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Sample records for investigating high field

  1. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and

  2. Investigation of the asymmetric distributions of RF transmission and reception fields at high static field.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    When radiofrequency (RF) transmission field represents B(1)(+), the reception field represents B(1)(-)*. The distribution of those maps demonstrates asymmetric features at high field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Both maps are in mirror symmetry to one another. Almost symmetric distribution of the B(1) field was expected on the laboratory frame in a symmetric sample loaded inside the RF coil designed to achieve a homogeneous B(1) field. Then, a simple change was made in the coordinate transformation equation of RF fields between the rotating and laboratory frames in both linear and quadrature modes to investigate the source of this feature of asymmetry. The magnitude of rotating frame components, B(1)(+) and B(1)(-), consists of the magnitude and the phase difference of the laboratory frame components. The rotating frame components differ in the sign of the sinusoidal phase difference. B(1)(+) is equal to B(1)(-) at lower field because phase changes that depend on position can be ignored. At higher fields, the magnitude component has a symmetric profile, and distribution in the phase component is antisymmetric. Thus, the distributions of B(1)(+) and B(1)(-) maps demonstrate mirror symmetry. Maps of magnitude and phase components were examined in the laboratory frame. Their maps were computed from B(1)(+) and B(1)(-) maps of the human brain and of a spherical saline phantom measured at 4.7T. It was concluded from these analytical and experimental results that the asymmetric and mirror symmetric distributions in B(1)(+) and B(1)(-) are derived from the phase difference in the laboratory frame. PMID:22790299

  3. Investigation of Molecular Exchange Using DEXSY with Ultra-High Pulsed Field Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2008-12-01

    Diffusion exchange spectroscopy has been employed for the investigation of water exchange between different regions of a cosmetic lotion as well as for the exchange of n-pentane between the inter- and intra-crystalline space in zeolite NaX. We successfully combined this two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiment with methods for the application of ultra-high pulsed field gradients of up to 35 T/m, resulting in observation times and mixing times as short as 2 ms and 2.8 ms, respectively.

  4. Investigation of Molecular Exchange Using DEXSY with Ultra-High Pulsed Field Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Gratz, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2008-12-05

    Diffusion exchange spectroscopy has been employed for the investigation of water exchange between different regions of a cosmetic lotion as well as for the exchange of n-pentane between the inter- and intra-crystalline space in zeolite NaX. We successfully combined this two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiment with methods for the application of ultra-high pulsed field gradients of up to 35 T/m, resulting in observation times and mixing times as short as 2 ms and 2.8 ms, respectively.

  5. Physics Laboratory Investigation of Vocational High School Field Stone and Concrete Construction Techniques in the Central Java Province (Indonesia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purwandari, Ristiana Dyah

    2015-01-01

    The investigation aims in this study were to uncover the observations of infrastructures and physics laboratory in vocational high school for Stone and Concrete Construction Techniques Expertise Field or Teknik Konstruksi Batu dan Beton (TKBB)'s in Purwokerto Central Java Province, mapping the Vocational High School or Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan…

  6. The investigation of active Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungrack; Kim, Younghwi; Park, Minseong

    2016-10-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has succeeded only a very few times—for example, in the Nili Patera study (Bridges et al. 2012) using change-detection algorithms and orbital imagery. Therefore, in this study, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution orbital imagery specifically using a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE time-series images over several Martian dune fields. Dune migrations were iteratively processed both spatially and volumetrically, and the results were integrated to be compared to the Martian climate model. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). As a result, a number of measurements over dune fields in the Mars Global Dune Database (Hayward et al. 2014) covering polar areas and mid-latitude will be demonstrated

  7. Investigation of Solar Wind Coupling to the High-Latitude Ionospheric Reverse Convection Electric Field during Large Positive IMF Bz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Deshpande, K.; Xu, Z.; Hartinger, M.; Weimer, D. R.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    An empirical determination of the coupling function between the solar wind dynamo electric field and the high latitude ionospheric electric field is possible using the Weiner filter technique. We investigate the response of the high latitude reverse convection electric field measured by the Resolute Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR) during periods of large northward IMF for two CME-related events 12-13 September 2014 and 22 - 23 June 2015. The technique provides the most general linear coupling function including frequency response and time delays. We find that the solar wind is strongly coupled to the high latitude reverse convection electric field. We discuss the details of this coupling as it relates to various parameters that may influence the coupling efficiency, such as solar wind mach number, plasma beta, ionospheric Pederson conductivity, etc.

  8. Experimental investigation of image degradation created by a high-velocity flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, L. L.; Kalin, David A.; McNeal, Terry

    1991-07-01

    A unique experimental apparatus has been designed and constructed to characterize aero-optical distortions related to the turbulent flow conditions experienced by a windowed hypersonic vehicle. Using this apparatus, a series of imaging tests was conducted with a classical mixing/shear layer traveling at approximately 600 mIs. The experimental setup consisted of a collimated 0.84 mm laser diode point source that was passed through the flow field and imaged onto a CCD array. During a one second stable flow period, 92.5 frames of images were collected. Several runs were made with the lasr diode operating in both continuous and pulsed (40is duration) modes. These images were used to investigate several effects such as, image blur, jitter, and strehl loss. For long integration periods, the image experienced an average image blur circle size increase of approximately 24 times from the "wind-off" case. The pulsed runs showed an increase in jitter of approximately 36.4 j.trad. In addition, during continuous runs, a strehl ratio of approximately 0.0026 was observed. These and other preliminary results correlated well with theoretical predictions.

  9. Investigation of MAGSAT and TRIAD magnetometer data to provide corrective information on high-latitude external fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potemra, T. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The compilation of a catalog of the MAGSAT-observed high altitude disturbances is discussed and an example of contents and format is given. The graphs allow the investigation of Birkeland current signatures which are superimposed upon the main geomagnetic field. An example of a display of the MAGSAT orbital tracks in a polar geomagnetic coordinate system with the locations, flow directions, and intensities of field aligned currents shown in color is also given. The display was generated using an interactive color graphics terminal.

  10. Experimental investigation of a Ka band high power millimeter wave generator operated at low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai; Fan Yuwei

    2011-05-15

    An overmoded slow wave type Ka band generator is investigated experimentally to produce high power millimeter waves in this paper. The experiments were carried out at the TORCH-01 accelerator. The produced microwave frequency was measured by dispersive line method, and the power was estimated by integrating over the radiation pattern at far field. With relatively low guiding magnetic field of 0.8 T and diode voltage and beam current of 590 kV and 5.2 kA, respectively, a 33.56 GHz millimeter wave with an output power of 320 MW was generated, and the microwave mode was quasi-TM{sub 01} mode.

  11. Theoretical investigation of the behavior of CuSe2O5 compound in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghafi, Z.; Jahangiri, J.; Mahdavifar, S.; Hadipour, H.; Farjami Shayesteh, S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the analytical and numerical approaches, we investigate thermodynamic properties of CuSe2O5 compound at high magnetic fields which is a candidate for the strong intra-chain interaction in quasi one-dimensional (1D) quantum magnets. Magnetic behavior of the system can be described by the 1D spin-1/2 XXZ model in the presence of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Under these circumstances, there is one quantum critical field in this compound. Below the quantum critical field the spin chain system is in the gapless Luttinger liquid (LL) regime, whereas above it one observes a crossover to the gapped saturation magnetic phase. Indications on the thermodynamic curves confirm the occurrence of such a phase transition. The main characteristics of the LL phase are gapless and spin-spin correlation functions decay algebraic. The effects of zero-temperature quantum phase transition are observed even at rather high temperatures in comparison with the counterpart compounds. In addition, we calculate the Wilson ratio in the model. The Wilson ratio at a fixed temperature remains almost independent of the field in the LL region. In the vicinity of the quantum critical field, the Wilson ratio increases and exhibits anomalous enhancement.

  12. Toward increased concentration sensitivity for continuous wave EPR investigations of spin-labeled biological macromolecules at high fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Likai; Liu, Zhanglong; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Esquiaqui, Jackie M.; Hunter, Robert I.; Hill, Stephen; Smith, Graham M.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2016-04-01

    High-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at W-(∼94 GHz) and D-band (∼140 GHz) is important for investigating the conformational dynamics of flexible biological macromolecules because this frequency range has increased spectral sensitivity to nitroxide motion over the 100 ps to 2 ns regime. However, low concentration sensitivity remains a roadblock for studying aqueous samples at high magnetic fields. Here, we examine the sensitivity of a non-resonant thin-layer cylindrical sample holder, coupled to a quasi-optical induction-mode W-band EPR spectrometer (HiPER), for continuous wave (CW) EPR analyses of: (i) the aqueous nitroxide standard, TEMPO; (ii) the unstructured to α-helical transition of a model IDP protein; and (iii) the base-stacking transition in a kink-turn motif of a large 232 nt RNA. For sample volumes of ∼50 μL, concentration sensitivities of 2-20 μM were achieved, representing a ∼10-fold enhancement compared to a cylindrical TE011 resonator on a commercial Bruker W-band spectrometer. These results therefore highlight the sensitivity of the thin-layer sample holders employed in HiPER for spin-labeling studies of biological macromolecules at high fields, where applications can extend to other systems that are facilitated by the modest sample volumes and ease of sample loading and geometry.

  13. Toward increased concentration sensitivity for continuous wave EPR investigations of spin-labeled biological macromolecules at high fields.

    PubMed

    Song, Likai; Liu, Zhanglong; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Esquiaqui, Jackie M; Hunter, Robert I; Hill, Stephen; Smith, Graham M; Fanucci, Gail E

    2016-04-01

    High-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at W-(∼94 GHz) and D-band (∼140 GHz) is important for investigating the conformational dynamics of flexible biological macromolecules because this frequency range has increased spectral sensitivity to nitroxide motion over the 100 ps to 2 ns regime. However, low concentration sensitivity remains a roadblock for studying aqueous samples at high magnetic fields. Here, we examine the sensitivity of a non-resonant thin-layer cylindrical sample holder, coupled to a quasi-optical induction-mode W-band EPR spectrometer (HiPER), for continuous wave (CW) EPR analyses of: (i) the aqueous nitroxide standard, TEMPO; (ii) the unstructured to α-helical transition of a model IDP protein; and (iii) the base-stacking transition in a kink-turn motif of a large 232 nt RNA. For sample volumes of ∼50 μL, concentration sensitivities of 2-20 μM were achieved, representing a ∼10-fold enhancement compared to a cylindrical TE011 resonator on a commercial Bruker W-band spectrometer. These results therefore highlight the sensitivity of the thin-layer sample holders employed in HiPER for spin-labeling studies of biological macromolecules at high fields, where applications can extend to other systems that are facilitated by the modest sample volumes and ease of sample loading and geometry.

  14. The role of high-resolution geomagnetic field models for investigating ionospheric currents at low Earth orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, Claudia; Michaelis, Ingo; Rauberg, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Low Earth orbiting geomagnetic satellite missions, such as the Swarm satellite mission, are the only means to monitor and investigate ionospheric currents on a global scale and to make in situ measurements of F region currents. High-precision geomagnetic satellite missions are also able to detect ionospheric currents during quiet-time geomagnetic conditions that only have few nanotesla amplitudes in the magnetic field. An efficient method to isolate the ionospheric signals from satellite magnetic field measurements has been the use of residuals between the observations and predictions from empirical geomagnetic models for other geomagnetic sources, such as the core and lithospheric field or signals from the quiet-time magnetospheric currents. This study aims at highlighting the importance of high-resolution magnetic field models that are able to predict the lithospheric field and that consider the quiet-time magnetosphere for reliably isolating signatures from ionospheric currents during geomagnetically quiet times. The effects on the detection of ionospheric currents arising from neglecting the lithospheric and magnetospheric sources are discussed on the example of four Swarm orbits during very quiet times. The respective orbits show a broad range of typical scenarios, such as strong and weak ionospheric signal (during day- and nighttime, respectively) superimposed over strong and weak lithospheric signals. If predictions from the lithosphere or magnetosphere are not properly considered, the amplitude of the ionospheric currents, such as the midlatitude Sq currents or the equatorial electrojet (EEJ), is modulated by 10-15 % in the examples shown. An analysis from several orbits above the African sector, where the lithospheric field is significant, showed that the peak value of the signatures of the EEJ is in error by 5 % in average when lithospheric contributions are not considered, which is in the range of uncertainties of present empirical models of the EEJ.

  15. High nutrient concentration and temperature alleviated formation of large colonies of Microcystis: Evidence from field investigations and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Huaimin; Gao, Li; Xiao, Man; Li, Ming

    2016-09-15

    Correlations between Microcystis colony size and environmental factors were investigated in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu (China) from 2011 to 2013. Compared with Gonghu Bay, both nutrient concentrations and Microcystis colony sizes were greater in Meiliang Bay. The median colony size (D50: 50% of the total mass of particles smaller than this size) increased from April to August and then decreased until November. In both bays, the average D50 of Microcystis colonies were <100 μm in spring, but colonies within moderate-size (100-500 μm) dominated in summer. The differences in colony size in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay were probably due to horizontal drift driven by the prevailing south wind in summer. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of field data indicated that colony size was negatively related to nutrient concentrations but positively related to air temperature, suggesting that low nutrient concentrations and high air temperature promoted formation of large colonies. To validate the field survey, Microcystis colonies collected from Lake Taihu were cultured at different temperatures (15, 20, 25 and 30 °C) under high and low nutrient concentrations for 9 days. The size of Microcystis colonies significantly decreased when temperature was above 20 °C but had no significant change at 15 °C. The differences in temperature effects on colony formation shown from field and laboratory suggested that the larger colonies in summer were probably due to the longer growth period rather than the higher air temperature and light intensity. In addition, colony size decreased more significantly at high nutrient levels. Therefore, it could be concluded that high nutrient concentration and temperature may alleviate formation of large colonies of Microcystis. PMID:27262121

  16. The field-dependent shock profiles of a magnetorhelogical damper due to high impact: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwan-Choong; Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-02-01

    This work proposes a new damper featuring magnetorheological fluid (MR damper) and presents its field-dependent damping forces due to high impact. To achieve this goal, a large MR damper, which can produce a damping force of 100 kN at 6 A, is designed and manufactured based on the analysis of the magnetic flux intensity of the damper. After identifying the field-dependent damping force levels of the manufactured MR damper, a hydraulic horizontal shock tester is established. This shock testing system consists of a velocity generator, impact mass, shock programmer, and test mass. The MR damper is installed at the end of the wall in the shock tester and tested under four different experimental conditions. The shock profile characteristics of the MR damper due to different impact velocities are investigated at various input current levels. In addition, the inner pressure of the MR damper during impact, which depends on the input’s current level, is evaluated at two positions that can represent the pressure drop that generates the damping force of the MR damper. It is demonstrated from this impact testing that the shock profiles can be changed by the magnitude of the input current applied to the MR damper. It directly indicates that a desired shock profile can be achieved by installing the MR damper associated with appropriate control logics to adjust the magnitude of the input current.

  17. Magnetic fields and childhood cancer: an epidemiological investigation of the effects of high-voltage underground cables.

    PubMed

    Bunch, K J; Swanson, J; Vincent, T J; Murphy, M F G

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence of increased risks for childhood leukaemia from magnetic fields has implicated, as one source of such fields, high-voltage overhead lines. Magnetic fields are not the only factor that varies in their vicinity, complicating interpretation of any associations. Underground cables (UGCs), however, produce magnetic fields but have no other discernible effects in their vicinity. We report here the largest ever epidemiological study of high voltage UGCs, based on 52,525 cases occurring from 1962-2008, with matched birth controls. We calculated the distance of the mother's address at child's birth to the closest 275 or 400 kV ac or high-voltage dc UGC in England and Wales and the resulting magnetic fields. Few people are exposed to magnetic fields from UGCs limiting the statistical power. We found no indications of an association of risk with distance or of trend in risk with increasing magnetic field for leukaemia, and no convincing pattern of risks for any other cancer. Trend estimates for leukaemia as shown by the odds ratio (and 95% confidence interval) per unit increase in exposure were: reciprocal of distance 0.99 (0.95-1.03), magnetic field 1.01 (0.76-1.33). The absence of risk detected in relation to UGCs tends to add to the argument that any risks from overhead lines may not be caused by magnetic fields.

  18. The Crustal Structure of Beira High, Central Mozambique - Combined Investigation of Wide-angle Seismic and Potential Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, C. O.; Schreckenberger, B.; Heyde, I.; Jokat, W.

    2015-12-01

    the lowermost velocity gradients to allow a sound interpretation of the Beira High origin. The acquired shipborne, magnetic data show a complex magnetic pattern and strong influences by the presence of lava flows and intrusions and require further investigations. We will introduce the latest results of the joint interpretation of seismic and potential field data sets.

  19. HAIC/HIWC field campaign - investigating ice microphysics in high ice water content regions of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter; Lilie, Lyle; Dezitter, Fabien; Grandin, Alice

    2015-04-01

    Despite existing research programs focusing on tropical convection, high ice water content (IWC) regions in Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) - potentially encountered by commercial aircraft and related to reported in-service events - remain poorly documented either because investigation of such high IWC regions was not of highest priority or because utilized instrumentation was not capable of providing accurate cloud microphysical measurements. To gather quantitative data in high IWC regions, a multi-year international HAIC/HIWC (High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content) field project has been designed including a first field campaign conducted out of Darwin (Australia) in 2014. The French Falcon 20 research aircraft had been equipped among others with a state-of-the-art in situ microphysics package including the IKP (isokinetic evaporator probe which provides a reference measurement of IWC and TWC), the CDP (cloud droplet spectrometer probe measuring particles in the range 2-50 µm), the 2D-S (2D-Stereo, 10-1280 µm) and PIP (precipitation imaging probe, 100-6400 µm) optical array probes. Microphysical data collection has been performed mainly at -40°C and -30°C levels, whereas little data could be sampled at -50°C and at -15C/-10°C. The study presented here focuses on ice crystal size properties, thereby analyzing in detail the 2D image data from 2D-S and PIP optical array imaging probes. 2D images recorded with 2D-S and PIP were processed in order to extract a large variety of geometrical parameters, such as maximum diameter (Dmax), 2D surface equivalent diameter (Deq), and the corresponding number particle size distribution (PSD). Using the PSD information from both probes, a composite size distribution was then built, with sizes ranging from few tens of µm to roughly 10 mm. Finally, mass-size relationships for ice crystals in tropical convection were established in terms of power laws in order to compute median mass diameters MMDmax and

  20. Mars Observer magnetic fields investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Wasilewski, P.; Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Carlson, C. W.; Mcfadden, J.; Curtis, D. W.; Reme, H.; Cros, A.

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic fields experiment designed for the Mars Observer mission will provide definitive measurements of the Martian magnetic field from the transition and mapping orbits planned for the Mars Observer. The paper describes the instruments (which include a classical magnetometer and an electron reflection magnetometer) and techniques designed to investigate the nature of the Martian magnetic field and the Mars-solar wind interaction, the mapping of crustal magnetic fields, and studies of the Martian ionosphere, which are activities included in the Mars Observer mission objectives. Attention is also given to the flight software incorporated in the on-board data processor, and the procedures of data processing and analysis.

  1. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  2. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  3. An investigation of dynamic failure events in steels using full field high-speed infrared thermography and high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guduru, Pradeep R.

    An infrared (IR) imaging system has been developed for measuring the temperature increase during the dynamic deformation of materials. The system consists of an 8 x 8 HgCdTe focal plane array, each with its own preamplifier. Outputs from all 64 signals are simultaneously acquired and held using a bank of track and hold amplifiers. An array of eight 8:1 multiplexers then routes the signals to eight 10MHz digitizers, acquiring data from each row of detectors in parallel. The maximum rate is one million frames per second. Crack tip temperature rise during dynamic deformation is known to alter the fracture mechanisms and consequently the fracture toughness of a material. However, no direct experimental measurements have ever been made to determine the same because of limited diagnostic tools. By transcending the existing experimental limitations, this investigation presents detailed, real time evolution of the transient crack tip temperature fields in two different steels (C300 and HY100 steels), using the 2-D high speed IR camera. The crack tip temperature rise at initiation in C300 steel was found to be about 55K. In case of HY100, which is a highly ductile steel, the crack tip temperature rise was above 200K and was seen to be a strong function of loading rate. HRR elastic-plastic singular field has been used to extract J integral evolution from the measured temperature field. An experimental investigation has been conducted to study the initiation and propagation characteristics of dynamic shear bands in C300 maraging steel. Pre-fatigued single edge notched specimens were impacted on the edge under the notch to produce shear dominated mixed mode stress fields. The optical technique of coherent gradient sensing (CGS) was employed to study the evolution of the mixed mode stress intensity factors. Simultaneously, a newly developed high speed IR camera was employed to obtain the temperature field evolution during the initiation and propagation of the shear bands. The

  4. Investigation of fertility and in utero effects in rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity 60-Hz electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Walker, C.F.

    1984-11-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate subtle bioeffects in Sprague-Dawley rats chronically exposed to a 60-Hz electric field at 80 kV/m unperturbed intensity. The details of our exposure facility, artifact considerations, environmental conditions, and exposure protocol are reported in this paper. Results of electric field exposure on reproduction and prenatal and postnatal development of rats over four generations are discussed. Statistical analysis of data from 305 females, 213 pregnancies, and 2683 births revealed no effects of electric field exposure on fertility, fecundity, nurturing, survival, or sex ratio of off-spring. In the final generation, 51 pregnant females were euthanized between days 16 and 20 of gestation, and 681 fetuses were carefully examined for gross malformations. Statistical analysis indicated that exposure to the electric field produced no significant increase in gross malformations, nor were any differences noted in resorptions, orientation of fetus in utero, sex ratio, or differential frequencies of uterine horn implantation. A detailed discussion of statistical power and sensitivity is included.

  5. Investigation of Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization Physics in High-beta Plasmas Using Applied Non-axisymmetric Fields in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, A. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Zhu, W.; Menard, J. E.; Bell, R. E.; Bialek, J. M.; Bell, M. G.; Gates, D. A.; Glasser, A. H.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Shaing, K. C.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K. L.

    2009-06-16

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) offers an operational space characterized by high-beta (βt = 39%, βN > 7, βN/βno-wall N > 1.5) and low aspect ratio (A > 1.27) to leverage the plasma parameter dependences of RWM stabilization and plasma rotation damping physics giving greater confidence for extrapolation to ITER. Significant new capability for RWM research has been added to the device with the commissioning of a set of six nonaxisymmetric magnetic field coils, allowing generation of fields with dominant toroidal mode number, n, of 1–3. These coils have been used to study the dependence of resonant field amplification on applied field frequency and RWMstabilization physics by reducing the toroidal rotation profile belowits steady-state value through non-resonant magnetic braking. Modification of plasma rotation profiles shows that rotation outside q = 2.5 is not required for passive RWM stability and there is large variation in the RWM critical rotation at the q = 2 surface, both of which are consistent with distributed dissipation models.

  6. A visualization instrument to investigate the mechanical-electro properties of high temperature superconducting tapes under multi-fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xingyi; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Wentao; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, YouHe

    2016-07-01

    We construct a visible instrument to study the mechanical-electro behaviors of high temperature superconducting tape as a function of magnetic field, strain, and temperature. This apparatus is directly cooled by a commercial Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The minimum temperature of sample can be 8.75 K. A proportion integration differentiation temperature control is used, which is capable of producing continuous variation of specimen temperature from 8.75 K to 300 K with an optional temperature sweep rate. We use an external loading device to stretch the superconducting tape quasi-statically with the maximum tension strain of 20%. A superconducting magnet manufactured by the NbTi strand is applied to provide magnetic field up to 5 T with a homogeneous range of 110 mm. The maximum fluctuation of the magnetic field is less than 1%. We design a kind of superconducting lead composed of YBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductor and beryllium copper alloy (BeCu) to transfer DC to the superconducting sample with the maximum value of 600 A. Most notably, this apparatus allows in situ observation of the electromagnetic property of superconducting tape using the classical magnetic-optical imaging.

  7. A visualization instrument to investigate the mechanical-electro properties of high temperature superconducting tapes under multi-fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xingyi; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Wentao; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, YouHe

    2016-07-01

    We construct a visible instrument to study the mechanical-electro behaviors of high temperature superconducting tape as a function of magnetic field, strain, and temperature. This apparatus is directly cooled by a commercial Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The minimum temperature of sample can be 8.75 K. A proportion integration differentiation temperature control is used, which is capable of producing continuous variation of specimen temperature from 8.75 K to 300 K with an optional temperature sweep rate. We use an external loading device to stretch the superconducting tape quasi-statically with the maximum tension strain of 20%. A superconducting magnet manufactured by the NbTi strand is applied to provide magnetic field up to 5 T with a homogeneous range of 110 mm. The maximum fluctuation of the magnetic field is less than 1%. We design a kind of superconducting lead composed of YBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductor and beryllium copper alloy (BeCu) to transfer DC to the superconducting sample with the maximum value of 600 A. Most notably, this apparatus allows in situ observation of the electromagnetic property of superconducting tape using the classical magnetic-optical imaging.

  8. A visualization instrument to investigate the mechanical-electro properties of high temperature superconducting tapes under multi-fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xingyi; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Wentao; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, YouHe

    2016-07-01

    We construct a visible instrument to study the mechanical-electro behaviors of high temperature superconducting tape as a function of magnetic field, strain, and temperature. This apparatus is directly cooled by a commercial Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. The minimum temperature of sample can be 8.75 K. A proportion integration differentiation temperature control is used, which is capable of producing continuous variation of specimen temperature from 8.75 K to 300 K with an optional temperature sweep rate. We use an external loading device to stretch the superconducting tape quasi-statically with the maximum tension strain of 20%. A superconducting magnet manufactured by the NbTi strand is applied to provide magnetic field up to 5 T with a homogeneous range of 110 mm. The maximum fluctuation of the magnetic field is less than 1%. We design a kind of superconducting lead composed of YBa2Cu3O7-x coated conductor and beryllium copper alloy (BeCu) to transfer DC to the superconducting sample with the maximum value of 600 A. Most notably, this apparatus allows in situ observation of the electromagnetic property of superconducting tape using the classical magnetic-optical imaging. PMID:27475594

  9. The crustal structure of Beira High, central Mozambique-Combined investigation of wide-angle seismic and potential field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Christian Olaf; Jokat, Wilfried; Schreckenberger, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    The timing and geometry of the initial Gondwana break-up between Africa and East Antarctica is still poorly known due to missing information about the continent-ocean boundaries along the rifted margins. In this context, the Beira High off central Mozambique forms a critical geological feature of uncertain crustal fabric. Based on new wide-angle seismic and potential field data across Beira High a P-wave velocity model, supported by amplitude and gravity modelling, provides constraints on the crustal composition of this area. In the Mozambique Basin mainly normal oceanic crust of 5.5-7 km thickness with velocities of 6.5-7.0 km/s in the lower crust is present. A sharp transition towards Beira High marks the continent-ocean boundary. Here the crust thickens to 23 km at maximum. A small velocity-depth gradient and a constant increase in velocity with basal velocities of maximum 7.0 km/s are in good agreement with typical velocities of continental crust and continental fragments. The density model indicates the existence of felsic material in greater depths and supports a fabric of stretched, but highly intruded continental crust below Beira High. A gradual decrease in crustal thickness characterizes the transition towards the Mozambican shelf area. Here, in the Zambezi Delta Depression 12 km of sediments cover the underlying 7 km thick crust. The presence of a high-velocity lower crustal body with velocities of 7.1-7.4 km/s indicates underplated, magmatic material in this part of the profile. However, the velocity structure in the shelf area allows no definite interpretation because of the experimental setup. Thus, the crustal nature below the Zambezi Delta and consequently the landward position of the continent-ocean boundary remains unknown. The difference in stretching below the margins of Beira High suggests the presence of different thinning directions and a rift jump during the early rifting stage.

  10. The DYNAMO Orbiter Project: High Resolution Mapping of Gravity/Magnetic Fields and In Situ Investigation of Mars Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Reme, H.; Mazelle, C.; Blelly, P. -L.; Acuna, M.; Connerney, J.; Purucker, M.; Lin, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamo is a small Mars orbiter planned to be launched in 2005 or 2007, in the frame of the NASA/CNES Mars exploration program. It is aimed at improving gravity and magnetic field resolution, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars, and at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained. These objectives are achieved by using a low periapsis orbit, similar to the one used by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during its aerobraking phases. The proposed periapsis altitude for Dynamo of 120-130 km, coupled with the global distribution of periapses to be obtained during one Martian year of operation, through about 5000 low passes, will produce a magnetic/gravity field data set with approximately five times the spatial resolution of MGS. Low periapsis provides a unique opportunity to investigate the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, therefore atmospheric escape, which may have played a crucial role in removing atmosphere, and water, from the planet. There is much room for debate on the importance of current atmosphere escape processes in the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, as early "exotic" processes including hydrodynamic escape and impact erosion are traditionally invoked to explain the apparent sparse inventory of present-day volatiles. Yet, the combination of low surface gravity and the absence of a substantial internally generated magnetic field have undeniable effects on what we observe today. In addition to the current losses in the forms of Jeans and photochemical escape of neutrals, there are solar wind interaction-related erosion mechanisms because the upper atmosphere is directly exposed to the solar wind. The solar wind related loss rates, while now comparable to those of a modest comet, nonetheless occur continuously, with the intriguing possibility of important cumulative and

  11. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  12. Damage and loss assessment on rubber trees caused by typhoon based on high-precision remote sensing data and field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Fang, Weihua; Tan, Chenyan

    2016-04-01

    Forest dynamics are highly relevant to land hydrology, climate, carbon budget and biodiversity. Damage and loss assessment of forest caused by typhoon is essential to the understanding of ecosystem variations. Combination of high-precision remote sensing data and field investigation is critical to the assessment of forest damage loss. In this study, high-precision remote sensing data prior to and after typhoon from IKONOS, QuickBird, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are used for identifying rubber tree disturbance. The ground truth data of rubber tree damage collected through field investigation are used to verify and compare the results. Taken the forest damage induced by typhoon Rammasun (201409) in Hainan as an example, 5 damage types (overthrown, trunk snapped below 2m, trunk snapped above 2m, half-overthrown, and sheared) of rubber trees are clearly interpreted compared with field investigation results. High-precision remote sensing data is then applied to other areas to evaluate the forest damage severity. At last, rubber tree damage severity is investigated with other typhoon hazard factors such as wind, topography, soil and precipitation.

  13. Numerical investigation of the high Reynolds number 3D flow field generated by a self-propelling manta ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederzani, Jean-Noel; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    An embedded-boundary (or cut-cell) method for complex geometry with moving boundaries is used to solve the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equation around a self-propelling manta swimming at moderately high Reynolds numbers. The motion of the ray is prescribed using a kinematic model fitted to actual biological data. The dependence of thrust production mechanism on Strouhal and Reynolds numbers is investigated. The vortex core structures are accurately plotted and a correlation between wake structures and propulsive performance is established. This insight is critical in understanding the key flow features that a bio-inspired autonomous vehicle should reproduce in order to swim efficiently. The solution method is implemented, on a block-structured Cartesian grid using a cut-cell approach enabling the code to correctly evaluate the wall shear-stress, a key feature necessary at higher Reynolds. To enhance computational efficiency, a parallel adaptive mesh refinement technique is used. The present method is validated against published experimental results. Supported by ONR MURI.

  14. Investigations on the magnetic field coupling of automotive high voltage systems to determine relevant parameters for an EMR-optimized designing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, David; John, Werner; Weigel, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The implementation of electrical drive trains in modern vehicles is a new challenge for EMC development. This contribution depicts a variety of investigations on magnetic field coupling of automotive high-voltage (HV) systems in order to fulfil the requirements of an EMR-optimized designing. The theoretical background is discussed within the scope of current analysis, including the determination of current paths and spectral behaviour. It furthermore presents models of shielded HV cables with particular focus on the magnetic shielding efficiency. Derived findings are validated by experimental measurements of a state-of-the-art demonstrator on system level. Finally EMC design rules are discussed in the context of minimized magnetic fields.

  15. Field investigation of keyblock stability

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    Discontinuities in a rock mass can intersect an excavation surface to form discrete blocks (keyblocks) which can be unstable. This engineering problem is divided into two parts: block identification, and evaluation of block stability. One stable keyblock and thirteen fallen keyblocks were observed in field investigations at the Nevada Test Site. Nine blocks were measured in detail sufficient to allow back-analysis of their stability. Measurements included block geometry, and discontinuity roughness and compressive strength. Back-analysis correctly predicted stability or failure in all but two cases. These two exceptions involved situations that violated the stress assumptions of the stability calculations. Keyblock faces correlated well with known joint set orientations. The effect of tunnel orientation on keyblock frequency was apparent. Back-analysis of physical models successfully predicted block pullout force for two-dimensional models of unit thickness. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analytic models for the stability of simple pyramidal keyblocks were examined. Calculated stability is greater for 3D analyses than for 2D analyses. Calculated keyblock stability increases with larger in situ stress magnitudes, larger lateral stress ratios, and larger shear strengths. Discontinuity stiffness controls block displacement more strongly than it does stability itself. Large keyblocks are less stable than small ones, and stability increases as blocks become more slender. Rock mass temperature decreases reduce the confining stress magnitudes and can lead to failure. The pattern of stresses affecting each block face explains conceptually the occurrence of pyramidal keyblocks that are truncated near their apex.

  16. Synthetic turf field investigation in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Nancy J; Bracker, Anne; Ginsberg, Gary; Toal, Brian; Golembiewski, Brian; Kurland, Tara; Hedman, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to characterize the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC), rubber-related chemicals such as benzothiazole (BZT) and nitrosamine, and particulate matter (PM(10)) in air at synthetic turf crumb rubber fields. Both new and older fields were evaluated under conditions of active use. Three types of fields were targeted: four outdoor crumb rubber fields, one indoor facility with crumb rubber turf, and an outdoor natural grass field. Background samples were collected at each field on grass. Personal air sampling was conducted for VOC, BZT, nitrosamines, and other chemicals. Stationary air samples were collected at different heights to assess the vertical profile of release. Air monitoring for PM(10) was conducted at one height. Bulk samples of turf grass and crumb rubber were analyzed, and meteorological data were recorded. Results showed that personal concentrations were higher than stationary concentrations and were higher on turf than in background samples for certain VOC. In some cases, personal VOC concentrations from natural grass fields were as high as those on turf. Naphthalene, BZT, and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were detected in greater concentration at the indoor field compared to the outdoor fields. Nitrosamine air levels were below reporting levels. PM(10) air concentrations were not different between on-field and upwind locations. All bulk lead (Pb) samples were below the public health target of 400 ppm. More research is needed to better understand air quality at indoor facilities. These field investigation data were incorporated into a separate human health risk assessment.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF THE EXTENDED RANGE REM-COUNTER SMARTREM-LINUS IN REFERENCE AND WORKPLACE FIELDS EXPECTED AROUND HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Eike; Trovati, S; Strauch, U; Mayer, S

    2016-09-01

    Radiation survey instrumentation is adequate for the use around high-energy accelerators if capable to measure the dose arising from neutrons with energies ranging from thermal up to a few gigaelectronvolts. The SmartREM-LINUS is a commercial extended range rem-counter, consisting of a central (3)He-proportional counter surrounded by a spherical moderator made of borated polyethylene with an internal shield made of lead. The dose rate indicated by the SmartREM-LINUS was investigated for two different irradiation conditions. The linearity and the angular dependence of the indicated dose rate were investigated using reference neutron fields produced by (241)AmBe and (252)Cf. Additional measurements were performed in two different workplace fields with a component of neutrons with energies >20 MeV, namely the CERN-EU high-energy reference field and near the beam dump of the SwissFEL injector test facility. The measured dose rates were compared to a commercial rem-counter (WENDI2) and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:27315828

  18. Polypyrrole nanostructures and their field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpale, Kashmira; More, Mahendra A.; Koinkar, Pankaj M.; Patil, Sandip S.; Sonawane, Kishor M.

    2015-03-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanostructures have been synthesized on indium doped tin oxide (ITO) substrates by a facile electrochemical route employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) mode. The morphology of the PPy thin films was observed to be influenced by the monomer concentration. Furthermore, FTIR revealed formation of electrically conducting state of PPy. Field emission investigations of the PPy nanostructures were carried out at base pressure of 1×10-8mbar. The values of turn-on field, corresponding to emission current density of 1 μA/cm2 were observed to be 0.6, 1.0 and 1.2 V/μm for the PPy films characterized with rod-like, cauliflower and granular morphology, respectively. In case of PPy nanorods maximum current density of 1.2 mA/cm2 has been drawn at electric field of 1 V/μm. The low turn on field, extraction of very high emission current density at relatively lower applied field and good emission stability propose the PPy nanorods as a promising material for field emission based devices.

  19. High volume-high value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 2 -- Field investigations. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The field investigation phase of the project was essentially completed when grout placed into auger holes at the Lodestar Energy mine site during Summer 1997 was sampled. Mining had proceeded to a point where the strata overlying the coal was completely removed, thus exposing the grout-filled auger holes. All of the auger holes contained either grout from these experiments or shale that in-filled the non-grouted holes during the process of clearing the top surface of the coal. Eleven grouted holes were sampled, utilizing hammers and chisels, for physical (strength) testing, as well as chemical, mineralogical, and microscopical analysis. Upon arrival at the laboratory, moisture contents, densities, and void ratios were obtained before disturbing the samples, and after strength testing. Representative samples of each grout were then cut into flat-sided prisms, with a height:width ratio {approx}2, to be used for testing of unconfined compressive strength. In summary, all of the grouts had very good mechanical strength, ranging from 1000 psi to 2250 psi. The lowest compressive strength was recorded on a bed ash-based grout.

  20. Investigation of Aluminum Site Changes of Dehydrated Zeolite H-Beta during a Rehydration Process by High Field Solid State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Suochang; Hu, Mary Y.; Bao, Xinhe; Peden, Charles HF; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-01-22

    Aluminum site changes for dehydrated H-Beta zeolite during rehydration process are systematically investigated by ²⁷Al MAS and MQ MAS NMR at high magnetic fields up to 19.9 T. Benefiting from the high magnetic field, more detailed information is obtained from the considerably broadened and overlapped spectra of dehydrated H-beta zeolite. Dynamic changes of aluminum sites are demonstrated during rehydration process. In completely dehydrated H-Beta, invisible aluminum can reach 29%. The strength of quadrupole interactions for framework aluminum sites decreases gradually during water adsorption processes. The number of extra-framework aluminum (EFAL) species, i.e., penta- (34 ppm) and octa- (4 ppm) coordinated aluminum atoms rises initially with increasing water adsorption, and finally change into either tetra-coordinated framework or extra-framework aluminum in saturated water adsorption samples, with the remaining octa-coordinated aluminum lying at 0 and -4 ppm, respectively. Quantitative ²⁷Al MAS NMR analysis combined with ¹H MAS NMR indicates that some active EFAL species formed during calcination can reinsert into the framework during this hydration process. The assignment of aluminum at 0 ppm to EFAL cation and -4 ppm to framework aluminum is clarified for H-Beta zeolite.

  1. Spray features in the near field of a flow-blurring injector investigated by high-speed visualization and time-resolved PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lulin; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2015-05-01

    In a flow-blurring (FB) injector, atomizing air stagnates and bifurcates at the gap upstream of the injector orifice. A small portion of the air penetrates into the liquid supply line to create a turbulent two-phase flow. Pressure drop across the injector orifice causes air bubbles to expand and burst thereby disintegrating the surrounding liquid into a fine spray. In previous studies, we have demonstrated clean and stable combustion of alternative liquid fuels, such as biodiesel, straight vegetable oil and glycerol by using the FB injector without requiring fuel pre-processing or combustor hardware modification. In this study, high-speed visualization and time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques are employed to investigate the FB spray in the near field of the injector to delineate the underlying mechanisms of atomization. Experiments are performed using water as the liquid and air as the atomizing gas for air to liquid mass ratio of 2.0. Flow visualization at the injector exit focused on a field of view with physical dimensions of 2.3 mm × 1.4 mm at spatial resolution of 7.16 µm per pixel, exposure time of 1 µs, and image acquisition rate of 100 k frames per second. Image sequences illustrate mostly fine droplets indicating that the primary breakup by FB atomization likely occurs within the injector itself. A few larger droplets appearing mainly at the injector periphery undergo secondary breakup by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Time-resolved PIV is applied to quantify the droplet dynamics in the injector near field. Plots of instantaneous, mean, and root-mean-square droplet velocities are presented to reveal the secondary breakup process. Results show that the secondary atomization to produce fine and stable spray is complete within a few diameters from the injector exit. These superior characteristics of the FB injector are attractive to achieve clean combustion of different fuels in practical systems.

  2. High volume-high value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 2 -- Field investigations. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The factors that control the strength of FBC ash grout were the focus of work during this quarter. Samples were prepared at different water contents and placed into cylindrical PVC molds. At specified curing intervals, the grout cylinders were subjected to unconfined compressive strength testing as per procedures described in previous reports. Chemical, mineralogical, and microscopical analyses were also conducted on the samples. It was found that higher curing temperatures significantly increase the strength gain rate of the FBC ash grout, in agreement with earlier results. As expected, water content also exerts a strong influence on the strength of the grout. The compressive strength data obtained for the laboratory-prepared samples are in excellent agreement with strength data obtained on grout placed in auger holes during the field demonstrations. The data also indicate that the field samples suffered negligible deterioration over the course of the curing period in the auger holes. Analysis of the laboratory prepared grout samples using XRD revealed a mineralogy similar to the field samples. A correspondence between ettringite abundance and compressive strength was observed only during grout curing. The formation of minerals such as ettringite is apparently a good indication that curing reactions are progressing and that the grout strength is increasing, but mineral distribution by itself does not explain or predict final strength. The microscopy data, in combination with geotechnical and XRD data, suggest that the strength of the grout is largely a function of the density of an amorphous (or finely crystalline) material that comprises the majority of the cured grout. Therefore, an increase in density of this material results in an increase in grout strength.

  3. Hurricane Ike: Field Investigation Survey (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, L.

    2009-12-01

    Hurricane Ike made landfall at 2:10 a.m. on September 13, 2008, as a Category 2 hurricane. The eye of the hurricane crossed over the eastern end of Galveston Island and a large region of the Texas and Louisiana coast experienced extreme winds, waves and water levels, resulting in large impacts from overtopping, overwash, wind and wave forces and flooding. Major damage stretched from Freeport to the southwest and to Port Arthur to the northeast. The effects of the hurricane force winds were felt well inland in Texas and Louisiana and the storm continued to the interior of the US, causing more damage and loss of life. Through the support of the Coasts, Oceans, Ports and Rivers Institute (COPRI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) a team of 14 coastal scientists and engineers inspected the upper Texas coast in early October 2008. The COPRI team surveyed Hurricane Ike’s effects on coastal landforms, structures, marinas, shore protection systems, and other infrastructure. Damages ranges from very minor to complete destruction, depending upon location and elevation. Bolivar Peninsula, to the right of the hurricane path, experienced severe damage and three peninsula communities were completely destroyed. Significant flood and wave damage also was observed in Galveston Island and Brazoria County that were both on the left side of the hurricane path. Beach erosion and prominent overwash fans were observed throughout much of the field investigation area. The post-storm damage survey served to confirm expected performance under extreme conditions, as well as to evaluate recent development trends and conditions unique to each storm. Hurricane Ike confirmed many previously reported observations. One of the main conclusions from the inspection of buildings was that elevation was a key determinant for survival. Elevation is also a major factor in the stability and effectiveness of shore protection. The Galveston Seawall was high enough to provide protection from

  4. Performance Investigation of Proteomic Identification by HCD/CID Fragmentations in Combination with High/Low-Resolution Detectors on a Tribrid, High-Field Orbitrap Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shichen; Sheng, Quanhu; Shyr, Yu; Qu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The recently-introduced Orbitrap Fusion mass spectrometry permits various types of MS2 acquisition methods. To date, these different MS2 strategies and the optimal data interpretation approach for each have not been adequately evaluated. This study comprehensively investigated the four MS2 strategies: HCD-OT (higher-energy-collisional-dissociation with Orbitrap detection), HCD-IT (HCD with ion trap, IT), CID-IT (collision-induced-dissociation with IT) and CID-OT on Orbitrap Fusion. To achieve extensive comparison and identify the optimal data interpretation method for each technique, several search engines (SEQUEST and Mascot) and post-processing methods (score-based, PeptideProphet, and Percolator) were assessed for all techniques for the analysis of a human cell proteome. It was found that divergent conclusions could be made from the same dataset when different data interpretation approaches were used and therefore requiring a relatively fair comparison among techniques. Percolator was chosen for comparison of techniques because it performs the best among all search engines and MS2 strategies. For the analysis of human cell proteome using individual MS2 strategies, the highest number of identifications was achieved by HCD-OT, followed by HCD-IT and CID-IT. Based on these results, we concluded that a relatively fair platform for data interpretation is necessary to avoid divergent conclusions from the same dataset, and HCD-OT and HCD-IT may be preferable for protein/peptide identification using Orbitrap Fusion. PMID:27472422

  5. Performance Investigation of Proteomic Identification by HCD/CID Fragmentations in Combination with High/Low-Resolution Detectors on a Tribrid, High-Field Orbitrap Instrument.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Li, Jun; Shen, Shichen; Sheng, Quanhu; Shyr, Yu; Qu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The recently-introduced Orbitrap Fusion mass spectrometry permits various types of MS2 acquisition methods. To date, these different MS2 strategies and the optimal data interpretation approach for each have not been adequately evaluated. This study comprehensively investigated the four MS2 strategies: HCD-OT (higher-energy-collisional-dissociation with Orbitrap detection), HCD-IT (HCD with ion trap, IT), CID-IT (collision-induced-dissociation with IT) and CID-OT on Orbitrap Fusion. To achieve extensive comparison and identify the optimal data interpretation method for each technique, several search engines (SEQUEST and Mascot) and post-processing methods (score-based, PeptideProphet, and Percolator) were assessed for all techniques for the analysis of a human cell proteome. It was found that divergent conclusions could be made from the same dataset when different data interpretation approaches were used and therefore requiring a relatively fair comparison among techniques. Percolator was chosen for comparison of techniques because it performs the best among all search engines and MS2 strategies. For the analysis of human cell proteome using individual MS2 strategies, the highest number of identifications was achieved by HCD-OT, followed by HCD-IT and CID-IT. Based on these results, we concluded that a relatively fair platform for data interpretation is necessary to avoid divergent conclusions from the same dataset, and HCD-OT and HCD-IT may be preferable for protein/peptide identification using Orbitrap Fusion. PMID:27472422

  6. The Electron Losses and Fields Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingley, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Caron, R.; Zarifian, A.; Miller, J.; Gildemeister, A.; Schoen, B.; Tsai, E.; Berger, S.; Zhang, F.; Subramanian, A.; Chung, M.; Runov, A.; Cruce, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Electron Losses and Fields Investigation (ELFIN), is a joint NASA/NSF funded project at the University of California, Los Angeles focusing on eliminating the current deficit in the understanding of the innate physical processes behind geomagnetic storms. Set to launch in 2017, the mission takes advantage of a 3U+ CubeSat design to reduce cost and complexity traditionally associated with a space weather mission of this kind. This mission seeks to quantify the precipitation of relativistic electrons from the radiation belts using a pair of energetic particle detectors (EPDs). The spacecraft will also fly a fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) for determining the pitch angle distribution of the particles, which in conjunction with the EPDs will provide insight to the mechanisms responsible for their loss. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are thought to be a significant contributor to the precipitation of electrons trapped in the magnetosphere; however without direct measurement to verify the exact energy range of the particles with high angular resolution, the precise role of these waves is as yet undetermined. ELFIN is unique as it is the first spacecraft that will perform direct pitch angle measurements of the high-energy electrons at the region in the ionosphere where the particles are being lost. Together with correlative measurements from THEMIS, Van Allen Probes and the upcoming ERG mission, ELFIN will provide a unique dataset of magnetospheric wave-particle interactions that will be able to contribute to a marked increase in the fidelity of current space weather models.

  7. The magnetic field investigation on Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Southwood, D. J.; Musmann, G.; Luhr, H.; Neubauer, F. M.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Riedler, W.; Heyn, M. F.; Acuna, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic field investigation of the Cluster four-spacecraft mission is designed to provide intercalibrated measurements of the B magnetic field vector. The instrumentation and data processing of the mission are discussed. The instrumentation is identical on the four spacecraft. It consists of two triaxial fluxgate sensors and of a failure tolerant data processing unit. The combined analysis of the four spacecraft data will yield such parameters as the current density vector, wave vectors, and the geometry and structure of discontinuities.

  8. Time-resolved investigation of dual high power impulse magnetron sputtering with closed magnetic field during deposition of Ti-Cu thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2010-08-15

    Time-resolved comparative study of dual magnetron sputtering (dual-MS) and dual high power impulse magnetron sputtering (dual-HiPIMS) systems arranged with closed magnetic field is presented. The dual-MS system was operated with a repetition frequency 4.65 kHz (duty cycle {approx_equal}50%). The frequency during dual-HiPIMS is lower as well as its duty cycle (f=100 Hz, duty 1%). Different metallic targets (Ti, Cu) and different cathode voltages were applied to get required stoichiometry of Ti-Cu thin films. The plasma parameters of the interspace between magnetrons in the substrate position were investigated by time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, Langmuir probe technique, and measurement of ion fluxes to the substrate. It is shown that plasma density as well as ion flux is higher about two orders of magnitude in dual-HiPIMS system. This fact is partially caused by low diffusion of ionized sputtered particles (Ti{sup +},Cu{sup +}) which creates a preionized medium.

