Science.gov

Sample records for investment casting process

  1. Development of polymer nano composite patterns using fused deposition modeling for rapid investment casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, Tiwary; Arunkumar, P.; Deshpande, A. S.; Vinayak, Malik; Kulkarni, R. M.; Asif, Angadi

    2018-04-01

    Conventional investment casting is one of the oldest and most economical manufacturing techniques to produce intricate and complex part geometries. However, investment casting is considered economical only if the volume of production is large. Design iterations and design optimisations in this technique proves to be very costly due to time and tooling cost for making dies for producing wax patterns. However, with the advent of Additive manufacturing technology, plastic patterns promise a very good potential to replace the wax patterns. This approach can be very useful for low volume production & lab requirements, since the cost and time required to incorporate the changes in the design is very low. This research paper discusses the steps involved for developing polymer nanocomposite filaments and checking its suitability for investment castings. The process parameters of the 3D printer machine are also optimized using the DOE technique to obtain mechanically stronger plastic patterns. The study is done to develop a framework for rapid investment casting for lab as well as industrial requirements.

  2. Effects of process variables on the properties of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics formed by investment casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, M. W.; Taylor, T. D.; Leigh, H. D.; Wise, S. A.; Buckley, J. D.; Vasquez, P.; Buck, G. M.; Hicks, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    An investment casting process has been developed to produce net-shape, superconducting ceramics. In this work, a factorial experiment was performed to determine the critical process parameters for producing cast YBa2Cu3O7 ceramics with optimum properties. An analysis of variance procedure indicated that the key variables in casting superconductive ceramics are the particle size distribution and sintering temperature. Additionally, the interactions between the sintering temperature and the other process parameters (e.g., particle size distribution and the use of silver dopants) were also found to influence the density, porosity, and critical current density of the fired ceramics.

  3. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  4. Army Investment Casting Industry Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Page 9 #5 Capacity Utilization Rates Page 10 #6 Labor Intensity Indicator Page 11 #7 Market Share By Firm Size Page 12 #8 Market Share By Type of Firm...information gathered from the U.S. casters. These similarities coupled with the relatively small Canadian market share resulted in similar conclusions...investment castings further expanding into the Defense market some foreseeable difficulties that could arise would be: a. Lack of adequate tooling. b

  5. [Variables effecting casting accuracy of quick heating casting investments].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Nakamura, H; Iwasaki, N; Morita, N; Habu, N; Nishimura, F

    1994-06-01

    Recently, several new products of investments for "quick heating" have been put on the Japanese market. The total casting procedure time for this quick heating method involves only one hour; 30-minutes waiting after the start of mixing before placing the mold directly into the 700 degrees C furnace and 30-minutes heating in the furnace. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two variables effecting casting accuracy using these new investments. The effect of thickness of the casting liner inside the casting ring and the effect of waiting time before placing the mold into the 700 degrees C furnace were evaluated. A stainless-steel die with a convergence angle of 8 degrees was employed. Marginal discrepancies of the crown between the wax patterns and castings were measured. The size of the cast crown became larger when the thickness of the ring liner was thick and when the waiting time before placing the mold into the furnace was long. These results suggest that these new investments have the advantage of providing sound castings using short-time casting procedures. However, it is necessary to pay careful attention to the casting conditions for obtaining reproducible castings.

  6. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  7. Beryllium-aluminum alloys for investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtrab, W.T.; Levoy, N.

    1997-05-01

    Beryllium-aluminum alloys containing greater than 60 wt % beryllium are very favorable materials for applications requiring light weight and high stiffness. However, when produced by traditional powder metallurgical methods, these alloys are expensive and have limited applications. To reduce the cost of making beryllium-aluminum components, Nuclear Metals Inc. (NMI) and Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles have recently developed a family of patented beryllium-aluminum alloys that can be investment cast. Designated Beralcast, the alloys can achieve substantial weight savings because of their high specific strength and stiffness. In some cases, weight has been reduced by up to 50% over aluminum investmentmore » casting. Beralcast is now being used to make thin wall precision investment castings for several advanced aerospace applications, such as the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and F-22 jet fighter. This article discusses alloy compositions, properties, casting method, and the effects of cobalt additions on strength.« less

  8. Modeling the surface contamination of dental titanium investment castings.

    PubMed

    Atwood, R C; Lee, P D; Curtis, R V

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a computational tool for assisting the design of titanium dental castings with minimal defects and to compare computational simulations with casting experiments. Modeling. An in-house cellular-automata solidification and finite-difference diffusion program was coupled with a commercial casting program and applied to (a) simple geometric wedge models and (b) a 3D-laser scan of a molar crown casting. Experimental. Wedges and molar crowns were hand-waxed and investment cast in commercial purity grade 1 (CP-1) titanium by a commercial dental laboratory. The castings were sectioned and analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and microhardness testing. In the wedge sample, contamination with impurities (Al, Si), including intermetallic precipitates, was found to extend to a depth ranging from 30 to 120 microm depending on the section thickness and hence the local cooling rate. Microstructural and mechanical (hardness) effects were found to a depth ranging from 80 to 250 microm. The coupled micro/macro model predictions showed reasonable agreement for the pattern of contamination. Dental and medical applications demand close dimensional tolerance and freedom from surface impurities and structural flaws in castings having unique shapes. The ability to predict the structural, mechanical, and chemical changes resulting from the casting process will help to design the casting and post-casting processes to minimize these problems.

  9. Marginal Accuracy of Castings Fabricated with Ringless Casting Investment System and Metal Ring Casting Investment System: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kalavathi, M; Sachin, Bhuvana; Prasanna, B G; Shreeharsha, T V; Praveen, B; Ragher, Mallikarjuna

    2016-02-01

    The thermal expansion of the investment can be restricted by the metal casting ring because the thermal expansion of the ring is less than that of the investment. The ringless casting procedure is in use in clinical dentistry, though there is little scientific data to support its use in fixed partial dentures. In this study, marginal discrepancy of castings produced with the ringless casting technique and the conventional technique using the metal rings were compared. A total of 30 wax patterns were fabricated directly on a metal die. Optical stereomicroscope was used to measure the marginal discrepancy between the metal die and wax patterns. A total of 15 castings were invested using Bellavest T phosphate-bonded investment with the ringless technique and 15 were invested with the same investment with a metal ring; 30 castings were produced using a nickel-chromium ceramo-metal alloy. The internal surface of the castings was not modified and seated with finger pressure. The vertical marginal discrepancy was measured using an optical stereomicroscope at a magnification of 100x. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using students t-test (paired t-test and unpaired t-test). The castings of the ringless technique provided less vertical marginal discrepancy (240.56 ± 45.81 μ) than the castings produced with the conventional metal ring technique (281.98± 53.05 μ). The difference was statistically significant. The ringless casting technique had produced better marginal accuracy compared with conventional casting technique. Ringless casting system can be used routinely for clinical purpose.

  10. Improving Metal Casting Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Don Sirois, an Auburn University research associate, and Bruce Strom, a mechanical engineering Co-Op Student, are evaluating the dimensional characteristics of an aluminum automobile engine casting. More accurate metal casting processes may reduce the weight of some cast metal products used in automobiles, such as engines. Research in low gravity has taken an important first step toward making metal products used in homes, automobiles, and aircraft less expensive, safer, and more durable. Auburn University and industry are partnering with NASA to develop one of the first accurate computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials used in a manufacturing process called casting. Ford Motor Company's casting plant in Cleveland, Ohio is using NASA-sponsored computer modeling information to improve the casting process of automobile and light-truck engine blocks.

  11. [The surface roughness analysis of the titanium casting founding by a new titanium casting investment material].

    PubMed

    Liang, Qin-ye; Wu, Xia-yi; Lin, Xue-feng

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the surface roughness property of the titanium castings cast in a new investment for titanium casting. Six wax patterns (20 mm × 20 mm × 0.5 mm) were invested using two investments: three in a new titanium investment material and three in the control material (Rematitan Plus). Six titanium specimens were obtained by conventional casting. After casting, surface roughness of the specimens were evaluated with a surface profilometer. The surface roughness of the specimens cast in new titanium investment material was (1.72 ± 0.08) µm, which was much smaller than that from Rematitan Plus [(1.91 ± 0.15) µm, P < 0.05]. The surfaces of titanium cast using these two investment materials are both smooth enough to fulfill the demand of the titanium precision-casting for prosthodontic clinical use.

  12. FInal Report - Investment Casting Shell Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Von Richards

    2003-12-01

    This project made a significant contribution to the understanding of the investment casting shell cracking problem. The effects of wax properties on the occurrence of shell cracking were demonstrated and can be measured. The properties measured include coefficient of thermal expansion, heating rate and crystallinity of the structure. The important features of production molds and materials properties have been indicated by case study analysis and fractography of low strength test bars. It was found that stress risers in shell cavity design were important and that typical critical flaws were either oversize particles or large pores just behind the prime coat.more » It was also found that the true effect of fugitive polymer fibers was not permeability increase, but rather a toughening mechanism due to crack deflection.« less

  13. Nonaqueous slip casting of high temperature ceramic superconductors using an investment casting technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Matthew W. (Inventor); Taylor, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wise, Stephanie A. (Inventor); Buckley, John D. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor); Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Hicks, Lana P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for slip casting ceramic articles that does not employ parting agents and affords the casting of complete, detailed, precision articles that do not possess parting lines is presented. This process is especially useful for high temperature superconductors and water-sensitive ceramics. A wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell mold of the calcium sulfate-bonded investment material. The shell mold is cooled to room temperature, and a ceramic slip, created by dispersing a ceramic powder in an organic liquid, is poured therein. After a ceramic shell of desired thickness or a solid article has set up in the shell mold, excess ceramic slip is poured out. The shell mold is misted with water and peeled away from the ceramic article, after which the ceramic is fired to provide a complete, detailed, precision, high temperature superconductive ceramic article without parting lines. The casting technique may take place in the presence of a magnetic field to orient the ceramic powders during the casting process.

  14. Modeling the investment casting of a titanium crown.

    PubMed

    Atwood, R C; Lee, P D; Curtis, R V; Maijer, D M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply computational modeling tools to assist in the design of titanium dental castings. The tools developed should incorporate state-of-the-art micromodels to predict the depth to which the mechanical properties of the crown are affected by contamination from the mold. The model should also be validated by comparison of macro- and micro-defects found in a typical investment cast titanium tooth crown. Crowns were hand-waxed and investment cast in commercial purity grade 1 (CP-1) titanium by a commercial dental laboratory. The castings were analyzed using X-ray microtomography (XMT). Following sectioning, analysis continued with optical and scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness testing. An in-house cellular-automata solidification and finite-difference diffusion program was coupled with a commercial casting program to model the investment casting process. A three-dimensional (3D) digital image generated by X-ray tomography was used to generate an accurate geometric representation of a molar crown casting. Previously reported work was significantly expanded upon by including transport of dissolved oxygen and impurity sources upon the arbitrarily shaped surface of the crown, and improved coupling of micro- and macro-scale simulations. Macroscale modeling was found to be sufficient to accurately predict the location of the large internal porosity. These are shrinkage pores located in the thick sections of the cusp. The model was used to determine the influence of sprue design on the size and location of these pores. Combining microscale with macroscale modeling allowed the microstructure and depth of contamination to be predicted qualitatively. This combined model predicted a surprising result--the dissolution of silicon from the mold into the molten titanium is sufficient to depress the freezing point of the liquid metal such that the crown solidifies the subsurface. Solidification then progresses inwards and back out to the

  15. Processing of IN-718 Lattice Block Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2002-01-01

    Recently a low cost casting method known as lattice block casting has been developed by JAM Corporation, Wilmington, Massachusetts for engineering materials such as aluminum and stainless steels that has shown to provide very high stiffness and strength with only a fraction of density of the alloy. NASA Glenn Research Center has initiated research to investigate lattice block castings of high temperature Ni-base superalloys such as the model system Inconel-718 (IN-718) for lightweight nozzle applications. Although difficulties were encountered throughout the manufacturing process , a successful investment casting procedure was eventually developed. Wax formulation and pattern assembly, shell mold processing, and counter gravity casting techniques were developed. Ten IN-718 lattice block castings (each measuring 15-cm wide by 30-cm long by 1.2-cm thick) have been successfully produced by Hitchiner Gas Turbine Division, Milford, New Hampshire, using their patented counter gravity casting techniques. Details of the processing and resulting microstructures are discussed in this paper. Post casting processing and evaluation of system specific mechanical properties of these specimens are in progress.

  16. Microstructure of As-cast Co-Cr-Mo Alloy Prepared by Investment Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Bum; Jung, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Kang Min; Son, Yong; Lee, Jung-Il; Ryu, Jeong Ho

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by an investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants owing to its high strength, good corrosion resistance, and excellent biocompatibility. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from normal industrial environmental conditions. The characterization of the samples was carried out using optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. In this study, the as-cast microstructure is an γ-Co (face-centered cubic) dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as M23C6 carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloy. Other minority phases, such as the σ phase, were also detected, and their presence could be linked to the manufacturing process and environment.

  17. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  18. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-04-01

    Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessarymore » for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions

  19. The effect of investment type on the fit of cast titanium crowns.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Jean-Louis, M; Yabugami, M; Togaya, T

    1994-12-01

    In order to determine the best laboratory procedure for titanium crown casting, a set of thermal expansion measurements and casting experiments were carried out using a casting machine (argon arc, pressure difference type) and three different investments, two conventional SiO2 based investments and a new Al2O3/MgO based investment. The thermal expansion measurements involved a cycle of heating and cooling. The relatively low mould temperatures recommended (200 degrees C) or chosen (350 degrees C) for the conventional investments provided zero or negative mould expansion for the compensation of metal shrinkage. Crowns made from these investments exhibited heavy reaction with the mould, and the common cleaning method of sand blasting appeared to be essential. This cleaning process, however, was not adequate for the assessment of casting accuracy as the short sand blasting time (15 s) rapidly altered the fit of the crowns. The metal reacted little with the new investment and the best compensation (0.15 mm discrepancy) for the metal shrinkage, as assessed 'as cast', was achieved when the investment was heated to 950 degrees C and then cooled to the recommended mould temperature (600 degrees C).

  20. Three-dimensional microstructure simulation of Ni-based superalloy investment castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng

    2011-05-01

    An integrated macro and micro multi-scale model for the three-dimensional microstructure simulation of Ni-based superalloy investment castings was developed, and applied to industrial castings to investigate grain evolution during solidification. A ray tracing method was used to deal with the complex heat radiation transfer. The microstructure evolution was simulated based on the Modified Cellular Automaton method, which was coupled with three-dimensional nested macro and micro grids. Experiments for Ni-based superalloy turbine wheel investment casting were carried out, which showed a good correspondence with the simulated results. It is indicated that the proposed model is able to predict the microstructure of the casting precisely, which provides a tool for the optimizing process.

  1. Development of a New Ferrous Aluminosilicate Refractory Material for Investment Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chen; Jones, Sam; Blackburn, Stuart

    2012-12-01

    Investment casting is a time-consuming, labour intensive process, which produces complex, high value-added components for a variety of specialised industries. Current environmental and economic pressures have resulted in a need for the industry to improve current casting quality, reduce manufacturing costs and explore new markets for the process. Alumino-silicate based refractories are commonly used as both filler and stucco materials for ceramic shell production. A new ceramic material, norite, is now being produced based on ferrous aluminosilicate chemistry, having many potential advantages when used for the production of shell molds for casting aluminum alloy. This paper details the results of a direct comparison made between the properties of a ceramic shell system produced with norite refractories and a typical standard refractory shell system commonly used in casting industry. A range of mechanical and physical properties of the systems was measured, and a full-scale industrial casting trial was also carried out. The unique properties of the norite shell system make it a promising alternative for casting aluminum based alloys in the investment foundry.

  2. Dimensional accuracy and surface property of titanium casting using gypsum-bonded alumina investment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Min; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Nishimura, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dimensional accuracy and surface property of titanium casting obtained using a gypsum-bonded alumina investment. The experimental gypsum-bonded alumina investment with 20 mass% gypsum content mixed with 2 mass% potassium sulfate was used for five cp titanium castings and three Cu-Zn alloy castings. The accuracy, surface roughness (Ra), and reaction layer thickness of these castings were investigated. The accuracy of the castings obtained from the experimental investment ranged from -0.04 to 0.23%, while surface roughness (Ra) ranged from 7.6 to 10.3microm. A reaction layer of about 150 microm thickness under the titanium casting surface was observed. These results suggested that the titanium casting obtained using the experimental investment was acceptable. Although the reaction layer was thin, surface roughness should be improved.

  3. Surface modification of investment cast-316L implants: microstructure effects.

    PubMed

    El-Hadad, Shimaa; Khalifa, Waleed; Nofal, Adel

    2015-03-01

    Artificial femur stem of 316L stainless steel was fabricated by investment casting using vacuum induction melting. Different surface treatments: mechanical polishing, thermal oxidation and immersion in alkaline solution were applied. Thicker hydroxyapatite (HAP) layer was formed in the furnace-oxidized samples as compared to the mechanically polished ones. The alkaline treatment enhanced the precipitation of HAP on the samples. It was also observed that the HAP precipitation responded differently to the different phases of the microstructure. The austenite phase was observed to have more homogeneous and smoother layer of HAP. In addition, the growth of HAP was sometimes favored on the austenite phase rather than on ferrite phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties weremore » accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.« less

  5. Alloy Shrinkage Factors for the Investment Casting of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Porter, Wallace D.

    2008-04-01

    In this study, alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a coordinate measurement machine (CMM). For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made, in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed a different evolution on heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation was performed with thermal expansion obtained on heating, and another one was performed with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from the numerical simulation results of the solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly overpredicted.

