; Eyring, H.

    1974-01-01

    It has been the purpose of the present paper to investigate and explore the conditions under which the linear relation between Δ/CD0 and Δ in the Hanna-Ashbaugh-Foster-Fyfe equation for the evaluation of equilibrium constants holds, (CD0 is initial concentration of a donor and Δ is the observed chemical shift relative to the chemical shift of the acceptor) to obtain the equation representing the exact linear relation between Δ/CD0 and Δ, when the linear relation between Δ/CD0 and Δ holds, and to discuss how to use the Job method in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements to determine the stoichiometry of molecular complexes. We have found that the conventional belief that CD0 should always be chosen to be much greater than CA0 (initial concentration of acceptor) is not necessarily always true and the exact linear relation between Δ/CD0 and Δ is represented by the equation Δ/CD0 = K1Δ0/(1 + K1CA0) - K1Δ/(1 + K1CA0)2, where K1 is the formation constant of the complex. It is shown that in the Job method of nuclear magnetic resonance measurements one has to plot ΔCA0 against the mole fraction, and the mole fraction at the maximum should give us the composition of the complex. Theoretical results have been verified experimentally on the weak interaction between naphthalene and methyl iodide. PMID:16592155

  3. Investigation of synthetic molecular recognition for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; McMasters, Sun; Sooter, Letha J.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2007-04-01

    A fundamental understanding of the factors which influence binding performance is critical to any technology or methodology relying on molecular recognition of a specific target species. For the Army, there is a growing need for a basic understanding of these interactions with traditional recognition elements (e.g., antibodies) in non-traditional environmental conditions, such as with new and emerging threats. There is a similar need for building a base of knowledge on non-traditional affinity ligands that are biomimetic or biosynthetic in nature. In this paper, specific research at the Army Research Laboratory towards the development, evaluation and use of synthetic affinity ligands for sensing applications is discussed. This includes the results of our investigations of aptamer-based affinity ligands targeting Campylobacter jejuni. Using capillary electrophoretic techniques, the relative binding affinities of the aptamer ligands towards the target pathogen as well as the degree of cross-reactivity with other food borne-pathogens (i.e., Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium) were evaluated. Current progress towards the development of synthetic affinity ligands for sensing applications will also be discussed.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of themore » substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  5. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  6. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, NMR spectra and molecular structure investigation of (E)-2-(3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)-1-(3-ethyl-2, 6-diphenyl piperidin-4-ylidene) hydrazine: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therasa Alphonsa, A.; Loganathan, C.; Athavan Alias Anand, S.; Kabilan, S.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents the characterization of (E)-2-(3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)-1-(3-ethyl-2, 6-diphenyl piperidin-4-ylidene) hydrazine (HDE) by quantum chemical calculations and spectral techniques. The structure was investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-vis and NMR techniques. The geometrical parameters and energies have been obtained from Density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP (6-31G (d, p)) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule was fully optimized, vibrational spectra were calculated and fundamental vibrations were assigned on the basis of total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using Gauge-independent atomic orbital method (GIAO). The electronic properties such as excitation energies, wavelength, HOMO, LUMO energies performed by Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. NBO analysis has been performed for analyzing charge delocalization throughout the molecule. The calculation results were applied to simulate spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. To provide information about the interactions between human cytochrome protein and the novel compound theoretically, docking studies were carried out using Schrödinger software.

  7. Hygrothermal aging effects on buried molecular structures at epoxy interfaces.

    PubMed

    Myers, John N; Zhang, Chi; Lee, Kang-Wook; Williamson, Jaimal; Chen, Zhan

    2014-01-14

    Interfacial properties such as adhesion are determined by interfacial molecular structures. Adhesive interfaces in microelectronic packages that include organic polymers such as epoxy are susceptible to delamination during accelerated stress testing. Infrared-visible sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to study molecular structures at buried epoxy interfaces during hygrothermal aging to relate molecular structural changes at buried interfaces to decreases in macroscopic adhesion strength. SFG peaks associated with strongly hydrogen bonded water were detected at hydrophilic epoxy interfaces. Ordered interfacial water was also correlated to large decreases in interfacial adhesion strength that occurred as a result of hygrothermal aging, which suggests that water diffused to the interface and replaced original hydrogen bond networks. No water peaks were observed at hydrophobic epoxy interfaces, which was correlated with a much smaller decrease in adhesion strength from the same aging process. ATR-FTIR water signals observed in the epoxy bulk were mainly contributed by relatively weakly hydrogen bonded water molecules, which suggests that the bulk and interfacial water structure was different. Changes in interfacial methyl structures were observed regardless of the interfacial hydrophobicity which could be due to water acting as a plasticizer that restructured both the bulk and interfacial molecular structure. This research demonstrates that SFG studies of molecular structural changes at buried epoxy interfaces during hygrothermal aging can contribute to the understanding of moisture-induced failure mechanisms in electronic packages that contain organic adhesives.

  8. Conformation of receptor-associated PGI2: An investigation by molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ah-lim; Strobel-Jager, Eva; Wu, Kenneth K.

    1991-04-01

    To elucidate the conformation of receptor-associated prostacyclin (PGI2), we first performed structure-activity correlation analysis of over 200 PGI2 analogues and derived from this analysis several crucial features pertaining to structural requirements for PGI2 activity [Ah-lim Tsai and Kenneth K. Wu, Eicosanoids, 2 (1989) 131-143]. These structural features proved to be useful guidelines for selecting `model molecules' for further investigations by molecular mechanics. By properly selecting four analogues with either rigid or uniquely oriented α-side chain structure for geometric fitting, we succeeded in maximally minimizing the degree of freedom of the carboxylate terminus of PGI2. We were able to define the spatial relationship among the four critical functional groups, i.e., C1-COOH, C6a-O, C11-OH and C15-OH. More information is needed, however, to define the geometry of the ω-side chain, particularly for the moiety beyond C15. Nevertheless, results from structure-activity correlation analysis and molecular modeling provide useful information regarding the conformation of receptor-associated PGI2, which assumes an `elongated' conformation instead of the traditional `hairpin' structure.

  9. Unraveling the Structure of Ultracold Mesoscopic Collinear Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurer, J. M.; Negretti, A.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-08-01

    We present an in-depth many-body investigation of the so-called mesoscopic molecular ions that can buildup when an ion is immersed into an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in one dimension. To this end, we employ the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method for mixtures of ultracold bosonic species for solving the underlying many-body Schrödinger equation. This enables us to unravel the actual structure of such massive charged molecules from a microscopic perspective. Laying out their phase diagram with respect to atom number and interatomic interaction strength, we determine the maximal number of atoms bound to the ion and reveal spatial densities and molecular properties. Interestingly, we observe a strong interaction-induced localization, especially for the ion, that we explain by the generation of a large effective mass, similarly to ions in liquid Helium. Finally, we predict the dynamical response of the ion to small perturbations. Our results provide clear evidence for the importance of quantum correlations, as we demonstrate by benchmarking them with wave function ansatz classes employed in the literature.

  10. Synthesis, spectroscopic investigations (X-ray, NMR and TD-DFT), antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of 2,6-bis(hydroxy(phenyl)methyl)cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Assem; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Soliman, Saied M; Ali, M; Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Shaik, Mohammed Rafi; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2015-07-21

    The synthesis of 2,6-bis(hydroxy(phenyl)methyl)cyclohexanone 1 is described. The molecular structure of the title compound 1 was confirmed by NMR, FT-IR, MS, CHN microanalysis, and X-ray crystallography. The molecular structure was also investigated by a set of computational studies and found to be in good agreement with the experimental data obtained from the various spectrophotometric techniques. The antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of the synthesized compound was investigated.

  11. Effect of valence of lanthanide ion and molecular symmetry in polyoxotungstoborate on the molecular structure and spectrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Jun; Naruke, Haruo

    2017-01-01

    The compound K9(NH4)H[CeIV(α-BW11O39)(W5O18)]·16H2O (1) was successfully isolated and structurally characterized. The structural investigation revealed that 1 displayed a less molecular distortion, whereas Ln3+-analogs exhibited a large molecular distortion. IR spectroscopy demonstrated that the spectral patterns of 1 and Ce3+-analog were depending on each valence of Ce (IV/III). 11B-NMR spectroscopy showed that a decrease in site symmetry of B atom in the polyoxotungstoborate was related with an increase in a half width of NMR peak. There is a difference in molecular distortion between 1 and Ce3+-analog, but they have similar large half widths because of the same site symmetry of B atom. The 4f electron in Ce atom exhibited less effect on the chemical shift.

  12. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  13. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  14. An Investigation of College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Structure-Property Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Corley, Leah M.; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2013-01-01

    The connection between the molecular-level structure of a substance and its macroscopic properties is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Students in college-level general and organic chemistry courses were interviewed to investigate how they used structure-property relationships to predict properties such as melting and boiling points. Although…

  15. An Investigation of College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Structure-Property Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Corley, Leah M.; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2013-01-01

    The connection between the molecular-level structure of a substance and its macroscopic properties is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Students in college-level general and organic chemistry courses were interviewed to investigate how they used structure-property relationships to predict properties such as melting and boiling points. Although…

  16. Structural investigation of a new antimicrobial thiazolidine compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozar, I. B.; Pırnǎu, A.; Vedeanu, N.; Nastasǎ, C.

    2013-11-01

    Thiazoles and their derivatives have attracted the interest over the last decades because of their varied biological activities: antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, inflammation or in the treatment of allergies. A new synthesized compound 3-[2-(4-Methyl-2-phenyl-thiazol-5-yl)-2-oxo-ethyl]-thazolidine-2,4-dione was investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopies and also by DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The very good correlation found between the experimental and theoretical data shows that the optimized molecular structure is very close to reality. Also the NMR spectra show a monomeric behaviour of this compound in solutions.

  17. Structural investigation of a new antimicrobial thiazolidine compound

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, I. B.; Pîrnău, A.; Vedeanu, N.; Nastasă, C.

    2013-11-13

    Thiazoles and their derivatives have attracted the interest over the last decades because of their varied biological activities: antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, inflammation or in the treatment of allergies. A new synthesized compound 3-[2-(4-Methyl-2-phenyl-thiazol-5-yl)-2-oxo-ethyl]-thazolidine-2,4-dione was investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopies and also by DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The very good correlation found between the experimental and theoretical data shows that the optimized molecular structure is very close to reality. Also the NMR spectra show a monomeric behaviour of this compound in solutions.

  18. DFT investigation on the electronic structure of Faujasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, Horea; Calborean, Adrian; Tudoran, Cristian; Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza

    2013-11-01

    We report here first-principle pseudopotential DFT calculations to investigate relevant aspects of the electronic structure of zeolites based FAU. Fundamental molecular issues of the band-gap and electronic population analysis were reviewed under GGA/RPBE level of theory, corroborated with a DZP basis set and Troullier-Martins norm conserving pseudo-potentials. The atom-projected density of states and the analysis of HOMO-LUMO frontier orbitals at Gamma point were performed. Their electronic transfers are discussed through the alignment and relative positions of orbitals in order to determine the way that the molecule interacts with adsorbed molecules and other practical applications. Mulliken population analysis was employed for describing atomic charge distribution in the chosen systems.

  19. Marine Toxins Origin, Structure, and Molecular Pharmacology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    thin-layer chromatography (TLC) were instrumental in the initial isolation and purification processes. Mass spectrometry (MS), infrared spectroscopy ...Frederick, MD 21701-5011 Methods of detection, metabolism, and pathophysiology of the brevetoxins, PbTx-2 and PbTx-3, are summarized. Infrared spectros...1R), circular dichroism (CD), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and X-ray crystal- lography all played important roles in structure

  20. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  1. Molecular sonography with targeted microbubbles: current investigations and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Misun; Lyshchik, Andrej; Fleischer, Arthur C

    2010-06-01

    Sonography using targeted microbubbles affords a variety of diagnostic and potentially therapeutic clinical applications. It provides a whole new world of functional information at the cellular and molecular level. This information can then be used to diagnose and possibly prevent diseases at early stages as well as devise therapeutic strategies at the molecular level. It is also useful in monitoring tumor response to therapy and devising treatment timing and plans based on the molecular state of an individual's health. Moreover, targeted microbubble-enhanced sonography has several advantages over other imaging modalities, including widespread availability, low cost, fast acquisition times, and lack of radiation risk. These traits are likely to advance it as one of the imaging methods of choice in future clinical trials examining the impact of molecular imaging on treatment outcome. This review describes the fundamental concepts of targeted microbubble-enhanced sonography as well as its potential clinical applications.

  2. Prediction of chemical carcinogenicity from molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongmao

    2004-01-01

    Carcinogens represent a serious threat to human health. In vivo determination of carcinogenicity is time-consuming and expensive, thus in silico models to predict chemical carcinogenicity are highly desirable for virtual screening of compound libraries of both pharmaceutically and other commercially interesting molecules. In the present study, a PLS-DA (partial least squares discriminant analysis) model was developed to predict carcinogenicities in each of four rodent models: male mouse (MM), female mouse (FM), male rat (MR), and female rat (FR). The data set that was used contained over 520 compounds from both the NTP and the FDA databases. All the models were built from the same molecular descriptor system, which is based on atom typing [Sun, H. J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2004, 44, 748-757], enabling the comparison of atomic contributions to carcinogenicity with respect to species and gender. Using four components, the models were able to achieve excellent fitting and prediction, with r(2) = 0.987 and q(2) = 0.944 for MM, r(2) = 0.985 and q(2) = 0.950 for FM, r(2) = 0.989 and q(2) = 0.962 for MR, and r(2) = 0.990 and q(2) = 0.965 for FR. The models were further validated by response permutation testing and external validation, and the results indicated that the models were both statistically significant and predictive. Variable influence on projection (VIP) analysis identified the key atom types and fragments that contributed to carcinogenicities and response differences across species and gender.

  3. Complementary molecular information changes our perception of food web structure.

    PubMed

    Wirta, Helena K; Hebert, Paul D N; Kaartinen, Riikka; Prosser, Sean W; Várkonyi, Gergely; Roslin, Tomas

    2014-02-04

    How networks of ecological interactions are structured has a major impact on their functioning. However, accurately resolving both the nodes of the webs and the links between them is fraught with difficulties. We ask whether the new resolution conferred by molecular information changes perceptions of network structure. To probe a network of antagonistic interactions in the High Arctic, we use two complementary sources of molecular data: parasitoid DNA sequenced from the tissues of their hosts and host DNA sequenced from the gut of adult parasitoids. The information added by molecular analysis radically changes the properties of interaction structure. Overall, three times as many interaction types were revealed by combining molecular information from parasitoids and hosts with rearing data, versus rearing data alone. At the species level, our results alter the perceived host specificity of parasitoids, the parasitoid load of host species, and the web-wide role of predators with a cryptic lifestyle. As the northernmost network of host-parasitoid interactions quantified, our data point exerts high leverage on global comparisons of food web structure. However, how we view its structure will depend on what information we use: compared with variation among networks quantified at other sites, the properties of our web vary as much or much more depending on the techniques used to reconstruct it. We thus urge ecologists to combine multiple pieces of evidence in assessing the structure of interaction webs, and suggest that current perceptions of interaction structure may be strongly affected by the methods used to construct them.

  4. Complementary molecular information changes our perception of food web structure

    PubMed Central

    Wirta, Helena K.; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Kaartinen, Riikka; Prosser, Sean W.; Várkonyi, Gergely; Roslin, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    How networks of ecological interactions are structured has a major impact on their functioning. However, accurately resolving both the nodes of the webs and the links between them is fraught with difficulties. We ask whether the new resolution conferred by molecular information changes perceptions of network structure. To probe a network of antagonistic interactions in the High Arctic, we use two complementary sources of molecular data: parasitoid DNA sequenced from the tissues of their hosts and host DNA sequenced from the gut of adult parasitoids. The information added by molecular analysis radically changes the properties of interaction structure. Overall, three times as many interaction types were revealed by combining molecular information from parasitoids and hosts with rearing data, versus rearing data alone. At the species level, our results alter the perceived host specificity of parasitoids, the parasitoid load of host species, and the web-wide role of predators with a cryptic lifestyle. As the northernmost network of host–parasitoid interactions quantified, our data point exerts high leverage on global comparisons of food web structure. However, how we view its structure will depend on what information we use: compared with variation among networks quantified at other sites, the properties of our web vary as much or much more depending on the techniques used to reconstruct it. We thus urge ecologists to combine multiple pieces of evidence in assessing the structure of interaction webs, and suggest that current perceptions of interaction structure may be strongly affected by the methods used to construct them. PMID:24449902

  5. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  6. Syntheses and molecular structures of new cali.

    PubMed

    Attner, J; Radius, U

    2001-01-01

    An unusual disproportionation reaction of the molybdenum(IV) and tungsten(IV) chlorides [MCl4L2] (M=Mo, L=Et2S, Et2O; M=W; L= Et2S) in the presence of p-tBu-calix[4]arene (Cax(OH)4) and triethylamine leads to d0 complexes [(CaxO4)[CaxO2(OH)2]M] (1) and d3 compounds (HNEt3)2[(CaxO4)2M2] (2). Complexes la (M = Mo), 1b (M = W), and the HCl adduct of 2a (M = Mo) have been structurally characterized. Compound 1a represents one of the few examples of a well-characterized molybdenum(VI) hexa-alkoxide complex of the type [Mo(OR)6]. Isolation and structural characterization of the side product [(CaxO4W)[kappa2(O)-kappa1(O)-CaxO3(OH)](CaxO4WCl)] (3) suggests the intermediacy of chloro-containing calix[4]arene complexes in these reaction mixtures. The reaction of 1a with HCI provides [CaxO4MoCl2] (4a), the first well-defined example of a mixed molybdenum(VI) alkoxide halide compound of the general formula [MoClx(OR)6-x].

  7. Structural investigations on lipid nanoparticles containing high amounts of lecithin.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Martin Alexander; Harms, Meike; Müller-Goymann, Christel Charlotte

    2006-02-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), an alternative colloidal drug delivery system to polymer nanoparticles, emulsions and liposomes, possess inherent low incorporation rates resulting from the crystalline structure of the solid lipid. To increase the drug loading capacity of SLN, matrix modification by incorporation of the amphiphilic lipid lecithin within the lipid matrices has been proposed as a promising alternative. The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of the lecithin on the microstructure of matrix modified SLN. In addition, these systems were checked for the existence of aggregates like mixed micelles, liposomes, etc., which could possibly be formed by lecithin leakage into the aqueous phase during the preparation process. For this purpose, laser diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed to investigate the structure, mobility, and molecular environment of the compounds. Lecithin incorporation within the lipid matrices resulted in a concentration dependent decrease in particle size up to a critical concentration of 30%. Lecithin incorporation up to 50% was investigated but caused no further particle size decrease. TEM revealed anisometrical and crystalline platelets of ellipsoidal to disc-like shape. Furthermore, SAXS and TEM showed no signs of lecithin and nonionic emulsifier derived aggregates in the aqueous phase. This points in agreement with NMR measurements to a strong attachment of both substances to the SLN surfaces. The proposed structure of the particles after melt emulsification consists of two different layers: a crystalline triglyceride-rich core is covered in dependence of the lecithin content either by a monomolecular or multimolecular lecithin/Solutol HS15 (SOL) layer.