  9. Time-resolved investigation of dual high power impulse magnetron sputtering with closed magnetic field during deposition of Ti-Cu thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan; Hippler, Rainer

    2010-08-01

    Time-resolved comparative study of dual magnetron sputtering (dual-MS) and dual high power impulse magnetron sputtering (dual-HiPIMS) systems arranged with closed magnetic field is presented. The dual-MS system was operated with a repetition frequency 4.65 kHz (duty cycle ≈50%). The frequency during dual-HiPIMS is lower as well as its duty cycle (f =100 Hz, duty 1%). Different metallic targets (Ti, Cu) and different cathode voltages were applied to get required stoichiometry of Ti-Cu thin films. The plasma parameters of the interspace between magnetrons in the substrate position were investigated by time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, Langmuir probe technique, and measurement of ion fluxes to the substrate. It is shown that plasma density as well as ion flux is higher about two orders of magnitude in dual-HiPIMS system. This fact is partially caused by low diffusion of ionized sputtered particles (Ti+,Cu+) which creates a preionized medium.

  10. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  11. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  12. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  13. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ghezzehei, T.A.; Cook, P.J.; Marshall, B.D.

    2006-01-01

    The "Drift Shadow" is defined as the relatively drier region that forms below subsurface cavities or drifts in unsaturated rock. Its existence has been predicted through analytical and numerical models of unsaturated flow. However, these theoretical predictions have not been demonstrated empirically to date. In this project we plan to test the drift shadow concept through field investigations and compare our observations to simulations. Based on modeling studies we have an identified a suitable site to perform the study at an inactive mine in a sandstone formation. Pretest modeling studies and preliminary characterization of the site are being used to develop the field scale tests.

  14. FIELD INVESTIGATIONS OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    SciTech Connect

    G. W. Su, T. J. Kneafsey, T. A. Ghezzehei, B. D. Marshall, and P. J. Cook

    2006-01-15

    The ''Drift Shadow'' is defined as the relatively drier region that forms below subsurface cavities or drifts in unsaturated rock. Its existence has been predicted through analytical and numerical models of unsaturated flow. However, these theoretical predictions have not been demonstrated empirically to date. In this project they plan to test the drift shadow concept through field investigations and compare our observations to simulations. Based on modeling studies they have an identified suitable site to perform the study at an inactive mine in a sandstone formation. Pretest modeling studies and preliminary characterization of the site are being used to develop the field scale tests.

  15. Rydberg EIT in High Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lu; Anderson, David; Miller, Stephanie; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards an all-optical approach for measurements of strong magnetic fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Rydberg atoms in an atomic vapor. Rydberg EIT spectroscopy is a promising technique for the development of atom-based, calibration- and drift-free technology for high magnetic field sensing. In this effort, Rydberg EIT is employed to spectroscopically investigate the response of Rydberg atoms exposed to strong magnetic fields, in which Rydberg atoms are in the strong-field regime. In our setup, two neodymium block magnets are used to generate fields of about 0.8 Tesla, which strongly perturb the atoms. Information on the field strength and direction is obtained by a comparison of experimental spectra with calculated spectral maps. Investigations of magnetic-field inhomogeneities and other decoherence sources will be discussed.

  16. Investigation of high-temperature, igneous-related hydraulic fracturing as a reservoir control in the Blackburn and Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat oil fields, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Research in progress to evaluate natural, igenous-related hydrothermal fracturing as a reservoir control in two eastern Nevada oil fields has revealed evidence of a far more comprehensive role for moderate- to high-temperature hydrothermal systems in Basin-and-Range oil-reservoir evolution. Fluid-inclusion and petrographic studies have shown that (now) oil-bearing dolomite breccias of the Blackburn field (Pine Valley, Eureka County) were formed when overpressured, magmatically-heated, high-temperature (>350{degrees}C) hydrothermal brines explosively ruptured their host rocks; similar studies of texturally identical breccias of the Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat field (Railroad Valley, Nye County) so far do not support such an explosive origin. At Grant Canyon, however, hydrothermal, breccia-cementing quartz hosts primary oil, aqueous/oil, and aqueous fluid inclusions (homogenization temperature = 120{degrees}C) which document a direct geothermal connection for oil migration and entrapment. Moreover, at both Blackburn and Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat, the oil reservoirs are top- and side-sealed by hydrothermally altered Tertiary ignimbrites and epiclastic rocks. Contemporary geothermal activity is also apparent at grant Canyon/Bacon Flat, where subsurface water temperatures reach 171{degrees}C, and at Blackburn, above which a petroleum-providing hot spring issues at a temperature of 90{degrees}C. We suggest that in the Basin and Range province, hydrothermal systems may have: (1) matured oil from otherwise submature source rocks; (2) transported oil to ultimate entrapment sites by convection in moderate-to high-temperature fluids; and (3) sealed reservoir traps through hydrothermal alteration of overlying Tertiary caprocks. 69 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Spectroscopic investigation of the spatiotemporal dynamics of an electric field in plasma of a beam-type high-voltage discharge in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.

    2015-02-15

    In the present work, a method of determining the spatiotemporal characteristics of the electric field strength in an accelerating gap and a plasma flare of a beam-type high-voltage pulsed discharge in He at moderate pressure is presented. The method is based on spectroscopic data on the Stark splitting of π-components of He 2P–4Q transitions; Q = D(4921.93 Å), F(4920.35 Å) in the near-cathode region of the discharge and on the spatiotemporal characteristics of intensities of He(2s{sup 1}S–3p{sup 1}P{sup 0}) spectral lines with λ = 5015 Å and He{sup +}(3d–4f) spectral lines with λ = 4685 Å measured experimentally and calculated from the data of statistical simulation of the electron kinetics by the Monte Carlo method. The shape and strength of the electric field of the space charge in the interelectrode gap and the drift region of the discharge are estimated. It is demonstrated that the electric field created by the current pulse of uncompensated space charge in the near-anode region changes the discharge regime and causes degradation of the electron beam in the plasma flare. It is established that the flux of secondary electrons from the drift region to the anode has significant effect on the radiation intensity distribution in this region of the discharge.

  18. Planar dipolar polymer brush: field theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, Jyoti; Kumar, Rajeev; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    Physical properties of polymer brushes bearing monomers with permanent dipole moments and immersed in a polar solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory (SCFT). It is found that mismatch between the permanent dipole moments of the monomer and the solvent plays a significant role in determining the height of the polymer brush. Sign as well as magnitude of the mismatch determines the extent of collapse of the polymer brush. The mismatch in the dipole moments also affects the force-distance relations and interpenetration of polymers in opposing planar brushes. In particular, an attractive force between the opposing dipolar brushes is predicted for stronger mismatch parameter. Furthermore, effects of added monovalent salt on the structure of dipolar brushes will also be presented. This investigation highlights the significance of dipolar interactions in affecting the physical properties of polymer brushes. Csmd division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  19. Investigation of the Structure and Active Sites of TiO2 Nanorod Supported VOx Catalysts by High-Field and Fast-Spinning 51V MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Xu, Suochang; Li, Weizhen; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Dixon, David A.; Vasiliu, Monica; Craciun, Raluca; Wang, Yong; Bao, Xinhe; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-07-02

    Supported VOx/TiO2-Rod catalysts were studied by 51V MAS NMR at high field using a sample spinning rate of 55 kHz. The superior spectral resolution allows for the observation of at least five vanadate species. The assignment of these vanadate species was carried out by quantum mechanical calculations of 51V NMR chemical shifts of model V-surface structures. Methanol oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) was used to establish the correlation between the reaction rate and the various surface V-sites. It is found that monomeric V-species dominated the catalyst at low vanadium loadings with two peaks observed at about -502 and -529 ppm. V-dimers with two bridged oxygen appeare at about -555 ppm. Vanadate dimers and polyvanadates connected by one bridged oxygen atom between two adjacent V atoms resonate at about -630 ppm. A positive correlation is found between the V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak and the ODH rate while a better correlation is obtained by including monomeric contributions. This result indicates that surface V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak are the major active sites for ODH reaction despite mono-V species are more catalytic active but their relative ratios are decreased dramatically at high V-loadings. Furthermore, a portion of the V-species is found invisible. In particular, the level of such invisibility increases with decreased level of V-loading, suggesting the existence of paramagnetic V-species at the surface.

  20. Low temperature, high magnetic field investigations of the nature of magnetism in the molecular semiconductor β- cobalt phthalocyanine (C32H16CoN8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang (王正君), Zhengjun; Lee, M.; Choi, E. S.; Poston, J.; Seehra, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    Results from detailed investigations of the magnetic properties of a powder sample of β-CoPc for the temperatures T=0.4 K to 300 K and in magnetic fields H up to 90 kOe are reported. X-ray diffraction confirmed the β-phase and scanning electron microscopy showed plate-like morphology of the sample. For T>3 K, the data of magnetic susceptibility χ vs. T fit the Curie-Weiss (CW) law yielding θ=-2.5 K, μ=2.16 μB per Co2+ and g=2.49 for spin S=1/2 of the low spin-state of Co2+. However for T<3 K, the χ vs. T data deviates from the CW law yielding a peak in χ at Tmax=1.9 K. It is shown that the χ vs. T data from 0.4 K to 300 K fits well with the predictions of the Bonner-Fisher (BF) model for S=1/2 Heisenberg linear chain antiferromagnet with the Co2+-Co2+ exchange J/kB = -1.5 K (Ĥ=-2J Σ Si•Si+1). The data of magnetization M vs. H at T=1 K agrees with the predictions of the BF model with J/kB=-1.5 K, yielding saturation magnetization MS=12.16 emu/g above 60 kOe corresponding to complete alignment of the spins.

  1. Understanding and manipulating the RF fields at high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Hue, Yik-Kiong; Tang, Lin

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a complete overview of the electromagnetics (radiofrequency aspect) of MRI at low and high fields. Using analytical formulations, numerical modeling (computational electromagnetics), and ultrahigh field imaging experiments, the physics that impacts the electromagnetic quantities associated with MRI, namely (1) the transmit field, (2) receive field, and (3) total electromagnetic power absorption, is analyzed. The physical interpretation of the above-mentioned quantities is investigated by electromagnetic theory, to understand 'What happens, in terms of electromagnetics, when operating at different static field strengths?' Using experimental studies and numerical simulations, this paper also examines the physical and technological feasibilities by which all or any of these specified electromagnetic quantities can be manipulated through techniques such as B(1) shimming (phased array excitation) and signal combination using a receive array in order to advance MRI at high field strengths. Pertinent to this subject and with highly coupled coils operating at 7 T, this paper also presents the first phantom work on B(1) shimming without B(1) measurements.

  2. Persistence in STEM: An investigation of the relationship between high school experiences in science and mathematics and college degree completion in STEM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, Adam V.

    While the number of Bachelor's degrees awarded annually has nearly tripled over the past 40 years (NSF, 2008), the same cannot be said for degrees in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that by the year 2014 the combination of new positions and retirements will lead to 2 million job openings in STEM (BLS, 2005). Thus, the research questions I sought to answer with this study were: (1)What are the most common enrollment patterns for students who enter into and exit from the STEM pipeline during high school and college? (2) Controlling for differences in student background and early interest in STEM careers, what are the high school science and mathematics classroom experiences that characterize student completion of a college major in STEM? Using data from NELS:88 I analyzed descriptive statistics and completed logistic regressions to gain an understanding of factors related to student persistence in STEM. Approximately 4700 students with transcript records and who participated in all survey rounds were included in the analyses. The results of the descriptive analysis demonstrated that most students who went on to complete majors in STEM completed at least three or four years of STEM courses during high school, and enrolled in advanced high school mathematics and science courses at higher rates. At almost every pipeline checkpoint indicators of the level of coursework and achievement were significant in predicting student completion of a STEM degree. The results also support previous research that showed demographic variables have little effect on persistence once the sample is limited to those who have the intrinsic ability and desire to complete a college degree. The most significant finding is that measures of student interest and engagement in science and mathematics were significant in predicting completion of a STEM degree, above and beyond the effects of course enrollment and performance

  3. Emplacement and geochemical evolution of highly evolved syenites investigated by a combined structural and geochemical field study: The lujavrites of the Ilímaussaq complex, SW Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratschbacher, Barbara C.; Marks, Michael A. W.; Bons, Paul D.; Wenzel, Thomas; Markl, Gregor

    2015-08-01

    Structural mapping and the combined study of magmatic to solid-state deformation textures and mineral compositions in highly evolved nepheline syenites (lujavrites) of the alkaline to peralkaline Ilímaussaq complex (South Greenland) reveal detailed insight into the emplacement and geochemical evolution of the melts they crystallized from. Based on magmatic to solid-state flow textures such as foliations and lineations, we propose that the investigated rock sequence forms a sill-like structure with a steep feeder zone that flattens out over a short distance and intrudes into less evolved overlying units as sub-horizontal sheets by roof uplift. Systematic compositional variation of early-magmatic eudialyte-group minerals (EGM) in the investigated rock sequence monitors the geochemical evolution of the lujavrite-forming melt(s). The chlorine contents of EGM decrease successively upwards within the rock sequence, which probably indicates a successive increase of water activity during differentiation, consistent with a change from sodic pyroxene (aegirine) to sodic amphibole (arfvedsonite) in the mineral assemblage. Both REE contents and Fe/Mn ratios of EGM are promising differentiation indicators, which increase and decrease, respectively, upwards within the sequence due to fractional crystallization. This closed-system evolution is interrupted by a shift towards less evolved melt compositions in one lujavrite unit, for which we assume magma recharge. Our study demonstrates the strength of a combined structural and petrological approach to understand the petrogenesis of an igneous body in more detail and highlights their close connection.

  4. A high-resolution field-emission-gun, scanning electron microscope investigation of anisotropic hydrogen decrepitation in Nd-Fe-B-based sintered magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Soderznik, Marko; McGuiness, Paul; Zuzek-Rozman, Kristina; Kobe, Spomenka; Skulj, Irena; Yan Gaolin

    2010-05-15

    In this investigation commercial magnets based on (Nd,Dy){sub 14}(Fe,Co){sub 79}B{sub 7} were prepared by a conventional powder-metallurgy route with a degree of alignment equal to {approx}90% and then exposed to hydrogen at a pressure of 1 bar. The magnets, in the form of cylinders, were observed to decrepitate exclusively from the ends. High-resolution electron microscopy was able to identify the presence of crack formation within the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains, with the cracks running parallel to the c axis of these grains. Based on the concentration profile for hydrogen in a rare-earth transition-metal material, it is clear that the presence of hydrogen-induced cracks running perpendicular to the ends of the magnet provides for a much more rapidly progressing hydrogen front in this direction than from the sides of the magnet. This results in the magnet exhibiting a macroscopic tendency to decrepitate from the poles of the magnet toward the center. This combination of microstructural modification via particle alignment as part of the sintering process and direct observation via high-resolution electron microscopy has led to a satisfying explanation for the anisotropic hydrogen-decrepitation effect.

  5. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. Su; T.J. Kneafsey

    2006-02-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rock mass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming the existence of the drift shadow have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow--and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sand mine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rock mass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content using a gravimetric technique, as well as analyzed for chemistry. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift

  6. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Christian; Zheng, Yan; Easton, Daniel; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  7. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-09-08

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an undergroundvoidthat, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturatedrock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirmingits existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of driftshadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristicscould provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in thesubsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposednuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the fieldprogram that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadowand the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch,California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it anexcellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. Themine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, anapproximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales,coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the minerequired the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other,driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. Thisconfiguration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around theunderlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performedare described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radialpattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situwater content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test,water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel driftsand the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottomdrift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, andground penetrating radar may be

  8. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  9. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  10. High Performance Field Reversed Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, Michl

    2014-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a prolate compact toroid with poloidal magnetic fields. FRCs could lead to economic fusion reactors with high power density, simple geometry, natural divertor, ease of translation, and possibly capable of burning aneutronic fuels. However, as in other high-beta plasmas, there are stability and confinement concerns. These concerns can be addressed by introducing and maintaining a significant fast ion population in the system. This is the approach adopted by TAE and implemented for the first time in the C-2 device. Studying the physics of FRCs driven by Neutral Beam (NB) injection, significant improvements were made in confinement and stability. Early C-2 discharges had relatively good confinement, but global power losses exceeded the available NB input power. The addition of axially streaming plasma guns, magnetic end plugs as well as advanced surface conditioning leads to dramatic reductions in turbulence driven losses and greatly improved stability. As a result, fast ion confinement significantly improved and allowed for build-up of a dominant fast particle population. Under such appropriate conditions we achieved highly reproducible, long-lived, macroscopically stable FRCs with record lifetimes. This demonstrated many beneficial effects of large orbit particles and their performance impact on FRCs Together these achievements point to the prospect of beam-driven FRCs as a path toward fusion reactors. This presentation will review and expand on key results and present context for their interpretation.

  11. Hyperfine structure and magnetic properties of Zn doped Co2Z hexaferrite investigated by high-field Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jung Tae; Kim, Chul Sung

    2015-05-01

    The polycrystalline samples of Ba3Co2-xZnxFe24O41 (x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) were synthesized by the standard solid-state-reaction method. Based on the XRD patterns analyzed by Rietveld refinement, the structure was determined to be single-phased hexagonal with space group of P63/mmc. With increasing Zn ion concentration, the unit cell volume (Vu) of samples was increased, as the sites of Fe3+ ions changed from tetrahedral to octahedral sites. We have obtained zero-field Mössbauer spectra of all samples at various temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 750 K. The measured spectra below TC were analyzed with six distinguishable sextets due to the superposition of ten-sextets for Fe sites, corresponding to the Z-type hexagonal ferrite. Also, the hyperfine field (Hhf) and electric quadrupole shift (EQ) have shown abrupt changes around spin transition temperature (TS). In addition, Mössbauer spectra of all samples at 4.2 K were taken with an applied field ranging from 0 to 50 kOe, which indicates the decrease in the canting angle between applied field and Hhf of samples with increasing Zn concentration.

  12. Hyperfine structure and magnetic properties of Zn doped Co{sub 2}Z hexaferrite investigated by high-field Mössbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jung Tae; Kim, Chul Sung

    2015-05-07

    The polycrystalline samples of Ba{sub 3}Co{sub 2−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} (x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) were synthesized by the standard solid-state-reaction method. Based on the XRD patterns analyzed by Rietveld refinement, the structure was determined to be single-phased hexagonal with space group of P6{sub 3}/mmc. With increasing Zn ion concentration, the unit cell volume (V{sub u}) of samples was increased, as the sites of Fe{sup 3+} ions changed from tetrahedral to octahedral sites. We have obtained zero-field Mössbauer spectra of all samples at various temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 750 K. The measured spectra below T{sub C} were analyzed with six distinguishable sextets due to the superposition of ten-sextets for Fe sites, corresponding to the Z-type hexagonal ferrite. Also, the hyperfine field (H{sub hf}) and electric quadrupole shift (E{sub Q}) have shown abrupt changes around spin transition temperature (T{sub S}). In addition, Mössbauer spectra of all samples at 4.2 K were taken with an applied field ranging from 0 to 50 kOe, which indicates the decrease in the canting angle between applied field and H{sub hf} of samples with increasing Zn concentration.

  13. Experimental investigation of strong field trident production

    SciTech Connect

    Esberg, J.; Kirsebom, K.; Knudsen, H.; Thomsen, H. D.; Uggerhoej, E.; Uggerhoej, U. I.; Sona, P.; Mangiarotti, A.; Ketel, T. J.; Dizdar, A.; Dalton, M. M.; Ballestrero, S.; Connell, S. H.

    2010-10-01

    We show by experiment that an electron impinging on an electric field that is of critical magnitude in its rest frame, may produce an electron-positron pair. Our measurements address higher-order QED, using the strong electric fields obtainable along particular crystallographic directions in single crystals. For the amorphous material our data are in good agreement with theory, whereas a discrepancy with theory on the magnitude of the trident enhancement is found in the precisely aligned case where the strong electric field acts.

  14. Coordinated use of ground-based auroral and high-precision LEO magnetic and electric field measurements to investigate auroral electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.

    2008-12-01

    There are now dozens of sensitive All-Sky Imagers (ASIs) deployed in networks spanning latitudes from the subauroral zone into the polar cap and many hours of magnetic local time. These new networks are collecting data with unprecedented spatial coverage and temporal resolution and in numerous scientifically interesting wavelength ranges. As well, direct satellite overflights of ground-based images that were once rare occurrences are becoming increasingly commonplace. This talk will focus on the scientific opportunities afforded by the integrated use of ground-based auroral images and magnetic and electric field data from existing and planned LEO missions including CHAMP, Oersted, and Swarm. These opportunities include exploring the relationship between field-aligned current and Poynting flux and different types of aurora, as well as reducing spatio-temporal ambiguity in the in situ measurements.

  15. High RF Magnetic Field Near-Field Microwave Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Tamin; Mircea, Dragos I.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2010-03-01

    Near-field microwave microscopes have been developed to quantitatively image RF and microwave properties of a variety of materials on deep sub-wavelength scales [1]. Microscopes that develop high-RF magnetic fields on short length scales are useful for examining the fundamental electrodynamic properties of superconductors [2]. We are creating a new class of near-field microwave microscopes that develop RF fields on the scale of 1 Tesla on sub-micron length scales. These microscopes will be employed to investigate defects that limit the RF properties of bulk Nb materials used in accelerator cavities, and the nonlinear Meissner effect in novel superconductors. Work funded by the US Department of Energy. [1] S. M. Anlage, V. V. Talanov, A. R. Schwartz, ``Principles of Near-Field Microwave Microscopy,'' in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Electrical and Electromechanical Phenomena at the Nanoscale, Volume 1, edited by S. V. Kalinin and A. Gruverman (Springer-Verlag, New York, 2007), pp. 215-253. [2] D. I. Mircea, H. Xu, S. M. Anlage, ``Phase-sensitive Harmonic Measurements of Microwave Nonlinearities in Cuprate Thin Films,'' Phys. Rev. B 80, 144505 (2009).

  16. Magnetic Field Investigations During ROSETTA's Steins Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, K.; Auster, H.; Richter, I.; Motschmann, U.; RPC/ROMAP Teams

    2009-05-01

    During the recent Steins flyby of the ROSETTA spacecraft magnetic field measurements have been made with both, the RPC orbiter magnetometer and the ROMAP lander magnetometer. These combined magnetic field measurements allow a detailed examination of any magnetic signatures caused either directly by the asteroid or indirectly by Steins different modes of interaction with the solar wind. Comparing our measurements with simulation results show that Steins does not possess a significant remanent magnetization. The magnetization is estimated at less than 1 mAm2/kg. This is significantly different from results at Braille and Gaspra.

  17. Investigating the QED vacuum with ultra-intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Di Piazza, A.

    2014-05-01

    In view of the increasingly stronger available laser fields it is becoming feasible to employ them to probe the nonlinear dielectric properties of the vacuum as predicted by quantum electrodynamics (QED) and to test QED in the presence of intense laser beams. First, we discuss vacuum-polarization effects that arise in the collision of a high-energy proton beam with a strong laser field. In addition, we investigate the process of light-by-light diffraction mediated by the virtual electron-positrons of the vacuum. A strong laser beam "diffracts" a probe laser field due to vacuum polarization effects, and changes its polarization. This change of the polarization is shown to be in principle measurable. Also, the possibility of generating harmonics by exploiting vacuum-polarization effects in the collision in vacuum of two ultra-strong laser beams is discussed. Moreover, when two strong parallel laser beams collide with a probe electromagnetic field, each photon of the probe may interact through the "polarized" quantum vacuum with the photons of the other two fields. Analogously to "ordinary" double-slit set-ups involving matter, the vacuum-scattered probe photons produce a diffraction pattern, which is the envisaged observable to measure the quantum interaction between the probe and strong field photons. We have shown that the diffraction pattern becomes visible in a few operating hours, if the strong fields have an intensity exceeding 1024W/cm2.

  18. Stream temperature investigations: field and analytic methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Alternative public domain stream and reservoir temperature models are contrasted with SNTEMP. A distinction is made between steady-flow and dynamic-flow models and their respective capabilities. Regression models are offered as an alternative approach for some situations, with appropriate mathematical formulas suggested. Appendices provide information on State and Federal agencies that are good data sources, vendors for field instrumentation, and small computer programs useful in data reduction.

  19. Some results of Moon's gravitational field investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigel, Y. I.; Zazulyak, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    The task of studying the gravitational field of the moon is important for long-term planning of its research using manned and robotic spacecrafts. Determination of harmonic expansion coefficients of selenopotential may not be reliable because of their construction based on different data and different methods of mathematical processing. With mutual comparative assessment of selenopotential models we can get some information about the reliability determination harmonic coefficients.

  20. Probes for investigating the effect of magnetic field, field orientation, temperature and strain on the critical current density of anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes in a split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwong, P.; Higgins, J. S.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2014-06-15

    We present the designs of probes for making critical current density (J{sub c}) measurements on anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes as a function of field, field orientation, temperature and strain in our 40 mm bore, split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet. Emphasis is placed on the design of three components: the vapour-cooled current leads, the variable temperature enclosure, and the springboard-shaped bending beam sample holder. The vapour-cooled brass critical-current leads used superconducting tapes and in operation ran hot with a duty cycle (D) of ∼0.2. This work provides formulae for optimising cryogenic consumption and calculating cryogenic boil-off, associated with current leads used to make J{sub c} measurements, made by uniformly ramping the current up to a maximum current (I{sub max}) and then reducing the current very quickly to zero. They include consideration of the effects of duty cycle, static helium boil-off from the magnet and Dewar (b{sup ′}), and the maximum safe temperature for the critical-current leads (T{sub max}). Our optimized critical-current leads have a boil-off that is about 30% less than leads optimized for magnet operation at the same maximum current. Numerical calculations show that the optimum cross-sectional area (A) for each current lead can be parameterized by LI{sub max}/A=[1.46D{sup −0.18}L{sup 0.4}(T{sub max}−300){sup 0.25D{sup −{sup 0{sup .{sup 0{sup 9}}}}}}+750(b{sup ′}/I{sub max})D{sup 10{sup −{sup 3I{sub m}{sub a}{sub x}−2.87b{sup ′}}}}]× 10{sup 6}A m{sup −1} where L is the current lead's length and the current lead is operated in liquid helium. An optimum A of 132 mm{sup 2} is obtained when I{sub max} = 1000 A, T{sub max} = 400 K, D = 0.2, b{sup ′} = 0.3 l h{sup −1} and L = 1.0 m. The optimized helium consumption was found to be 0.7 l h{sup −1}. When the static boil-off is small, optimized leads have a boil-off that can be roughly parameterized by: b/I{sub max } ≈ (1.35 × 10

  1. Investigations of low-dimensional field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifrin, Leonid

    Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking plays an important role in the low-energy dynamics of QCD. The nonzero chiral condensate is related to the non-zero density of small Dirac eigenvalues through the Banks-Casher relation. Further, the low-energy QCD Dirac spectrum has to satisfy a family of universal consistency relations called Leutwyler-Smilga (LS) spectral sum rules. We discuss these sum rules in the closely related to QCD but much simpler 2-dimensional Schwinger model. The dynamics of the two theories share chiral anomaly, topologically non-trivial vacuum, instantons, dynamical mass generation and confinement. While LS sum rules are the same for both theories, in the Schwinger model it is possible to achieve a more detailed microscopic understanding of them. We give three different derivations of LS sum rules in the Schwinger Model. The first is based on the clustering property of fermionic correlators and is also valid for 1-flavor QCD. The second is an exact microscopic (field theory) derivation. The third relies on 2D bosonization. Next, we discuss the clustering property for the multi-flavor QCD. It is shown that standard clustering is violated in the chiral limit, and a modified clustering relation is derived. Then we consider multi-flavor Schwinger model, and discuss the spectral density and mass dependence of the chiral condensate in the thermodynamic limit. The relation to Random Fermion models used in condensed matter physics is also discussed here. Relations with the Random Matrix Theory and the so called spectral duality are discussed next. Finally, we comment briefly on the remaining unsolved problems and relevance to lattice studies.

  2. Field investigation to assess nutrient emission from paddy field to surface water in river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    TD water can be sampled for infiltrating water measurement. We installed monitoring wells to measure ground water level and water quality. Inflow, outflow, flooding water, infiltrating water, and ground water were measured and sampled. Regarding to parameters, temperature, pH, EC, DO and COD, main ions were measured to understand characteristic of water quality and transformation processes. Inorganic forms of nitrogen and phosphorus were also measured, as behavior and balance of nitrogen and phosphorus are focused on. We observed following points by taking data of water quality; seasonal trend, changes occurred according to agricultural events like irrigation and fertilization. Nitrogen in ground water tends to high in June due to fertilizer. It is thought because farmers fertilize the filed before transplanting at the beginning of flooding season. Regarding to dissolved inorganic nitrogen, higher concentrations were observed in inflow water than in flooding water and outflow water. Though it needs discussion in loads as well as flow measurement, this suggests that nutrients are absorbed in paddy field and less nutrients are emitted after irrigation water passing through paddy field. Based on this research we are planning continuous investigation to assess environmental impact from paddy field.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Mak–Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method that permits NMR signal intensities of solids and liquids to be enhanced significantly, and is therefore potentially an important tool in structural and mechanistic studies of biologically relevant molecules. During a DNP experiment, the large polarization of an exogeneous or endogeneous unpaired electron is transferred to the nuclei of interest (I) by microwave (μw) irradiation of the sample. The maximum theoretical enhancement achievable is given by the gyromagnetic ratios (γe/γl), being ∼660 for protons. In the early 1950s, the DNP phenomenon was demonstrated experimentally, and intensively investigated in the following four decades, primarily at low magnetic fields. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of DNP with a special emphasis on work done at high magnetic fields (≥5 T), the regime where contemporary NMR experiments are performed. After a brief historical survey, we present a review of the classical continuous wave (cw) DNP mechanisms—the Overhauser effect, the solid effect, the cross effect, and thermal mixing. A special section is devoted to the theory of coherent polarization transfer mechanisms, since they are potentially more efficient at high fields than classical polarization schemes. The implementation of DNP at high magnetic fields has required the development and improvement of new and existing instrumentation. Therefore, we also review some recent developments in μw and probe technology, followed by an overview of DNP applications in biological solids and liquids. Finally, we outline some possible areas for future developments. PMID:18266416

  4. [Field investigations of the air pollution level of populated territories].

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, M V

    2014-01-01

    The assessment and management of air quality of settlements is one of the priorities in the field of environmental protection. In the management of air quality the backbone factor is the methodology of the organization, performance and interpretation of data of field investigations. The present article is devoted to the analysis of the existing methodological approaches and practical aspects of their application in the organization and performance of field investigations with the aim to confirm the adequacy of the boundaries of the sanitary protection zone in the old industrial regions, hygienic evaluation of the data of field investigations of the air pollution level.

  5. High School Students' Representations and Understandings of Electric Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Ying; Brizuela, Bárbara M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the representations and understandings of electric fields expressed by Chinese high school students 15 to 16 years old who have not received high school level physics instruction. The physics education research literature has reported students' conceptions of electric fields post-instruction as indicated by students'…

  6. Superferric microundulator with high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadichev, V. A.; Vysotsky, V. S.; Tsikhon, V. N.; Eremichev, V. T.

    1993-07-01

    A model of a plane superferric undulator with a period of 8 mm was made and tested. Its length is 100 mm, its width is 50 mm, and 4 and 2.5 mm air gaps between upper and lower poles were used for magnetic measurements. The gap can be changed by inserting spacers of the necessary thickness. The magnetic structure is made of magnetically soft low carbon iron (Armco). The slots for winding were machine cut. The windings are made of 40 turns of Nb 3Sn superconductor or 10 turns of NbTi for the 4 and 2.5 mm gaps, respectively. The maximum current in the first series of experiments was 70 A and in the second series it was 450 A. Poles of three types were tried. The maximum magnetic field amplitude of 7.7 kG was measured with the poles in the form of a trapezoid. This field corresponds to an undulator deflection parameter K = 0.57. Results of magnetic measurements are presented.

  7. Investigation of trap properties in high-k/metal gate p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors with aluminum ion implantation using random telegraph noise analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Tsung-Hsien; Chang, Shoou-Jinn Fang, Yean-Kuen; Huang, Po-Chin; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wu, San-Lein

    2014-08-11

    In this study, the impact of aluminum ion implantation (Al I/I) on random telegraph noise (RTN) in high-k/metal gate (HK/MG) p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (pMOSFETs) was investigated. The trap parameters of HK/MG pMOSFETs with Al I/I, such as trap energy level, capture time and emission time, activation energies for capture and emission, and trap location in the gate dielectric, were determined. The configuration coordinate diagram was also established. It was observed that the implanted Al could fill defects and form a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and thus increase the tunneling barrier height for holes. It was also observed that the trap position in the Al I/I samples was lower due to the Al I/I-induced dipole at the HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  8. Recent biophysical studies in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Georg

    1990-06-01

    A brief overview of biophysical effects of steady magnetic fields is given. The need of high field strength is illustrated by several recent diamagnetic orientation experiments. They include rod-like viruses, purple membranes and chromosomes. Results of various studies on bees, quails, rats and pigeons exposed to fields above 7 T are also resumed.

  9. Single-layer high field dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim V. Kashikhin and Alexander V. Zlobin

    2001-07-30

    Fermilab is developing high field dipole magnets for post-LHC hadron colliders. Several designs with a nominal field of 10-12 T, coil bore size of 40-50 mm based on both shell-type and block-type coil geometry are currently under consideration. This paper presents a new approach to magnet design, based on simple and robust single-layer coils optimized for the maximum field, good field quality and minimum number of turns.

  10. Local fields in high- Tc materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrio, C.; Benitez, E. L.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1992-04-01

    Most high-temperature superconductors exhibit two-dimensional conductance; therefore the conduction electrons are localized in the third dimension, and experience the local electric field rather than the macroscopic applied field in that direction. We report model calculations which indicate that the local field leads to enhanced electron-phonon coupling in these materials which may play a role in determining the high transition temperatures.

  11. HIGH FIELD SOLENOID FOR MUON COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    KAHN, S.A.; ALSHARO'A, M.; HANLET, P.; JOHNSON, R.P.; KUCHNIR, M.; NEWSHAM, F.; GUPTA, R.C.; PALMER, R.B.; WILLEN, E.

    2006-06-26

    Magnets made with high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils operating at low temperatures have the potential to produce extremely high fields for use in accelerators and beam lines. The specific application of interest that we are proposing is to use a very high field (of the order of 50 Tesla) solenoid to provide a very small beta region for the final stages of cooling for a muon collider. With the commercial availability of HTS conductor based on BSCCO technology with high current carrying capacity at 4.2 K, very high field solenoid magnets should be possible. In this paper we will evaluate the technical issues associated with building this magnet. In particular we address how to mitigate the high Lorentz stresses associated with this high field magnet.

  12. Investigations in Life Science, Junior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Robert L.

    Developed for teachers of junior high school science classes, this unit presents ten investigations on plant growth, animal life, pond life, and general science interests. These investigations are designed to accompany any popular life science textbooks, may be used to supplement a year-long course in life science, are intended as a springboard…

  13. A Comparative Model of Field Investigations: Aligning School Science Inquiry with the Practices of Contemporary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windschitl, Mark; Dvornich, Karen; Ryken, Amy E.; Tudor, Margaret; Koehler, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Field investigations are not characterized by randomized and manipulated control group experiments; however, most school science and high-stakes tests recognize only this paradigm of investigation. Scientists in astronomy, genetics, field biology, oceanography, geology, and meteorology routinely select naturally occurring events and conditions and…

  14. Large Field, High Resolution Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Assayag, Osnath; Antoine, Martine; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Riben, Michael; Harms, Fabrice; Burcheri, Adriano; Grieve, Kate; Dalimier, Eugénie; Le Conte de Poly, Bertrand; Boccara, Claude

    2014-01-01

    We present a benchmark pilot study in which high-resolution Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) was used to image human breast tissue and is evaluated to assess its ability to aid the pathologist’s management of intra-operative diagnoses. FF-OCT imaging safety was investigated and agreement between FF-OCT and routinely prepared histopathological images was evaluated. The compact setup used for this study provides 1 µm3 resolution and 200 µm imaging depth, and a 2.25 cm2 specimen is scanned in about 7 minutes. 75 breast specimens were imaged from 22 patients (21 women, 1 man) with a mean age of 58 (range: 25-83). Pathologists blind diagnosed normal/benign or malignant tissue based on FF-OCT images alone, diagnosis from histopathology followed for comparison. The contrast in the FF-OCT images is generated by intrinsic tissue scattering properties, meaning that no tissue staining or preparation is required. Major architectural features and tissue structures of benign breast tissue, including adipocytes, fibrous stroma, lobules and ducts were characterized. Subsequently, features resulting from pathological modification were characterized and a diagnosis decision tree was developed. Using FF-OCT images, two breast pathologists were able to distinguish normal/benign tissue from lesional with a sensitivity of 94% and 90%, and specificity of 75% and 79% respectively. PMID:24000981

  15. Liquid Droplet Dynamics in Gravity Compensating High Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojarevics, V.; Easter, S.; Pericleous, K.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical models are used to investigate behavior of liquid droplets suspended in high DC magnetic fields of various configurations providing microgravity-like conditions. Using a DC field it is possible to create conditions with laminar viscosity and heat transfer to measure viscosity, surface tension, electrical and thermal conductivities, and heat capacity of a liquid sample. The oscillations in a high DC magnetic field are quite different for an electrically conducting droplet, like liquid silicon or metal. The droplet behavior in a high magnetic field is the subject of investigation in this paper. At the high values of magnetic field some oscillation modes are damped quickly, while others are modified with a considerable shift of the oscillating droplet frequencies and the damping constants from the non-magnetic case.

  16. Investigations of Magnetically Enhanced RIE Reactors with Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2008-10-01

    In Magnetically Enhanced Reactive Ion Etching (MERIE) reactors, a magnetic field parallel to the substrate enables higher plasma densities and control of ion energy distributions. Since it is difficult to make the B-field uniform across the wafer, the B-field is often azimuthally rotated at a few Hz to average out non-uniformities. The rotation is slow enough that the plasma is in quasi-equilibrium with the instantaneous B-field. For the pressures (10's mTorr or less) and B-fields (10's - 100's G) of interest, electrons are magnetized whereas ions are usually not. The orientation and intersection of the B-field with the wafer are important, as intersecting field lines provide a low resistance path for electron current to the substrate. We report on a modeling study of plasma properties in MERIE reactors having rotating B-fields by investigating a series of quasi-steady states of B-field profiles. To resolve side-to-side variations, computations are performed in Cartesian coordinates. The model, nonPDPSIM, was improved with full tensor conductivities in the fluid portions of the code and v x B forces in the kinetic portions. Results are discussed while varying the orientation and strength of the B-field for electropositive (argon) and electronegative (Ar/CxFy, Ar/Cl2) gas mixtures.

  17. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). As a part of the IRP program, field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions willneed to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities.

  18. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 deg and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 7 Teslas. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in high field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is 2.77 + or - 0.08 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  19. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 70 kilogauss. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in the high-field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is about 2.77 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  20. High magnetic field facilities in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, R.; Grössinger, R.; Bertorello, H.; Broto, J. M.; Davies, H. A.; Estevez-Rams, E.; Gonzalez, J.; Matutes, J.; Sinnecker, J. P.; Sagredo, V.

    2006-11-01

    The EC supported a network (under the Framework 5 ALFA Programme) designated HIFIELD (Project number II0147FI) and entitled: "Measurement methods involving high magnetic fields for advanced and novel materials". As a result, high field facilities were initiated, constructed or extended at the following laboratories in Latin America: University Cordoba (Argentina), CES, Merida (Venezuela), CIMAV, Chihuahua (Mexico), University Federal de Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

  1. Field Theoretical Investigation of Fluctuation-Induced Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langsjoen, Luke Schell

    This thesis presents a field-theoretical investigation of the emergent properties of random fluctuations. We resolve a long-standing dilemma involving the ultraviolet divergences that often occur in Casimir calculations. We show that all formally divergent terms in the Casimir energy orgininate from geometrical properties of the boundary in question. Any material boundary will become transparent to sufficiently high-energy modes, and the formally divergent component of the energy is derived as an expansion in powers of this cutoff frequency. We demonstrate that the Casimir self-energy of a smooth boundary in two dimensions is a sum of two Weyl terms (exhibiting quadratic and logarithmic cutoff dependence), a geometrical term that is independent of the cutoff, and a non-geometrical intrinsic term. As by-products we resolve the puzzle of the divergent Casimir force on a ring and correct the sign of the coefficient of linear tension of a Dirichlet line predicted in earlier treatments. Next, we compute the generic mode sum that quantifies the effect on the spectrum of a harmonic field when a spherical shell is inserted into vacuum. We demonstrate that in the case of a scalar field obeying Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the shell surface the Casimir self-energy is cutoff-dependent while in the case of the electromagnetic field perturbed by a conductive shell the Casimir self-energy is universal. We also discuss generalized Casimir effects, for example an analog of the non-relativistic Casimir effect which can be realized in ferromagnets due to zero-point excitation of spin waves. We introduce a unique model for the Casimir effect of a boundary of finite thickness, with preliminary results. We present a calculation of the energy of N spinless non-interacting fermions confined to a one-dimensional interval. These results are shown to reinforce those obtained in the previous work of Kolomeisky et.al., [89]. Finally, we examine the classical Euler buckling

  2. Frustrated magnets in high magnetic fields-selected examples.

    PubMed

    Wosnitza, J; Zvyagin, S A; Zherlitsyn, S

    2016-07-01

    An indispensable parameter to study strongly correlated electron systems is the magnetic field. Application of high magnetic fields allows the investigation, modification and control of different states of matter. Specifically for magnetic materials experimental tools applied in such fields are essential for understanding their fundamental properties. Here, we focus on selected high-field studies of frustrated magnetic materials that have been shown to host a broad range of fascinating new and exotic phases. We will give brief insights into the influence of geometrical frustration on the critical behavior of triangular-lattice antiferromagnets, the accurate determination of exchange constants in the high-field saturated state by use of electron spin resonance measurements, and the coupling of magnetic degrees of freedom to the lattice evidenced by ultrasound experiments. The latter technique as well allowed new, partially metastable phases in strong magnetic fields to be revealed. PMID:27310818

  3. Experiments to investigate particulate materials in reduced gravity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, M.; Eden, H. F.; Felsenthal, P.; Glaser, P. E.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates agglomeration and macroscopic behavior in reduced gravity fields of particles of known properties by measuring and correlating thermal and acoustical properties of particulate materials. Experiment evaluations provide a basis for a particle behavior theory and measure bulk properties of particulate materials in reduced gravity.

  4. Investigation of the light field of a semiconductor diode laser.

    PubMed

    Ankudinov, A V; Yanul, M L; Slipchenko, S O; Shelaev, A V; Dorozhkin, P S; Podoskin, A A; Tarasov, I S

    2014-10-20

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy was applied to study, with sub-wavelength spatial resolution, the near- and the far-field distributions of propagating modes from a high-power laser diode. Simple modeling was also performed and compared with experimental results. The simulated distributions were consistent with the experiment and permitted clarification of the configuration of the transverse modes of the laser. PMID:25401675

  5. Results of investigations at the Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.; Goff, F.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Hanold, B.

    1990-04-01

    Well logging operations were performed in eight of the geothermal wells at Ahuachapan. High-temperature downhole instruments, including a temperature/rabbit, caliper, fluid velocity spinner/temperature/pressure (STP), and fluid sampler, were deployed in each well. The caliper tool was used primarily to determine if chemical deposits were present in well casings or liners and to investigate a suspected break in the casing in one well. STP logs were obtained from six of the eight wells at various flow rates ranging from 30 to 80 kg/s. A static STP log was also run with the wells shut-in to provide data to be used in the thermodynamic analysis of several production wells. The geochemical data obtained show a system configuration like that proposed by C. Laky and associates in 1989. Our data indicate recharge to the system from the volcanic highlands south of the field. Additionally, our data indicate encroachment of dilute fluids into deeper production zones because of overproduction. 17 refs., 50 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Processing of polymers in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, E.P.; Smith, M.E.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Earls, J.D.; Priester, R.D. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    Many organic molecules and polymers have an anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility, and thus can be aligned in high magnetic fields. The presence of liquid crystallinity allows cooperative motions of the individual molecules, and thus the magnetic energy becomes greater than the thermal energy at experimentally obtainable field strengths. This work has determined the effect of magnetic field alignment on the thermal expansion and mechanical properties of liquid crystalline thermosets in the laboratory. Further advances in magnet design are needed to make magnetic field alignment a commercially viable approach to polymer processing. The liquid crystal thermoset chosen for this study is the diglycidyl ether of dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene cured with the diamine sulfamilamide. This thermoset has been cured at field strengths up to 18 Tesla.

  7. Investigation of precipitation characteristics during NASA GV field projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, B.; Rutledge, S. A.; Petersen, W. A.; Wolff, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    The availability of high quality rain gage networks for extended periods of time during NASA ground validation (GV) field projects supporting the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) allow for extensive analysis of precipitation characteristics over a variety of locations and meteorological regimes. Changes in drop size distribution (DSD) parameters (e.g. D0, Nw, LWC) over the course of a six week deployment are shown for the MC3E, IFloodS, and IPHEx experiments. During MC3E, median drop diameters (D0) progressively increased from late April through mid-May, coupled with a decrease in the normalized gamma number concentration (Nw). The environmental characteristics, such as CAPE, shear and moisture, that are most correlated with this change in DSD are investigated. It is hypothesized that increasing storm strength leads to larger precipitation particles that consume the available water at the expense of smaller particles, leading to increased D0 and lower Nw. In stratiform regions, stronger storms could lead to enhanced convergence and strong mesoscale ascent, resulting in the growth of larger ice particles and aggregates, also increasing D0 and lowering Nw. Changes in DSD are also examined from the perspective of polarimetric radar. The NASA S-band NPOL research radar is used to analyze changes in the DSD using the so-called self-consistency relationship between the ratio of specific differential phase (Kdp) to linear horizontal reflectivity (Zh) as a function of differential reflectivity (Zdr). The ability to detect changes in drop size distribution parameters from a high spatial and temporal resolution platform such as a radar would be useful for rainfall estimation. Changes in the self-consistency relationship during MC3E indicate an increase in Zdr from late April to mid-May, associated with a decrease in the ratio of Kdp/Zh. The polarimetric data from NPOL are also used to infer bulk microphysics in the column leading to changes in the drop size

  8. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called "dipolons"); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  9. Optical measurement techniques for high Reynolds number train investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, S.; Richard, H.; Bosbach, J.; Thimm, M.; Becker, W.; Raffel, M.

    2006-04-01

    This article reports on experimental aerodynamic investigations on a generic high-speed train configuration performed within two different wind tunnels. Both wind tunnels are specialized facilities for high Reynolds number investigations and offer low turbulence levels. The wind tunnels are the cryogenic wind tunnel located in Cologne (KKK) and in the high-pressure wind tunnel located in Göttingen (HDG). Both facilities are part of the German Dutch wind tunnel association (DNW). The adaptation and application of three optical measurement techniques for such high Reynolds number investigations is described in the article. The optical methods are: Particle Image Velocimetry for the measurement of velocity fields, Background Oriented Schlieren technique for density gradient measurements, and a white light Digital Speckle Photography technique for model deformation monitoring.

  10. High magnetic fields in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Laurence J.; Parkin, Don E.; Crow, Jack E.; Schneider-Muntau, Hans J.; Sullivan, Neil S.

    During the past thirty years research using high magnetic fields has technically evolved in the manner, but not the magnitude, of the so-called big science areas of particle physics, plasma physics, neutron scattering, synchrotron light scattering, and astronomy. Starting from the laboratories of individual researchers it moved to a few larger universities, then to centralized national facilities with research and maintenance staffs, and, finally, to joint international ventures to build unique facilities, as illustrated by the subject of this conference. To better understand the nature of this type of research and its societal justification it is helpful to compare it, in general terms, with the aforementioned big-science fields. High magnetic field research differs from particle physics, plasma physics, and astronomy in three respects: (1) it is generic research that cuts across a wide range of scientific disciplines in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and engineering; (2) it studies materials and processes that are relevant for a variety of technological applications and it gives insight into biological processes; (3) it has produced, at least, comparably significant results with incomparably smaller resources. Unlike neutron and synchrotron light scattering, which probe matter, high magnetic fields change the thermodynamic state of matter. This change of state is fundamental and independent of other state variables, such as pressure and temperature. After the magnetic field is applied, various techniques are then used to study the new state.

  11. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendix A, contains the analytical results.

  12. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  13. Regional Ecorisk Field investigation, upper Clark Fork River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.; LaTier, A.; Ginn, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Regional Ecorisk Field Investigation was conducted at the Clark Fork River Superfund Site (Montana) to evaluate the relationships between plant communities and tailings deposits in riparian habitats and to evaluate food-chain transfer of trace elements to selected wildlife species. Stations were selected to represent a range of vegetation biomass (or cover) values and apparent impact of trace elements, with some areas of lush vegetation, some areas of mostly unvegetated soil (e.g., < 30 percent plant cover), and a gradient in between. For the evaluation of risk to wildlife, bioaccumulation of metals was evaluated in native or naturalized plants, terrestrial invertebrates, and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Potential reproductive effects in the deer mouse were evaluated by direct measurements. For other wildlife species, bioaccumulation data were interpreted in the context of food web exposure models. Total biomass and species richness of riparian plant communities are related to tailings content of soil as indicated by pH and metals concentrations. Risk to populations of omnivorous small mammals such as the deer mouse was not significant. Relative abundance and reproductive condition of the deer mouse were normal, even in areas of high metals enrichment. Based on exposure models and site-specific tissue residue data for dietary species, risk to local populations of predators such as red fox and American kestrel that feed on deer mice and terrestrial invertebrates is not significant. Risk to herbivores related to metals bioaccumulation in plant tissues is not significant. Population level effects in deer and other large wildlife are not expected because of the large home ranges of such species and compensatory demographic factors.