  6. Vacuum investment cast PH13-8Mo corrosion resistant steel. (SAE standard)

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    An industry-wide interest has arisen with regards to the properties and capabilities of investment cast PH 13-8Mo corrosion resistant steel. Specifically of interest are the structural applications in the aerospace industry for this product heat treated to the H1000 condition. The objective of this AMEC cooperative test program was to generate and compile useful data for aerospace structural evaluation of investment cast PH 13-8Mo heat treated to H1000. The determination was made of overall mechanical properties, fatigue, fracture toughness, and crack growth data along with basic microstructural evaluation of the investment cast material. The evaluation of mechanical property variations betweenmore » cast and machined tensile specimens and evaluation of microstructural constituents. PH 13-8Mo, H1000 investment castings for use in the aerospace industry is included.« less

  7. The effects of different types of investments on the alpha-case layer of titanium castings.

    PubMed

    Guilin, Yu; Nan, Li; Yousheng, Li; Yining, Wang

    2007-03-01

    Different types of investments affect the formation of the alpha-case (alpha-case) layer on titanium castings. This alpha-case layer may possibly alter the mechanical properties of cast titanium, which may influence the fabrication of removable and fixed prostheses. The formation mechanism for the alpha-case layer is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 3 types of investments on the microstructure, composition, and microhardness of the alpha-case layer on titanium castings. Fifteen wax columns with a diameter of 5 mm and a length of 40 mm were divided into 3 groups of 5 patterns each. Patterns were invested using 3 types of investment materials, respectively, and were cast in pure titanium. The 3 types of materials tested were SiO(2)-, Al(2)O(3)-, and MgO-based investments. All specimens were sectioned and prepared for metallographic observation. The microstructure and composition of the surface reaction layer of titanium castings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The surface microhardness (VHN) for all specimens was measured using a hardness testing machine, and a mean value for each group was calculated. The alpha-case layer on titanium castings invested with SiO(2)-, Al(2)O(3)-, and MgO-based investments consisted of 3 layers-namely, the oxide layer, alloy layer, and hardening layer. In this study, the oxide layer and alloy layer were called the reaction layer. The thickness of the reaction layer for titanium castings using SiO(2)-, Al(2)O(3)-, and MgO-based investments was approximately 80 microm, 50 microm, and 14 microm, respectively. The surface microhardness of titanium castings made with SiO(2)-based investments was the highest, and that with MgO-based investments was the lowest. The type of investment affects the microstructure and microhardness of the alpha-case layer of titanium castings. Based on the thickness of the surface reaction layer and the surface

  8. Effect of investment type and mold temperature on casting accuracy and titanium-ceramic bond.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mônica Barbosa; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the casting accuracy of crown margins and metal-ceramic shear bond strength (SBS) of pure titanium injected into casting molds made using 2 investment types at 3 mold temperatures. Sixty crown (30-degree beveled finish line) and 60 cylinder (5mm diameter × 8mm high) patterns were divided into 6 groups (n=10), and cast using a phosphate-bonded investment (P) and a magnesium oxide-bonded investment (U), at 400°C (groups P400 and U400), 550°C (groups P550 and U550) and 700°C (groups P700 and U700) mold temperatures. Crown margins were recorded in impression material, the degree of marginal rounding was measured and margin length deficiencies (µm) were calculated. Titanium-ceramic specimens were prepared using Triceram ceramic (2mm high) and SBS was tested. Failure modes were assessed by optical microscopy. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). For casting accuracy, expressed by marginal deficiency (µm), investment U provided more accurate results (64 ± 11) than P (81 ± 23) (p<0.001). The increase in temperature resulted in different effects for the tested investments (p<0.001), as it provided better casting accuracy for U700 (55 ± 7) and worse for P700 (109 ± 18). Casting accuracy at 700°C (82 ± 31) was significantly different from 400°C (69 ± 9) and 550°C (68 ± 9) (p<0.05). For SBS, there was no significant differences among the groups for factors investment (p=0.062) and temperature (p=0.224), or for their interaction (p=0.149). Investment U provided better casting accuracy than investment P. The SBS was similar for all combinations of investments and temperatures.

  9. Effect of porosity on ductility variation in investment cast 17-4PH.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Robert D.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grant, Richard P.

    2005-02-01

    The stainless steel alloy 17-4PH contains a martensitic microstructure and second phase delta ({delta}) ferrite. Strengthening of 17-4PH is attributed to Cu-rich precipitates produced during age hardening treatments at 900-1150 F (H900-H1150). For wrought 17-4PH, the effects of heat treatment and microstructure on mechanical properties are well-documented [for example, Ref. 1]. Fewer studies are available on cast 17-4PH, although it has been a popular casting alloy for high strength applications where moderate corrosion resistance is needed. Microstructural features and defects particular to castings may have adverse effects on properties, especially when the alloy is heat treated to high strength. Themore » objective of this work was to outline the effects of microstructural features specific to castings, such as shrinkage/solidification porosity, on the mechanical behavior of investment cast 17-4PH. Besides heat treatment effects, the results of metallography and SEM studies showed that the largest effect on mechanical properties is from shrinkage/solidification porosity. Figure 1a shows stress-strain curves obtained from samples machined from castings in the H925 condition. The strength levels were fairly similar but the ductility varied significantly. Figure 1b shows an example of porosity on a fracture surface from a room-temperature, quasi-static tensile test. The rounded features represent the surfaces of dendrites which did not fuse or only partially fused together during solidification. Some evidence of local areas of fracture is found on some dendrite surfaces. The shrinkage pores are due to inadequate backfilling of liquid metal and simultaneous solidification shrinkage during casting. A summary of percent elongation results is displayed in Figure 2a. It was found that higher amounts of porosity generally result in lower ductility. Note that the porosity content was measured on the fracture surfaces. The results are qualitatively similar to those found

  10. The Effects of Casting Porosity on the Tensile Behavior of Investment Cast 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan, D. F.; Crenshaw, T. B.; Gearhart, J. S.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of casting porosity on the mechanical behavior of investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel was studied as well as the effect of heat treatment on the alloy's sensitivity to casting defects. Interdendritic porosity, formed during solidification and shrinkage of the alloy, reduces the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength roughly in proportion to the reduction in load bearing cross-section. The effects of casting porosity on ductility (% strain, % reduction in area) are more severe, in agreement with research on other alloy systems. In this study, 10% porosity reduced the ductility of 17-4PH stainless steel by almost 80% for the high-strength H925 condition. Tensile testing at -10°C (263 K) further reduces the alloy ductility with and without pores present. In the lower strength H1100 condition, the ductility is higher than the H925 condition, as expected, and somewhat less sensitive to porosity. By measuring the area % porosity on the fracture surface of tensile specimens, the trend in failure strain versus area % porosity was obtained and analyzed using two methods: an empirical approach to determine an index of defect susceptibility with a logarithmic fit and an analytical approach based on the constitutive stress-strain behavior and critical strain concentration in the vicinity of the casting voids. The applicability of the second method depends on the amount of non-uniform strain (necking) and, as such, the softer H1100 material did not correlate well to the model. The behavior of 17-4PH was compared to previous work on cast Al alloys, Mg alloys, and other cast materials.

  11. Properties of experimental titanium cast investment mixing with water reducing agent solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zutai; Ding, Ning; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Han-Cheol, Cho; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a dental investment for titanium casting. ZrO(2) and Al(2)O(3) were selected as refractory materials to prepare three investments (Codes: A-C) according to the quantity of Zr. Al(2)O(3) cement was used as a binder at a ratio of 15%, they were mixed with special mixing liquid. B1 was used as a control mixed with water. Fundamental examinations were statistically evaluated. A casting test was performed with investment B. Fluidities, setting times, and green strengths showed no remarkable differences; however, they were significantly different from those of B1. Expansion values for A, B, C, and B1 at 850°C were 1.03%±0.08%, 1.96%±0.17%, 4.35%±0.23%, and 1.50%±0.28%, respectively. Castings were covered by only small amounts of mold materials. The hardness test showed no significant differences between castings from B and the ones from commercial investments. The experimental special mixing liquid effectively reduced the water/powder ratio and improved the strength and thermal expansion.

  12. Modeling the spray casting process

    SciTech Connect

    El-Haggar, S.M.; Muoio, N.; Crowe, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    Spray forming is a process in which a liquid metal is atomized into very small droplets and deposited on a substrate. These small droplets cool very rapidly in a high velocity gas jet, giving rise to smaller grain structure and improved mechanical properties. This paper presents a numerical model, based on the trajectory approach, for the velocity and thermal properties of the droplets in the jet and predicts the deposition pattern and the state of the droplets upon contact with the substrate.

  13. Gating geometry studies of thin-walled 17-4PH investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Zanner, F.J.

    1992-11-01

    The ability to design gating systems that reliably feed and support investment castings is often the result of ``cut-and-try`` methodology. Factors such as hot tearing, porosity, cold shuts, misruns, and shrink are defects often corrected by several empirical gating design iterations. Sandia National Laboratories is developing rules that aid in removing the uncertainty involved in the design of gating systems for investment castings. In this work, gating geometries used for filling of thin walled investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel flat plates were investigated. A full factorial experiment evaluating the influence of metal pour temperature, mold preheat temperature, and mold channelmore » thickness were conducted for orientations that filled a horizontal flat plate from the edge. A single wedge gate geometry was used for the edge-gated configuration. Thermocouples placed along the top of the mold recorded metal front temperatures, and a real-time x-ray imaging system tracked the fluid flow behavior during filling of the casting. Data from these experiments were used to determine the terminal fill volumes and terminal fill times for each gate design.« less

  14. Gating geometry studies of thin-walled 17-4PH investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Zanner, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to design gating systems that reliably feed and support investment castings is often the result of cut-and-try'' methodology. Factors such as hot tearing, porosity, cold shuts, misruns, and shrink are defects often corrected by several empirical gating design iterations. Sandia National Laboratories is developing rules that aid in removing the uncertainty involved in the design of gating systems for investment castings. In this work, gating geometries used for filling of thin walled investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel flat plates were investigated. A full factorial experiment evaluating the influence of metal pour temperature, mold preheat temperature, and mold channelmore » thickness were conducted for orientations that filled a horizontal flat plate from the edge. A single wedge gate geometry was used for the edge-gated configuration. Thermocouples placed along the top of the mold recorded metal front temperatures, and a real-time x-ray imaging system tracked the fluid flow behavior during filling of the casting. Data from these experiments were used to determine the terminal fill volumes and terminal fill times for each gate design.« less

  15. Process for slip casting textured tubular structures

    DOEpatents

    Steinlage, Greg A.; Trumble, Kevin P.; Bowman, Keith J.

    2002-01-01

    A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

  16. Non-rigid Reconstruction of Casting Process with Temperature Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinhua; Wang, Yanjie; Li, Xin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Lu

    2017-09-01

    Off-line reconstruction of rigid scene has made a great progress in the past decade. However, the on-line reconstruction of non-rigid scene is still a very challenging task. The casting process is a non-rigid reconstruction problem, it is a high-dynamic molding process lacking of geometric features. In order to reconstruct the casting process robustly, an on-line fusion strategy is proposed for dynamic reconstruction of casting process. Firstly, the geometric and flowing feature of casting are parameterized in manner of TSDF (truncated signed distance field) which is a volumetric block, parameterized casting guarantees real-time tracking and optimal deformation of casting process. Secondly, data structure of the volume grid is extended to have temperature value, the temperature interpolation function is build to generate the temperature of each voxel. This data structure allows for dynamic tracking of temperature of casting during deformation stages. Then, the sparse RGB features is extracted from casting scene to search correspondence between geometric representation and depth constraint. The extracted color data guarantees robust tracking of flowing motion of casting. Finally, the optimal deformation of the target space is transformed into a nonlinear regular variational optimization problem. This optimization step achieves smooth and optimal deformation of casting process. The experimental results show that the proposed method can reconstruct the casting process robustly and reduce drift in the process of non-rigid reconstruction of casting.

  17. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys part 1. Application of developed investment for Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Nakai, Akira; Goto, Shin-ichi; Wakamatsu, Yasushi; Yara, Atushi; Miyagawa, Yukio; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a casting investment that prevents the blackening of the cast surface of noble metal alloys. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which the metallic powders such as boron (B), silicon (Si), aluminum (Al) and titanium (Ti) were added as oxidizing agents. An Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the addition of each metal powder was evaluated from the color difference between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. The color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. A lower mean value in the color difference was obtained at 0.25-1.00 mass% B content. B and Al are useful as an additive in a gypsum-bonded investment to prevent the blackening of an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. The effects of Si and Ti powder addition could not be found.

  18. Fabrication of low-cost, cementless femoral stem 316L stainless steel using investment casting technique.

    PubMed

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Suhasril, Andril Arafat; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Omar, Mohd Afian; Abd Kader, Ab Saman; Mohd Noor, Alias; A Harris, Arief Ruhullah; Abdul Majid, Norazman

    2014-07-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a flourishing orthopedic surgery, generating billions of dollars of revenue. The cost associated with the fabrication of implants has been increasing year by year, and this phenomenon has burdened the patient with extra charges. Consequently, this study will focus on designing an accurate implant via implementing the reverse engineering of three-dimensional morphological study based on a particular population. By using finite element analysis, this study will assist to predict the outcome and could become a useful tool for preclinical testing of newly designed implants. A prototype is then fabricated using 316L stainless steel by applying investment casting techniques that reduce manufacturing cost without jeopardizing implant quality. The finite element analysis showed that the maximum von Mises stress was 66.88 MPa proximally with a safety factor of 2.39 against endosteal fracture, and micromotion was 4.73 μm, which promotes osseointegration. This method offers a fabrication process of cementless femoral stems with lower cost, subsequently helping patients, particularly those from nondeveloped countries. Copyright © 2013 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Novel technologies for the lost foam casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenming; Fan, Zitian

    2018-03-01

    Lost foam casting (LFC) is a green precision casting process categorized as a near net forming technology. Yet, despite its popularity, it still suffers from some technological problems, such as poor filling ability of the castings, coarse and non-dense microstructure, low mechanical properties for the Al and Mg LFC processes, and defective carburization for the low carbon steel LFC process. These drawbacks restrict the development and widespread application of the LFC process. To solve these problems, the present study developed several novel LFC technologies, namely, LFC technologies under vacuum and low pressure, vibration solidification, and pressure solidification conditions; expendable shell casting technology; and preparation technology of bimetallic castings based on the LFC process. The results showed that the LFC under vacuum and low pressure evidently improved the filling ability and solved the oxidization problem of the alloys, which is suitable for producing complex and thinwall castings. The vibration and pressure solidifications increased the compactness of the castings and refined the microstructure, significantly improving the mechanical properties of the castings. The expendable shell casting technology could solve the pore, carburization, and inclusion defects of the traditional LFC method, obtaining castings with acceptable surface quality. Moreover, the Al/Mg and Al/Al bimetallic castings with acceptable metallurgical bonding were successfully fabricated using the LFC process. These proposed novel LFC technologies can solve the current technological issues and promote the technological progress of the LFC process.

  20. Application of Rapid Prototyping to the Investment Casting of Test Hardware (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project No. 98-08)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. G.; Wells, D.

    2000-01-01

    Investment casting masters of a selected propulsion hardware component, a fuel pump housing, were rapid prototyped on the several processes in-house, along with the new Z-Corp process acquired through this project. Also, tensile samples were prototyped and cast using the same significant parameters. The models were then shelled in-house using a commercial grade zircon-based slurry and stucco technique. Next, the shelled models were fired and cast by our in-house foundry contractor (IITRI), with NASA-23, a commonly used test hardware metal. The cast models are compared by their surface finish and overall appearance (i.e., the occurrence of pitting, warping, etc.), as well as dimensional accuracy.

  1. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Conventional investing and casting techniques are time-consuming and usually requires 2-4 h for completion. Accelerated nonstandard, casting techniques have been reported to achieve similar quality results in significantly less time, namely, in 30-40 min. During casting, it is essential to achieve compensation for the shrinkage of solidifying alloy by investment expansion. The metal casting ring restricts the thermal expansion of investment because the thermal expansion of the ring is lesser than that of the investment. The use of casting ring was challenged with the introduction of the ringless technique. A total of 40 test samples of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) cast copings were obtained from the patterns fabricated using inlay casting wax. The 20 wax patterns were invested using metal ring and 20 wax patterns were invested using the ringless investment system. Of both the groups, 10 samples underwent conventional casting, and the other 10 underwent accelerated casting. The patterns were casted using the induction casting technique. All the test samples of cast copings were evaluated for vertical marginal gaps at four points on the die employing a stereo optical microscope. The vertical marginal discrepancy data obtained were tabulated. Mean and standard deviations were obtained. Vertical discrepancies were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significantly different. The data obtained were found to be very highly significant (P < 0.001). Mean vertical gap was the maximum for Group II (53.64 μm) followed by Group IV (47.62 μm), Group I (44.83 μm) and Group III (35.35 μm). The Ni-Cr cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had shown the least vertical marginal discrepancies among the four

  2. The effect of coating patterns with spinel-based investment on the castability and porosity of titanium cast into three phosphate-bonded investments.