  8. Relation between photochromic properties and molecular structures in salicylideneaniline crystals.

    PubMed

    Johmoto, Kohei; Ishida, Takashi; Sekine, Akiko; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Ohashi, Yuji

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structures of the salicylideneaniline derivatives N-salicylidene-4-tert-butyl-aniline (1), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-3-methoxyaniline (2), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-3-bromoaniline (3), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-3-chloroaniline (4), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-4-bromoaniline (5), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-aniline (6), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-4-carboxyaniline (7) and N-salicylidene-2-chloroaniline (8) were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis at ambient temperature to investigate the relationship between their photochromic properties and molecular structures. A clear correlation between photochromism and the dihedral angle of the two benzene rings in the salicylideneaniline derivatives was observed. Crystals with dihedral angles less than 20° were non-photochromic, whereas those with dihedral angles greater than 30° were photochromic. Crystals with dihedral angles between 20 and 30° could be either photochromic or non-photochromic. Inhibition of the pedal motion by intra- or intermolecular steric hindrance, however, can result in non-photochromic behaviour even if the dihedral angle is larger than 30°.

  9. Electronic and molecular structure of carbon grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almloef, Jan; Luethi, Hans-Peter

    1990-01-01

    Clusters of carbon atoms have been studied with large-scale ab initio calculations. Planar, single-sheet graphite fragments with 6 to 54 atoms were investigated, as well as the spherical C(sub 60) Buckminsterfullerene molecule. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have also been considered. Thermodynamic differences between diamond- and graphite-like grains have been studied in particular. Saturation of the peripheral bonds with hydrogen is found to provide a smooth and uniform convergence of the properties with increasing cluster size. For the graphite-like clusters the convergence to bulk values is much slower than for the three-dimensional complexes.

  10. Microwave spectrum and molecular structure of PNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, Toshiaki; Yamazaki, Emi; Tanimoto, Mitsutoshi

    1999-08-01

    The microwave spectra of P14N16O and its isotopomers P15N16O and P14N18O were observed in a dc glow discharge plasma of a mixture of nitric oxide and hydrogen gases over solid red phosphorus placed on the stainless steel electrode. Rotational transitions of the parent P14N16O species were measured in the ground state as well as in the vibrationally excited ν1 (PN str.), ν2 (bend), and 2ν2 states. The l=0 substate of the 2ν2 state interacts with the ν1 state through a Fermi resonance. The rotational constants determined for the ground states of the three isotopomers yield the substitution structure, rs(PN)=151.6516(87) pm and rs(NO)=119.5025(80) pm.

  11. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, NMR spectra, molecular structure, ESP, NBO and HOMO-LUMO investigation of 2-methylpyridine 1-oxide: a combined experimental and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Shoba, D; Periandi, S; Boomadevi, S; Ramalingam, S; Fereyduni, E

    2014-01-24

    In this paper, the equilibrium geometry, bonding features, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C chemical shift values, molecular electrostatic potential maps, HOMO-LUMO energies and several thermodynamic parameters of title compound in the ground state have been calculated by using the density functional method with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of 2-methylpyridine 1-oxide was reported. Furthermore, natural bond orbitals were performed in this work. The theoretical results showed an excellent agreement with the experimental values.

  12. DFT study of the effect of substitution on the molecular structure of copper phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Sachdeva, Ritika; Singh, Sukhwinder; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-05-01

    To study the effect of sulfonic acid group as substituent on the molecular structure of an organic compound copper Phthalocyanine, the optimized geometry, mulliken charges, energies and dipole momemts of copper phthalocyanine and copper phthalocyaninetetrasulfonic acid tetra sodium salt have been investigated using density functional theory. Also to predict the change in reactive sites after substitution, molecular electrostatic potential maps for both the molecules have been calculated.

  13. First-principles investigation of iron pentacarbonyl molecular solid phases at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Kien Nguyen; Steele, Brad A.; Landerville, Aaron C.; Oleynik, Ivan I.

    2017-01-01

    The polymeric phases of carbon monoxide (p-CO), an extended non-molecular solid, represent a new class of low-Z energetic materials. The presence of transition metal ions is believed to stabilize polymeric carbon monoxide (p-CO) at ambient conditions. Since p-CO forms at high pressures, it becomes important to investigate the high-pressure behavior of one of the potential precursors, iron pentacarbonyl Fe(CO)5. In this work, a first-principles evolutionary structure search method is used to determine the crystal phases of Fe(CO)5 at high pressure. The calculations predict the crystal structure of Phase I in agreement with experiment. Moreover, the previously unidentified crystal structure of Phase II is found. The calculated pressure-dependent Raman spectra are used to demonstrate that the changes in Raman spectra as a function of pressure observed in recent experiment can be explained without invoking a phase transition to a new phase III.

  14. Molecular structures and properties of starches of Australian wild rice.

    PubMed

    Tikapunya, Tiparat; Zou, Wei; Yu, Wenwen; Powell, Prudence O; Fox, Glen P; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2017-09-15

    Australian wild rices have significant genetic differences from domesticated rices, which might provide rices with different starch molecular structure and thus different functional properties. Molecular structure, gelatinization properties, and pasting behaviours of starch of three Australian wild rices (Oryza australiensis, taxa A (O. rufipogon like) and taxa B (O. meridionalis like)) were determined and compared to domesticated indica and japonica rice. These had higher amylose content, more shorter amylose chains and fewer short amylopectin chains, resulted in a high gelatinization temperature in these wild rices. Compared to domesticated japonica rice, taxa A had a lower pasting viscosity; taxa B had a similar pasting viscosity but lower final viscosity. The significantly different starch molecular structure from that of normal domesticated rices, and concomitantly different properties, suggest advantageous uses in products such as rice crackers or rice pudding, and a source of nutritionally-desirable slowly digestible starch. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular arrangement investigation of copper phthalocyanine grown on hydrogen passivated Si(1 1 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbi, I.; Ben Hamada, B.; Souissi, A.; Menzli, S.; Ben Azzouz, C.; Laribi, A.; Akremi, A.; Chefi, C.

    2014-06-01

    Chemical, electronic and structural properties of ultra thin films of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) grown on hydrogen passivated silicon (1 1 1) surfaces were investigated in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS), X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and electron diffraction (LEED). The early stages of copper phthalocyanine adsorption (1-2) were characterized by the saturation of surface defects and by a flat lying disposition on the surface. Upon further CuPc coverage, the passivation of Si surfaces resulted in the molecule taking a standing position in films. The molecular packing deduced from these studies appears very close to the one in the bulk α phase of CuPc. The work function of the films was found to be decreasing during the growth and was correlated with the molecular orientation.

  16. Molecular structure of vapor-deposited amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Li, C.; Pennycook, S. J.; Schneider, J.; Blom, A.; Zhao, W.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of amorphous selenium is clouded with much uncertainty and contradictory results regarding the dominance of polymeric chains versus monomer rings. The analysis of the diffraction radial distribution functions are inconclusive because of the similarities between the crystalline allotropes of selenium in terms of the coordination number, bond length, bond angle, and dihedral angle. Here, we took a much different approach and probed the molecular symmetry of the thermodynamically unstable amorphous state via analysis of structural phase transformations. We verified the structure of the converted metastable and stable crystalline structures using scanning transmission electron microscopy. In addition, given that no experimental technique can tell us the exact three-dimensional atomic arrangements in glassy semiconductors, we performed molecular-dynamic simulations using a well-established empirical three-body interatomic potential. We developed a true vapor-deposited process for the deposition of selenium molecules onto a substrate using empirical molecular vapor compositions and densities. We prepared both vapor-deposited and melt-quenched samples and showed that the simulated radial distribution functions match very well to experiment. The combination of our experimental and molecular-dynamic analyses shows that the structures of vapor- and melt-quenched glassy/amorphous selenium are quite different, based primarily on rings and chains, respectively, reflecting the predominant structure of the parent phase in its thermodynamic equilibrium.

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral investigations, DFT computations, Biological activities and molecular docking of methyl(2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl)(4-methylbenzene) sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-fluorophenyl)prop-2-enoate, a potential bioactive agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugavel, S.; Vetri Velan, V.; Kannan, Damodharan; Bakthadoss, Manickam

    2016-03-01

    The title compound methyl(2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl) (4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-fluorophenyl) prop-2-enoate (MFMSF) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. The grown crystals were characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the crystal, molecules are linked by intermolecular C-H…O hydrogen bonds forming a two-dimensional supramolecular network along [110] direction. The molecular geometry was also optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311G (d,p) basis set in ground state and compared with the experimental data. The entire vibrational assignments of wave numbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) by VEDA 4 programme. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. In addition, NLO, MEP, Mulliken, thermodynamic properties, HOMO and LUMO energy gap were theoretically predicted. The global chemical reactivity descriptors are calculated for MFMSF and used to predict their relative stability and reactivity. The antibacterial activity of the compound was also tested against various pathogens. The molecular docking studies concede that title compound may exhibit PBP-2X inhibitor activity.

  18. A mixed molecular modeling-robotics approach to investigate lipase large molecular motions.

    PubMed

    Barbe, Sophie; Cortés, Juan; Siméon, Thierry; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; André, Isabelle

    2011-08-01

    Large-scale conformational rearrangement of a lid subdomain is a key event in the interfacial activation of many lipases. We present herein a study in which the large-scale "open-to-closed" movement of Burkholderia cepacia lipase lid has been simulated at the atomic level using a hybrid computational method. The two-stage approach combines path-planning algorithms originating from robotics and molecular mechanics methods. In the first stage, a path-planning approach is used to compute continuous and geometrically feasible pathways between two protein conformational states. Then, an energy minimization procedure using classical molecular mechanics is applied to intermediate conformations in the path. The main advantage of such a combination of methods is that only geometrically feasible solutions are prompted for energy calculation in explicit solvent, which allows the atomic-scale description of the transition pathway between two extreme conformations of B. cepacia lipase (BCL; open and closed states) within very short computing times (a few hours on a desktop computer). Of interest, computed pathways enable the description of intermediate conformations along the "open-to-closed" conformational transition of BCL lid and the identification of bottlenecks during the lid closing. Furthermore, consideration of the solvent effect when computing the transition energy profiles provides valuable information regarding the feasibility and the spontaneity of the movement under the influence of the solvent environment. This new hybrid computational method turned out to be well-suited for investigating at an atomistic level large-scale conformational motion and at a qualitative level, the solvent effect on the energy profiles associated with the global motion. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Comprehensive Molecular Structure of the Eukaryotic Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Derek J.; Devkota, Batsal; Huang, Andrew D.; Topf, Maya; Narayanan, Eswar; Sali, Andrej; Harvey, Stephen C.; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Despite the emergence of a large number of X-ray crystallographic models of the bacterial 70S ribosome over the past decade, an accurate atomic model of the eukaryotic 80S ribosome is still not available. Eukaryotic ribosomes possess more ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA than bacterial ribosomes, which are implicated in extra-ribosomal functions in the eukaryotic cells. By combining cryo-EM with RNA and protein homology modeling, we obtained an atomic model of the yeast 80S ribosome complete with all ribosomal RNA expansion segments and all ribosomal proteins for which a structural homolog can be identified. Mutation or deletion of 80S ribosomal proteins can abrogate maturation of the ribosome, leading to several human diseases. We have localized one such protein unique to eukaryotes, rpS19e, whose mutations are associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia in humans. Additionally, we characterize crucial and novel interactions between the dynamic stalk base of the ribosome with eukaryotic elongation factor 2. PMID:20004163

  20. Molecular Evolution, Structure, and Function of Peroxidasins

    PubMed Central

    Soudi, Monika; Zamocky, Marcel; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Peroxidasins represent the subfamily 2 of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily and are closely related to chordata peroxidases (subfamily 1) and peroxinectins (subfamily 3). They are multidomain proteins containing a heme peroxidase domain with high homology to human lactoperoxidase that mediates one- and two-electron oxidation reactions. Additional domains of the secreted and glycosylated metalloproteins are type C-like immunoglobulin domains, typical leucine-rich repeats, as well as a von Willebrand factor C module. These are typical motifs of extracellular proteins that mediate protein–protein interactions. We have reconstructed the phylogeny of this new family of oxidoreductases and show the presence of four invertebrate clades as well as one vertebrate clade that includes also two different human representatives. The variability of domain assembly in the various clades was analyzed, as was the occurrence of relevant catalytic residues in the peroxidase domain based on the knowledge of catalysis of the mammalian homologues. Finally, the few reports on expression, localization, enzymatic activity, and physiological roles in the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Homo sapiens are critically reviewed. Roles attributed to peroxidasins include antimicrobial defense, extracellular matrix formation, and consolidation at various developmental stages. Many research questions need to be solved in future, including detailed biochemical/physical studies and elucidation of the three dimensional structure of a model peroxidasin as well as the relation and interplay of the domains and the in vivo functions in various organisms including man. PMID:22976969

  1. RxnFinder: biochemical reaction search engines using molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qian-Nan; Deng, Zhe; Hu, Huanan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions play a key role to help sustain life and allow cells to grow. RxnFinder was developed to search biochemical reactions from KEGG reaction database using three search criteria: molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity. RxnFinder is helpful to get reference reactions for biosynthesis and xenobiotics metabolism. RxnFinder is freely available via: http://sdd.whu.edu.cn/rxnfinder. qnhu@whu.edu.cn.

  2. Nuclear-structure investigations on spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Heisenberg, J.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear structure research at the University of New Hampshire is reported. Energy level studies using electron inelastic scattering and electron-induced fission are briefly discussed. Also, the theoretical studies are outlined including exchange current calculations, shell model RPA calculations, and self-consistent RPA. Publications are listed. (WHK)

  3. Structural Refinement of Proteins by Restrained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Non-interacting Molecular Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rong; Han, Wei; Fiorin, Giacomo; Islam, Shahidul M.; Schulten, Klaus; Roux, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of multiple conformational states is a prerequisite to understand the function of membrane transport proteins. Unfortunately, the determination of detailed atomic structures for all these functionally important conformational states with conventional high-resolution approaches is often difficult and unsuccessful. In some cases, biophysical and biochemical approaches can provide important complementary structural information that can be exploited with the help of advanced computational methods to derive structural models of specific conformational states. In particular, functional and spectroscopic measurements in combination with site-directed mutations constitute one important source of information to obtain these mixed-resolution structural models. A very common problem with this strategy, however, is the difficulty to simultaneously integrate all the information from multiple independent experiments involving different mutations or chemical labels to derive a unique structural model consistent with the data. To resolve this issue, a novel restrained molecular dynamics structural refinement method is developed to simultaneously incorporate multiple experimentally determined constraints (e.g., engineered metal bridges or spin-labels), each treated as an individual molecular fragment with all atomic details. The internal structure of each of the molecular fragments is treated realistically, while there is no interaction between different molecular fragments to avoid unphysical steric clashes. The information from all the molecular fragments is exploited simultaneously to constrain the backbone to refine a three-dimensional model of the conformational state of the protein. The method is illustrated by refining the structure of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the Kv1.2 potassium channel in the resting state and by exploring the distance histograms between spin-labels attached to T4 lysozyme. The resulting VSD structures are in good agreement with

  4. Rheological and microstructural investigation of oat β-glucan isolates varying in molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Agbenorhevi, Jacob K; Kontogiorgos, Vassilis; Kirby, Andrew R; Morris, Victor J; Tosh, Susan M

    2011-10-01

    The rheological properties and microstructure of aqueous oat β-glucan solutions varying in molecular weight were investigated. The structural features and molecular weights (MW) were characterized by (13)C NMR spectroscopy and high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC), respectively. The microstructure of the β-glucans dispersions was also examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The samples with β-glucan content between 78 and 86% on a dry weight basis had MW, intrinsic viscosity ([η]) and critical concentration (c*) in the range of 142-2800×10(3)g/mol, 1.7-7.2dl/g and 0.25-1.10g/dl, respectively. The flow and viscoelastic behaviour was highly dependent on MW and on the concentration of the β-glucans dispersions. Pseudoplastic behaviour was exhibited at high concentrations and Newtonian behaviour was evident at low concentrations. At the same concentration, the viscosity was higher for higher MW samples. The Cox-Merz rule was applicable for the lower molecular weight samples at higher concentrations whereas the high molecular weight sample deviated at concentrations greater than 1.0%, w/v. The mechanical spectra with variation of both MW and concentration were typical of entangled biopolymer solutions. AFM images revealed the formation of clusters or aggregates linked via individual polymer chains scattered heterogeneously throughout the system. The aggregate size increased with the molecular weight of the samples investigated and has been linked to the rheological behaviour of the samples. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  6. Molecular and chemical investigations and comparisons of biomaterials for ocular surface regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Hee; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Jae Hyung; Park, Dong Jin; Choi, Samjin; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated and compared the ultrastructural and chemical properties of representative biomaterials for ocular surface regeneration: a human amniotic membrane (AM) in a basal plate, a human AM in reflected chorion, a preserved AM, and a human corneo-scleral tissue. Assessments of the morphological differences in the extracellular matrices were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's trichrome (for total collagen), and picrosirius-red (for newly synthesized collagen) staining. Assessments of the changes in the molecular structures and chemical compositions of the biomaterials for ocular surface regeneration were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. A placental AM (52 %) was a dense and thick collagenous structure compared to a reflected AM (23 %). The spectroscopy did not obtain any structural information for a preserved AM. The cornea group (100 %, control) and sclera group (104 %) showed the collagen lamellae and interfibrillar spacing, and a slight inflammatory reaction with more fibrous and granulomatous tissues. There was a formation of newly synthesized collagen in a placental AM, while there were few collagen components in a reflected AM. Human AM tissues showed consistent Raman spectra and the characteristic collagen bands, similar to the corneal and scleral tissues. Therefore, these findings suggest that human placental AM and reflected AM are structurally suitable for scleral and corneal surface regeneration, respectively, while human placental or preserved AM and reflected AM are molecularly and chemically suitable for corneal and scleral surface regeneration, respectively.

  7. Importance of Molecular Structure on the Thermophoresis of Binary Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pardeep; Goswami, Debabrata

    2014-12-26

    Using thermal lens spectroscopy, we study the role of molecular structural isomers of butanol on the thermophoresis (or Soret effect) of binary mixtures of methanol in butanol. In this study, we show that the thermal lens signal due to the Soret effect changes its sign for all the different concentrations of binary mixtures of butanol with methanol except for the one containing tertiary-butanol. The magnitude and sign of the Soret coefficients strongly depend on the molecular structure of the isomers of butanol in the binary mixture with methanol. This isomerization dependence is in stark contrast to the expected mass dependence of the Soret effect.