  14. Ultra-High-Field MR Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Balchandani, P.; Naidich, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY At ultra-high magnetic fields, such as 7T, MR imaging can noninvasively visualize the brain in unprecedented detail and through enhanced contrast mechanisms. The increased SNR and enhanced contrast available at 7T enable higher resolution anatomic and vascular imaging. Greater spectral separation improves detection and characterization of metabolites in spectroscopic imaging. Enhanced blood oxygen level–dependent contrast affords higher resolution functional MR imaging. Ultra-high-field MR imaging also facilitates imaging of nonproton nuclei such as sodium and phosphorus. These improved imaging methods may be applied to detect subtle anatomic, functional, and metabolic abnormalities associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders, including epilepsy, brain tumors, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and psychiatric conditions. At 7T, however, physical and hardware limitations cause conventional MR imaging pulse sequences to generate artifacts, requiring specialized pulse sequences and new hardware solutions to maximize the high-field gain in signal and contrast. Practical considerations for ultra-high-field MR imaging include cost, siting, and patient experience. PMID:25523591

  15. High-field electron-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V

    1999-02-26

    Recent advances in novel technologies (including chirped-pulse amplification, femtosecond laser systems operating in the TW-PW range, high-gradient rf photoinjectors, and synchronized relativistic electron bunches with subpicosecond durations and THz bandwidths) allow experimentalists to study the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultrahigh-intensity photon fields. Ponderomotive scattering can accelerate these electrons with extremely high gradients in a three-dimensional vacuum laser focus. The nonlinear Doppler shift induced by relativistic radiation pressure in Compton backscattering is shown to yield complex nonlinear spectra which can be modified by using temporal laser pulse shaping techniques. Colliding laser pulses, where ponderomotive acceleration and Compton backscattering are combined, could also yield extremely short wavelength photons. Finally, one expects strong radiative corrections when the Doppler-upshifted laser wavelength approaches the Compton scale. These are discussed within the context of high-field classical electrodynamics, a new discipline borne out of the aforementioned innovations.

  16. High electrical field effects on cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Pliquett, U; Joshi, R P; Sridhara, V; Schoenbach, K H

    2007-05-01

    Electrical charging of lipid membranes causes electroporation with sharp membrane conductance increases. Several recent observations, especially at very high field strength, are not compatible with the simple electroporation picture. Here we present several relevant experiments on cell electrical responses to very high external voltages. We hypothesize that, not only are aqueous pores created within the lipid membranes, but that nanoscale membrane fragmentation occurs, possibly with micelle formation. This effect would produce conductivity increases beyond simple electroporation and display a relatively fast turn-off with external voltage. In addition, material loss can be expected at the anode side of cells, in agreement with published experimental reports at high fields. Our hypothesis is qualitatively supported by molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, such cellular responses might temporarily inactivate voltage-gated and ion-pump activity, while not necessarily causing cell death. This hypothesis also supports observations on electrofusion.

  17. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  18. The Pioneer XI high field fluxgate magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    The high field fluxgate magnetometer experiment flown aboard the Pioneer XI spacecraft is described. This extremely simple instrument was used to extend the spacecraft's upper-limit measurement capability by approximately an order of magnitude (from 0.14 mT to 1.00 mT) with minimum power and volume requirements. This magnetometer was designed to complement the low-field measurements provided by a helium vector magnetometer and utilizes magnetic ring core sensors with biaxial orthogonal sense coils. The instrument is a single-range, triaxial-fluxgate magnetometer capable of measuring fields of up to 1 mT along each orthogonal axis, with a maximum resolution of 1 microT.

  19. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, James E; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Coolbaugh, Mark F

    2010-11-01

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  20. Interpretation and communication of the results of medical field investigations.

    PubMed

    Schulte, P A; Singal, M

    1989-07-01

    Since the controversy over cytogenetic test results at the Love Canal in New York State, there has been increasing concern about the communication of medical test results to participants in field studies. To identify the range of issues that arise and to present examples of practices that might be useful for consideration, we have drawn from 15 years of experience in interpreting and communicating the results of medical field investigations by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The investigations were qualitatively characterized according to study type and design, substances involved, language used in the notification of results, and the nature of the efforts to put results in perspective. Based on this evaluation, the following recommendations are made: (1) provide a comprehensible consent form, (2) interpret results for study participants, (3) use clear language, (4) be explicit about uncertainty of findings, (5) where appropriate, indicate the need for medical follow-up, (6) provide results promptly, (7) provide overall study results, (8) evaluate the impact of the notification, (9) train investigators in the practice of communicating results. PMID:2769455

  1. Applications of high dielectric materials in high field magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Kristina Noel

    At high magnetic fields, radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of components all contribute to losses in conventional RF MRI coil designs. The hypothesis tested here is that these problems can be combated by the use of high permittivity ceramic materials at high fields. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in compact structures at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study NMR probes were constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) and 900 MHz (21.1 Tesla) using inductively fed CaTiO3 (relative permittivity of 156-166) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonators. The designs showed the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore, which accommodates the sample. The 600 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. The 900 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value of 940 and shows Q performance five times better than Alderman-Grant and loop-gap resonators of similar dimensions. High resolution images were acquired of an excised mouse spinal cord (25 microm 3) and an excised rat soleus muscle (20 microm3). The spatial distribution of electromagnetic fields within the human body can be tailored using external dielectric materials. Here, a new material is introduced with high dielectric constant and low background MRI signal. The material is based upon metal titanates, which can be made into geometrically formable suspensions in de-ionized water. The suspension's material properties are

  2. Investigating oiled birds from oil field waste pits

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.G.; Edwards, W.C. )

    1991-10-01

    Procedures and results of investigations concerning the oiling of inland raptors, migratory water-fowl and other birds are presented. Freon washings from the oiled birds and oil from the pits were analyzed by gas chromatography. In most instances the source of the oil could be established by chromatographic procedures. The numbers of birds involved (including many on the endangered species list) suggested the need for netting or closing oil field waste pits and mud disposal pits. Maintaining a proper chain of custody was important.

  3. An investigation of swirl flow field in pneumatic conveying duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xijun; Dong, Jinzhong

    1992-10-01

    The swirl flow field of a pneumatic conveying system is investigated experimentally. The swirl is imparted to the flow by the use of swirl vanes. A five-hole probe is used for measuring the tangential angle of flow, axial velocity, static pressure of flow, and swirl number in the flow sections of a conveying system. It is shown that the existence of a central screw conveyer produces the contrary swirl flow under some of the swirl vane angle conditions. The larger axial velocity is produced in the outer annular layer of flow. The maximum value of the swirl number in the flow sections agrees with a simplified theoretical relation.

  4. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  5. High field superconductor development and understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.; Tarantini, Chiara

    2014-09-28

    All present circular accelerators use superconducting magnets to bend and to focus the particle beams. The most powerful of these machines is the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The main ring dipole magnets of the LHC are made from Nb-Ti but, as the machine is upgraded to higher luminosity, more powerful magnets made of Nb3Sn will be required. Our work addresses how to make the Nb3Sn conductors more effective and more suitable for use in the LHC. The most important property of the superconducting conductor used for an accelerator magnet is that it must have very high critical current density, the property that allows the generation of high magnetic fields in small spaces. Nb3Sn is the original high field superconductor, the material which was discovered in 1960 to allow a high current density in the field of about 9 T. For the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC, much higher current densities in fields of about 12 Tesla will be required. The critical value of the current density is of order 2600 A/mm2 in a field of 12 Tesla. But there are very important secondary factors that complicate the attainment of this critical current density. The first is that the effective filament diameter must be no larger than about 40 µm. The second factor is that 50% of the cross-section of the Nb3Sn conductor that is pure copper must be protected from any poisoning by any Sn leakage through the diffusion barrier that protects the package of niobium and tin from which the Nb3Sn is formed by a high temperature reaction. These three, somewhat conflicting requirements, mean that optimization of the conductor is complex. The work described in this contract report addresses these conflicting requirements. They show that very sophisticated characterizations can uncover the way to satisfy all 3 requirements and they also suggest that the ultimate optimization of Nb3Sn is still not yet in sight

  6. Investigating Sonothrombolysis with High Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Cameron; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David

    2009-04-01

    Despite a significant body of work establishing the feasibility of ultrasound mediated thrombolysis in vitro, in vivo, and in clinical settings, there remains considerable uncertainty about the specific mechanisms involved in this process. This motivates further work to elucidate these mechanisms, which will be central to optimizing safe and effective operating conditions, and to guide the development of novel approaches and instrumentation. In this study, we investigate the use of high frequency ultrasound as a means of gaining mechanistic insight into sonothrombolysis. A high frequency ultrasound (20-50 MHz) instrument is employed which provides the ability to conduct volumetric clot imaging as well as pulsed-wave Doppler to monitor hemodynamics within vessels and clots. With modifications, it is enabled to perform the acquisition of RF data to assess the displacement of clots and vessel walls subjected to therapeutic pulses. Additional modifications were made to perform nonlinear imaging of micron to submicron sized bubbles, which are of interest in enhancing clot lysis. Experiments were performed on in vitro clots, and in vivo using a rabbit femoral artery clot model initiated by the injection of thrombin. Therapeutic pulses are provided by a single element spherically focused air backed transducer with transmit frequencies of 1.68 MHz. Clear visualization of the clots, displacements, and presence or absence of flow within these vessels is shown to be feasible, indicating the potential of this approach as a tool for providing insight into sonothrombolysis.

  7. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. Geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendices B, C, and D contains information on the following: geophysical contour maps and profile plots; human health risk assessment; and ecological risk assessment.

  8. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal, to be avoided during drilling activities. This report contains appendices E and F with information on the following: soil boring logs, and data validation of samples analyzed.

  9. Investigation of a supersonic cruise fighter model flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.; Bare, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to survey the flow field around a model of a supersonic cruise fighter configuration. Local values of angle of attack, side flow, Mach number, and total pressure ratio were measured with a single multi-holed probe in three survey areas on a model previously used for nacelle/nozzle integration investigations. The investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2, and at angles of attack from 0 deg to 10 deg. The purpose of the investigation was to provide a base of experimental data with which theoretically determined data can be compared. To that end the data are presented in tables as well as graphically, and a complete description of the model geometry is included as fuselage cross sections and wing span stations. Measured local angles of attack were generally greater than free stream angle of attack above the wing and generally smaller below. There were large spanwise local angle-of-attack and side flow gradients above the wing at the higher free stream angles of attack.

  10. Investigating completion strategies; Cormorant Field, U. K. North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, J.H. Jr. ); Valenti, N.P. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes studies that evaluate various completion strategies for new subsea wells in the Cormorant field, U.K. North Sea. These studies, which complement work done by the field operator, include detailed reservoir description work to define oil-in-place (OIP) and permeability distribution and a waterflood simulation for a representative reservoir cross section. Wellbore, flowline, and pipeline hydraulics for the complex production/injection system are included to model well rates more accurately. The results provide general insight into the nature of displacement during waterflooding of a stratified section with a limited number of wells. They also provide specific guidance on dual vs. single completions; perforating, testing, and stimulation sequence; and the benefits of partially perforating high-permeability sands.

  11. Investigation of the Arcjet near Field Plume Using Electrostatic Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The near field plume of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster was investigated using electrostatic probes of various geometries. The electron number densities and temperatures were determined in a simulated hydrazine plume at axial distances between 3 cm (1.2 in.) and 15 cm (5.9 in.) and radial distances extending to 10 cm (3.9 in.) off centerline. Values of electron number densities obtained using cylindrical and spherical probes of different geometries agreed very well. The electron density on centerline followed a source flow approximation for axial distances as near as 3 cm (1.2 in.) from the nozzle exit plane. The model agreed well with previously obtained data in the far field. The effects of propellant mass flow rate and input power level were also studied. Cylindrical probes were used to obtain ion streamlines by changing the probe orientation with respect to the flow. The effects of electrical configuration on the plasma characteristics of the plume were also investigated by using a segmented anode/nozzle thruster. The results showed that the electrical configuration in the nozzle affected the distribution of electrons in the plume.

  12. Investigation of the arcjet plume near field using electrostatic probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The near field plum of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster was investigated using electrostatic probes of various geometries. The electron number densities and temperatures were determined in a simulated hydrazine plume at axial distances between 3 cm (1.2 in) and 15 cm (5.9 in) and radial distances extending to 10 cm (3.9 in) off centerline. Values of electron number densities obtained using cylindrical and spherical probes of different geometries agreed very well. The electron density on centerline followed a source flow approximation for axial distances as near as 3 cm (1.2 in) from the nozzle exit plane. The model agreed well with previously obtained data in the far field. The effects of propellant mass flow rate and input power level were also studied. Cylindrical probes were used to obtain ion streamlines by changing the probe orientation with respect to the flow. The effects of electrical configuration on the plasma characteristics of the plume were also investigated by using a segmented anode/nozzle thruster. The results showed that the electrical configuration in the nozzle affected the distribution of electrons in the plume.

  13. FINESSE: Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer; Lim, Darlene; Colaprete, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and Phobos and Deimos. We follow the philosophy that "science enables exploration and exploration enables science." 1) FINESSE Science: Understand the effects of volcanism and impacts as dominant planetary processes on the Moon, NEAs, and Phobos & Deimos. 2) FINESSE Exploration: Understand which exploration concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities enable and enhance scientific return. To accomplish these objectives, we are conducting an integrated research program focused on scientifically-driven field exploration at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in Idaho and at the West Clearwater Lake Impact Structure in northern Canada. Field deployments aimed at reconnaissance geology and data acquisition were conducted in 2014 at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve. Targets for data acquisition included selected sites at Kings Bowl eruptive fissure, lava field and blowout crater, Inferno Chasm vent and outflow channel, North Crater lava flow and Highway lava flow. Field investigation included (1) differential GPS (dGPS) measurements of lava flows, channels (and ejecta block at Kings Bowl); (2) LiDAR imaging of lava flow margins, surfaces and other selected features; (3) digital photographic documentation; (4) sampling for geochemical and petrographic analysis; (5) UAV aerial imagery of Kings Bowl and Inferno Chasm features; and (6) geologic assessment of targets and potential new targets. Over the course of the 5-week field FINESSE campaign to the West Clearwater Impact Structure (WCIS) in 2014, the team focused on several WCIS research topics, including impactites, central uplift formation, the impact-generated hydrothermal system, multichronometer

  14. The Grenoble High Magnetic Field Laboratory as a user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debray, F.; Jongbloets, H.; Joss, W.; Martinez, G.; Mossang, E.; Picoche, J. C.; Plante, A.; Rub, P.; Sala, P.; Wyder, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Grenoble High Magnetic Field Laboratory (GHMFL), run jointly by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, France) and the Max-Planck Gesellschaft (MPG, Germany) is a leading laboratory pursuing research in the highest static magnetic fields technically feasible. The laboratory maintains strong in-house research activities and partly operates as a user facility for qualified external researchers. It has developed highly sophisticated instrumentation for specific use under high magnetic fields, including transport, magnetization, visible and infrared optical measurements at low temperatures and/or high pressures, EPR and NMR investigations in high magnetic fields. The laboratory delivers around 5000 h of magnet time per year. Access for users to the high magnetic field facility is supported by the European Union, in the framework of the Human Potential Program : “Transnational Access to Major Research Infrastructures”.We give an overview of the technical aspects of the facility and of the laboratory activities as a facility over the last few years. The general organization of the user community and repartition between countries will also be reviewed.

  15. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)-an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents-could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  16. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ge

    2015-10-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST.

  17. Investigation of back surface fields effect on bifacial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepeai, Suhaila; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2012-11-01

    A bifacial solar cell, in contrast with a conventional monofacial solar cell, produces photo-generated current from both front and back sides. Bifacial solar cell is an attractive candidate for enhancing photovoltaic (PV) market competitiveness as well as supporting the current efforts to increase efficiency and lower material costs. This paper reports on the fabrication of bifacial solar cells using phosphorus-oxytrichloride (POCl3) emitter formation on p-type, nanotextured silicon (Si) wafer. Backside surface field was formed through Al-diffusion using conventional screen-printing process. Bifacial solar cells with a structure of n+pp+ with and without back surface field (BSF) were fabricated in which silicon nitride (SiN) anti reflection and passivation films were coated on both sides, followed by screen printing of Argentum (Ag) and Argentum/Aluminum (Ag/Al) on front and back contacts, respectively. Bifacial solar cells without BSF exhibited open circuit voltage (VOC) of 535 mV for front and 480 mV for back surface. With Al-alloyed BSF bifacial solar cells, the VOC improved to 580 mV for the front surface and 560 mV for the back surface. Simulation of bifacial solar cells using PC1D and AFORS software demonstrated good agreement with experimental results. Simulations showed that best bifacial solar cells are achieved through a combination of high lifetime wafer, low recombination back surface field, reduced contact resistance, and superior surface passivation.

  18. High diffraction efficiency in SBN with applied fields near the coercive field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvestani, S. S.; Siahmakoun, A.; Duree, G.; Johnson, K.

    2001-05-01

    We present the experiments and results of our investigation of electrical fixing in SBN:60. We propose an optical method for determining the value of the coercive field in ferroelectric crystals. An interferometric method is used to map the change in the index of refraction with negative applied fields, where the minimum of the index change is an indication of the coercive field. From this experiment, values of 1.55 kV±20 V for the coercive voltage and 147±6 pm/V for the linear electro-optic coefficient are found. Two electrical-fixing techniques that result in very high diffraction efficiencies are presented, discussed and compared to previous publications on electrical fixing in SBN. High diffraction efficiencies of about 95% were achieved with the application of negative fields near the coercive region, during and after holographic recording in the crystal.

  19. High-Field Transport in Semiconducting Material and Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nisar

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Considering the developments and most recent technological innovations of semiconductor devices, it is important to investigate the ramifications of charge carrier transport in high electric field in modern semiconductor microstructures, where the electric fields are found to be necessarily high. The fundamental ideas of transport theory including the mobility -limiting scattering mechanisms are reviewed. The ideas of linear transport are extended and the derivation of the high-field distribution is described in a single-valley model appropriate for the band structures of silicon and germanium. The velocity-field profile obtained from this distribution function is compared with the experimental results on bulk (3-dimensional) samples of silicon and germanium. The two-band model of intrinsic transport in a high electric field is also included. The single valley distribution is applied to the multi-valley structures of CaAs and (InGa)As to explain the experimentally observed negative differential resistivity in bulk samples. The calculations are further extended to two dimensional quantum -well microstructures of GaAs and (InGa)As. The conditions necessary for negative differential resistivity in these microstructures to be observable is also discussed. The applications of the above ideas in modelling submicron -length channel field effect transistors (MOSFET's and MODFET's) is discussed. Suggestions for further future applications of the analysis are offered.

  20. Neurodegenerative disease high-field imaging

    PubMed Central

    van der Grond, J.; van Buchem, M.A.; van Zijl, P.; Webb, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    High field magnetic resonance imaging is showing potential for imaging of neurodegenerative diseases. 7 T MRI is beginning to be used in a clinical research setting and the theoretical benefits, i.e. higher signal-to-noise, sensitivity to iron, improved MRA and increased spectral resolution in spectroscopy are being confirmed. Despite the limited number of studies to date, initial results in patients with multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease show promising additional features in contrast that may assist in better diagnosis of these disorders. PMID:22548926

  1. High-magnetic-field research collaborations

    SciTech Connect

    Goettee, J.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was to develop collaborations with the academic community to exploit scientific research potential of the pulsed magnetic fields that might be possible with electrically pulsed devices, as well as magneto-cumulative generators. The author started with a campaign of experiments using high-explosive-driven flux compression generators. The campaign's objective was to explore completely novel ideas in condensed-matter physics and chemistry. The initiative was very successful in pulling together top researchers from around the world.

  2. Investigations on the Incompletely Developed Plane Diagonal-Tension Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1940-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation on the incompletely developed diagonal-tension field. Actual diagonal-tension beams work in an intermediate stage between pure shear and pure diagonal tension; the theory developed by wagner for diagonal tension is not directly applicable. The first part of the paper reviews the most essential items of the theory of pure diagonal tension as well as previous attempts to formulate a theory of incomplete diagonal tension. The second part of the paper describes strain measurement made by the N. A. C. A. to obtain the necessary coefficients for the proposed theory. The third part of the paper discusses the stress analysis of diagonal-tension beams by means of the proposed theory.

  3. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4/sup 0/K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs.

  4. Continuous field investigation assessing nitrogen and phosphorus emission from irrigated paddy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In order to maintain good river environment, it is very important to understand and to control nutrient behavior such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Other than urban and industrial waste water, nutrient emission from agricultural activity is dominant pollution source into the river system. Rice is one of the staple products of Asia and paddy field occupies large areas in Asian countries. Rice is also widely cultivated in Japan. Paddy field occupies large areas in Japanese river basin areas. While paddy field can deteriorate river water quality by discharging fertilizer, it is also suggested that paddy field has water purification function. Regarding to nutrient emission from paddy field, existing monitored data are insufficient so as to discuss quantitatively seasonal change of material behavior including flooding season and dry season and to evaluate year round comprehensive impact from paddy field to the river system. These are not sufficient data for discussion of material flow and emission impact quantitatively as well as qualitatively. We have carried out field investigation in paddy fields in middle reach of the Tone River Basin. The aim of the survey is understanding of water and nutrient balance in paddy field. In order to understand emission impact from paddy field to river system, all input and output flow are measured to calculate nutrient balance in paddy field. Therefore we observed quantity of water flow into/from paddy field, water quality change of inflow and outflow during flooding season. We set focus on a monitoring paddy field IM, and monitored continuously water and nutrient behavior. By measuring water quality and flow rate of inflow, outflow, infiltrating water, ground water and depth of flooding water, we tried to quantitatively understand N and P cycle around paddy field including seasonal tendency, change accompanying with rainy events and occurred according to agricultural events like fertilization. At the beginning of flooding season, we

  5. High field electrophoresis—computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M. J.; Kułakowski, K.

    2004-11-01

    We describe for the first time the results, obtained by means of a new two-dimensional version of a cellular automaton (2DA), designed for the simulation of the gel electrophoresis at high fields. The calculations are performed up to N=442 reptons. The results are compared with those from a modified version of the one-dimensional automaton (1DA), which has been constructed previously. The modification is that the movements of different parts of a molecule of DNA are treated as statistically independent events. This approach is applied also for 2DA. Main results are: (i) for long molecules (N≫1) the velocity v tends to a constant both for 1DA and 2DA; (ii) the diffusion coefficient D for 2DA increases with N; (iii) 2DA enables the formation of so-called hernias, i.e. fragments of DNA locally perpendicular to the molecule, and (iv) a direct observation of the geometration effect. The results (i) and (ii) mimic the experimental behavior at high electric fields. We also calculate a dimensionless quantity y=D/(Lv), where L=Na is the molecule length and a is the stiffness length. The discussion of y reveals the role of the length fluctuations.

  6. Physical processes at high field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation produced by the high field interaction with the rare gases have revealed the presence of both copious harmonic production and fluorescence. The highest harmonic observed was the seventeenth (14.6 rm) in Ne, the shortest wavelength ever produced by that means. Strong fluorescence was seen in Ar, Kr, and Xe with the shortest wavelengths observed being below 10 nm. Furthermore, radiation from inner-shell excited configurations in Xe, specifically the 4d/sup 9/5s5p ..-->.. 4d/sup 10/5s manifold at approx. 17.7 nm, was detected. The behaviors of the rare gases with respect to multiquantum ionization, harmonic production, and fluorescence were found to be correlated so that the materials fell into two groups, He and Ne in one and Ar, Kr, and Xe in the other. These experimental findings, in alliance with other studies on inner-shell decay processes, give evidence for a role of atomic correlations in a direct nonlinear process of inner-shell excitation. It is expected that an understanding of these high-field processes will enable the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. A high performance field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Garate, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Thompson, M. C.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Andow, R.; Aefsky, S.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRCs), high-beta, prolate compact toroids embedded in poloidal magnetic fields, face notable stability and confinement concerns. These can be ameliorated by various control techniques, such as introducing a significant fast ion population. Indeed, adding neutral beam injection into the FRC over the past half-decade has contributed to striking improvements in confinement and stability. Further, the addition of electrically biased plasma guns at the ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved stability. Together, these enabled the build-up of a well-confined and dominant fast-ion population. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable hot FRCs (with total plasma temperature of ∼1 keV) with record lifetimes were achieved. These accomplishments point to the prospect of advanced, beam-driven FRCs as an intriguing path toward fusion reactors. This paper reviews key results and presents context for further interpretation.

  8. A high performance field-reversed configurationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Garate, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Schmitz, L.; Guo, H. Y.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Thompson, M. C.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Andow, R.; Aefsky, S.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R.; Cheung, A. H.; Conroy, K. D.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Feng, P.; Galeotti, L.; Giammanco, F.; Granstedt, E.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kinley, J. S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Hollins, M.; Magee, R.; Mendoza, R.; Mok, Y.; Necas, A.; Primavera, S.; Onofri, M.; Osin, D.; Rath, N.; Roche, T.; Romero, J.; Schroeder, J. H.; Sevier, L.; Sibley, A.; Song, Y.; Van Drie, A. D.; Walters, J. K.; Waggoner, W.; Yushmanov, P.; Zhai, K.

    2015-05-01

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRCs), high-beta, prolate compact toroids embedded in poloidal magnetic fields, face notable stability and confinement concerns. These can be ameliorated by various control techniques, such as introducing a significant fast ion population. Indeed, adding neutral beam injection into the FRC over the past half-decade has contributed to striking improvements in confinement and stability. Further, the addition of electrically biased plasma guns at the ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved stability. Together, these enabled the build-up of a well-confined and dominant fast-ion population. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable hot FRCs (with total plasma temperature of ˜1 keV) with record lifetimes were achieved. These accomplishments point to the prospect of advanced, beam-driven FRCs as an intriguing path toward fusion reactors. This paper reviews key results and presents context for further interpretation.

  9. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  10. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2000-03-14

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

  11. A field investigation and numerical simulation of coastal fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, E. J.; Eadie, W. J.; Rogers, C. W.; Kocmond, W. C.; Pilie, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A field investigation of the microphysical and micrometeorological features of fogs occurring near Los Angeles and Vandenberg, California was conducted. Observations of wind speed and direction, temperature, dew point, vertical wind velocity, dew deposition, drop-size distribution, liquid water content, and haze and cloud nucleus concentration were obtained. These observations were initiated in late evening prior to fog formation and continued until the time of dissipation in both advection and radiation fogs. Data were also acquired in one valley fog and several dense haze situations. The behavior of these parameters prior to and during fog are discussed in detail. A two-dimensional numerical model was developed to investigate the formation and dissipation of advection fogs under the influence of horizontal variations in surface temperature. The model predicts the evolution of potential temperature, water vapor content, and liquid water content in a vertical plane as determined by vertical turbulent transfer and horizontal advection. Results are discussed from preliminary numerical experiments on the formation of warm-air advection fog and dissipation by natural and artificial heating from the surface.

  12. Radiocolloids in leachate from the NRC field lysimeter investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Brey, R.R.; Butikofer, T.; McConnell, J.W.; Rogers, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    An investigation of colloidal particles has been completed on leachate samples collected from sand and soil-filled lysimeters (of the Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program) in which low-level radioactive waste forms were buried. An array of analytical techniques including: gamma spectroscopy, liquid scintillation spectrometry, gross alpha and beta particle proportional counting, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), neutron activation analysis (NAA), X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), proton induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE), gravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were performed on samples thought to contain colloidal particles to determine particle composition and the nature of their association with radioactive material. Several different types of particles ranging in size from 0.02 to 20 {micro}m were identified within the leachate including crystalline calcium hydroxide particles, rounded siliceous grains, angular weathered soil, and spherical particles apparently composed of an organic polymer. The primary radioactive material associated with these particles was Sr-90. About 2% of the total Sr-90 activity in the leachate is associated with colloidal particles. This information indicates that colloidal particles play a role in radioactive material transport through lysimeter soils.

  13. Distinguishing among Declarative, Descriptive and Causal Questions to Guide Field Investigations and Student Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Arthur Louis; Bell, Clare V.

    2011-01-01

    Teachers as well as students often have difficulty formulating good research questions because not all questions lend themselves to scientific investigation. The following is a guide for high-school and college life-science teachers to help students define question types central to biological field studies. The mayfly nymph was selected as the…

  14. Electric and magnetic field measurements in a high voltage center.

    PubMed

    Safigianni, Anastasia S; Spyridopoulos, Anastasios I; Kanas, Vasilis L

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the electric and magnetic fields inside a large high voltage center constituted both of 400/150 and 150/20 kV substation areas. Results of previous field measurements and calculations in substations, made by the authors of this paper or other researchers, are presented first. The basic data distinguishing the examined center from previously examined substations follow. The main results of the field measurements in the areas of the above-mentioned center are presented in relevant diagrams. General conclusions arising from the comparison of the measured field values with relevant reference levels in force for safe public and occupational exposure as well as with the results of previous research are finally given. PMID:21917821

  15. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  16. High-field transport in two-dimensional graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tian; Konar, Aniruddha; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2011-09-01

    Transport of carriers in two-dimensional graphene at high electric fields is investigated by combining semianalytical and Monte Carlo methods. A semianalytical high-field transport model based on the high rate of optical phonon emission provides useful estimates of the saturation currents in graphene. For developing a more accurate picture, the nonequilibrium (hot) phonon effect and the role of electron-electron scattering were studied using Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the hot phonon effect plays a dominant role in current saturation, and electron-electron scattering strongly thermalizes the hot carrier population in graphene. We also find that electron-electron scattering removes negative differential resistance in graphene. Transient phenomenon such as velocity overshoot can be used to speed up graphene-based high-speed electronic devices by shrinking the channel length below 80 nm if electrostatic control can be exercised in the absence of a band gap.

  17. Experimental investigations of hard photon emission from strong crystalline fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Jensen, B. N.; Strakhovenko, V. M.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Elsener, K.; Sona, P.; Connell, S. H.; Sellschop, J. P. F.; Avakian, R. O.; Avetisian, A. E.; Taroian, S. P.

    1992-05-01

    For the first time very pronounced high-energy photon peaks have been measured in the radiation emission from 70, 150 and 240 GeV electrons incident at 0.1-1.0 mrad to the axis in diamond and Si crystals. The energy of the photons in the peaks is 0.7-0.8 times the particle energy with yields of 50 times the Bethe-Heitler one (in diamond). The peaks consist of single photons and are caused by the influence of strong crystalline fields on emission of coherent bremsstrahlung, emitted when the ultrarelativistic electrons cross the rows of atoms in a crystal plane. The effect should be envisaged as a source for nearly monoenergetic photons in the multihundred GeV-region.

  18. Investigation of the electric field below 80 km from a parachute-deployed payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, E. A.; Benbrook, J. R.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the atmospheric electric field from rocket-boosted parachute-deployed payloads has been conducted. Data from two prototype flights; a drop test from a high-altitude balloon on July 10, 1973; and a rocket test on July 24, 1974, indicate that measurements of the ambient electric field from parachuted payloads are possible under appropriate circumstances. However, intermittent anomalous charging of the payloads, probes, and parachute has sometimes prevented measurement of the ambient field. No good explanation of this anomalous behavior has been found. This charging process needs to be understood or prevented before fully reliable operation of this and other related instruments can be achieved.

  19. Guided resonances on lithium niobate for extremely small electric field detection investigated by accurate sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wentao; Ndao, Abdoulaye; Lu, Huihui; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Baida, Fadi Issam

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of guided resonances (GR) on a thin film lithium niobate rectangular lattice photonic crystal by band diagram calculations and 3D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) transmission investigations which cover a broad range of parameters. A photonic crystal with an active zone as small as 13μm×13μm×0.7μm can be easily designed to obtain a resonance Q value in the order of 1000. These resonances are then employed in electric field (E-field) sensing applications exploiting the electro optic (EO) effect of lithium niobate. A local field factor that is calculated locally for each FDTD cell is proposed to accurately estimate the sensitivity of GR based E-field sensor. The local field factor allows well agreement between simulations and reported experimental data therefore providing a valuable method in optimizing the GR structure to obtain high sensitivities. When these resonances are associated with sub-picometer optical spectrum analyzer and high field enhancement antenna design, an E-field probe with a sensitivity of 50 μV/m could be achieved. The results of our simulations could be also exploited in other EO based applications such as EEG (Electroencephalography) or ECG (Electrocardiography) probe and E-field frequency detector with an 'invisible' probe to the field being detected etc. PMID:27607627

  20. Numerical Investigation of Near-Field Plasma Flows in Magnetic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Kamesh; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2009-01-01

    The development and application of a multidimensional numerical simulation code for investigating near-field plasma processes in magnetic nozzles are presented. The code calculates the time-dependent evolution of all three spatial components of both the magnetic field and velocity in a plasma flow, and includes physical models of relevant transport phenomena. It has been applied to an investigation of the behavior of plasma flows found in high-power thrusters, employing a realistic magnetic nozzle configuration. Simulation of a channel-flow case where the flow was super-Alfvenic has demonstrated that such a flow produces adequate back-emf to significantly alter the shape of the total magnetic field, preventing the flow from curving back to the magnetic field coil in the near-field region. Results from this simulation can be insightful in predicting far-field behavior and can be used as a set of self-consistent boundary conditions for far-field simulations. Future investigations will focus on cases where the inlet flow is sub-Alfvenic and where the flow is allowed to freely expand in the radial direction once it is downstream of the coil.

  1. NSTX High Field Side Gas Fueling System

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; M. Anderson; G. Barnes; M. Bell; W. Blanchard; L. Dudek; D. Gates; R. Gernhardt; R. Maingi; D. Mueller; T. Provost; R. Raman; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Winston

    2003-10-09

    Fueling National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas with gas injected from the high field side (HFS) has produced earlier, more reliable transitions to the H-mode, longer H-mode durations, higher toroidal rotation, and higher edge electron temperature compared with similar discharges using the low field side (LFS) gas fueling injectors. The HFS gas fueling system consists of a Center Stack midplane injector, and an injector at the inner, upper corner of the Center Stack. The challenging design and installation constraints for the HFS gas system involved placing the control components as close as possible to the machine-vacuum interface, devising a special feed-through flange, traversing through vessel regions whose temperatures during bake-out range from 150 to 350 degrees Centigrade, adapting the gas transport tubing size and route to the small instrumentation wire channels behind the existing graphite plasma facing component tiles on the Center Stack, and providing output orifices shielded from excessive plasma power depositions while concentrating the output flow to facilitate fast camera viewing and analysis. Design, recent performance, and future upgrades will be presented.

  2. Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Philip, J.

    1995-04-01

    The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

  3. First results of the MAVEN magnetic field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Gruesbeck, J. R.; Oliversen, R. J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J.; Mazelle, C.; Brain, D.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    Two Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN magnetic field sensors sample the ambient magnetic field at the outer edge of each solar array. We characterized relatively minor spacecraft-generated magnetic fields using in-flight subsystem tests and spacecraft maneuvers. Dynamic spacecraft fields associated with the power subsystem (≤1 nT) are compensated for using spacecraft engineering telemetry to identify active solar array circuits and monitor their electrical current production. Static spacecraft magnetic fields are monitored using spacecraft roll maneuvers. Accuracy of measurement of the environmental magnetic field is demonstrated by comparison with field directions deduced from the symmetry properties of the electron distribution function measured by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer. We map the bow shock, magnetic pileup boundary, the V × B convection electric field and ubiquitous proton cyclotron, and 1 Hz waves in the ion foreshock region.

  4. Theoretical investigation of bacteria polarizability under direct current electric fields.

    PubMed

    Dingari, Naga Neehar; Buie, Cullen R

    2014-04-22

    We present a theoretical model to investigate the influence of soft polyelectrolyte layers on bacteria polarizability. We resolve soft-layer electrokinetics by considering the pH-dependent dissociation of ionogenic groups and specific interactions of ionogenic groups with the bulk electrolyte to go beyond approximating soft-layer electrokinetics as surface conduction. We model the electrokinetics around a soft particle by modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) to account for the effects of ion transport in the soft layer and electric double layer. Fluid flow is modeled by modified Stokes equations accounting for soft-layer permeability. Two test cases are presented to demonstrate our model: fibrillated and unfibrillated Streptococcus salivarius bacteria. We show that electrolytic and pH conditions significantly influence the extent of soft-particle polarizability in dc fields. Comparison with an approximate analytical model based on Dukhin-Shilov theory for soft particles shows the importance of resolving soft-layer electrokinetics. Insights from this study can be useful in understanding the parameters that influence soft-particle dielectrophoresis in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  5. Limited field investigation for the 200-UP-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit is located in the southern portion of the 200 West Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The operable unit is located adjacent to the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit and underlies a significant part of seven source operable units: 200-RO-1, 200-RO-2, 200-RO-3, 200-RO-4, 200-SS-2, 200-UP-2, and 200-UP-3. Remedial efforts in the 100-ZP-1 Operable Unit focus on addressing volatile organic contamination in the aquifer. The focus of the 200-UP-1 limited field investigation (LFI) is on contaminated aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, with the exception of uranium and technetium-99 plumes, which are addressed by an existing 200-UP-1 interim remedial measure (IRM). The LFI approach is driven by general and specific data needs required to refine the site conceptual model and conduct a risk assessment. Activities supporting the LFI include drilling, well construction, sampling and analysis, data validation, geologic and geophysical logging, aquifer testing, measuring depth to water, and evaluating geodetic survey and existing analytical data.

  6. Field Investigations of Evaporation from a Bare Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evett, Steven Roy

    Selected components of the water and energy balances at the surface of a bare clay loam were measured at 57 locations in a 1 ha field. Spatial and temporal variability of these components were also studied. Components included evaporation, irrigation, moisture storage, sensible heat flux and long wave radiation. Sub-studies were conducted on irrigation uniformity under low pressure sprinklers; and, on steel versus plastic microlysimeters (ML) of various lengths. An energy balance model of evaporation, requiring minimal inputs, was developed and validated giving an r ^2 value of 0.78. Model improvements included an easy method of accurately estimating soil surface temperature at many points in a field, and an empirically fitted transfer coefficient function for the sensible heat flux from the reference dry soil. The omission of soil heat flux and reflected shortwave radiation terms was shown to reduce model accuracy. Steel ML underestimated cumulative evaporation compared to plastic ML at 20 and 30 cm lengths. Cumulative evaporation increased with ML length. The 10 and 20 cm ML were too short for use over multiple days but 30 cm ML may not be long enough for extended periods. Daily net soil heat flux for steel ML averaged 44% higher than that for both plastic ML and undisturbed field soil. Christiansen's uniformity coefficient (UCC) was close to 0.83 for each of 3 irrigations when measured by both catch cans and by profile water contents. But UCC for the change in storage due to irrigation averaged only 0.43 indicating than the high uniformity of profile water contents was more due to surface and subsurface redistribution than to the uniformity of application. Profile water contents and catch can depths were time invariant across at least 3 irrigations. Midday soil surface temperatures and daily evaporation were somewhat less time invariant. Variogram plots for evaporation and surface temperature showed mostly random behavior. Relative variograms represented well

  7. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  8. High-density Au nanorod optical field-emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. G.; Yang, Y.; Keathley, P. D.; Swanwick, M. E.; Velásquez-García, L. F.; Kärtner, F. X.; Graves, W. S.; Berggren, K. K.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate the design, fabrication, characterization, and operation of high-density arrays of Au nanorod electron emitters, fabricated by high-resolution electron beam lithography, and excited by ultrafast femtosecond near-infrared radiation. Electron emission characteristic of multiphoton absorption has been observed at low laser fluence, as indicated by the power-law scaling of emission current with applied optical power. The onset of space-charge-limited current and strong optical field emission has been investigated so as to determine the mechanism of electron emission at high incident laser fluence. Laser-induced structural damage has been observed at applied optical fields above 5 GV m-1, and energy spectra of emitted electrons have been measured using an electron time-of-flight spectrometer.

  9. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  10. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  11. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  12. Near-field scanning optical microscopy investigations of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearo, Jessie Ann

    The Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) studies of novel, optically active, conjugated polymers are presented. NSOM is a relatively new technique which produces super resolution (˜50--100 nm) optical images simultaneously with topography. The conjugated polymer poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) and derivatives of PPV are organic semiconductor-like materials with interesting and unique optical properties. Derivatives of PPV have been used in LEDs and have potential in other optoelectronic devices. NSOM provides a tool for investigation of the photoluminescence, absorption/reflection, photo-dynamics and photoconductivity of films of PPV and PPV derivatives on the length scale that these properties are fundamentally defined. The NSOM experiments have revealed mesoscale domains (˜100 nm) of varying photoluminescence emission and average molecular order in drop cast films of PPV. NSOM of stretch-oriented PPV have shown domains of perpendicular molecular orientation with low photoluminescence emission. Near-field photoconductivity experiments of stretch-oriented PPV have correlated the mesoscale topography with the photoconductivity properties of the polymer. NSOM experiments of films of poly(2-methoxy, 5-(2'-(ethyl(hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) have shown that there is mesoscale spatial inhomogeneity in the photo-oxidation process which reduces photoluminescence emission. NSOM has also been used to create nanoscale photo-patterning in MEH-PPV films. The NSOM experiments of blended films of MEH-PPV in polystyrene have shown mesoscale phase separation directly correlated to variations in the optical properties of the film. Derivatives of PPV, stretch-oriented in polyethylene, show photoluminescence intensity variations perpendicular and parallel to the stretch-direction correlated to topography features. As a complement to the NSOM studies of conjugated polymers, single polymer molecule experiments of MEH-PPV are also presented. The

  13. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Crow, James T.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for generating homogenous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set.

  14. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Crow, J.T.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating homogeneous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set. 55 figs.

  15. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Crow, J.T.

    1998-02-10

    An apparatus and method for generating homogeneous electromagnetic fields within a volume is disclosed. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented mirror symmetrically about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set. 39 figs.

  16. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Crow, J.T.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating homogeneous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented mirror symmetrically about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set. 26 figs.

  17. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Crow, James Terry

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for generating homogenous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented mirror symmetrically about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially canceling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set.

  18. Generating highly uniform electromagnetic field characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Crow, James T.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for generating homogenous electromagnetic fields within a volume. The homogeneity provided may be for magnetic and/or electric fields, and for field magnitude, radial gradient, or higher order radial derivative. The invention comprises conductive pathways oriented mirror symmetrically about a desired region of homogeneity. A corresponding apparatus and method is provided for substantially cancelling the electromagnetic field outside of the apparatus, comprising a second set of conductive pathways placed outside the first set.

  19. Theoretical investigations of high lift aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, G.; Thompson, J.

    1983-01-01

    A program which generates a coordinate system for a two element airfoil with the mesh points concentrated in areas of significant vorticity, i.e., boundary layer and wake is operational. The 'imbedded' grid method developed allows a transition from the scale of the main airfoil to the scale of the flap. This requirement is essential for the modeling of viscous flows over the flap and slat of a multielement airfoil. An airfoil mounted in a 2-D wind tunnel was formulated. The program is ready for a fine grid and a large number of planes to explore the characteristics of a Navier-Stokes solver in a quasi-3D case. The program was converted to a form suitable for the STAR computer. Runs were made to map a three dimensional flow field for a wall airfoil intersection with and without lift.

  20. Effective High School Teachers: A Mixed Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Don P.; Slate, John R.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    The researchers conducted a sequential qualitative-quantitative mixed analysis of the characteristics of effective high school teachers as perceived by 615 college students, predominantly Hispanic, at two Hispanic-Serving Institutions. Qualitative analyses revealed the presence of 24 themes: Caring; Communication; Creative; Disciplinarian;…

  1. High magnetic field induced changes of gene expression in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Meisel, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background High magnetic fields are becoming increasingly prevalent components of non-invasive, biomedical imaging tools (such as MRI), thus, an understanding of the molecular impacts associated with these field strengths in biological systems is of central importance. The biological impact of magnetic field strengths up to 30 Tesla were investigated in this study through the use of transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Methods Magnetic field induced Adh/GUS activity was evaluated with histochemical staining to assess tissue specific expression and distribution, and with quantitative, spectrofluometric assays to measure degree of activation. The evaluation of global changes in the Arabidopsis genome in response to exposure to high magnetic fields was facilitated with Affymetrix Gene Chip microarrays. Quantitative analyses of gene expression were performed with quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Field strengths in excess of about 15 Tesla induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. From the microarray analyses that surveyed 8000 genes, 114 genes were differentially expressed to a degree greater than 2.5 fold over the control. These results were quantitatively corroborated by qRT-PCR examination of 4 of the 114 genes. Conclusion The data suggest that magnetic fields in excess of 15 Tesla have far-reaching effect on the genome. The wide-spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism, are prominent examples. The roles of magnetic field orientation of macromolecules and magnetophoretic effects are discussed as possible factors that contribute to the mounting of this response. PMID:17187667

  2. Mechanical reinforcement for RACC cables in high magnetic background fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, C. M.; Gade, P. V.; Barth, C.; Preuß, A.; Jung, A.; Weiß, K. P.

    2016-02-01

    Operable in liquid helium, liquid hydrogen or liquid nitrogen, high temperature superconductor (HTS) cables are investigated as future alternatives to low temperature superconductor (LTS) cables in magnet applications. Different high current HTS cable concepts have been developed and optimized in the last years—each coming with its own benefits and challenges. As the Roebel assembled coated conductor (RACC) is the only fully transposed HTS cable investigated so far, it is attractive for large scale magnet and accelerator magnet applications when field quality and alternating current (AC) losses are of highest importance. However, due to its filamentary character, the RACC is very sensitive to Lorentz forces. In order to increase the mechanical strength of the RACC, each of the HTS strands was covered by an additional copper tape. After investigating the maximum applicable transverse pressure on the strand composition, the cable was clamped into a stainless steel structure to reinforce it against Lorentz forces. A comprehensive test has been carried out in the FBI facility at 4.2 K in a magnetic field of up to 12 T. This publication discusses the maximum applicable pressure as well as the behaviour of the RACC cable as a function of an external magnetic field.

  3. First Results of the MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Gruesbeck, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J. S.; Mazelle, C. X.; Brain, D.; Jakosky, B. M.; Oliversen, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN spacecraft approaches the end of its first year in orbit, systematically mapping the interaction region about Mars with a focus on atmospheric escape. The comprehensive instrument suite aboard MAVEN has busied itself in mapping the magnetosphere, magnetosheath, magnetotail, and extended atmospheric corona in near-Mars space. MAVEN carries two magnetic field sensors (fluxgate magnetometers) as part of the particles and fields package (PFP); they sample the ambient magnetic field from a vantage point on at the outer edge of each solar array. We characterized relatively minor spacecraft-generated magnetic fields using a series of in-flight subsystem tests and spacecraft maneuvers. Dynamic spacecraft fields (≤ 1 nT) associated with the operation of specific solar array circuits are compensated for using spacecraft engineering telemetry to identify active circuits and monitor their electrical current production. Static spacecraft magnetic fields are monitored using spacecraft roll maneuvers. Accuracy of measurement of the environmental magnetic field is demonstrated by comparison with field directions deduced from the symmetry properties of the electron distribution function measured by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA). We compile magnetometer observations to characterize intense crustal magnetic fields, the solar wind interaction with Mars, and ubiquitous proton cyclotron and 1-Hz waves in the upstream solar wind (ion foreshock region). The figure below compiles observations of magnetic fluctuations obtained by MAVEN in near-Mars space. The map of magnetic fluctuations reveals the statistical extent of the magnetosheath, confined between the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up region.

  4. High magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact technology

    DOEpatents

    Wilgen, John [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gail [Oak Ridge, TN; Jaramillo, Roger [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for high magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact treatment of conductive materials in a high magnetic field. A method includes applying a high magnetic field to at least a portion of a conductive material; and applying an inductive magnetic field to at least a fraction of the conductive material to induce a surface current within the fraction of the conductive material, the surface current generating a substantially bi-directional force that defines a vibration. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, the fraction of the conductive material is located within the portion of the conductive material and ohmic heating from the surface current is ohmically decoupled from the vibration. An apparatus includes a high magnetic field coil defining an applied high magnetic field; an inductive magnetic field coil coupled to the high magnetic field coil, the inductive magnetic field coil defining an applied inductive magnetic field; and a processing zone located within both the applied high magnetic field and the applied inductive magnetic field. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, and ohmic heating of a conductive material located in the processing zone is ohmically decoupled from a vibration of the conductive material.

  5. Field effect type devices based on highly doped conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, O.; Park, J. H.; Hsu, F. C.; Chiou, N. R.; Kim, Y. R.; Epstein, A. J.

    2003-03-01

    Field-effect type devices based on the highly doped polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/polystyrene sulfonic acid (PEDOT/PSS) show a reversible change of the source-drain current by several orders of magnitude upon application of appropriate gate voltages. However, the underlying physical mechanism of their operation is little understood so far. A field-effect like operation, dopant ion diffusion, or electrochemical process has been conjectured. In this work, we investigated devices fabricated on glass substrates with polyvinyl phenol and aluminum as dielectric layer and gate, respectively. We applied a saw tooth shaped voltage profile to the gate electrode and a very small source-drain voltage while measuring gate and source-drain currents. These measurements resemble capacitance-voltage measurements used to study the field-effect in inorganic devices as well as cyclic voltammetry used in electrochemical work. Conclusions concerning the operation principle will be discussed. Supported in part by ONR.

  6. Penetration dynamics of a magnetic field pulse into high-? superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, V.; Sinder, M.; Sokolovsky, V.; Goren, S.; Jung, G.; Shter, G. E.; Grader, G. S.

    1996-12-01

    The penetration of a magnetic field pulse into a high-0953-2048/9/12/004/img9 superconducting plate is investigated experimentally and theoretically. It follows from our experiments that the threshold of penetration increases with increasing amplitude and/or decreasing duration of the applied pulse. The penetrating field continues to grow as the applied magnetic field decreases. The peculiarities observed are explained in the framework of the extended critical state model. It appears that the deviations from Bean's classical critical state model are characterized by a parameter equal to the square of the ratio of plate thickness to skin depth. The applicability of the classical critical state model is restricted by the condition that this parameter is much less than 1. This condition is also the criterion for the applicability of pulse methods of critical current measurements.