    PubMed

    Pieralini, Anelise R F; Benjamin, Camila M; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Scaf, Gulnara; Adabo, Gelson Luis

    2010-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pattern coating with spinel-based investment Rematitan Ultra (RU) on the castability and internal porosity of commercially pure (CP) titanium invested into phosphate-bonded investments. The apparent porosity of the investment was also measured. Square patterns (15 × 15 × 0.3 mm(3)) were either coated with RU, or not and invested into the phosphate-bonded investments: Rematitan Plus (RP), Rema Exakt (RE), Castorit Super C (CA), and RU (control group). The castings were made in an Ar-arc vacuum-pressure machine. The castability area (mm(2) ) was measured by an image-analysis system (n = 10). For internal porosity, the casting (12 × 12 × 2 mm(3) ) was studied by the X-ray method, and the projected porous area percentage was measured by an image-analysis system (n = 10). The apparent porosity of the investment (n = 10) was measured in accordance with the ASTM C373-88 standard. Analysis of variance (One-way ANOVA) of castability was significant, and the Tukey test indicated that RU had the highest mean but the investing technique with coating increased the castability for all phosphate-bonded investments. The analysis of the internal porosity of the cast by the nonparametric test demonstrated that the RP, RE, and CA with coating and RP without coating did not differ from the control group (RU), while the CA and RE casts without coating were more porous. The one-way ANOVA of apparent porosity of the investment was significant, and the Tukey test showed that the means of RU (36.10%) and CA (37.22%) were higher than those of RP (25.91%) and RE (26.02%). Pattern coating with spinel-based material prior to phosphate-bonded investments can influence the castability and the internal porosity of CP Ti. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Influence of time of placement of investments for burnout and the type of rings being used on the casting accuracy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shabir A; Naqash, Talib Amin; Padmanabhan, T V; Subramanium; Lambodaran; Nazir, Shazana

    2014-03-01

    The sole objective of casting procedure is to provide a metallic duplication of missing tooth structure, with as great accuracy as possible. The ability to produce well fitting castings require strict adherence to certain fundamentals. A study was undertaken to comparatively evaluate the effect on casting accuracy by subjecting the invested wax patterns to burnout after different time intervals. The effect on casting accuracy using metal ring into a pre heated burnout furnace and using split ring was also carried. The readings obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis.

  4. Gypsum-bonded alumina dental investment for high-fusing casting.

    PubMed

    Yan, M; Takahashi, H

    1998-09-01

    In this study, we developed a new gypsum-bonded investment for high-fusing alloys. The investment was composed of gypsum as a binder and alumina as a refractory. Effects of type of alumina powder and gypsum content on characteristics of the gypsum-bonded alumina investment were investigated. Obtained characteristics of this experimental investment were as follows: fluidities ranged from 48.8 to 88.9 mm; setting times ranged from 21.2 to more than 120 minutes; setting expansions ranged from 0.4 to 1.3%; green strengths showed 0.5 to 4.5 MPa; fired strengths ranged from 0.2 to 1.7 MPa; thermal expansions after firing were -1.60 to 2.16%. Thermal expansion occurred because of the chemical reaction between Al2O3 and CaO decomposed from gypsum. These results suggest that this gypsum-bonded alumina investment with 20 or 25 mass% gypsum content possessed the fundamental properties for high-fusing alloy casting.

  5. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys part 3. Effect of reducing agent addition on the strength and expansion of the investments.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yukun; Nakai, Akira; Ogura, Hideo

    2004-06-01

    Different reducing agents (B, Al, Si and Ti) were individually added to two gypsum-bonded investments to prepare investments preventing surface blackening of some noble cast alloys. The effect of different additive contents on green-body and burnout compressive strength, setting and thermal expansion of the investments were evaluated. The strength and expansion of the investments were changed by the additives. The compressive strength of Al-, Si- and Ti-added investments decreased with the increase of additive contents. The burnout strength of B-added investments significantly increased while green-body strength remained unchanged. The setting expansion of the B-added investments increased while those of the Al-, Si- and Ti-added investments decreased with the increase of additive contents. The thermal expansion of the Si- and Ti-added investments decreased, and that of the Al- and B-added investments remained unchanged. Further study is necessary to evaluate the effects of these additives on the accuracy of dental castings.

  6. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys Part 2. Application of developed investment for type 4 gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Akira; Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Goto, Shin-ichi; Kato, Katuma; Yara, Atushi; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the developed investment for the prevention of blackening of a cast Type 4 gold and to analyze the oxides on its surface in relation to the blackening of the alloy. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which boron (B) or aluminum (Al) was added as a reducing agent. A Type 4 gold alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the additives was evaluated from the color difference (deltaE*) between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. B and Al were effective to prevent the blackening of a Type 4 gold alloy and the color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. The prevention of the blackening of the gold alloy can be achieved by restraining the formation of CuO.

  7. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Evaluation of an Investment Cast Al-Be Alloy for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; McGill, P. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum-Beryllium metal matrix composite materials are useful due to their desirable performance characteristics for aerospace applications. Desirable characteristics of this material includes light-weight, dimensional stability, stiffness, good vibration damping characteristics, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and workability, This material is 3.5 times stiffer and 22% lighter than conventional aluminum alloys. electro-optical systems, advanced sensor and guidance components for flight and satellite systems, components for light-weight high-performance aircraft engines, and structural components for helicopters. Aluminum-beryllium materials are now available in the form of near net shape investment castings. In this materials properties characterization study, the cryogenic tensile and fracture properties of an investment casting alloy, Beralcast 363, were determined. Tensile testing was performed at 21 C (70 F), -73.3 C (-100 F), -195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F), and fracture (K(sub lc) and da/dN) testing was performed at -73.3 C (-100 F), -195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F). Their use is attractive for weight critical structural applications such as advanced

  8. Numerical simulation and optimization of casting process for complex pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueqin; Dong, Anping; Wang, Donghong; Lu, Yanling; Zhu, Guoliang

    2017-09-01

    The complex shape of the casting pump body has large complicated structure and uniform wall thickness, which easy give rise to casting defects. The numerical simulation software ProCAST is used to simulate the initial top gating process, after analysis of the material and structure characteristics of the high-pressure pump. The filling process was overall smooth, not there the water shortage phenomenon. But the circular shrinkage defects appear at the bottom of casting during solidification process. Then, the casting parameters were optimized and adding cold iron in the bottom. The shrinkage weight was reduced from 0.00167g to 0.0005g. The porosity volume was reduced from 1.39cm3 to 0.41cm3. The optimization scheme is simulated and actual experimented. The defect has been significantly improved.

  9. Numerical simulation of the solidification microstructure of a 17-4PH stainless steel investment casting and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You Yun; Tsai, DeChang; Hwang, Weng Sing

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique of numerically simulating the microstructure of 17-4PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel during investment casting. A cellular automation (CA) algorithm was adopted to simulate the nucleation and grain growth. First a calibration casting was made, and then by comparing the microstructures of the calibration casting with those simulated using different kinetic growth coefficients (a2, a3) in CA, the most appropriate set of values for a2 and a3 would be obtained. Then, this set of values was applied to the microstructure simulation of a separate casting, where the casting was actually made. Through this approach, this study has arrived at a set of growth kinetic coefficients from the calibration casting: a2 is 2.9 × 10-5, a3 is 1.49 × 10-7, which is then used to predict the microstructure of the other test casting. Consequently, a good correlation has been found between the microstructure of actual 17-4PH casting and the simulation result.

  10. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y. Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M. Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Conventional investing and casting techniques are time-consuming and usually requires 2–4 h for completion. Accelerated nonstandard, casting techniques have been reported to achieve similar quality results in significantly less time, namely, in 30–40 min. During casting, it is essential to achieve compensation for the shrinkage of solidifying alloy by investment expansion. The metal casting ring restricts the thermal expansion of investment because the thermal expansion of the ring is lesser than that of the investment. The use of casting ring was challenged with the introduction of the ringless technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 test samples of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) cast copings were obtained from the patterns fabricated using inlay casting wax. The 20 wax patterns were invested using metal ring and 20 wax patterns were invested using the ringless investment system. Of both the groups, 10 samples underwent conventional casting, and the other 10 underwent accelerated casting. The patterns were casted using the induction casting technique. All the test samples of cast copings were evaluated for vertical marginal gaps at four points on the die employing a stereo optical microscope. Results: The vertical marginal discrepancy data obtained were tabulated. Mean and standard deviations were obtained. Vertical discrepancies were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significantly different. The data obtained were found to be very highly significant (P < 0.001). Mean vertical gap was the maximum for Group II (53.64 μm) followed by Group IV (47.62 μm), Group I (44.83 μm) and Group III (35.35 μm). Conclusion: The Ni-Cr cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had

  11. Lightweight Concrete Produced Using a Two-Stage Casting Process

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin Young; Kim, Jae Hong; Hwang, Yoon Yi; Shin, Dong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    The type of lightweight aggregate and its volume fraction in a mix determine the density of lightweight concrete. Minimizing the density obviously requires a higher volume fraction, but this usually causes aggregates segregation in a conventional mixing process. This paper proposes a two-stage casting process to produce a lightweight concrete. This process involves placing lightweight aggregates in a frame and then filling in the remaining interstitial voids with cementitious grout. The casting process results in the lowest density of lightweight concrete, which consequently has low compressive strength. The irregularly shaped aggregates compensate for the weak point in terms of strength while the round-shape aggregates provide a strength of 20 MPa. Therefore, the proposed casting process can be applied for manufacturing non-structural elements and structural composites requiring a very low density and a strength of at most 20 MPa. PMID:28788007

  12. Lightweight Concrete Produced Using a Two-Stage Casting Process.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin Young; Kim, Jae Hong; Hwang, Yoon Yi; Shin, Dong Kyu

    2015-03-25

    The type of lightweight aggregate and its volume fraction in a mix determine the density of lightweight concrete. Minimizing the density obviously requires a higher volume fraction, but this usually causes aggregates segregation in a conventional mixing process. This paper proposes a two-stage casting process to produce a lightweight concrete. This process involves placing lightweight aggregates in a frame and then filling in the remaining interstitial voids with cementitious grout. The casting process results in the lowest density of lightweight concrete, which consequently has low compressive strength. The irregularly shaped aggregates compensate for the weak point in terms of strength while the round-shape aggregates provide a strength of 20 MPa. Therefore, the proposed casting process can be applied for manufacturing non-structural elements and structural composites requiring a very low density and a strength of at most 20 MPa.

  13. Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young

    2013-08-20

    Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process asmore » this time and could not be concluded.« less

  14. Designing High Performance Steel Castings Today: Proceedings of the Steel Founders Society of America, Technical and Operating Conference December 7-10, 2016Chicago, IL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-10

    will be 2 x failure (critical) depth. G. INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS Either the No- Bake sand or Investment process is selected based on which... Bake sand and the Investment Casting Handbook by the Investment Casting Institute has the tolerance values for investment castings. Typically there

  15. AMCC casting development, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    PCC successfully cast and performed nondestructive testing, FPI and x-ray, on seventeen AMCC castings. Destructive testing, lab analysis and chemical milling, was performed on eleven of the castings and the remaining six castings were shipped to NASA or Aerojet. Two of the six castings shipped, lots 015 and 016, were fully processed per blueprint requirements. PCC has fully developed the gating and processing parameters of this part and feels the part could be implemented into production, after four more castings have been completed to ensure the repeatability of the process. The AMCC casting has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or thermal gradient control. This method of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. The alloy, JBK75, is a relatively new alloy in the investment casting arena and required our engineering staff to learn the gating, processing, and dimensional characteristics of the material.

  16. Process improvement as an investment: Measuring its worth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Frank; Jeletic, Kellyann

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses return on investment (ROI) generated from software process improvement programs. It details the steps needed to compute ROI and compares these steps from the perspective of two process improvement approaches: the widely known Software Engineering Institute's capability maturity model and the approach employed by NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL). The paper then describes the specific investments made in the SEL over the past 18 years and discusses the improvements gained from this investment by the production organization in the SEL.

  17. [Experimental processing of corrosion casts of large animal organs].

    PubMed

    Pálek, R; Liška, V; Eberlová, L; Mírka, H; Svoboda, M; Haviar, S; Emingr, M; Brzoň, O; Mik, P; Třeška, V

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion casts (CCs) are used for the visualization and assessment of hollow structures. CCs with filled capillaries enable (with the help of imaging methods) to obtain data for mathematical organ perfusion modelling. As the processing is more difficult in case of organs with greater volume of the vasculature, mainly organs from small animals have been cast up to now. The aim of this study was to optimize the protocol of corrosion casting of different organs of pig. Porcine organs are relatively easily accessible and frequently used in experimental medicine. Organs from 10 healthy Prestice Black-Pied pigs (6 females, body weight 35-45 kg), were used in this study (liver, spleen, kidneys and small intestine). The organs were dissected, heparin was administered into the systemic circulation and then the vascular bed of the organs was flushed with heparinized saline either in situ (liver) or after their removal (spleen, kidney, small intestine). All handling was done under the water surface to prevent air embolization. The next step was an intraarterial (in case of the liver also intraportal) administration of Biodur E20® (Heidelberg, Germany) resin. After hardening of the resin the organ tissue was dissolved by 15% KOH and the specimen was rinsed with tap water. Voluminous casts were stored in 70% denatured alcohol, the smaller ones were lyophilized. The casts were assessed with a stereomicroscope, computed and microcomputed tomography (CT and microCT), a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high-resolution digital microscope (HRDM). High-quality CCs of the porcine liver, kidneys, spleen and small intestine were created owing to the sophisticated organ harvesting, the suitable resin and casting procedure. Macroscopic clarity was improved thanks to the possibility of resin dying. Scanning by CT was performed and showed to be a suitable method for the liver cast examination. MicroCT, SEM and HRDM produced images of the most detailed structures of vascular bed

  18. Relationship between microstructure and ductility of investment cast ASTM F-75 implant alloy.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M; Mancha, H; Salinas, A; Rodríguez, J L; Escobedo, J; Castro, M; Méndez, M

    1997-02-01

    Hip replacement implants fabricated using the ASTM F-75 alloy sometimes fail in a sudden catastrophic way. In general, fractures start at microstructural defects subjected to stress-corrosion under chemical attack by body fluids. In this paper the results of a study on the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure of ASTM F-75 are presented. The preheating mold temperature and the liquid temperature were varied between 900 and 1000 degrees C, and 1410 and 1470 degrees C, respectively. Optimum static strength and ductility were obtained when shrinkage microporosity and the volume fraction of M23C6 "eutectic" carbides precipitated at grain boundaries were minimized by increasing the preheating mold temperature to 1000 degrees C and by using intermediate pouring temperatures of 1455 degrees C. Under these casting conditions, however, the solidification rates are low, leading to large grain sizes, which, in turn, reduce the strength of the material under dynamic loading conditions. The volume fraction of the M23C6 "blocky" carbides appears to be independent of the casting conditions; however, their size and spatial distributions determine the strength of the as-cast alloys.

  19. Novel method for titanium crown casting using a combination of wax patterns fabricated by a CAD/CAM system and a non-expanded investment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zutai; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2006-07-01

    For titanium casting, most commercial investments for titanium recommend casting at a low mold temperature to reduce oxidation. However, the thermal expansion values of the molds at low casting temperatures may be insufficient. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining accurate titanium crown casts using wax pattern fabricated by a CAD/CAM system with a non-expanded mold. Three types of experimental magnesia-based investments (A, B and C) were made and their properties were evaluated for dental use. Two kinds of wax patterns for full-coverage coping crowns (S-0: cement space of 0 microm; S-20: cement space of 20 microm) were fabricated using a commercial CAD/CAM system. A traditional method (TM) using inlay wax was performed for comparison. The investment for titanium casting was decided from the fundamental data of experimental investments. Titanium crowns were replaced on the stone die and the thickness of the cement layer was evaluated. There were no significant differences for the setting time and setting expansion among the experimental investments, but the aluminous cement content played a role in hardening and contracting the mold. The fit of the titanium crowns differed significantly between the TM and the CAD/CAM system. The ranges of thickness obtained from the TM, S-0 and S-20 were 20.78-357.88 microm, 25.12-107.46 microm and 17.84-58.92 microm, respectively. High quality titanium crown casting was obtained using a combination of wax patterns fabricated by a CAD/CAM system and a non-expanded MgO-based investment.

  20. Discussion of "Investigation of Oxide Bifilms in Investment Cast Superalloy IN100 Parts I and II"*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2017-10-01

    Fuchs and Kaplan carried out experiments in an attempt to ascertain whether oxide bifilms were present in a vacuum-cast Ni-base superalloy but concluded negatively. Although this author challenged their interpretation of their findings, both parties had overlooked the presence in the alloy of boron which is now known to inhibit bifilm formation. However, even though boron can help significantly, improved filling system designs remain important if other damaging entrainment defects are to be avoided.

  1. Vacuum forming of thermoplastic sheet results in low-cost investment casting patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, A. E., Jr.

    1964-01-01

    Vacuum forming of a sheet of thermoplastic material around a mandrel conforming to the shape of the finished object provides a pattern for an investment mold. The thickness of the metal part is determined by the thickness of the plastic pattern.

  2. Development of Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin-Wall Magnesium Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jon T.; Wang, Gerry; Luo, Alan

    The purpose of this project was to develop a process and product which would utilize magnesium die casting and result in energy savings when compared to the baseline steel product. The specific product chosen was a side door inner panel for a mid-size car. The scope of the project included: re-design of major structural parts of the door, design and build of the tooling required to make the parts, making of parts, assembly of doors, and testing (both physical and simulation) of doors. Additional work was done on alloy development, vacuum die casting, and overcasting, all in order to improvemore » the performance of the doors and reduce cost. The project achieved the following objectives: 1. Demonstrated ability to design a large thin-wall magnesium die casting. 2. Demonstrated ability to manufacture a large thin-wall magnesium die casting in AM60 alloy. 3. Tested via simulations and/or physical tests the mechanical behavior and corrosion behavior of magnesium die castings and/or lightweight experimental automotive side doors which incorporate a large, thin-wall, powder coated, magnesium die casting. Under some load cases, the results revealed cracking of the casting, which can be addressed with re-design and better material models for CAE analysis. No corrosion of the magnesium panel was observed. 4. Using life cycle analysis models, compared the energy consumption and global warming potential of the lightweight door with those of a conventional steel door, both during manufacture and in service. Compared to a steel door, the lightweight door requires more energy to manufacture but less energy during operation (i.e., fuel consumption when driving vehicle). Similarly, compared to a steel door, the lightweight door has higher global warming potential (GWP) during manufacture, but lower GWP during operation. 5. Compared the conventional magnesium die casting process with the “super-vacuum” die casting process. Results achieved with cast tensile bars suggest some

  3. Measurement of the setting expansion of phosphate-bonded investment materials: Part I - Development of the Casting-Ring Test.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, C H; Yearn, J A; Cowper, G A; Blavier, J; Vanderdonckt, M

    2004-07-01

    The setting expansion is an important property for a phosphate-bonded investment material. This research was undertaken to investigate a test that might be suitable for its measurement when used in a Standard. In the 'Casting-Ring Test', the investment sample is contained in a steel ring and expands to displace a precisely positioned pin. Variables with the potential to alter routine reproduction of the value were investigated. The vacuum-mixer model is a production laboratory variable that must not be ignored and for this reason, experiments were repeated using a different vacuum-mixer located at a second test site. Restraint by the rigid ring material increased expansion, while force on the pin reduced it. Expansion was specific to the lining selected. Increased environmental temperature decreased the final value. Expansion was still taking place at a time at which its value might be measured. However, when these factors are set, the reproducibility of values for setting expansion was good at both test sites (coefficient of variation 14%, at most). The results revealed that with the control that is available reliable routine measurement is possible in a Standard test. The inter-laboratory variable, vacuum-mixer model, produced significant differences and it should be the subject of further investigation.