  8. Molecular investigation on the interaction of spermine with proteinase K by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Koupaei, Mansoore; Shareghi, Behzad; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Davar, Fateme

    2017-01-01

    The alteration in structure, function and stability of proteinase K in the presence of spermine was investigated using spectroscopic methods and simulation techniques. The stability and enzyme activity of proteinase K-spermine complex were significantly enhanced as compared to that of the pure enzyme. The increase in the value of Vmax and the catalytic efficiency of Proteinase K in presence of spermine confirmed that the polyamine could bring the enzyme hyperactivation. UV-vis spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism methods demonstrated that the binding of spermine changed the microenvironment and structure of proteinase K. The fluorescence studies, showing that spermine quenched the intensity of proteinase K with static mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters analysis suggested that hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces play a key role in complex stability which is in agreement with modeling studies. The CD spectra represented the secondary structure alteration of proteinase K with an increase in α-helicity and a decrease in β-sheet of proteinase K upon spermine conjugation. The molecular simulation results proposed that spermine could interact with proteinase K spontaneously at single binding site, which is in agreement with spectroscopic results. This agreement between experimental and theoretical results may be a worth method for protein-ligand complex studies.

  9. Molecular structure and exciton dynamics in organic conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alan K.

    Intermolecular electronic interactions, dipole coupling and orbital overlap, caused by pi-pi stacking in organic conjugated polymers lead to unique structures and properties that can be harnessed for optoelectronic applications. These interactions define structure-function relationships in amorphous and aggregated forms of polymers in the solid state and determine their efficiencies and functionality in electronic devices, from transistors to solar cells. Organic polymer electronic device performance depends critically upon electronic coupling between monomer units -mediated by conformation and packing characteristics - that dictates electronic properties like conductivity and capacitance as well as electronic processes, such as charge carrier generation and transport. This dissertation demonstrates how electronic processes in conjugated polymers are mediated by subtle inter- and intra-chain electronic interactions imparted by the conformational degrees of freedom within their solid state structure and how this effects device performance. To initiate this investigation into structure-function relationships, an examination of nanoparticles representing two limiting aggregation states of the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) was conducted. These aggregates are defined by their predominate form of electronic coupling, inter- or intrachain, called H- and J-aggregates respectively. H- or J-aggregates of P3HT were embedded in an insulating matrix and time-resolved fluorescence intensity modulation spectroscopy was utilized to uncover the existence of efficient singlet-triplet quenching in J aggregates not present in H-aggregates. These studies were extended by examining P3HT H-and J-aggregates under applied electric fields in capacitor type devices using multiple time-resolved and steady-state spectroscopic techniques. These experiments reveal electronic couplings in J aggregates that shift excited state population towards a majority composed of long lived

  10. Investigation of the torsional barrier of EDOT using molecular mechanics and DFT methods.

    PubMed

    Durães, Jussara A; da Silva Filho, Demétrio A; Ceschin, Artemis M; Sales, Maria J A; Martins, João B L

    2014-08-01

    When heterocyclic monomers are polymerized by electrochemical or chemical methods, they form fully conjugated polymers which have a wide range of applications due to their outstanding electronic properties. Among this class of compounds, thiophene derivatives are widely used due to their chemical stability and synthesis flexibility. With the goal to investigate the torsion barrier of polymer chains, a few units of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) were chosen and submitted to molecular mechanics (MM), density functional theory (DFT) and coupled cluster CCSD(T) calculations. This study helps to understand the performance and transferability of force fields used in molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations often used to describe structure-property relationships of those systems. Determination of inter-ring torsion angle was performed in a comparative study using both force field, DFT and CCSD(T) methods. A good agreement was noticed between MM and QC results and highlights the importance of the description of the interactions involving the oxygen atoms present in the structure of EDOT. These observations are related to the α,α-coupling that occurs between the monomer units and yields a linear polymer. DFT HOMO and LUMO orbitals were also presented. Finally, UV-vis spectra of EDOT units were obtained using several levels of theory by means of time-dependent DFT calculations (TD-DFT).

  11. Electronic Structure Investigations of Aluminum Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-27

    EOARD, high energy density matter, Propellants, aluminium clusters 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON BARRETT A. FLAKE...la ser ablation source . Structures of the AICC H isomers halle been optim ized using density functional theory (OFT) and the excitation energies ...gra in composi tion, ioni1.ation balance, mass loss and elementa[ depletions from evolved Slars . To date, nine molecules containing the metals

  12. Investigation of Vibration Reduction through Structural Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    energy calculations (Equation 13) were beyond the scope of this study. However, by using the Direct Mctrix Abstraction Program ( DMAP ) capability in NASTRAN ...Fuselage vertical bending 26.96 29.47 6th Skid mode 29.04 - 25 The AH-lG elastic-line NASTRAN model (including the DMAP ALTER procedure developed for...energy method for reducing vibration response, primarily via structural stiffness changes, using NASTRAN beam-element repre- sentation of the WI-G with

  13. Probing dynamic interference in high-order harmonic generation from long-range molecular ion: Bohmian trajectory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Bing-Bing; Guo, Fu-Ming; Li, Su-Yu; Ding, Da-Jun; Chen, Ji-Gen; Zeng, Si-Liang; Yang, Yu-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Using Bohmian trajectory (BT) method, we investigate the dynamic interference in high-order harmonic generation from diatomic molecular ions. It is demonstrated that the main characteristics of the molecular harmonic spectrum can be well reproduced by only two BTs which are located at the two ions. This happens because these two localized trajectories can receive and store the whole collision information coming from all of the other re-collision trajectories. Therefore, the amplitudes and frequencies of these two trajectories represent the intensity and frequency distribution of the harmonic generation. Moreover, the interference between these two trajectories shows a dip in the harmonic spectrum, which reveals the molecular structure information.

  14. Investigating the influence of effective parameters on molecular characteristics of bovine serum albumin nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohiwal, S. S.; Satvekar, R. K.; Tiwari, A. P.; Raut, A. V.; Kumbhar, S. G.; Pawar, S. H.

    2015-04-01

    The protein nanoparticles formulation is a challenging task as they are prone to undergo conformational transitions while processing which may affect bioavailability for bioactive compounds. Herein, a modified desolvation method is employed to prepare Bovine Serum Albumin nanoparticles, with controllable particle size ranging from 100 to 300 nm and low polydispersity index. The factors influencing the size and structure of BSA NPs viz. protein concentration, pH and the conditions for purification are well investigated. The structure of BSA NPs is altered due to processing, and may affect the effective binding ability with drugs and bioactive compounds. With that aims, investigations of molecular characteristics of BSA NPs are carried out in detail by using spectroscopic techniques. UV-visible absorption and Fourier Transform Infrared demonstrate the alteration in protein structure of BSA NPs whereas the FT-Raman spectroscopy investigates changes in the secondary and tertiary structures of the protein. The conformational changes of BSA NPs are observed by change in fluorescence intensity and emission maximum wavelength of tryptophan residue by fluorescence spectroscopy. The field emission scanning electron and atomic force microscopy micrographs confirm the size and semi-spherical morphology of the BSA NPs. The effect of concentration and pH on particle size distribution is studied by particle size analyzer.

  15. Mechanistic investigation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by low molecular weight organic sulfur species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel, Eryn M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight organic sulfur species, often referred to as thiols, are known to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments and represent important chemical reductants of Fe(III) oxides. Thiols are excellent electron shuttles used during dissimilatory iron reduction, and in this capacity could indirectly affect the redox state of sediments, release adsorbed contaminants via reductive dissolution, and influence the carbon cycle through alteration of bacterial respiration processes. Interestingly, the reduction of Fe(III) oxides by thiols has not been previously investigated in environmentally relevant conditions, likely due to analytical limitations associated with the detection of thiols and their oxidized products. In this study, a novel electrochemical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiol/disulfide pair concentrations in situ during the reduction of ferrihydrite in batch reactors. First order rate laws with respect to initial thiol concentration were confirmed for Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by four common thiols: cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, and glutathione. Zero order was determined for both Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and proton concentration at circumneutral pH. A kinetic model detailing the molecular mechanism of the reaction was optimized with proposed intermediate surface structures. Although metal oxide overall reduction rate constants were inversely proportional to the complexity of the thiol structure, the extent of metal reduction increased with structure complexity, indicating that surface complexes play a significant role in the ability of these thiols to reduce iron. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of considering the molecular reaction mechanism at the iron oxide surface when investigating the potential for thiols to act as electron shuttles during dissimilatory iron reduction in natural environments.

  16. Structured water and water-polymer interactions in hydrogels of molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Jian; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Li; Wu, Tao

    2008-06-26

    Recently, molecular imprinting technology has fleetly developed for applications in different fields. It shows great potential in sensor design, drug delivery, chromatography separation, catalysis, chiral synthesis, and especially in the molecular recognition field. In this work, a cubic model of a hydrogel network was developed and an infinite hydrogel backbone network was constructed for molecular dynamics simulation. The water structure and water-polymer interaction was investigated from the radial distribution function and the viewpoint of the hydrogen-bonding system. It is found that the hydrogen bonds between polymer and water strongly depress the diffusion of water molecules and enhance the structure of water in the system. The greater the network mesh size of the polymer, the weaker the structure of the water. The decreasing of the density of hydrogen bonds between polymer and water is the major factor that leads to the weakening of water structure.

  17. Structural properties of CHAPS micelles, studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Fernando E; Garay, A Sergio; Rodrigues, Daniel E

    2014-04-10

    Detergents are essential tools to study biological membranes, and they are frequently used to solubilize lipids and integral membrane proteins. Particularly the nondenaturing zwitterionic detergent usually named CHAPS was designed for membrane biochemistry and integrates the characteristics of the sulfobetaine-type detergents and bile salts. Despite the available experimental data little is known about the molecular structure of its micelles. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the aggregation in micelles of several numbers of CHAPS (≤ 18) starting from a homogeneous water dilution. The force field parameters to describe the interactions of the molecule were developed and validated. After 50 ns of simulation almost all the systems result in the formation of stable micelles. The molecular shape (gyration radii, volume, surface) and the molecular structure (RDF, salt bridges, H-bonds, SAS) of the micelles were characterized. It was found that the main interactions that lead to the stability of the micelles are the electrostatic ones among the polar groups of the tails and the OH's from the ring moiety. Unlike micelles of other compounds, CHAPS show a grainlike heterogeneity with hydrophobic micropockets. The results are in complete agreement with the available experimental information from NMR, TEM, and SAXS studies, allowing the modeling of the molecular structure of CHAPS micelles. Finally, we hope that the new force field parameters for this detergent will be a significant contribution to the knowledge of such an interesting molecule.

  18. From non-random molecular structure to life and mind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    The evolutionary hierarchy molecular structure-->macromolecular structure-->protobiological structure-->biological structure-->biological functions has been traced by experiments. The sequence always moves through protein. Extension of the experiments traces the formation of nucleic acids instructed by proteins. The proteins themselves were, in this picture, instructed by the self-sequencing of precursor amino acids. While the sequence indicated explains the thread of the emergence of life, protein in cellular membrane also provides the only known material basis for the emergence of mind in the context of emergence of life.

  19. From non-random molecular structure to life and mind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    The evolutionary hierarchy molecular structure-->macromolecular structure-->protobiological structure-->biological structure-->biological functions has been traced by experiments. The sequence always moves through protein. Extension of the experiments traces the formation of nucleic acids instructed by proteins. The proteins themselves were, in this picture, instructed by the self-sequencing of precursor amino acids. While the sequence indicated explains the thread of the emergence of life, protein in cellular membrane also provides the only known material basis for the emergence of mind in the context of emergence of life.

  20. Investigation of Acoustic-Structure Interaction Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kin Loong

    1995-01-01

    A new procedure to formulate and analyze vibration problems of structural-acoustic coupled system has been established. At first, free vibration analysis of the acoustic system by the modal expansion method was applied for elliptic cavities, then the system equations of structure -acoustic coupled systems are formulated utilizing the concept of the equivalent mass source. The modal expansion method and a matrix transformation technique are used to solve the free and forced vibration problems. The final formulation of this method in the free vibration problems gives rise to a standard eigenvalue problem. The validity of the procedure is verified by comparing its results with the exact solutions for a one-dimensional coupled system. Parameters dictating coupling effects are also identified and discussed. In the final part of the dissertation, a new solution method was introduced to solve the forced response of acoustic -structure coupled system, which includes damping and absorbing elements. The new method proposed here does not require any matrix inversion as has been used in conventional methods. The method proposed here also has a better numerical efficiency. The other advantage of the method is that the effect of the absorbing material on the system response can be modeled as a virtual sound source with its own magnitude and phase. The system frequency response functions can be expressed as a summation of the uncoupled component modes of the system, The procedure for the forced response solution was again confirmed by comparing its results with the exact solution available for the one dimensional case. Possible applications of the method are also discussed.

  1. Determination of structure parameters in molecular tunnelling ionisation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in a molecular tunnelling ionisation model (the so-called MO-ADK model) for 23 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behaviour are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model. We show that the orientation-dependent ionisation rate reflects the shape of the ionising orbitals in general. The influences of the Stark shifts of the energy levels on the orientation-dependent ionisation rates of the polar molecules are studied. We also examine the angle-dependent ionisation rates (or probabilities) based on the MO-ADK model by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation calculations and with recent experimental measurements.

  2. Structural and dipolar fluctuations in liquid water: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco; Guardia, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the local tetrahedral order, molecular dipole fluctuations and their interrelation with hydrogen bonding in liquid water. Water molecules were classified in three types, exhibiting low, intermediate and high tetrahedral order. Transitions from low to high tetrahedrally ordered structures take place only through transitions to the intermediate state. The molecular dipole moments depend strongly on the tetrahedral order and hydrogen bonding. The average dipole moment of water molecules with a strong tetrahedral order around them comes in excellent agreement with previous estimations of the dipole moment of ice Ih molecules.

  3. ALMA Reveals Internal Structure of Molecular Clouds in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    We carried out high-resolution (0.7 pc) CO J=1-0 mosaic observations of five giant molecular clouds, which cover a wide range of evolutionary stages based on their associations to recent star formation, in the Large Magellanic Cloud with ALMA. The observations revealed a variety of spatial structures of the gas, from faint and diffuse emission to bright and compact structures. The variation of structures, which is similar to that seen in the Milky Way, is quantified by the brightness distribution function (BDF) and brightness distribution index (BDI) established in our prior studies. The structured molecular gas may indicate the readiness for, rather than the outcome of, star formation.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopic and structural investigations on fullerene: A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Christy, P. Anto; Premkumar, S.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-06

    The molecular structure of fullerene (C{sub 60}) molecule was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with 6-31G and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets using Gaussian 09 program. The vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized molecular structure of the molecule. The calculated vibrational frequencies confirm that the molecular structure of the molecule was located at the minimum energy potential energy surface. The calculated vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of functional group analysis and also confirmed using the GaussView 05 software. The frontier molecular orbitals analysis was carried out. The FMOs related molecular properties were predicted. The higher ionization potential, higher electron affinity, higher softness, lower band gap energy and lower hardness values were obtained, which confirm that the fullerene molecule has a higher molecular reactivity. The Mulliken atomic charge distribution of the molecule was also calculated. Hence, these results play an important role due to its potential applications as drug delivery devices.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic and structural investigations on fullerene: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, P. Anto; Premkumar, S.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The molecular structure of fullerene (C60) molecule was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with 6-31G and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets using Gaussian 09 program. The vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized molecular structure of the molecule. The calculated vibrational frequencies confirm that the molecular structure of the molecule was located at the minimum energy potential energy surface. The calculated vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of functional group analysis and also confirmed using the GaussView 05 software. The frontier molecular orbitals analysis was carried out. The FMOs related molecular properties were predicted. The higher ionization potential, higher electron affinity, higher softness, lower band gap energy and lower hardness values were obtained, which confirm that the fullerene molecule has a higher molecular reactivity. The Mulliken atomic charge distribution of the molecule was also calculated. Hence, these results play an important role due to its potential applications as drug delivery devices.

  6. Origin and structure of polar domains in doped molecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Meirzadeh, E.; Azuri, I.; Qi, Y.; Ehre, D.; Rappe, A. M.; Lahav, M.; Kronik, L.; Lubomirsky, I.

    2016-01-01

    Doping is a primary tool for the modification of the properties of materials. Occlusion of guest molecules in crystals generally reduces their symmetry by the creation of polar domains, which engender polarization and pyroelectricity in the doped crystals. Here we describe a molecular-level determination of the structure of such polar domains, as created by low dopant concentrations (<0.5%). The approach comprises crystal engineering and pyroelectric measurements, together with dispersion-corrected density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics calculations of the doped crystals, using neutron diffraction data of the host at different temperatures. This approach is illustrated using centrosymmetric α-glycine crystals doped with minute amounts of different L-amino acids. The experimentally determined pyroelectric coefficients are explained by the structure and polarization calculations, thus providing strong support for the local and global understanding of how different dopants influence the properties of molecular crystals. PMID:27824050

  7. The Oligomeric Structure of High Molecular Weight Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shinji; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Wert, David; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen; Lee, David H.

    2007-01-01

    There is great interest in the structure of adiponectin as its oligomeric state may specify its biological activities. It occurs as a trimer, a hexamer and a high molecular weight complex. Epidemiological data indicates that the high molecular weight form is significant with low serum levels in type 2 diabetics but to date, has not been well-defined. To resolve this issue, characterization of this oligomer from bovine serum and 3T3-L1 adipocytes by sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation and gel electrophoresis respectively, was carried out, revealing that it is octadecameric. Further studies by dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy established that bovine and possibly mouse high molecular weight adiponectin is C1q-like in structure. PMID:17292892

  8. Investigating Molecular Kinetics by Variationally Optimized Diffusion Maps.

    PubMed

    Boninsegna, Lorenzo; Gobbo, Gianpaolo; Noé, Frank; Clementi, Cecilia

    2015-12-08

    Identification of the collective coordinates that describe rare events in complex molecular transitions such as protein folding has been a key challenge in the theoretical molecular sciences. In the Diffusion Map approach, one assumes that the molecular configurations sampled have been generated by a diffusion process, and one uses the eigenfunctions of the corresponding diffusion operator as reaction coordinates. While diffusion coordinates (DCs) appear to provide a good approximation to the true dynamical reaction coordinates, they are not parametrized using dynamical information. Thus, their approximation quality could not, as yet, be validated, nor could the diffusion map eigenvalues be used to compute relaxation rate constants of the system. Here we combine the Diffusion Map approach with the recently proposed Variational Approach for Conformation Dynamics (VAC). Diffusion Map coordinates are used as a basis set, and their optimal linear combination is sought using the VAC, which employs time-correlation information on the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. We have applied this approach to ultra-long MD simulations of the Fip35 WW domain and found that the first DCs are indeed a good approximation to the true reaction coordinates of the system, but they could be further improved using the VAC. Using the Diffusion Map basis, excellent approximations to the relaxation rates of the system are obtained. Finally, we evaluate the quality of different metric spaces and find that pairwise minimal root-mean-square deviation performs poorly, while operating in the recently introduced kinetic maps based on the time-lagged independent component analysis gives the best performance.