  7. High frequency high magnetic field response of graphene monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Ivana; Williams, Francis; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Bennaceur, Keyan; Glattli, Christian

    2012-02-01

    We study the electronic magnetotransport in graphene at rf frequencies (5-50GHz). Our aim is to investigate the dynamics of charge carriers in the quantum Hall regime. The graphene sample is placed in a break made in a coplanar waveguide and the transmitted power is measured. In order to isolate the response of the sample from the direct transmission between the input and output waveguides, the graphene electron density distribution is modulated with a side gate and the resulting modulation in the transmitted power detected via a standard lock-in technique. The fixed frequency graphene response as a function of magnetic field reveals two different components. One is symmetric in B and dominates under large side gate voltage, and the other shows reproducible fluctuations revealed only at low gate voltage modulation amplitude. The first part is thought to be related to the bulk conductivity and the fluctuations to the carrier dynamics close to the edge. The amplitude of the fluctuations depends on the trajectory of the carriers, since the parity with respect to magnetic field reversal is not conserved. We thus demonstrate the chiral nature of the transport. We assume that the fluctuations of impedance originate in the scattering from localized states close to the sample edge.

  8. Particle flocculation and filtration by high-gradient magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, S.

    1997-01-01

    Flocculation and filtration of micrometer-sized particles in a high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) were investigated. Experiments were conducted using a cryogenic magnet of 6 Tesla maximum strength. Hematite particles were used for flocculation and filtration experiments. A new approach of using magnetic fields to enhance separation of weakly magnetic particles was also investigated. This approach is based on magnetic seeding which involves flocculation of existing non-magnetic particles with injected paramagnetic particles. A particle-flocculation model was developed based on trajectory analysis. External forces due to gravity and magnetism, and interparticle forces such as electrostatic, hydrodynamic, magnetic dipole, and van der Waals forces, were taken into consideration in these models.

  9. Background information on high voltage fields.

    PubMed

    Janes, D E

    1977-10-01

    The increased demand for power has led to higher voltages for overhead transmission lines. Environmentalists, governmental agencies, and some members of the scientific community have questioned if past biological effects research and experience with lower voltage lines provide adequate bases for predicting the possible health and environmental effects of the higher voltage lines. Only a small amount of work has been done to explore the possible effects, especially long term effects, of the exposure of biological systems to electric fields from transmission lines. Research in Western Europe and the United States has not identified any prompt or acute effects other than spark and electric discharge and no permanent effects. Contrasted with this are the studies of workers in Soviet and Spanish high voltage switchyards that report effects, such as excitability, headaches, drowsiness, fatique, and nausea, that are not found in Soviet line maintenance workers. The results of current and planned research, supported by both U.S. Government agencies and the private sector, should resolve a number of the present uncertanties and provide answers for the many questions concerning potential effects.

  10. Background information on high voltage fields.

    PubMed Central

    Janes, D E

    1977-01-01

    The increased demand for power has led to higher voltages for overhead transmission lines. Environmentalists, governmental agencies, and some members of the scientific community have questioned if past biological effects research and experience with lower voltage lines provide adequate bases for predicting the possible health and environmental effects of the higher voltage lines. Only a small amount of work has been done to explore the possible effects, especially long term effects, of the exposure of biological systems to electric fields from transmission lines. Research in Western Europe and the United States has not identified any prompt or acute effects other than spark and electric discharge and no permanent effects. Contrasted with this are the studies of workers in Soviet and Spanish high voltage switchyards that report effects, such as excitability, headaches, drowsiness, fatique, and nausea, that are not found in Soviet line maintenance workers. The results of current and planned research, supported by both U.S. Government agencies and the private sector, should resolve a number of the present uncertanties and provide answers for the many questions concerning potential effects. PMID:598346

  11. Laboratory and field investigations of marsh edge erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents the laboratory experiments and field observations of marsh edge erosion. The marsh retreat rate in a field study site in Terrebonne Bay, Louisiana, was measured using GPS systems and aerial photographs. The wave environment was also measured in order to correlate the marsh edge...

  12. Evolution of magnetic fields at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibel, E. G.

    2006-06-01

    The origin of magnetic fields in the Universe is a cosmology problem. The evolution of the field is a plasma physics problem. I review these problems and focus on magnetogenesis in accretion disks, specifically, the transition from the Biermann battery, which creates seed fields, to amplification by turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability. In collisional disks, there is a gap between the fieldstrength characteristic of the battery and the fieldstrength necessary to sustain magnetorotational instability, but in collisionless disks the transition occurs at low fieldstrength. Because collisionless disks are generally hot, and have short dynamical times, they are likely to be small. Thus, in the battery scenario, magnetic fields on large scales were built from fields created in many small sources. Simple estimates based on turbulent diffusion suggest that galaxies and the cores of galaxy clusters can be magnetized in this way, but not the intergalactic medium at large. The problem of creating a large-scale field remains unsolved.

  13. High-temperature superconductor antenna investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasack, Vincent G.

    1990-01-01

    The use of superconductors to increase antenna radiation efficiency and gain is examined. Although the gain of all normal-metal antennas can be increased through the use of superconductors, some structures have greater potential for practical improvement than others. Some structures suffer a great degradation in bandwidth when replaced with superconductors, while for others the improvement in efficiency is trivial due to the minimal contribution of the conductor loss mechanism to the total losses, or the already high efficiency of the structure. The following antennas and related structures are discussed: electrically small antennas, impedance matching of antennas, microstrip antennas, microwave and millimeter-wave antenna arrays, and superdirective arrays. The greatest potential practical improvements occur for large microwave and millimeter-wave arrays and the impedance matching of antennas.

  14. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high ζ scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-01

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment—Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called ζ, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-ζ operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  15. Investigation of Spherical-Wave-Initiated Flow Fields Around Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Donald R.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity flow fields and vortex movements have been made about various simple blunt models undergoing spherical blast waves with a positive overpressure of 4 pounds per square inch. A bullet-optical method was used to determine flow velocities and is applied to velocity fields in which the gradients are largely normal to the free-stream direction. The velocity flow fields are shown at various flow times following passage of the blast front for different models. Vortex movements with time are compared for square-bar models of various aspect ratios. Corner sharpness had no discernible effect on the overall disturbed velocity fields or vortex movements for the square-box models used.

  16. Theoretical investigation of hyperfine field parameters through mossbauer gamma ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Sikander; Hashim, Mohd

    2012-06-05

    When a Mossbauer gamma-ray emitting or absorbing nucleus is placed in a crystalline environment, the quadrupole moment of the nucleus interacts with the electric field gradient set up by the ligands around it. In the transition |7/2>{yields}|5/2> twelve lines are obtained. Applying the multipole radiation field theory and density matrix formalism, the determinant of coherency matrix, intensity and degree of polarization have been calculated for each line.

  17. Atomic Hydrogen as High-Precision Field Standard for High-Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Stefan; Ozarowski, Andrew; Britt, R. David; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We introduce atomic hydrogen trapped in an octaisobutylsilsesquioxane nanocage (H@iBuT8) as a new molecular high-precision magnetic field standard for high-field EPR spectroscopy of organic radicals and other systems with signals around g = 2. Its solid-state EPR spectrum consists of two narrow lines separated by about 51 mT and centered at g ≈ 2. The isotropic g factor is 2.00294(3) and essentially temperature independent. The isotopic 1H hyperfine coupling constant is 1416.8(2) MHz below 70 K and decreases slightly with increasing temperature to 1413.7(1) MHz at room temperature. The spectrum of the standard does not overlap with those of most organic radicals, and it can be easily prepared and is stable at room temperature. PMID:20813570

  18. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of High-Brightness Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-11-30

    Theoretical and computational investigations of adiabatic thermal beams have been carried out in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research and for various applications such as light sources. Most accelerator applications require high-brightness beams. This is true for high-energy accelerators such as linear colliders. It is also true for energy recovery linacs (ERLs) and free electron lasers (FELs) such as x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from February 1, 2013 to November 30, 2013 were: a) Completion of a preliminary theoretical and computational study of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow (Mok, 2013); and b) Presentation of an invited paper entitled ?Adiabatic Thermal Beams in a Periodic Focusing Field? at Space Charge 2013 Workshop, CERN, April 16-19, 2013 (Chen, 2013). In this report, an introductory background for the research project is provided. Basic theory of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow is reviewed. Results of simulation studies of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flows are discussed.

  19. 7 CFR 12.22 - Highly erodible field determination criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of changing field boundaries. When field boundaries are changed to include areas of land that were... Section 12.22 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.22 Highly erodible field determination criteria....

  20. Investigation of mechanosensation in C. elegans using light field calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Michael; Elmi, Muna; Pawar, Vijay; Srinivasan, Mandayam A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new experimental approach to investigate touch sensation in the model organism C. elegans using light field deconvolution microscopy. By combining fast volumetric image acquisition with controlled indentation of the organism using a high sensitivity force transducer, we are able to simultaneously measure activity in multiple touch receptor neurons expressing the calcium ion indicator GCaMP6s. By varying the applied mechanical stimulus we show how this method can be used to quantify touch sensitivity in C. elegans. We describe some of the challenges of performing light field calcium imaging in moving samples and demonstrate that they can be overcome by simple data processing. PMID:27446713

  1. Aqueous foams: a field of investigation at the frontier between chemistry and physics.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Dominique

    2008-03-14

    This paper reviews the properties of aqueous foams. The current state of knowledge is summarized briefly and the interdisciplinary aspects of this field of investigation are emphasized. Many phenomena are controlled by physical laws, but they are highly dependent upon the chemicals used as foam stabilizers: surfactants, polymers, particles. Most of the existing work is related to surfactants and polymer foams, and little is known yet for particle foams although research in this field is becoming popular. This article presents the general concepts used to describe the monolayers and the films and also some of the recent advances being made in this area.

  2. Threats to ultra-high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2009-08-01

    In 2004 the European Commission (EC) adopted a directive restricting occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. This directive (2004/40/CE), which examines the possible health risks of the electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other devices, concluded that upper limits on radiation and applied electromagnetic fields are necessary to prevent workers from suffering any undue acute health effects. But although not initially intended, the biggest impact of the directive could be on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is used in hospitals worldwide to produce images of unrivalled quality of the brain and other soft tissues.

  3. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%–60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%–36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  4. A high-field superferric NMR magnet.

    PubMed

    Huson, F R; Bryan, R N; MacKay, W W; Herrick, R C; Colvin, J; Ford, J J; Pissanetzky, S; Plishker, G A; Rocha, R; Schmidt, W

    1993-01-01

    Strong, extensive magnetic fringe fields are a significant problem with magnetic resonance imaging magnets. This is particularly acute with 4-T, whole-body research magnets. To date this problem has been addressed by restricting an extensive zone around the unshielded magnet or by placing external unsaturated iron shielding around the magnet. This paper describes a solution to this problem which uses superconducting coils closely integrated with fully saturated iron elements. A 4-T, 30-cm-bore prototype, based on this design principle, was built and tested. The 5 G fringe field is contained within 1 meter of the magnet bore along the z axis. Homogeneity of the raw magnetic field is 10 ppm over 30% of the magnet's diameter after passive shimming. Compared with an unshielded magnet, 20% less superconductor is required to generate the magnetic field. Images and spectra are presented to demonstrate the magnet's viability for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

  5. High-resolution geomagnetic field modeling and forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukhovitskaya, Veronika

    2010-12-01

    We use geomagnetic observatory data, survey data and satellite data from the CHAMP, Oersted, MAGSAT, DE-2 and POGO missions to derive two time-dependent spherical harmonic models of Earth's magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary: one for the years 1957-2009 and the other for the years 2001-2009 (in order to investigate the limits of core field resolution with the most recent, highly accurate data). We pay particular attention to observatory and satellite data analysis and to spatial and temporal data distributions in order to separate external and internal fields. Our approach is to produce models with varying spatial roughness and to examine them with respect to correlations with known structures of core and crustal fields. The final models are consistent with other main field models in their general structure, but show differences predominantly in places where main field features are known to be complex (e.g. the South Atlantic Anomaly). Thus, the models reveal a more detailed spatial and temporal structure of the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary. Such high-resolution models can be used to infer small-scale core surface flows and core dynamics. We use the 1957-2009 geomagnetic field model to derive time-dependent core flow models and produce hindcasts of the Earth's main magnetic field. The goal of this study is to explore whether we can accurately forecast changes in geomagnetic secular variation by advecting core-surface flows forward in time and accounting for torsional oscillations. We compare hindcasts produced over different time intervals and computed from steady and time-varying core flow models, and also consider differently parametrized core flows (such as steady flow, steadily accelerated flow and steadily accelerated flow with torsional oscillations). We find that the steadily accelerated flow plus torsional oscillations is able to accurately reproduce changes in the Earth's magnetic field for short-term (5 years) and medium-term (13

  6. Magnetic field investigations during ROSETTA's 2867 Šteins flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auster, H. U.; Richter, I.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Berghofer, G.; Carr, C. M.; Motschmann, U.

    2010-07-01

    During the 2867 Šteins flyby of the ROSETTA spacecraft on September 5, 2008 magnetic field measurements have been made with both the RPC orbiter magnetometer and the ROMAP lander magnetometer. These combined magnetic field measurements allow a detailed examination of any magnetic signatures caused either directly by the asteroid or indirectly by Šteins' different modes of interaction with the solar wind. Comparing measurements with simulation results show that Šteins does not posses a significant remanent magnetization. The magnetization is estimated at less than 10 -3 A m 2/kg. This is significantly different from results at 9969 Braille and 951 Gaspra.

  7. An investigation into the induced electric fields from transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadimani, Ravi; Lee, Erik; Duffy, Walter; Waris, Mohammed; Siddiqui, Waquar; Islam, Faisal; Rajamani, Mahesh; Nathan, Ryan; Jiles, David; David C Jiles Team; Walter Duffy Collaboration

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for noninvasive brain stimulation that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of major depressive disorder. To stimulate the brain, TMS uses large, transient pulses of magnetic field to induce an electric field in the head. This transient magnetic field is large enough to cause the depolarization of cortical neurons and initiate a synaptic signal transmission. For this study, 50 unique head models were created from MRI images. Previous simulation studies have primarily used a single head model, and thus give a limited image of the induced electric field from TMS. This study uses finite element analysis simulations on 50 unique, heterogeneous head models to better investigate the relationship between TMS and the electric field induced in brain tissues. Results showed a significant variation in the strength of the induced electric field in the brain, which can be reasonably predicted by the distance from the TMS coil to the stimulated brain. Further, it was seen that some models had high electric field intensities in over five times as much brain volume as other models.

  8. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  9. Extending methods: using Bourdieu's field analysis to further investigate taste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindel Dimick, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    In this commentary on Per Anderhag, Per-Olof Wickman and Karim Hamza's article Signs of taste for science, I consider how their study is situated within the concern for the role of science education in the social and cultural production of inequality. Their article provides a finely detailed methodology for analyzing the constitution of taste within science education classrooms. Nevertheless, because the authors' socially situated methodology draws upon Bourdieu's theories, it seems equally important to extend these methods to consider how and why students make particular distinctions within a relational context—a key aspect of Bourdieu's theory of cultural production. By situating the constitution of taste within Bourdieu's field analysis, researchers can explore the ways in which students' tastes and social positionings are established and transformed through time, space, place, and their ability to navigate the field. I describe the process of field analysis in relation to the authors' paper and suggest that combining the authors' methods with a field analysis can provide a strong methodological and analytical framework in which theory and methods combine to create a detailed understanding of students' interest in relation to their context.

  10. Irradiation of graphene field effect transistors with highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, P.; Kozubek, R.; Madauß, L.; Sonntag, J.; Lorke, A.; Schleberger, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, graphene field-effect transistors are used to detect defects due to irradiation with slow, highly charged ions. In order to avoid contamination effects, a dedicated ultra-high vacuum set up has been designed and installed for the in situ cleaning and electrical characterization of graphene field-effect transistors during irradiation. To investigate the electrical and structural modifications of irradiated graphene field-effect transistors, their transfer characteristics as well as the corresponding Raman spectra are analyzed as a function of ion fluence for two different charge states. The irradiation experiments show a decreasing mobility with increasing fluences. The mobility reduction scales with the potential energy of the ions. In comparison to Raman spectroscopy, the transport properties of graphene show an extremely high sensitivity with respect to ion irradiation: a significant drop of the mobility is observed already at fluences below 15 ions/μm2, which is more than one order of magnitude lower than what is required for Raman spectroscopy.

  11. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an "all-or-none" manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  12. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an “all-or-none” manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  13. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  14. Polarized neutron reflectometry in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    2005-11-15

    A simple method is described to maintain the polarization of a neutron beam on its way through the large magnetic stray fields produced by a vertical field of a cryomagnet with a split-coil geometry. The two key issues are the proper shielding of the neutron spin flippers and an additional radial field component in order to guide the neutron spin through the region of the null point (i.e., point of reversal for the vertical field component). Calculations of the neutron's spin rotation as well as polarized neutron reflectometry experiments on an ErFe{sub 2}/DyFe{sub 2} multilayer show the perfect performance of the used setup. The recently commissioned cryomagnet M5 with a maximum vertical field of up to 7.2 T in asymmetric mode for polarized neutrons and 9 T in symmetric mode for unpolarized neutrons was used on the C5 spectrometer in reflectometry mode, at the NRU reactor in Chalk River, Canada.

  15. An X-ray Investigation of the NGC 346 Field in the SMC (2): The Field Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naze, Y.; Hartwell, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Manfroid, J.; Marchenko. S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Skalkowski, G.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a Chandra observation of the NGC 346 cluster, the ionizing source of N66, the most luminous H II region and the largest star formation region in the SMC. In the first part of this investigation, we have analysed the X-ray properties of the cluster itself and the remarkable star HD 5980. But the field contains additional objects of interest. In total, 79 X-ray point sources were detected in the Chandra observation and we investigate here their characteristics in details. The sources possess rather high HRs, and their cumulative luminosity function is steeper than the SMC's trend. Their absorption columns suggest that most of the sources belong to NGC 346. Using new UBVRI imaging with the ESO 2.2m telescope, we also discovered possible counterparts for 36 of these X-ray sources. Finally, some objects show X-ray and/or optical variability, and thus need further monitoring.

  16. High critical field NbC superconductor on carbon spheres.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Pati, Satya Prakash; Maity, Arjun

    2016-06-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) nanoparticles embedded on the surface of carbon spheres (CS) were synthesized at 1350 °C by the carbothermal reduction of niobium oxide precursor in flowing argon (Nbc@CS). The morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the hybrid nanocomposite were investigated by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and a superconducting quantum interference device. It was found that the NbC@CS nanocomposites exhibit type-II superconductivity with a critical temperature (Tc) of 8-12 K, typical for stoichiometric NbC. The superconducting hysteresis loop reveals several interesting traits, including strong vortex pinning, the presence of asymmetry and a high penetration field. Moreover, the sample shows much improved irreversible (Hirr), lower (Hc1) and upper (Hc2) critical fields. The coherence length (ξ), penetration depth (λ), and Ginzburg-Landau (κ) parameters for the sample were estimated to be 9.78 nm, 33 nm and 3.39, respectively.

  17. 7 CFR 12.22 - Highly erodible field determination criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Highly erodible field determination criteria. 12.22 Section 12.22 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.22 Highly erodible field determination criteria....

  18. 7 CFR 12.22 - Highly erodible field determination criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Highly erodible field determination criteria. 12.22 Section 12.22 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.22 Highly erodible field determination criteria....

  19. 7 CFR 12.22 - Highly erodible field determination criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Highly erodible field determination criteria. 12.22 Section 12.22 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.22 Highly erodible field determination criteria....

  20. 7 CFR 12.22 - Highly erodible field determination criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Highly erodible field determination criteria. 12.22 Section 12.22 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture HIGHLY ERODIBLE LAND AND WETLAND CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.22 Highly erodible field determination criteria....

  1. High-field superconducting nested coil magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverick, C.; Lobell, G. M.

    1970-01-01

    Superconducting magnet, employed in conjunction with five types of superconducting cables in a nested solenoid configuration, produces total, central magnetic field strengths approaching 70 kG. The multiple coils permit maximum information on cable characteristics to be gathered from one test.

  2. Enzyme Substrate Reactions in High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Maling, J. E.; Weissbluth, M.; Jacobs, E. E.

    1965-01-01

    The reaction rates of two enzyme substrate systems, ribonuclease-RNA and succinate-cytochrome c reductase, were followed as a function of magnetic field from zero to 48,000 gauss. The reaction rates remained constant to within 10 per cent. PMID:5884011

  3. Field investigation source area ST58 old Quartermaster service station, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Liikala, T.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Source area ST58 is the site of the old Quartermaster service station at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The source area is one of several Source Evaluation Report sites being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Air Force as candidates for no further remedial action, interim removal action, or a remedial investigation/feasibility study under a Federal Facilities Agreement. The purpose of this work was to characterize source area ST58 and excavate the most contaminated soils for use in composting treatability studies. A field investigation was conducted to determine the nature and extent of soil contamination. The field investigation entailed a records search; grid node location, surface geophysical, and soil gas surveys; and test pit soil sampling. Soil excavation followed based on the results of the field investigation. The site was backfilled with clean soil. Results from this work indicate close spatial correlation between screening instruments, used during the field investigation and soil excavation, and laboratory analyses. Gasoline was identified as the main subsurface contaminant based on the soil gas surveys and test pit soil sampling. A center of contamination was located near the northcentral portion of the source area, and a center was located in the northwestern comer. The contamination typically occurred near or below a former soil horizon probably as a result of surface spills and leaks from discontinuities and/or breaks in the underground piping. Piping locations were delineated during the surface geophysical surveys and corresponded very well to unscaled drawings of the site. The high subsurface concentrations of gasoline detected in the northwestern comer of the source area probably reflect ground-water contamination and/or possibly floating product.

  4. Investigation of defect-induced abnormal body current in fin field-effect-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kuan-Ju; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Yang, Ren-Ya; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung

    2015-08-24

    This letter investigates the mechanism of abnormal body current at the linear region in n-channel high-k/metal gate stack fin field effect transistors. Unlike body current, which is generated by impact ionization at high drain voltages, abnormal body current was found to increase with decreasing drain voltages. Notably, the unusual body leakage only occurs in three-dimensional structure devices. Based on measurements under different operation conditions, the abnormal body current can be attributed to fin surface defect-induced leakage current, and the mechanism is electron tunneling to the fin via the defects, resulting in holes left at the body terminal.

  5. Investigation of a high power electromagnetic pulse source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Chen, Dongqun; Zhang, Jiande; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2012-09-01

    A high power electromagnetic pulse source with a resonant antenna driven by a compact power supply was investigated in this paper. To match the impedance of the resonant antenna and initial power source, a compact power conditioning circuit based on electro exploding opening switch (EEOS) and pulsed transformer was adopted. In the preliminary experiments, an impulse capacitor was used to drive the system. With the opening of the EEOS at the current of 15 kA flowing trough the primary of the transformer, the resonant antenna was rapidly charged to about -370 kV within a time of about 100 ns. When the switch in the resonant antenna closed at the charging voltage of about -202 kV, the peak intensity of the detected electric field at a distance of about 10 m from the center of the source was 7.2 kV/m. The corresponding peak power of the radiated electromagnetic field reached 76 MW, while the total radiated electromagnetic energy was about 0.65 J. The total energy efficiency of the resonant antenna was about 22% which can be improved by increasing the closing rapidity of the switch in the antenna.

  6. Investigation of a high power electromagnetic pulse source.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Chen, Dongqun; Zhang, Jiande; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2012-09-01

    A high power electromagnetic pulse source with a resonant antenna driven by a compact power supply was investigated in this paper. To match the impedance of the resonant antenna and initial power source, a compact power conditioning circuit based on electro exploding opening switch (EEOS) and pulsed transformer was adopted. In the preliminary experiments, an impulse capacitor was used to drive the system. With the opening of the EEOS at the current of 15 kA flowing trough the primary of the transformer, the resonant antenna was rapidly charged to about -370 kV within a time of about 100 ns. When the switch in the resonant antenna closed at the charging voltage of about -202 kV, the peak intensity of the detected electric field at a distance of about 10 m from the center of the source was 7.2 kV∕m. The corresponding peak power of the radiated electromagnetic field reached 76 MW, while the total radiated electromagnetic energy was about 0.65 J. The total energy efficiency of the resonant antenna was about 22% which can be improved by increasing the closing rapidity of the switch in the antenna. PMID:23020399

  7. Spectral investigation of nonlinear local field effects in Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Rodrigo Takeda, Yoshihiko; Ohnuma, Masato; Oyoshi, Keiji

    2015-03-21

    The capability of Ag nanoparticles to modulate their optical resonance condition, by optical nonlinearity, without an external feedback system was experimentally demonstrated. These optical nonlinearities were studied in the vicinity of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), using femtosecond pump-and-probe spectroscopy with a white-light continuum probe. Transient transmission changes ΔT/T exhibited strong photon energy and particle size dependence and showed a complex and non-monotonic change with increasing pump light intensity. Peak position and change of sign redshift with increasing pump light intensity demonstrate the modulation of the LSPR. These features are discussed in terms of the intrinsic feedback via local field enhancement.

  8. ASTEROSEISMIC INVESTIGATION OF KNOWN PLANET HOSTS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Arentoft, T.; Frandsen, S.; Quirion, P.-O.; Brown, T. M.; Gilliland, R. L.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J. M.

    2010-04-20

    In addition to its great potential for characterizing extra-solar planetary systems, the Kepler Mission is providing unique data on stellar oscillations. A key aspect of Kepler asteroseismology is the application to solar-like oscillations of main-sequence stars. As an example, we here consider an initial analysis of data for three stars in the Kepler field for which planetary transits were known from ground-based observations. For one of these, HAT-P-7, we obtain a detailed frequency spectrum and hence strong constraints on the stellar properties. The remaining two stars show definite evidence for solar-like oscillations, yielding a preliminary estimate of their mean densities.

  9. A Field Course Investigation of a Pembrokeshire River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    The river was investigated at six stations from source to estuary. Modifications of water quality and aquatic communities are related to man's activities in the river basin. The organization of the exercise and the method employed are described. (Author/BB)

  10. Echoes from the Field: An Ethnographic Investigation of Outdoor Science Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxerman, Jonathan Zvi

    2013-01-01

    As popular as field trips are, one might think they have been well-studied. Nonetheless, field trips have not been heavily studied, and little research has mapped what actually transpires during field trips. Accordingly, to address this research gap, I asked two related research questions. The first question is a descriptive one: What happens on…

  11. GRACE gravity field modeling with an investigation on correlation between nuisance parameters and gravity field coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan; Cai, Hua; Liu, Xianglin

    2011-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) monthly gravity models have been independently produced and published by several research institutions, such as Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS). According to their processing standards, above institutions use the traditional variational approach except that the DEOS exploits the acceleration approach. The background force models employed are rather similar. The produced gravity field models generally agree with one another in the spatial pattern. However, there are some discrepancies in the gravity signal amplitude between solutions produced by different institutions. In particular, 10%-30% signal amplitude differences in some river basins can be observed. In this paper, we implemented a variant of the traditional variational approach and computed two sets of monthly gravity field solutions using the data from January 2005 to December 2006. The input data are K-band range-rates (KBRR) and kinematic orbits of GRACE satellites. The main difference in the production of our two types of models is how to deal with nuisance parameters. This type of parameters is necessary to absorb low-frequency errors in the data, which are mainly the aliasing and instrument errors. One way is to remove the nuisance parameters before estimating the geopotential coefficients, called NPARB approach in the paper. The other way is to estimate the nuisance parameters and geopotential coefficients simultaneously, called NPESS approach. These two types of solutions mainly differ in geopotential coefficients from degree 2 to 5. This can be explained by the fact that the nuisance parameters and the gravity field coefficients are highly correlated, particularly at low degrees. We compare these solutions with the official and published ones by means of spectral analysis. It is

  12. Echoes from the Field: An Ethnographic Investigation of Outdoor Science Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxerman, Jonathan Zvi

    As popular as field trips are, one might think they have been well-studied. Nonetheless, field trips have not been heavily studied, and little research has mapped what actually transpires during field trips. Accordingly, to address this research gap, I asked two related research questions. The first question is a descriptive one: What happens on field trips? The second question is explanatory: What field trip events are memorable and why? I employed design research and ethnographic methodologies to study learning in naturally occurring contexts. I collaborated with middle-school science teachers to design and implement more than a dozen field trips. The field trips were nested in particular biology and earth sciences focal units. Students were tasked with making scientific observations in the field and then analyzing this data during classroom activities. Audio and video recording devices captured what happened during the field trips, classroom activities and discussions, and the interviews. I conducted comparative microanalysis of videotaped interactions. I observed dozens of events during the field trips that reverberated across time and place. I characterize the features of these events and the objects that drew interest. Then, I trace the residue across contexts. This study suggests that field trips could be more than one-off experiences and have the potential to be resources to seed and enrich learning and to augment interest in the practice of science.

  13. Simulation of radiolysis in the near field of a nuclear repository and the spectrophotometric investigation of the formation of radiolysis by-products by applying high energy beam-like experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, T.; Paviet-Hartmann, P.; Wetteland, C. J.; Lu, N.; Ware, S. D.; Sage, S.

    2002-01-01

    In the event of inundation of a nuclear waste repository located in a geological salt formation, chloride brines in contact with nuclear waste will be exposed to different kind of radiation depending on waste-form conditions. Ionizing radiations, however, have the ability to significantly affect the groundwater chemistry of the brines through the formation of free radicals, ionic- and molecular species; among them the typical byproducts of a-radiolysis: hypochlorite (OC1-) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). In the absence of effects which arc supposed to dominate the redox conditions in the repository (corrosion of metals, microbial activity) the presence of OC1- is known to increase the redox potential of the brines and further to influence the stability of actinide waste-forms by accelerating their dissolution arid - most importantly - to oxidize actinides to their higlier oxidation states, whicli are gcncrally the most soluble ones. We are presenting a new approach to determine the radiation-induced formation rates of hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid as a first step to assess long-term steady-state repository conditions. To ovt:rcome the serious constraints of conventional radiocheinical work with GBq activity levels, we are simulating a-irradiation of chloride brines by the adaptation of ion-beam-line experiments. Therefore, we irradiate liquid chloride brine targets with 5 MeV protons, and 5 MeV helium ions. The irradiation-induced formation rates of OCX- and HOC1 were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. To give an example, the measured G values for the HOCl formation in 3.7 M MgC12.6H20, pW 4.42, irradiated by 5 MeV protons was determined to be 0.0374 {+-} 0.0022, and 0.0536 {+-} 49 by irradiating with 5 MeV helium. The distinguished ltnowledge about the radiation-induced production of oxo-chloride species is the first step towards the assumption of their steady-state concentrations in the irradiation field of the repository.

  14. First Investigation on the Radiation Field of the Spherical Hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Huo, Wen Yi; Li, Zhichao; Chen, Yao-Hua; Xie, Xuefei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Ren, Guoli; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Lifei; Du, Huabing; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Chaoguang; Zhan, Xiayu; Yuan, Guanghui; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Huang, Lizhen; Du, Kai; Zhao, Runchang; Li, Ping; Wang, Wei; Su, Jingqin; Ding, Yongkun; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    The first spherical hohlraum energetics experiment is accomplished on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. In the experiment, the radiation temperature is measured by using an array of flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRDs) through a laser entrance hole at four different angles. The radiation temperature and M-band fraction inside the hohlraum are determined by the shock wave technique. The experimental observations indicate that the radiation temperatures measured by the FXRDs depend on the observation angles and are related to the view field. According to the experimental results, the conversion efficiency of the vacuum spherical hohlraum is in the range from 60% to 80%. Although this conversion efficiency is less than the conversion efficiency of the near vacuum hohlraum on the National Ignition Facility, it is consistent with that of the cylindrical hohlraums used on the NOVA and the SGIII-prototype at the same energy scale. PMID:27447512

  15. Results of investigation at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.B. )

    1990-04-01

    The Ahuachapan Geothermal Field (AGF) is a 95 megawatt geothemal-sourced power-plant operated by the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) of El Salvador. During the past decade, as part of an effort to increase in situ thermal reserves in order to realize the full generation capacity of the AGF, extensive surface geophysical coverage has been obtained over the AGF and the prospective Chipilapa area to the east. The geophysical surveys were performed to determine physical property characteristics of the known reservoir and then to search for similar characteristics in the Chipilapa area. A secondary objective was to evaluate the surface recharge area in the highlands to the south of the AGF. The principal surface electrical geophysical methods used during this period were DC resistivity and magnetotellurics. Three available data sets have been reinterpreted using drillhole control to help form geophysical models of the area. The geophysical models are compared with the geologic interpretations.

  16. First Investigation on the Radiation Field of the Spherical Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wen Yi; Li, Zhichao; Chen, Yao-Hua; Xie, Xuefei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Ren, Guoli; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Lifei; Du, Huabing; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Chaoguang; Zhan, Xiayu; Yuan, Guanghui; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Huang, Lizhen; Du, Kai; Zhao, Runchang; Li, Ping; Wang, Wei; Su, Jingqin; Ding, Yongkun; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    The first spherical hohlraum energetics experiment is accomplished on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. In the experiment, the radiation temperature is measured by using an array of flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRDs) through a laser entrance hole at four different angles. The radiation temperature and M -band fraction inside the hohlraum are determined by the shock wave technique. The experimental observations indicate that the radiation temperatures measured by the FXRDs depend on the observation angles and are related to the view field. According to the experimental results, the conversion efficiency of the vacuum spherical hohlraum is in the range from 60% to 80%. Although this conversion efficiency is less than the conversion efficiency of the near vacuum hohlraum on the National Ignition Facility, it is consistent with that of the cylindrical hohlraums used on the NOVA and the SGIII-prototype at the same energy scale.

  17. Numerical investigation of high pressure and high Reynolds diffusion flame using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichkoohi, Ali Lohrasbi; Tousi, Abolghasem Mesgarpour

    2014-10-01

    Today, with nonstop improvement in computational power, Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is a high demanding research tool for predicting engineering flows. Such flows on high pressure condition like diesel engines is extensively employed in ground and marine transportation, oblige the designer to control and predict toxic pollutants, while maintaining or improving their high thermal efficiency. This becomes one of the main challenging issues in decades. In the present work, numerical investigation of diffusion flame dynamics is performed in the near-field of high-Reynolds jet flow on high pressure condition encountered in diesel engine applications. This work discusses the implementation of Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) combustion model by the approaches of large eddy simulation (LES). The simulation results show that LES, in comparison with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation predicts and captures transient phenomena very well. These phenomena such as unsteadiness and curvature are inherent in the near-field of high Reynolds diffusion flame. The outcomes of this research are compared and validated by other researchers' results. Detailed comparisons of the statistics show good agreement with the corresponding experiments.

  18. An X-ray Investigation of the NGC 346 Field in the SMC (2): The Field Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naze, Y.; Hartwell, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Manfroid, J.; Marchenko, S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Skalkowski, G.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a Chandra observation of the NGC 346 cluster, which is the ionizing source of N66, the most luminous HII region and the largest star formation region in the SMC. In the first part of this investigation, we have analysed the X-ray properties of the cluster itself and the remarkable star HD 5980. But the field contains additional objects of interest. In total, 79 X-ray point sources were detected in the Chandra observation: this is more than five times the number of sources detected by previous X-ray surveys. We investigate here their characteristics in detail. The sources possess rather high hardness ratios, and their cumulative luminosity function is steeper than that for the rest of the SMC at higher .luminosities. Their absorption columns suggest that most of the sources belong to NGC346. Using new UBV RI imaging with the ESO 2.2m telescope, we also discovered possible counterparts for 36 of these X-ray sources and estimated a B spectral type for a large number of these counterparts. This tends to suggest that most of the X-ray sources in the field are in fact X-ray binaries. Finally, some objects show X-ray and/or optical variability, with a need for further monitoring.

  19. Fractional field equations for highly improbable events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, H.

    2013-06-01

    Free and weakly interacting particles perform approximately Gaussian random walks with collisions. They follow a second-quantized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, or relativistic versions of it. By contrast, the fields of strongly interacting particles extremize more involved effective actions obeying fractional wave equations with anomalous dimensions. Their particle orbits perform universal Lévy walks with heavy tails, in which rare events are much more frequent than in Gaussian random walks. Such rare events are observed in exceptionally strong windgusts, monster or rogue waves, earthquakes, and financial crashes. While earthquakes may destroy entire cities, the latter have the potential of devastating entire economies.

  20. Vortex telegraph noise in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shung, E.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Coppersmith, S.N.; Crabtree, G.W.; Kwok, W.

    1997-11-01

    We cool untwinned single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} with columnar defects down to liquid-He temperatures and study the development of pinning in the strongly interacting Bose glass with local Hall-probe magnetometry. We are able to resolve discrete fluctuations in the local vortex density resulting from reconfigurations of the vortex assembly between metastable states nearby in energy. By varying the applied magnetic field, and therefore the mean vortex density, we gain microscopic information about vortex-vortex interactions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Field investigation of FGD system chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, S.T.; Colley, J.D.; Glover, R.L.; Maller, G.; Behrens, G.P.

    1984-12-01

    Three full-scale wet limestone FGD systems were investigated to gain a better understanding of FGD system operation and chemistry. The three plants which participated in the program were South Mississippi Electric Power Association's R. D. Morrow Station, Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Craig Station, and Central Illinois Light Company's Duck Creek Station. Each FGD system was characterized with respect to SO/sub 2/ removal, liquid and solid phase chemistry, and calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate relative saturation. Mist eliminator chemistry and performance were documented at Morrow and Duck Creek. Solutions to severe mist eliminator scaling and pluggage were demonstrated at Duck Creek. A technical and econ

  2. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Wang

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  3. Atoms and plasmas in a high-magnetic-field trap

    SciTech Connect

    Raithel, G.; Knuffman, B.; Shah, M. H.; Hempel, C.; Paradis, E.; Mhaskar, R.; Zhang, X.; Choi, J.-H.; Povilus, A. P.; Guest, J. R.

    2008-08-08

    We investigate cold rubidium plasmas in a particle trap that has the unique capability to simultaneously laser-cool and trap neutral atoms as well as to confine plasmas in magnetic fields of about three Tesla. The atom trap is a high-field Ioffe-Pritchard laser trap, while the plasma trap is a Ioffe-Penning trap that traps electrons and ions in separate wells. The observed plasma dynamics is characterized by a breathing-mode oscillation of the positive (ionic) plasma component, which feeds back on the behavior of the negative (electron) component of the plasma. At higher densities, the observed oscillations become nonlinear. The electron component has been found to undergo rapid cooling. We further report on the recombination of magnetized plasmas into Rydberg atoms in transient traps and quasi-steady-state traps. In transient traps, large numbers of recombined Rydberg atoms in high-lying states are observed. In quasi-steady-state traps, the measured numbers of recombined atoms are lower and the binding energies higher.

  4. Final Report: Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Plasma Wake-Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.

    1997-10-31

    We discuss the exploration of the newly proposed blowout regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator and advanced photoinjector technology for linear collider applications. The plasma wakefield experiment at ANL produced several ground-breaking results in the physics of the blowout regime. The photoinjector R and D effort produced breakthroughs in theoretical, computational, and experimental methods in high brightness beam physics. Results have been published.

  5. A compact high field magnetic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibiao; Wang, Ze; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-12-01

    We present the design and performance of a simple and compact magnetic force microscope (MFM), whose tip-sample coarse approach is implemented by the piezoelectric tube scanner (PTS) itself. In brief, a square rod shaft is axially spring-clamped on the inner wall of a metal tube which is glued inside the free end of the PTS. The shaft can thus be driven by the PTS to realize image scan and inertial stepping coarse approach. To enhance the inertial force, each of the four outer electrodes of the PTS is driven by an independent port of the controller. The MFM scan head is so compact that it can easily fit into the 52mm low temperature bore of a 20T superconducting magnet. The performance of the MFM is demonstrated by imaging a manganite thin film at low temperature and in magnetic fields up to 15T. PMID:25189114

  6. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. ); Medina, V. . Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Porous-floor Effects on Cavity Flow Fields at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a passive-venting system to modify the flow field characteristics of a rectangular-box cavity at supersonic speeds. The passive-venting system consists of a porous floor with a vent chamber beneath the floor. For certain cavity length-to-height ratios, this configuration allowed high-pressure air at the rear of the cavity to vent to the forward part of the cavity, thereby modifying the cavity flow field. The wind-tunnel model consisted of a flat plate that housed a cavity mounted on a balance such that only the cavity drag was measured. The cavity height remained constant, and the length varied with rectangular-block inserts. Both solid-and porous-floor cavities were tested for comparison at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.90, 2.16, and 2.86. These results showed that the passive-venting system did modify the cavity flow field. In order to determine the type flow field which existed for the porous-floor configuration, pressures were measured inside the cavity at the same conditions and for the same configurations as those used in the drag tests. Pressure data were also obtained with stores mounted in the cavity. These results, along with Schlieren photographs and the tabulated data, are presented to document the porous-floor cavity flow field.

  8. Development of Point Doppler Velocimetry for Flow Field Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavone, Angelo A.; Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2006-01-01

    A Point Doppler Velocimeter (pDv) has been developed using a vapor-limited iodine cell as the sensing medium. The iodine cell is utilized to directly measure the Doppler shift frequency of laser light scattered from submicron particles suspended within a fluid flow. The measured Doppler shift can then be used to compute the velocity of the particles, and hence the fluid. Since this approach does not require resolution of scattered light from individual particles, the potential exists to obtain temporally continuous signals that could be uniformly sampled in the manner as a hot wire anemometer. This leads to the possibility of obtaining flow turbulence power spectra without the limitations of fringe-type laser velocimetry. The development program consisted of a methodical investigation of the technology coupled with the solution of practical engineering problems to produce a usable measurement system. The paper outlines this development along with the evaluation of the resulting system as compared to primary standards and other measurement technologies.

  9. Field investigation of airborne radioactivity anomalies in Marquette County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Harold L.

    1950-01-01

    The broad radioactivity anomalies recorded by the airborne detector in the vicinity of Republic, Marquette County, Michigan, coincide rather closely with parts of a granitic complex chiefly of Archean age. Ground examination of the rock in these areas of high radioactivity shows that the granitic rock typically yields two to four times the normal background activity. Fissures, shear zones, veins, and pegmatites were tested carefully. None exhibited activity higher than that of the adjacent granitic rock. It is significant that the zones of more-than-average radio-activity are related to the larger elements of the geology - in fact, the information will be of considerable value in reconsideration of some of the regional problems.

  10. Seismic investigations for high resolution exploration ahead and around boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksch, Katrin; Giese, Ruediger; Kopf, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Deep reservoirs usually will be explored with a surface seismic survey often in combination with borehole seismic measurements like VSP or SWD which can improve the velocity model of the underground. Reservoirs especially in geothermal fields are often characterized by small-scale structures. Additionally, with depth the need for exploration methods with a high resolution increases because standard methods like borehole seismic measurements cannot improve their resolution with depth. To localize structures with more accuracy methods with higher resolution in the range of meters are necessary. Within the project SPWD - Seismic Prediction While Drilling a new exploration method will be developed. With an implementation of seismic sources and receivers in one device an exploration method ahead and around the borehole will be enabled. Also, a high resolution independent from the depth will be achieved. Therefore active and powerful seismic sources are necessary to reach an acceptable penetration depth. Step by step seismic borehole devices were developed, which can be used under different conditions. Every borehole device contains four seismic sources and several three-component geophones. A small distance between actuators and geophones allows detecting also the high frequency content of the wave field reflected at geological structures. Also, exploration with a high resolution is possible. A first borehole device was developed for basic conditions in horizontal boreholes without special terms to temperature or pressure. In a mine first methodical measurements for the initiated wave field were performed. Therefor an existing seismic test area at the research and education mine of the TU Bergakademie Freiberg was extended with boreholes. In the seismic test area, consisting of a dense geophone array with three-component geophone anchors, two horizontal and one vertical borehole was drilled. To achieve a radiation pattern in predefined directions by constructive

  11. Double disordered YBCO coated conductors of industrial scale: high currents in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, D.; Ballarino, A.; Barth, C.; Bottura, L.; Dietrich, R.; Francis, A.; Jaroszynski, J.; Majkic, G. S.; McCallister, J.; Polyanskii, A.; Rossi, L.; Rutt, A.; Santos, M.; Schlenga, K.; Selvamanickam, V.; Senatore, C.; Usoskin, A.; Viouchkov, Y. L.

    2015-11-01

    A significant increase of critical current in high magnetic field, up to 31 T, was recorded in long tapes manufactured by employing a double-disorder route. In a double-disordered high-temperature superconductor (HTS), a superimposing of intrinsic and extrinsic disorder takes place in a way that (i) the intrinsic disorder is caused by local stoichiometry deviations that lead to defects of crystallinity that serve as pining centers in the YBa2Cu3O x-δ matrix and (ii) the extrinsic disorder is introduced via embedded atoms or particles of foreign material (e.g. barium zirconate), which create a set of lattice defects. We analyzed possible technological reasons for this current gain. The properties of these tapes over a wider field-temperature range as well as field anisotropy were also studied. Record values of critical current as high as 309 A at 31 T, 500 A at 18 Tm and 1200 A at 5 T were found in 4 mm wide tape at 4.2 K and B perpendicular to tape surface. HTS layers were processed in medium-scale equipment that allows a maximum batch length of 250 m while 22 m long batches were provided for investigation. Abnormally high ratios (up to 10) of critical current density measured at 4.2 K, 19 T to critical current density measured at 77 K, self-field were observed in tapes with the highest in-field critical current. Anisotropy of the critical current as well as angular dependences of n and α values were investigated. The temperature dependence of critical current is presented for temperatures between 4.2 and 40 K. Prospects for the suppression of the dog-bone effect by Cu plating and upscale of processing chain to >500 m piece length are discussed.

  12. Investigation of well redevelopment techniques for the MWD Well Field, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Kroening, D.E.; Snipes, D.S.; Falta, R.W.; Benson, S.M. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Janssen, J. )

    1994-03-01

    Clemson University, in cooperation with the Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating well treatment techniques at the Mixed Waste Disposal (MWD) Well Field at SRS. This well field consists of fifteen wells screened in three aquifers with a downward trending head gradient. Based on aquifer performance tests of the MWD wells, it has been determined that many of the wells exhibit low well efficiencies and high skin factors, indicative of damaged wells. Bacterial investigations show that the biological activity in these wells is low, probably due to a high pH environment. Evaluation of the Calcite Saturation Index for each well indicates that nearly all of the MWD wells have the potential for precipitating calcite and calcite deposits have been observed on downhole equipment. The calcite deposits may occur due to the dissolution of the grout mixtures by waters infiltrating down the well annulus driven by the downward head gradient with subsequent precipitation of calcite in the higher pH sand pack. Well rehabilitation techniques currently under investigation include acidification, hydraulic fracturing and traditional physical methods. In addition to treating the wells at MWD, the authors plan to perform aquifer performance tests and evaluate post-treatment skin factors. Further research into the long term effects of well treatment will be conducted, focusing on long term chemical changes brought about by the treatments.

  13. Initial Results from the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Acuna, M.; Le, G.; Farrell, W.; Holzworth, R.; Wilson, G.; Burke, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Martin, S.; Kujawski, J.; Uribe, P.; Fourre, R.; McCarthy, M.; Maynard, N.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Steigies, C.

    2009-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. The DC electric field detector has revealed zonal and meridional electric fields that undergo a diurnal variation, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. In general, the measured DC electric field amplitudes are in the 0.5-2 mV/m range, corresponding to I3 x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. What is surprising is the high degree of large-scale (10's to 100's of km) structure in the DC electric field, particularly at night, regardless of whether well-defined spread-F plasma density depletions are present. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. On some occasions, localized regions of low frequency (< 8 Hz) magnetic field broadband irregularities have been detected, suggestive of filamentary currents, although there is no one-to-one correspondence of these waves with the observed plasma density depletions, at least within the data examined thus far. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF waves corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence

  14. Electric Fields and Waves Instrument on the RBSP Spacecraft: Investigating the Dynamic of the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Goetz, K.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F.; Cattell, C. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Hudson, M. K.; Bale, S. D.; Chaston, C. C.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Mann, I. R.; Donovan, E.; Foster, J. C.; Albert, J. M.; Kersten, K.; Breneman, A. W.; Dombeck, J. P.; Malaspina, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two RBSP spacecraft provide measurements of the three dimensional quasi-static electric field in the inner magentosphere in order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the energization and loss of energetic particles. Some of the processes of immediate interest include the effects of impacts on the magnetosphere by intense interplanetary shocks, the effects of large scale convection, acceleration by injection events, energization by large scale ULF waves, and coherent and stochastic acceleration by intense lower hydrid, whistler mode, and kinetic Alfven waves. We will present, for the first time, deep within in the inner magnetosphere, examples of two spacecraft measurements of electric fields associated with energetic particle acceleration from the RBSP spacedraft during the first three months after launch. These will be discussed with in the context of RBSP science goals and measurements from previous missions. The electric field measurement uses two pairs of spherical sensors at the ends of orthogonal spin plane booms with tip to tip separations of 100 m. The spin axis measurement uses spheres at the ends of oppositely oriented stacers with an adjustable tip to tip separation of 12-14 m. The most accurate measurement of the electric field is from the spin plane sensors with are roughly orthogoal to the x gse axis and which will have an accuracy of <0.3 mV/m (after ground analysis and calibraiton) and a dynamic range of ~400 mV/m. Wave electric field from the EFW sensors as well as wave magnetic field signal from the EMFISIS search coil sensors will nominally be sampled at 512 samples/s. (with a capabitity of 12 ksamples/s) into a 32 gigabyte burst memory in order to provide high time resolution information on selected intervals of dynamically signficant waves and plasma structures.