  4. Investment casting using multi-jet modelling patterns: the thermogravimetric analysis of visijet® SR200 UV curable acrylate plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsa, M. N.; Ibrahim, M.; Sharif, S.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid Prototyping (RP) technology is actively studied to be implemented in Investment Casting (IC) process. Nowadays RP techniques are studied for their feasibility as IC master patterns, in terms of pattern collapsibility and drainage during burnout. The purpose of the study is to determine the characteristic of Visijet® SR200 acrylate material during burnout process. Traditional IC patterns made from wax have properties that limit their application in precision casting, especially for parts with thin geometries that readily break or deform when handled or dipped in the refractory slurry. Furthermore, it is not economical when producing a small number of parts. Non wax patterns fabricated for IC process, revealed ceramic shell cracking due to excessive thermal expansions, incomplete collapsibility of pattern during burnout, residual ash and poor surface finish. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to measured the weight loss of acrylate material as the temperature was increased. TGA measured the change of material's mass as it is heated. It represents the decomposition temperature after being subjected to varying temperatures, as well as the amount of residual ash. In this experiment, the temperature range was from 20°C to 700°C with 5°C increment. Experiment results show the values of material's optimum reaction temperature and decomposing temperature of Visijet® SR200 acrylate. The percentages of remaining materials were also monitored throughout the process to obtain the amount of residual ash. All of the temperature values obtained is a resemblance for the actual burnout process and can be used as references.

  5. Engineering scale demonstration of a prospective Cast Stone process

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Fowley, M.; Hansen, E.

    2014-09-30

    This report documents an engineering-scale demonstration with non-radioactive simulants that was performed at SRNL using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. Overmore » three days, the SCPF was used to fill a 1600 gallon container, staged outside the facility, with simulated Cast Stone grout. The container, staged outside the building approximately 60 ft from the SCPF, was instrumented with x-, y-, and z-axis thermocouples to monitor curing temperature. The container was also fitted with two formed core sampling vials. For the operation, the targeted grout production rate was 1.5 gpm. This required a salt solution flow rate of approximately 1 gpm and a premix feed rate of approximately 580 lb/h. During the final day of operation, the dry feed rate was increased to evaluate the ability of the system to handle increased throughput. Although non-steady state operational periods created free surface liquids, no bleed water was observed either before or after operations. The final surface slope at a fill height of 39.5 inches was 1-1.5 inches across the 8.5 foot diameter container, highest at the final fill point and lowest diametrically opposed to the fill point. During processing, grout was collected in cylindrical containers from both the mixer discharge and the discharge into the container. These samples were stored in a humid environment either in a closed box proximal to the container or inside the laboratory. Additional samples collected at these sampling

  6. Thermal casting process for the preparation of membranes

    DOEpatents

    Caneba, G.T.M.; Soong, D.S.

    1985-07-10

    Disclosed is a method for providing anisotropic polymer membrane from a binary polymer/solvent solution using a thermal inversion process. A homogeneous binary solution is cast onto a support and cooled in such a way as to provide a differential in cooling rate across the thickness of the resulting membrane sheet. Isotropic or anisotropic structures of selected porosities can be produced, depending on the initial concentration of polymer in the selected solvent and on the extent of the differential in cooling rate. This differential results in a corresponding gradation in pore size. The method may be modified to provide a working skin by applying a rapid, high-temperature pulse to redissolve a predetermined thickness of the membrane at one of its faces and then freezing the entire structure.

  7. Automotive Manufacturing Processes. Volume III - Casting and Forging Processes

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-02-01

    Extensive material substitution and resizing of the domestic automotive fleet, as well as the introduction of new technologies, will require major changes in the techniques and equipment used in the various manufacturing processes employed in the pro...

  8. Single Crystal Casting with Fluidized Carbon Bed Cooling: A Process Innovation for Quality Improvement and Cost Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, M.; Franke, M. M.; Koerner, C.; Singer, R. F.

    2017-12-01

    Superalloy gas turbine blades are being produced by investment casting and directional solidification. A new process, Fluidized Carbon Bed Cooling (FCBC), has been developed and is now being optimized in a prototype casting unit with 10 kg pouring weight. In early test runs with still rather simple mold cluster geometries, a reduction of the primary dendrite arm spacing of around 40 pct compared to the standard radiation cooling process (HRS) could be demonstrated. The improvement is mainly attributed to higher temperature gradients driving solidification, made possible by a functioning Dynamic Baffle. Compared to earlier development efforts in the literature, contamination of the melt and damage to the equipment are avoided using carbon-based fluidized bed materials and the so-called "counter pressure concept."

  9. Validation of a model for the cast-film process

    SciTech Connect

    Chambon, F.; Ohlsson, S.; Silagy, D.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed a model of the cast-film process and compared theoretical predictions against experiments on a pilot line. Three polyethylenes with a markedly different level of melt elasticity were used in this evaluation; namely, a high pressure low density polyethylene, LDPE, and two linear low density polyethylenes, LLDPE-1 and LLDPE-2. The final film dimensions of the LDPE were found to be in good agreement with 1-D viscoelastic stationary predictions. Flow field visualization experiments indicate, however, a 2-D velocity field in the airgap between the extrusion die and the chill roll. Taking this observation into account, evolutions of the freemore » surface of the web along the airgap were recorded with LLDPE-2, our least elastic melt. An excellent agreement is found between these measurements and predictions of neck-in and edge bead with 2-D Newtonian stationary simulations. The time-dependent solution, which is based on a linear stability analysis, allows to identify a zone of draw resonance within the working space of the process, defined by the draw ratio, the Deborah number, and the web aspect ratio. It is predicted that increasing this latter parameter stabilizes the process until an optimum value is reached. Experiments with LLDPE-1 are shown to validate this unique theoretical result, thus allowing to increase the draw ratio by about 75%.« less

  10. Effect of Solidification Behavior on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Ni-Cr-Fe Superalloy Investment Casting

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Maodong; Wang, Jun; Gao, Haiyan; Han, Yanfeng; Wang, Guoxiang; He, Shuxian

    2017-01-01

    The effect of solidification behavior on the microstructures and mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-Fe superalloy investment casting is given. Metallographic and image analysis have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructures’ evolution. For the parts with the thickness of 3 mm and 24 mm, the volume fraction and maximum equivalent radius of the Laves phase increases from 0.3% to 1.2%, from 11.7 μm to 23.4 μm, respectively. Meanwhile, the volume fraction and maximum equivalent radius of carbides increase from 0.3% to 0.5%, from 8.1 μm to 9.9 μm, respectively. In addition, the volume fraction of microporosity increases from 0.3% to 2.7%. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength is reduced from 1125.5 MPa to 820.9 MPa, the elongation from 13.3% to 7.7%, and the quality index from 1294.2 MPa to 954.0 MPa, respectively. A typical brittle fracture is observed on the tensile fracture. As the cooling rate decreases, the microstructures become coarser. PMID:28772611

  11. Software Analytical Instrument for Assessment of the Process of Casting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franěk, Zdeněk; Kavička, František; Štětina, Josef; Masarik, Miloš

    2010-06-01

    The paper describes the original proposal of ways of solution and function of the program equipment for assessment of the process of casting slabs. The program system LITIOS was developed and implemented in EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel Ostrava on the equipment of continuous casting of steel (further only ECC). This program system works on the data warehouse of technological parameters of casting and quality parameters of slabs. It enables an ECC technologist to analyze the course of casting melt and with using statistics methods to set the influence of single technological parameters on the duality of final slabs. The system also enables long term monitoring and optimization of the production.

  12. The effect of mold temperature on castability of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V castings into phosphate bonded investment materials.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro César Garcia; Adabo, Gelson Luis; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rocha, Sicknan Soares

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the castability of CP titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy castings into Rematitan Plus investment at three different mold temperatures. A nylon mesh pattern (20 mm with 64 squares and wire of 0.7 mm in diameter) was used for the castability testing. Initially, an image of the wax pattern was obtained by means of a digital camera and the total extension of filaments (mm) was then measured, using the Leica Qwin image analysis system. The mesh sprued was placed in the Rematitan Plus investment material and the castings were made in a Discovery Plasma machine at three different mold temperatures: 430 degrees C (control group), 480 degrees C or 530 degrees C. Ten castings were made for each temperature. The images of the castings were analyzed (Leica Qwin) and the castability index determined by the number of the completely cast segments as a percentage of the wax pattern. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test (a = 0.05) using materials and temperatures as discriminating variables. The Ti-6Al-4V alloy (60.86%) presented a better castability index than CP Ti (48.44%) (p < 0.000001). For CP Ti, the temperature of 530 degrees C (23.96%) presented better castability than at other temperatures, 480 degrees C (14.66%) and 430 degrees C (12.54%), with no difference between them (p < 0.001). For Ti-6Al-4V alloy, there was a statistically significant difference among the three temperatures: 530 degrees C (28.36%) > 480 degrees C (19.66%) > 430 degrees C (15.97%) (p < 0.002). Within the limitations of this study, the increase in the mold temperature of the Rematitan Plus investment resulted in a better castability index for both materials, and Ti-6Al-4V presented a better castability index than CP Ti.

  13. Heat treatment of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel: Part II. Isothermal aging kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robino, C. V.; Cieslak, M. J.; Hochanadel, P. W.; Edwards, G. R.

    1994-04-01

    The hardening response of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel has been evaluated by hardness measurements following aging in the temperature range normally specified for this alloy (510 °C to 593 °C). A new relationship between fraction transformed and hardness was developed, and analysis of the data in terms of the kinetics of precipitation, in a manner similar to that frequently applied to other precipitation-hardenable martensitic steels, yielded low time exponents and a low value for the apparent activation energy. The values of the time exponents were 0.49, 0.37, 0.56, and 0.53 at 510 °C, 538 °C, 566 °C, and 593 °C, respectively, and that for the apparent activation energy was 139 kJ/mole. As has been proposed for other maraging type steels, these estimates suggest that Β-NiAl precipitates along or near dislocations and that growth of the precipitates is dominated by dislocation pipe diffusion. However, these predictions were neither supported nor refuted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of difficulties in imaging the Β-NiAl precipitates at the aging times and temperatures used. Further, analysis of the data using the formalism of Wert and Zener for the growth of precipitates with interfering diffusion fields indicated that the estimates of fraction transformed from hardness data are not fully appropriate for maraging type steels. Consideration of the nature of the Avrami analysis and the electron microscopy results suggests that other phenomena, including dislocation recovery and reversion of martensite to austenite, occur at rates sufficient to convolute the Avrami analysis. It is further suggested that these results cast doubt on the fundamental implications of previous analyses of precipitation kinetics in age-hardening martensitic steels. Although the Avrami analysis was found not to provide a tenable description of the precipitation kinetics, it does provide a reasonable methodology for portrayal of the hardening response

  14. Multiphysics modeling of the steel continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.

    This work develops a macroscale, multiphysics model of the continuous casting of steel. The complete model accounts for the turbulent flow and nonuniform distribution of superheat in the molten steel, the elastic-viscoplastic thermal shrinkage of the solidifying shell, the heat transfer through the shell-mold interface with variable gap size, and the thermal distortion of the mold. These models are coupled together with carefully constructed boundary conditions with the aid of reduced-order models into a single tool to investigate behavior in the mold region, for practical applications such as predicting ideal tapers for a beam-blank mold. The thermal and mechanical behaviors of the mold are explored as part of the overall modeling effort, for funnel molds and for beam-blank molds. These models include high geometric detail and reveal temperature variations on the mold-shell interface that may be responsible for cracks in the shell. Specifically, the funnel mold has a column of mold bolts in the middle of the inside-curve region of the funnel that disturbs the uniformity of the hot face temperatures, which combined with the bending effect of the mold on the shell, can lead to longitudinal facial cracks. The shoulder region of the beam-blank mold shows a local hot spot that can be reduced with additional cooling in this region. The distorted shape of the funnel mold narrow face is validated with recent inclinometer measurements from an operating caster. The calculated hot face temperatures and distorted shapes of the mold are transferred into the multiphysics model of the solidifying shell. The boundary conditions for the first iteration of the multiphysics model come from reduced-order models of the process; one such model is derived in this work for mold heat transfer. The reduced-order model relies on the physics of the solution to the one-dimensional heat-conduction equation to maintain the relationships between inputs and outputs of the model. The geometric

  15. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baicheng; Xu, Qingyan; Jing, Tao; Shen, Houfa; Han, Zhiqiang

    2011-04-01

    The development of the aviation, energy and automobile industries requires an advanced integrated product/process R&D systems which could optimize the product and the process design as well. Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is a promising approach to fulfill this requirement and make the product and process development efficient, economic, and environmentally friendly. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes, including mathematical models as well as engineering applications are presented in the paper. Dendrite morphology of magnesium and aluminum alloy of solidification process by using phase field and cellular automaton methods, mathematical models of segregation of large steel ingot, and microstructure models of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade casting are studied and discussed. In addition, some engineering case studies, including microstructure simulation of aluminum casting for automobile industry, segregation of large steel ingot for energy industry, and microstructure simulation of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade castings for aviation industry are discussed.

  16. Numerical simulation of the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Wagner, I; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of this paper were to simulate the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges; to predict and control porosity defect. A casting simulation software, MAGMASOFT, was used. The geometry of the crowns with fine details of the occlusal surface were digitized by means of laser measuring technique, then converted and read in the simulation software. Both mold filling and solidification were simulated, the shrinkage porosity was predicted by a "feeding criterion", and the gas pore sensitivity was studied based on the mold filling and solidification simulations. Two types of dental prostheses (a single-crown casting and a three-unit-bridge) with various sprue designs were numerically "poured", and only one optimal design for each prosthesis was recommended for real casting trial. With the numerically optimized design, real titanium dental prostheses (five replicas for each) were made on a centrifugal casting machine. All the castings endured radiographic examination, and no porosity was detected in the cast prostheses. It indicates that the numerical simulation is an efficient tool for dental casting design and porosity control. Copyright 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  17. Materials processing threshold report: 2. Use of low gravity for cast iron process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankhouser, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Potential applications of a low gravity environment of interest to the commercial producers of cast iron were assessed to determine whether low gravity conditions offer potential opportunities to producers for improving cast iron properties and expanding the use of cast irons. The assessment is limited to the gray and nodular types of iron, however, the findings are applicable to all cast irons. The potential advantages accrued through low gravity experiments with cast irons are described.

  18. Prediction of Shrinkage Porosity Defect in Sand Casting Process of LM25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Hardik; Dhulia, Jay K.; Maniar, Nirav P.

    2017-08-01

    In the present worldwide and aggressive environment, foundry commercial enterprises need to perform productively with least number of rejections and create casting parts in shortest lead time. It has become extremely difficult for foundry industries to meet demands of defects free casting and meet strict delivery schedules. The process of casting solidification is complex in nature. Prediction of shrinkage defect in metal casting is one of the critical concern in foundries and is one of the potential research areas in casting. Due to increasing pressure to improve quality and to reduce cost, it is very essential to upgrade the level of current methodology used in foundries. In the present research work, prediction methodology of shrinkage porosity defect in sand casting process of LM25 using experimentation and ANSYS is proposed. The objectives successfully achieved are prediction of shrinkage porosity distribution in Al-Si casting and determining effectiveness of investigated function for predicting shrinkage porosity by correlating results of simulating studies to those obtained experimentally. The real-time application of the research reflects from the fact that experimentation is performed on 9 different Y junctions at foundry industry and practical data obtained from experimentation are used for simulation.

  19. Numerical simulation of the casting process of titanium removable partial denture frameworks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menghuai; Wagner, Ingo; Sahm, Peter R; Augthun, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this work was to study the filling incompleteness and porosity defects in titanium removal partial denture frameworks by means of numerical simulation. Two frameworks, one for lower jaw and one for upper jaw, were chosen according to dentists' recommendation to be simulated. Geometry of the frameworks were laser-digitized and converted into a simulation software (MAGMASOFT). Both mold filling and solidification of the castings with different sprue designs (e.g. tree, ball, and runner-bar) were numerically calculated. The shrinkage porosity was quantitatively predicted by a feeding criterion, the potential filling defect and gas pore sensitivity were estimated based on the filling and solidification results. A satisfactory sprue design with process parameters was finally recommended for real casting trials (four replica for each frameworks). All the frameworks were successfully cast. Through X-ray radiographic inspections it was found that all the castings were acceptably sound except for only one case in which gas bubbles were detected in the grasp region of the frame. It is concluded that numerical simulation aids to achieve understanding of the casting process and defect formation in titanium frameworks, hence to minimize the risk of producing defect casting by improving the sprue design and process parameters.

  20. Thin Gauge Twin-Roll Casting, Process Capabilities and Product Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daaland, O.; Espedal, A. B.; Nedreberg, M. L.; Alvestad, I.