  9. Molecular structure of DNA by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cricenti, A; Selci, S; Felici, A C; Generosi, R; Gori, E; Djaczenko, W; Chiarotti, G

    1989-09-15

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris(l-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with the use of a high-resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Constant-current and gap-modulated STM images show clear evidence of the helicity of the DNA structure: pitch periodicity ranges from 25 to 35 angstroms, whereas the average diameter is 20 angstroms. Molecular structure within a single helix turn was also observed.

  10. Molecular Structure of DNA by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cricenti, A.; Selci, S.; Felici, A. C.; Generosi, R.; Gori, E.; Djaczenko, W.; Chiarotti, G.

    1989-09-01

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris(1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with the use of a high-resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Constant-current and gap-modulated STM images show clear evidence of the helicity of the DNA structure: pitch periodicity ranges from 25 and 35 angstroms, whereas the average diameter is 20 angstroms. Molecular structure within a single helix turn was also observed.

  11. Rattlesnake Neurotoxin Structure, Mechanism of Action, Immunology and Molecular Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-10

    Aird, S. D., and Kaiser, I. I. (1988) Physiological and immunological properties of small myotoxins from -Zhe venom of the midget faded rattlesnake ...AD-A258 669 AD RATTLESNAKE NEUROTOXIN STRUCTURE, MECHANISM OF ACTION, IMMUNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY FINAL REPORT D TIC IVAN I. KAISER ELECTE S DEC...u m_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 6 2 7 8 7 A I 6 2 7 8 7 A 8 7 7 I A A [ ~A 3 1 7 8 2 1 (u) Rattlesnake neurotoxin structure

  12. Electronic Structure Investigation of Doping C60 with Metal Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenggong; Gao, Yongli

    2014-03-01

    Fullerene (C60) has been used extensively as an acceptor material in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Other applications including n-channel organic thin film transistors (OTFT) and C60 based organic superconductors have been reported more than a decade ago. We have investigated p-doping of C60 with molybdenum oxide (MoOx) with ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS), inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both surface doping and bulk doping by MoOx are studied. It was found that the thermally evaporated MoOx inter-layer substantially increased the surface workfunction. This increased surface workfunction strongly attract electrons towards the MoOx layer at the C60/MoOx interface, resulting in strong inversion of C60. Energy levels of C60 relax gradually as the thickness of C60 increases. An exceptionally long (greater than 400 Angstrom) band bending is observed during this relaxation in C60. Such a long band bending has not been observed for other organic/MoOx interface. For the bulk doping, MoOx doping ratios from 1% to over 100% were investigated. The saturation occurs at approximately 20 %, when the highest occupied molecular level (HOMO) of C60 starts to be pinned at the Fermi level. These studies demonstrate effective ways to manipulate the electronic structures of the fullerene. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR-1303742.

  13. Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mullenbach, Tyler K; McGarry, Kathryn A; Luhman, Wade A; Douglas, Christopher J; Holmes, Russell J

    2013-07-19

    Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives demonstrates how the diffusion length of rubrene can be enhanced through targeted functionalization aiming to enhance self-Förster energy transfer. Functionalization adds steric bulk, forcing the molecules farther apart on average, and leading to increased photoluminescence efficiency. A diffusion length enhancement greater than 50% is realized over unsubstituted rubrene.

  14. Crystal and molecular structure of lancerodiol–p–hydroxybenzoate

    PubMed Central

    Abd El–Razek, Mohamed H.; Hegazy, Mohamed–Elamir F.; Mohamed, Abou El–Hamd H.

    2010-01-01

    Lancerodiol–p–hydroxybenzoate was isolated from the leaves of Ferula sinaica L. (Apiaceae) as light needle crystals. This work reports for the first time the molecular structure and relative configuration of compound 1, established by X-ray analysis. PMID:21808543

  15. Investigation of Nuclear Partonic Structure. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Henry J.; Engelage, J. M.

    2016-08-30

    Our research program had two primary goals during the period of this grant, to search for new and rare particles produced in high-energy nuclear collisions and to understand the internal structure of nuclear matter. We have developed electronics to pursue these goals at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment and the AnDY experiment. Our results include discovery of the anti-hyper-triton, anti- 3Λ-barH, which opened a new branch on the chart of the nuclides, and the anti-alpha, anti- 4He, the heaviest form of anti-matter yet seen, as well as uncovering hints of gluon saturation in cold nuclear matter and observation of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions that will be used to probe orbital motion inside protons.

  16. The Venus SAGE Atmospheric Structure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, Anthony; Crisp, Dave; LaBaw, Clayton; Morse, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    Experiment goals and objectives are: a) To accurately define the state properties as a function of altitude from below the 10(exp -4) mb level (approx.150 km) to 92 bars (surface); b) To measure the stability of the atmosphere, and identify convective layers and stable layers, where they exist; c) To detect cloud levels from changes in the lapse rate at their boundaries; d) To provide state properties within the cloud levels, and thus provide supplementary information on cloud composition; e) To search for and characterize wave structure within the atmosphere; f) To search for and measure the intensity and scale of turbulence; g) To measure descent and surface wind speed and direction; h) To provide Lander altitude and attitude during decent for descent imaging analysis; and i) To provide a back-up landing sensor.

  17. Structure and photochromic properties of molybdenum-containing silica gels obtained by molecular-lamination method

    SciTech Connect

    Belotserkovskaya, N.G.; Dobychin, D.P.; Pak, V.N.

    1992-05-10

    The structure and physicochemical properties of molybdenum-containing silica gels obtained by molecular lamination have been studied quite extensively. Up to the present, however, no studies have been made of the influence of the pore structure of the original silica gel on the structure and properties of molybdenum-containing silica gels (MSG). The problem is quite important, since molybdenum silicas obtained by molecular lamination may find applications in catalysis and as sensors of UV radiation. In either case, the structure of the support is not a factor to be ignored. Here, the authors are reporting on an investigation of the structure of MSG materials with different pore structures and their susceptibility to reduction of the Mo(VI) oxide groupings when exposed to UV radiation. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. An experimental and theoretical investigation of Acenaphthene-5-boronic acid: conformational study, NBO and NLO analysis, molecular structure and FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV spectra.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Sinha, Leena; Prasad, Onkar; Asiri, Abdullah M; Cinar, Mehmet

    2013-11-01

    The solid state Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of Acenaphthene-5-boronic acid (AN-5-BA), have been recorded in the range 4000-400cm(-1) and 4000-10cm(-1), respectively. Density functional theory (DFT), with the B3LYP functional was used for the optimization of the ground state geometry and simulation of the infrared and Raman spectra of the molecule. The vibrational wave numbers and their assignments were examined theoretically using the Gaussian 09 set of quantum chemistry codes and the normal modes were assigned by a scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) force field approach. Hydrogen-bonded dimer of AN-5-BA, optimized by counterpoise correction, has also been studied by B3LYP at the 6-311++G(d,p) level and the effects of molecular association through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonding have been discussed. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by Gauge-Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been applied to study stability of the molecule arising from charge delocalization. UV spectrum of the title compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as frontier orbitals, and band gap energies were measured by TD-DFT approach. The first order hyperpolarizability 〈β〉, its components and associated properties such as average polarizability and anisotropy of the polarizability (α and Δα) of AN-5-BA was calculated using the finite-field approach.

  19. Investigate the binding of catechins to trypsin using docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fengchao; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Yunqi

    2015-01-01

    To explore the inhibitory mechanism of catechins for digestive enzymes, we investigated the binding mode of catechins to a typical digestive enzyme-trypsin and analyzed the structure-activity relationship of catechins, using an integration of molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculation. We found that catechins with different structures bound to a conservative pocket S1 of trypsin, which is comprised of residues 189-195, 214-220 and 225-228. In the trypsin-catechin complexes, Asp189 by forming strong hydrogen bonding, and Gln192, Trp215 and Gly216 through hydrophobic interactions, all significantly contribute to the binding of catechins. The number and the position of hydroxyl and aromatic groups, the structure of stereoisomers, and the orientation of catechins in the binding pocket S1 of trypsin all affect the binding affinity. The binding affinity is in the order of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) > Epicatechin gallate (ECG) > Epicatechin (EC) > Epigallocatechin (EGC), and 2R-3R EGCG shows the strongest binding affinity out of other stereoisomers. Meanwhile, the synergic conformational changes of residues and catechins were also analyzed. These findings will be helpful in understanding the knowledge of interactions between catechins and trypsin and referable for the design of novel polyphenol based functional food and nutriceutical formulas.

  20. Investigate the Binding of Catechins to Trypsin Using Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fengchao; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Yunqi

    2015-01-01

    To explore the inhibitory mechanism of catechins for digestive enzymes, we investigated the binding mode of catechins to a typical digestive enzyme-trypsin and analyzed the structure-activity relationship of catechins, using an integration of molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculation. We found that catechins with different structures bound to a conservative pocket S1 of trypsin, which is comprised of residues 189–195, 214–220 and 225–228. In the trypsin-catechin complexes, Asp189 by forming strong hydrogen bonding, and Gln192, Trp215 and Gly216 through hydrophobic interactions, all significantly contribute to the binding of catechins. The number and the position of hydroxyl and aromatic groups, the structure of stereoisomers, and the orientation of catechins in the binding pocket S1 of trypsin all affect the binding affinity. The binding affinity is in the order of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) > Epicatechin gallate (ECG) > Epicatechin (EC) > Epigallocatechin (EGC), and 2R-3R EGCG shows the strongest binding affinity out of other stereoisomers. Meanwhile, the synergic conformational changes of residues and catechins were also analyzed. These findings will be helpful in understanding the knowledge of interactions between catechins and trypsin and referable for the design of novel polyphenol based functional food and nutriceutical formulas. PMID:25938485

  1. Elucidation of Drug Metabolite Structural Isomers Using Molecular Modeling Coupled with Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, Eamonn; Munoz-Muriedas, Jordi; Roberts, Andrew D; Dear, Gordon J; Robinson, Carol V; Beaumont, Claire

    2016-02-16

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in combination with molecular modeling offers the potential for small molecule structural isomer identification by measurement of their gas phase collision cross sections (CCSs). Successful application of this approach to drug metabolite identification would facilitate resource reduction, including animal usage, and may benefit other areas of pharmaceutical structural characterization including impurity profiling and degradation chemistry. However, the conformational behavior of drug molecules and their metabolites in the gas phase is poorly understood. Here the gas phase conformational space of drug and drug-like molecules has been investigated as well as the influence of protonation and adduct formation on the conformations of drug metabolite structural isomers. The use of CCSs, measured from IM-MS and molecular modeling information, for the structural identification of drug metabolites has also been critically assessed. Detection of structural isomers of drug metabolites using IM-MS is demonstrated and, in addition, a molecular modeling approach has been developed offering rapid conformational searching and energy assessment of candidate structures which agree with experimental CCSs. Here it is illustrated that isomers must possess markedly dissimilar CCS values for structural differentiation, the existence and extent of CCS differences being ionization state and molecule dependent. The results present that IM-MS and molecular modeling can inform on the identity of drug metabolites and highlight the limitations of this approach in differentiating structural isomers.

  2. Structural investigation into physiological DNA phosphorothioate modification

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Wenxian; Hu, Zhongpei; Shen, Jie; Wang, Chunxi; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Huili; Long, Dewu; Liu, Maili; Cao, Chunyang

    2016-01-01

    DNA phosphorothioate (PT) modification, with sulfur replacing a nonbridging phosphate oxygen in a sequence and stereo specific manner, is a novel physiological variation in bacteria. But what effects on DNA properties PT modification has is still unclear. To address this, we prepared three double-stranded (ds) DNA decamers, d(CGPXGCCGCCGA) with its complementary strand d(TCGGCGPXGCCG) (where X = O or S, i.e., PT-free dsDNA, [Sp, Sp]-PT dsDNA or [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA) located in gene of Streptomyces lividans. Their melting temperature (Tm) measurement indicates that [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA is most unstable. Their electron transfer potential detection presents an order of anti-oxidation properties: Sp-PT DNA > Rp-PT DNA > PT-free DNA. Their NMR structures demonstrate that PT modification doesn’t change their B-form conformation. The sulfur in [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA locates in the major groove, with steric effects on protons in the sugar close to modification sites, resulting in its unstability, and facilitating its selectively interactions with ScoMcrA. We thought that PT modification was dialectical to the bacteria. It protects the hosting bacteria by working as antioxidant against H2O2, and acts as a marker, directing restriction enzyme observed in other hosts, like ScoMcrA, to correctly cleave the PT modified DNA, so that bacteria cannot spread and survive. PMID:27169778

  3. Structural investigation into physiological DNA phosphorothioate modification.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wenxian; Hu, Zhongpei; Shen, Jie; Wang, Chunxi; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Huili; Long, Dewu; Liu, Maili; Cao, Chunyang

    2016-05-12

    DNA phosphorothioate (PT) modification, with sulfur replacing a nonbridging phosphate oxygen in a sequence and stereo specific manner, is a novel physiological variation in bacteria. But what effects on DNA properties PT modification has is still unclear. To address this, we prepared three double-stranded (ds) DNA decamers, d(CG(PX)GCCGCCGA) with its complementary strand d(TCGGCG(PX)GCCG) (where X = O or S, i.e., PT-free dsDNA, [Sp, Sp]-PT dsDNA or [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA) located in gene of Streptomyces lividans. Their melting temperature (Tm) measurement indicates that [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA is most unstable. Their electron transfer potential detection presents an order of anti-oxidation properties: Sp-PT DNA > Rp-PT DNA > PT-free DNA. Their NMR structures demonstrate that PT modification doesn't change their B-form conformation. The sulfur in [Rp, Rp]-PT dsDNA locates in the major groove, with steric effects on protons in the sugar close to modification sites, resulting in its unstability, and facilitating its selectively interactions with ScoMcrA. We thought that PT modification was dialectical to the bacteria. It protects the hosting bacteria by working as antioxidant against H2O2, and acts as a marker, directing restriction enzyme observed in other hosts, like ScoMcrA, to correctly cleave the PT modified DNA, so that bacteria cannot spread and survive.

  4. Investigating surface structures by EUV scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, Victor; Laubis, Christian; Fernández Herrero, Analía.; Pflüger, Mika; Haase, Anton; Scholze, Frank

    2017-03-01

    As the industry continues to progress along the ITRS roadmap, not only the device dimensions shrink, but the architectures also increase in 3D complexity. Therefore, new metrology approaches for small structures are required. Small angle X-ray scattering has the potential for fast in line metrology but suffers from the large spot size needed in grazing incidence reflection and the low signal for the transmission geometry. Turning the incidence angle closer to normal and tuning the wavelengths into the EUV spectral range allows to decrease the spot size while keeping the signal high. We present an exploration of soft X-ray and EUV-scatterometry from grazing to near normal incidence, including a new approach in the design of metrology targets to avoid the footprint problem in grazing incidence geometry. Measurements were performed on e-beam written silicon gratings. The reconstructed geometrical line shape models are statistically validated by applying a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo sampling technique. Experimental data and simulation results provide a first insight into the potential of EUV Scatterometry.

  5. Investigation of deformation mechanisms of staggered nanocomposites using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiazhagan, S.; Anup, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biological materials with nanostructure of regularly or stair-wise staggered arrangements of hard platelets reinforced in a soft protein matrix have superior mechanical properties. Applications of these nanostructures to ceramic matrix composites could enhance their toughness. Using molecular dynamics simulations, mechanical behaviour of the bio-inspired nanocomposites is studied. Regularly staggered model shows better flow behaviour compared to stair-wise staggered model due to the symmetrical crack propagation along the interface. Though higher stiffness and strength are obtained for stair-wise staggered models, rapid crack propagation reduces the toughness. Arresting this crack propagation could lead to superior mechanical properties in stair-wise staggered models.

  6. Molecular Population Genetic Structure in the Piping Plover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark P.; Haig, Susan M.; Gratto-Trevor, Cheri L.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    The Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) is a migratory shorebird currently listed as Endangered in Canada and the U.S. Great Lakes, and threatened throughout the remainder of its U.S. breeding and winter range. In this study, we undertook the first comprehensive molecular genetic-based investigation of Piping Plovers. Our primary goals were to (1) address higher level subspecific taxonomic issues, (2) characterize population genetic structure, and (3) make inferences regarding past bottlenecks or population expansions that have occurred within this species. Our analyses included samples of individuals from 23 U.S. States and Canadian Provinces, and were based on mitochondrial DNA sequences (580 bp, n = 245 individuals) and eight nuclear microsatellite loci (n = 229 individuals). Our findings illustrate strong support for separate Atlantic and Interior Piping Plover subspecies (C. m. melodus and C. m. circumcinctus, respectively). Birds from the Great Lakes region were allied with the Interior subspecies group and should be taxonomically referred to as C. m. circumcinctus. Population genetic analyses suggested that genetic structure was stronger among Atlantic birds relative to the Interior group. This pattern indicates that natal and breeding site fidelity may be reduced among Interior birds. Furthermore, analyses suggested that Interior birds have previously experienced genetic bottlenecks, whereas no evidence for such patterns existed among the Atlantic subspecies. Likewise, genetic analyses indicated that the Great Lakes region has experienced a population expansion. This finding may be interpreted as population growth following a previous bottleneck event. No genetic evidence for population expansions was found for Atlantic, Prairie Canada, or U.S. Northern Great Plains individuals. We interpret our population history insights in light of 25 years of Piping Plover census data. Overall, differences observed between Interior and Atlantic birds may reflect

  7. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song-Feng, Zhao; Fang, Huang; Guo-Li, Wang; Xiao-Xin, Zhou

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  8. Single Molecule Switches and Molecular Self-Assembly: Low Temperature STM Investigations and Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Iancu, Violeta

    2006-08-01

    This dissertation is devoted to single molecule investigations and manipulations of two porphyrin-based molecules, chlorophyll-a and Co-popphyrin. The molecules are absorbed on metallic substrates and studied at low temperatures using a scanning tunneling microscope. The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the molecules are investigated in detail with atomic level precision. Chlorophyll-a is the key ingredient in photosynthesis processes while Co-porphyrin is a magnetic molecule that represents the recent emerging field of molecular spintronics. Using the scanning tunneling microscope tip and the substrate as electrodes, and the molecules as active ingredients, single molecule switches made of these two molecules are demonstrated. The first switch, a multiple and reversible mechanical switch, is realized by using chlorophyll-a where the energy transfer of a single tunneling electron is used to rotate a C-C bond of the molecule's tail on a Au(111) surface. Here, the det

  9. Molecular design for growth of supramolecular membranes with hierarchical structure.

    PubMed

    Zha, R Helen; Velichko, Yuri S; Bitton, Ronit; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-02-07

    Membranes with hierarchical structure exist in biological systems, and bio-inspired building blocks have been used to grow synthetic analogues in the laboratory through self-assembly. The formation of these synthetic membranes is initiated at the interface of two aqueous solutions, one containing cationic peptide amphiphiles (PA) and the other containing the anionic biopolymer hyaluronic acid (HA). The membrane growth process starts within milliseconds of interface formation and continues over much longer timescales to generate robust membranes with supramolecular PA-HA nanofibers oriented orthogonal to the interface. Computer simulation indicates that formation of these hierarchically structured membranes requires strong interactions between molecular components at early time points in order to generate a diffusion barrier between both solutions. Experimental studies using structurally designed PAs confirm simulation results by showing that only PAs with high ζ potential are able to yield hierarchically structured membranes. Furthermore, the chemical structure of such PAs must incorporate residues that form β-sheets, which facilitates self-assembly of long nanofibers. In contrast, PAs that form low aspect ratio nanostructures interact weakly with HA and yield membranes that exhibit non-fibrous fingering protrusions. Furthermore, experimental results show that increasing HA molecular weight decreases the growth rate of orthogonal nanofibers. This result is supported by simulation results suggesting that the thickness of the interfacial contact layer generated immediately after initiation of self-assembly increases with polymer molecular weight.