  15. Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

  16. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation deals in detail with the three recognized stages of plastic fracture in high strength steels, namely, void initiation, void growth, and void coalescence. The particular steels under investigation include plates from both commercial purity and high purity heats of AISI 4340 and 18 Ni, 200 grade maraging steels. A scanning electron microscope equipped with an X-ray energy dispersive analyzer, together with observations made using light microscopy, revealed methods of improving the resistance of high strength steels to plastic fracture.

  17. A high brightness field emission display

    SciTech Connect

    Palevsky, A.

    1996-12-31

    The military requirement for avionics display performance requires that displays be legible with 10,000 foot-candles (fc) bright light shining into the pilot`s eyes, or 10,000 fc shining directly on the display. The contrast ratio under these conditions must be at least 4.66:1. In addition, instant-on operation is sought for temperatures as low as {minus}54 C. Currently these specifications can barely be met by monochrome CRTs whose use is counter-indicated by other factors. No color display can achieve optimum performance in the areas mentioned, nor do any current contenders, primarily AMLCD`s, have any prospects of achieving full compliance. The FED being developed by Raytheon shows strong promise of being able to achieve the brightness and contrast ratios desired. The FED is also inherently able to provide instant-on functionality at any terrestrial temperature and does not require any heating at low temperatures. The technical objective of the Raytheon development program is to develop a high performance, full color, FED Panel that meets the performance and environmental operating condition requirements specified for military and other high performance display applications.

  18. Countering Solutal Buoyant Convection with High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemist, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitant, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in microgravity, we have been able to dramatically effect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  19. Recent developments of high field ESR systems in Kobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, H.; Tomoo, M.; Okubo, S.; Sakurai, T.; Fujisawa, M.; Tomita, T.; Kimata, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Kawauchi, M.; Kindo, K.

    2006-11-01

    The magnetic field of the high field ESR system in Kobe University has been extended to 55 T by using a new non-destructive pulse magnet and the 300 kJ (10kV) capacitor bank. The properties of new 55 T pulse magnet are reported. As an example of its application, the high field ESR measurement of a quantum spin system CsCuCl3 for Hparallela will be shown.

  20. Developments of Multi-extreme High Field ESR in Kobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, H.; Okubo, S.; Ohmichi, E.; Sakurai, T.; Zhang, W.-M.; Shimokawa, T.

    2013-03-01

    Recent developments of "multi-extreme" high magnetic field electron spin resonance (ESR) in Kobe will be reviewed. Our high magnetic field ESR covers the frequency region between 0.03 and 7 THz and the temperature region between 1.8 and 300 K. With this high magnetic field ESR system we can apply the magnetic field up to 55 T using a Cu-Ag pulsed magnet and a 300 kJ (10 kV) capacitor bank. Under this high magnetic field we can also apply the high pressure up to 1.4 GPa. As we can make the measurement under low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure simultaneously, we name it as "multi-extreme" ESR. Moreover, in order to gain the sensitivity of our high magnetic field ESR, we have developed a micro-cantilever ESR system using a torque method, which enables the ESR measurement of micrometer size single crystal at low temperature. At the moment we are in the process of extending the magnetic field region of micro-cantilever ESR. Recently we have succeeded in making the measurement up to 369 GHz and the achieved sensitivity is about 1010 spins/G, which is much higher than that using the conventional transmission method. Finally our development of magnetization detected ESR using SQUID magnetometer (SQUID ESR) will be also presented.

  1. Ground-based complex for detection and investigation of fast optical transients in wide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Plokhotnichenko, Vladimir; de-Bur, Vjacheslav; Greco, Guiseppe; Bartolini, Corrado; Guarnieri, Adriano; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2008-07-01

    To study short stochastic optical flares of different objects (GRBs, SNs, etc) of unknown localizations as well as NEOs it is necessary to monitor large regions of sky with high time resolution. We developed a system which consists of wide-field camera (FOW is 400-600 sq.deg.) using TV-CCD with time resolution of 0.13 s to record and classify optical transients, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their spectroscopic and photometric investigation just after detection. Such two telescope complex TORTOREM combining wide-field camera TORTORA and robotic telescope REM operated from May 2006 at La Silla ESO observatory. Some results of its operation, including first fast time resolution study of optical transient accompanying GRB and discovery of its fine time structure, are presented. Prospects for improving the complex efficiency are given.

  2. Investigating the impact of electromagnetic fields on human cells: A thermodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto; Ponzetto, Antonio; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2016-02-01

    The consequences of the interactions of electromagnetic waves, as used in conventional MRI technology, with human cells are not fully understood. To analyze these interactions, a novel thermodynamic approach is presented that is based on the relationship between electromagnetic and thermodynamic quantities. The theoretical results indicate that the waves' impact is largest at high magnetic field strengths and at low frequencies. This is the first step towards a clinically useful framework to quantitatively assess MRI impact including a potential trade-off between the desired increase in spatial resolution that higher magnetic field strengths yield for diagnostic purposes and the danger this may pose for cell membranes, and by extension, for the tissues investigated.

  3. Exploration of Traveling Waves in High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Zachary

    2010-10-01

    MRI has been a remarkable means of medical imaging for the last three decades without exposure to ionizing radiation. The increase in MRI signal with the increase of magnetic field strength is the main motive in a move towards imaging at higher field strengths. However, the advent of higher field strength MRI has come with the challenge of maintaining homogeneous excitation fields (B1). One promising solution to this has been to transmit radio-frequency (RF) signals using a patch antenna instead of the usual RF coil. This technique exploits the theory of waveguides and traveling waves typically used in high frequency applications. In this particular study we have investigated this unique application by measuring B1 maps, geometric distortions, and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in order to better quantify its potential in MRI. Using phantoms to match the similar physical features of the human head/torso region, we ran comparative scans using the traveling wave setup versus the conventional head volume coil setup on a Philips 7 Tesla MRI scanner. The goal of this experiment was to systematically measure B1 maps for flip angle efficiency and multi-planar rendering images for geometric distortion. Although the application of traveling wave in MRI does suffer from low excitation (small flip angles), there seems to be little to no correlation between traveling wave phase variability and frequency/phase encoding. Therefore, further experiments, if carried out, may enhance image quality such as RF shielding, the use of local receive coils, and/or the addition of a second patch antenna.

  4. Topical Developments in High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Matthew K.; Frantz, Derik K.; Walish, Joseph J.; Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    We report our recent efforts directed at improving high-field DNP experiments. We investigated a series of thiourea nitroxide radicals and the associated DNP enhancements ranging from ε = 25 to 82 that demonstrate the impact of molecular structure on performance. We directly polarized low-gamma nuclei including 13C, 2H, and 17O using trityl via the cross effect. We discuss a variety of sample preparation techniques for DNP with emphasis on the benefit of methods that do not use a glass-forming cryoprotecting matrix. Lastly, we describe a corrugated waveguide for use in a 700 MHz / 460 GHz DNP system that improves microwave delivery and increases enhancements up to 50%. PMID:25977588

  5. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed. PMID:27121926

  6. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed.

  7. Sessile multidroplets and salt droplets under high tangential electric fields.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxin; He, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Si, Lina; Guo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction behaviors between sessile droplets under imposed high voltages is very important in many practical situations, e.g., microfluidic devices and the degradation/aging problems of outdoor high-power applications. In the present work, the droplet coalescence, the discharge activity and the surface thermal distribution response between sessile multidroplets and chloride salt droplets under high tangential electric fields have been investigated with infrared thermography, high-speed photography and pulse current measurement. Obvious polarity effects on the discharge path direction and the temperature change in the droplets in the initial stage after discharge initiation were observed due to the anodic dissolution of metal ions from the electrode. In the case of sessile aligned multidroplets, the discharge path direction could affect the location of initial droplet coalescence. The smaller unmerged droplet would be drained into the merged large droplet as a result from the pressure difference inside the droplets rather than the asymmetric temperature change due to discharge. The discharge inception voltages and the temperature variations for two salt droplets closely correlated with the ionization degree of the salt, as well as the interfacial electrochemical reactions near the electrodes. Mechanisms of these observed phenomena were discussed. PMID:27121926

  8. Investigation of High School Students' Reading Compherension Levels According to Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceran, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the level of reading comprehension of high school students in their fields of study and learning strategies to explain the relationship between the level of reading comprehension. This working group is composed of 11th grade high school students. In this study, relational model was used. In the study…

  9. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/μm, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/μm, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  10. High-resolution gravity field modeling using GRAIL mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Goossens, S. J.; Sabaka, T. J.; Nicholas, J. B.; Mazarico, E.; Rowlands, D. D.; Neumann, G. A.; Loomis, B.; Chinn, D. S.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft were designed to map the structure of the Moon through high-precision global gravity mapping. The mission consisted of two spacecraft with Ka-band inter-satellite tracking complemented by tracking from Earth. The mission had two phases: a primary mapping mission from March 1 until May 29, 2012 at an average altitude of 50 km, and an extended mission from August 30 until December 14, 2012, with an average altitude of 23 km before November 18, and 20 and 11 km after. High-resolution gravity field models using both these data sets have been estimated, with the current resolution being degree and order 1080 in spherical harmonics. Here, we focus on aspects of the analysis of the GRAIL data: we investigate eclipse modeling, the influence of empirical accelerations on the results, and we discuss the inversion of large-scale systems. In addition to global models we also estimated local gravity adjustments in areas of particular interest such as Mare Orientale, the south pole area, and the farside. We investigate the use of Ka-band Range Rate (KBRR) data versus numerical derivatives of KBRR data, and show that the latter have the capability to locally improve correlations with topography.

  11. Torsional oscillations of neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequencies of magnetic oscillations in neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields, we derive the perturbation equations. We assume that the field strength of the global magnetic structure is so small that such fields are negligible compared with tangled fields, which may still be far from a realistic configuration. Then, we systematically examine the spectra of the magnetic oscillations, as varying the magnetic field strength and stellar mass. The frequencies without crust elasticity are completely proportional to the strength of the magnetic field, whose proportionality constant depends strongly on the stellar mass. On the other hand, the oscillation spectra with crust elasticity become more complicated, where the frequencies even for weak magnetic fields are different from the crustal torsional oscillations without magnetic fields. For discussing spectra, the critical field strength can play an important role, and it is determined in such a way that the shear velocity is equivalent to the Alfvén velocity at the crust basis. Additionally, we find that the effect of the crust elasticity can be seen strongly in the fundamental oscillations with a lower harmonic index, ℓ. Unlike the stellar models with a pure dipole magnetic field, we also find that the spectra with highly tangled magnetic fields become discrete, where one can expect many of the eigenfrequencies. Maybe these frequencies could be detected after the violent phenomena breaking the global magnetic field structure.

  12. Investigating Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations of Nanocolloids in a Magnetic Field Using Direct Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Ashley; Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel; Rice-Oprisan College of Charleston Team

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide have a high surface area and can be controlled by an external magnetic field. Since they have a fast response to the applied magnetic field, these systems have been used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and cell separation. We performed three direct imaging experiments in order to investigate the concentration-driven fluctuations using magnetic nanoparticles in the absence and in the presence of magnetic field. Our direct imaging experimental setup involved a glass cell filled with magnetic nanocolloidal suspension and water with the concentration gradient oriented against the gravitational field and a superluminescent diode (SLD) as the light source. Nonequilibrium concentration-driven fluctuations were recorded using a direct imaging technique. We used a dynamic structure factor algorithm for image processing in order to compute the structure factor and to find the power law exponents. We saw evidence of large concentration fluctuations and permanent magnetism. Further research will use the correlation time to approximate the diffusion coefficient for the free diffusion experiment. Funded by College of Charleston Department of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities SURF grant.

  13. Stud arc welding in a magnetic field - Investigation of the influences on the arc motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartz-Behrend, K.; Marqués, J. L.; Forster, G.; Jenicek, A.; Müller, M.; Cramer, H.; Jilg, A.; Soyer, H.; Schein, J.

    2014-11-01

    Stud arc welding is widely used in the construction industry. For welding of studs with a diameter larger than 14 mm a ceramic ferrule is usually necessary in order to protect the weld pool. Disadvantages of using such a ferrule are that more metal is molten than necessary for a high quality welded joint and that the ferrule is a consumable generally thrown away after the welding operation. Investigations show that the ferrule can be omitted when the welding is carried out in a radially symmetric magnetic field within a shielding gas atmosphere. Due to the Lorentz force the arc is laterally shifted so that a very uniform and controlled melting of the stud contact surface as well as of the work piece can be achieved. In this paper a simplified physical model is presented describing how the parameters welding current, flux density of the magnetic field, radius of the arc and mass density of the shielding gas influence the velocity of the arc motion. The resulting equation is subsequently verified by comparing it to optical measurements of the arc motion. The proposed model can be used to optimize the required field distribution for the magnetic field stud welding process.

  14. Investigating the active hydrothermal field of Kolumbo Volcano using CTD profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleni Christopoulou, Maria; Mertzimekis, Theo; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The submarine Kolumbo volcano NE of Santorini Island and the unique active hydrothermal vent field on its crater field (depth ~ 500 m) have been recently explored in multiple cruises aboard E/V Nautilus. ROV explorations showed the existence of extensive vent activity and almost completely absence of vent-specific macrofauna. Gas discharges have been found to be 99%-rich in CO2, which is sequestered at the bottom of the crater due to a special combination of physicochemical and geomorphological factors. The dynamic conditions existing along the water column in the crater have been studied in detail by means of temperature, salinity and conductivity depth profiles for the first time. CTD sensors aboard the ROV Hercules were employed to record anomalies in those parameters in an attempt to investigate several active and inactive vent locations. Temporal CTD monitoring inside and outside of the crater was carried out over a period of two years. Direct comparison between the vent field and locations outside the main cone, where no hydrothermal activity is known to exist, showed completely different characteristics. CTD profiles above the active vent field (NNE side) are correlated to Kolumbo's cone morphology. The profiles suggest the existence of four distinct zones of physicochemical properties in the water column. The layer directly above the chimneys exhibit gas discharges highly enriched in CO2. Continuous gas motoring is essential to identify the onset of geological hazards in the region.

  15. A field-sweep/field-lock system for superconducting magnets--Application to high-field EPR.

    PubMed

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G

    2006-12-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of +/-0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10(-5) T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR.

  16. A Field-Sweep/Field-Lock System for Superconducting Magnets-Application to High-Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H-NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of ± 0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10-5 T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR. PMID:17027306

  17. Magnetic probe array with high sensitivity for fluctuating field.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Yuki; Gota, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Kayoko; Ikeyama, Taeko; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2007-03-01

    A magnetic probe array is constructed to measure precisely the spatial structure of a small fluctuating field included in a strong confinement field that varies with time. To exclude the effect of the confinement field, the magnetic probes consisting of figure-eight-wound coils are prepared. The spatial structure of the fluctuating field is obtained from a Fourier analysis of the probe signal. It is found that the probe array is more sensitive to the fluctuating field with a high mode number than that with a low mode number. An experimental demonstration of the present method is attempted using a field-reversed configuration plasma, where the fluctuating field with 0.1% of the confinement field is successfully detected.

  18. Field calibration studies for ionisation chambers in mixed high-energy radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Theis, C; Forkel-Wirth, D; Fuerstner, M; Mayer, S; Otto, Th; Roesler, S; Vincke, H

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of ambient doses at work places around high-energy accelerators is a challenging task due the complexity of the mixed stray radiation fields encountered. At CERN, mainly Centronics IG5 high-pressure ionisation chambers are used to monitor radiation exposure in mixed fields. The monitors are calibrated in the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(10) using standard, source-generated photon- and neutron fields. However, the relationship between ionisation chamber reading and ambient dose equivalent in a mixed high-energy radiation field can only be assessed if the spectral response to every component and the field composition is known. Therefore, comprehensive studies were performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility where the spectral fluence for each particle type has been assessed with Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, studies have been performed in an accessible controlled radiation area in the vicinity of a beam loss point of CERN's proton synchrotron. The comparison of measurements and calculations has shown reasonable agreement for most exposure conditions. The results indicate that conventionally calibrated ionisation chambers can give satisfactory response in terms of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields at high-energy accelerators in many cases. These studies are one step towards establishing a method of 'field calibration' of radiation protection instruments in which Monte Carlo simulations will be used to establish a correct correlation between the response of specific detectors to a given high-energy radiation field.

  19. HIGH FIELD Q-SLOPE AND THE BAKING EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2009-11-01

    The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing RF losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by a low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated at high temperature in the presence of a small partial pressure of nitrogen. Improvement of the cavity performances have been obtained, while surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  20. Flux-gate magnetic field sensor based on yttrium iron garnet films for magnetocardiography investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetoshko, P. M.; Gusev, N. A.; Chepurnova, D. A.; Samoilova, E. V.; Syvorotka, I. I.; Syvorotka, I. M.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Korotaeva, A. A.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    A new type of f lux-gate vector magnetometer based on epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films has been developed and constructed for magnetocardiography (MCG) investigations. The magnetic field sensor can operate at room temperature and measure MCG signals at a distance of about 1 mm from the thoracic cage. The high sensitivity of the sensor, better than 100 fT/Hz1/2, is demonstrated by the results of MCG measurements on rats. The main MCG pattern details and R-peak on a level of 10 pT are observed without temporal averaging, which allows heart rate anomalies to be studied. The proposed magnetic sensors can be effectively used in MCG investigations.

  1. Use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to investigate an outbreak of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z Y; Liu, P Y; Lau, Y J; Lin, Y H; HU, B S

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing was applied to the epidemiological investigation of 20 Serratia marcescens isolates collected from urine specimens of 17 patients and three urinals over a 2-month period. Twenty-five epidemiologically unrelated strains were also tested to determine the discriminatory power of PFGE. The PFGE fingerprints of each isolate were consistent in three different tests. The 20 outbreak isolates had an identical PFGE fingerprint pattern, while the epidemiologically unrelated strains demonstrated unique PFGE fingerprint patterns. The source of the outbreak was inadequately disinfected urinals. We conclude that PFGE served as a highly discriminatory and reproducible method for the epidemiological investigation of the outbreak of S. marcescens infection addressed by this study. PMID:8968940

  2. The generation and application of megagauss fields at the Humboldt High Magnetic Field Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portugall, O.; Puhlmann, N.; Müller, H. U.; Barczewski, M.; Stolpe, I.; Ortenberg, M. von

    1998-05-01

    A new multi-megagauss generator has been constructed which produces 239 and 311 T with a pulse duration of 5 μs in single turn coils with an inner diameter of 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Prominent features of the installation are the vertical coil orientation, a stripline-based lightweight/low inductance discharge circuit in modular arrangement and the galvanic separation of control panels and high-voltage units. The installation is designed as a scientific instrument including suitable cryostats, fast data acquisition systems and basic setups for spectroscopical investigations. The design and performance of the field generator as well as the supplementary equipment are discussed and demonstrated in connection with cyclotron resonance measurements at temperatures down to 5 K.

  3. Developments in materials for high-field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.R.; Hill, M.A.; Walsh, R.P.

    1993-10-01

    Results of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory`s program of characterization of materials and fabrication techniques used in the construction of high-field pulsed magnets are reported. High-field pulsed magnets require conductors with high mechanical strength (750 MPa or greater YS at 77K) and high electrical conductivity (70% IACS or greater at RT). Electrical insulation and resin systems for vacuum impregnation with high compressive strength (500 MPa at 77K) and moderate thermal conductivity (1kW/mK at 77K) are also required. Developments and future plans for the characterization of new magnet material systems are discussed. Testing result are reported: Mechanical and fatigue testing, electrical conductivity testing and thermal expansion measurements of high strength, high conductivity conductors at cryogenic and room temperature, mechanical testing of a coil support material at cryogenic and room temperature, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity tests of an electrical insulating system at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. A High School Statistics Class Investigates the Death Penalty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brelias, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Recommendations for reforming high school mathematics curricula emphasize the importance of engaging students in mathematical investigations of societal issues (CCSSI [Common Core State Standards Initiative] 2010; NCTM [National Council of Teachers of Mathematics] 2000). Proponents argue that these investigations can positively influence students'…

  5. Analysis of a high brightness photo electron beam with self field and wake field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    High brightness sources are the basic ingredients in the new accelerator developments such as Free-Electron Laser experiments. The effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, e.g. R.F., Space charge and Wake fields can be detrimental to the beam and the experiments. We present and discuss the formulation used, some simulation and results for the Brookhaven National Laboratory high brightness beam that illustrates effects of the accelerating field, space charge forces (e.g. due to self field of the bunch), and the wake field (e.g. arising from the interaction of the cavity surface and the self field of the bunch).

  6. Analysis of a high brightness photo electron beam with self field and wake field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    High brightness sources are the basic ingredients in the new accelerator developments such as Free-Electron Laser experiments. The effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, e.g. R.F., Space charge and Wake fields can be detrimental to the beam and the experiments. We present and discuss the formulation used, some simulation and results for the Brookhaven National Laboratory high brightness beam that illustrates effects of the accelerating field, space charge forces (e.g. due to self field of the bunch), and the wake field (e.g. arising from the interaction of the cavity surface and the self field of the bunch).

  7. Superconductivity in an Organic Insulator at Very High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Balicas, L.; Brooks, J. S.; Storr, K.; Uji, S.; Tokumoto, M.; Tanaka, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Kobayashi, A.; Barzykin, V.; Gor'kov, L. P.

    2001-08-06

    We investigate by electrical transport the field-induced superconducting state (FISC) in the organic conductor {lambda}-(BETS){sub 2}FeCl{sub 4} . Below 4K, antiferromagnetic-insulator, metallic, and eventually superconducting (FISC) ground states are observed with increasing in-plane magnetic field. The FISC state survives between 18 and 41T and can be interpreted in terms of the Jaccarino-Peter effect, where the external magnetic field compensates the exchange field of aligned Fe{sup 3+} ions. We further argue that the Fe{sup 3+} moments are essential to stabilize the resulting singlet, two-dimensional superconducting state.

  8. High critical field NbC superconductor on carbon spheres.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Pati, Satya Prakash; Maity, Arjun

    2016-06-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) nanoparticles embedded on the surface of carbon spheres (CS) were synthesized at 1350 °C by the carbothermal reduction of niobium oxide precursor in flowing argon (Nbc@CS). The morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the hybrid nanocomposite were investigated by means of electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and a superconducting quantum interference device. It was found that the NbC@CS nanocomposites exhibit type-II superconductivity with a critical temperature (Tc) of 8-12 K, typical for stoichiometric NbC. The superconducting hysteresis loop reveals several interesting traits, including strong vortex pinning, the presence of asymmetry and a high penetration field. Moreover, the sample shows much improved irreversible (Hirr), lower (Hc1) and upper (Hc2) critical fields. The coherence length (ξ), penetration depth (λ), and Ginzburg-Landau (κ) parameters for the sample were estimated to be 9.78 nm, 33 nm and 3.39, respectively. PMID:27212586

  9. Effect of a High Magnetic Field on Microstructures of Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy During Seed Melt-Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weidong; Liu, Huan; Li, Chuanjun; Ren, Zhongming; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Cao, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    The effects of a high magnetic field on microstructures during seed melt-back of superalloy were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the high magnetic field significantly modified the melt-back interface shape and the melt-back zone length. In addition, stray grain on the edge of sample was effectively suppressed in the high magnetic field. Based on experimental results and quantitative analysis, the above results should be attributed to the increasing temperature gradient in a high magnetic field.

  10. High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers

    DOEpatents

    Smith, M.E.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Douglas, E.P.

    1998-11-24

    A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  11. High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Mark E.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Douglas, Elliot P.

    1998-01-01

    A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  12. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  13. Evaluation of field methods for vertical high resolution aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vienken, T.; Tinter, M.; Rogiers, B.; Leven, C.; Dietrich, P.

    2012-12-01

    The delineation and characterization of subsurface (hydro)-stratigraphic structures is one of the challenging tasks of hydrogeological site investigations. The knowledge about the spatial distribution of soil specific properties and hydraulic conductivity (K) is the prerequisite for understanding flow and fluid transport processes. This is especially true for heterogeneous unconsolidated sedimentary deposits with a complex sedimentary architecture. One commonly used approach to investigate and characterize sediment heterogeneity is soil sampling and lab analyses, e.g. grain size distribution. Tests conducted on 108 samples show that calculation of K based on grain size distribution is not suitable for high resolution aquifer characterization of highly heterogeneous sediments due to sampling effects and large differences of calculated K values between applied formulas (Vienken & Dietrich 2011). Therefore, extensive tests were conducted at two test sites under different geological conditions to evaluate the performance of innovative Direct Push (DP) based approaches for the vertical high resolution determination of K. Different DP based sensor probes for the in-situ subsurface characterization based on electrical, hydraulic, and textural soil properties were used to obtain high resolution vertical profiles. The applied DP based tools proved to be a suitable and efficient alternative to traditional approaches. Despite resolution differences, all of the applied methods captured the main aquifer structure. Correlation of the DP based K estimates and proxies with DP based slug tests show that it is possible to describe the aquifer hydraulic structure on less than a meter scale by combining DP slug test data and continuous DP measurements. Even though correlations are site specific and appropriate DP tools must be chosen, DP is reliable and efficient alternative for characterizing even strongly heterogeneous sites with complex structured sedimentary aquifers (Vienken et

  14. Thermodynamic critical fields in high T c superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.; Johnson, Keith H.

    1988-06-01

    Using the free electron approximation, a real space mechanism of how magnetic fields of sufficient strength destroy the superconducting state is outlined. Using the resultant equation together with the molecular orbital model of superconductivity 1,2, the thermodynamic critical magnetic field is calculated and compared to experiment for type I elemental superconductors and type II superconductors, including high-Tc superconductors. The expression for critical field compares favorably with an expression derived by Schrieffer.

  15. Strong magnetic fields in normal galaxies at high redshift.

    PubMed

    Bernet, Martin L; Miniati, Francesco; Lilly, Simon J; Kronberg, Philipp P; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava

    2008-07-17

    The origin and growth of magnetic fields in galaxies is still something of an enigma. It is generally assumed that seed fields are amplified over time through the dynamo effect, but there are few constraints on the timescale. It was recently demonstrated that field strengths as traced by rotation measures of distant (and hence ancient) quasars are comparable to those seen today, but it was unclear whether the high fields were in the unusual environments of the quasars themselves or distributed along the lines of sight. Here we report high-resolution spectra that demonstrate that the quasars with strong Mg II absorption lines are unambiguously associated with larger rotation measures. Because Mg ii absorption occurs in the haloes of normal galaxies along the sightlines to the quasars, this association requires that organized fields of surprisingly high strengths are associated with normal galaxies when the Universe was only about one-third of its present age.

  16. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland (Figure 1. 1). Since World War II activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) (predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center [AEC]). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA -environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in data were collected to model, groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1996-01-01

    Boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer since high heat flux levels are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences. The high heat transfer coefficients associated with boiling have made the use of these processes increasingly attractive to aerospace engineering. Applications of this type include compact evaporators in the thermal control of aircraft avionics and spacecraft environments, heat pipes, and use of boiling to cool electronic equipment. In spite of its efficiency, cooling based on liquid-vapor phase change processes has not yet found wide application in aerospace engineering due to specific problems associated with the low gravity environment. After a heated surface has reached the superheat required for the initiation of nucleate boiling, bubbles will start forming at nucleation sites along the solid interface by evaporation of the liquid. Bubbles in contact with the wall will continue growing by this mechanism until they detach. In terrestrial conditions, bubble detachment is determined by the competition between body forces (e.g. buoyancy) and surface tension forces that act to anchor the bubble along the three phase contact line. For a given body force potential and a balance of tensions along the three phase contact line, bubbles must reach a critical size before the body force can cause them to detach from the wall. In a low gravity environment the critical bubble size for detachment is much larger than under terrestrial conditions, since buoyancy is a less effective means of bubble removal. Active techniques of heat transfer enhancement in single phase and phase change processes by utilizing electric fields have been the subject of intensive research during recent years. The field of electrohydrodynamics (EHD) deals with the interactions between electric fields, flow fields and temperature fields. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 as

  18. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1984-04-19

    In a field-effect transistor comprising a semiconductor having therein a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship, there is provided an improvement wherein said semiconductor is a superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers comprising a first direct gap semiconductor material which in bulk form has a certain bandgap and a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, the barrier layers comprising a second semiconductor material having a bandgap wider than that of said first semiconductor material, wherein the layer thicknesses of said quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice having a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, and wherein the thicknesses of said quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field whereby, at applied electric fields higher than that at which the maximum electron velocity occurs in said first material when in bulk form, the electron velocities are higher in said superlattice than they are in said first semiconductor material in bulk form.

  19. Field Trips as Cognitive Motivators for High Level Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Marlene M.

    2006-01-01

    Using a composite example of field trips from several years of traveling to Yellowstone with high school biology students, the author illustrates how to raise the cognitive level of science instruction and student learning through science field trips. The author examines what teachers can do to raise the level of both teaching and learning in all…

  20. Effects of high external electric fields on protein conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, Pier Paolo; Bramanti, Alessandro; Maruccio, Giuseppe; del Mercato, Loretta Laureana; Chiuri, Rocco; Cingolani, Roberto; Rinaldi, Ross

    2005-06-01

    Resistance of biomolecules to high electric fields is a main concern for nanobioelectronics/nanobiosensing applications, and it is also a relevant issue from a fundamental perspective, to understand the dielectric properties and structural dynamics of proteins. In nanoscale devices, biomolecules may experience electric fields as high as 107 V/m in order to elicit charge transport/transfer. Understanding the effects of such fields on their structural integrity is thus crucial to assess the reliability of biomolecular devices. In this study, we show experimental evidence for the retention of native-like fold pattern by proteins embedded in high electric fields. We have tested the metalloprotein azurin, deposited onto SiO2 substrates in air with proper electrode configuration, by applying high static electric fields (up to 106-107 V/m). The effects on the conformational properties of protein molecules have been determined by means of intrinsic fluorescence measurements. Experimental results indicate that no significant field-induced conformational alteration occurs. This behavior is also discussed and supported by theoretical predictions of the intrinsic intra-protein electric fields. As the general features of such inner fields are not peculiar of azurin, the conclusions presented here should have general validity.

  1. Alzheimer's disease research: scientific productivity and impact of the top 100 investigators in the field.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Aaron A

    2009-01-01

    The online availability of scientific-literature databases and natural-language-processing (NLP) algorithms has enabled large-scale bibliometric studies within the field of scientometrics. Using NLP techniques and Thomson ISI reports, an initial analysis of the role of Alzheimer's disease (AD) within the neurosciences as well as a summary of the various research foci within the AD scientific community are presented. Citation analyses and productivity filters are applied to post-1984, AD-specific subsets of the PubMed and Thomson ISI Web-of-Science literature bases to algorithmically identify a pool of the top AD researchers. From the initial pool of AD investigators, top-100 rankings are compiled to assess productivity and impact. One of the impact and productivity metrics employed is an AD-specific H-index. Within the AD-specific H-index ranking, there are many cases of multiple AD investigators with similar or identical H-indices. In order to facilitate differentiation among investigators with equal or near-equal H indices, two derivatives of the H-index are proposed: the Second-Tier H-index and the Scientific Following H-index. Winners of two prestigious AD-research awards are highlighted, membership to the Institute of Medicine of the US National Academy of Sciences is acknowledged, and an analysis of highly-productive, high-impact, AD-research collaborations is presented.

  2. [Effect on Fermi Resonance by Some External Fields: Investigation of Fermi Resonance According to Raman Spectra].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiu-lan; Sun, Cheng-lin; Zhou, Mi; Li, Dong-fei; Men, Zhi-wei; Li, Zuo-wei; Gao, Shu-qin

    2015-03-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of molecular vibrational coupling and energy transfer occurred between different groups of a single molecule or neighboring molecules. Many properties of Fermi resonance under different external fields, the investigation method of Raman spectroscopy as well as the application of Fermi resonance, etc need to be developed and extended further. In this article the research results and development about Fermi resonance obtained by Raman spectral technique were introduced systematically according to our work and the results by other researchers. Especially, the results of the behaviors of intramolecular and intermolecular Fermi resonance of some molecules under some external fields such as molecular field, pressure field and temperature field, etc were investigated and demonstrated in detail according to the Raman spectra obtained by high pressure DAC technique, temperature variation technique as well as the methods we planed originally in our group such as solution concentration variation method and LCOF resonance Raman spectroscopic technique, and some novel properties of Fermi resonance were found firstly. Concretely, (1) Under molecular field. a. The Raman spectra of C5H5 N in CH3 OH and H2O indicates that solvent effect can influence Fermi resonance distinctly; b. The phenomena of the asymmetric movement of the Fermi resonance doublets as well as the fundamental involved is tuned by the Fermi resonance which had not been found by other methods were found firstly by our variation solution concentration method; c. The Fermi resonance properties can be influenced distinctly by the molecular group reorganization induced by the hydrogen bond and anti-hydrogen bond in solution; d. Fermi resonance can occurred between C7 H8 and m-C8H10, and the Fermi resonance properties behave quite differently with the solution concentration; (2) Under pressure field. a. The spectral lines shift towards high wavenumber with increasing pressure, and

  3. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  4. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  5. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  6. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  7. Astrophysical dynamos and the growth of magnetic fields in high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Michael; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-08-01

    The origin and evolution of magnetic fields in the Universe is still an open question. Observations of galaxies at high-redshift give evidence for strong galactic magnetic fields even in the early Universe which are consistently measured at later times up to the present age. However, primordial magnetic fields and seed field generation by battery processes cannot explain such high field strengths, suggesting the presence of a rapid growth mechanism in those high-redshift galaxies and subsequent maintenance against decay. Astrophysical dynamo theory provides efficient means of field amplification where even weak initial fields can grow exponentially on sufficiently fast timescales, driving the conversion of kinetic energy into magnetic energy. We investigate the role which feedback mechanisms play in the creation of the turbulence necessary for dynamos to operate. Performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cooling halos of dwarf and Milky Way-like high-redshift progenitors, we compare the magnetic field evolution of weak seed fields with various topologies and stellar feedback mechanisms. We find that strong feedback can drive galactic gas turbulence which gives rise to velocity fields with fast exponential magnetic field growth. The simulations display a high gas fraction and a clumpy morphology with kinematics resembling Kolmogorov turbulence and magnetic energy spectra as predicted by Kazantsev dynamo theory. Magnetic fields reach equipartition with $\\mu$G field strength. In a final quiescent phase where feedback is turned off, gas turbulence is reduced and a quadrupole symmetry is observed in the magnetic field. These findings support the theory of rapid magnetic field amplification inside high-redshift galaxies, when the Universe was still young.

  8. High Magnetic Field-Induced Formation of Banded Microstructures in Lamellar Eutectic Alloys During Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2016-08-01

    The influences of high magnetic field (up to 12 T) on the morphology of Pb-Sn and Al-Al2Cu lamellar eutectics during directional solidification were investigated. The experimental results indicate that, along with a decrease in eutectic spacing, the banded structure forms at lower growth speeds under high magnetic field and the band spacing decreases as the magnetic field increases. Moreover, the application of a magnetic field enriches the Cu solute in the liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface during directional solidification of an Al-Al2Cu eutectic alloy. The effects of high magnetic field on the eutectic points of non-ferromagnetic alloys and the stress acting on the eutectic lamellae during directional solidification have been studied. Both thermodynamic evaluation and DTA measurements reveal that the high magnetic field has a negligible effect on the eutectic points of non-ferromagnetic alloys. However, the high magnetic field caused an increase of the nucleation temperature and undercooling. The numerical results indicate that a considerable stress is produced on the eutectic lamellae during directional solidification under high magnetic field. The formation of a banded structure in a lamellar eutectic during directional solidification under high magnetic field may be attributed to both the buildup of the solute in the liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface and the stress acting on the eutectic lamellae.

  9. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  10. Pushing the Limits: RF Field Control at High Loaded Q

    SciTech Connect

    M. Liepe; S.A. Belomestnykh; J. Dobbins; R.P.K. Kaplan; C.R. Strohman; B.K. Stuhl; C. Hovater; T. Plawski

    2005-05-16

    The superconducting cavities in an Energy-Recovery-Linac will be operated with a high loaded Q of several 10{sup 7}, possible up to 10{sup 8}. Not only has no prior control system ever stabilized the RF field in a linac cavity with such high loaded Q, but also highest field stability in amplitude and phase is required at this high loaded Q. Because of a resulting bandwidth of the cavity of only a few Hz, this presents a significant challenge: the field in the cavity extremely sensitive to any perturbation of the cavity resonance frequency due to microphonics and Lorentz force detuning. To prove that the RF field in a high loaded Q cavity can be stabilized, and that Cornell's newly developed digital control system is able to achieve this, the system was connected to a high loaded Q cavity at the JLab IR-FEL. Excellent cw field stability--about 10{sup -4} rms in relative amplitude and 0.02 deg rms in phase--was achieved at a loaded Q of 2.1 x 10{sup 7} and 1.2 x 10{sup 8}, setting a new record in high loaded Q operation of a linac cavity. Piezo tuner based cavity frequency control proved to be very effective in keeping the cavity on resonance and allowed reliable to ramp up to high gradients in less than 1 second.

  11. A novel high-sensitivity electrostatic biased electric field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing'ao; Wu, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiaohong; Yan, Xiaojun; Lin, Liwei

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an electric field sensor (EFS) with high sensitivity is proposed for low-frequency weak-strength ac electric field (E-field) measurements. The EFS is based on a piezoelectric cantilever biased by a strong electrostatic field. The electrostatic bias can enhance the electric field force of a weak ac E-field, thus the cantilever can oscillate in a weak ac E-field and the device sensitivity improves. Theoretical analyses have been established and suggest that a stronger strength of electrostatic field bias would produce a higher sensitivity improvement. In the experiment, a demonstrated sensor consisting of a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric cantilever and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) electret was built and tested. Instead of extra voltage sources, the PTFE electret was charged to provide the electrostatic field, allowing the EFS a low energy consumption and a simple electric circuit design. The experiment results show good agreement with the simulation. The sensitivity of the cantilever E-field sensor reached 0.84 mV (kV/m)-1 when the surface potential of the electret was  -770 V.

  12. Rotating sample magnetometer for cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Eisterer, M; Hengstberger, F; Voutsinas, C S; Hörhager, N; Sorta, S; Hecher, J; Weber, H W

    2011-06-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a rotating sample magnetometer (RSM) operating in the variable temperature insert (VTI) of a cryostat equipped with a high-field magnet. The limited space and the cryogenic temperatures impose the most critical design parameters: the small bore size of the magnet requires a very compact pick-up coil system and the low temperatures demand a very careful design of the bearings. Despite these difficulties the RSM achieves excellent resolution at high magnetic field sweep rates, exceeding that of a typical vibrating sample magnetometer by about a factor of ten. In addition the gas-flow cryostat and the high-field superconducting magnet provide a temperature and magnetic field range unprecedented for this type of magnetometer.

  13. Large-field high-resolution mosaic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Sliepen, Guus; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sütterlin, Peter; Lin, Yong; Martin, Sara F.; Panasenco, Olga; Romashets, Eugene P.

    2013-08-01

    Movies with fields-of-view larger than normal, for high-resolution telescopes, will give a better understanding of processes on the Sun such as filament and active region developments and their possible interactions. New active regions can serve as an igniter of the eruption of a nearby filament. A method to create a large field-of-view is to join several fields-of-view into a mosaic. Fields are imaged quickly, one after another, using fast telescope-pointing. Such a pointing cycle has been automated at the Dutch open telescope (DOT), a high-resolution solar telescope located on the Canary Island La Palma. The number and positions of the subfields are calculated automatically and represented by an array of bright points in the guider image which indicates the subfield centers inside the drawn rectangle of the total field on the computer screen with the whole-sun image. Automatic production of flats is also programmed. For the first time, mosaic movies were programmed from stored information on automated telescope motions. The mosaic movies show larger regions of the solar disk in high resolution and fill a gap between available whole-sun images with limited spatial resolution of synoptic telescopes including space instruments and small-field high-cadence movies of high-resolution solar telescopes.

  14. Disintegration and field evaporation of thiolate polymers in high electric fields.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, B S; Karahka, M; Kreuzer, H J

    2015-12-01

    High electrostatic fields cause major changes in polymers, structural (e.g. electrostriction) and electronic (e.g. reduction of the "band gap" with final metallization). Using density functional theory we have studied field effects on amino-alkane-thiols and perfluoro-alkane-thiols adsorbed on a metal substrate. Our results agree well with the APT fragmentation spectra obtained by Stoffers, Oberdorfer and Schmitz and shed light on disintegration pathways. We demonstrate that in SAMs the HOMO/LUMO gap is again reduced as a function of the field strength and vanishes at evaporation. We also follow the field dependence of the dielectric constant and polarizability. PMID:25825029

  15. RAPID ARSENITE OXIDATION BY THERMUS AQUATICUS AND THERMUS THERMOPHILUS: FIELD AND LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS. (R826189)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, common inhabitants of terrestrial hot springs and thermally polluted domestic and industrial waters, have been found to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate. Field investigations at a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park revealed ...

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bekefi, G.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.; Danly, B.; Temkin, R.J.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-FG0291ER-40648. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration.'' This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design and fabrication of a 17GHz of photocathode gun, Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration using a 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders. This report is organized as follows. The development of an rf gun design and research progress on the picosecond laser system is summarized in Sec. 2, the status of the studies of the LBL/Haimson high gradient structure, using a 50 MW free-electron laser is summarized in Sec. 3, and theoretical research progress is described in Sec. 4. Supporting material is contained in Appendices A-G.

  17. Comparison of field-scale herbicide runoff and volatilization losses: an eight-year field investigation.

    PubMed

    Gish, Timothy J; Prueger, John H; Daughtry, Craig S T; Kustas, William P; McKee, Lynn G; Russ, Andrew L; Hatfield, Jerry L

    2011-01-01

    An 8-yr study was conducted to better understand factors influencing year-to-year variability in field-scale herbicide volatilization and surface runoff losses. The 21-ha research site is located at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, MD. Site location, herbicide formulations, and agricultural management practices remained unchanged throughout the duration of the study. Metolachlor [2-chloro--(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)--(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] and atrazine [6-chloro--ethyl--(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine] were coapplied as a surface broadcast spray. Herbicide runoff was monitored from a month before application through harvest. A flux gradient technique was used to compute volatilization fluxes for the first 5 d after application using herbicide concentration profiles and turbulent fluxes of heat and water vapor as determined from eddy covariance measurements. Results demonstrated that volatilization losses for these two herbicides were significantly greater than runoff losses ( < 0.007), even though both have relatively low vapor pressures. The largest annual runoff loss for metolachlor never exceeded 2.5%, whereas atrazine runoff never exceeded 3% of that applied. On the other hand, herbicide cumulative volatilization losses after 5 d ranged from about 5 to 63% of that applied for metolachlor and about 2 to 12% of that applied for atrazine. Additionally, daytime herbicide volatilization losses were significantly greater than nighttime vapor losses ( < 0.05). This research confirmed that vapor losses for some commonly used herbicides frequently exceeds runoff losses and herbicide vapor losses on the same site and with the same management practices can vary significantly year to year depending on local environmental conditions.

  18. High-Resolution Light Field Capture With Coded Aperture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Wang, Li-Chun; Kong, De-Hui; Yin, Bao-Cai

    2015-12-01

    Acquiring light field with larger angular resolution and higher spatial resolution in low cost is the goal of light field capture. Combining or modifying traditional optical cameras is a usual method for designing light field capture equipment, among which most models should deliberate trade-off between angular and spatial resolution, but augmenting coded aperture avoids this consideration by multiplexing information from different views. On the basis of coded aperture, this paper suggests an improved light field camera model that has double measurements and one mask. The two compressive measurements are respectively realized by a coded aperture and a random convolution CMOS imager, the latter is used as imaging sensor of the camera. The single mask design permits high light efficiency, which enables the sampling images to have high clarity. The double measurement design keeps more correlation information, which is conductive to enhancing the reconstructed light field. The higher clarity and more correlation of samplings mean higher quality of rebuilt light field, which also means higher resolution under condition of a lower PSNR requirement for rebuilt light field. Experimental results have verified advantage of the proposed design: compared with the representative mask-based light field camera models, the proposed model has the highest reconstruction quality and a higher light efficiency.

  19. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN HIGH-MASS INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J.; Tan, J. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Carey, S. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-01-20

    High-mass stars are cosmic engines known to dominate the energetics in the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, their formation is still not well understood. Massive, cold, dense clouds, often appearing as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), are the nurseries of massive stars. No measurements of magnetic fields in IRDCs in a state prior to the onset of high-mass star formation (HMSF) have previously been available, and prevailing HMSF theories do not consider strong magnetic fields. Here, we report observations of magnetic fields in two of the most massive IRDCs in the Milky Way. We show that IRDCs G11.11–0.12 and G0.253+0.016 are strongly magnetized and that the strong magnetic field is as important as turbulence and gravity for HMSF. The main dense filament in G11.11–0.12 is perpendicular to the magnetic field, while the lower density filament merging onto the main filament is parallel to the magnetic field. The implied magnetic field is strong enough to suppress fragmentation sufficiently to allow HMSF. Other mechanisms reducing fragmentation, such as the entrapment of heating from young stars via high-mass surface densities, are not required to facilitate HMSF.

  20. Large-field high-resolution mosaic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Sliepen, Guus; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sütterlin, Peter; Martin, Sara F.

    2012-09-01

    Movies with fields-of-view larger than normal for high-resolution telescopes will give a better understanding of processes on the Sun, such as filament and active region developments and their possible interactions. New active regions can influence, by their emergence, their environment to the extent of possibly serving as an igniter of the eruption of a nearby filament. A method to create a large field-of-view is to join several fields-of-view into a mosaic. Fields are imaged quickly one after another using fast telescope-pointing. Such a pointing cycle has been automated at the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), a high-resolution solar telescope located on the Canary Island La Palma. The observer can draw with the computer mouse the desired total field in the guider-telescope image of the whole Sun. The guider telescope is equipped with an H-alpha filter and electronic enhancement of contrast in the image for good visibility of filaments and prominences. The number and positions of the subfields are calculated automatically and represented by an array of bright points indicating the subfield centers inside the drawn rectangle of the total field on the computer screen with the whole-sun image. When the exposures start the telescope repeats automatically the sequence of subfields. Automatic production of flats is also programmed including defocusing and fast motion over the solar disk of the image field. For the first time mosaic movies were programmed from stored information on automated telescope motions from one field to the next. The mosaic movies fill the gap between whole-sun images with limited resolution of synoptic telescopes including space instruments and small-field high-cadence movies of high-resolution solar telescopes.

  1. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    New and highly sensitive method of detecting infrared irradiation makes possible solid state infrared detector which is more sensitive near room temperature than usual photoconductive low band gap semiconductor devices. Reconfiguration of high field domains in cadmium sulphide crystals provides basis for discovery.

  2. PIXELS: Using field-based learning to investigate students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Tinigin, L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Ormand, C. J.; LaDue, N.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical work over the past decade supports the notion that a high level of spatial thinking skill is critical to success in the geosciences. Spatial thinking incorporates a host of sub-skills such as mentally rotating an object, imagining the inside of a 3D object based on outside patterns, unfolding a landscape, and disembedding critical patterns from background noise. In this study, we focus on sense of scale, which refers to how an individual quantified space, and is thought to develop through kinesthetic experiences. Remote sensing data are increasingly being used for wide-reaching and high impact research. A sense of scale is critical to many areas of the geosciences, including understanding and interpreting remotely sensed imagery. In this exploratory study, students (N=17) attending the Juneau Icefield Research Program participated in a 3-hour exercise designed to study how a field-based activity might impact their sense of scale and their conceptions of pixels in remotely sensed imagery. Prior to the activity, students had an introductory remote sensing lecture and completed the Sense of Scale inventory. Students walked and/or skied the perimeter of several pixel types, including a 1 m square (representing a WorldView sensor's pixel), a 30 m square (a Landsat pixel) and a 500 m square (a MODIS pixel). The group took reflectance measurements using a field radiometer as they physically traced out the pixel. The exercise was repeated in two different areas, one with homogenous reflectance, and another with heterogeneous reflectance. After the exercise, students again completed the Sense of Scale instrument and a demographic survey. This presentation will share the effects and efficacy of the field-based intervention to teach remote sensing concepts and to investigate potential relationships between students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale.