    Traditionally industrial twin roll casters have been operated at gauges 6-10 mm, depending on the type of caster and the final product requirements. Over the past few years it has become apparent that a significant increase in productivity can be achieved when the casting gauge is reduced. Hydro Aluminium embarked on an extensive research and development, thin gauge casting programme, in the beginning of the 1990's and this paper presents some results from a five year lasting project (joint programme between Hydro Aluminium a.s. and Lauener Engineering). Based on more than 400 casting trials the major benefits and limitations of casting at reduced gauge and increased speed are outlined. Important aspects related to process development and product quality are discussed including: productivity and limitations, surface defects, microstructural characteristics, cooling rates and dendrite structure, segregation behaviour and mechanical properties after thermo-mechanical processing. Results for casting of several alloys are given. Additionally, numerical modelling results of the strip casting process are included.

  1. A Statistics-Based Cracking Criterion of Resin-Bonded Silica Sand for Casting Process Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huimin; Lu, Yan; Ripplinger, Keith; Detwiler, Duane; Luo, Alan A.

    2017-02-01

    Cracking of sand molds/cores can result in many casting defects such as veining. A robust cracking criterion is needed in casting process simulation for predicting/controlling such defects. A cracking probability map, relating to fracture stress and effective volume, was proposed for resin-bonded silica sand based on Weibull statistics. Three-point bending test results of sand samples were used to generate the cracking map and set up a safety line for cracking criterion. Tensile test results confirmed the accuracy of the safety line for cracking prediction. A laboratory casting experiment was designed and carried out to predict cracking of a cup mold during aluminum casting. The stress-strain behavior and the effective volume of the cup molds were calculated using a finite element analysis code ProCAST®. Furthermore, an energy dispersive spectroscopy fractographic examination of the sand samples confirmed the binder cracking in resin-bonded silica sand.

  2. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Process for Producing a Cast Article from a Hypereutectic Aluminum-Silicon Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A process for making a cast article from an aluminum alloy includes first casting an article from an alloy having the following composition, in weight percent: Silicon (Si) 14.0-25.0, Copper (CU) 5.5-8.0, Iron (Fe) 0-0.8, Magnesium (Mg) 0.5-1.5, Nickel (Ni) 0.05-1.2, Manganese (Mn) 0-1.0, Titanium (Ti) 0.05-1.2, Zirconium (Zr) 0.12-1.2, Vanadium (V) 0.05-1.2, Zinc (Zn) 0-0.9, Phosphorus (P) 0.001-0.1, Aluminum, balance. In this alloy the ration of Si:Mg is 15-35, and the ratio of Cu:Mg is 4-15. After an article is cast from the alloy, the cast article is aged at a temperature within the range of 400 F to 500 F for a time period within the range of four to 16 hours. It has been found especially advantageous if the cast article is first exposed to a solutionizing step prior to the aging step. This solutionizing step is carried out by exposing the cast article to a temperature within the range of 875 F to 1025 F for a time period of fifteen minutes to four hours. It has also been found to be especially advantageous if the solutionizing step is followed directly with a quenching step, wherein the cast article is quenched in a quenching medium such as water at a temperature within the range of 120 F to 300 F. The resulting cast article is highly suitable in a number of high temperature applications, such as heavy-duty pistons for internal combustion engines.

  4. Thermodynamic Behavior Research Analysis of Twin-roll Casting Lead Alloy Strip Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chengcan; Rui, Yannian

    2017-03-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of twin-roll casting (TRC) lead alloy strip process directly affects the forming of the lead strip, the quality of the lead strip and the production efficiency. However, there is little research on the thermodynamics of lead alloy strip at home and abroad. The TRC lead process is studied in four parameters: the pouring temperature of molten lead, the depth of molten pool, the roll casting speed, and the rolling thickness of continuous casting. Firstly, the thermodynamic model for TRC lead process is built. Secondly, the thermodynamic behavior of the TRC process is simulated with the use of Fluent. Through the thermodynamics research and analysis, the process parameters of cast rolling lead strip can be obtained: the pouring temperature of molten lead: 360-400 °C, the depth of molten pool: 250-300 mm, the roll casting speed: 2.5-3 m/min, the rolling thickness: 8-9 mm. Based on the above process parameters, the optimal parameters(the pouring temperature of molten lead: 375-390 °C, the depth of molten pool: 285-300 mm, the roll casting speed: 2.75-3 m/min, the rolling thickness: 8.5-9 mm) can be gained with the use of the orthogonal experiment. Finally, the engineering test of TRC lead alloy strip is carried out and the test proves the thermodynamic model is scientific, necessary and correct. In this paper, a detailed study on the thermodynamic behavior of lead alloy strip is carried out and the process parameters of lead strip forming are obtained through the research, which provide an effective theoretical guide for TRC lead alloy strip process.

  5. Development of an Optimization Methodology for the Aluminum Alloy Wheel Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianglan; Reilly, Carl; Maijer, Daan M.; Cockcroft, Steve L.; Phillion, Andre B.

    2015-08-01

    An optimization methodology has been developed for the aluminum alloy wheel casting process. The methodology is focused on improving the timing of cooling processes in a die to achieve improved casting quality. This methodology utilizes (1) a casting process model, which was developed within the commercial finite element package, ABAQUS™—ABAQUS is a trademark of Dassault Systèms; (2) a Python-based results extraction procedure; and (3) a numerical optimization module from the open-source Python library, Scipy. To achieve optimal casting quality, a set of constraints have been defined to ensure directional solidification, and an objective function, based on the solidification cooling rates, has been defined to either maximize, or target a specific, cooling rate. The methodology has been applied to a series of casting and die geometries with different cooling system configurations, including a 2-D axisymmetric wheel and die assembly generated from a full-scale prototype wheel. The results show that, with properly defined constraint and objective functions, solidification conditions can be improved and optimal cooling conditions can be achieved leading to process productivity and product quality improvements.

  6. Hydroxyapatite scaffolds processed using a TBA-based freeze-gel casting/polymer sponge technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Young; Lee, Jung Min; Yoon, Seog Young; Park, Hong Chae

    2010-05-01

    A novel freeze-gel casting/polymer sponge technique has been introduced to fabricate porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds with controlled "designer" pore structures and improved compressive strength for bone tissue engineering applications. Tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA) was used as a solvent in this work. The merits of each production process, freeze casting, gel casting, and polymer sponge route were characterized by the sintered microstructure and mechanical strength. A reticulated structure with large pore size of 180-360 microm, which formed on burn-out of polyurethane foam, consisted of the strut with highly interconnected, unidirectional, long pore channels (approximately 4.5 microm in dia.) by evaporation of frozen TBA produced in freeze casting together with the dense inner walls with a few, isolated fine pores (<2 microm) by gel casting. The sintered porosity and pore size generally behaved in an opposite manner to the solid loading, i.e., a high solid loading gave low porosity and small pore size, and a thickening of the strut cross section, thus leading to higher compressive strengths.

  7. Microstructural and mechanical evolutions during the forging step of the COBAPRESS, a casting/forging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Desrayaud, Christophe; Bouvier, Véronique

    Aluminum casting/forging processes are used to produce parts for the automotive industry. In this study, we examined the influence of the forging step on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of an A356 aluminum alloy modified with strontium. Firstly, a design of samples which allows us to test mechanically the alloy before and after forging was created. A finite element analysis with the ABAQUS software predicts a maximum of strain in the core of the specimens. Observations with the EBSD technique confirm a more intense sub-structuration of the dendrite cells in this zone. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation and fatigue lives were then improved for the casting/forging samples compared to the only cast specimens. The closure of the porosities and the improvement of the surface quality during the forging step enhance also the fatigue resistance of the samples.

  8. Workplace Basic Skills in the Metal Casting Industry for World Class Process and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Bonnie

    A workplace basic skills project for the metal casting industry was established jointly by Central Alabama Community College and Robinson Foundry, Inc. Evaluation of the project was made through a commercial test of hourly workers' general literacy level gains, instructor-developed pre- and posttests of mastery of the industrial process and…

  9. Microstructure of Haynes® 282® Superalloy after Vacuum Induction Melting and Investment Casting of Thin-Walled Components.

    PubMed

    Matysiak, Hubert; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Andersson, Joel; Balkowiec, Alicja; Cygan, Rafal; Rasinski, Marcin; Pisarek, Marcin; Andrzejczuk, Mariusz; Kubiak, Krzysztof; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the microstructure of the as-cast Haynes ® 282 ® alloy. Observations and analyses were carried out using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), wave length dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS), auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS). The phases identified in the as-cast alloy include: γ (gamma matrix), γ' (matrix strengthening phase), (TiMoCr)C (primary carbide), TiN (primary nitride), σ (sigma-TCP phase), (TiMo)₂SC (carbosulphide) and a lamellar constituent consisting of molybdenum and chromium rich secondary carbide phase together with γ phase. Within the dendrites the γ' appears mostly in the form of spherical, nanometric precipitates (74 nm), while coarser (113 nm) cubic γ' precipitates are present in the interdendritic areas. Volume fraction content of the γ' precipitates in the dendrites and interdendritic areas are 9.6% and 8.5%, respectively. Primary nitrides metallic nitrides (MN), are homogeneously dispersed in the as-cast microstructure, while primary carbides metallic carbides (MC), preferentially precipitate in interdendritic areas. Such preference is also observed in the case of globular σ phase. Lamellar constituents characterized as secondary carbides/γ phases were together with (TiMo)₂SC phase always observed adjacent to σ phase precipitates. Crystallographic relations were established in-between the MC, σ, secondary carbides and γ/γ' matrix.

  10. Part I: In-situ fluorometric quantification of microalgal neutral lipids. Part II: Thermal degradation behavior of investment casting polymer patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongfang

    Research described in this dissertation covers two topics. Part-I is focused on in-situ determination of neutral lipid content of microalgae using a lipophilic fluorescent dye. The traditional Nile red stain-based method for detecting microalgal intracellular lipids is limited due to varying composition and thickness of rigid cell walls. In this study, the addition of dilute acid and heating of solution, were found to greatly enhance staining efficiency of Nile red for microalgal species evaluated. Oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion stabilized by a non-ionic surfactant was employed as a pseudo-standard that mimics lipid-bearing microalgal cells suspended in water. The average neutral lipid contents determined were very close to the results obtained by traditional gravimetric method and solid phase extraction. Part II of the dissertation explores thermo-physico-chemical properties of polymeric pattern materials, including expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam, polyurethane foam, and epoxy stereolithography (SLA) patterns, that are used in investment casting. Density, elastic modulus, expansion coefficient, thermal degradation behavior, etc. were experimentally investigated for their effects on metal casting quality. The reduction in toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) generated during thermal decomposition of polyurethane pattern was achieved by increasing either oxidant level or residence time in heated zone. Thermal degradation kinetics of the pattern materials were examined with a thermogravimetric analysis and activation energies were determined by Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods.

  11. Detection and reconstruction of solidification cracks - Laser ultrasonic measurements during the continuous casting process of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitter, Thomas; Grün, Hubert; Roither, Jürgen; Betz, Andreas; Bozorgi, Salar; Reitinger, Bernhard; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    In the continuous casting process the avoidance and rapid detection of occurring solidification cracks in the slab is a crucial issue, in particular for the maintenance of a high quality level in further production processes. Due to the elevated temperatures of the slab surface a remote sensing non-destructive tool for quality inspection is required, which is also applicable for the harsh industrial environment. In this work the application of laser ultrasound (LUS) technique during the continuous casting process in industrial environment is shown. The proof of principle of the detection of the centered solidification cracks is shown by pulse-echo measurements with laser ultrasonic equipment for inline quality inspection. Preliminary examinations in the lab of different casted samples have shown the distinguishability of slabs with and without any solidification cracks. Furthermore the damping of the bulk wave has been used for the prediction of the dimension of the crack. With an adapted "synthetic aperture focusing technique" (SAFT) algorithm the image reconstruction of multiple measurements at different positions around the circumference has provided enough information for the estimation of the localization and extension of the centered solidification cracks. Subsequent first measurements using this laser ultrasonic setup during the continuous casting of aluminum were carried out and showed the proof of principle in an industrial environment with elevated temperatures, dust, cooling water and vibrations.

  12. Understanding How Processing Additives Tune the Nanoscale Morphology of High Efficiency Organic Photovoltaic Blends: From Casting Solution to Spun-Cast Thin Film

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Ming; Keum, Jong Kahk; Kumar, Rajeev

    2014-08-26

    Adding a small amount of a processing additive to the casting solution of photoactive organic blends has been demonstrated to be an effective method for achieving improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs). However, an understanding of the nano-structural evolution occurring in the transformation from casting solution to thin photoactive films is still lacking. In this report, the effects of the processing additive diiodooctane (DIO) on the morphology of the established blend of PBDTTT-C-T polymer and the fullerene derivative PC71BM used for OPVs are investigated, starting in the casting solution and tracing the effects in spun-cast thin filmsmore » by using neutron/X-ray scattering, neutron reflectometry, and other characterization techniques. The results reveal that DIO has no observable effect on the structures of PBDTTT-C-T and PC71BM in solution; however, in the spun-cast films, it significantly promotes their molecular ordering and phase segregation, resulting in improved PCE. Thermodynamic analysis based on Flory-Huggins theory provides a rationale for the effects of DIO on different characteristics of phase segregation due to changes in concentration resulting from evaporation of the solvent and additive during film formation. Such information may help improve the rational design of ternary blends to more consistently achieve improved PCE for OPVs.« less

  13. Understanding how processing additives tune nanoscale morphology of high efficiency organic photovoltaic blends: From casting solution to spun-cast thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Ming; Keum, Jong Kahk; Kumar, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Adding a small amount of a processing additive to the casting solution of organic blends has been demonstrated to be an effective method for achieving improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs). However, an understanding of the nano-structural evolution occurring in the transformation from casting solution to thin photoactive films is still lacking. In this report, we investigate the effects of the processing additive diiodooctane (DIO) on the morphology of OPV blend of PBDTTT-C-T and fullerene derivative, PC71BM in a casting solution and in spun-cast thin films by using neutron/x-ray scattering, neutron reflectometry and other characterization techniques. Themore » results reveal that DIO has no effect on the solution structures of PBDTTT-C-T and PC71BM. In the spun-cast films, however, DIO is found to promote significantly the molecular ordering of PBDTTT-C-T and PC71BM, and phase segregation, resulting in the improved PCE. Thermodynamic analysis based on Flory-Huggins theory provides a rationale for the effects of DIO on different characteristics of phase segregation as a solvent and due to evaporationg during the film formation. Such information may enable improved rational design of ternary blends to more consistently achieve improved PCE for OPVs.« less

  14. Biostratinomic processes for the development of mud-cast logs in Carboniferous and Holocene swamps

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, R.A.; Demko, T.M.; Liu, Yuejin

    1989-08-01

    Prostrate trees are common features of fossil forest litters, and are frequently preserved as mud-casts. Specimens of Carboniferous mud-cast trees and a mud-filled incipient cast of a Holocene Taxodium have been investigated to determine the biostratinomic processes responsible for their formation. These processes are complex. Hollowing of tree trunks may take place during life or by degradation after death. Once the trunk has fallen, the hollow cavity is supported by surrounding wood and/or bark tissues and acts as a conduit for sediment-laden waters. Leaf litter may be preserved on bedding surfaces. The infilling sequence of horizontal, parallel bedded, fine-grained sedimentmore » is deposited from suspended load during multiple overbank flooding events. These results differ from experimentally produced pith casts in which the sediment grain size is of fine sand. In Holocene specimens, alluvial mud within the log may provide a substrate for infaunal invertebrates. No evidence of infaunal burrowing in Carboniferous analogues exists.« less

  15. Process development for producing fine-grain casting in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Malik, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    Assessment of grain growth kinetics at temperatures near the melting point and investigation into the use of potential nucleating agents in combination with the naturally occurring BeO led to the definition of critical low-g experiments which would help to determine whether one or both of these possibilities are valid and whether space processing would be able to yield fine grain ingot beryllium.

  16. Development of expert systems for modeling of technological process of pressure casting on the basis of artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavarieva, K. N.; Simonova, L. A.; Pankratov, D. L.; Gavariev, R. V.

    2017-09-01

    In article the main component of expert system of process of casting under pressure which consists of algorithms, united in logical models is considered. The characteristics of system showing data on a condition of an object of management are described. A number of logically interconnected steps allowing to increase quality of the received castings is developed

  17. Coordinated microgrid investment and planning process considering the system operator

    DOE PAGES

    Armendáriz, M.; Heleno, M.; Cardoso, G.; ...

    2017-05-12

    Nowadays, a significant number of distribution systems are facing problems to accommodate more photovoltaic (PV) capacity, namely due to the overvoltages during the daylight periods. This has an impact on the private investments in distributed energy resources (DER), since it occurs exactly when the PV prices are becoming attractive, and the opportunity to an energy transition based on solar technologies is being wasted. In particular, this limitation of the networks is a barrier for larger consumers, such as commercial and public buildings, aiming at investing in PV capacity and start operating as microgrids connected to the MV network. To addressmore » this challenge, this paper presents a coordinated approach to the microgrid investment and planning problem, where the system operator and the microgrid owner collaborate to improve the voltage control capabilities of the distribution network, increasing the PV potential. The results prove that this collaboration has the benefit of increasing the value of the microgrid investments while improving the quality of service of the system and it should be considered in the future regulatory framework.« less

  18. Coordinated microgrid investment and planning process considering the system operator

    SciTech Connect

    Armendáriz, M.; Heleno, M.; Cardoso, G.

    Nowadays, a significant number of distribution systems are facing problems to accommodate more photovoltaic (PV) capacity, namely due to the overvoltages during the daylight periods. This has an impact on the private investments in distributed energy resources (DER), since it occurs exactly when the PV prices are becoming attractive, and the opportunity to an energy transition based on solar technologies is being wasted. In particular, this limitation of the networks is a barrier for larger consumers, such as commercial and public buildings, aiming at investing in PV capacity and start operating as microgrids connected to the MV network. To addressmore » this challenge, this paper presents a coordinated approach to the microgrid investment and planning problem, where the system operator and the microgrid owner collaborate to improve the voltage control capabilities of the distribution network, increasing the PV potential. The results prove that this collaboration has the benefit of increasing the value of the microgrid investments while improving the quality of service of the system and it should be considered in the future regulatory framework.« less

  19. Microstructures and performance of CaO-based ceramic cores with different particle size distributions for investment casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P. P.; Wu, G. Q.; Tao, Y.; Cheng, X.; Zhao, J. Q.; Nan, H.