  10. Photoelectron Angular Distribution and Molecular Structure in Multiply Charged Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Lai S.

    2009-02-12

    Photoelectrons emitted from multiply charged anions (MCAs) carry information of the intramolecular Coulomb repulsion (ICR), which is dependent on molecular structures. Using photoelectron imaging, we observed the effects of ICR on photoelectron angular distributions (PAD) of the three isomers of benzene dicarboxylate dianions C6H4(CO2)22– (o-, m- and p-BDC2–). Photoelectrons were observed to peak along the laser polarization due to the ICR, but the anisotropy was the largest for p-BDC2–, followed by the m- and o-isomer. The observed anisotropy is related to the direction of the ICR or the detailed molecular structures, suggesting that photoelectron imaging may allow structural information to be obtained for complex multiply charged anions.

  11. Designing π-stacked molecular structures to control heat transport through molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiršanskas, Gediminas; Li, Qian; Solomon, Gemma C.; Flensberg, Karsten; Leijnse, Martin

    2014-12-08

    We propose and analyze a way of using π stacking to design molecular junctions that either enhance or suppress a phononic heat current, but at the same time remain conductors for an electric current. Such functionality is highly desirable in thermoelectric energy converters, as well as in other electronic components where heat dissipation should be minimized or maximized. We suggest a molecular design consisting of two masses coupled to each other with one mass coupled to each lead. By having a small coupling (spring constant) between the masses, it is possible to either reduce or perhaps more surprisingly enhance the phonon conductance. We investigate a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use first principle calculations to extract model parameters for a number of specific molecular realizations, confirming that our proposal can indeed be realized using standard molecular building blocks.

  12. Interaction between new synthesized derivative of (E,E)-azomethines and BN(6,6-7) nanotube for medical applications: Geometry optimization, molecular structure, spectroscopic (NMR, UV/Vis, excited state), FMO, MEP and HOMO-LUMO investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhi, Masoome; Shahab, Siyamak; Filippovich, Liudmila; Khaleghian, Mehrnoosh; Dikusar, Evgenij; Mashayekhi, Mahsa

    2017-10-01

    In this present work, first time interaction between new synthesized derivative of the 4-((E)-((4-((E)-phenyldiazenyl)phenyl)imino)methyl)benzoic acid (E-PABA) and the BN(6,6-7) Nanotube for medical applications were studied. The geometries of the compounds E-PABA, the BN(6,6-7) Nanotube and the Complex BN(6,6-7)/E-PABA were optimized by Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the gas phase. The adsorption effect of the compound E-PABA on the electronic properties, chemical shift tensors and natural charge of the BN(6,6-7) Nanotube was investigated and discussed. The electronic spectra of the E-PABA and the Complex BN(6,6-7)/E-PABA in the gas phase carried out by Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) for the foundation adsorption effect on maximum wavelength of the E-PABA.

  13. Investigation of molecular penetration depth variation with SMBI fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Lin; Wang, Zhan-Hui; Xu, Min; Wang, Qi; Nie, Lin; Feng, Hao; Sun, Wei-Guo

    2016-09-01

    We study the molecular penetration depth variation with the SMBI fluxes. The molecular transport process and the penetration depth during SMBI with various injection velocities and densities are simulated and compared. It is found that the penetration depth of molecules strongly depends on the radial convective transport of SMBI and it increases with the increase of the injection velocity. The penetration depth does not vary much once the SMBI injection density is larger than a critical value due to the dramatic increase of the dissociation rate on the fueling path. An effective way to improve the SMBI penetration depth has been predicted, which is SMBI with a large radial injection velocity and a lower molecule injection density than the critical density. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375053, 11575055, 11405022, and 11405112), the Chinese National Fusion Project for ITER (Grant Nos. 2013GB107001 and 2013GB112005), the International S&T Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61760), and the Funds of the Youth Innovation Team of Science and Technology in Sichuan Province of China (Grant No. 2014TD0023).

  14. Investigating the Lithospheric Structure of Southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann, F. J.; Yuan, X.; Rumpker, G.; Heit, B.; Rambolamana, G.; Rindraharisaona, E.; Priestley, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    eastern part of the study area, where there is some so-far poorly characterised seismicity. We will present preliminary results on the lithospheric crust and mantle structure based on surface wave dispersion and waveform modelling, focussing on the contrast between the metamorphic areas in the east and the presumably stretched regions in the west. Station distribution Red diamonds: Temporary Broadband Light red squares: Short period Green: permanent stations Other temporary experiments: Open dark blue boxes: RHUM-RUM stations Open light blue boxes: MACOMO stations

  15. MOLVIE: an interactive visualization environment for molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huandong; Li, Ming; Xu, Ying

    2003-05-01

    A Molecular visualization interactive environment (MOLVIE), is designed to display three-dimensional (3D) structures of molecules and support the structural analysis and research on proteins. The paper presents the features, design considerations and applications of MOLVIE, especially the new functions used to compare the structures of two molecules and view the partial fragment of a molecule. Being developed in JAVA, MOLVIE is platform-independent. Moreover, it may run on a webpage as an applet for remote users. MOLVIE is available at http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~mli/Bioinf/software/index.html.

  16. Building bridges between cellular and molecular structural biology.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Ardan; Brandt, Robert; Butcher, Sarah J; Collinson, Lucy; Gault, David; Grünewald, Kay; Hecksel, Corey; Huiskonen, Juha T; Iudin, Andrii; Jones, Martin L; Korir, Paul K; Koster, Abraham J; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Lawson, Catherine L; Mastronarde, David; McCormick, Matthew; Parkinson, Helen; Rosenthal, Peter B; Saalfeld, Stephan; Saibil, Helen R; Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Solanes Valero, Irene; Subramaniam, Sriram; Swedlow, Jason R; Tudose, Ilinca; Winn, Martyn; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2017-07-06

    The integration of cellular and molecular structural data is key to understanding the function of macromolecular assemblies and complexes in their in vivo context. Here we report on the outcomes of a workshop that discussed how to integrate structural data from a range of public archives. The workshop identified two main priorities: the development of tools and file formats to support segmentation (that is, the decomposition of a three-dimensional volume into regions that can be associated with defined objects), and the development of tools to support the annotation of biological structures.

  17. Experimental investigations of 3 mm aperture PPLN structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolker, D.; Pronyushkina, A.; Boyko, A.; Kostyukova, N.; Trashkeev, S.; Nuyshkov, B.; Shur, V.

    2017-01-01

    We are reporting about investigation of domestic 3 mm aperture periodically polled lithium niobate (PPLN) structures for cascaded mid-IR OPO. Wide aperture periodically poled MgO-doped lithium niobate (LiNbO3) structures at multigrating, fan-out and multi fan-out configuration were prepared at “Labfer LTD”. Laser source based on such structures can be used for special applications. Four different PPLN structures were investigated and effective aperture for effective pumping was defined.

  18. Study on molecular structure, spectroscopic investigation (IR, Raman and NMR), vibrational assignments and HOMO-LUMO analysis of L-sodium folinate using DFT: a combined experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Cai, Tiancheng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, an exhaustive conformational search of N-[4-[[(2-amino-5-formyl-(6S)-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-6-pteridinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid disodium salt (L-SF) has been preformed. The optimized structure of the molecule, vibrational frequencies and NMR spectra studies have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. IR and FT-Raman spectra for L-SF have been recorded in the region of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 100-3500 cm(-1), respectively. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated based on the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Finally all of the calculation results were applied to simulate IR, Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectrum of the title compound which showed excellent agreement with observed spectrum. Furthermore, reliable vibrational assignments which have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) and characteristic vibratinonal absorption bands of the title compound in IR and Raman have been figured out. HOMO-LUMO energy and Mulliken atomic charges have been evaluated, either.

  19. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons.

  20. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  1. Three-dimensional depth profiling of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Wucher, A; Cheng, J; Zheng, L; Winograd, N

    2009-04-01

    Molecular time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) imaging and cluster ion beam erosion are combined to perform a three-dimensional chemical analysis of molecular films. The resulting dataset allows a number of artifacts inherent in sputter depth profiling to be assessed. These artifacts arise from lateral inhomogeneities of either the erosion rate or the sample itself. Using a test structure based on a trehalose film deposited on Si, we demonstrate that the "local" depth resolution may approach values which are close to the physical limit introduced by the information depth of the (static) ToF-SIMS method itself.

  2. Molecular structures and protonation state of 2-Mercaptopyridine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, S.; Miedema, P. S.; Quevedo, W.; O'Cinneide, B.; Fondell, M.; Beye, M.; Pietzsch, A.; Ross, M.; Khalil, M.; Föhlisch, A.

    2016-03-01

    The speciation of 2-Mercaptopyridine in aqueous solution has been investigated with nitrogen 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy and time dependent Density Functional Theory. The prevalence of distinct species as a function of the solvent basicity is established. No indications of dimerization towards high concentrations are found. The determination of different molecular structures of 2-Mercaptopyridine in aqueous solution is put into the context of proton-transfer in keto-enol and thione-thiol tautomerisms.

  3. Molecular dynamics modelling of mechanical properties of polymers for adaptive aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Michail; Drikakis, Dimitris; Asproulis, Nikolaos

    2015-02-01

    The features of adaptive structures depend on the properties of the supporting materials. For example, morphing wing structures require wing skin materials, such as rubbers that can withstand the forces imposed by the internal mechanism while maintaining the required aerodynamic properties of the aircraft. In this study, Molecular Dynamics and Minimization simulations are being used to establish well-equilibrated models of Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM) elastomer systems and investigate their mechanical properties.

  4. Investigating the Lithospheric Structure of Southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann, Frederik; Yuan, Xiaohui; Rümpker, Georg; Gerard, Rambolamana; Elisa, Rindraharisaona; Priestley, Keith

    2014-05-01

    study area, where there is some so-far poorly characterised seismicity. We present preliminary results on the lithospheric crust and mantle structure based on surface wave dispersion and waveform modelling, focussing on the contrast between the metamorphic areas in the east and the presumably stretched regions in the west. Interstation Green's functions have been obtained from all pairs of vertical broadband records, with coherent Rayleigh waves being identifiable for periods of 3-40 s. In addition, two-station phase dispersion measurements have allowed us to determine phase dispersion between 25 and 60 s. The ambient noise and earthquake data both indicate a slow-down of surface propagation in the western part of the array for periods < 40-45 s, but faster propagation in the western part for periods >45 s.

  5. Semifluorinated Alkanes at the Air-Water Interface: Tailoring Structure and Rheology at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Antigoni; Jonas, Ulrich; Loppinet, Benoit; Geue, Thomas; Stangenberg, Rene; Keller, Rabea; Li, Dan; Berger, Rüdiger; Vermant, Jan; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-04-05

    Semifluorinated alkanes form monolayers with interesting properties at the air-water interface due to their pronounced amphi-solvophobic nature and the stiffness of the fluorocarbons. In the present work, using a combination of structural and dynamic probes, we investigated how small molecular changes can be used to control the properties of such an interface, in particular its organization, rheology, and reversibility during compression-expansion cycles. Starting from a reference system perfluor(dodecyl)dodecane, we first retained the linear structure but changed the linkage groups between the alkyl chains and the fluorocarbons, by introducing either a phenyl group or two oxygens. Next, the molecular structure was changed from linear to branched, with four side chains (two fluorocarbons and two hydrocarbons) connected to extended aromatic cores. Neutron reflectivity at the air-water interface and scanning force microscopy on deposited films show how the changes in the molecular structure affect molecular arrangement relative to the interface. Rheological and compression-expansion measurements demonstrate the significant consequences of these changes in molecular structure and interactions on the interfacial properties. Remarkably, even with these simple molecules, a wide range of surface rheological behaviors can be engineered, from viscous over viscoelastic to brittle solids, for very similar values of the surface pressure.

  6. Investigation of the molecular similarity in closely related protein systems: The PrP case study.

    PubMed

    Storchi, Loriano; Paciotti, Roberto; Re, Nazzareno; Marrone, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    The amyloid conversion is a massive detrimental modification affecting several proteins upon specific physical or chemical stimuli characterizing a plethora of diseases. In many cases, the amyloidogenic stimuli induce specific structural features to the protein conferring the propensity to misfold and form amyloid deposits. The investigation of mutants, structurally similar to their native isoform but inherently prone to amyloid conversion, may be a viable strategy to elucidate the structural features connected with amyloidogenesis. In this article, we present a computational protocol based on the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and grid-based approaches suited for the pairwise comparison of closely related protein structures. This method was applied on the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a case study and, in particular, addressed to the quali/quantification of the structural features conferred by either E200K mutations and treatment with CaCl(2), both able to induce the scrapie conversion of PrP. Several schemes of comparison were developed and applied to this case study, and made up suitable of application to other protein systems. At this purpose an in-house python codes has been implemented that, together with the parallelization of the GRID force fields program, will spread the applicability of the proposed computational procedure. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Mitochondrial diseases: molecular mechanisms, clinical presentations and diagnosis investigations].

    PubMed

    Auré, Karine; Jardel, Claude; Lombès, Anne

    2005-09-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are relatively common inherited metabolic diseases due to mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction. Their clinical presentation is extremely diverse, multisystemic or confined to a single tissue, sporadic or transmitted, by maternal or mendelian inheritance. The diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders is difficult. It is based upon several types of clues both clinical (family history, type of symptoms but also their association in syndromic presentation,...) and biological (alteration of the lactate metabolism, brain imaging, morphological alterations especially of muscle tissue). The diagnosis relies upon the demonstration of a defect of the respiratory chain activities and/or upon the identification of the underlying genetic alteration. Molecular diagnosis remains quite difficult and up to-date concerns essentially mitochondrial DNA mutations. On one hand, clinical and biological presentations as well as enzymatic defects lack specificity. On the other hand, candidate genes are very numerous and part of them are probably still unknown.

  8. Infectious Bronchitis Virus Variants: Molecular Analysis and Pathogenicity Investigation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Yi; Chen, Hui-Wen

    2017-09-22

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) variants constantly emerge and pose economic threats to poultry farms worldwide. Numerous studies on the molecular and pathogenic characterization of IBV variants have been performed between 2007 and 2017, which we have reviewed herein. We noted that viral genetic mutations and recombination events commonly gave rise to distinct IBV genotypes, serotypes and pathotypes. In addition to characterizing the S1 genes, full viral genomic sequencing, comprehensive antigenicity, and pathogenicity studies on emerging variants have advanced our understanding of IBV infections, which is valuable for developing countermeasures against IBV field outbreaks. This review of IBV variants provides practical value for understanding their phylogenetic relationships and epidemiology from both regional and worldwide viewpoints.

  9. Challenges and novel approaches for investigating molecular mediation

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, R.C.; Hemani, G.; Tilling, K.; Davey Smith, G.; Relton, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding mediation is useful for identifying intermediates lying between an exposure and an outcome which, when intervened upon, will block (some or all of) the causal pathway between the exposure and outcome. Mediation approaches used in conventional epidemiology have been adapted to understanding the role of molecular intermediates in situations of high-dimensional omics data with varying degrees of success. In particular, the limitations of observational epidemiological study including confounding, reverse causation and measurement error can afflict conventional mediation approaches and may lead to incorrect conclusions regarding causal effects. Solutions to analysing mediation which overcome these problems include the use of instrumental variable methods such as Mendelian randomization, which may be applied to evaluate causality in increasingly complex networks of omics data. PMID:27439390

  10. A molecular dynamics investigation of surface reconstruction on magnetite (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Wasserman, E.; Felmy, A. R.

    1999-07-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations using analytical potential functions with polarizable oxygen ions have been used to identify a novel mode of reconstruction on the half-occupied tetrahedral layer termination of the magnetite (Fe 3O 4) (001) surface. In the proposed reconstruction, the twofold coordinated iron ion in the top monolayer rotates downward to occupy a vacant half-octahedral site in the plane of the second-layer iron ions. At the same time, half of the tetrahedral iron ions in the third iron layer are pushed upward to occupy an adjacent octahedral vacancy at the level of the second-layer iron ions. The other half of the third-layer iron ions remain roughly in their original positions. The proposed reconstruction is consistent with recent low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results. It also provides a compelling interpretation for the arrangement of atoms suggested by high-resolution scanning-tunneling microscopy studies.

  11. Spatially resolved dynamic structure factor of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raitza, Thomas; Roepke, Gerd; Reinholz, Heidi; Morozov, Igor

    2011-09-15

    The dynamical response of metallic clusters up to 10{sup 3} atoms is investigated using the restricted molecular dynamics simulations scheme. Exemplarily, a sodium like material is considered. Correlation functions are evaluated to investigate the spatial structure of collective electron excitations and the optical response of laser-excited clusters. In particular, the spectrum of bilocal correlation functions shows resonances representing different modes of collective excitations inside the nano plasma. The spatial structure, the resonance energy, and the width of the eigenmodes have been investigated for various values of electron density, temperature, cluster size, and ionization degree. Comparison with bulk properties is performed and the dispersion relation of collective excitations is discussed.