  3. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  4. Enhanced trapped field performance of bulk high-temperature superconductors using split coil, pulsed field magnetization with an iron yoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.; Mochizuki, H.; Takahashi, K.; Shi, Y.-H.; Namburi, D. K.; Zou, J.; Zhou, D.; Dennis, A. R.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Investigating and predicting the magnetization of bulk superconducting materials and developing practical magnetizing techniques is crucial to using them as trapped field magnets in engineering applications. The pulsed field magnetization (PFM) technique is considered to be a compact, mobile and relative inexpensive way to magnetize bulk samples, requiring shorter magnetization times (on the order of milliseconds) and a smaller and less complicated magnetization fixture; however, the trapped field produced by PFM is generally much smaller than that of slower zero field cooling or field cooling techniques, particularly at lower operating temperatures. In this paper, the PFM of two, standard Ag-containing Gd–Ba–Cu–O samples is carried out using two types of magnetizing coils: (1) a solenoid coil, and (2) a split coil, both of which make use of an iron yoke to enhance the trapped magnetic field. It is shown that a significantly higher trapped field can be achieved using a split coil with an iron yoke, and in order to explain these how this arrangement works in detail, numerical simulations using a 2D axisymmetric finite element method based on the H -formulation are carried to qualitatively reproduce and analyze the magnetization process from both electromagnetic and thermal points of view. It is observed that after the pulse peak significantly less flux exits the bulk when the iron core is present, resulting in a higher peak trapped field, as well as more overall trapped flux, after the magnetization process is complete. The results have important implications for practical applications of bulk superconductors as such a split coil arrangement with an iron yoke could be incorporated into the design of a portable, high magnetic field source/magnet to enhance the available magnetic field or in an axial gap-type bulk superconducting electric machine, where iron can be incorporated into the stator windings to (1) improve the trapped field from the magnetization

  5. Enhanced trapped field performance of bulk high-temperature superconductors using split coil, pulsed field magnetization with an iron yoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.; Mochizuki, H.; Takahashi, K.; Shi, Y.-H.; Namburi, D. K.; Zou, J.; Zhou, D.; Dennis, A. R.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Investigating and predicting the magnetization of bulk superconducting materials and developing practical magnetizing techniques is crucial to using them as trapped field magnets in engineering applications. The pulsed field magnetization (PFM) technique is considered to be a compact, mobile and relative inexpensive way to magnetize bulk samples, requiring shorter magnetization times (on the order of milliseconds) and a smaller and less complicated magnetization fixture; however, the trapped field produced by PFM is generally much smaller than that of slower zero field cooling or field cooling techniques, particularly at lower operating temperatures. In this paper, the PFM of two, standard Ag-containing Gd-Ba-Cu-O samples is carried out using two types of magnetizing coils: (1) a solenoid coil, and (2) a split coil, both of which make use of an iron yoke to enhance the trapped magnetic field. It is shown that a significantly higher trapped field can be achieved using a split coil with an iron yoke, and in order to explain these how this arrangement works in detail, numerical simulations using a 2D axisymmetric finite element method based on the H -formulation are carried to qualitatively reproduce and analyze the magnetization process from both electromagnetic and thermal points of view. It is observed that after the pulse peak significantly less flux exits the bulk when the iron core is present, resulting in a higher peak trapped field, as well as more overall trapped flux, after the magnetization process is complete. The results have important implications for practical applications of bulk superconductors as such a split coil arrangement with an iron yoke could be incorporated into the design of a portable, high magnetic field source/magnet to enhance the available magnetic field or in an axial gap-type bulk superconducting electric machine, where iron can be incorporated into the stator windings to (1) improve the trapped field from the magnetization process

  6. Investigation on critical breakdown electric field of hot carbon dioxide for gas circuit breaker applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Murphy, Anthony B.; Zhang, Hantian

    2015-02-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas is widely used in high-voltage circuit breakers, but due to its high global warming potential, substitutes are being sought. CO2 has been investigated as a candidate based on its arc interruption performance. The hot gas in the circuit breaker after current zero, with a complicated species composition caused by the dissociation and many other reactions, will lead to the electrical breakdown, which is one of the major concerns in assessing the arc interruption performance. Despite this, little research has been reported on the dielectric strength of hot CO2. In this paper, the dielectric properties of hot CO2 related to the dielectric recovery phase of the circuit breaker were investigated in the temperature range from 300 to 4000 K and in the pressure range from 0.01 to 1.0 MPa. Under the assumptions of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and local chemical equilibrium (LCE), the equilibrium compositions of hot CO2 were obtained based on Gibbs free energy minimization. The cross sections for interactions between electrons and the species are presented. The critical reduced electric field strength of CO2 was determined by balancing electron generation and loss. These were evaluated using the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) derived from the two-term Boltzmann transport equation. The result indicates that unlike SF6 or air, in hot CO2 the reduced critical electric field strength does not change monotonically with increasing heavy-particle temperature from 300 to 4000 K. CO2 has a superior dielectric strength to pure SF6 above 2500 K at 0.5 MPa, which means it has the potential to improve the interruption performance of the circuit breakers, while reducing the global warming effect. Good agreement was found with published experimental results and calculations for CO2 at room temperature, and with previous calculations for hot CO2.

  7. Field Investigation of Natural Attenuation of a Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifer, Gyeonggi Province, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, K.; Bae, G.

    2004-12-01

    In remediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer, natural attenuation may be significant as a remedial alternative. Therefore, natural attenuation should be investigated in the field in order to effectively design and evaluate the remediation strategy at the contaminated site. This study focused on evaluating the natural attenuation for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) at a contaminated site in South Korea. At the study site, the aquifer is composed of a high permeable gravel layer and relatively low permeable sandy-silt layers. Groundwater level vertically fluctuated between 1m and 2m throughout the year (April, 2003~June, 2004) and showed direct response to rainfall events. Chemical analyses of sampled groundwater were performed to investigate the concentrations of various chemical species which are associated with the natural attenuation processes. To evaluate the degree of the biodegradation, the expressed biodegradation capacity (EBC) analysis was done using aerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, manganese reduction, ferric iron reduction, and sulfate reduction as an indicator. High EBC value of sulfate indicate that anaerobic biodegradation by sulfate reduction was a dominant process of mineralization of BTEX at this site. The EBC values decrease sensitively when heavy rainfall occurs due to the dilution and inflow of electron acceptors through a gravel layer. The first-order biodegradation rates of BTEX were estimated by means of the Buscheck and Alcantar method (1995). Results show that the natural attenuation rate of benzene was the highest among the BTEX.

  8. Using triaxial magnetic fields to create high susceptibility particle composites.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Venturini, Eugene; Gulley, Gerald L; Williamson, Jonathan

    2004-02-01

    We report on the use of triaxial magnetic fields to create a variety of isotropic and anisotropic magnetic particle/polymer composites with significantly enhanced magnetic susceptibilities. A triaxial field is a superposition of three orthogonal ac magnetic fields, each generated by a Helmholtz coil in series resonance with a tunable capacitor bank. Field frequencies are in the range of 150-400 Hz. Because both the field amplitudes and frequencies can be varied, a rich variety of structures can be created. Perhaps the most unusual effects occur when either two or three of the field components are heterodyned to give beat frequencies on the order of 1 Hz. This leads to a striking particle dynamics that evolves into surprising structures during resin gelation. These structures are found to have perhaps the highest susceptibility that a particle composite can have. The susceptibility anisotropy of these composites can be controlled over a wide range by judicious adjustment of the relative field amplitudes. These experimental data are supported by large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of the complex many-body interactions that occur in triaxial magnetic fields. These simulations show that athermal three-dimensional field heterodyning leads to structures with a susceptibility that is as high as that achieved with thermal annealing. Thus with coherent particle motions we can achieve magnetostatic energies that are quite close to the ground state. PMID:14995450

  9. T1 and susceptibility contrast at high fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar

    Clinical imaging at high magnetic field strengths (≥ 3Tesla) is sought after primarily due to the increased signal strength available at these fields. This increased SNR can be used to perform: (a) high resolution imaging in the same time as at lower field strengths; (b) the same resolution imaging with much faster acquisition; and (c) functional MR imaging (fMRI), dynamic perfusion and diffusion imaging with increased sensitivity. However they are also associated with increased power deposition (SAR) due to increase in imaging frequency and longer T1 relaxation times. Longer T1s mean longer imaging times for generating good T1 contrast images. On the other hand for faster imaging, at high fields fast spin echo or magnetization prepared sequences are conventionally proposed which are, however, associated with high SAR values. Imaging with low SAR is more and more important as we move towards high fields and particularly for patients with metallic implants like pacemakers or deep brain stimulator. The SAR limit acceptable for these patients is much less than the limit acceptable for normal subjects. A new method is proposed for imaging at high fields with good contrast with simultaneous reduction in power deposition. Further, T1 based contrast optimization problem in FLASH imaging is considered for tissues with different T1s but same spin densities. The solution providing optimal imaging parameters is simplified for quick and easy computation in a clinical setting. The efficacy of the simplification is evaluated and practical limits under which the simplification can be applied are worked out. The phase difference due to variation in magnetic susceptibility property among biological tissues is another unique source of contrast which is different from the conventional T1, T2 and T2* contrast. This susceptibility based phase contrast has become more and more important at high fields, partly due to contrast generation issues due to longer T 1s and shorter T2s and

  10. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1999-01-01

    In boiling high heat fluxes are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences, which make its use increasingly attractive in aerospace applications. The objective of the research is to develop ways to overcome specific problems associated with boiling in the low gravity environment by substituting the buoyancy force with the electric force to enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50, as compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. The goal of our research is to experimentally explore the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions, by visualizing the temperature distributions in the vicinity of the heated surface and around the bubble during boiling using real-time holographic interferometry (HI) combined with high-speed cinematography. In the first phase of the project the influence of the electric field on a single bubble is investigated. Pool boiling is simulated by injecting a single bubble through a nozzle into the subcooled liquid or into the thermal boundary layer developed along the flat heater surface. Since the exact location of bubble formation is known, the optical equipment can be aligned and focused accurately, which is an essential requirement for precision measurements of bubble shape, size and deformation, as well as the visualization of temperature fields by HI. The size of the bubble and the frequency of bubble departure can be controlled by suitable selection of nozzle diameter and mass flow rate of vapor. In this approach effects due to the presence of the electric field can be separated from effects caused by the temperature gradients in the thermal boundary layer. The influence of the thermal boundary layer can be investigated after activating the heater at a later stage of the research. For the visualization experiments a

  11. Investigating Safely: A Guide for High School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry; Summers, John

    2004-01-01

    Just as high school science is more complex than it is at lower grade levels, so are the safety issues teachers face in their classes and labs. Reduce the risks to people and place with Investigating Safely, the third and most advanced and detailed volume in NSTA's unique series of safety guidebooks for science teachers. Some of the guides 11…

  12. A Model for Investigating Predictive Validity at Highly Selective Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Alan L.; And Others

    A statistical model for investigating predictive validity at highly selective institutions is described. When the selection ratio is small, one must typically deal with a data set containing relatively large amounts of missing data on both criterion and predictor variables. Standard statistical approaches are based on the strong assumption that…

  13. Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Scott Campbell Dr. Terry Holesinger Dr. Ybing Huang

    2012-06-30

    The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have

  14. FRONTIER FIELDS: HIGH-REDSHIFT PREDICTIONS AND EARLY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry; Zitrin, Adi

    2015-02-20

    The Frontier Fields program is obtaining deep Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope images of new ''blank'' fields and nearby fields gravitationally lensed by massive galaxy clusters. The Hubble images of the lensed fields are revealing nJy sources (AB mag > 31), the faintest galaxies yet observed. The full program will transform our understanding of galaxy evolution in the first 600 million years (z > 9). Previous programs have yielded a dozen or so z > 9 candidates, including perhaps fewer than expected in the Ultra Deep Field and more than expected in shallower Hubble images. In this paper, we present high-redshift (z > 6) number count predictions for the Frontier Fields and candidates in three of the first Hubble images. We show the full Frontier Fields program may yield up to ∼70 z > 9 candidates (∼6 per field). We base this estimate on an extrapolation of luminosity functions observed between 4 < z < 8 and gravitational lensing models submitted by the community. However, in the first two deep infrared Hubble images obtained to date, we find z ∼ 8 candidates but no strong candidates at z > 9. We defer quantitative analysis of the z > 9 deficit (including detection completeness estimates) to future work including additional data. At these redshifts, cosmic variance (field-to-field variation) is expected to be significant (greater than ±50%) and include clustering of early galaxies formed in overdensities. The full Frontier Fields program will significantly mitigate this uncertainty by observing six independent sightlines each with a lensing cluster and nearby blank field.

  15. An experimental investigation of domain wall motion in polycrystalline Ni during high-rate compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Bah, Abubakarr; Carman, Gregory P.; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes experimental data on a polycrystalline nickel subjected to compressive loads induced in a split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A perpendicular bias magnetic field with respect to the loading direction is used to orient the domains and a pick-up coil measures the magnetic response of the sample during loading. Utilizing this experimental configuration, this study investigated the coupled effects of the magnetic and mechanical fields on domain wall motion in a polycrystalline magnetostrictive material (Ni) during the high-rate elastic loading. The experimental measurements reveal that the magnitude of the stress-induced magnetization change is dependent upon bias magnetic field.

  16. Proximity superconductivity in ballistic graphene at high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prance, J. R.; Ben Shalom, M.; Zhu, M. J.; Fal'Ko, V. I.; Mishchenko, A.; Kretinin, A. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Woods, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Geim, A. K.

    We present measurements of the superconducting proximity effect in graphene-based Josephson junctions with a mean free path of several microns, which exceeds the junctions' length. The junctions exhibit low contact resistance and large supercurrents. We observe Fabry-Pérot oscillations in the normal-state resistance and the critical current of the junctions. The proximity effect is mostly suppressed in magnetic fields of <10 mT showing the conventional Fraunhofer interference pattern; however, unexpectedly, a weak proximity effect survives in magnetic fields as high as 1 T. Superconducting states randomly appear and disappear as a function of field and carrier concentration, and each exhibits a supercurrent carrying capacity close to the universal limit of e Δ/h where Δ is the superconducting gap of the contacts. We attribute the high-field supercurrent to mesoscopic Andreev states that persist near graphene edges. Our work reveals new proximity regimes that can be controlled by quantum confinement and cyclotron motion.

  17. High field optical nonlinearity and the Kramers-Kronig relations.

    PubMed

    Wahlstrand, J K; Cheng, Y-H; Milchberg, H M

    2012-09-14

    The nonlinear optical response to high fields is absolutely measured for the noble gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. We find that the response is quadratic in the laser field magnitude up to the ionization threshold of each gas. Its size and quadratic dependence are well predicted by a Kramers-Kronig analysis employing known ionization probabilities, and the results are consistent with calculations using the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  18. Enzyme-Substrate Reactions in Very High Magnetic Fields. I

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitch, B.; Maling, J. E.; Weissbluth, M.

    1967-01-01

    The availability of very high magnetic fields of up to 170,000 gauss made it worthwhile to pursue the search for a critical change in the rate of four enzyme substrate reactions. The four enzymes were ribonuclease, polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase, and aldolase. The experiments showed that, to within ±3%, no detectable change was observable in the rate of reaction of any of the systems for periods of exposure to the magnetic field of up to 20 min. PMID:6048870

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, J.S.; Bekefi, G.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.C.; Temkin, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-AC02-91-ER40648, Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration''. This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design, fabrication and testing of a 17GHz RF photocathode gun, which can produce 2ps electron pulses with up to 1nC of charge at 2MeV energy and at a 1OHz repetition rate. Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration at 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders.

  20. Quantum cascade laser linewidth investigations for high resolution photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Germer, Markus; Wolff, Marcus

    2009-02-01

    High detection selectivity is extremely important for gas analyzers in order to correctly identify the measured compound. Therefore, laser-based systems require a high optical resolution, which primarily depends on the spectral linewidth of the radiation source. This study examines the effective linewidth (chirp) of a pulsed distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) in a photoacoustic (PA) gas detection system. The influence of the QCL operating parameters pulse duration and pulse current as well as the impact of the modulation technique are investigated. Effective QCL linewidths for pulse gate modulation, pulse frequency modulation, and chopper modulation are compared. The investigations are performed by measuring the PA spectra of nitrogen monoxide absorption lines. The results prove the strong influence of pulse duration and pulse current. They also demonstrate that the modulation technique has a considerable influence and, consequently, affects the detection selectivity of the PA analyzer. The aim of this research is to determine optimum operational parameters for high resolution PA spectroscopy.

  1. High-energy electroproduction in an atomic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krachkov, P. A.; Milstein, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    The differential cross section of high-energy electroproduction in the electric field of heavy atoms is derived. The results are obtained with the exact account for the atomic field. We use the quasiclassical approximation to the wave functions in the external field. For heavy atoms, the Coulomb corrections substantially modify the differential cross section as compared with the Born result. They lead to the azimuth asymmetry in the differential cross section for the polarized incoming electron. The Coulomb corrections to the total cross section are obtained in the leading logarithmic approximation.

  2. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  3. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  4. Deuterium NMR investigations of field-induced director alignment in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Akihiko; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R

    2016-05-01

    There have been many investigations of the alignment of nematic liquid crystals by either a magnetic and/or an electric field. The basic features of the important hydrodynamic processes for low molar mass nematics have been characterized for the systems in their equilibrium and non-equilibrium states. These have been created using electric and magnetic fields to align the director and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR) spectroscopy has been used to explore this alignment. Theoretical models based on continuum theory have been developed to complement the experiments and found to describe successfully the static and the dynamic phenomena observed. Such macroscopic behaviour has been investigated with (2)H NMR spectroscopy, in which an electric field in addition to the magnetic field of the spectrometer is used to rotate the director and produce a non-equilibrium state. This powerful technique has proved to be especially valuable for the investigation of nematic liquid crystals. Since the quadrupolar splitting for deuterons observed in the liquid crystal phase is determined by the angle between the director and the magnetic field, time-resolved and time-averaged (2)H NMR spectroscopies can be employed to investigate the dynamic director alignment process in a thin nematic film following the application or removal of an electric field. In this article, we describe some seminal studies to illustrate the field-induced static and dynamic director alignment for low molar mass nematics.

  5. Investigation of the effects of magnetic field exposure on human melatonin. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Cohen, H.D.

    1994-08-01

    Several rodent studies have suggested that magnetic field exposure may alter the daily pattern of melatonin secretion. This study investigated melatonin levels in mean exposed overnight to magnetic fields of 10 mG and 200 mG. The study also assessed the potential effects of exposure on a number of performance and self-reported endpoints in the subjects. Investigation of this area is important, as altered diurnal melatonin cycles have been linked to a variety of endpoints, including reproductive outcome, neurobehavioral function, and carcinogenesis. The results of this investigation did not support the a priori hypothesis that exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields of 10 mG and 200 mG alters nighttime melatonin levels in a population of adult males. However, the data suggested the possibility of differential sensitivity to magnetic fields based on an individual`s baseline melatonin level.

  6. Investigation of fullerenes for high speed low latency, photonic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. W. H; Shelton, R.N.

    1997-02-13

    The components in high-speed, all-optical photonic systems must satisfy two essential requirements: (1) high switching speeds in the range of Tbit/s, and (2) low latency, where the latency is the amount of time that the optical signal remains in the device. An important problem precluding the practical implementation of high-speed, all- optical switching is the lack of a material with appropriate nonlinear optical properties needed to effect the switching. Numerous material systems have been studied in the past, but none have met all the necessary requirements. Development of such a material and its incorporation into photonic devices would advance the field tremendously. This Lab-wide LDRD project resolved this critical problem.

  7. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  8. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  9. NMR in High Fields and Field Gradients up to 42 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Eric E.

    2002-03-01

    We describe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed in fields as high as 42 T. This work was done at Northwestern University and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) with superconducting magnets, resistive Bitter-style electromagnets, and a superconducting-resistive hybrid magnet. After reviewing crucial probe and spectrometer design features, we describe the scientific and technical advantages that high field provides for two experiments. First, we studied the mixed state of the high-temperature superconductor YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x through ^17O NMR.[1] The NMR spectrum gives the field distribution associated with vortices which we use to selectively inspect regions inside and outside the vortex core. We use the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T_1-1) to probe the electronic density-of-states in this spatially resolved fashion. Second, we have studied ultraslow diffusion in glass-forming liquids such as glycerol. These studies use the high magnetic field gradient at the edge of the solenoid, which can exceed 200 T/m for the resistive magnets at the NHMFL. We employed a 4 K inductive shield to stabilize the fluctuations in the resistive magnets' applied field over the necessarily long timescales of a slow diffusion NMR experiment. We have also made use of fast frequency jumping to enhance signal-to-noise by circumventing the finite spatial excitation bandwidth imposed by the large gradient. We show NMR experiments of slow diffusion in glass-formers up to high field (H0 = 21 T, G = 220 T/m) that have resolved diffusivities as low as 10-10 cm^2/s. [1] V. F. Mitrovic et.al., Nature 413, 501-504 (2001).

  10. High field magnetic behavior in Boron doped Fe2VAl Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Ch.; Vasundhara, M.; Srinivas, V.; Rao, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the magnetic behavior of Fe2VAl1-xBx (x=0, 0.03, 0.06 and 0.1) alloys under high temperature and high magnetic field conditions separately. Although, the low temperature DC magnetization data for the alloys above x>0 show clear magnetic transitions, the zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) curves indicate the presence of spin cluster like features. Further, critical exponent (γ) deduced from the initial susceptibility above the Tc, does not agree with standard models derived for 3 dimensional long range magnetic systems. The deviation in γ values are consistent with the short range magnetic nature of these alloys. We further extend the analysis of magnetic behavior by carrying the magnetization measurements at high temperatures and high magnetic fields distinctly. We mainly emphasize the following observations; (i) The magnetic hysteresis loops show sharp upturns at lower fields even at 900 K for all the alloys. (ii) High temperature inverse susceptibility do not overlap until T=900 K, indicating the persistent short range magnetic correlations even at high temperatures. (iii) The Arrott's plot of magnetization data shows spontaneous moment (MS) for the x=0 alloy at higher magnetic fields which is absent at lower fields (<50 kOe), while the Boron doped samples show feeble MS at lower fields. The origin of this short range correlation is due to presence of dilute magnetic heterogeneous phases which are not detected from the X-ray diffraction method.

  11. Investigation of CO2 induced biogeochemical reactions and active microorganisms of two German gas fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, N.; Kassahun, A.; Seifert, J.; Krüger, M.; Bretschneider, H.; Gniese, C.; Frerichs, J.; Simon, A.; Simon, E.; Muschalle, T.

    2009-04-01

    The BMBF-Geotechnologien project "RECOBIO 2" continues the investigation of the long-term biogeochemical transformation of stored CO2. In addition to the Upper Carboniferous gas reservoir Schneeren (Westphalian C) the almost depleted Altmark gas field (Permian - Upper Rotliegend) is also investigated. Both sandstone reservoirs belong to the North German Basin and are operated by the GDF SUEZ E&P Germany (GDF SUEZ). The reservoirs differ in depth, initial and current fluid pressure as well as reservoir temperature, which is a biogeochemical important parameter. While the uplifted horst structure of Schneeren (approx. depth 2700 m) has a temperature level of 80 - 90 °C, the Altmark gas field (approx. depth 3300 m) shows temperatures around 120 °C. The Altmark site is known to be favourable for underground CO2-storage by enhanced gas recovery (EGR). This EGR process is operated by GDF SUEZ at the small and hydraulic isolated reservoir block "Altensalzwedel". This pilot test is accompanied by the scientific large-scale project CLEAN. In addition the RECOBIO2 project characterises the biogeochemical situation of the both large reservoir blocks of the Altmark gas field - „Salzwedel/ Peckensen" and „Heidberg/ Mellin". The produced formation waters of these reservoir blocks were sampled on different wellheads. The redox potentials are partly very low (Eh up to -300 mV) with slightly acidic pH-values (5,5 to 6). The high saline and (nearly) sulphate free formation waters of Na/Ca-Cl type have very high loads of Zn, Pb, Hg and As. In combination to the analysed DOC levels the talk discusses the importance of metal organic complexes. Also results of fluid geochemical calculations will be presented. Furthermore the diversity of bacteria and archaea of the formation waters as well as the potentials of CH4-, CO2-formation and sulphate reduction will be shown. Therefore the cultivation experiments were carried out with different substrates (H2/CO2, acetate, methanol). It

  12. High-Efficiency Absorber for Damping the Transverse Wake Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Weathersby, S.; /SLAC

    2007-02-28

    Transverse wake fields generated by intense beams may propagate long distances in the vacuum chamber and dissipate power in different shielded elements such as bellows, vacuum valves or vacuum pumps. Induced heating in these elements may be high enough to deteriorate vacuum conditions. We have developed a broadband water-cooled bellows-absorber to capture and damp these harmful transverse fields without impacting the longitudinal beam impedance. Experimental results at the PEP-II SLAC B-factory demonstrate high efficiency of this device. This absorber may be useful in other machines like synchrotron light sources or International Linear Collider.

  13. Study of HTS Wires at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.J.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kikuchi, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials is being considered for these magnets using Helium refrigeration. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors were performed at FNAL and at NIMS up to 28 T under magnetic fields at zero to 90 degree with respect to the sample face. A description of the test setups and results on a BSCCO-2223 tape and second generation (2G) coated conductors are presented.

  14. An investigation into the vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields from appliances in UK homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.; Conein, Emma; Henshaw, Denis L.

    2005-07-01

    Elliptically polarized magnetic fields induce higher currents in the body compared with their plane polarized counterparts. This investigation examines the degree of vector ellipticity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) in the home, with regard to the adverse health effects reportedly associated with ELF-MFs, for instance childhood leukaemia. Tri-axial measurements of the magnitude and phase of the 0-3000 Hz magnetic fields, produced by 226 domestic mains-fed appliances of 32 different types, were carried out in 16 homes in Worcestershire in the summer of 2004. Magnetic field strengths were low, with average (RMS) values of 0.03 ± 0.02 µT across all residences. In contrast, background field ellipticities were high, on average 47 ± 11%. Microwave and electric ovens produced the highest ellipticities: mean respective values of 21 ± 21% and 21 ± 17% were observed 20 cm away from these appliances. There was a negative correlation between field strength and field polarization, which we attribute to the higher relative field contribution close to each individual (single-phase) appliance. The measurements demonstrate that domestic magnetic fields are extremely complex and cannot simply be characterized by traditional measurements such as time-weighted average or peak exposure levels. We conclude that ellipticity should become a relevant metric for future epidemiological studies of health and ELF-MF exposure. This work is supported by the charity CHILDREN with LEUKAEMIA, registered charity number 298405.

  15. New high homogeneity 55T pulsed magnet for high field NMR.

    PubMed

    Orlova, A; Frings, P; Suleiman, M; Rikken, G L J A

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed magnets can produce magnetic fields largely exceeding those achieved with resistive or even hybrid magnets. This kind of magnet is indispensable in studies of field-induced phenomena which occur only in high magnetic field. A new high homogeneous pulsed magnet capable of producing field up to 55T and specially designed for NMR experiments was built and tested. Experimentally observed homogeneity of magnetic field in central part of the magnet is 10ppm over a sample volume of 2-3mm(3) at 12T and 30ppm at 47T, which are the best values ever reported for a pulsed magnet. Reasons which affect the field profile and reduce homogeneity at high field are discussed. PMID:27179456

  16. Coincidence spectroscopy of high-lying Rydberg states produced in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimian, Seyedreza; Erattupuzha, Sonia; Lemell, Christoph; Yoshida, Shuhei; Nagele, Stefan; Maurer, Raffael; Baltuška, Andrius; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the detection of high-lying Rydberg states produced in strong laser fields with coincidence spectroscopy. Electron emission after the interaction of strong laser pulses with atoms and molecules is measured together with the parent ions in coincidence measurements. These electrons originate from high-lying Rydberg states with quantum numbers from n ˜20 up to n ≲120 formed by frustrated field ionization. Ionization rates are retrieved from the measured ionization signal of these Rydberg states. Simulations show that both tunneling ionization by a weak dc field and photoionization by blackbody radiation contribute to delayed electron emission on the nano- to microsecond scale. Furthermore, the dependence of the Rydberg-state production on the ellipticity of the driving laser field indicates that such high-lying Rydberg states are populated through electron recapture. The present experiment provides detailed quantitative information on Rydberg production in strong-field interaction.

  17. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-06-08

    A field effect transistor comprises a semiconductor having a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship. The semiconductor is a strained layer superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers and barrier layers being selected from the group of layer pairs consisting of InGaAs/AlGaAs, InAs/InAlGaAs, and InAs/InAlAsP. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice which has a superlattice conduction band energy level structure in k-vector space. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice L/sub 2D/-valley which has a shape which is substantially more two-dimensional than that of said bulk L-valley. 2 figs.

  18. Investigation of electric field distribution on FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2016-07-01

    One of the important parameters for establishing charge particle equilibrium (CPE) conditions of free-air ionization chamber is an electric field distribution. In this paper, electric field distribution inside the ionization chamber was investigated by finite element method. For this purpose, the effects of adding guard plate and guard strips on the electric field distribution in the ionization chamber were studied. it is necessary to apply a lead box around the ionization chamber body to avoid of scattered radiation effects on the ionization chamber operation, but the lead box changes the electric field distribution. In the following, the effect of lead box on the electric field distribution was studied. Finally, electric field distribution factor (kfield) was calculated by the simulation. The results of the simulation showed that presence of the guard plate and guard strips, and applying a suitable potential to lead box, a convergence of kfield to 1 was achieved.

  19. Technology transfer opportunities: new development: computerized field manual provides valuable resource for hydrologic investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapel, Paul

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is known throughout the world for conducting quality scientific investigation is hydrologic environments. Proper and consistent field techniques have been an integral part of this good research. Over the past few decades, the USGS has developed and published detailed, standard protocols for conducting studies in most aspects of the hydrologic environment. These protocols have been published in a number of diverse documents. The wealth of information contained in these diverse documents can benefit other scientists in industry, government, and academia that are involved in conducting hydrologic studies. Scientists at the USGS have brought together many of the most important of the field protocols in a user-friendly, graphical-interfaced field manual that will be useful in both the field and in the office. This electronic field manual can assist hydrologists and other scientists in conducting and documenting their field activities in a manner that is recognized standard throughout the hydrologic community.

  20. Sources and Radiation Patterns of Volcano-Acoustic Signals Investigated with Field-Scale Chemical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the processes that give rise to complex acoustic signals during volcanic blasts by monitoring buried chemical explosions with infrasound and audio range microphones, strong motion sensors, and high speed imagery. Acoustic waveforms vary with scaled depth of burial (SDOB, units in meters per cube root of joules), ranging from high amplitude, impulsive, gas expansion dominated signals at low SDOB to low amplitude, longer duration, ground motion dominated signals at high SDOB. Typically, the sudden upward acceleration of the substrate above the blast produces the first acoustic arrival, followed by a second pulse due to the eruption of pressurized gas at the surface. Occasionally, a third overpressure occurs when displaced material decelerates upon impact with the ground. The transition between ground motion dominated and gas release dominated acoustics ranges between 0.0038-0.0018 SDOB, respectively. For example, one explosion registering an SDOB=0.0031 produced two overpressure pulses of approximately equal amplitude, one due to ground motion, the other to gas release. Recorded volcano infrasound has also identified distinct ground motion and gas release components during explosions at Sakurajima, Santiaguito, and Karymsky volcanoes. Our results indicate that infrasound records may provide a proxy for the depth and energy of these explosions. Furthermore, while magma fragmentation models indicate the possibility of several explosions during a single vulcanian eruption (Alidibirov, Bull Volc., 1994), our results suggest that a single explosion can also produce complex acoustic signals. Thus acoustic records alone cannot be used to distinguish between single explosions and multiple closely-spaced blasts at volcanoes. Results from a series of lateral blasts during the 2014 field experiment further indicates whether vent geometry can produce directional acoustic radiation patterns like those observed at Tungarahua volcano (Kim et al., GJI, 2012). Beside

  1. High aspect ratio conjugated polymer nanowires for high performance field-effect transistors and phototransistors.

    PubMed

    Um, Hyun Ah; Lee, Dae Hee; Heo, Dong Uk; Yang, Da Seul; Shin, Jicheol; Baik, Hionsuck; Cho, Min Ju; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2015-05-26

    We synthesized a highly crystalline DPP-based polymer, DPPBTSPE, which contained 1,2-bis(5-(thiophen-2-yl)selenophen-2-yl)ethene as a planar and rigid electron donating group. High- and low-molecular weight (MW) DPPBTSPE fractions were collected by Soxhlet extraction and were employed to investigate their unique charge transport properties in macroscopic films and single crystalline polymer nanowire (SC-PNW), respectively. The low-MW polymer could provide well-isolated and high aspect ratio SC-PNWs, in which the direction of π-π stacking was perpendicular to the wire growing axis. The field effect transistors made of SC-PNWs exhibited remarkably high carrier mobility of 24 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). In addition, phototransistors (PTs) made of SC-PNW showed very high performance in terms of photoresponsivity (R) and photoswitching ratio (P). The average R of the SC PNW-based PTs were in the range of 160-170 A W(-1) and the maximum R was measured at 1920 A W(-1), which is almost three orders higher than that of thin film-based PT device. PMID:25961419

  2. Multistage Background Field Removal (MUBAFIRE)-Compensating for B0 Distortions at Ultra-High Field.

    PubMed

    Lindemeyer, Johannes; Oros-Peusquens, Ana-Maria; Shah, N Jon

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of tissue magnetic susceptibility and the resultant magnetic field offers a new avenue for quantitative tissue characterisation by MRI. One crucial step in mining the phase and field data for relevant tissue information is the correction of externally induced field shifts. This article outlines a multistep approach comprising several methodologies for background field removal. The virtues of B0 long-range variation detection and compensation of more localised external disturbances are unified in a sequential filter chain. The algorithm is tested by means of a numerical Monte Carlo simulation model and applied to in vivo measurements at 3T and 9.4T as well as to a fixed brain tissue measurement at 9.4T. Further, a comparison to conventional filter types has been undertaken. PMID:26393515

  3. Detecting breast microcalcifications with high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Hendrik; Stehouwer, Bertine L; Bakker, Chris J G; Klomp, Dennis W J; van Diest, Paul J; Luijten, Peter R; Seevinck, Peter R; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Viergever, Max A; Veldhuis, Wouter B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to detect microcalcifications in human whole breast specimens using high-field MRI. Four mastectomy specimens, obtained with approval of the institutional review board, were subjected to gradient-echo MRI acquisitions on a high-field MR scanner. The phase derivative was used to detect microcalcifications. The echo time and imaging resolution were varied to study the sensitivity of the proposed method. Computed tomography images of the mastectomy specimens and prior acquired mammography images were used to validate the results. A template matching algorithm was designed to detect microcalcifications automatically. The three spatial derivatives of the signal phase surrounding a field-perturbing object allowed three-dimensional localization, as well as the discrimination of diamagnetic field-perturbing objects, such as calcifications, and paramagnetic field-perturbing structures, e.g. blood. A longer echo time enabled smaller disturbances to be detected, but also resulted in shading as a result of other field-disturbing materials. A higher imaging resolution increased the detection sensitivity. Microcalcifications in a linear branching configuration that spanned over 8 mm in length were detected. After manual correction, the automatic detection tool identified up to 18 microcalcifications within the samples, which was in close agreement with the number of microcalcifications found on previously acquired in vivo mammography images. Microcalcifications can be detected by MRI in human whole breast specimens by the application of phase derivative imaging. PMID:24535752

  4. Nb$_3$Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  5. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. B.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the plastic fracture process to improve tensile strength in high strength steels is presented. Two generic types of steels are considered: a quenched and tempered grade and a maraging grade, in order to compare two different matrix microstructures. Each type of steel was studied in commercial grade purity and in special melted high purity form, low in residual and impurity elements. The specific alloys dealt with include AISI 4340 and 18 Ni, 200 grade maraging steel, both heat treated to the same yield strength level of approximately 200 ksi.

  6. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  7. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  8. Design for a high field combined function superferric magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. C.; Morgan, G. H.

    A combined function superferric magnet option was investigated for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The option requires the maximum value of the field in the magnet to be much higher than that achieved in any existing combined function accelerator magnet. A model is presented in which a good field quality can be maintained up to 2T. It is done by carefully designing the yoke structure and positioning the coils in such a way that the iron poles tend to saturate evenly across the gap. A cold iron model might be necessary for this magnet.

  9. Limited field investigation report for the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to optimize the use of interim remedial measures (IRM) for expediting clean up while maintaining a technically sound and cost-effective program. The 100-KR-4 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 K Area. Operable units KR-1, KR-2 and KR-3 address contaminant sources while 100-KR-4 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The IRM decision process for groundwater operable units is based on three aspects: (1) Is the concentration greater than Hanford background? (2) Does the concentration present a medium or high human-health risk? (3) Does the concentration exceed an ecologically based applicable, relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR) or present an environmental hazard quotient > I? The primary methods of investigation used during this LFI were the installation of monitoring wells and sampling of groundwater. The samples collected from the groundwater and soils were submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the location and degree of contamination. All soil samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all first round and a minimum of 10% of subsequent round data were validated.

  10. High Field Magnetoresistance of Graphene at the Dirac Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checkelsky, Joseph; Li, Lu; Ong, N. P.

    2008-03-01

    The longitudinal and Hall resistance of graphene near the charge neutral point have been studied down to low temperature (20 mK) in high magnetic field (20 T). At issue is the nature of the ground state in the vicinity of the Dirac point in high magnetic fields. In samples in which the offset voltage is small, we observe a highly unusual approach to an insulating state as the field increases. In samples with μ> 0.5 T-1 and V0< 3 V, the resistance at the Dirac point R0 increases divergently to Mφ in fields of 14-20 T at temperatures T < 2 K. This divergent behavior is suppressed in samples with large V0. Surprisingly, this rise shows little temperature dependence below 2 K. The acute dependence on magnetic field and accompanying lack of activated behavior with temperature provides evidence for an unusual cross-over or transition to the insulating state. Implications for theoretical models including gapless edge modes and Quantum Hall Ferromagnetism will be discussed in the context of these results.

  11. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

    2014-05-20

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  12. Sensitivity to Error Fields in NSTX High Beta Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Menard, Jonathan E.; Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Buttery, Richard J.; Sabbagh, Steve A.; Bell, Steve E.; LeBlanc, Benoit P.

    2011-11-07

    It was found that error field threshold decreases for high β in NSTX, although the density correlation in conventional threshold scaling implies the threshold would increase since higher β plasmas in our study have higher plasma density. This greater sensitivity to error field in higher β plasmas is due to error field amplification by plasmas. When the effect of amplification is included with ideal plasma response calculations, the conventional density correlation can be restored and threshold scaling becomes more consistent with low β plasmas. However, it was also found that the threshold can be significantly changed depending on plasma rotation. When plasma rotation was reduced by non-resonant magnetic braking, the further increase of sensitivity to error field was observed.

  13. High electric field deuterium ion sources for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk

    Active interrogation systems for highly enriched uranium require improved fieldable neutron sources. The target technology for deuterium-tritium neutron generators is well understood and the most significant improvement can be achieved by improving the deuterium ion source through increased output and, in some cases, lifetime of the ion source. We are developing a new approach to a deuterium ion sources based upon the field desorption/evaporation of deuterium from the surfaces of metal tips. Electrostatic field desorption (EFD) desorbs previously adsorbed deuterium as ions under the influence of high electric fields (several V/A), without removing tip material. Single etched wire tip experiments have been performed and have shown that this is difficult but can be achieved with molybdenum and tungsten tips. Electrostatic field evaporation (EFE) evaporates ultra thin deuterated titanium films as ions. It has been shown that several 10s of atomic layers can be removed within a few nanoseconds from etched tungsten tips. In the course of these studies titanium deposition and deuteration methods were studied and new detection methods developed. Space charge effects resulting from the large ion currents were identified to be the most likely cause of some unusual ion emission characteristics. In addition, on W < 110 > oriented substrates a surprising body-centered cubic crystal structure of the titanium film was found and studied. The ion currents required for neutron generator applications can be achieved by microfabrication of metal tip arrays. Field desorption studies of microfabricated field emitter tip arrays have been conducted for the first time. Maximum fields of 3 V/A have been applied to the array tip surfaces to date, although fields of ˜ 2 V/A to ˜ 2.5 V/A are more typical. Desorption of atomic deuterium ions has been observed at fields of roughly 2 V/A at room temperature. The desorption of common surface adsorbates, such as hydrogen, carbon, water, and

  14. Application of the high-resolution EM method in the investigation of B Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lanfang; He, Zhanxiang; Wang, Xuben; Zhang, Xizhe; Yang, Lunkai

    2005-09-01

    A successful case history of exploring for concealed structure using the high-resolution EM method in the investigation of the West-East Gas Pipeline Project’s B Tunnel is presented in this paper. The high frequency electromagnetic image system named STRATAGEM EH4, operating at frequencies ranging from 90 KHz to lHz, was used for data acquisition. The orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field were measured during the field acquisition and the relevant electromagnetic attributes of the object body were extracted from the electromagnetic data. Hybrid sources, consisting of natural and full tensor-controlled sources, were utilized to produce high-quality electromagnetic field data. B Tunnel lies in the western part of Hubei province, at depths of less than 200 m. The geologic setting of B tunnel is very complex. Following an initial geologic investigation, an outcrop considered to be a bedrock interface by investigators, collapsed during tunneling operations. A second investigation applied high-resolution EM and seismic refraction methods to reveal a more complex geologic structure along the tunnel route. The predicted rock classes and fault were encountered during the subsequent tunneling operations.

  15. Structural Controls on Groundwater Flow in Basement Terrains: Geophysical, Remote Sensing, and Field Investigations in Sinai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Lamees; Sultan, Mohamed; Ahmed, Mohamed; Zaki, Abotalib; Sauck, William; Soliman, Farouk; Yan, Eugene; Elkadiri, Racha; Abouelmagd, Abdou

    2015-09-01

    An integrated [very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic, magnetic, remote sensing, field, and geographic information system (GIS)] study was conducted over the basement complex in southern Sinai (Feiran watershed) for a better understanding of the structural controls on the groundwater flow. The increase in satellite-based radar backscattering values following a large precipitation event (34 mm on 17-18 January 2010) was used to identify water-bearing features, here interpreted as preferred pathways for surface water infiltration. Findings include: (1) spatial analysis in a GIS environment revealed that the distribution of the water-bearing features (conductive features) corresponds to that of fractures, faults, shear zones, dike swarms, and wadi networks; (2) using VLF (43 profiles), magnetic (7 profiles) techniques, and field observations, the majority (85 %) of the investigated conductive features were determined to be preferred pathways for groundwater flow; (3) northwest-southeast- to north-south-trending conductive features that intersect the groundwater flow (southeast to northwest) at low angles capture groundwater flow, whereas northeast-southwest to east-west features that intersect the flow at high angles impound groundwater upstream and could provide potential productive well locations; and (4) similar findings are observed in central Sinai: east-west-trending dextral shear zones (Themed and Sinai Hinge Belt) impede south to north groundwater flow as evidenced by the significant drop in hydraulic head (from 467 to 248 m above mean sea level) across shear zones and by reorientation of regional flow (south-north to southwest-northeast). The adopted integrated methodologies could be readily applied to similar highly fractured basement arid terrains elsewhere.

  16. Investigation of a direct effect of nanosecond pulse electric fields on mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estlack, Larry E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Cerna, Cesario Z.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-03-01

    The unique cellular response to nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) exposure, as compared to longer pulse exposure, has been theorized to be due to permeabilization of intracellular organelles including the mitochondria. In this investigation, we utilized a high-throughput oxygen and pH sensing system (Seahorse® XF24 extracellular flux analyzer) to assess the mitochondrial activity of Jurkat and U937 cells after nsPEF. The XF Analyzer uses a transient micro-chamber of only a few μL in specialized cell culture micro-plates to enable oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) to be monitored in real-time. We found that for nsPEF exposures of 10 pulses at 10-ns pulse width and at 50 kV/cm e-field, we were able to cause an increase in OCR in both U937 and Jurkat cells. We also found that high pulse numbers (>100) caused a significant decrease in OCR. Higher amplitude 150 kV/cm exposures had no effect on U937 cells and yet they had a deleterious effect on Jurkat cells, matching previously published 24 hour survival data. These results suggest that the exposures were modulating metabolic activity in cells possibly due to direct effects on the mitochondria themselves. To validate this hypothesis, we isolated mitochondria from U937 cells and exposed them similarly and found no significant change in metabolic activity for any pulse number. In a final experiment, we removed calcium from the buffer solution that the cells were exposed in and found that no significant enhancement in metabolic activity was observed. These results suggest that direct permeabilization of the mitochondria is unlikely a primary effect of nsPEF exposure and calcium-mediated intracellular pathway activation is likely responsible for observed pulse-induced mitochondrial effects.

  17. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  18. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton

    2014-01-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization’ schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters. PMID:24239701

  19. NMR investigation of field-induced magnetic order in barium manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Steve

    the triangular Mn5+ magnetic lattice of Ba3Mn2O8 coupled with interdimer interaction is predicted to result in incommensurate spin structure when the symmetry axis of Ba3Mn2O8 is aligned parallel to the field. Because of single ion anisotropy of the system, Ba3Mn 2O8 has phase diagram that depends on its alignment with respect to the external field[5]. This means that the microscopic spin structure is different depending on whether the material's symmetry axis is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the field. Also, since we are dealing with S = 1, we have potential to investigate spin-gap closure due to singlet and triplet states as well as triplet and quintet states if we are able to access high enough fields (15T to 30T). Measurements at National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), gives us a superficial taste of what it is like to be in the phase created by triplet and quintet gap closure. The temperature range allowed by the Oxford dilution refrigerator system at Brown Lab, UCLA is from 1K down to 30mK. The magnetic field range allowed by the superconducting magnet at Brown Lab, UCLA is from 0T up to 12T. This combination of temperature and field range allows us to investigate the first quantum critical point (Hc1) in detail with various NMR measurements. Normal state frequency shift as a function of temperature near Hc1 reveals behavior consistent with dilute hardcore bose gas. Analysis of the lineshapes of NMR spectra going into spin order BEC phase as a function of field, we directly observe incommensurate nature of spin order and deduce development of order parameter consistent with mean-field theory. Finally, we verify that the language of dilute 3D Bosons also applies to Ba3Mn2O8 through T1 measurements. From critical behavior inferred in T1 measurements, we complete phase boundary diagram at low temperatures and apply general concept of softening in Goldstone mode near Hc1 to describe our T 1 dependence as a function of temperature.

  20. Reflection type metasurface designed for high efficiency vectorial field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyi; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-07-01

    We propose a reflection type metal-insulator-metal (MIM) metasurface composed of hybrid nano-antennas for comprehensive spatial engineering of the properties of optical fields. The capability of such structure is illustrated in the design of a device that can be used to produce a radially polarized vectorial beam for optical needle field generation. This device consists of uniformly segmented sectors of high efficiency MIM metasurface. With each of the segment sector functioning as a local quarter-wave-plate (QWP), the device is designed to convert circularly polarized incidence into local linear polarization to create an overall radial polarization with corresponding binary phases and extremely high dynamic range amplitude modulation. The capability of such devices enables the generation of nearly arbitrarily complex optical fields that may find broad applications that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

  1. Reflection type metasurface designed for high efficiency vectorial field generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyi; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a reflection type metal-insulator-metal (MIM) metasurface composed of hybrid nano-antennas for comprehensive spatial engineering of the properties of optical fields. The capability of such structure is illustrated in the design of a device that can be used to produce a radially polarized vectorial beam for optical needle field generation. This device consists of uniformly segmented sectors of high efficiency MIM metasurface. With each of the segment sector functioning as a local quarter-wave-plate (QWP), the device is designed to convert circularly polarized incidence into local linear polarization to create an overall radial polarization with corresponding binary phases and extremely high dynamic range amplitude modulation. The capability of such devices enables the generation of nearly arbitrarily complex optical fields that may find broad applications that transcend disciplinary boundaries. PMID:27417150

  2. Extended depth of field imaging for high speed object analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortyn, William (Inventor); Basiji, David (Inventor); Frost, Keith (Inventor); Liang, Luchuan (Inventor); Bauer, Richard (Inventor); Hall, Brian (Inventor); Perry, David (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high speed, high-resolution flow imaging system is modified to achieve extended depth of field imaging. An optical distortion element is introduced into the flow imaging system. Light from an object, such as a cell, is distorted by the distortion element, such that a point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system is invariant across an extended depth of field. The distorted light is spectrally dispersed, and the dispersed light is used to simultaneously generate a plurality of images. The images are detected, and image processing is used to enhance the detected images by compensating for the distortion, to achieve extended depth of field images of the object. The post image processing preferably involves de-convolution, and requires knowledge of the PSF of the imaging system, as modified by the optical distortion element.

  3. Reflection type metasurface designed for high efficiency vectorial field generation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyi; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a reflection type metal-insulator-metal (MIM) metasurface composed of hybrid nano-antennas for comprehensive spatial engineering of the properties of optical fields. The capability of such structure is illustrated in the design of a device that can be used to produce a radially polarized vectorial beam for optical needle field generation. This device consists of uniformly segmented sectors of high efficiency MIM metasurface. With each of the segment sector functioning as a local quarter-wave-plate (QWP), the device is designed to convert circularly polarized incidence into local linear polarization to create an overall radial polarization with corresponding binary phases and extremely high dynamic range amplitude modulation. The capability of such devices enables the generation of nearly arbitrarily complex optical fields that may find broad applications that transcend disciplinary boundaries. PMID:27417150

  4. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, deceased, Roger J.; Dawson, Ralph; Fritz, Ian J.; Osbourn, Gordon C.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    A field effect transistor comprises a semiconductor having a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship. The semiconductor is a strained layer superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers and barrier layers being selected from the group of layer pairs consisting of InGaAs/AlGaAs, InAs/InAlGaAs, and InAs/InAlAsP. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice which has a superlattice conduction band energy level structure in k-vector space which includes a lowest energy .GAMMA.-valley and a next lowest energy L-valley, each k-vector corresponding to one of the orthogonal directions defined by the planes of said layers and the directions perpendicular thereto. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice L.sub.2D -valley which has a shape which is substantially more two-dimensional than that of said bulk L-valley.

  5. Investigation of ultra violet (UV) resistance for high strength fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M. A.; Dingwall, Brenda; Gupta, A.; Seyam, A. M.; Mock, G.; Theyson, T.

    Ultra long duration balloons (ULDB), currently under development by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), requires the use of high strength fibers in the selected super-pressure pumpkin design. The pumpkin shape balloon concept allows clear separation of the load transferring functions of the major structural elements of the pneumatic envelope, the tendons and the film. Essentially, the film provides the gas barrier and transfers only local pressure load to the tendons. The tendons, in the mean time, provide the global pressure containing strength. In that manner, the strength requirement for the film only depends on local parameters. The tendon is made of p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole (PBO) fibers, which is selected due to its high strength to weight ratio when compared to other high performance, commercially available, fibers. High strength fibers, however, are known to degrade upon exposure to light, particularly at short wavelengths. This paper reports the results of an investigation of the resistance of four commercial high strength fibers to ultra violet (UV) exposure. The results indicate that exposing high strength fibers in continuous yarn form to UV led to serious loss in strength of the fibers except for Spectra® fibers. The adverse changes in mechanical behavior occurred over short duration of exposure compared to the 100 day duration targeted for these missions. UV blocking finishes to improve the UV resistance of these fibers are being investigated. The application of these specially formulated coatings is expected to lead to significant improvement of the UV resistance of these high performance fibers. In this publication, we report on the mechanical behavior of the fibers pre- and post-exposure to UV, but without application of the blocking finishes.