    2018-02-01

    A series of calcium-based ceramic cores for casting titanium alloy were prepared by mixing different amounts of coarse and fine powders through injection molding. The effects of particle size on the microstructures and properties of the ceramic cores were investigated using quantitative and statistical analysis methods. It is found that the shrinkage and room-temperature strength of the ceramic cores were enhanced as increasing the contents of fine particles. Moreover, the creep resistance of the ceramic cores increased initially and then decreased. The increase in the fine particle content of the cores reduced the number and mean diameter of pores after sintering. The grain boundary density decreased firstly and then increased. The flexural strength of the ceramic cores at room temperature decreased with increasing porosity of ceramic cores, whereas the creep resistance increased with decreasing grain boundary density. A core exhibiting the optimal property was obtained when mixing 65 wt% of coarse powders (75-150 μm) and 35 wt% of fine powders (25-48 μm).

  20. Novel casting processes for single-crystal turbine blades of superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dexin

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the current casting techniques for single-crystal (SC) blades, as well as an analysis of the solidification process in complex turbine blades. A series of novel casting methods based on the Bridgman process were presented to illustrate the development in the production of SC blades from superalloys. The grain continuator and the heat conductor techniques were developed to remove geometry-related grain defects. In these techniques, the heat barrier that hinders lateral SC growth from the blade airfoil into the extremities of the platform is minimized. The parallel heating and cooling system was developed to achieve symmetric thermal conditions for SC solidification in blade clusters, thus considerably decreasing the negative shadow effect and its related defects in the current Bridgman process. The dipping and heaving technique, in which thinshell molds are utilized, was developed to enable the establishment of a high temperature gradient for SC growth and the freckle-free solidification of superalloy castings. Moreover, by applying the targeted cooling and heating technique, a novel concept for the three-dimensional and precise control of SC growth, a proper thermal arrangement may be dynamically established for the microscopic control of SC growth in the critical areas of large industrial gas turbine blades.

  1. A process chain for integrating piezoelectric transducers into aluminum die castings to generate smart lightweight structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Stefan; Wedler, Jonathan; Rhein, Sebastian; Schmidt, Michael; Körner, Carolin; Michaelis, Alexander; Gebhardt, Sylvia

    The application of piezoelectric transducers to structural body parts of machines or vehicles enables the combination of passive mechanical components with sensor and actuator functions in one single structure. According to Herold et al. [1] and Staeves [2] this approach indicates significant potential regarding smart lightweight construction. To obtain the highest yield, the piezoelectric transducers need to be integrated into the flux of forces (load path) of load bearing structures. Application in a downstream process reduces yield and process efficiency during manufacturing and operation, due to the necessity of a subsequent process step of sensor/actuator application. The die casting process offers the possibility for integration of piezoelectric transducers into metal structures. Aluminum castings are particularly favorable due to their high quality and feasibility for high unit production at low cost (Brunhuber [3], Nogowizin [4]). Such molded aluminum parts with integrated piezoelectric transducers enable functions like active vibration damping, structural health monitoring or energy harvesting resulting in significant possibilities of weight reduction, which is an increasingly important driving force of automotive and aerospace industry (Klein [5], Siebenpfeiffer [6]) due to increasingly stringent environmental protection laws. In the scope of those developments, this paper focuses on the entire process chain enabling the generation of lightweight metal structures with sensor and actuator function, starting from the manufacturing of piezoelectric modules over electrical and mechanical bonding to the integration of such modules into aluminum (Al) matrices by die casting. To achieve this challenging goal, piezoceramic sensors/actuator modules, so-called LTCC/PZT modules (LPM) were developed, since ceramic based piezoelectric modules are more likely to withstand the thermal stress of about 700 °C introduced by the casting process (Flössel et al., [7]). The

  2. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  3. Quantitative Experimental Study of Defects Induced by Process Parameters in the High-Pressure Die Cast Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, P.; Jamali, J.; Sadayappan, K.; Wood, J. T.

    2018-05-01

    A quantitative experimental study of the effects of process parameters on the formation of defects during solidification of high-pressure die cast magnesium alloy components is presented. The parameters studied are slow-stage velocity, fast-stage velocity, intensification pressure, and die temperature. The amount of various defects are quantitatively characterized. Multiple runs of the commercial casting simulation package, ProCAST™, are used to model the mold-filling and solidification events. Several locations in the component including knit lines, last-to-fill region, and last-to-solidify region are identified as the critical regions that have a high concentration of defects. The area fractions of total porosity, shrinkage porosity, gas porosity, and externally solidified grains are separately measured. This study shows that the process parameters, fluid flow and local solidification conditions, play major roles in the formation of defects during HPDC process.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Cast Distortion in Gas Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Dubrovskaya, A. S.; Dongauser, K. A.; Trufanov, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper the process of multiple airfoilvanes manufacturing through investment casting is considered. The mathematical model of the full contact problem is built to determine stress strain state in a cast during the process of solidification. Studies are carried out in viscoelastoplastic statement. Numerical simulation of the explored process is implemented with ProCASTsoftware package. The results of simulation are compared with the real production process. By means of computer analysis the optimization of technical process parameters is done in order to eliminate the defect of cast walls thickness variation.

  5. Development of an Innovative Laser-Assisted Coating Process for Extending Lifetime of Metal Casting Dies. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Madhav Rao Gonvindaraju

    1999-10-18

    Die casting dies used in the metal casting industry fail due to thermal fatigue cracking accompanied by the presence of residual tensile stresses, corrosion, erosion and wear of die surfaces. This phase 1 SBIR Final Report summarize Karta Technologies research involving the development of an innovative laser coating technology for metal casting dies. The process involves depositing complex protective coatings of nanocrystalline powders of TiC followed by a laser shot peening. The results indicate a significant improvement in corrosion and erosion resistance in molten aluminum for H13 die casting die steels. The laser-coated samples also showed improved surface finish, amore » homogeneous and uniform coating mircrostructure. The technology developed in this research can have a significant impact on the casting industry by saving the material costs involved in replacing dies, reducing downtime and improving the quality.« less

  6. Influence of macromolecular architecture on necking in polymer extrusion film casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Pol, Harshawardhan; Banik, Sourya; Azad, Lal Busher

    2015-05-22

    Extrusion film casting (EFC) is an important polymer processing technique that is used to produce several thousand tons of polymer films/coatings on an industrial scale. In this research, we are interested in understanding quantitatively how macromolecular chain architecture (for example long chain branching (LCB) or molecular weight distribution (MWD or PDI)) influences the necking and thickness distribution of extrusion cast films. We have used different polymer resins of linear and branched molecular architecture to produce extrusion cast films under controlled experimental conditions. The necking profiles of the films were imaged and the velocity profiles during EFC were monitored using particlemore » tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. Additionally, the temperature profiles were captured using an IR thermography and thickness profiles were calculated. The experimental results are compared with predictions of one-dimensional flow model of Silagy et al{sup 1} wherein the polymer resin rheology is modeled using molecular constitutive equations such as the Rolie-Poly (RP) and extended Pom Pom (XPP). We demonstrate that the 1-D flow model containing the molecular constitutive equations provides new insights into the role of macromolecular chain architecture on film necking.{sup 1}D. Silagy, Y. Demay, and J-F. Agassant, Polym. Eng. Sci., 36, 2614 (1996)« less

  7. A study on atomic diffusion behaviours in an Al-Mg compound casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yongning; Chen, Yiqing; Yang, Chunhui, E-mail: r.yang@uws.edu.au

    Al and Mg alloys are main lightweight alloys of research interest and they both have superb material properties, i.e., low density and high specific strength, etc. Being different from Al alloys, the corrosion of Mg alloys is much more difficult to control. Therefore to combine merits of these two lightweight alloys as a composite-like structure is an ideal solution through using Al alloys as a protective layer for Mg alloys. Compound casting is a realistic technique to manufacture such a bi-metal structure. In this study, a compound casting technique is employed to fabricate bi-layered samples using Al and Mg andmore » then the samples are analysed using electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) to determine diffusion behaviours between Al and Mg. The diffusion mechanism and behaviours between Al and Mg are studied numerically at atomic scale using molecular dynamics (MD) and parametric studies are conducted to find out influences of ambient temperature and pressure on the diffusion behaviours between Al and Mg. The results obtained clearly show the effectiveness of the compound casting process to increase the diffusion between Al and Mg and thus create the Al-base protection layer for Mg.« less

  8. Modeling of microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during the high pressure die casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengwu; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    Two important microstructure characteristics of high pressure die cast magnesium alloy are the externally solidified crystals (ESCs) and the fully divorced eutectic which form at the filling stage of the shot sleeve and at the last stage of solidification in the die cavity, respectively. Both of them have a significant influence on the mechanical properties and performance of magnesium alloy die castings. In the present paper, a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method was developed to simulate the microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Modeling of dendritic growth of magnesium alloy with six-fold symmetry was achieved by defining a special neighbourhood configuration and calculating of the growth kinetics from complete solution of the transport equations. Special attention was paid to establish a nucleation model considering both of the nucleation of externally solidified crystals in the shot sleeve and the massive nucleation in the die cavity. Meanwhile, simulation of the formation of fully divorced eutectic was also taken into account in the present CA model. Validation was performed and the capability of the present model was addressed by comparing the simulated results with those obtained by experiments.

  9. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood ... The urine sample you provide may need to be from your first morning urine. The sample needs to be ...

  10. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  11. Numerical Simulation and Optimization of Directional Solidification Process of Single Crystal Superalloy Casting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of numerical modeling techniques has led to more accurate results in modeling metal solidification processes. In this study, the cellular automaton-finite difference (CA-FD) method was used to simulate the directional solidification (DS) process of single crystal (SX) superalloy blade samples. Experiments were carried out to validate the simulation results. Meanwhile, an intelligent model based on fuzzy control theory was built to optimize the complicate DS process. Several key parameters, such as mushy zone width and temperature difference at the cast-mold interface, were recognized as the input variables. The input variables were functioned with the multivariable fuzzy rule to get the output adjustment of withdrawal rate (v) (a key technological parameter). The multivariable fuzzy rule was built, based on the structure feature of casting, such as the relationship between section area, and the delay time of the temperature change response by changing v, and the professional experience of the operator as well. Then, the fuzzy controlling model coupled with CA-FD method could be used to optimize v in real-time during the manufacturing process. The optimized process was proven to be more flexible and adaptive for a steady and stray-grain free DS process. PMID:28788535

  12. AMCC casting development. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Combustion Chamber Casting (AMCC) has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or Thermal Gradient Control. This method, of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification, represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. Metallurgical integrity of the final four castings was very good. Only the areas of the parts that utilized 'TGC Shape & Location System #2' showed any significant areas of microshrinkage when evaluated by non-destructive tests. Alumina oxides detected by FPI on the 'float' surfaces (top sid surfaces of the casting during solidification) of the part were almost entirely less than the acceptance criteria of .032 inches in diameter. Destructive chem mill of the castings was required to determine the effect of the process variables used during the processing of these last four parts (with the exception of the 'Shape & Location of TGC' variable).

  13. Study on Pot Forming of Induction Heater Type Rice Cookers by Forging Cast Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Ohashi, Osamu

    This paper describes a study result on pot fabrication by the forging cast process of stainless steel with aluminum. Rice cooked with the new bowl-shaped pot for the induction heater type rice cookers is better tasting than rice cooked with the conventional cylindrical one, due to the achievement of better heat conduction and convection. The conventional pot is made of the clad sheet, consisting of stainless steel and aluminum. However, it is rather difficult to form a bowl shape from the clad sheet, primarily due to the problem of a material spring back. The fabrication of a new type of a pot was made possible by means of the adoption of a forging cast process instead of the clad sheet. In this process, iron powder is inserted between stainless steel and aluminum in order to alleviate the large difference on the coefficient of expansion between each material. It was made clear that the application of two kinds of iron particle, namely 10 μm size powder on the stainless steel side and 44 μm on the aluminum side, enables the joints to become strong enough. The joint strength of the new pot by this fabrication process was confirmed by the tests of the shear strength and the fatigue tests together with the stress analysis.

  14. Quantitative examination of carbide and sulphide precipitates in chemically complex steels processed by direct strip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Dorin, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorin@deakin.edu.au; Wood, Kathleen; Taylor, Adam

    2016-02-15

    A high strength low alloy steel composition has been melted and processed by two different routes: simulated direct strip casting and slow cooled ingot casting. The microstructures were examined with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The formation of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C), manganese sulphides (MnS) and niobium carbo-nitrides (Nb(C,N)) was investigated in both casting conditions. The sulphides were found to be significantly refined by the higher cooling rate, and developed an average diameter of only 100 nm for the fast cooled sample, and a diameter too large to be measured with SANSmore » in the slow cooled condition (> 1.1 μm). Slow cooling resulted in the development of classical Nb(C,N) precipitation, with an average diameter of 7.2 nm. However, after rapid cooling both the SANS and atom probe tomography data indicated that the Nb was retained in the matrix as a random solid solution. There was also some evidence that O, N and S are also retained in solid solution in levels not found during conventional processing. - Highlights: • The influence of cooling rate on microstructure is investigated in a HSLA steel. • SANS, TEM and APT are used to characterise the sulphides and Nb(C,N) precipitates. • The slow cooling rate result in the formation of Nb(C,N) precipitates. • The fast cooling rate results in a microstructure supersaturated in Nb, C and N. • The sulphides are 100 nm in the fast cooled sample and > 1 μm in the slow cooled one.« less

  15. EBSD Study on Grain Boundary and Microtexture Evolutions During Friction Stir Processing of A413 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2016-07-01

    The as-cast Al alloys contain heterogeneous distributions of non-deforming particles due to non-equilibrium solidification effects. Therefore, these alloys have poor tribological and mechanical behaviors. It is well known that using friction stir processing (FSP), very fine microstructure is created in the as-cast Al alloys, while their wear resistance can be improved. In this research work, FSP is used to locally refine a surface layer of the coarse as-cast microstructure of cast A413 Al alloy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FSP on microstructure and microtexture evolutions in A413 cast Al alloy. The grain boundary character distribution, grain structure, and microtexture evolutions in as-cast and friction stir processed A413 Al alloy are analyzed by electron back scatter diffraction technique. It is found that with the FSP, the fraction of low ∑boundary such as ∑3, 7, and 9 are increased. The obtained results show that there are no deformation texture components in the structure of friction stir processed samples. However, some of the main recrystallization texture components such as BR and cubeND are formed during FSP which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization phenomenon due to the severe plastic deformation induced by the rotation of tool.

  16. Stacked dielectric elastomer actuator (SDEA): casting process, modeling and active vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuoyuan; Sheng, Meiping; Wang, Minqing; Dong, Pengfei; Li, Bo; Chen, Hualing

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, a novel fabrication process of stacked dielectric elastomer actuator (SDEA) is developed based on casting process and elastomeric electrode. The so-fabricated SDEA benefits the advantages of homogenous and reproducible properties as well as little performance degradation after one-year use. A coupling model of SDEA is established by taking into consideration of the elastomeric electrode and the calculated results agree with the experiments. Based on the model, we attain the method to optimize the SDEA’s parameters. Finally, the SDEA is used as an isolator in active vibration isolation system to verify the feasibility in dynamic application. And the experiment results show a great prospect for SDEA in such application.

  17. Aluminum-Silicon Alloy Having Improved Properties At Elevated Temperatures and Process for Producing Cast Articles Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A process for making a cast article from an aluminum alloy includes first casting an article from an alloy having the following composition, in weight percent: Silicon 11.0-14.0, Copper 5.6-8.0, Iron 0-0.8, Magnesium 0.5-1.5, Nickel 0.05-0.9, Manganese 0-1.0, Titanium 0.05-1.2, Zirconium 0.12-1.2, Vanadium 0.05-1.2, Zinc 0.05-0.9, Strontium 0.001-0.1, Aluminum balance . In this alloy the ratio of silicon to magnesium is 10 to 25, and the ratio of copper to magnesium is 4 to 15. After an article is cast from the alloy, the cast article is aged at a temperature within the range of 400F to 500F for a time period within the range of four to 16 hours. It has been found especially advantageous if the cast article is first exposed to a solutionizing step prior to the aging step. This solutionizing step is carried out by exposing the cast article to a temperature within the range of 900F to 1000F for a time period of fifteen minutes to four hours. It has also been found to be especially advantageous if the solutionizing step is followed directly with a quenching step, wherein the cast article is quenched in a quenching medium such as water at a temperature within the range of 120F to 300F. The resulting cast article is suitable in a number of high temperature applications, such as heavy-duty pistons for internal combustion engines.

  18. Silica coatings formed on noble dental casting alloy by the sol-gel dipping process.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Tanagawa, M; Kamada, K; Hatada, R; Baba, K; Inoi, T; Atsuta, M

    1999-08-01

    The sol-gel dipping process, in which liquid silicon alkoxide is transformed into the solid silicon-oxygen network, can produce a thin film coating of silica (SiO2). The features of this method are high homogeneity and purity of the thin SiO2 film and a low sinter temperature, which are important in preparation of coating films that can protect from metallic ion release from the metal substrate and prevent attachment of dental plaque. We evaluated the surface characteristics of the dental casting silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy coated with a thin SiO2 film by the sol-gel dipping process. The SiO2 film bonded strongly (over 40 MPa) to Ti-implanted Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy substrate as demonstrated by a pull test. Hydrophobilization of Ti-implanted/SiO2-coated surfaces resulted in a significant increase of the contact angle of water (80.5 degrees) compared with that of the noncoated alloy specimens (59.3 degrees). Ti-implanted/SiO2-coated specimens showed the release of many fewer metallic ions (192 ppb/cm2) from the substrate than did noncoated specimens (2,089 ppb/cm2). The formation of a thin SiO2 film by the sol-gel dipping process on the surface of Ti-implanted Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy after casting clinically may be useful for minimizing the possibilities of the accumulation of dental plaque and metal allergies caused by intraoral metal restorations.