  12. A Structural and Molecular Approach for the Study Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Vali, Hojatollah; Sears, S. Kelly; Roh, Yul

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of the nucleation and growth of crystals in both abiotic and biotic systems is critical to seemingly diverse disciplines of geology, biology, environmental science, and astrobiology. While there are abundant studies devoted to the determination of the structure and composition of inorganic crystals, as well as to the development of thermodynamic and kinetic models, it is only recently that research efforts have been directed towards understanding mineralization in biological systems (i.e., biomineralization). Biomineralization refers to the processes by which living organisms form inorganic solids. Studies of the processes of biomineralization under low temperature aqueous conditions have focused primarily on magnetite forming bacteria and shell forming marine organisms. Many of the biological building materials consist of inorganic minerals (calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, silica or iron oxide) intricately combined with organic polymers (like proteins). More recently, efforts have been undertaken to explore the nature of biological activities in ancient rocks. In the absence of well-preserved microorganisms or genetic material required for the polmerase chain reaction (PCR) method in molecular phylogenetic studies, using biominerals as biomarkers offers an alternative approach for the recognition of biogenic activity in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. The primary driving force in biomineralization is the interaction between organic and inorganic phases. Thus, the investigation of the ultrastructure and the nature of reactions at the molecular level occurring at the interface between inorganic and organic phases is essential to understanding the processes leading to the nucleation and growth of crystals. It is recognized that crystal surfaces can serve as the substrate for the organization of organic molecules that lead to the formation of polymers and other complex organic molecules, and in discussions of the origins of life

  13. A Self-Assisting Protein Folding Model for Teaching Structural Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Jodi; Pique, Michael; Getzoff, Elizabeth; Huntoon, Jon; Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2017-04-04

    Structural molecular biology is now becoming part of high school science curriculum thus posing a challenge for teachers who need to convey three-dimensional (3D) structures with conventional text and pictures. In many cases even interactive computer graphics does not go far enough to address these challenges. We have developed a flexible model of the polypeptide backbone using 3D printing technology. With this model we have produced a polypeptide assembly kit to create an idealized model of the Triosephosphate isomerase mutase enzyme (TIM), which forms a structure known as TIM barrel. This kit has been used in a laboratory practical where students perform a step-by-step investigation into the nature of protein folding, starting with the handedness of amino acids to the formation of secondary and tertiary structure. Based on the classroom evidence we collected, we conclude that these models are valuable and inexpensive resource for teaching structural molecular biology.

  14. Ab initio molecular crystal structures, spectra, and phase diagrams.

    PubMed

    Hirata, So; Gilliard, Kandis; He, Xiao; Li, Jinjin; Sode, Olaseni

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular crystals are chemists' solids in the sense that their structures and properties can be understood in terms of those of the constituent molecules merely perturbed by a crystalline environment. They form a large and important class of solids including ices of atmospheric species, drugs, explosives, and even some organic optoelectronic materials and supramolecular assemblies. Recently, surprisingly simple yet extremely efficient, versatile, easily implemented, and systematically accurate electronic structure methods for molecular crystals have been developed. The methods, collectively referred to as the embedded-fragment scheme, divide a crystal into monomers and overlapping dimers and apply modern molecular electronic structure methods and software to these fragments of the crystal that are embedded in a self-consistently determined crystalline electrostatic field. They enable facile applications of accurate but otherwise prohibitively expensive ab initio molecular orbital theories such as Møller-Plesset perturbation and coupled-cluster theories to a broad range of properties of solids such as internal energies, enthalpies, structures, equation of state, phonon dispersion curves and density of states, infrared and Raman spectra (including band intensities and sometimes anharmonic effects), inelastic neutron scattering spectra, heat capacities, Gibbs energies, and phase diagrams, while accounting for many-body electrostatic (namely, induction or polarization) effects as well as two-body exchange and dispersion interactions from first principles. They can fundamentally alter the role of computing in the studies of molecular crystals in the same way ab initio molecular orbital theories have transformed research practices in gas-phase physical chemistry and synthetic chemistry in the last half century. In this Account, after a brief summary of formalisms and algorithms, we discuss applications of these methods performed in our group as compelling

  15. Molecular structures in the charmonium spectrum: the XYZ puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, P. G.; Entem, D. R.; Fernández, F.

    2013-06-01

    We study in the framework of a constituent quark model the possible contributions of molecular structures to the XYZ charmonium-like states. We analyze simultaneously the c\\bar{c} structures and the possible molecular components in the coupled channel formalism. In the 1++ sector two states appear which could be identified with X(3872) and X(3940). The recently confirmed X(3915) state appears as a mixture of c\\bar{c} and D\\bar{D} components as a JPC = 0++ state in agreement with the new measurements. A second broad resonance which may correspond with the so-called Y(3940) state is found with these quantum numbers. In the JPC = 1-- sector we also found significant contributions of the molecular structures which may affect the phenomenology. In particular the study allows us to understand the G(3900) state recently observed in Belle and BaBar. All these resonances together with the prediction of the model of a c\\bar{c} structure for Z(3930) provide a reasonable scenario for the so-called XYZ states with masses near 3.9 GeV.

  16. Molecular structure in soil humic substances: The new view

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison

    2005-04-21

    A critical examination of published data obtained primarily from recent nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and pyrolysis studies reveals an evolving new view of the molecular structure of soil humic substances. According to the new view, humic substances are collections of diverse, relatively low molecular mass components forming dynamic associations stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. These associations are capable of organizing into micellar structures in suitable aqueous environments. Humic components display contrasting molecular motional behavior and may be spatially segregated on a scale of nanometers. Within this new structural context, these components comprise any molecules intimately associated with a humic substance, such that they cannot be separated effectively by chemical or physical methods. Thus biomolecules strongly bound within humic fractions are by definition humic components, a conclusion that necessarily calls into question key biogeochemical pathways traditionally thought to be required for the formation of humic substances. Further research is needed to elucidate the intermolecular interactions that link humic components into supramolecular associations and to establish the pathways by which these associations emerge from the degradation of organic litter.

  17. Enhanced Molecular Mobility of Ordinarily Structured Regions Drives Polyglutamine Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lupton, Christopher J.; Steer, David L.; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Hughes, Victoria A.; Ellisdon, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion is a hallmark of nine neurodegenerative diseases, with protein aggregation intrinsically linked to disease progression. Although polyglutamine expansion accelerates protein aggregation, the misfolding process is frequently instigated by flanking domains. For example, polyglutamine expansion in ataxin-3 allosterically triggers the aggregation of the catalytic Josephin domain. The molecular mechanism that underpins this allosteric aggregation trigger remains to be determined. Here, we establish that polyglutamine expansion increases the molecular mobility of two juxtaposed helices critical to ataxin-3 deubiquitinase activity. Within one of these helices, we identified a highly amyloidogenic sequence motif that instigates aggregation and forms the core of the growing fibril. Critically, by mutating residues within this key region, we decrease local structural fluctuations to slow ataxin-3 aggregation. This provides significant insight, down to the molecular level, into how polyglutamine expansion drives aggregation and explains the positive correlation between polyglutamine tract length, protein aggregation, and disease severity. PMID:26260925

  18. Study of the structuring of pure molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letamendia, L.; Duplessix, R.; Nouchi, G.; Vaucamps, C.

    Recent experiments have shown that changes in the slope of specific heat variation as a function of temperature in liquids are not always regular. In this study, the authors consider the possibility that fluid structure can change with temperature, by shifting from one form to another. They study such molecular liquids as benzene, hexafluorobenzene, and quinoleine using Rayleigh-Brillouin and depolarized Rayleigh diffusion, and total intensity diffusion. The authors clearly found anomalies for all collective properties of the medium in the liquids studied, though purely molecular properties were undisturbed. The accidents observed occurred at the same temperatures, whatever the collective or intermolecular property under study. But it took some time (several hours) for them to manifest themselves, which suggests that molecular liquids are characterized by a long thermodynamic equilibrium. Results also show a disturbance in hydrodynamic state at accident temperatures, which are similar to those generated by long spatial correlation processes.

  19. Molecular docking and structure-based drug design strategies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Dos Santos, Ricardo N; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2015-07-22

    Pharmaceutical research has successfully incorporated a wealth of molecular modeling methods, within a variety of drug discovery programs, to study complex biological and chemical systems. The integration of computational and experimental strategies has been of great value in the identification and development of novel promising compounds. Broadly used in modern drug design, molecular docking methods explore the ligand conformations adopted within the binding sites of macromolecular targets. This approach also estimates the ligand-receptor binding free energy by evaluating critical phenomena involved in the intermolecular recognition process. Today, as a variety of docking algorithms are available, an understanding of the advantages and limitations of each method is of fundamental importance in the development of effective strategies and the generation of relevant results. The purpose of this review is to examine current molecular docking strategies used in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry, exploring the advances in the field and the role played by the integration of structure- and ligand-based methods.

  20. Solution structures and molecular interactions of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lim, Sung-Kil; Lee, Weontae

    2010-12-01

    The solution structures and inter-molecular interaction of the cyclic melanocortin antagonists SHU9119, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 with receptor molecules have been determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. While SHU9119 is known as a nonselective antagonist, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 are selective for the melanocortin subtype-4 receptor (MC4R) involved in modulation of food intake. Data from NMR and molecular dynamics suggest that the conformation of the Trp9 sidechain in the three MC4R-selective antagonists is quite different from that of SHU9119. This result strongly supports the concept that the spatial orientation of the hydrophobic aromatic residue is more important for determining selectivity than the presence of a basic, "arginine-like" moiety responsible for biological activity. We propose that the conformation of hydrophobic residues of MCR antagonists is critical for receptor-specific selectivity.

  1. Multi-Probe Investigation of Proteomic Structure of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Vogelstein, B; Wheeler, K E

    2008-01-24

    Complete genome sequences are available for understanding biotransformation, environmental resistance and pathogenesis of microbial, cellular and pathogen systems. The present technological and scientific challenges are to unravel the relationships between the organization and function of protein complexes at cell, microbial and pathogens surfaces, to understand how these complexes evolve during the bacterial, cellular and pathogen life cycles, and how they respond to environmental changes, chemical stimulants and therapeutics. In particular, elucidating the molecular structure and architecture of human pathogen surfaces is essential to understanding mechanisms of pathogenesis, immune response, physicochemical interactions, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. The objective of this project was to investigate the architecture, proteomic structure, and function of bacterial spores through a combination of high-resolution in vitro atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based immunolabeling with threat-specific antibodies. Particular attention in this project was focused on spore forming Bacillus species including the Sterne vaccine strain of Bacillus anthracis and the spore forming near-neighbor of Clostridium botulinum, C. novyi-NT. Bacillus species, including B. anthracis, the causative agent of inhalation anthrax are laboratory models for elucidating spore structure/function. Even though the complete genome sequence is available for B. subtilis, cereus, anthracis and other species, the determination and composition of spore structure/function is not understood. Prof. B. Vogelstein and colleagues at the John Hopkins University have recently developed a breakthrough bacteriolytic therapy for cancer treatment (1). They discovered that intravenously injected Clostridium novyi-NT spores germinate exclusively within the avascular regions of tumors in mice and destroy advanced cancerous lesions. The bacteria were also

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar Das, Amita; Sen, Abhijit; Kaw, Predhiman

    2015-03-15

    The existence and evolution of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium are investigated in a first principles approach using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of particles interacting via a Yukawa potential. These localized structures are found to exist in both weakly and strongly coupled regimes with their structures becoming sharper as the correlation effects between the dust particles get stronger. A surprising result, compared to fluid simulations, is the existence of rarefactive soliton-like structures in our non-dissipative system, a feature that arises from the charge conjugation symmetry property of the Yukawa fluid. Our simulation findings closely resemble many diverse experimental results reported in the past.

  3. Molecular spectroscopy and molecular structure - Selected communications presented at the 1st International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, James R.; Fausto, Rui; Ünsalan, Ozan; Bayarı, Sevgi; Kuş, Nihal; Ildız, Gülce Ö.

    2016-01-01

    The First International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013) took place at the Harbiye Cultural Center & Museum, Istanbul, Turkey, September 15-20, 2013. The main aim of the congress was to encourage the exchange of scientific ideas and collaborations all around the world, introduce new techniques and instruments, and discuss recent developments in the field of molecular spectroscopy. Among the different subjects covered, particular emphasis was given to the relevance of spectroscopy to elucidate details of the molecular structure and the chemical and physical behavior of systems ranging from simple molecules to complex biochemical molecules. Besides experimental spectroscopic approaches, related computational and theoretical methods were also considered. In this volume, selected contributions presented at the congress were put together.

  4. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz Anastacio; da Silva, João Herminio Martins; Ferreira, Dinarte Neto Moreira; Fidalgo-Neto, Antonio Augusto; Teixeira, Pedro Celso Nogueira; de Souza, Cristina Alves Magalhães; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl; de Freitas, Mônica Santos

    2014-01-01

    Currently, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors. PMID:24637936

  5. Improving structure-based function prediction using molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Dariya S.; Radmer, Randall J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The number of molecules with solved three-dimensional structure but unknown function is increasing rapidly. Particularly problematic are novel folds with little detectable similarity to molecules of known function. Experimental assays can determine the functions of such molecules, but are time-consuming and expensive. Computational approaches can identify potential functional sites; however, these approaches generally rely on single static structures and do not use information about dynamics. In fact, structural dynamics can enhance function prediction: we coupled molecular dynamics simulations with structure-based function prediction algorithms that identify Ca2+ binding sites. When applied to 11 challenging proteins, both methods showed substantial improvement in performance, revealing 22 more sites in one case and 12 more in the other, with a modest increase in apparent false positives. Thus, we show that treating molecules as dynamic entities improves the performance of structure-based function prediction methods. PMID:19604472

  6. Structural investigations and morphology of tomato fruit starch.

    PubMed

    Luengwilai, Kietsuda; Beckles, Diane M

    2009-01-14

    The physicochemical properties of starch from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) pericarp and columella of cv. Moneymaker fruit at 28 days post anthesis (DPA) were investigated, providing the first description of the composition and structure of tomato fruit starch. Starch granules from pericarp were mainly polygonal, 13.5-14.3 microm, and increased in size through development, being largest in ripening fruit. Amylopectin content was 81-83% and was of molecular weight 1.01 x 10(8) g/mol; the phosphorus content was 139 ppm, and starch showed a C-type pattern with crystallinity of 30%. Starch characteristics were similar in columella except granule size (16.8-17.8 microm) and crystallinity (40%), although 6-fold more starch accumulated in the pericarp. Solara, a high-sugar tomato cultivar, was also studied to determine if this affects starch granule architecture. There were few differences from Moneymaker, except that Solara columella starch crystallinity was lower (26%), and more starch granule-intrinsic proteins could be extracted by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  7. Investigation on surface molecular conformations and pervaporation performance of the poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zhennan; Wang, Xinping

    2009-05-01

    A simple method of changing pre-treatment temperature in the course of film formation was used to tune the surface structures of PVA membranes. Surface structure and property of the resulting membranes were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements. The results show that PVA have different molecular conformations at the membrane surface while those membranes were prepared at different pre-treatment temperature. At higher pre-treatment temperatures, polar acetoxyl residues and hydroxyl groups of the PVA chains oriented in a more orderly fashion, as induced by the faster evaporation of water. When the membranes were in air, CH(3) groups adjacent to the acetoxyl groups covered the surface in order to minimize the surface free energy, while backbones of the PVA were rarely observed. These surfaces exhibited a hydrophilic nature upon contact with water due to rapid surface reconstruction. Conversely, at lower pre-treatment temperatures, the backbone CH(2) groups dominated the surface, forming a less hydrophilic surface. When the PVA membranes were employed to separate ethanol/water mixtures, it was found that the PVA membranes with more hydrophilic surface exhibited higher water selectivity. Our investigation indicates that molecular conformations on the membrane surface have considerable influence on pervaporation performance.

  8. Molecular-Level Investigations of Nucleation Mechanisms and Kinetics of Formation of Environmental Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Shin Jun; Glenn A. Waychunas

    2007-04-19

    Environmental nanoparticles are often poorly-crystalline or metastable structures, whose kinetics of formation and growth are poorly understood. Further, the sorption or growth of nanoparticles on mineral surfaces may control the mineral surface's reactivity and modify its ability to influence contaminant transport. Due to the characteristic length scale, a holistic understanding of the nucleation mechanisms and kinetics of nanoparticle formation on mineral surfaces is difficult to achieve with traditional methodology. In this work, our intent is to determine the molecular nature of nucleation on surfaces, the kinetics of surface nucleation and growth, and the effect of crystal surface topology using new synchrotron-based techniques. We have approached these objectives by: (1) combining state-of-the-art crystal-truncation rod diffraction (CTR) and grazing incidence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GIXAS) techniques to investigate the three-dimensional molecular-scale geometry of silicate monomer sorption on the r-plane of hematite; and (2) developing a new grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) setup at SSRL (0.08 nm{sup -1} < q < 8 nm{sup -1}) to explore the initial development of environmental nanoparticles on various mineral surfaces. This study also includes complementary techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), bulk SAXS, dynamic light scattering (DLS), XRD, and TEM.

  9. Structures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon adducts by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    The structures of the adducts of (+)- and (-)trans-7,8,dihydroxy-anti-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo (a)pyrene (anti-BPDE) formed by trans addition to N[sup 2] of guanine have been of great interest because the high biological activity of BPDE in mammalian mutagenesis and tumorigenesis has been attributed to the predominant (+)-adduct, while the (-)-adduct is inactive. Molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations have been employed to elucidate the structural difference between this mirror image adduct pair in a duplex dodecamer, d(5' GCGCGCG-(BPDE)CGCGC3') [center dot] d(5'GCGCGCGCGCGC3'). Minimized potential energy calculations using the program DUPLEX were employed to locate starting structures for the dynamics. Three types of structures were found in the energy minimized conformation space searches for each enantiomer: pyrenyl moiety in the minor groove of a Watson-Crick base paired B-DNA duplex, pyrenyl moiety in the major groove of a B-DNA duplex with syn guanine and Hoogsteen base pairs at the modification site, and intercalation type structures. The minor groove structure is energetically preferred for the (+) enantiomer while both minor groove and major groove structures are favored and of comparable energy in the (-) enantiomer. These energy-minimized duplex dodecamers, as well as an unmodified B-DNA control of the same sequence, were subjected to 100 ps molecular dynamics simulations with solvent and salt with the program AMBER. The duplex dodecamer, d(CGCGAATTCGCG)[sub 2], was subjected to a similar simulation using the crystal structure as starting coordinates. Detailed analysis of the dynamic evolution of the conformational and the helical parameters of all the dodecamer simulations were carried out with Molecular Dynamics Analysis Toolchest.