  6. FIELD EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the field evaluation of a high-volume dichotomous sampler that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. The key feature of this device is the utilization of a round-nozzle virtual impactor with a 50% cutpoint at 2.5 5m to split PM10 into...

  7. The high field superconducting magnet program at LLNL: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Kerns, J.A.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Slack, D.S.; Summers, L.T.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1986-12-01

    In FY 86 the program continued along several interrelated thrust areas. These thrust areas have been broadly labeled as follows: (1) Superconductor Research and Technology; (2) Magnet Systems Materials Technology; (3) Magnet Systems Design Technology; (4) High Field Test Facility; and (5) Technology Transfer.

  8. Survey of high field superconducting material for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scahlan, R.; Greene, A.F.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-05-01

    The high field superconductors which could be used in accelerator dipole magnets are surveyed, ranking these candidates with respect to ease of fabrication and cost as well as superconducting properties. Emphasis is on Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi. 27 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  9. Investigating membrane breakdown of neuronal cells exposed to nonuniform electric fields by finite-element modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Wagenaar, Joost B M; Rutten, Wim L C; Marani, Enrico

    2002-10-01

    High electric field strengths may induce high cell membrane potentials. At a certain breakdown level the membrane potential becomes constant due to the transition from an insulating state into a high conductivity and high permeability state. Pores are thought to be created through which molecules may be transported into and out of the cell interior. Membrane rupture may follow due to the expansion of pores or the creation of many small pores across a certain part of the membrane surface. In nonuniform electric fields, it is difficult to predict the electroporated membrane area. Therefore, in this study the induced membrane potential and the membrane area where this potential exceeds the breakdown level is investigated by finite-element modeling. Results from experiments in which the collapse of neuronal cells was detected were combined with the computed field strengths in order to investigate membrane breakdown and membrane rupture. It was found that in nonuniform fields membrane rupture is position dependent, especially at higher breakdown levels. This indicates that the size of the membrane site that is affected by electroporation determines rupture.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Effectiveness of Magnetic Field on Food Freezing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toru; Takeuchi, Yuri; Masuda, Kazunori; Watanabe, Manabu; Shirakashi, Ryo; Fukuda, Yutaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Koga, Nobumitsu; Hiruma, Naoya; Ichioka, Jun; Takai, Kiyoshi

    Recently, several food refrigeration equipments that utilize magnetic field have attracted much attention from food production companies, consumers and mass media. However, the effectiveness of the freezers is not scientifically examined. Therefore, the effectiveness should be clarified by experiments or theoretical considerations. In this study, the effect of weak magnetic field (about 0.0005 T) on freezing process of several kinds of foods was investigated by using a specially designed freezer facilitated with magnetic field generator. The investigation included the comparison of freezing curves, drip amount, physicochemical evaluations on color and texture, observation of microstructure, and sensory evaluation. From the results of the control experiments, it can be concluded that weak magnetic field around 0.0005 T provided no significant difference on temperature history during freezing and on the qualities of frozen foods, within our experimental conditions.

  11. Experimental investigation of the visual field dependency in the erect and supine positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, J. H.; Saucer, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The increasing utilization of simulators in many fields, in addition to aeronautics and space, requires the efficient use of these devices. It seemed that personnel highly influenced by the visual scene would make desirable subjects, particularly for those simulators without sufficient motion cues. In order to evaluate this concept, some measure of the degree of influence of the visual field on the subject in necessary. As part of this undertaking, 37 male and female subjects, including eight test pilots, were tested for their visual field dependency or independency. A version of Witkin's rod and frame apparatus was used for the tests. The results showed that nearly all the test subjects exhibited some degree of field dependency, the degree varying from very high field dependency to nearly zero field dependency in a normal distribution. The results for the test pilots were scattered throughout a range similar to the results for the bulk of male subjects. The few female subjects exhibited a higher field dependency than the male subjects. The male subjects exhibited a greater field dependency in the supine position than in the erect position, whereas the field dependency of the female subjects changed only slightly.

  12. Comparative investigation of three dose rate meters for their viability in pulsed radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L; Pawelke, J

    2015-06-01

    Pulsed radiation fields, characterized by microsecond pulse duration and correspondingly high pulse dose rates, are increasingly used in therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Yet, dose rate meters which are used to monitor radiation protection areas or to inspect radiation shielding are mostly designed, characterized and tested for continuous fields and show severe deficiencies in highly pulsed fields. Despite general awareness of the problem, knowledge of the specific limitations of individual instruments is very limited, complicating reliable measurements. We present here the results of testing three commercial dose rate meters, the RamION ionization chamber, the LB 1236-H proportional counter and the 6150AD-b scintillation counter, for their response in pulsed radiation fields of varied pulse dose and duration. Of these three the RamION proved reliable, operating in a pulsed radiation field within its specifications, while the other two instruments were only able to measure very limited pulse doses and pulse dose rates reliably. PMID:25978117

  13. Characterisation of a high resolution small field of view portable gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Bugby, S L; Lees, J E; Bhatia, B S; Perkins, A C

    2014-05-01

    A handheld, high-resolution small field of view (SFOV) pinhole gamma camera has been characterised using a new set of protocols adapted from standards previously developed for large field of view (LFOV) systems. Parameters investigated include intrinsic and extrinsic spatial resolution, spatial linearity, uniformity, sensitivity, count rate capability and energy resolution. Camera characteristics are compared to some clinical LFOV gamma cameras and also to other SFOV cameras in development.

  14. Wave propagation downstream of a high power helicon in a dipolelike magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, James; Winglee, Robert; Roberson, B. Race; Ziemba, Timothy

    2010-01-15

    The wave propagating downstream of a high power helicon source in a diverging magnetic field was investigated experimentally. The magnetic field of the wave has been measured both axially and radially. The three-dimensional structure of the propagating wave is observed and its wavelength and phase velocity are determined. The measurements are compared to predictions from helicon theory and that of a freely propagating whistler wave. The implications of this work on the helicon as a thruster are also discussed.

  15. Levitation apparatus for neutron diffraction investigations on high temperature liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Hennet, Louis; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Bytchkov, Aleksei; Cristiglio, Viviana; Palleau, Pierre; Fischer, Henry E.; Cuello, Gabriel J.; Johnson, Mark; Melin, Philippe; Zanghi, Didier; Brassamin, Severine; Brun, Jean-Francois; Price, David L.; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2006-05-15

    We describe a new high temperature environment based on aerodynamic levitation and laser heating designed for neutron scattering experiments up to 3000 deg. C. The sample is heated to the desired temperature with three CO{sub 2} lasers from different directions in order to obtain a homogeneous temperature distribution. The apparent temperature of the sample is measured with an optical pyrometer, and two video cameras are employed to monitor the sample behavior during heating. The levitation setup is enclosed in a vacuum-tight chamber, enabling a high degree of gas purity and a reproducible sample environment for structural investigations on both oxide and metallic melts. High-quality neutron diffraction data have been obtained on liquid Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} and ZrNi alloy for relatively short counting times (1.5 h)

  16. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2000-02-25

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

  17. Investigating damage fields in a particulate composite material using real-time x-ray technique

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Tang, B.

    1993-12-31

    The damage fields in an edge-cracked sheet specimen subjected to a constant crosshead speed were investigated using the real-time x-ray technique. The specimen was made from polybutadiene rubber embedded with hard particles. The x-ray data were analyzed to delineate the damage field near the crack tip and to generate contour plots of the damage intensity. The experimental data were analyzed and the results are discussed.

  18. Comparison and Properties of Near-Field and Far-Field Events of High Speed Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Pinqing; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Two independent algorithms are applied to different signals to extract events that are potentially responsible for jet noise production. The data consist of 10 kHz TRPIV measurement and pressure sampling in both near- and far-field. One method uses near-field diagnostics (representatives of 2D velocity sections, e.g. velocity, vorticity, Q criterion, etc.) and near-field and far-field pressure. Applying cross-correlation and continuous wavelet to pairs of these signals, we look for the more dominant events in the time, frequency and lag domain. These are regarded as the main contributors of communication between the selected signals and are recorded as Near-Field Events. The other method only uses far-field microphones. The short time excerpts are identified as Far-Field Events that are common to three FF signals and responsible for peak energy spectrum. To compare these events, we map out their property distribution, including frequency, magnitude and time of occurrence. The individual events are also compared and a high portion is found to be common to both lists. We regard this as a verification of both algorithms. This work is supported in part by a Syracuse University Graduate Fellowship, by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at SU, and by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL.

  19. Magnetic fields end-face effect investigation of HTS bulk over PMG with 3D-modeling numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yujie; Lu, Yiyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the magnetic fields end-face effect of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk over a permanent magnetic guideway (PMG) is researched with 3D-modeling numerical method. The electromagnetic behavior of the bulk is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The framework is formulated by the magnetic field vector method (H-method). A superconducting levitation system composed of one rectangular HTS bulk and one infinite long PMG is successfully investigated using the proposed method. The simulation results show that for finite geometrical HTS bulk, even the applied magnetic field is only distributed in x-y plane, the magnetic field component Hz which is along the z-axis can be observed interior the HTS bulk.

  20. Investigating microbial transformations of soil organic matter: synthesizing knowledge from disparate fields to guide new experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, S. A.; Tiemann, L. K.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Lehmeier, C. A.; Min, K.

    2015-04-01

    Discerning why some soil organic matter (SOM) leaves soil profiles relatively quickly while other compounds, especially at depth, can be retained for decades to millennia is challenging for a multitude of reasons. Simultaneous with soil-specific advances, multiple other disciplines have enhanced their knowledge bases in ways potentially useful for future investigations of SOM decay. In this article, we highlight observations highly relevant for those investigating SOM decay and retention but often emanating from disparate fields and residing in literature seldom cited in SOM research. We focus on recent work in two key areas. First, we turn to experimental approaches using natural and artificial aquatic environments to investigate patterns of microbially mediated OM transformations as environmental conditions change, and highlight how aquatic microbial responses to environmental change can reveal processes likely important to OM decay and retention in soils. Second, we emphasize the importance of establishing intrinsic patterns of decay kinetics for purified substrates commonly found in soils to develop baseline rates. These decay kinetics - which represent the upper limit of the reaction rates - can then be compared to substrate decay kinetics observed in natural samples, which integrate intrinsic decay reaction rates and edaphic factors essential to the site under study but absent in purified systems. That comparison permits the site-specific factors to be parsed from the fundamental decay kinetics, an important advance in our understanding of SOM decay (and thus persistence) in natural systems. We then suggest ways in which empirical observations from aquatic systems and purified substrate-enzyme reaction kinetics can be used to advance recent theoretical efforts in SOM-focused research. Finally, we suggest how the observations in aquatic and purified substrate-enzyme systems could be used to help unravel the puzzles presented by oft-observed patterns of SOM

  1. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA) (WHC 1993a), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. A LFI Report is required, in accordance with the HPPS, when waste sites are to be considered for IRMs. The LFI is an integral part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) and process and functions as a focused RI or RFI for selection of IRMs. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRMs, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARA), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose an unacceptable risk that warrants action through IRMs. The 100-HR-1 unit encompasses approximately 100 acres adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. It contains waste units associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support the H Reactor. The area also contains evaporation basins which received liquid process wastes and nonroutine deposits of chemical wastes from the 300 Area, where fuel elements for the N Reactor were produced.

  2. Ionization of highly excited helium atoms in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    van de Water, W.; Mariani, D.R.; Koch, P.M.

    1984-11-01

    We present detailed measurements of ionization of highly excited triplet helium atoms in a static electric field. The atoms were prepared in states with energy E close to the saddle-point threshold E = -2(F(a.u.))/sup 1/2/. The electric field F was sufficiently strong for the states to be characterized by total spin S and absolute value of the magnetic quantum number M/sub L/. For M/sub L/ = 0 states the experiments measured ionization properties of adiabatic states. In another case, Vertical BarM/sub L/Vertical Bar = 2, they predominantly measured those of diabatic states. In both cases the ionization rate was found to be a highly nonmonotonic function of the field strength. The observations are analyzed in terms of a theory of the helium density of states in an electric field. A companion paper (D. A. Harmin, Phys. Rev. A 30, 2413 (1984)) develops in detail the general theory, which uses quantum defects to parametrize the effect of the core interaction. The agreement between measured and calculated ionization curves is good, indicating that the field ionization of a nonhydrogenic atom can now be understood in a detailed, quantitative, and predictive sense.

  3. Investigation of spatial distribution of radiocesium in a paddy field as a potential sink.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Iwatani, Hokuto; Takahashi, Yoshio; Sakaguchi, Aya; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Onda, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Surface soils, under various land uses, were contaminated by radionuclides that were released by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Because paddy fields are one of the main land uses in Japan, we investigated the spatial distribution of radiocesium and the influence of irrigation water in a paddy field during cultivation. Soil core samples collected at a paddy field in Fukushima showed that plowing had disturbed the original depth distribution of radiocesium. The horizontal distribution of radiocesium did not show any evidence for significant influence of radiocesium from irrigation water, and its accumulation within the paddy field, since the original amount of radiocesium was much larger than was added into the paddy field by irrigation water. However, it is possible that rainfall significantly increases the loading of radiocesium.

  4. Si:P as a laboratory analogue for hydrogen on high magnetic field white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Murdin, B N; Li, Juerong; Pang, M L Y; Bowyer, E T; Litvinenko, K L; Clowes, S K; Engelkamp, H; Pidgeon, C R; Galbraith, I; Abrosimov, N V; Riemann, H; Pavlov, S G; Hübers, H-W; Murdin, P G

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen in a magnetic flux density of 10(5) T (1 gigagauss), the maximum observed on high-field magnetic white dwarfs, is impossible because practically available fields are about a thousand times less. In this regime, the cyclotron and binding energies become equal. Here we demonstrate Lyman series spectra for phosphorus impurities in silicon up to the equivalent field, which is scaled to 32.8 T by the effective mass and dielectric constant. The spectra reproduce the high-field theory for free hydrogen, with quadratic Zeeman splitting and strong mixing of spherical harmonics. They show the way for experiments on He and H(2) analogues, and for investigation of He(2), a bound molecule predicted under extreme field conditions. PMID:23403570

  5. Si:P as a laboratory analogue for hydrogen on high magnetic field white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Murdin, B N; Li, Juerong; Pang, M L Y; Bowyer, E T; Litvinenko, K L; Clowes, S K; Engelkamp, H; Pidgeon, C R; Galbraith, I; Abrosimov, N V; Riemann, H; Pavlov, S G; Hübers, H-W; Murdin, P G

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen in a magnetic flux density of 10(5) T (1 gigagauss), the maximum observed on high-field magnetic white dwarfs, is impossible because practically available fields are about a thousand times less. In this regime, the cyclotron and binding energies become equal. Here we demonstrate Lyman series spectra for phosphorus impurities in silicon up to the equivalent field, which is scaled to 32.8 T by the effective mass and dielectric constant. The spectra reproduce the high-field theory for free hydrogen, with quadratic Zeeman splitting and strong mixing of spherical harmonics. They show the way for experiments on He and H(2) analogues, and for investigation of He(2), a bound molecule predicted under extreme field conditions.

  6. Numerical simulation of screening current distribution in HTS tape of high field magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Ryusei; Oga, Yuki; Noguchi, So; Igarashi, Hajime; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, especially in-field performance and mechanical strength, have been continuously improved. The HTS tapes have been widely used for high field (>20 T) magnet researches and there are several technical challenges including field attenuation of an HTS magnet by screening currents induced within the HTS tapes. Several publications reported that the screening currents, induced by penetration of self magnetic fields into HTS tapes within an HTS magnet, weakened a field constant of the HTS magnet. The result may demonstrate that the screening current changes an overall current density distribution in HTS tapes and, as a consequence, the generated magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the screening current distribution in an HTS tape. This paper reports numerical simulation of the screening current distribution in an HTS tape of high field magnets using 2D finite element method with the E-J characteristic of the HTS tape taken into account. Self magnetic field distribution and its orientation to the HTS tape are also considered to compute critical currents and locally generated electric fields, two key components to figure out the distribution of screening currents.

  7. Iridate compound produces extraordinarily high coercive magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, Vivien; Topping, Craig; Kim, Jae-Wook; Mun, Eun-Deok; Goddard, Paul; Ghannadzadeh, Saman; Luo, Xuan; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Singleton, John

    2014-03-01

    We present a data on an iridate compound that shows an extraordinarily large magnetic hysteresis loop. The coercive magnetic field exceeds 40 Tesla in single-crystal samples. The hysteresis coexists with a linear background, and the total remanent magnetization is about half a Bohr magneton. We will discuss the emergence of these properties from the interplay of spin-orbit coupling, magnetic exchange and possible frustration. The single crystalline material exhibits a magnetic hysteresis loop for one orientation of the magnetic field and a smooth linear increase in the magnetization with field for the other. Measurements were conducted in 65 T short-pulse magnets and the 60 Tesla shaped-pulse magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Lab in Los Alamos. We do not observe any dependence of the magnetic hysteresis on magnetic field sweep rate. Compounds containing Ir4 + have attracted attention recently due to strong spin-orbit coupling that competes with crystal-electric field and exchange interactions. This competition can result in non-Hund's-rule ground states with unusual properties.

  8. Investigation of different magnetic field configurations using an electrical, modular Zeeman slower

    SciTech Connect

    Ohayon, Ben; Ron, Guy

    2015-10-15

    We present a method of constructing an automatically reconfigurable, modular, electronic Zeeman slower, which is remotely controlled. This setup is used to investigate the ability of different magnetic field profiles to slow thermal atoms to the capture velocity of a magneto-optical-trap. We show that a simple numerical optimization process yields better results than the commonly used approach for deciding on the appropriate field and comes close to the optimum field, found by utilizing a fast feedback loop which uses a genetic algorithm. Our new numerical method is easily adaptable to a variety of existing slower designs and may be beneficial where feedback is unavailable.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University was motivated by previous studies indicating that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 when compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The influence of electric fields on bubble formation has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  10. Theoretical investigation of boundary contours of ground-state atoms in uniform electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    The boundary contours were investigated for first 54 ground-state atoms of the periodic table when they are in uniform electric fields of strengths 106, 107 and 108 V/m. The atomic characteristic boundary model in combination with an ab-initio method was employed. Some regularities of the deformation of atoms, ΔR, in above electric fields are revealed. Furthermore, atomic polarisabilities of the first 54 elements of the periodic table are shown to correlate strongly with the mean variation rate of atomic radial size divided by the strength of the electric field F, ?, which provides a predictive method of calculating atomic polarisabilities of 54 atoms.

  11. High field superconductor development and understanding project, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.

    2009-07-15

    Over 25 years the Applied Superconductivity Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provided a vital technical resource to the High Energy Physics community covering development in superconducting strand for HEP accelerator magnet development. In particular the work of the group has been to develop the next generation of high field superconductors for high field application. Grad students Mike Naus, Chad Fischer, Arno Godeke and Matt Jewell improved our understanding of the microstructure and microchemistry of Nb3Sn and their impact on the physical and mechanical properties. The success of this work has led to the continued funding of this work at the ASC after it moved to the NHMFL and also to direct funding from BNL for some aspects of Nb3Sn cable evaluation.

  12. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  13. Compound specific isotope analysis to investigate pesticide degradation in lysimeter experiments at field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabenko, Evgenia; Elsner, Martin; Bakkour, Rani; Hofstetter, Thomas; Torrento, Clara; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The frequent detection of organic micropollutants such as pesticides, consumer care products or pharmaceuticals in water is an increasing concern for human and ecosystem health. Degradation analysis of these compounds can be challenging in complex systems due to the fact that metabolites are not always found and mass balances frequently cannot be closed. Many abiotic and biotic degradation pathways cause, however, distinct isotope fractionation, where light isotopes are transferred preferentially from the reactant to the product pool (normal isotope fractionation). Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of multiple elements is a particularly powerful method to evaluate organic micropollutant transformation, because it can even give pathway-specific isotope fractionation (1,2). Available CSIA field studies, however, have focused almost exclusively on volatile petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons, which are present in high concentrations in the environment and can be extracted easily from water for GC-IRMS analysis. In the case of micropollutants, such as pesticides, CSIA in more challenging since it needs to be conducted at lower concentrations and requires pre-concentration, purification and high chromatographic performance (3). In this study we used lysimeters experiments to analyze transformation of atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor and chloridazone by studying associated isotope fractionation. The project combines a) analytical method development for CSIA, b) identification of pathways of micropollutant degradation and c) quantification of transformation processes under field condition. The pesticides were applied both, at the soil surface and below the top soil under field-relevant concentrations in May 2014. After typical irrigation of the lysimeters, seepage water was collected in 50L bottles and stored for further SPE and CSIA. Here we present the very first result of a) analytical method development, b) improvement of SPE methods for complex pesticide

  14. High-order harmonic generation from Rydberg atoms in inhomogeneous fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; He, Lixin; Luo, Jianghua; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2014-10-20

    We theoretically investigate the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from Rydberg atoms considering the spatial inhomogeneity of the driving field. It is found that in the inhomogeneous field, the effect of the cutoff extension in the harmonic spectrum from Rydberg atoms can be extended to multi-cycle regime, while in the homogeneous field case, the extension of the harmonic cutoff is limited to the few-cycle regime (less than two optical cycles). The underlying physics of the cutoff extension from Rydberg atoms in the inhomogeneous field is analyzed based on the classical and quantum-mechanical models. Furthermore, by optimizing the field inhomogeneity, the electron dynamics can be well controlled to generate a smooth supercontinuum in the extended spectral region. This can support the efficient generation of isolated attosecond pulses in Rydberg atoms from multi-cycle laser fields.

  15. High field - low energy muon ionization cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham; Palmer, Robert B.; Neuffer, David

    2015-09-01

    Muon beams are generated with large transverse and longitudinal emittances. In order to achieve the low emittances required by a muon collider, within the short lifetime of the muons, ionization cooling is required. Cooling schemes have been developed to reduce the muon beam 6D emittances to ≈300 μ m -rad in transverse and ≈1 - 1.5 mm in longitudinal dimensions. The transverse emittance has to be further reduced to ≈50 - 25 μ m -rad with an upper limit on the longitudinal emittance of ≈76 mm in order to meet the high-energy muon collider luminosity requirements. Earlier studies of the transverse cooling of low energy muon beams in high field magnets showed a promising performance, but did not include transverse or longitudinal matching between the stages. In this study we present the first complete design of the high field-low energy ionization cooling channel with transverse and longitudinal matching. The channel design was based on strong focusing solenoids with fields of 25-30 T and low momentum muon beam starting at 135 MeV /c and gradually decreasing. The cooling channel design presented here is the first to reach ≈50 micron scale emittance beam. We present the channel's optimized design parameters including the focusing solenoid fields, absorber parameters and the transverse and longitudinal matching.

  16. High-precision measurements of global stellar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachinda, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a brief history of the development of devices and techniques for high-precision measurements of stellar magnetic fields. Two main approaches for the processing of spectral-polarimetric observations are described: the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), which is used to find a mean-weighted average of the normalized polarization profile using a set of spectral lines, and a method in which each individual spectral line is used to determine the magnetic field, viz., the single line method (SL). The advantages and disadvantages of the LSD and SL methods are discussed.

  17. Experimental study of the formation of field-reversed configurations employing high-order multipole fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slough, J. T.; Hoffman, A. L.

    1990-04-01

    A high-order multipole ``barrier'' field was applied at the vacuum tube wall in the TRX experiment [Phys. Fluids B 1, 840 (1989)] during both the preionization and field reversal phases of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation. Use of this field during field reversal resulted in a significant reduction of impurities as well as increased flux trapping. With a large enough Bθ at the wall, sheath detachment from the wall became apparent, and flux loss through the sheath became negligible (<10%). At larger wall Bθ (>1.5 kG), destructive rotational spin-up occurred, driven by Hall current forces. When the multipole barrier field was also applied during either axial discharge or ringing theta current preionization, a very symmetric and uniform breakdown of the fill gas was achieved. In particular, using ringing theta preionization, complete ionization of the fill gas was accomplished with purely inductive fields of remarkably low magnitude, where Ez≤3 V/cm, and Eθ≤20 V/cm. Due to the improved ionization symmetry, about 65% to 75% of the lift-off flux (flux remaining after field reversal) could be retained through the remaining formation processes into an equilibrium FRC. Using the multipole field during both preionization and formation, it was possible to form FRC's with good confinement with greater than 3 mWb of trapped flux at 15 mTorr D2 or H2 in a 10 cm radius device. Values of s in excess of 4 could be achieved in this manner.

  18. High-pressure and high-temperature stability field of hydrous phase delta-AlOOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, A.; Ohtani, E.; Kondo, T.; Hirao, N.; Sone, T.; Kikegawa, T.; Sata, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Stability field of hydrous phases is a key for understanding water concentration in the earth's mantle. δ-AlOOH is a high-pressure polymorph of diaspore (α-AlOOH) and boehmite (γ-AlOOH). The space group of this phase is Pnn2 and it is similar to CaCl2-type SiO2 which is a high-pressure polymorph of stishovite; edge-sharing Al-O octahedra make single-chain along c-axis. Although it has a large stability field in pressure range from 18 GPa to 32 GPa and temperature of up to 1473 K, the high-pressure stability limits has not yet clarified. In this study, we investigated the stability field of δ-AlOOH up to 130 GPa. The high-pressure experiments were performed using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Starting material was gibbsite (Al(OH)3) powder mixed with platinum black as a laser absorber. The sample was sandwiched by pure gibbsite layers and loaded into a rhenium gasket. Pressures were measured with ruby-fluorescence technique before and after heating. The sample was heated from both sides by a Nd:YAG laser operated in multimode. After experiment, stable phase in each condition was determined using the X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy method. We also conducted in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments under high-pressure and temperature conditions together with the X-ray diffraction of the recovered samples both at BL10XU in SPring-8 and BL-13A in Photon Factory. In these runs, pressures were also calculated using the equation of state of platinum. The experimental conditions were in the pressures between 50-130 GPa and temperatures to 1800 K. X-ray analysis shows the sample recovered from the pressure and temperature range from 40 GPa and 1577 K to 130 GPa and 1800 K consists of δ-AlOOH. In the in-situ experiments, crystallization of δ-AlOOH was observed at 65 GPa and 1300 K and it was stable up to 1700 K. δ-AlOOH is stable in the large pressure range with a dehydration temperature around 1800K. It can be a water reservoir in subducting slabs in the

  19. An investigation of the performance of a coaxial HPGe detector operating in a magnetic resonance imaging field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, L. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cole, P.; Cresswell, J. R.; Filmer, F.; Jones, M.; Judson, D. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Sampson, J. A.; Scraggs, D. P.; Slee, M. J.; Bimson, W. E.; Kemp, G. J.; Groves, J.; Headspith, J.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Cooper, R. J.

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear medical imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography are used to probe physiological functions of the body by detecting gamma rays emitted from biologically targeted radiopharmaceuticals. A system which is capable of simultaneous data acquisition for nuclear medical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging is highly sought after by the medical imaging community. Such a device could provide a more complete medical insight into the functions of the body within a well-defined structural context. However, acquiring simultaneous nuclear/MRI sequences are technically challenging due to the conventional photomultiplier tube readout employed by most existing scintillator detector systems. A promising solution is a nuclear imaging device composed of semiconductor detectors that can be operated with a standard MRI scanner. However, the influence of placing a semiconductor detector such as high purity germanium (HPGe) within or close to the bore of an MRI scanner, where high magnetic fields are present, is not well understood. In this paper, the performance of a HPGe detector operating in a high strength static ( BS) MRI field along with fast switching gradient fields and radiofrequency from the MRI system has been assessed. The influence of the BS field on the energy resolution of the detector has been investigated for various positions and orientations of the detector within the magnetic field. The results have then been interpreted in terms of the influence of the BS field on the charge collection properties. MRI images have been acquired with the detector situated at the entrance of the MRI bore to investigate the effects of simultaneous data acquisition on detector performance and MRI imaging.

  20. Dynamics and structure of self-generated magnetics fields on solids following high contrast, high intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Albertazzi, B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Böker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; D'Humières, E.; Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnagni, L.; Lancia, L.; Shepherd, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Starodubtsev, M.; and others

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of self-generated magnetic B-fields produced following the interaction of a high contrast, high intensity (I > 10{sup 19 }W cm{sup −2}) laser beam with thin (3 μm thick) solid (Al or Au) targets is investigated experimentally and numerically. Two main sources drive the growth of B-fields on the target surfaces. B-fields are first driven by laser-generated hot electron currents that relax over ∼10–20 ps. Over longer timescales, the hydrodynamic expansion of the bulk of the target into vacuum also generates B-field induced by non-collinear gradients of density and temperature. The laser irradiation of the target front side strongly localizes the energy deposition at the target front, in contrast to the target rear side, which is heated by fast electrons over a much larger area. This induces an asymmetry in the hydrodynamic expansion between the front and rear target surfaces, and consequently the associated B-fields are found strongly asymmetric. The sole long-lasting (>30 ps) B-fields are the ones growing on the target front surface, where they remain of extremely high strength (∼8–10 MG). These B-fields have been recently put by us in practical use for focusing laser-accelerated protons [B. Albertazzi et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 043502 (2015)]; here we analyze in detail their dynamics and structure.

  1. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  2. Control and data acquisition systems for high field superconducting wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A.; Ilyin, I.; Karpov, G.; Kozak, V.; Kuzin, M.; Kuper, E.; Mamkin, V.; Mezentsev, N.; Repkov, V.; Selivanov, A.; Shkaruba, V.

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the control and DAQ system of superconducting wigglers with magnetic field range up to 10.3 T. The first version of the system controls a 7 T superconducting wiggler prepared for installation at Bessy-II (Germany). The second one controls a 10 T wiggler which is under testing now at the SPring-8 site (Japan). Both systems are based on VME apparatus. The set of specialized VME modules is elaborated to arrange wiggler power supply control, full time wiggler monitoring, and magnetic field high accuracy measurement and field stabilization. The software for the control of the wigglers is written in C language for VxWorks operation system for a Motorola-162 VME controller. The task initialization, stops and acquisition of the data can be done from the nearest personal computer (FTP host for VME), or from the remote system as well.

  3. Microencapsulation of Multiple-Layer Emulsion with High-Voltage Electrostatic Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water-soluble materials are widely used in the applications of agriculture, food and pharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to investigate a new microencapsulation method to produce water-soluble materials. A high-voltage electrostatic field apparatus was used to produce such materials r...

  4. NMR probing of quantum electron solids in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhone, Trevor David

    2015-03-01

    In the presence of a high magnetic field, a two dimensional electron system (2DES) is expected to manifest Wigner crystal phases. Over thirty years ago, the search for the Wigner solid led to the discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). Since then, with the advent of GaAs quantum wells with increasingly high mobility, 2DESs in the quantum Hall regime have proved to be a hunting ground for exceedingly rich many-body physics. Incompressible liquid FQHE states were found to occur in the first Landau level at several fractional filling factors v with odd-denominator. The sequence of FQHE states is truncated by the formation of a Wigner crystal of electrons at very low filling factors, the transition being affected by disorder. In the second Landau level, composite fermions, the quasiparticles of the FQHE, can pair to yield a remarkable even-denominator FQHE state, whose properties are at the forefront of investigation. More recently, electron solid phases have been shown to emerge around integer quantum Hall states. In this talk, I will discuss a new tool, resistively detected NMR, which serves as a direct local probe of in-plane charge density modulations in the 2DES. In our recent work [1] we probe the local charge density landscape of Wigner solids in the vicinity of v = 2 and v<1/3 revealing quantum correlations. This unprecedented access to the microscopic behavior of these exotic solid phases opens up new venues in FQH studies. Furthermore, our NMR technique can probe in-plane charge density fluctuations due to disorder, allowing increased access to understanding roles of disorder in quantum Hall systems. In addition, our latest NMR measurements reveal evidence for charge inhomogeneity in the third Landau level which leads to the possibility of studying bubble and stripe phases in this regime. Future directions may find our NMR technique applied to other exotic phases such as quasiparticle solid phases, which have been proposed to emerge near the v

  5. High Resolution Optical Surface Investigation based on Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spannagel, Ruven; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus

    2012-07-01

    We present results on high precision optical profilometry for investigating reflecting surfaces with respect to surface properties such as structure, roughness, and waviness. Our metrology system is based on a highly symmetric heterodyne interferometer with a potential sensitivity at the picometer level. The profilometer is capable of scanning surfaces by actuating either the device under test (DUT), or the measurement laser beam of the interferometer. The current setup with DUT-actuation has a sensitivity of about 1 nm/ ? , and achives a measurement accuracy better than 5 nm at a measurement range of 100 μm with a lateral resolution of approximately 15 μm. Different profiles of various surfaces were measured and the reproducibility of the results have been demonstrated by measuring a reference surface.

  6. Wide-field high-performance geosynchronous imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. John; Jenstrom, Del; Wilson, Mark; Hinkal, Sanford; Kirchman, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) Program and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are sponsoring the Advanced Geosynchronous Studies (AGS) to develop technologies and system concepts for Earth observation from geosynchronous orbit. This series of studies is intended to benefit both MTPE science and the NOAA GOES Program. Within the AGS program, advanced imager trade studies have investigated two candidate concepts for near-term advanced geosynchronous imagers. One concept uses a scan mirror to direct the line of sight from a 3-axis stabilized platform. Another eliminates the need for a scan mirror by using an agile spacecraft bus to scan the entire instrument. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the optical design trades and system issues encountered in evaluating the two scanning approaches. The imager design started with a look at first principles: what is the most efficient way to image the Earth in those numerous spectral bands of interest to MTPE scientists and NOAA weather forecasters. Optical design trades included rotating filter wheels and dispersive grating instruments. The design converged on a bandpass filter instrument using four focal planes to cover the spectral range 0.45 to 13.0 micrometers. The first imager design uses a small agile spacecraft supporting an afocal optical telescope. Dichroic beamsplitters feed refractive objectives to four focal planes. The detectors are a series of long linear and rectangular arrays which are scanned in a raster fashion over the 17 degree Earth image. The use of the spacecraft attitude control system to raster the imager field-of-view (FOV) back and forth over the Earth eliminates the need for a scan mirror. However, the price paid is significant energy and time required to reverse the spacecraft slew motions at the end of each scan line. Hence, it is desired to minimize the number of scan lines needed to cover the full Earth disk. This desire, coupled with the ground

  7. Graded High Field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.

    2007-06-01

    Dipole magnets with fields beyond 16T will require superconducting coils that are at least 40 mm thick, an applied pres-stress around 150 MPa and a protection scheme for stored energy in the range of 1-2 MJ/m. The coil size will have a direct impact on the overall magnet cost and the stored energy will raise new questions on protection. To reduce coil size and minimize risk, the coil may have to be graded. Grading is achieved by splitting the coil into several layers with current densities that match the short sample field in each layer. Grading, especially at high fields, can be effective; however it will also significantly raise the stress. In this paper we report on the results of a study on the coil size and field relation to that of the stress and stored energy. We then extend the results to graded coils and attempt to address high stress issues and ways to reduce it.

  8. Gigagauss Magnetic Field Generation from High Intensity Laser Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcik, J.; Perry, M. D.; Lasinski, B. F.; Langdon, A. B.; Cowan, T.; Hammer, J.; Hatchett, S.; Hunt, A.; Key, M. H.; Moran, M.; Pennington, D.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.; Wilks, S. C.

    2004-11-01

    Intense laser (>1021 W/cm2) sources using pulse compression techniques in the sub-picosecond time frame have been used to create dynamic electric field strengths in excess of 100 Megavolts/micron with associated magnetic field strengths in the gigagauss regime. We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for a variety of applications. Hot electron spectra from laser-target interactions in Au have been measured with energies up to 100 MeV. Hot x-ray production has been measured using filtered thermoluminescent dosimeters and threshold nuclear activation (γ,n) from giant resonance interactions. High-resolution radiographs through ρr ≥ 165 gm/cm2 have been obtained. Dose levels in the x-ray band from 2-8 MeV have been measured at the level of several rads at one meter from the target for a single pulse. The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide high magnetic fields are discussed. Results of preliminary magnetic field calculations are presented along with potential applications of this technology and estimates of the fundamental scaling limits for future development.

  9. High Field RMF FRC Experiments on STX-HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreason, Samuel; Slough, John

    2001-10-01

    As part of the effort of the TCS program to explore the physics of RMF generated FRCs, a start-up experiment has been constructed to operate at much higher RMF and axial magnetic fields. It is hoped that with the RMF alone at higher power density , it will be possible to form plasmas with both high density, and high electron and ion temperatures. To this end the STX experiment with its 2 MW RMF supply was reconfigured to drive a smaller plasma volume (rp reduced from 18 to 6 cm). In addition an axially remote plasma source was used to supply plasma in a manner that limits neutral contamination and RMF field penetration issues. With axial fields in the kG range, plasma temperatures and densities in a more fusion relevant regime can be studied. Initial results at low RMF power (60 kW) have produced Te = Ti for the first time (T_tot 25 eV). As a result, both ions and electrons are magnetized (ωτ >> 1). Unlike previous experiments, the plasma is formed with a fully penetrated RMF field, producing a rigid rotor current profile. The plasma resistivity at low RMF power is consistent with classical ( 60 μohm-m). The particle confinement is found to be considerably enhanced by the RMF, with a confinement time several times classical. Results at higher power will be presented as well.

  10. 77 FR 16852 - Notice of Reclassification of Five Regional Offices to Investigative Field Offices: Seattle, WA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ...: Seattle, WA; New Orleans, LA; Baltimore, MD; Tampa, FL; and Detroit, MI; Closure of Two Investigative..., Washington; New Orleans, Louisiana; Baltimore, Maryland; Tampa, Florida; and Detroit, Michigan regional..., Louisiana; Baltimore, Maryland; Tampa, Florida; and Detroit, Michigan regional offices as field offices...

  11. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect

    T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M. Firestone; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A. C. T. Resch, and D. Newcomer , S. Koenigsberg and A. Willet Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr at Hanford 100H

    2005-04-20

    The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

  12. Infrared cyclotron resonances of Dirac electrons in SiC epitaxial graphene in ultra-high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Nakamura, D.; Takeyama, S.; Hibino, H.

    2013-12-04

    To investigate the high magnetic field properties of the Dirac fermion system, we performed magneto-absorption measurements of epitaxially grown graphene at high magnetic field using the single-turn coil (STC) method. We observed the cyclotron resonance absorption corresponding to n = 0 to 1 intraband transitions.

  13. Measurements of radiation fields around high-energy proton accelerators.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Silari, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring of ionising radiation around high-energy particle accelerators is a difficult task due to the complexity of the radiation field, which is made up of neutrons, charged hadrons, muons, photons and electrons, with energy spectra extending over a wide energy range. The dose-equivalent outside a thick shield is mainly owing to neutrons, with some contribution from photons and, to a minor extent, the other particles. Neutron dosimetry and spectrometry are thus of primary importance to correctly evaluate the exposure of personnel. This paper reviews the relevant techniques and instrumentation employed for monitoring radiation fields around high-energy proton accelerators, with particular emphasis on the recent development to increase the response of neutron measuring devices > 20 MeV. Rem-counters, pressurised ionisation chambers, superheated emulsions, tissue-equivalent proportional counters and Bonner sphere spectrometers are discussed. PMID:16604662

  14. Investigation of mechanical field weakening of axial flux permanent magnet motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaifuddin Mohd, M.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.; Syafiq Mohd, M.

    2015-12-01

    An investigation of axial flux permanent magnet motor (AFPM) characteristics was conducted with a proposed mechanical field weakening control mechanisms (by means of stator-rotor force manipulation) on the motor through modeling and experimentation. By varying the air gap between at least two bistable positions, the peak torque and top speed of the motor can be extended. The motor high efficiency region can also be extended to cover greater part of the motor operating points. An analytical model of the motor had been developed to study the correlation between the total attraction force (between the rotor and the stator) and the operating parameters of the motor. The test results shows that the motor output complies with the prediction of the research hypothesis and it is likely that a spring locking mechanism can be built to dynamically adjust the air gap of the motor to increase the operating range and could be applied in electric drivetrain applications to improve overall efficiency of electric and hybrid electric vehicles.

  15. Release and fate of fluorocarbons in a shredder residue landfill cell: 2. Field investigations.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Nedenskov, Jonas; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The shredder residues from automobiles, home appliances and other metal containing products are often disposed in landfills, as recycling technologies for these materials are not common in many countries. Shredder waste contains rigid and soft foams from cushions and insulation panels blown with fluorocarbons. The objective of this study was to determine the gas composition, attenuation, and emission of fluorocarbons in a monofill shredder residue landfill cell by field investigation. Landfill gas generated within the shredder waste primarily consisted of CH(4) (27%) and N(2) (71%), without CO(2), indicating that the gas composition was governed by chemical reactions in combination with anaerobic microbial reactions. The gas generated also contained different fluorocarbons (up to 27 μg L(-1)). The presence of HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 indicated that anaerobic degradation of CFC-11 occurred in the landfill cell, as neither of these compounds has been produced for industrial applications. This study demonstrates that a landfill cell containing shredder waste has a potential for attenuating CFC-11 released from polyurethane (PUR) insulation foam in the cell via aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes. In deeper, anaerobic zones of the cell, reductive dechlorination of CFCs to HCFCs was evident, while in the shallow, oxic zones, there was a high potential for biooxidation of both methane and lesser chlorinated fluorocarbons. These findings correlated well with both laboratory results (presented in a companion paper) and surface emission measurements that, with the exception from a few hot spots, indicated that surface emissions were negative or below detection. PMID:20444588

  16. Modelling high arctic percent vegetation cover using field digital images and high resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nanfeng; Treitz, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In this study, digital images collected at a study site in the Canadian High Arctic were processed and classified to examine the spatial-temporal patterns of percent vegetation cover (PVC). To obtain the PVC of different plant functional groups (i.e., forbs, graminoids/sedges and mosses), field near infrared-green-blue (NGB) digital images were classified using an object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach. The PVC analyses comparing different vegetation types confirmed: (i) the polar semi-desert exhibited the lowest PVC with a large proportion of bare soil/rock cover; (ii) the mesic tundra cover consisted of approximately 60% mosses; and (iii) the wet sedge consisted almost exclusively of graminoids and sedges. As expected, the PVC and green normalized difference vegetation index (GNDVI; (RNIR - RGreen)/(RNIR + RGreen)), derived from field NGB digital images, increased during the summer growing season for each vegetation type: i.e., ∼5% (0.01) for polar semi-desert; ∼10% (0.04) for mesic tundra; and ∼12% (0.03) for wet sedge respectively. PVC derived from field images was found to be strongly correlated with WorldView-2 derived normalized difference spectral indices (NDSI; (Rx - Ry)/(Rx + Ry)), where Rx is the reflectance of the red edge (724.1 nm) or near infrared (832.9 nm and 949.3 nm) bands; Ry is the reflectance of the yellow (607.7 nm) or red (658.8 nm) bands with R2's ranging from 0.74 to 0.81. NDSIs that incorporated the yellow band (607.7 nm) performed slightly better than the NDSIs without, indicating that this band may be more useful for investigating Arctic vegetation that often includes large proportions of senescent vegetation throughout the growing season.

  17. Superconducting Nb3Ge for high-field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginski, A. I.; Daniel, M. R.; Roland, C. W.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting Nb3Ge tape conductors 5 to 10 m long were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition. Such tapes could be used in high-field magnet applications. Average tape properties set the upper performance limit of a magnet at 17 teslas (4.2 K). Highest critical-current densities obtained in thin and layered films set the upper performance limit at 20 teslas (4.2 K).

  18. High dynamic range diamond magnetometry for time dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummal Momeen, M.; Nusran, N. M.; Gurudev Dutt, M. V.

    2012-02-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have become a topic of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in high resolution nanoscale magnetometry and quantum information processing devices at ambient conditions. We will present our recent progress on implementing novel phase estimation algorithms with a single electron spin qubit associated with the NV center, in combination with dynamical decoupling techniques, to improve the dynamic range and sensitivity of magnetometry with time-varying magnetic fields.

  19. Field Investigation of a New Recharge Approach for ASR Projects in Near-Surface Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaisheng; Knobbe, Steven; Reboulet, Edward C; Whittemore, Donald O; Händel, Falk; Butler, James J

    2016-05-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is the artificial recharge and temporary storage of water in an aquifer when water is abundant, and recovery of all or a portion of that water when it is needed. One key limiting factor that still hinders the effectiveness of ASR is the high costs of constructing, maintaining, and operating the artificial recharge systems. Here we investigate a new recharge method for ASR in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers that uses small-diameter, low-cost wells installed with direct-push (DP) technology. The effectiveness of a DP well for ASR recharge is compared with that of a surface infiltration basin at a field site in north-central Kansas. The performance of the surface basin was poor at the site due to the presence of a shallow continuous clay layer, identified with DP profiling methods, that constrained the downward movement of infiltrated water and significantly reduced the basin recharge capacity. The DP well penetrated through this clay layer and was able to recharge water by gravity alone at a much higher rate. Most importantly, the costs of the DP well, including both the construction and land costs, were only a small fraction of those for the infiltration basin. This low-cost approach could significantly expand the applicability of ASR as a water resources management tool to entities with limited fiscal resources, such as many small municipalities and rural communities. The results of this investigation demonstrate the great potential of DP wells as a new recharge option for ASR projects in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers.

  20. Field Investigation of a New Recharge Approach for ASR Projects in Near-Surface Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaisheng; Knobbe, Steven; Reboulet, Edward C; Whittemore, Donald O; Händel, Falk; Butler, James J

    2016-05-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is the artificial recharge and temporary storage of water in an aquifer when water is abundant, and recovery of all or a portion of that water when it is needed. One key limiting factor that still hinders the effectiveness of ASR is the high costs of constructing, maintaining, and operating the artificial recharge systems. Here we investigate a new recharge method for ASR in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers that uses small-diameter, low-cost wells installed with direct-push (DP) technology. The effectiveness of a DP well for ASR recharge is compared with that of a surface infiltration basin at a field site in north-central Kansas. The performance of the surface basin was poor at the site due to the presence of a shallow continuous clay layer, identified with DP profiling methods, that constrained the downward movement of infiltrated water and significantly reduced the basin recharge capacity. The DP well penetrated through this clay layer and was able to recharge water by gravity alone at a much higher rate. Most importantly, the costs of the DP well, including both the construction and land costs, were only a small fraction of those for the infiltration basin. This low-cost approach could significantly expand the applicability of ASR as a water resources management tool to entities with limited fiscal resources, such as many small municipalities and rural communities. The results of this investigation demonstrate the great potential of DP wells as a new recharge option for ASR projects in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers. PMID:26313764

  1. Investigating microbial transformations of soil organic matter: synthesizing knowledge from disparate fields to guide new experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, S. A.; Tiemann, L. K.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Lehmeier, C.; Min, K.

    2014-12-01

    Investigators of soil organic matter (SOM) transformations struggle with a deceptively simple-sounding question: "Why does some SOM leave the soil profile relatively quickly, while other compounds, especially those at depth, appear to be retained on timescales ranging from the decadal to the millennial?" This question is important on both practical and academic levels, but addressing it is challenging for a multitude of reasons. Simultaneous with soil-specific advances, multiple other disciplines have enhanced their knowledge bases in ways potentially useful for future investigations of SOM decay. In this article, we highlight observations highly relevant for those investigating SOM decay and retention but often emanating from disparate fields and residing in literature seldom cited in SOM research. We focus on recent work in two key areas. First, we turn to experimental approaches using natural and artificial aquatic environments to investigate patterns of microbially-mediated OM transformations as environmental conditions change, and highlight how aquatic microbial responses to environmental change can reveal processes likely important to OM decay and retention in soils. Second, we emphasize the importance of establishing intrinsic patterns of decay kinetics for purified substrates commonly found in soils to develop baseline rates. These decay kinetics - which represent the upper limit of the reaction rates - can then be compared to substrate decay kinetics observed in natural samples, which integrate intrinsic decay reaction rates and edaphic factors essential to the site under study but absent in purified systems. That comparison permits the site-specific factors to be parsed from the fundamental decay kinetics, an important advance in our understanding of SOM decay (and thus persistence) in natural systems. We then suggest ways in which empirical observations from aquatic systems and purified enzyme-substrate reaction kinetics can be used to advance recent

  2. Investigation of flow and solute transport at the field scale through heterogeneous deformable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-09-01

    This work describes an investigation of the spatial statistical structure of specific discharge field and solute transport process of a nonreactive solute at the field scale through a heterogeneous deformable porous medium. The flow field is driven by a vertical gradient in the excess pore water pressure induced by a step increase in load applied on the upper part of a finite-thickness aquifer. The non-stationary spectral representation is adopted to characterize the spatial covariance of the specific discharge field necessary for the development of the solute particle trajectory statistics using the Lagrangian formalism. We show that the statistics of the specific discharge and particle trajectory derived herein are non-stationary and functions of the coefficient of soil compressibility, μ. The effect of μ on the relative variation of specific discharge and the solute particle trajectory statistics are analyzed upon evaluating our expressions.