  19. Implementing a Process to Measure Return on Investment for Nursing Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Elisabeth; Beverage, Jodie

    Return on investment (ROI) is one way to quantify the value that nursing professional development brings to the organization. This article describes a process to begin tracking ROI for nursing professional development. Implementing a process of tracking nursing professional development practitioners' ROI increased awareness of the financial impact and effectiveness of the department.

  20. Thermal casting process for the preparation of anisotropic membranes and the resultant membrane

    DOEpatents

    Caneba, Gerard T. M.; Soong, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A method for providing anisotropic polymer membranes from a binary polymer/solvent solution using a thermal inversion process. A homogeneous binary solution is cast onto a support and cooled in such a way as to provide a differential in cooling rate across the thickness of the resulting membrane sheet. Isotropic or anisotropic structures of selected porosities can be produced, depending on the initial concentration of polymer in the selected solvent and on the extent of the differential in cooling rate. This differential results in a corresponding gradation in pore size. The method may be modified to provide a working skin by applying a rapid, high-temperature pulse to redissolve a predetermined thickness of the membrane at one of its faces and then freezing the entire structure.

  1. Fabrication process analysis and experimental verification for aluminum bipolar plates in fuel cells by vacuum die-casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chul Kyu; Kang, Chung Gil

    2011-10-01

    There are various methods for the fabrication of bipolar plates, but these are still limited to machining and stamping processes. High-pressure die casting (HPDC) is an ideal process for the manufacture of bipolar plates This study aims to investigate the formability of bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) fabricated by vacuum HPDC of an Al-Mg alloy (ALDC6). The cavity of the mold consisted of a thin-walled plate (200 mm × 200 mm × 0.8 mm) with a layer of serpentine channel (50 mm × 50 mm). The location and direction of the channel in the final mold design was determined by computational simulation (MAGMA soft). In addition, simulation results for different conditions of plunger stroke control were compared to those from actual die-casting experiments. Under a vacuum pressure of 35 kPa and for injection speeds of 0.3 and 2.5 m s-1 in the low and high speed regions, respectively, the samples had few casting defects. In addition, the hardness was higher and porosity in microstructure was less than those of the samples made under other injection speed conditions. In case of thin-walled plates, vacuum die casting is beneficial in terms of formability compared to conventional die casting.

  2. Analysis of Monolith Cores from an Engineering Scale Demonstration of a Prospective Cast Stone Process

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C. L.; Cozzi, A. D.; Hill, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    The primary disposition path of Low Activity Waste (LAW) at the DOE Hanford Site is vitrification. A cementitious waste form is one of the alternatives being considered for the supplemental immobilization of the LAW that will not be treated by the primary vitrification facility. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has been directed to generate and collect data on cementitious or pozzolanic waste forms such as Cast Stone. This report documents the coring and leach testing of monolithic samples cored from an engineering-scale demonstration (ES Demo) with non-radioactive simulants. The ES Demo was performed at SRNL in October of 2013 usingmore » the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft. diameter x 3.25 ft. high container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average LAW composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. In 2014 core samples originally obtained approximately six months after filling the ES Demo were tested along with bench scale molded samples that were collected during the original pour. A latter set of core samples were obtained in late March of 2015, eighteen months after completion of the original ES Demo. Core samples were obtained using a 2” diameter x 11” long coring bit. The ES Demo was sampled in three different regions consisting of an outer ring, a middle ring and an inner core zone. Cores from these three lateral zones were further segregated into upper, middle and lower vertical segments. Monolithic core samples were tested using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1315, which is designed to provide mass transfer

  3. The development of ultrahigh strength low alloy cast steels with increased toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Paul C.

    This work describes the initial work on the development of the next generation of ultrahigh strength low alloy (UHSLA) cast steels. These UHSLA cast steels have both ultrahigh strength levels and good impact toughness. The influence of heat treatment, secondary processing using hot isostatic processing (HIP), and chemical composition on the microstructure and properties of UHSLA cast steels have been evaluated. The extent of microsegregation reduction expected during the heat treatment of UHSLA cast steels has also been estimated by diffusion modeling. This new family of UHSLA cast steels is similar in composition and properties to UHSLA wrought steels. However, the heat treatment and secondary processing of the UHSLA cast steels is used to develop microstructures and properties typically developed through thermomechanical processing and heat treatment for wrought UHSLA steels. Two martensitic UHSLA steels, 4340+ (silicon modified 4340) and ES-1 were investigated for this study. For the 4340+ alloy, heat treatment variables evaluated include homogenization temperature and time, tempering temperature, and austempering temperature and time. For the ES-1 alloy, heat treatment variables evaluated include homogenization temperature and time, austenization temperature, cryogenic treatment, and tempering temperature. The effect of high temperature hot isostatic processing (HIP) on the 4340+ and ES- 1 alloys was also investigated. Tensile properties, charpy v-notch impact toughness (CVN), microstructures, and fractographs have all been characterized after heat treatment. The effects of HIP on microporosity reduction in the ES-1 alloy were also investigated. The experiments carried out on the investment cast 4340+ alloy have shown that increasing the homogenization temperature can increase CVN without changing the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) or yield strength (YS) of the cast material. By replacing the homogenization step in the conventional heat treatment process with

  4. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  5. Process research into metallic pipe wear of hot chamber die casting machines and methods ofincreasing wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhametzyanova, G. F.; Kolesnikov, MS; Mukhametzyanov, I. R.; Astatshenko, V. I.

    2017-09-01

    The kinetics and reasons for metallic pipe wear of hot chamberzinc alloy die casting machines are established.Increasing metallic pipe wear components wear resistance is being achieved by means of die steelДИ - 22 with electroslag remelting modification and electron-beamremelting modification and after the processes of nitriding and boriding besides.

  6. The study of flow pattern and phase-change problem in die casting process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Wei, H.; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    The flow pattern and solidification phenomena in die casting process have been investigated in the first phase study. The flow pattern in filling process is predicted by using a VOF (volume of fluid) method. A good agreement with experimental observation is obtained for filling the water into a die cavity with different gate geometry and with an obstacle in the cavity. An enthalpy method has been applied to solve the solidification problem. By treating the latent heat implicitly into the enthalpy instead of explicitly into the source term, the CPU time can be reduced at least 20 times. The effect of material properties on solidification fronts is tested. It concludes that the dependence of properties on temperature is significant. The influence of the natural convection over the diffusion has also been studied. The result shows that the liquid metal solidification phenomena is diffusion dominant, and the natural convection can affect the shape of the interface. In the second phase study, the filling and solidification processes will be considered simultaneously.

  7. Microstructure Analysis on 6061 Aluminum Alloy after Casting and Diffuses Annealing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Q.; Sun, W. L.; Xing, Y. Q.

    One factory using semi-continuous casting process produce the ф200×6000 mm 6061 aluminium alloy barstock, and then rotary forged for car wheels. 6061 distorting aluminium alloy is an forged aluminum alloy, and mainly containing Mg, Si, Cu and other alloying elements. The main strengthening phase is Mg2Si, and also has few phase of (FeMn) 3Si2Al15. In order to eliminate the segregation and separation which present in the crystal boundary, and make the distortion to be uniform, and does not present ear and fracture defects after the forging. So the 6061 distorting aluminium alloy adopt the diffusion annealing heat treatment before the forging process.According to the current conditions, we use the diffusion annealing which have the different heating temperature and different holding time.The best process we can obtain from the test which can improve the production efficiency and reduce the material waste, improve the mechanical properties, and eliminate the overheated film on the surface.Then,we using OM,SEM and EDS to analyse the microstructure and the chemical composition of compound between the surface and centre. The result shows that the amount of segregation were different in the surface and in the center, and the different diffusion annealing can cause the phase change in the surface and the center.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  9. Enhancement of Efficiency and Reduction of Grid Thickness Variation on Casting Process with Lean Six Sigma Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witantyo; Setyawan, David

    2018-03-01

    In a lead acid battery industry, grid casting is a process that has high defect and thickness variation level. DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyse-Improve-Control) method and its tools will be used to improve the casting process. In the Define stage, it is used project charter and SIPOC (Supplier Input Process Output Customer) method to map the existent problem. In the Measure stage, it is conducted a data retrieval related to the types of defect and the amount of it, also the grid thickness variation that happened. And then the retrieved data is processed and analyzed by using 5 Why’s and FMEA method. In the Analyze stage, it is conducted a grid observation that experience fragile and crack type of defect by using microscope showing the amount of oxide Pb inclusion in the grid. Analysis that is used in grid casting process shows the difference of temperature that is too high between the metal fluid and mold temperature, also the corking process that doesn’t have standard. The Improve stage is conducted a fixing process which generates the reduction of grid variation thickness level and defect/unit level from 9,184% to 0,492%. In Control stage, it is conducted a new working standard determination and already fixed control process.

  10. Demonstration of the Impact of Thermomagnetic Processing on Cast Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Murphy, Bart L.; Rios, Orlando

    2017-10-01

    This project builds on an earlier Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technical Collaboration phase 1 project to investigate application of high magnetic fields during solution heat treating and aging of three different cast aluminum alloys.

  11. Process for casting hard-faced, lightweight camshafts and other cylindrical products

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Wilson, Rick D.

    1996-01-01

    A process for casting a hard-faced cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft includes the steps of: (a) preparing a composition formed from a molten base metal and an additive in particle form and having a hardness value greater than the hardness value of the base metal; (b) introducing the composition into a flask containing a meltable pattern of a cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft to be manufactured and encased in sand to allow the composition to melt the pattern and assume the shape of the pattern within the sand; and (c) rotating the flask containing the pattern about the longitudinal axes of both the flask and the pattern as the molten base metal containing the additive in particle form is introduced into the flask to cause particles of the additive entrained in the molten base metal to migrate by centrifugal action to the radial extremities of the pattern and thereby provide a cylindrical product having a hardness value greater at it's radial extremities than at its center when the molten base metal solidifies.

  12. Isotope biogeochemical assessment of natural biodegradation processes in open cast pit mining landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Christina; Knöller, Kay; Koschorreck, Matthias; Ussath, Maria; Hoth, Nils

    2014-05-01

    In Germany, a major share of the energy production is based on the burning of lignite from open cast pit mines. The remediation and re-cultivation of the former mining areas in the Lusatian and Central German lignite mining district is an enormous technical and economical challenge. After mine closures, the surrounding landscapes are threatened by acid mine drainage (AMD), i.e. the acidification and mineralization of rising groundwater with metals and inorganic contaminants. The high content of sulfur (sulfuric acid, sulfate), nitrogen (ammonium) and iron compounds (iron-hydroxides) deteriorates the groundwater quality and decelerates sustainable development of tourism in (former) mining landscapes. Natural biodegradation or attenuation (NA) processes of inorganic contaminants are considered to be a technically low impact and an economically beneficial solution. The investigations of the stable isotope compositions of compounds involved in NA processes helps clarify the dynamics of natural degradation and provides specific informations on retention processes of sulfate and nitrogen-compounds in mine dump water, mine dump sediment, and residual pit lakes. In an active mine dump we investigated zones where the process of bacterial sulfate reduction, as one very important NA process, takes place and how NA can be enhanced by injecting reactive substrates. Stable isotopes signatures of sulfur and nitrogen components were examined and evaluated in concert with hydrogeochemical data. In addition, we delineated the sources of ammonium pollution in mine dump sediments and investigated nitrification by 15N-labeling techniques to calculate the limit of the conversion of harmful ammonium to nitrate in residual mining lakes. Ultimately, we provided an isotope biogeochemical assessment of natural attenuation of sulfate and ammonium at mine dump sites and mining lakes. Also, we estimated the risk potential for water in different compartments of the hydrological system. In

  13. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  14. Influence of rotational speed of centrifugal casting process on appearance, microstructure, and sliding wear behaviour of Al-2Si cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda, P. G.; Shailesh, Rao A.; Rao, Shrikantha S.

    2010-02-01

    Although the manner in which the molten metal flows plays a major role in the formation of the uniform cylinder in centrifugal casting, not much information is available on this topic. The flow in the molten metal differs at various rotational speeds, which in turn affects the final casting. In this paper, the influence of the flow of molten metal of hyper eutectic Al-2Si alloys at various rotational speeds is discussed. At an optimum speed of 800 rpm, a uniform cylinder was formed. For the rotational speeds below and above these speeds, an irregular shaped casting was formed, which is mainly due to the influence of melt. Primary á-Al particles were formed in the tube periphery at low rotational speed, and their sizes and shapes were altered with changes in rotational speeds. The wear test for the inner surface of the casting showed better wear properties for the casting prepared at the optimum speed of rotation.

  15. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qing-chun; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Cheng-tao; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Peng-yu; Sun, Na; Ren, Luquan

    2009-04-01

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  16. A Value Based Justification Process for Aerospace RDT and E Capability Investments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-12-01

    end of MS C by funding the five-year, $350 million T&E infrastructure investment proposed in the DoD plan. This expansion of the cost - benefit “control...expansion of the cost - benefit “control volume” to include projected system development savings, as described in Ref. [3], proved successful in justifying...Fig. 1 The Expanded Cost - Benefit Analysis Control Volume. It is also worth noting that this process has the greatest potential for success when the

  17. Statistical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Processing Variables on Shrinkage Incidence During Solidification of Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. M.; Natxiondo, A.; Nieves, J.; Zabala, A.; Sertucha, J.

    2017-04-01

    The study of shrinkage incidence variations in nodular cast irons is an important aspect of manufacturing processes. These variations change the feeding requirements on castings and the optimization of risers' size is consequently affected when avoiding the formation of shrinkage defects. The effect of a number of processing variables on the shrinkage size has been studied using a layout specifically designed for this purpose. The β parameter has been defined as the relative volume reduction from the pouring temperature up to the room temperature. It is observed that shrinkage size and β decrease as effective carbon content increases and when inoculant is added in the pouring stream. A similar effect is found when the parameters selected from cooling curves show high graphite nucleation during solidification of cast irons for a given inoculation level. Pearson statistical analysis has been used to analyze the correlations among all involved variables and a group of Bayesian networks have been subsequently built so as to get the best accurate model for predicting β as a function of the input processing variables. The developed models can be used in foundry plants to study the shrinkage incidence variations in the manufacturing process and to optimize the related costs.

  18. Thermal analysis on Al7075/Al2O3 metal matrix composites fabricated by stir casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, S.; Shajin, S.; Gnanavel, C.

    2017-03-01

    Metal matrix Composites (MMC’s) have evoked a keen interest in recent times for various applications in aerospace, renewable energy and automotive industries due to their superior strength, low cost, easy availability and high temperature resistance [1]. The crack and propagation occurs in conventional materials without any appreciable indication in a short span. Hence composite materials are preferred nowadays to overcome this problem [2]. The process of metal matrix composites (MMC’s) is to unite the enviable attributes of metals and ceramics. The Stir casting method is used for producing aluminium metal matrix composites (AMC’s). A key challenge of the process is to spread the ceramic particles to achieve a defect free microstructure [2]. By carefully selecting stir casting processing specification, such as stirring time, temperature of the melt and blade angle, the desired microstructure can be obtained. The focus of this work is to develop a high strength particulate strengthen aluminium metal matrix composites, and Al7075 was selected which can offer high strength without much disturbing ductility of metal matrix [4]. The composites will be examined using standard metallurgical and mechanical tests. The cast composites are analysed to Laser flash analysis (LFA) to determine Thermal conductivity [5]. Also changes in microstructure are determined by using SEM analysis.

  19. Thermomechanical processing of microalloyed powder forged steels and a cast vanadium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, B.; Davies, T. J.

    1985-09-01

    The effects of controlled rolling on transformation behavior of two powder forged (P/F) microalloyed vanadium steels and a cast microalloyed vanadium steel were investigated. Rolling was carried out in the austenitic range below the recrystallization temperature. Equiaxed grain structures were produced in specimens subjected to different reductions and different cooling rates. The ferrite grain size decreased with increasing deformation and cooling rate. Ferrite nucleated on second phase particles, deformation bands, and on elongated prior austenite grain boundaries; consequently a high fractional ferrite refinement was achieved. Deformation raised the ferrite transformation start temperature while the time to transformation from the roll finish temperature decreased. Cooling rates in the cast steel were higher than in P/F steels for all four cooling media used, and the transformation start temperatures of cast steels were lower than that of P/F steel. Intragranular ferrite nucleation, which played a vital role in grain refinement, increased with cooling rate. Fully bainitic microstructures were formed at higher cooling rates in the cast steel. In the P/F steels inclusions and incompletely closed pores served as sites for ferrite nucleation, often forming a ‘secondary’ ferrite. The rolling schedule reduced the size of large pores and particle surface inclusions and removed interconnected porosity in the P/F steels.