  10. Alternative Radioligands for Investigating the Molecular Pharmacology of Melatonin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Legros, Céline; Brasseur, Chantal; Delagrange, Philippe; Ducrot, Pierre; Nosjean, Olivier; Boutin, Jean A

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin exerts a variety of physiologic activities that are mainly relayed through the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 Low expressions of these receptors in tissues have led to widespread experimental use of the agonist 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin as a substitute for melatonin. We describe three iodinated ligands: 2-(2-[(2-iodo-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-4,5-dimethoxy phenyl) (DIV880) and (2-iodo-N-2-[5-methoxy-2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridine-3-yl])acetamide (S70254), which are specific ligands at MT2 receptors, and N-[2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]iodoacetamide (SD6), an analog of 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin with slightly different characteristics. Here, we further characterized these new ligands with regards to their molecular pharmacology. We performed binding experiments, saturation assays, association/dissociation rate measurements, and autoradiography using sheep and rat tissues and recombinant cell lines. Our results showed that [(125)I]-S70254 is receptor, and can be used with both cells and tissue. This radioligand can be used in autoradiography. Similarly, DIV880, a partial agonist [43% of melatonin on guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding assay], selective for MT2, can be used as a tool to selectively describe the pharmacology of this receptor in tissue samples. The molecular pharmacology of both human melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2, using a series of 24 ligands at these receptors and the new radioligands, did not lead to noticeable variations in the profiles. For the first time, we described radiolabeled tools that are specific for one of the melatonin receptors (MT2). These tools are amenable to binding experiments and to autoradiography using sheep or rat tissues. These specific tools will permit better understanding of the role and implication in physiopathologic processes of the melatonin receptors. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Excitation energies of a water-bridged twisted retinal structure in the bacteriorhodopsin proton pump: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Tino; Welke, Kai; Phatak, Prasad; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Elstner, Marcus

    2013-08-14

    The first proton transfer in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle takes place during the L → M transition. Structural details of the pre proton transfer L intermediate have been investigated using experiments and computations. Here, we assess L-state structural models by performing hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics and excitation energy calculations. The computations suggest that a water-bridged twisted retinal structure gives the closest agreement with the experimental L/bR shift in the excitation energy.

  12. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Electrostatics and Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand the structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as means to sample conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. From this discussion, the major limitations with modeling, in general, were highlighted. These are the difficult issues in sampling conformational space effectively—the multiple minima or conformational sampling problems—and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:18428877

  13. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-12-19

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. A Structural and Molecular Approach for the Study Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Vali, Hojatollah; Sears, S. Kelly; Roh, Yul

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of the nucleation and growth of crystals in both abiotic and biotic systems is critical to seemingly diverse disciplines of geology, biology, environmental science, and astrobiology. While there are abundant studies devoted to the determination of the structure and composition of inorganic crystals, as well as to the development of thermodynamic and kinetic models, it is only recently that research efforts have been directed towards understanding mineralization in biological systems (i.e., biomineralization). Biomineralization refers to the processes by which living organisms form inorganic solids. Studies of the processes of biomineralization under low temperature aqueous conditions have focused primarily on magnetite forming bacteria and shell forming marine organisms. Many of the biological building materials consist of inorganic minerals (calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, silica or iron oxide) intricately combined with organic polymers (like proteins). More recently, efforts have been undertaken to explore the nature of biological activities in ancient rocks. In the absence of well-preserved microorganisms or genetic material required for the polmerase chain reaction (PCR) method in molecular phylogenetic studies, using biominerals as biomarkers offers an alternative approach for the recognition of biogenic activity in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. The primary driving force in biomineralization is the interaction between organic and inorganic phases. Thus, the investigation of the ultrastructure and the nature of reactions at the molecular level occurring at the interface between inorganic and organic phases is essential to understanding the processes leading to the nucleation and growth of crystals. It is recognized that crystal surfaces can serve as the substrate for the organization of organic molecules that lead to the formation of polymers and other complex organic molecules, and in discussions of the origins of life

  15. A Structural and Molecular Approach for the Study Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Vali, Hojatollah; Sears, S. Kelly; Roh, Yul

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of the nucleation and growth of crystals in both abiotic and biotic systems is critical to seemingly diverse disciplines of geology, biology, environmental science, and astrobiology. While there are abundant studies devoted to the determination of the structure and composition of inorganic crystals, as well as to the development of thermodynamic and kinetic models, it is only recently that research efforts have been directed towards understanding mineralization in biological systems (i.e., biomineralization). Biomineralization refers to the processes by which living organisms form inorganic solids. Studies of the processes of biomineralization under low temperature aqueous conditions have focused primarily on magnetite forming bacteria and shell forming marine organisms. Many of the biological building materials consist of inorganic minerals (calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, silica or iron oxide) intricately combined with organic polymers (like proteins). More recently, efforts have been undertaken to explore the nature of biological activities in ancient rocks. In the absence of well-preserved microorganisms or genetic material required for the polmerase chain reaction (PCR) method in molecular phylogenetic studies, using biominerals as biomarkers offers an alternative approach for the recognition of biogenic activity in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. The primary driving force in biomineralization is the interaction between organic and inorganic phases. Thus, the investigation of the ultrastructure and the nature of reactions at the molecular level occurring at the interface between inorganic and organic phases is essential to understanding the processes leading to the nucleation and growth of crystals. It is recognized that crystal surfaces can serve as the substrate for the organization of organic molecules that lead to the formation of polymers and other complex organic molecules, and in discussions of the origins of life

  16. Dynamic Wetting on Graphene-Coated Surface: Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Shih-Wei; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-11-01

    Wettability of graphene-coated surface gained significant attention recently due to discussion on the ``transparency'' (whether the wetting characteristics follow that of graphene or the underlying surface) and practical applications of graphene. In terms of static contact angle, the wettability of graphene-coated surfaces have been widely studied by experiments, simulations, and theory in recent years. However, the studies of dynamic wetting on graphene-coated surfaces are limited. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the dynamic wetting of water droplet on graphene-coated surfaces from a microscopic point of view. The results show that the degree of similarity between the spreading behavior on graphene-coated surface and that on pure graphene (or that on the underlying surface) depends on time, i.e. how nonequilibrium the interface dynamics is. We also found that this feature can be altered by introducing defects into graphene. The work is partially supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows 26-04364 and JST CREST.

  17. Investigation of the influence factors of polyethylene molecule encapsulated into carbon nanotubes by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; He, Guofang; Zhao, Rengao; Li, Yanfei

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the influence factors, namely chirality, temperature, radius and surface chemical modification, of the interaction energy for polyethylene (PE) molecule encapsulated into single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) had been investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results showed that all these factors would influence the interaction energy between PE and SWNTs. The interaction energy between PE molecule and the armchair SWNTs is largest among eight kinds of chiral SWNTs. The interaction energy decreases with the increase of temperature or the SWNT radius. The methyl, phenyl, hydroxyl, carboxyl, -F, and amino groups, have been introduced onto the surface of the SWNTs by the simulation software and the influence of SWNT chemical modification has also been investigated. The interaction energy between PE and chemically modified SWNTs is larger than that between PE and pristine SWNTs, and increases with increasing the concentration of the modified groups monotonously. In addition, the group electronegativity and van der Waals force will affect the interaction energy between PE and chemically modified SWNTs greatly, which can be attributed to the electronic structures of the chemically modified groups. This study can provide some useful suggestions for the composite material design and drug transport.

  18. Molecular modelling of miraculin: Structural analyses and functional hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Paladino, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni; Facchiano, Angelo M

    2008-02-29

    Miraculin is a plant protein that displays the peculiar property of modifying taste by swiching sour into a sweet taste. Its monomer is flavourless at all pH as well as at high concentration; the dimer form elicits its taste-modifying activity at acidic pH; a tetrameric form is also reported as active. Two histidine residues, located in exposed regions, are the main responsible of miraculin activity, as demonstrated by mutagenesis studies. Since structural data of miraculin are not available, we have predicted its three-dimensional structure and simulated both its dimer and tetramer forms by comparative modelling and molecular docking techniques. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations at different pH conditions have indicated that at acidic pH the dimer assumes a widely open conformation, in agreement with the hypotheses coming from other studies.

  19. Molecular solutes in ionic liquids: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Agílio A H; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Canongia Lopes, José N A

    2007-11-01

    Understanding physicochemical properties of ionic liquids is important for their rational use in extractions, reactions, and other applications. Ionic liquids are not simple fluids: their ions are generally asymetric, flexible, with delocalized electrostatic charges, and available in a wide variety. It is difficult to capture their subtle properties with models that are too simplistic. Molecular simulation using atomistic force fields, which describe structures and interactions in detail, is an excellent tool to gain insights into their liquid-state organization, how they solvate different compounds, and what molecular factors determine their properties. The identification of certain ionic liquids as self-organized phases, with aggregated nonpolar and charged domains, provides a new way to interpret the solvation and structure of their mixtures. Many advances are the result of a successful interplay between experiment and modeling, possible in this field where none of the two methodologies had a previous advance.

  20. The liquid structure of tetrachloroethene: Molecular dynamics simulations and reverse Monte Carlo modeling with interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gereben, Orsolya; Pusztai, László

    2013-10-01

    The liquid structure of tetrachloroethene has been investigated on the basis of measured neutron and X-ray scattering structure factors, applying molecular dynamics simulations and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling with flexible molecules and interatomic potentials. As no complete all-atom force field parameter set could be found for this planar molecule, the closest matching all-atom Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations (OPLS-AA) intra-molecular parameter set was improved by equilibrium bond length and angle parameters coming from electron diffraction experiments [I. L. Karle and J. Karle, J. Chem. Phys. 20, 63 (1952)]. In addition, four different intra-molecular charge distribution sets were tried, so in total, eight different molecular dynamics simulations were performed. The best parameter set was selected by calculating the mean square difference between the calculated total structure factors and the corresponding experimental data. The best parameter set proved to be the one that uses the electron diffraction based intra-molecular parameters and the charges qC = 0.1 and qCl = -0.05. The structure was further successfully refined by applying RMC computer modeling with flexible molecules that were kept together by interatomic potentials. Correlation functions concerning the orientation of molecular axes and planes were also determined. They reveal that the molecules closest to each other exclusively prefer the parallel orientation of both the molecular axes and planes. Molecules forming the first maximum of the center-center distribution have a preference for <30° and >60° axis orientation and >60° molecular plane arrangement. A second coordination sphere at ˜11 Å and a very small third one at ˜16 Å can be found as well, without preference for any axis or plane orientation.

  1. Investigating Change in Intraindividual Factor Structure over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of change in factor structure over time can provide new opportunities for the development of theory in psychology. The method proposed to investigate change in intraindividual factor structure over time is an extension of P-technique factor analysis, in which the P-technique factor model is fit within relatively small windows of…

  2. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe3C- (cementite-), Fe23C6- and Cr23C6-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr23C6 carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe23C6 carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe-C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  3. Molecular dynamics and experimental investigation of H2 and O2 diffusion in [Fe]-hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jordi; Kim, Kwiseon; Posewitz, Matthew; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Schulten, Klaus; Seibert, Michael; King, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes are highly efficient H2 catalysts found in ecologically, and phylogenetically diverse microorganisms, including the photosynthetic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Although these enzymes can occur in several forms, H2 catalysis takes place at a unique [FeS] prosthetic group, or H-cluster, located at the active site. Significant to the function of hydrogenases is how the surrounding protein structure facilitates substrate-product transfer, and protects the active site H-cluster from inactivation. To elucidate the role of protein structure in O2 inactivation of [Fe]-hydrogenases, experimental and theoretical investigations have been performed. Molecular dynamics was used to comparatively investigate O2 and H2 diffusion in [Fe]-hydrogenase CpI. The results are compared to initial investigations of H2 diffusion in [NiFe]-hydrogenase [1]. Our preliminary results suggest that H2 diffuses more easily and freely than O2, which is restricted to a small number of allowed pathways to and from the active site. These O2 pathways are located in the conserved active site domain, shown experimentally to have an essential role in active site protection. PMID:15667271

  4. Toxicological implications of esterases-From molecular structures to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tetsuo . E-mail: satohbri@peach.ifnet.or.jp

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on a keynote lecture at the 10th International Congress of Toxicology sponsored by the International Union of Toxicology and held on July 2004. Current developments in molecular-based studies into the structure and function of cholinesterases, carboxylesterases, and paraoxonases are described. This article covers mechanisms of regulation of gene expression of the various esterases by developmental factors and xenobiotics, as well as the interplay between physiological and chemical regulation of the enzyme activity.

  5. Rattlesnake Neurotoxin Structure, Mechanism of Action, Immunology and Molecular Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    from the venom of the midget faded . rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis concolor . Toxicon 2&, 319- 323. Rehm, H. and Betz, H. (1982) Binding of B...8217determined. It was shown to have great similarity to the basic subunits of related toxins from the venoms of the South American and midget faded ...AD-A228 003 CONTRACT NO.: DAMD17-89-C-9007 TITLE: RATTLESNAKE NEUROTOXIN STRUCTURE, MECHANISM OF ACTION, IMMUNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY PRINCIPAL

  6. Molecular self-assembly for biological investigations and nanoscale lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheunkar, Sarawut

    Small, diffusible molecules when recognized by their binding partners, such as proteins and antibodies, trigger enzymatic activity, cell communication, and immune response. Progress in analytical methods enabling detection, characterization, and visualization of biological dynamics at the molecular level will advance our exploration of complex biological systems. In this dissertation, analytical platforms were fabricated to capture membrane-associated receptors, which are essential proteins in cell signaling pathways. The neurotransmitter serotonin and its biological precursor were immobilized on gold substrates coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol)alkanethiols and their reactive derivatives. The SAM-coated substrates present the biologically selective affinity of immobilized molecules to target native membrane-associated receptors. These substrates were also tested for biospecificity using antibodies. In addition, small-molecule-functionalized platforms, expressing neurotransmitter pharmacophores, were employed to examine kinetic interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors and their associated neurotransmitters. The binding interactions were monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance equipped with liquid-flow injection. The interaction kinetics of G-protein-coupled serotonin 1A receptor and 5-hydroxytyptophan-functionalized surfaces were studied in a real-time, label-free environment. Key binding parameters, such as equilibrium dissociation constants, binding rate constants, and dissociative half-life, were extracted. These parameters are critical for understanding and comparing biomolecular interactions in modern biomedical research. By integrating self-assembly, surface functionalization, and nanofabrication, small-molecule microarrays were created for high-throughput screening. A hybrid soft-lithography, called microcontact insertion printing, was used to pattern small molecules at the dilute scales necessary for highly

  7. Molecular dynamics investigation of mechanisms of femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Changrui

    Laser micro-machining has been widely applied for material processing in many industries. A phenomenon called "laser ablation" is usually involved in the laser micro-machining process. Laser ablation is the process of material removal after the irradiation of a laser beam onto the material. It is commonly characterized by small temporal and spatial scales, extremely high material temperature and pressure, and strong non-equilibrium thermodynamic state. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is conducted to study the femtosecond laser ablation of metals (nickel and copper) and dielectrics (fused silica, or glass). The laser heating and the ablation processes are numerically modeled, and the computation is accelerated by parallel processing technique. Both the pair-wise Morse potential and the many-body EAM (Embedded-Atom Method) potential are employed for metals. In the simulation of fused silica, the BKS (van Beest, Kramer and van Santen) potential is used, and the generation of free electrons, the energy transport from laser beam to free electrons and energy coupling between electrons and the lattice are considered. The main goal of this work is to illustrate the detailed processes of femtosecond laser ablation and to study its mechanisms. From the MD results, it is found that the mechanism of femtosecond laser ablation is strongly dependent on the laser fluences. For metals, low fluence laser ablation is mainly through phase explosion (homogeneous gas bubble nucleation), while spinodal decomposition is responsible for high fluence ablation. Ablation mechanism is determined by whether or not the material (liquid) temperature exceeds the critical temperature. For fused silica, the generation and existence of free electrons are found to affect ablation significantly, especially at low fluence, where Coulomb explosion is found to play an important role in material separation.

  8. Copromicroscopic and molecular investigations on intestinal parasites in kenneled dogs.

    PubMed

    Simonato, Giulia; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Cassini, Rudi; Traversa, Donato; Beraldo, Paola; Tessarin, Cinzia; Pietrobelli, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Intestinal parasites are common in dogs worldwide, and their importance has recently increased for a renewed awareness on the public health relevance that some of them have. In this study, the prevalence of helminths and protozoa was evaluated by microscopy in 318 canine faecal samples collected from eight rescue shelters in the North-eastern Italy; 285 of them were also submitted to the molecular characterization of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. isolates. An analysis was performed to evaluate the prevalence rates in relation to canine individual data, shelter provenance and anthelmintic treatments. Overall, 52.5% (167/318) of faecal samples were positive for at least one parasite. Trichuris vulpis showed the highest overall prevalence rate (29.2%), followed by G. duodenalis (15.1%), Toxocara canis (9.7%), ancylostomatids (8.2%) and Cystoisospora (5.7%). The prevalence of G. duodenalis, evaluated by real-time PCR, was 57.9% (165/285), and 79 isolates were characterized by nested PCR on the β-giardin gene. The assemblages found were mainly the host-specific genotypes C and D, while only one assemblage was identified as the human-specific genotype B1. Isolates of Cryptosporidium spp., recorded in 3/285 (1.1%) stool samples, were Cryptosporidium parvum based on the characterization of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene. Although the results describe a relatively limited risk of dog-originating zoonoses, there is the need to improve the quality of shelter practices towards better health managements for safe pet-adoption campaigns and a minimization of the environmental faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites.

  9. Affinity of molecular ions for DNA structures is determined by solvent-accessible surface area.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miki; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Tanaka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-08-14

    It is considered that Hoogsteen base pairs and DNA triplex structures play important roles in cellular processes even though these structures are less than duplexes of Watson-Crick base pairs. Molecular ions clearly affect the stability of DNA structures in vivo; however, the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of sodium ions, choline ions, and tetramethylammonium ions on DNA triplexes using molecular dynamics simulations. We found that nonpolar interactions, which are associated with van der Waals interactions, and solvent-accessible surface area were more important than polar or electrostatic interactions in determining the affinity of a molecular cation for the DNA groove areas. The free energy gain due to a cation that fit optimally within a DNA groove was larger than the free energy loss due to the effect of dehydration. Cations with shapes complementary to that of a particular DNA groove configuration stabilized triplex formation, but cations that disturbed hydrogen bonds between DNA bases were destabilizing. These stabilizing and destabilizing mechanisms of molecular cations were also applicable to a DNA duplex composed of Watson-Crick base pairs. The molecular-level view of cation interactions with DNA structures will guide the design of DNA devices, DNA-based drugs, and genetic therapies.

  10. Optimization techniques in molecular structure and function elucidation.

    PubMed

    Sahinidis, Nikolaos V

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses recent optimization approaches to the protein side-chain prediction problem, protein structural alignment, and molecular structure determination from X-ray diffraction measurements. The machinery employed to solve these problems has included algorithms from linear programming, dynamic programming, combinatorial optimization, and mixed-integer nonlinear programming. Many of these problems are purely continuous in nature. Yet, to this date, they have been approached mostly via combinatorial optimization algorithms that are applied to discrete approximations. The main purpose of the paper is to offer an introduction and motivate further systems approaches to these problems.