  3. An investigation of smoothness constraints for the estimation of displacement vector fields from image sequences.

    PubMed

    Nagel, H H; Enkelmann, W

    1986-05-01

    A mapping between one frame from an image sequence and the preceding or following frame can be represented as a displacement vector field. In most situations, the mere gray value variations do not provide sufficient information in order to estimate such a displacement vector field. Supplementary constraints are necessary, for example the postulate that a displacement vector field varies smoothly as a function of the image position. Taken as a general requirement, this creates difficulties at gray value transitions which correspond to occluding contours. Nagel therefore introduced the ``oriented smoothness'' requirement which restricts variations of the displacement vector field only in directions with small or no variation of gray values. This contribution reports results of an investigation about how such an ``oriented smoothness'' constraint may be formulated and evaluated. PMID:21869357

  4. Electric-field induced mutation of DNA: a theoretical investigation of the GC base pair.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Jacquemin, Denis

    2013-04-01

    It is known that intense external electric fields affect the proton transfer (PT) reactions in simple chemical systems, such as hydrated chlorhydric acid or formic acid dimer. Accordingly, electric fields might be used to modulate the PT reactions responsible for the spontaneous mutation mechanism in DNA. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of these fields on the tautomeric equilibria of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair in order to gain further insight into this hypothesis. This task is performed with both density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) approaches. Our results demonstrate that electric fields not only drastically alter the rate constants of PT but also tune the mechanism of the PT reactions in the GC base pair. PMID:23338206

  5. High pressure apparatus for transport properties study in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmadi, A. M.; Nakotte, H.; Honda, F.; Sechovsky, V.; Mikulina, O.; Kamarad, J.; Lacerda, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    We have designed a high pressure apparatus for measuring electrical-transport properties at low temperatures, high magnetic field and hydrostatic pressure up to 10 kbar. Details of the high-pressure cell and an exemplary study on UNiAI are described and discussed briefly.

  6. Quasi permanent superconducting magnet of very high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Y.; Liu, J.; Weinstein, R.; Chen, I. G.; Parks, D.; Xu, J.; Obot, V.; Foster, C.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in a quasi-permanent magnet made of high temperature superconductor. The material has an average of 40 percent molar excess of Y, relative to Y1Ba2Cu3O7 and has been irradiated with high energy light ions at 200 MeV. The magnet, which traps 1.52 T at 77.3 K, traps nearly 4 T at 64.5 K. No evidence of giant flux jump or sample cracking was observed.

  7. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  8. High-Resolution, Wide-Field-of-View Scanning Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Cesar; Wilson, Robert; Seshadri, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    A proposed telescope would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view (<0.10 ) while scanning over a total field of view nominally 16 wide without need to slew the entire massive telescope structure. The telescope design enables resolution of a 1-m-wide object in a 50- km-wide area of the surface of the Earth as part of a 200-km-wide area field of view monitored from an orbit at an altitude of 700 km. The conceptual design of this telescope could also be adapted to other applications both terrestrial and extraterrestrial in which there are requirements for telescopes that afford both wide- and narrow-field capabilities. In the proposed telescope, the scanning would be effected according to a principle similar to that of the Arecibo radio telescope, in which the primary mirror is stationary with respect to the ground and a receiver is moved across the focal surface of the primary mirror. The proposed telescope would comprise (1) a large spherical primary mirror that would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view and (2) a small displaceable optical relay segment that would be pivoted about the center of an aperture stop to effect the required scanning (see figure). Taken together, both comprise a scanning narrow-angle telescope that does not require slewing the telescope structure. In normal operation, the massive telescope structure would stare at a fixed location on the ground. The inner moveable relay optic would be pivoted to scan the narrower field of view over the wider one, making it possible to retain a fixed telescope orientation, while obtaining high-resolution images over multiple target areas during an interval of 3 to 4 minutes in the intended orbit. The pivoting relay segment of the narrow-angle telescope would include refractive and reflective optical elements, including two aspherical mirrors, to counteract the spherical aberration of the primary mirror. Overall, the combination of the primary mirror and the smaller relay optic

  9. Investigation of superparamagnetic (Fe3O4) nanoparticles and magnetic field exposures on CHO-K1 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Zachary; Estlack, Larry; Hussain, Saber; Choi, Tae-Youl; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-03-01

    Rapid development in nanomaterial synthesis and functionalization has led to advanced studies in actuation and manipulation of cellular functions for biomedical applications. Often these actuation techniques employ externally applied magnetic fields to manipulate magnetic nanomaterials inside cell bodies in order to drive or trigger desired effects. While cellular interactions with low-frequency magnetic fields and nanoparticles have been extensively studied, the fundamental mechanisms behind these interactions remain poorly understood. Additionally, modern investigations on these concurrent exposure conditions have been limited in scope, and difficult to reproduce. This study presents an easily reproducible method of investigating the biological impact of concurrent magnetic field and nanoparticle exposure conditions using an in-vitro CHO-K1 cell line model, with the purpose of establishing grounds for in-depth fundamental studies of the mechanisms driving cellular-level interactions. Cells were cultured under various nanoparticle and magnetic field exposure conditions from 0 to 500 μg/ml nanoparticle concentrations, and DC, 50 Hz, or 100 Hz magnetic fields with 2.0 mT flux density. Cells were then observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, and subject to biological assays to determine the effects of concurrent extreme-low frequency magnetic field and nanoparticle exposures on cellnanoparticle interactions, such as particle uptake and cell viability by MTT assay. Current results indicate little to no variation in effect on cell cultures based on magnetic field parameters alone; however, it is clear that deleterious synergistic effects of concurrent exposure conditions exist based on a significant decrease in cell viability when exposed to high concentrations of nanoparticles and concurrent magnetic field.

  10. Development of low temperature and high magnetic field X-ray diffraction facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahee, Aga; Sharma, Shivani; Singh, K.; Lalla, N. P.; Chaddah, P.

    2015-06-01

    The current progress of materials science regarding multifunctional materials (MFM) has put forward the challenges to understand the microscopic origin of their properties. Most of such MFMs have magneto-elastic correlations. To investigate the underlying mechanism it is therefore essential to investigate the structural properties in the presence of magnetic field. Keeping this in view low temperature and high magnetic field (LTHM) powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), a unique state-of-art facility in the country has been developed at CSR Indore. This setup works on symmetric Bragg Brentano geometry using a parallel incident x-ray beam from a rotating anode source working at 17 kW. Using this one can do structural studies at non-ambient conditions i.e. at low- temperatures (2-300 K) and high magnetic field (+8 to -8 T). The available scattering angle ranges from 5° to 115° 2θ with a resolution better than 0.1°. The proper functioning of the setup has been checked using Si sample. The effect of magnetic field on the structural properties has been demonstrated on Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3 sample. Clear effect of field induced phase transition has been observed. Moreover, the effect of zero field cooled and field cooled conditions is also observed.

  11. Development of low temperature and high magnetic field X-ray diffraction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shahee, Aga; Sharma, Shivani; Singh, K.; Lalla, N. P. Chaddah, P.

    2015-06-24

    The current progress of materials science regarding multifunctional materials (MFM) has put forward the challenges to understand the microscopic origin of their properties. Most of such MFMs have magneto-elastic correlations. To investigate the underlying mechanism it is therefore essential to investigate the structural properties in the presence of magnetic field. Keeping this in view low temperature and high magnetic field (LTHM) powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), a unique state-of-art facility in the country has been developed at CSR Indore. This setup works on symmetric Bragg Brentano geometry using a parallel incident x-ray beam from a rotating anode source working at 17 kW. Using this one can do structural studies at non-ambient conditions i.e. at low- temperatures (2-300 K) and high magnetic field (+8 to −8 T). The available scattering angle ranges from 5° to 115° 2θ with a resolution better than 0.1°. The proper functioning of the setup has been checked using Si sample. The effect of magnetic field on the structural properties has been demonstrated on Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} sample. Clear effect of field induced phase transition has been observed. Moreover, the effect of zero field cooled and field cooled conditions is also observed.

  12. Numerical Investigation of High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleby, M.; Hossainpour, S.

    2012-12-01

    High-velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS) has recently developed as a possible alternative to conventional HVOF-spraying employing liquid suspensions instead of dry powder feedstock enables the use of nanoparticles. From the fluid dynamics point of view, the HVSFS system is complex and involves three-phase (gas, liquid and solid particles) turbulent flow, heat transfer, evaporation of the suspension solvent, chemical reactions of main fuel (propane) and suspension solvent (ethanol) and supersonic/subsonic flow transitions. Computational fluid dynamic techniques were carried out to solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model was used to account for the effect of turbulence. The HVSFS process involves two combustion reactions. A primary combustion process is the premixed oxygen-propane reaction and secondary process is the non-premixed oxygen-gaseous ethanol reaction. For each reaction, one step global reaction, which takes dissociations and intermediate reactions into account, was derived from the equilibrium chemistry code developed by Gordon and McBride and eddy dissipation model was used to calculate the rate of reactions based on the transport equations for all species (10 species) mass fractions. Droplets were tracked in the continuum in a Lagrangian approach. In this paper, flow field inside and outside the gun simulated to provide clear and complete insight about the HVSFS processes. Moreover, the effect of some operative parameters (oxy-fuel flow rate, ethanol flow rate, droplets injection velocity and droplets size) on the gas flow field along the centerline and droplets evaporation behavior was discussed.

  13. Ultra-high field magnets for whole-body MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Rory

    2016-09-01

    For whole-body MRI, an ultra-high field (UHF) magnet is currently defined as a system operating at 7 T or above. Over 70 UHF magnets have been built, all with the same technical approach originally developed by Magnex Scientific Ltd. The preferred coil configuration is a compensated solenoid. In this case, the majority of the field is generated by a simple long solenoid that stretches the entire length of the magnet. Additional coils are wound on a separate former outside the main windings with the purpose of balancing the homogeneity. Most of the magnets currently in operation are passively shielded systems where the magnet is surrounded by a steel box of 200–870 tonnes of carbon steel. More recently actively shielded magnets have been built for operation at 7 T; in this case the stray field is controlled by with reverse turns wound on a separate former outside the primary coils. Protection against quench damage is much more complex with an actively shielded magnet design due to the requirement to prevent the stray field from increasing during a quench. In the case of the 7 T 900 magnet this controlled by combining some of the screening coils into each section of the protection circuit. Correction of the field variations caused by manufacturing tolerances and environmental effects are made with a combination of superconducting shims and passive shims. Modern UHF magnets operate in zero boil-off mode with the use of cryocoolers with cooling capacity at 4.2 K. Although there are no cryogen costs associated with normal operation UHF magnets require a significant volume (10 000–20 000 l) of liquid helium for the cool-down. Liquid helium is expensive therefore new methods of cool-down using high-power cryocoolers are being implemented to reduce the requirement.

  14. Ultra-high field magnets for whole-body MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Rory

    2016-09-01

    For whole-body MRI, an ultra-high field (UHF) magnet is currently defined as a system operating at 7 T or above. Over 70 UHF magnets have been built, all with the same technical approach originally developed by Magnex Scientific Ltd. The preferred coil configuration is a compensated solenoid. In this case, the majority of the field is generated by a simple long solenoid that stretches the entire length of the magnet. Additional coils are wound on a separate former outside the main windings with the purpose of balancing the homogeneity. Most of the magnets currently in operation are passively shielded systems where the magnet is surrounded by a steel box of 200-870 tonnes of carbon steel. More recently actively shielded magnets have been built for operation at 7 T; in this case the stray field is controlled by with reverse turns wound on a separate former outside the primary coils. Protection against quench damage is much more complex with an actively shielded magnet design due to the requirement to prevent the stray field from increasing during a quench. In the case of the 7 T 900 magnet this controlled by combining some of the screening coils into each section of the protection circuit. Correction of the field variations caused by manufacturing tolerances and environmental effects are made with a combination of superconducting shims and passive shims. Modern UHF magnets operate in zero boil-off mode with the use of cryocoolers with cooling capacity at 4.2 K. Although there are no cryogen costs associated with normal operation UHF magnets require a significant volume (10 000-20 000 l) of liquid helium for the cool-down. Liquid helium is expensive therefore new methods of cool-down using high-power cryocoolers are being implemented to reduce the requirement.

  15. High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules induced by a bicircular laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odžak, S.; Hasović, E.; Milošević, D. B.

    2016-09-01

    High-order harmonic generation by a bicircular field, which consists of two coplanar counter-rotating circularly polarized fields of frequency r ω and s ω (r and s are integers), is investigated for a polyatomic molecule. This field possesses dynamical symmetry, which can be adjusted to the symmetry of the molecular Hamiltonian and used to investigate the molecular symmetry. For polyatomic molecules having the Cr +s symmetry, only the harmonics n =q (r +s )±r ,q =1 ,2 ,..., are emitted having the ellipticity ɛn=±1 . We illustrate this using the example of the planar molecules BH3 and BF3, which obey the C3 symmetry. We show that for the BF3 molecule, similarly to atoms with a p ground state, there is a strong asymmetry in the emission of high harmonics with opposite helicities. This asymmetry depends on the molecular orientation.

  16. New developments in pulsed fields at the US National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Parkin, D.M.; Rickel, D.G.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.

    1996-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a member of a consortium (with Florida State University and the University of Florida) to operate the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), with funding from the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida. Los Alamos provides unique resources for its component of NHMFL in the form of a 1.4 GW inertial storage motor-generator for high field pulsed magnets and infrastructure for fields generated by flux compression. The NHMFL provides a user facility open to all qualified users, develops magnet technology in association with the private sector, and advances science and technology opportunities. The magnets in service at Los Alamos are of three types. Starting with the pre-existing explosive flux compression capability in 1991, NHMFL added capacitor-driven magnets in December, 1992, and a 20 tesla superconducting magnet in January, 1993. The capacitor-driven magnets continue to grow in diversity and accessibility, with four magnet stations now available for several different magnet types. Two magnets of unprecedented size and strength are nearing completion of assembly and design, respectively. Under final assembly is a quasi-continuous magnet that contains 90 MJ of magnetic energy at full field, and being designed is a non-destructive 100 T magnet containing 140 MJ.

  17. Geophysical Properties of Hard Rock for Investigation of Stress Fields in Deep Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbo, M.; Young, R. P.; Schmitt, D. R.; Milkereit, B.

    2014-12-01

    A complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines is the high-stress dependency of the physical properties of hard rocks. In-mine observations show anisotropic variability of the in situ P- and S-wave velocities and resistivity of the hard rocks that are likely related to stress field changes. As part of a comprehensive study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, data from in situ monitoring of the seismicity, conductivity, stress, and stress dependent physical properties has been obtain. In-laboratory experiments are also being performed on borehole cores from the Sudbury mines. These experiments will measure the Norite borehole core's properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. Hydraulic fracturing has been successfully implemented in industries such as oil and gas and enhanced geothermal systems, and is currently being investigated as a potential method for preconditioning in mining. However, further research is required to quantify how hydraulic fractures propagate through hard, unfractured rock as well as naturally fractured rock typically found in mines. These in laboratory experiments will contribute to a hydraulic fracturing project evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing as a method of de-stressing hard rock mines. A tri-axial deformation cell equipped with 18 Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors will be used to bring the borehole cores to a tri-axial state of stress. The cores will then be injected with fluid until the the hydraulic fracture has propagated to the edge of the core, while AE waveforms will be digitized continuously at 10 MHz and 12-bit resolution for the duration of each experiment. These laboratory hydraulic fracture experiments will contribute to understanding how parameters including stress ratio, fluid injection rate, and viscosity, affect the fracturing process.

  18. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  19. Density limits investigation and high density operation in EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xingwei; Li, Jiangang; Hu, Jiansheng; Liu, Haiqing; Jie, Yinxian; Wang, Shouxin; Li, Jiahong; Duan, Yanming; Li, Miaohui; Li, Yongchun; Zhang, Ling; Ye, Yang; Yang, Qingquan; Zhang, Tao; Cheng, Yingjie; Xu, Jichan; Wang, Liang; Xu, Liqing; Zhao, Hailin; Wang, Fudi; Lin, Shiyao; Wu, Bin; Lyu, Bo; Xu, Guosheng; Gao, Xiang; Shi, Tonghui; He, Kaiyang; Lan, Heng; Chu, Nan; Cao, Bin; Sun, Zhen; Zuo, Guizhong; Ren, Jun; Zhuang, Huidong; Li, Changzheng; Yuan, Xiaolin; Yu, Yaowei; Wang, Houyin; Chen, Yue; Wu, Jinhua; EAST Team

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the density in a tokamak is limited by the so-called density limit, which is generally performed as an appearance of disruption causing loss of plasma confinement, or a degradation of high confinement mode which could further lead to a H  →  L transition. The L-mode and H-mode density limit has been investigated in EAST tokamak. Experimental results suggest that density limits could be triggered by either edge cooling or excessive central radiation. The L-mode density limit disruption is generally triggered by edge cooling, which leads to the current profile shrinkage and then destabilizes a 2/1 tearing mode, ultimately resulting in a disruption. The L-mode density limit scaling agrees well with the Greenwald limit in EAST. The observed H-mode density limit in EAST is an operational-space limit with a value of 0.8∼ 0.9{{n}\\text{GW}} . High density H-mode heated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) are analyzed, respectively. The constancy of the edge density gradients in H-mode indicates a critical limit caused perhaps by e.g. ballooning induced transport. The maximum density is accessed at the H  →  L transition which is generally caused by the excessive core radiation due to high Z impurities (Fe, Cu). Operating at a high density (>2.8× {{10}19} {{\\text{m}}-3} ) is favorable for suppressing the beam shine through NBI. High density H-mode up to 5.3× {{10}19}{{\\text{m}}-3}~≤ft(∼ 0.8{{n}\\text{GW}}\\right) could be sustained by 2 MW 4.6 GHz LHCD alone, and its current drive efficiency is studied. Statistics show that good control of impurities and recycling facilitate high density operation. With careful control of these factors, high density up to 0.93{{n}\\text{GW}} stable H-mode operation was carried out heated by 1.7 MW LHCD and 1.9 MW ion cyclotron resonance heating with supersonic molecular beam injection fueling.

  20. Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P.; Swenson, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

  1. Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P.; Swenson, C. A.

    2014-01-27

    Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

  2. The magnetic field investigation on the Ulysses mission - Instrumentation and preliminary scientific results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, A.; Beek, T. J.; Forsyth, R. J.; Hedgecock, P. C.; Marquedant, R. J.; Smith, E. J.; Southwood, D. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental feature of the heliosphere is the three-dimensional structure of the interplanetary magnetic field. The magnetic field investigation on Ulysses, the first space probe to explore the out-of-ecliptic and polar heliosphere, aims at determining the large-scale features and gradients of the field, as well as the heliolatitude dependence of interplanetary phenomena so far only observed near the ecliptic plane. The Ulysses magnetometer uses two sensors, one a Vector Helium Magnetometer, the other a Fluxgate Magnetometer. Onboard data processing yields measurements of the magnetic field vector with a time resolution up to 2 vectors/second and a sensitivity of about 10 pT. Since the switch-on of the instrument in flight on 25 October 1990, a steady stream of observations has been made, indicating that at this phase of the solar cycle the field is generally disturbed: several shock waves and a large number of discontinuities have been observed, as well as several periods with apparently intense wave activity. The paper gives a brief summary of the scientific objectives of the investigation, followed by a detailed description of the instrument and its characteristics. Examples of wave bursts, interplanetary shocks and crossings of the heliospheric current sheet are given to illustrate the observations made with the instrument.

  3. Low-temperature scanning system for near- and far-field optical investigations.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, D V; Dal Savio, C; Pierz, K; Güttler, B; Danzebrink, H-U

    2003-03-01

    A combined system for far- and near-field optical spectroscopy consisting of a compact scanning near-field optical microscope and a dedicated spectrometer was realized. The set-up allows the optical investigation of samples at temperatures from 10 to 300 K. The sample positioning range is as large as 5 x 5 x 5 mm3 and the spatial resolution is in the range of 1.5 micro m in the far-field optical microscopy mode at low temperatures. In the scanning near-field optical microscope mode the resolution is defined by the microfabricated cantilever probe, which is placed in the focus of a double-mirror objective. The tip-to-sample distance in the scanning near-field optical microscope is controlled by a beam deflection system in dynamic scanning force microscopy mode. After a description of the apparatus, scanning force topography images of self-assembled InAs quantum dots on a GaAs substrate with a density of less than one dot per square micrometre are shown, followed by the first spectroscopic investigations of such a sample. The presented results demonstrate the potential of the system.

  4. Internal Electric Field Behavior of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Radiation Detectors Under High Carrier Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.H.; Gul, R.; and James, R.B.

    2010-10-26

    The behavior of the internal electric-field of nuclear-radiation detectors substantially affects the detector's performance. We investigated the distribution of the internal field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors under high carrier injection. We noted the build-up of a space charge region near the cathode that produces a built-in field opposing the applied field. Its presence entails the collapse of the electric field in the rest of detector, other than the portion near the cathode. Such a space-charge region originates from serious hole-trapping in CZT. The device's operating temperature greatly affects the width of the space-charge region. With increasing temperature from 5 C to 35 C, its width expanded from about 1/6 to 1/2 of the total depth of the detector.

  5. Operation of cold-cathode gauges in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.; Goerz, D.A.; Pickles, W.L.

    1985-11-11

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B), under construction at LLNL, requires measurement of the neutral gas density in high magnetic fields near the plasma at several axial regions. This Background Gas Pressure (BGP) diagnostic will help us understand the role of background neutrals in particle and power balance, particularly in the maintenance of the cold halo plasma that shields the hot core plasma from the returning neutrals. It consists of several cold-cathode, magnetron-type gauges stripped of their permanent magnets, and utilizes the MFTF-B ambient B-field in strengths of 5 to 25 kG. Similar gauges have operated in TMX-U in B-fields up to 3 kG. To determine how well the gauges will perform, we assembled a test stand which operated magnetron gauges in an external, uniform magnetic field of up to 30 kG, over a pressure range of 1E-8 T to 1E-5 T, at several cathode voltages. This paper describes the test stand and presents the results of the tests.

  6. Operation of cold-cathode gauges in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. R., Jr.; Goerz, D. A.; Pickles, W. L.

    1985-11-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B), under construction at LLNL, requires measurement of the neutral gas density in high magnetic fields near the plasma at several axial regions. This Background Gas Pressure (BGP) diagnostic will help us understand the role of background neutrals in particle and power balance, particularly in the maintenance of the cold halo plasma that shields the hot core plasma from the returning neutrals. It consists of several cold-cathode, magnetron-type gauges stripped of their permanent magnets, and utilizes the MFTF-B ambient B-field in strengths of 5 to 25 kG. Similar gauges have operated in TMX-U in B-fields up to 3 kG. To determine how well the gauges will perform, we assembled a test stand which operated magnetron gauges in an external, uniform magnetic field of up to 30 kG, over a pressure range of 1E-8 T to 1E-5 T, at several cathode voltages. This paper describes the test stand and presents the results of the tests.

  7. Investigation of the jet-wake flow of a highly loaded centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckardt, D.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations, aimed at developing a better understanding of the complex flow field in high performance centrifugal compressors were performed. Newly developed measuring techniques for unsteady static and total pressures as well as flow directions, and a digital data analysis system for fluctuating signals were thoroughly tested. The loss-affected mixing process of the distorted impeller discharge flow was investigated in detail, in the absolute and relative system, at impeller tip speeds up to 380 m/s. A theoretical analysis proved good coincidence of the test results with the DEAN-SENOO theory, which was extended to compressible flows.

  8. Rheological investigation of highly filled polymers: Effect of molecular weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatkova, Eva; Hausnerova, Berenika; Hales, Andrew; Jiranek, Lukas; Vera, Juan Miguel Alcon

    2015-04-01

    The paper deals with rheological properties of highly filled polymers used in powder injection molding. Within the experimental framework seven PIM feedstocks based on superalloy Inconel 718 powder were prepared. Each feedstock contains the fixed amount of powder loading and the same composition of binder system consisting of three components: polyethylene glycol (PEG) differing in molecular weight, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and stearic acid (SA). The aim is to investigate the influence of PEG's molecular weight on the flow properties of feedstocks. Non-Newtonian indices, representing the shear rate sensitivity of the feedstocks, are obtained from a polynomial fit, and found to vary within measured shear rates range from 0.2 to 0.8. Temperature effect is considered via activation energies, showing decreasing trend with increasing of molecular weight of PEG (except of feedstock containing 1,500 g.mol-1 PEG).

  9. Investigation of high voltage spacecraft system interactions with plasma environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Berkopec, F. D.; Purvis, C. K.; Grier, N.; Staskus, J.

    1978-01-01

    The exposure of high voltage spacecraft systems to the charged particle environment of space can produce interactions that will influence system operation. An experimental investigation of these interactions has been undertaken for insulator and conductor test surfaces biased up to plus or minus 1 kV in a simulated low earth orbit charged particle environment. It has been found that these interactions are controlled by the insulator surfaces surrounding the biased conductors. For positive applied voltages the electron current collection can be enhanced by the insulators. For negative applied voltages the insulator surface confines the voltage to the conductor region; this can cause arcing. Understanding these interactions and the technology to control their impact on system operation is essential to the design of solar cell arrays for ion drive propulsion applications that use direct drive power processing.

  10. An investigation of thermal comfort at high humidities

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, M.E.; Arens, E. Xu, T.; Bauman, F.S.; Oguru, Masayuki

    1999-07-01

    Climate chamber experiments were performed to investigate thermal comfort at high humidities. Subjective reports were recorded for a total of 411 subjects at frequent intervals during the three-hour experiments with 65 selected subjects equipped with instrumentation to record skin wettedness and skin temperature. The exposures ranged from 20 C/60% RH to 26 C/90% RH with two clothing levels, 0.5 and 0.9 clo, and three levels of metabolic activity, 1.2, 1.6, and 4 met. Clear differences in humidity response were not found for sedentary subjects; however, non-sedentary activities produced differences on several subjective scales. These differences, though, are dictated via heat balance and thermoregulation and cannot be separated from humidity-related effects. For metabolic rates 1.6 met and above, these data suggest that no practical limit on humidity will lower the percent dissatisfied below 25%.

  11. Investigation of Rare Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-02

    Our program is an investigation of the hadronization process through measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. Such collisions of heavy nuclei provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. We are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. We have completed our physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. We have produced the electronics and software for the STAR trigger and will begin to use these tools to search for anti-nuclei and strange hadrons when RHIC turns on later this year.

  12. Structural Investigations of Afghanistan Deduced from Remote Sensing and Potential Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibi, Hakim; Azizi, Masood; Mogren, Saad

    2016-08-01

    This study integrates potential gravity and magnetic field data with remotely sensed images and geological data in an effort to understand the subsurface major geological structures in Afghanistan. Integrated analysis of Landsat SRTM data was applied for extraction of geological lineaments. The potential field data were analyzed using gradient interpretation techniques, such as analytic signal (AS), tilt derivative (TDR), horizontal gradient of the tilt derivative (HG-TDR), Euler Deconvolution (ED) and power spectrum methods, and results were correlated with known geological structures. The analysis of remote sensing data and potential field data reveals the regional geological structural characteristics of Afghanistan. The power spectrum analysis of magnetic and gravity data suggests shallow basement rocks at around 1 to 1.5 km depth. The results of TDR of potential field data are in agreement with the location of the major regional fault structures and also the location of the basins and swells, except in the Helmand region (SW Afghanistan) where many high potential field anomalies are observed and attributed to batholiths and near-surface volcanic rocks intrusions. A high-resolution airborne geophysical survey in the data sparse region of eastern Afghanistan is recommended in order to have a complete image of the potential field anomalies.

  13. High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) Team Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1998-01-01

    This report covers activities on the above grant for the period through the end of September 1997. The work originally proposed to be performed under a three-year award was converted at that time to a two-year award for the remainder of the period, and is now funded under award NAGS-4027 through Goddard Space Flight Center. The P.I. is a co-investigator on the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) team, selected as a Small-Class Explorer (SNMX) mission in 1997. He has also been a participant in the Space Physics Roadmap Planning Group. Our research has been strongly influenced by the NASA mission opportunities related to these activities. The report is subdivided into four sections, each dealing with a different aspect of our research within this guiding theme. Personnel involved in this research at UAH include the P.I. and graduate students Michele Montgomery and Amy Winebarger. Much of the work has been carried out in collaboration with investigators at other institutions, as detailed below. Attachment: Laser wakefield acceleration and astrophysical applications.

  14. Determination of satellite valley position in GaN emitter from photoexcited field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, M.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Argon plasma etched GaN field-emitter rods with nanometer-scale diameter were fabricated on GaN grown on an n+-GaN substrate. Their electron field emission properties were investigated both without and under illumination by using light sources with various wavelengths. The Fowler-Nordheim current-voltage characteristics of the cathodes show a change in slope for illuminated cathodes. The electron affinity difference ΔE between the different valleys in the conduction band has been ascertained and is in the range from 1.18 up to 1.21 eV.

  15. The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: field investigations and reconstruction effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Wallace R.; Eckel, Edwin B.; Schaem, William E.; Lyle, Robert E.; George, Warren; Chance, Genie

    1966-01-01

    One of the greatest geotectonic events of our time occurred in southern Alaska late in the afternoon of March 27, 1964. Beneath a leaden sky, the chill of evening was just settling over the Alaskan countryside. Light snow was falling on some communities. It was Good Friday, schools were closed, and the business day was ending. Suddenly without warning half of Alaska was rocked and jarred by the most violent earthquake to occur in North America this century. The descriptive summary that follows is based on the work of many investigators. A large and still-growing scientific literature has accumulated since the earthquake, and this literature has been freely drawn upon here. In particular, the writers have relied upon the findings of their colleagues in the Geological Survey. Some of these findings have been published, but some are still being prepared for publication. Moreover, some field investigations are still in progress. This is the first in a series of six reports that the U.S. Geological Survey published on the results of a comprehensive geologic study that began, as a reconnaissance survey, within 24 hours after the March 27, 1964, Magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake and extended, as detailed investigations, through several field seasons. The 1964 Great Alaska earthquake was the largest earthquake in the U.S. since 1700. Professional Paper 541, in 1 part, describes Field Investigations and Reconstruction Effort.

  16. Influence of electrode geometry on the high-field characteristics of photoconductive silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Madangarli, V.P.; Gradinaru, G.; Korony, G.; Sudarshan, T.S.; Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Patterson, P.E.

    1994-07-01

    A series of experiment were conducted to study the influence of electrode geometry on the prebreakdown (and breakdown) characteristics of high resistivity ({rho} > 30 k{Omega}-cm), p-type Si wafers under quasi-uniform and non-uniform electric field configurations. In the quasi-uniform field configuration, the 1mm thick Si wafer was mounted between the slots of two plane parallel stainless steel disc electrodes (parallel), while the non-uniform field was obtained by mounting the wafer between two pillar-type electrodes with a hemispherical tip (pillar). The main objective of the above investigation was to verify if the uniform field configuration under a parallel system has a positive influence by reducing the field enhancement at the contact region, as opposed to the definite field enhancement present in the case of the non-uniform pillar system. Also, it was proposed to study the effect of the contact profile on the field distribution over the wafer surface and hence its influence on the high-field performance of the Si wafers.

  17. High-Energy Physics Outstanding Junior Investigating Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David, E.

    2009-10-12

    Throughout the past five years I have worked to uncover what physics lies beyond that of the standard model. My main focus in the first two and a half years has been to understand physics at the electroweak scale, and to a lesser extent understand the relationship between particle physics and cosmology. My final two and a half years was spent on studying the feasibility of discovering “non-standard” models of electroweak physics at hadron colliders, working in close contact with experimentalists at the Tevatron and the LHC. My biggest successes during this period has been both in electroweak physics – expanding our understanding of the Higgs sector in supersymmetric theories and ultraviolet completions of little Higgs theories – and in collider physics – discovering a method for identifying high momentum top quarks and realizing the potential for LHCb to discover some versions of supersymmetry. I have also made some progress towards a particle physics/effective field theory solution of the cosmological constant problem.

  18. RAPID CASING CORROSION IN HIGH TEMPERATURE LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Bixley, P.F.; Wilson, D.M.

    1985-01-22

    Downhole logging and workover operations on 12-20 year old wells in several high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal fields in New Zealand has shown that severe corrosion has commonly occurred in the production casing string where this is unprotected by larger diameter casings. To date corrosion products from only one well have been examined in detail. These indicate that corrosion attack commences at the outer casing wall and continues at a rate as great as 0.8mm/year. Rapid corrosion has been attributed to neutral or slightly acid high bicarbonate waters formed by the absorption of steam and gas into shallow aquifers not directly connected to the deeper, high chloride reservoir.

  19. SKEW QUADRUPOLES IN RHIC DIPOLE MAGNETS AT HIGH FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; GUPTA, P.; THOMPSON, P.; WANDERER, P.

    1995-06-11

    In the RHIC arc dipoles, the center of the cold mass lies above the center of the cryostat. At the maximum design field, the magnetic flux lines leak through the yoke to the asymmetrically located cryostat, which provides an additional return path. This introduces a systematic top-bottom asymmetry leading to a skew quadrupole term at high fields. A similar asymmetry is also created by any difference in weights of the upper and the lower yoke halves. Data from measurements of several RHIC dipoles are presented to study this effect. In the current production series of the RDIC dipoles, an attempt is made to compensate the effect of the cryostat by an asymmetry in the iron yoke. Seven dipoles with this type of yoke have been cold tested, and show a reduced saturation in the skew quadrupole term, as expected.

  20. Improved capacitive stress transducers for high-field superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher Pete; Holik, Eddie Frank, III; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.

    2012-06-01

    High-field (12-18 Tesla) superconducting magnets are required to enable an increase in the energy of future colliders. Such field strength requires the use of Nb3Sn superconductor, which has limited tolerance for compressive and shear strain. A strategy for stress management has been developed at Texas A&M University and is being implemented in TAMU3, a short-model 14 Tesla stress-managed Nb3Sn block dipole. The strategy includes the use of laminar capacitive stress transducers to monitor the stresses within the coil package. We have developed fabrication techniques and fixtures, which improve the reproducibility of the transducer response both at room temperature and during cryogenic operation. This is a report of the status of transducer development.

  1. REVIEW OF HIGH FIELD Q SLOPE, CAVITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2008-01-23

    One of the most interesting phenomenon occurring in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk niobium is represented by a sharp decrease of the quality factor above peak surface magnetic field of about 90 mT and is referred to as "high field Q-slope" or "Q-drop". This phenomenon was observed first in 1997 and since then some effort was devoted to the understanding of the causes behind it. Still, no clear physical interpretation of the Q-drop has emerged, despite several attempts. In this contribution, I will review the experimental results for various cavities measured in many laboratories and I will try to identify common features and differences related to the Q-drop.

  2. Alternative Contrast Mechanisms in High Field MR Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Robert Thomas

    1995-01-01

    In high-field MR Microscopy, the T_1 relaxation times may become long and converge while the T_2 relaxation times may become short and converge. As a result, much of the contrast is due solely to differences in spin density. The use of T_{1rho} as an alternative contrast parameter in high-field MR Microscopy has been explored here. To this end, MR Microscopy experiments have been performed using 2.0 and 9.4 Tesla Bruker MRI systems. Spectroscopy experiments at 9.4 Tesla were performed on several phantoms (5.75% agar gel, 1.0 mM MnCl_2, 7.3% and 20% gelatin). Imaging experiments were performed on two, 17.5 day old, perfusion fixed, mouse embryos, embedded in 7.3% gelatin to minimize drying and susceptibility differences. The relaxation times, T_1, T _2, and T_{1rho }, the signal to noise ratios (SNR) and contrast to noise ratios (CNR), have been measured for several types of tissue. The T_{1rho} relaxation times were measured at four locking field strengths, 0.7, 0.9, 1.3 and 1.7 G. T_1 and T_2 imaging experiments were performed using a conventional spin warp imaging sequence. T_{1rho } imaging experiments were performed using a presaturating spin locking pulse, followed by a conventional spin warp imaging sequence. Muscle, diencephalon, lung and liver were chosen for the relaxation time measurements as they offered both good tissue specificity and size. Both static and locking field dispersion of T _{1rho} were observed in the selected mouse embryo tissues. The observed T _{1rho} relaxation times were generally longer than the T_2 relaxation times, increased with locking field strength, and were consistently shorter at 9.4 Tesla than at 2.0 Tesla. The static field dispersion of T_ {1rho} and T_2 are both believed to be due, in part, to diffusion losses through susceptibility induced gradients. The losses are much smaller in the T_{1rho} images, and decrease as the locking pulse is increased. Finally, under certain circumstances, T_{1rho }-weighting could produce

  3. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Low-Field and High-Field Characterization of THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Mossi, K.; Smith, R.; Bernd, J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    THUNDER (THin UNimorph DrivER) actuators are pre-stressed piezoelectric devices developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) that exhibit enhanced strain capabilities. As a result, they are of interest in a variety of aerospace applications. Characterization of their performance as a function of electric field, temperature and frequency is needed in order to optimize their operation. Towards that end, a number of THUNDER devices were obtained from FACE International Co. with a stainless steel substrate varying in thickness from 1 mil to 20 mils. The various devices were evaluated to determine low-field and high-field displacement its well as the polarization hysteresis loops. The thermal stability of these drivers was evaluated by two different methods. First, the samples were thermally cycled under electric field by systematically increasing the maximum temperature from 25 C to 200 C while the displacement was being measured. Second, the samples were isothermally aged at 0 C, 50 C, 100 C. and 150 C in air, and the isothermal decay of the displacement was measured at room temperature as a function of time.

  5. Investigating the structure and fragmentation of a highly filamentary IRDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henshaw, J. D.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Tan, J. C.; Longmore, S. N.; Pineda, J. E.; Parker, R. J.; Barnes, A. T.

    2016-11-01

    We present 3.7 arcsec (˜0.05 pc) resolution 3.2 mm dust continuum observations from the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique Plateau de Bure Interferometer, with the aim of studying the structure and fragmentation of the filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G035.39-00.33. The continuum emission is segmented into a series of 13 quasi-regularly spaced (λobs ˜ 0.18 pc) cores, following the major axis of the IRDC. We compare the spatial distribution of the cores with that predicted by theoretical work describing the fragmentation of hydrodynamic fluid cylinders, finding a significant (a factor of ≳ 8) discrepancy between the two. Our observations are consistent with the picture emerging from kinematic studies of molecular clouds suggesting that the cores are harboured within a complex network of independent sub-filaments. This result emphasizes the importance of considering the underlying physical structure, and potentially, dynamically important magnetic fields, in any fragmentation analysis. The identified cores exhibit a range in (peak) beam-averaged column density (3.6 × 1023 cm-2 < NH, c < 8.0 × 1023 cm-2), mass (8.1 M⊙ < Mc < 26.1 M⊙), and number density (6.1 × 105 cm-3 < nH, c, eq < 14.7 × 105 cm-3). Two of these cores, dark in the mid-infrared, centrally concentrated, monolithic (with no traceable substructure at our PdBI resolution), and with estimated masses of the order ˜20-25 M⊙, are good candidates for the progenitors of intermediate-to-high-mass stars. Virial parameters span a range 0.2 < αvir < 1.3. Without additional support, possibly from dynamically important magnetic fields with strengths of the order of 230 μG < B < 670 μG, the cores are susceptible to gravitational collapse. These results may imply a multilayered fragmentation process, which incorporates the formation of sub-filaments, embedded cores, and the possibility of further fragmentation.

  6. High-resolution field shaping utilizing a masked multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Williams, P C; Cooper, P

    2000-08-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLCs) have become an important tool in the modern radiotherapy department. However, the current limit of resolution (1 cm at isocentre) can be too coarse for acceptable shielding of all fields. A number of mini- and micro-MLCs have been developed, with thinner leaves to achieve approved resolution. Currently however, such devices are limited to modest field sizes and stereotactic applications. This paper proposes a new method of high-resolution beam collimation by use of a tertiary grid collimator situated below the conventional MLC. The width of each slit in the grid is a submultiple of the MLC width. A composite shaped field is thus built up from a series of subfields, with the main MLC defining the length of each strip within each subfield. Presented here are initial findings using a prototype device. The beam uniformity achievable with such a device was examined by measuring transmission profiles through the grid using a diode. Profiles thus measured were then copied and superposed to generate composite beams, from which the uniformity achievable could be assessed. With the average dose across the profile normalized to 100%, hot spots up to 5.0% and troughs of 3% were identified for a composite beam of 2 x 5.0 mm grids, as measured at Dmax for a 6 MV beam. For a beam composed from 4 x 2.5 mm grids, the maximum across the profile was 3.0% above the average, and the minimum 2.5% below. Actual composite profiles were also formed using the integrating properties of film, with the subfield indexing performed using an engineering positioning stage. The beam uniformity for these fields compared well with that achieved in theory using the diode measurements. Finally sine wave patterns were generated to demonstrate the potential improvements in field shaping and conformity using this device as opposed to the conventional MLC alone. The scalloping effect on the field edge commonly seen on MLC fields was appreciably reduced by use of 2 x 5.0 mm

  7. Wide-field, high-resolution Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoan; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report an imaging method, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), which iteratively stitches together a number of variably illuminated, low-resolution intensity images in Fourier space to produce a wide-field, high-resolution complex sample image. By adopting a wavefront correction strategy, the FPM method can also correct for aberrations and digitally extend a microscope’s depth-of-focus beyond the physical limitations of its optics. As a demonstration, we built a microscope prototype with a resolution of 0.78 μm, a field-of-view of ~120 mm2, and a resolution-invariant depth-of-focus of 0.3 mm (characterized at 632 nm). Gigapixel colour images of histology slides verify FPM’s successful operation. The reported imaging procedure transforms the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy from one that is coupled to the physical limitations of the system’s optics to one that is solvable through computation. PMID:25243016

  8. Optical near-field excitation at commercial scanning probe microscopy tips: a theoretical and experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Huber, Christoph; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Prior, Yehiam; Kautek, Wolfgang

    2014-02-14

    A systematic study of the influence of the excitation angle, the light polarization and the coating thickness of commercial SPM tips on the field enhancement in an apertureless scanning near-field optical microscope is presented. A new method to optimize the alignment of the electric field vector along the major tip axis by measuring the resonance frequency was developed. The simulations were performed with a MNPBEM toolbox based on the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The influence of the coating thickness was investigated for the first time. Coatings below 40 nm showed a drastic influence both on the resonance wavelength and the enhancement. A shift to higher angles of incidence for the maximum enhancement could be observed for greater tip radii.

  9. DDFT calibration and investigation of an anisotropic phase-field crystal model.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal; Li, Daming; Emmerich, Heike; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-07-01

    The anisotropic phase-field crystal model recently proposed and used by Prieler et al (2009 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 464110) is derived from microscopic density functional theory for anisotropic particles with fixed orientation. Its morphology diagram is also explored. In particular we have investigated the influence of anisotropy and undercooling on the process of nucleation and microstructure formation from the atomic to the microscale. To that end numerical simulations were performed varying those dimensionless parameters which represent anisotropy and undercooling in our anisotropic phase-field crystal model. The results from these numerical simulations are summarized in terms of a morphology diagram of the stable state phases. These stable phases are also investigated with respect to their kinetics and characteristic morphological features.

  10. Investigation of ginkgo biloba leave extracts as corrosion and Oil field microorganism inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jingrui; Zhou, Rui; Meng, Zuchao; Zhang, Jie

    2013-05-07

    Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae), originating from China, now distributes all over the world. Wide application of Ginkgo biloba extracts is determined by the main active substances, flavonoids and terpenoids, which indicates its extracts suitable to be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor. The extracts of Ginkgo biloba leave have been investigated on the corrosion inhibition of Q235A steel with weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. The inhibition efficiency of the extracts varies with extract concentration. The extracts inhibit corrosion mainly by adsorption mechanism. Potentiodynamic polarisation studies show that extracts are mixed type inhibitors. The antibacterial activity of the extracts against oil field microorganism (SRB, IB and TGB) was also investigated.

  11. Investigation of Electromagnetic Field Threat to Fuel Tank Wiring of a Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Scearce, Stephen A.; Beck, Fred B.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    National Transportation Safety Board investigators have questioned whether an electrical discharge in the Fuel Quantity Indication System (FQIS) may have initiated the TWA-800 center wing tank explosion. Because the FQIS was designed to be incapable of producing such a discharge on its own, attention has been directed to mechanisms of outside electromagnetic influence. To support the investigation, the NASA Langley Research Center was tasked to study the potential for radiated electromagnetic fields from external radio frequency (RF) transmitters and passenger carried portable electronic devices (PEDs) to excite the FQIS enough to cause arcing, sparking or excessive heating within the fuel tank.

  12. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 2, Appendix A: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendix A, contains the analytical results.

  13. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 1: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). As a part of the IRP program, field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions willneed to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities.

  14. MAGNETIC FIELD CONFIGURATION AT THE GALACTIC CENTER INVESTIGATED BY WIDE-FIELD NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY: TRANSITION FROM A TOROIDAL TO A POLOIDAL MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Nagata, Tetsuya; Hatano, Hirofumi; Nagayama, Takahiro; Tamura, Motohide; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Suenaga, Takuya; Hough, James H.; Sugitani, Koji; Kato, Daisuke

    2010-10-10

    We present a large-scale view of the magnetic field (MF) in the central 2{sup 0} x 2{sup 0} region of our Galaxy. The polarization of point sources has been measured in the J, H, and K{sub S} bands using the near-infrared polarimetric camera SIRPOL on the 1.4 m Infrared Survey Facility telescope. Comparing the Stokes parameters between high extinction stars and relatively low extinction ones, we obtain polarization originating from magnetically aligned dust grains in the central few hundred parsecs of our Galaxy. We find that near the Galactic plane, the MF is almost parallel to the Galactic plane (i.e., toroidal configuration), but at high Galactic latitudes (|b | >0.{sup 0}4) the field is nearly perpendicular to the plane (i.e., poloidal configuration). This is the first detection of a smooth transition of the large-scale MF configuration in this region.

  15. Electric fields and electrostatic potentials in the high latitude ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Saint Maurice, J.-P.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    Recent interpretive studies of electric field-driven ionospheric plasma convection data from the AE-C satellite are described, where the instruments employed include an ion drift meter and an ion-retarding potential analyzer. Electrostatic potential curves are derived from ion drift velocity measurements for high-latitude segments of the satellite's orbit. The potential curves are shown to be useful in determining the character of the global electrostatic potential pattern, with emphasis on the separation of convective cells. Results are given for six orbits, with attention to the mid-day auroral region.

  16. High Field Magnet R&D in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2003-06-24

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb{sub 3}Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R&D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R&D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed.

  17. Fast and Simple Detection of Yersinia pestis Applicable to Field Investigation of Plague Foci

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Stéphanie; Demeure, Christian; Lamourette, Patricia; Filali, Sofia; Plaisance, Marc; Créminon, Christophe; Volland, Hervé; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the plague bacillus, has a rodent-flea-rodent life cycle but can also persist in the environment for various periods of time. There is now a convenient and effective test (F1-dipstick) for the rapid identification of Y. pestis from human patient or rodent samples, but this test cannot be applied to environmental or flea materials because the F1 capsule is mostly produced at 37°C. The plasminogen activator (PLA), a key virulence factor encoded by a Y. pestis-specific plasmid, is synthesized both at 20°C and 37°C, making it a good candidate antigen for environmental detection of Y. pestis by immunological methods. A recombinant PLA protein from Y. pestis synthesized by an Escherichia coli strain was used to produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). PLA-specific mAbs devoid of cross-reactions with other homologous proteins were further cloned. A pair of mAbs was selected based on its specificity, sensitivity, comprehensiveness, and ability to react with Y. pestis strains grown at different temperatures. These antibodies were used to develop a highly sensitive one-step PLA-enzyme immunoassay (PLA-EIA) and an immunostrip (PLA-dipstick), usable as a rapid test under field conditions. These two PLA-immunometric tests could be valuable, in addition to the F1-disptick, to confirm human plague diagnosis in non-endemic areas (WHO standard case definition). They have the supplementary advantage of allowing a rapid and easy detection of Y. pestis in environmental and flea samples, and would therefore be of great value for surveillance and epidemiological investigations of plague foci. Finally, they will be able to detect natural or genetically engineered F1-negative Y. pestis strains in human patients and environmental samples. PMID:23383008

  18. Investigation of Threshold Voltage Variability at High Temperature Using Takeuchi Plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunomura, Takaaki; Nishida, Akio; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2010-05-01

    The property of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors' (MOSFETs) threshold voltage (VT) variability at high temperature is investigated by evaluating the device matrix array test element group (DMA-TEG). It is revealed that VT variation is lower at high temperature than at room temperature, and that VT at high temperature has a strong correlation with VT at room temperature. The normal property of VT variability both at room and high temperatures is validated using the normal probability plot. The decrease in VT variation at high temperature stems from the reduction of the channel depletion layer width (Wdep). The temperature dependence of VT variation is evaluated using the Takeuchi plot, the VT variation normalization method. It is revealed that the change in BVT, the parameter of VT variation in the Takeuchi plot, is very small with varying temperature.

  19. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  20. Diffractive imaging of highly focused X-ray fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiney, H. M.; Peele, A. G.; Cai, Z.; Paterson, D.; Nugent, K. A.

    2006-02-01

    The rapid development of new sources of coherent X-rays, such as third-generation synchrotrons, high-harmonic-generation lasers and X-ray free-electron lasers, has led to the emergence of the new field of X-ray coherent science. The extension of coherent methods to the X-ray regime makes possible methods such as coherent diffraction, X-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy, speckle interferometry and ultrafast probing at atomic resolution and femtosecond timescales. Despite rapid improvements in the resolution that conventional X-ray optics can achieve, new methods for manipulating X-rays are required to push this to the atomic scale. Here we demonstrate a coherent imaging technique that enables us to image the complex field at the focus of an X-ray zone plate without the need for conventional X-ray lenses. There are no fundamental limits on the resolution of this lensless imaging technique other than the wavelength of the X-rays themselves. The ability to characterize the beam with one measurement makes the method ideally suited to characterizing the fields generated by pulsed coherent X-ray sources.