  11. Nanoparticle Probes for Structural and Functional Photoacoustic Molecular Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haobin; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging. In addition, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), a method based on the photoacoustic effect, is widely recognized as a robust modality to evaluate the structure and function of biological tissues with high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution. The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity. This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development. PMID:26609534

  12. FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2016-08-01

    FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

  13. Investigation of structural behavior of candidate Space Station structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Miller, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative evaluations of the structural loads, stiffness and deflections of an example Space Station truss due to a variety of influences, including manufacturing tolerances, assembly operations, and operational loading are reported. The example truss is a dual-keel design composed of 5-meter-cube modules. The truss is 21 modules high and 9 modules wide, with a transverse beam 15 modules long. One problem of concern is the amount of mismatch which will be expected when the truss is being erected on orbit. Worst-case thermal loading results in less than 0.5 inch of mismatch. The stiffness of the interface is shown to be less than 100 pounds per inch. Thus, only moderate loads will be required to overcome the mismatch. The problem of manufacturing imperfections is analyzed by the Monte Carlo approach. Deformations and internal loads are obtained for ensembles of 100 example trusses. All analyses are performed on a personal computer. The necessary routines required to supplement commercially available programs are described.

  14. Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Holmes, Kenneth; Noe, Frank; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

  15. Investigating Actinide Molecular Adducts From Absorption Edge Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Den Auwer, C.; Conradson, S.D.; Guilbaud, P.; Moisy, P.; Mustre de Leon, J.; Simoni, E.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    Although Absorption Edge Spectroscopy has been widely applied to the speciation of actinide elements, specifically at the L{sub III} edge, understanding and interpretation of actinide edge spectra are not complete. In that sense, semi-quantitative analysis is scarce. In this paper, different aspects of edge simulation are presented, including semi-quantitative approaches. Comparison is made between various actinyl (U, Np) aquo or hydroxy compounds. An excursion into transition metal osmium chemistry allows us to compare the structurally related osmyl and uranyl hydroxides. The edge shape and characteristic features are discussed within the multiple scattering picture and the role of the first coordination sphere as well as contributions from the water solvent are described.

  16. Molecular structures of amyloid and prion fibrils: consensus versus controversy.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-07-16

    Many peptides and proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils. Examples include mammalian and fungal prion proteins, polypeptides associated with human amyloid diseases, and proteins that may have biologically functional amyloid states. To understand the propensity for polypeptides to form amyloid fibrils and to facilitate rational design of amyloid inhibitors and imaging agents, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular structures of these fibrils. Although fibril structures were largely mysterious 15 years ago, a considerable body of reliable structural information about amyloid fibril structures now exists, with essential contributions from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. This Account reviews results from our laboratories and discusses several structural issues that have been controversial. In many cases, the amino acid sequences of amyloid fibrils do not uniquely determine their molecular structures. Self-propagating, molecular-level polymorphism complicates the structure determination problem and can lead to apparent disagreements between results from different laboratories, particularly when different laboratories study different polymorphs. For 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ₁₋₄₀) fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, we have developed detailed structural models from solid state NMR and electron microscopy data for two polymorphs. These polymorphs have similar peptide conformations, identical in-register parallel β-sheet organizations, but different overall symmetry. Other polymorphs have also been partially characterized by solid state NMR and appear to have similar structures. In contrast, cryo-electron microscopy studies that use significantly different fibril growth conditions have identified structures that appear (at low resolution) to be different from those examined by solid state NMR. Based on solid state NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, the in-register parallel β-sheet organization

  17. Structural fluctuations and quantum transport through DNA molecular wires: a combined molecular dynamics and model Hamiltonian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, R.; Caetano, R.; Woiczikowski, P. B.; Kubar, T.; Elstner, M.; Cuniberti, G.

    2010-02-01

    Charge transport through a short DNA oligomer (Dickerson dodecamer (DD)) in the presence of structural fluctuations is investigated using a hybrid computational methodology based on a combination of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a model Hamiltonian approach. Based on a fragment orbital description, the DNA electronic structure can be coarse-grained in a very efficient way. The influence of dynamical fluctuations, arising either from the solvent fluctuations or from base-pair vibrational modes, can be taken into account in a straightforward way through the time series of the effective DNA electronic parameters, evaluated at snapshots along the MD trajectory. We show that charge transport can be promoted through the coupling to solvent fluctuations, which gate the on-site energies along the DNA wire.

  18. Molecular dynamics investigation of the grain boundary migration hysteresis of nanocrystalline Ni under cyclic shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Xinhua; Peng, Di

    2017-02-01

    The deformation behavior and grain boundary (GB) response of nanocrystalline Ni under cyclic shear loading are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The GB migration hysteresis phenomenon, in which the GB migration displacement lags behind the change in nominal shear strain, is observed in the symmetric tilt GBs for the first time. The elementary structure transformation occurring at the two end segments of the observed GB during GB migration produces a disordered and irreversible state, while the transformation in the middle segment is reversible. Both dislocation retraction and nucleation occur during unloading. Relatively large cyclic strain amplitudes lead to disordered GB segments of greater length, such that the residual GB migration displacement increases with increasing cyclic amplitude. GB migration hysteresis vanishes after the GB becomes immobile owing to a cyclic shear induced transition to a disordered state along its entire length.

  19. [Investigation on bioactive protective function of amino acids to insulin by molecular simulation].

    PubMed

    Li, Daixi; Zhai, Zhen; Guo, Baisong; Liu, Baolin; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Huaxing; Liu, Li; Yang, Chunsheng

    2014-08-01

    Heat sensitive protein medicines are increasingly exhibiting their critical importance on treatment of various diseases at present. But their popularization and application meet a great challenge because of their heat instability. In the present study, insulin was taken as a heat sensitive protein medicine and amino acid as bio-protective agent in order to investigate if these amino acids can protect the insulin from losing its bioactivity due to desiccation. The experiment was performed by using replica exchange molecular simulation (REMD) method and Gromacs software with Gromos96 (53a6) force field. The REMD results indicated that these amino acids could protect the bioactive structure of insulin during desiccation. The configurations of the protected insulin were preserved very well. Those results proved that amino acid is a kind of good bioactive protective agent for the heat sensitive protein medicines.

  20. 3D-QSAR Investigation of Synthetic Antioxidant Chromone Derivatives by Molecular Field Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Samee, Weerasak; Nunthanavanit, Patcharawee; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2008-01-01

    A series of 7-hydroxy, 8-hydroxy and 7,8-dihydroxy synthetic chromone derivatives was evaluated for their DPPH free radical scavenging activities. A training set of 30 synthetic chromone derivatives was subject to three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies using molecular field analysis (MFA). The substitutional requirements for favorable antioxidant activity were investigated and a predictive model that could be used for the design of novel antioxidants was derived. Regression analysis was carried out using genetic partial least squares (G/PLS) method. A highly predictive and statistically significant model was generated. The predictive ability of the developed model was assessed using a test set of 5 compounds (r2pred = 0.924). The analyzed MFA model demonstrated a good fit, having r2 value of 0.868 and cross-validated coefficient r2cv value of 0.771. PMID:19325746

  1. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Adhesion between TATB Surfaces and Amorphous Fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Bastea, S; Fried, L

    2007-01-25

    Atomistic simulations are used to study the adhesion properties of amorphous perfluoro- and fluoro-polymers onto two different crystal surfaces of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). Properties of the bulk amorphous polymer melts are also investigated. The fluoropolymers studied in this article include Kel-F 800, Teflon{reg_sign} AF, Hyflon AD{reg_sign}, and Cytop{reg_sign}. Simulations of the bulk polymer melts were performed over a wide range of temperatures including the volumetric glass transition temperature, so as to validate the interaction parameters used. The computed glass transition temperatures and densities compare well with experiment. The solubility parameters for the various polymers also compare well with calculations based on group additive methods. The local molecular structure at the TATB interface, as well as the degree of adhesion varies from one polymer to another. All polymers except Hyflon show a propensity to readily wet the two TATB surfaces studied.

  2. Hierarchical QSAR technology based on the Simplex representation of molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, V. E.; Artemenko, A. G.; Muratov, E. N.

    2008-06-01

    This article is about the hierarchical quantitative structure-activity relationship technology (HiT QSAR) based on the Simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) and its application for different QSAR/QSP(property)R tasks. The essence of this technology is a sequential solution (with the use of the information obtained on the previous steps) to the QSAR problem by the series of enhanced models of molecular structure description [from one dimensional (1D) to four dimensional (4D)]. It is a system of permanently improved solutions. In the SiRMS approach, every molecule is represented as a system of different simplexes (tetratomic fragments with fixed composition, structure, chirality and symmetry). The level of simplex descriptors detailing increases consecutively from the 1D to 4D representation of the molecular structure. The advantages of the approach reported here are the absence of "molecular alignment" problems, consideration of different physical-chemical properties of atoms (e.g. charge, lipophilicity, etc.), the high adequacy and good interpretability of obtained models and clear ways for molecular design. The efficiency of the HiT QSAR approach is demonstrated by comparing it with the most popular modern QSAR approaches on two representative examination sets. The examples of successful application of the HiT QSAR for various QSAR/QSPR investigations on the different levels (1D-4D) of the molecular structure description are also highlighted. The reliability of developed QSAR models as predictive virtual screening tools and their ability to serve as the base of directed drug design was validated by subsequent synthetic and biological experiments, among others. The HiT QSAR is realized as a complex of computer programs known as HiT QSAR software that also includes a powerful statistical block and a number of useful utilities.

  3. A molecular dynamic investigation for shock induced phase transition of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Nilanjan; Neogi, Anupam

    2015-06-01

    Atomistic equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was carried out to investigate shock induced phase transition of bulk liquid water. Multi-scale shock technique (MSST) was utilized to investigate low (US = 2 . 5km /s) to strong (US = 6 . 5km /s) intensity shock response on an extended flexible three point model up to 100 ns. The thermodynamic pathway of phase transition from liquid water to ice VII was investigated using temporal variation of thermodynamic state variables, power spectrum analyses of O-H bond vibration along with temporal evolution of pair correlation function between O-O, O-H and H-H atoms. Static structure factor along with pair-distribution function extended up to 20 Å was calculated and compared against the ideal ice VII to get information regarding long range ordering. Bragg reflection at different crystal planes were evaluated to investigate percentage of crystallinity of the shocked sample. Specific questions answered in this work involves: What is the exact time frame after the passage of shock at certain intensity in which nucleation of solid phase can be observed? Is it a complete or partial phase transition? Are external nucleators essential for this transformation? What is the percentage of crystallinity of the nucleated phase?

  4. Spectroscopic investigations, molecular interactions, and molecular docking studies on the potential inhibitor "thiophene-2-carboxylicacid"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, T.; Balachandran, V.; Perumal, S.

    2015-04-01

    Thiophene derivatives have been focused in the past decades due to their remarkable biological and pharmacological activities. In connection with that the conformational stability, spectroscopic characterization, molecular (inter- and intra-) interactions, and molecular docking studies on thiophene-2-carboxylicacid have been performed in this work by experimental FT-IR and theoretical quantum chemical computations. Experimentally recorded FT-IR spectrum in the region 4000-400 cm-1 has been compared with the scaled theoretical spectrum and the spectral peaks have been assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution results obtained from MOLVIB program package. The conformational stability of monomer and dimer conformers has been examined. The presence of inter- and intramolecular interactions in the monomer and dimer conformers have been explained by natural bond orbital analysis. The UV-Vis spectra of the sample in different solvents have been simulated and solvent effects were predicted by polarisable continuum model with TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. To test the biological activity of the sample, molecular docking (ligand-protein) simulations have been performed using SWISSDOCK web server. The full fitness (FF) score and binding affinity values revealed that thiophene-2-carboxylicacid can act as potential inhibitor against inflammation.

  5. Spectroscopic investigations, molecular interactions, and molecular docking studies on the potential inhibitor "thiophene-2-carboxylicacid".

    PubMed

    Karthick, T; Balachandran, V; Perumal, S

    2015-04-15

    Thiophene derivatives have been focused in the past decades due to their remarkable biological and pharmacological activities. In connection with that the conformational stability, spectroscopic characterization, molecular (inter- and intra-) interactions, and molecular docking studies on thiophene-2-carboxylicacid have been performed in this work by experimental FT-IR and theoretical quantum chemical computations. Experimentally recorded FT-IR spectrum in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) has been compared with the scaled theoretical spectrum and the spectral peaks have been assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution results obtained from MOLVIB program package. The conformational stability of monomer and dimer conformers has been examined. The presence of inter- and intramolecular interactions in the monomer and dimer conformers have been explained by natural bond orbital analysis. The UV-Vis spectra of the sample in different solvents have been simulated and solvent effects were predicted by polarisable continuum model with TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. To test the biological activity of the sample, molecular docking (ligand-protein) simulations have been performed using SWISSDOCK web server. The full fitness (FF) score and binding affinity values revealed that thiophene-2-carboxylicacid can act as potential inhibitor against inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Probing the molecular structure of interfacial films and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anfeng

    The properties of outside surfaces were found to play an important role in the nucleation and crystallization processes. Thus controlling the surface properties would provide an effective means for crystal engineering. Hydrophobic surface is prepared by self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on silicon surface, with the hydrophobicity adjusted by the monolayer coverage. Silicon wafer treated by RCA method is hydrophilic, so are SAMs formed by two amine-terminated organosilanes on silicon. However these three hydrophilic surfaces are unstable, due to contamination of the amine-terminated SAMs and hydrolysis of RCA treated silicon. Polymethine dyes, BDH+Cl- and BDH +ClO4-, are synthesized and characterized by UV spectra and crystal morphology. They have identical UV spectrum in dilute solutions due to the same chromophore, and J-aggregation happens at much higher concentrations. IR spectra are analyzed to monitor the crystallization process of BDH+Cl- OTS SAM surface and the crystallization process of BDH+Cl- on substrates with varying hydrophobicity was monitored by optical microscopy and compared. Due to the extreme flexibility of polysiloxane, silicone surfactants can arrange themselves at the interfaces quickly to adopt configurations with minimum free energy. Polysiloxane is hydrophobic but not oleophilic, which makes them effective emulsifiers and stabilizers in aqueous and nonaqueous media. The interaction between an AFM Si3N4 tip and a hydrophobic surface in silicone polyether (SPE) solution in the presence of ethanol was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) force measurement. ABA triblock type and comb-type SPE surfactants, adsorbed at the liquid-solid interface, provide steric barriers, even with significant addition of ethanol. On the contrary, conventional low-molecular weight and polymeric alkyl surfactants display no steric barrier even in the presence of moderate amount of ethanol. This unique property makes

  7. Cloning Yeast Actin cDNA Leads to an Investigative Approach for the Molecular Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Michael W.; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the…

  8. Cloning Yeast Actin cDNA Leads to an Investigative Approach for the Molecular Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Michael W.; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the…

  9. Molecular dynamics investigations of BioH protein substrate specificity for biotin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qiao; Cui, Ying-Lu; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2016-05-01

    BioH, an enzyme of biotin synthesis, plays an important role in fatty acid synthesis which assembles the pimelate moiety. Pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester, which is long known to be a biotin precursor, is the physiological substrate of BioH. Azelayl methyl ester, which has a longer chain than pimeloyl methyl ester, conjugated to ACP is also indeed accepted by BioH with very low rate of hydrolysis. To date, the substrate specificity for BioH and the molecular origin for the experimentally observed rate changes of hydrolysis by the chain elongation have remained elusive. To this end, we have investigated chain elongation effects on the structures by using the fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations combined with binding free energy calculations. The results indicate that the substrate specificity is determined by BioH together with ACP. The added two methylenes would increase the structural flexibility by protein motions at the interface of ACP and BioH, instead of making steric clashes with the side chains of the BioH hydrophobic cavity. On the other hand, the slower hydrolysis of azelayl substrate is suggested to be associated with the loose of contacts between BioH and ACP, and with the lost electrostatic interactions of two ionic/hydrogen bonding networks at the interface of the two proteins. The present study provides important insights into the structure-function relationships of the complex of BioH with pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester, which could contribute to further understanding about the mechanism of the biotin synthetic pathway, including the catalytic role of BioH.

  10. Structural characterization of polymorphs and molecular complexes of finasteride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzycka, Irena; Stȩpniak, Krystyna; Matyjaszczyk, Sławomir; Kozioł, Anna E.; Lis, Tadeusz; Abboud, Khalil A.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular structure of finasteride, 17 β-( N-tert-butylcarbamoyl)-4-aza-5 α-androst-1-en-3-one, and structures of three related crystalline forms have been determined by X-ray analysis. The rigid steroid skeleton of the molecule adopts a half-chair/chair/chair/half-chair conformation. Two peptide groups, one cyclic (lactam) in the ring A and a second being a part of the substituent at C17, are the main factors influencing intermolecular contacts. Different hydrogen-bond interactions of these hydrophilic groups are observed in the crystal structures. An infinite ribbon of finasteride molecules is formed between lactam groups in the orthorhombic homomolecular crystal ( 1) obtained from an ethanol solution. The linear molecular complex finasteride-acetic acid ( 1a) is connected by hydrogen bonds between the lactam of finasteride and the carboxyl group of acetic acid. The crystallization from an ethyl acetate solution gives a complex structure of bis-finasteride monohydrate ethyl acetate clathrate ( 1b) with guest molecule disordered in channels. Crystals of a second (monoclinic) finasteride polymorph ( 2) were obtained during thermal decomposition of 1a, and sublimation of 1, 1a and 1b. Two polymorphic forms show different IR spectra.

  11. A 3D visualization system for molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of molecules derive in part from their structures. Because of the importance of understanding molecular structures various methodologies, ranging from first principles to empirical technique, were developed for computing the structure of molecules. For large molecules such as polymer model compounds, the structural information is difficult to comprehend by examining tabulated data. Therefore, a molecular graphics display system, called MOLDS, was developed to help interpret the data. MOLDS is a menu-driven program developed to run on the LADC SNS computer systems. This program can read a data file generated by the modeling programs or data can be entered using the keyboard. MOLDS has the following capabilities: draws the 3-D representation of a molecule using stick, ball and ball, or space filled model from Cartesian coordinates, draws different perspective views of the molecule; rotates the molecule on the X, Y, Z axis or about some arbitrary line in space, zooms in on a small area of the molecule in order to obtain a better view of a specific region; and makes hard copy representation of molecules on a graphic printer. In addition, MOLDS can be easily updated and readily adapted to run on most computer systems.

  12. A 3D visualization system for molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of molecules derive in part from their structures. Because of the importance of understanding molecular structures various methodologies, ranging from first principles to empirical technique, were developed for computing the structure of molecules. For large molecules such as polymer model compounds, the structural information is difficult to comprehend by examining tabulated data. Therefore, a molecular graphics display system, called MOLDS, was developed to help interpret the data. MOLDS is a menu-driven program developed to run on the LADC SNS computer systems. This program can read a data file generated by the modeling programs or data can be entered using the keyboard. MOLDS has the following capabilities: draws the 3-D representation of a molecule using stick, ball and ball, or space filled model from Cartesian coordinates, draws different perspective views of the molecule; rotates the molecule on the X, Y, Z axis or about some arbitrary line in space, zooms in on a small area of the molecule in order to obtain a better view of a specific region; and makes hard copy representation of molecules on a graphic printer. In addition, MOLDS can be easily updated and readily adapted to run on most computer systems.

  13. Molecular Investigations into the Mechanics of a Muscle Anchoring Complex<