  20. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  1. Dimensional control of die castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karve, Aniruddha Ajit

    The demand for net shape die castings, which require little or no machining, is steadily increasing. Stringent customer requirements are forcing die casters to deliver high quality castings in increasingly short lead times. Dimensional conformance to customer specifications is an inherent part of die casting quality. The dimensional attributes of a die casting are essentially dependent upon many factors--the quality of the die and the degree of control over the process variables being the two major sources of dimensional error in die castings. This study focused on investigating the nature and the causes of dimensional error in die castings. The two major components of dimensional error i.e., dimensional variability and die allowance were studied. The major effort of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively study the effects of casting geometry and process variables on die casting dimensional variability and die allowance. This was accomplished by detailed dimensional data collection at production die casting sites. Robust feature characterization schemes were developed to describe complex casting geometry in quantitative terms. Empirical modeling was utilized to quantify the effects of the casting variables on dimensional variability and die allowance for die casting features. A number of casting geometry and process variables were found to affect dimensional variability in die castings. The dimensional variability was evaluated by comparisons with current published dimensional tolerance standards. The casting geometry was found to play a significant role in influencing the die allowance of the features measured. The predictive models developed for dimensional variability and die allowance were evaluated to test their effectiveness. Finally, the relative impact of all the components of dimensional error in die castings was put into perspective, and general guidelines for effective dimensional control in the die casting plant were laid out. The results of

  2. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Improved Die Casting Process to Preserve the Life of the Inserts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam, PI; Xuejun Zhu, Sr. Research Associate

    2012-09-30

    The goal of this project was to study the combined effects of die design, proper internal cooling and efficient die lubricants on die life. The project targeted improvements in die casting insert life by: Optomized Die Design for Reduced Surface Temperature: The life of die casting dies is significantly shorter when the die is exposed to elevated temperature for significant periods of time. Any die operated under conditions leading to surface temperature in excess of 1050oF undergoes structural changes that reduce its strength. Optimized die design can improve die life significantly. This improvement can be accomplished by means of coolingmore » lines, baffles and bubblers in the die. A key objective of the project was to establish criteria for the minimal distance of the cooling lines from the surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. The Uddeholm Dievar steel evaluated in this program showed superior resistance to thermal fatigue resistance. Based on the experimental evidence, cooling lines could be placed as close as 0.5" from the surface. Die Life Extension by Optimized Die Lubrication: The life of die casting dies is affected by additions made to its surface with the proper lubricants. These lubricants will protect the surface from the considerable temperature peaks that occur when the molten melt enters the die. Dies will reach a significantly higher temperature without this lubricant being applied. The amount and type of the lubricant are critical variables in the die casting process. However, these lubricants must not corrode the die surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. Chem- Trend participated in the program

  3. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspectionmore » procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at

  4. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R [Xenia, OH; Dzugan, Robert [Cincinnati, OH; Harrington, Richard M [Cincinnati, OH; Neece, Faurice D [Lyndurst, OH; Singh, Nipendra P [Pepper Pike, OH

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  5. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1993-01-01

    Because of high rejection rates for large structural castings (e.g., the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate Turbopump Design Program), a reliable casting simulation computer code is very desirable. This code would reduce both the development time and life cycle costs by allowing accurate modeling of the entire casting process. While this code could be used for other types of castings, the most significant reductions of time and cost would probably be realized in complex investment castings, where any reduction in the number of development castings would be of significant benefit. The casting process is conveniently divided into three distinct phases: (1) mold filling, where the melt is poured or forced into the mold cavity; (2) solidification, where the melt undergoes a phase change to the solid state; and (3) cool down, where the solidified part continues to cool to ambient conditions. While these phases may appear to be separate and distinct, temporal overlaps do exist between phases (e.g., local solidification occurring during mold filling), and some phenomenological events are affected by others (e.g., residual stresses depend on solidification and cooling rates). Therefore, a reliable code must accurately model all three phases and the interactions between each. While many codes have been developed (to various stages of complexity) to model the solidification and cool down phases, only a few codes have been developed to model mold filling.

  6. Effect of TurboSwirl Structure on an Uphill Teeming Ingot Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Haitong; Ersson, Mikael; Jönsson, Pär

    2015-12-01

    To produce high-quality ingot cast steel with a better surface quality, it would be beneficial for the uphill teeming process if a much more stable flow pattern could be achieved in the runners. Several techniques have been utilized in the industry to try to obtain a stable flow of liquid steel, such as a swirling flow. Some research has indicated that a swirl blade inserted in the horizontal and vertical runners, or some other additional devices and physics could generate a swirling flow in order to give a lower hump height, avoid mold flux entrapment, and improve the quality of the ingot products, and a new swirling flow generation component, TurboSwirl, was introduced to improve the flow pattern. It has recently been demonstrated that the TurboSwirl method can effectively reduce the risk of mold flux entrapment, lower the maximum wall shear stress, and decrease velocity fluctuations. The TurboSwirl is built at the elbow of the runners as a connection between the horizontal and vertical runners. It is located near the mold and it generates a tangential flow that can be used with a divergent nozzle in order to decrease the axial velocity of the vertical flow into the mold. This stabilizes flow before the fluid enters the mold. However, high wall shear stresses develop at the walls due to the fierce rotation in the TurboSwirl. In order to achieve a calmer flow and to protect the refractory wall, some structural improvements have been made. It was found that by changing the flaring angle of the divergent nozzle, it was possible to lower the axial velocity and wall shear stress. Moreover, when the vertical runner and the divergent nozzle were not placed at the center of the TurboSwirl, quite different flow patterns could be obtained to meet to different requirements. In addition, the swirl numbers of all the cases mentioned above were calculated to ensure that the swirling flow was strong enough to generate a swirling flow of the liquid steel in the TurboSwirl.

  7. Anisotropic Responses of Mechanical and Thermal Processed Cast Al-Si-Mg-Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Balogun, S. A.; Onoyemi, O. K.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of ambient directional rolling and heat treatments on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), hardness (HD), percent elongation (PE), and impact energy (IE) on Al-Si-Mg-Cu alloy casting with reference to inclination to rolling direction are discussed in this article. The results show that rolled and quenched (CQ) sample possess superior UTS and HD to as-cast and those of rolled and aged samples (CA). Improved IE resistance with ductility is shown by both CQ and CA samples. However, these mechanical properties are enhanced as changes in the test sample direction moved away from rolling direction for all heat-treated samples. The CQ samples displayed highest tensile strength (108 MPa) and PE (19.8%) in the 90° direction.

  8. Performance Steel Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Development of Sand Properties 103 Advanced Modeling Dataset.. 105 High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) Steels 107 Steel Casting and Engineering Support...to achieve the performance goals required for new systems. The dramatic reduction in weight and increase in capability will require high performance...for improved weapon system reliability. SFSA developed innovative casting design and manufacturing processes for high performance parts. SFSA is

  9. A Neuroeconomics Analysis of Investment Process with Money Flow Information: The Error-Related Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuicui; Vieito, João Paulo; Ma, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    This investigation is among the first ones to analyze the neural basis of an investment process with money flow information of financial market, using a simplified task where volunteers had to choose to buy or not to buy stocks based on the display of positive or negative money flow information. After choosing “to buy” or “not to buy,” participants were presented with feedback. At the same time, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to record investor's brain activity and capture the event-related negativity (ERN) and feedback-related negativity (FRN) components. The results of ERN suggested that there might be a higher risk and more conflict when buying stocks with negative net money flow information than positive net money flow information, and the inverse was also true for the “not to buy” stocks option. The FRN component evoked by the bad outcome of a decision was more negative than that by the good outcome, which reflected the difference between the values of the actual and expected outcome. From the research, we could further understand how investors perceived money flow information of financial market and the neural cognitive effect in investment process. PMID:26557139

  10. A Neuroeconomics Analysis of Investment Process with Money Flow Information: The Error-Related Negativity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuicui; Vieito, João Paulo; Ma, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    This investigation is among the first ones to analyze the neural basis of an investment process with money flow information of financial market, using a simplified task where volunteers had to choose to buy or not to buy stocks based on the display of positive or negative money flow information. After choosing "to buy" or "not to buy," participants were presented with feedback. At the same time, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to record investor's brain activity and capture the event-related negativity (ERN) and feedback-related negativity (FRN) components. The results of ERN suggested that there might be a higher risk and more conflict when buying stocks with negative net money flow information than positive net money flow information, and the inverse was also true for the "not to buy" stocks option. The FRN component evoked by the bad outcome of a decision was more negative than that by the good outcome, which reflected the difference between the values of the actual and expected outcome. From the research, we could further understand how investors perceived money flow information of financial market and the neural cognitive effect in investment process.

  11. A Numerical Simulation of Transport Phenomena During the Horizontal Single Belt Casting Process Using an Inclined Feeding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Isac, Mihaiela; Guthrie, Roderick I. L.

    2018-06-01

    Horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) has great potential to replace current conventional continuous casting (CCC) processes for sheet metal production, by directly casting 3 to 1 mm sheet for the automobile industry. In the present paper, two-dimensional mathematical models were developed to study transport phenomena, for the case of an inclined wall feeding system for a liquid aluminum wrought alloy (AA6111). Based on the commercial software ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 and user-defined functions, a two-layer turbulence model was used to examine the fluid flow emanating from a slot nozzle set above a water-cooled, high-speed, steel belt. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method was used to predict the shape of the melt-air interface. A transformed coordinate system ( x', y') was established in order to analyze the fluid flow on the inclined wall of the feeding system. The total pressure gauge gradient ( ∂p total/ ∂x) was used to describe the behavior of the melt film inside the slot nozzle of the head box. The modeling results show that during the melt film falling process, the total gauge pressure varies within the slot nozzle, which can decrease the stability of the falling film. The first impingement between the falling film and the inclined refractory wall of the feeding system gives rise to a local oscillation, and this influences the stability of the melt film moving downwards. At the rear meniscus position between the inclined wall and the moving belt, there is a clear vibration of the air-melt interface, together with a recirculation zone. The weak vibration of the air-melt interface could be induced by the periodic variation of the melt-air interface. Moreover, the formation of tiny air pockets is predicted. Finally, on the inclined wall of the feeding system, a suitable length of the transition area is needed to avoid over-acceleration of the melt film due to the force of gravity.

  12. A Numerical Simulation of Transport Phenomena During the Horizontal Single Belt Casting Process Using an Inclined Feeding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Isac, Mihaiela; Guthrie, Roderick I. L.

    2018-03-01

    Horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) has great potential to replace current conventional continuous casting (CCC) processes for sheet metal production, by directly casting 3 to 1 mm sheet for the automobile industry. In the present paper, two-dimensional mathematical models were developed to study transport phenomena, for the case of an inclined wall feeding system for a liquid aluminum wrought alloy (AA6111). Based on the commercial software ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 and user-defined functions, a two-layer turbulence model was used to examine the fluid flow emanating from a slot nozzle set above a water-cooled, high-speed, steel belt. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method was used to predict the shape of the melt-air interface. A transformed coordinate system (x', y') was established in order to analyze the fluid flow on the inclined wall of the feeding system. The total pressure gauge gradient (∂p total/∂x) was used to describe the behavior of the melt film inside the slot nozzle of the head box. The modeling results show that during the melt film falling process, the total gauge pressure varies within the slot nozzle, which can decrease the stability of the falling film. The first impingement between the falling film and the inclined refractory wall of the feeding system gives rise to a local oscillation, and this influences the stability of the melt film moving downwards. At the rear meniscus position between the inclined wall and the moving belt, there is a clear vibration of the air-melt interface, together with a recirculation zone. The weak vibration of the air-melt interface could be induced by the periodic variation of the melt-air interface. Moreover, the formation of tiny air pockets is predicted. Finally, on the inclined wall of the feeding system, a suitable length of the transition area is needed to avoid over-acceleration of the melt film due to the force of gravity.

  13. Evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the processing route for grain-oriented electrical steels using strip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hai-Tao, E-mail: liuht@ral.neu.edu.cn; Institute of Research of Iron and Steel, Shasteel, Zhangjiagang 215625, Jiangsu; Yao, Sheng-Jie

    2015-08-15

    In the present work, a regular grade GO sheet was produced successively by strip casting, hot rolling, normalizing annealing, two-stage cold rolling with intermediate annealing, primary recrystallization annealing, secondary recrystallization annealing and purification. The aim of this paper was to characterize the evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the new processing route by comprehensive utilization of optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that a fine microstructure with the ferrite grain size range of 7–12 μm could be obtained in the primary recrystallization annealed sheet though a very coarse microstructure was produced in the initialmore » as-cast strip. The main finding was that the “texture memory” effect on Goss texture started on the through-thickness intermediate annealed strip after first cold rolling, which was not similar to the “texture memory” effect on Goss texture starting on the surface layers of the hot rolled strip in the conventional production route. As a result, the origin of Goss nuclei capable of secondary recrystallization lied in the grains already presented in Goss orientation in the intermediate annealed strip after first cold rolling. Another finding was that fine and dispersive inhibitors (mainly AlN) were easy to be produced in the primary recrystallization microstructure due to the initial rapid solidification during strip casting and the subsequent rapid cooling, and the very high temperature reheating usually used before hot rolling in the conventional production route could be avoided. - Highlights: • A regular grade grain-oriented electrical steel was produced. • Evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor was characterized. • Origin of Goss nuclei lied in the intermediate annealed strip. • A fine primary recrystallization microstructure could be produced. • Effective inhibitors were easy to be obtained in the new processing

  14. Precision cast vs. wrought superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Borofka, J. C.; Casey, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    While cast polycrystalline superalloys recommend themselves in virtue of better 'buy-to-fly' ratios and higher strengthening gamma-prime volume fractions than those of wrought superalloys, the expansion of their use into such critical superalloy applications as gas turbine hot section components has been slowed by insufficient casting process opportunities for microstructural control. Attention is presently drawn, however, to casting process developments facilitating the production of defect-tolerant superalloy castings having improved fracture reliability. Integrally bladed turbine wheel and thin-walled turbine exhaust case near-net-shape castings have been produced by these means.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Porous MgAl2O4 Ceramics via a Novel Aqueous Gel-Casting Process

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lei; Liu, Zongquan; Liu, Zhenli; He, Xiao; Ma, Beiyue; Zhu, Qiang; Yu, Jingkun

    2017-01-01

    A novel and aqueous gel-casting process has been successfully developed to fabricate porous MgAl2O4 ceramics by using hydratable alumina and MgO powders as raw materials and deionized water as hydration agent. The effects of different amounts of deionized water on the hydration properties, apparent porosity, bulk density, microstructure, pore size distribution and compressive strength of the samples were investigated. The results indicated that the porosity and the microstructure of porous MgAl2O4 ceramics were governed by the amounts of deionized water added. The porous structure was formed by the liberation of physisorbed water and the decomposition of hydration products such as bayerite, brucite and boehmite. After determining the addition amounts of deionized water, the fabricated porous MgAl2O4 ceramics had a high apparent porosity (52.5–65.8%), a small average pore size structure (around 1–3 μm) and a relatively high compressive strength (12–28 MPa). The novel aqueous gel-casting process with easy access is expected to be a promising candidate for the preparation of Al2O3-based porous ceramics. PMID:29189734

  16. The Role of Lug Preheating, Melt Pool Temperature, and Lug Entrance Delay on the Cast-on-Strap Joining Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan, Sohrab; Nikpour, Saman; Mirjalili, Mostafa; Alagheband, Ali; Azimi, Mohammadyousef; Taji, Iman

    2017-07-01

    This work deals with effective parameters in the cast-on-strap (COS) process during which grid lugs of a lead-acid battery are joined together by a strap. The effects of lug preheating, melt pool temperature, and lug entrance delay on the quality of joints and casting defects were investigated. Lug preheating was found to propitiously reduce joint internal voids because of flux elimination. Its adverse effect on lowering lug wettability, however, made it unfavorable under the experimental conditions. The melt pool temperature also showed a two-sided effect depending on the process conditions. Raising the temperature increases the strap melt fluidity, which improves the joint contact area; however, it has a negative effect on lug wettability by flux evaporation. Besides, higher temperatures cause more lug back-melting and, hence, lower relative contact lengths. Therefore, an intermediate temperature of 683 K (410 °C) was found to make the most proper condition. Moreover, the case at which the lugs enter the mold coincident with its filling by the melt rendered the best joint quality. In this condition, the melt flows through the interlug spaces, which helps the voids to escape, resulting in the better joint interface. As the conclusion, the lug entrance time has the most effective role on joint quality, considering that lug preheating does not show any improving effect.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Porous MgAl₂O₄ Ceramics via a Novel Aqueous Gel-Casting Process.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Liu, Zongquan; Liu, Zhenli; He, Xiao; Ma, Beiyue; Zhu, Qiang; Yu, Jingkun

    2017-11-30

    A novel and aqueous gel-casting process has been successfully developed to fabricate porous MgAl₂O₄ ceramics by using hydratable alumina and MgO powders as raw materials and deionized water as hydration agent. The effects of different amounts of deionized water on the hydration properties, apparent porosity, bulk density, microstructure, pore size distribution and compressive strength of the samples were investigated. The results indicated that the porosity and the microstructure of porous MgAl₂O₄ ceramics were governed by the amounts of deionized water added. The porous structure was formed by the liberation of physisorbed water and the decomposition of hydration products such as bayerite, brucite and boehmite. After determining the addition amounts of deionized water, the fabricated porous MgAl₂O₄ ceramics had a high apparent porosity (52.5-65.8%), a small average pore size structure (around 1-3 μm) and a relatively high compressive strength (12-28 MPa). The novel aqueous gel-casting process with easy access is expected to be a promising candidate for the preparation of Al₂O₃-based porous ceramics.

  18. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Casting of Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Superalloys by HRS and LMC Directional Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xuewei; Wang, Run'nan; Xu, Qingyan; Liu, Baicheng

    2017-04-01

    Mathematical models for dynamic heat radiation and convection boundary in directional solidification processes are established to simulate the temperature fields. Cellular automaton (CA) method and Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi (KGT) growth model are used to describe nucleation and growth. Primary dendritic arm spacing (PDAS) and secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS) are calculated by the Ma-Sham (MS) and Furer-Wunderlin (FW) models respectively. The mushy zone shape is investigated based on the temperature fields, for both high-rate solidification (HRS) and liquid metal cooling (LMC) processes. The evolution of the microstructure and crystallographic orientation are analyzed by simulation and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique, respectively. Comparison of the simulation results from PDAS and SDAS with experimental results reveals a good agreement with each other. The results show that LMC process can provide both dendritic refinement and superior performance for castings due to the increased cooling rate and thermal gradient.

  19. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOEpatents

    Scheffer, Karl D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  20. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOEpatents

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  1. Effect of Friction Stir Processing on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ91C Magnesium Cast Alloy Weld Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Behzad; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Enayati, Mohammad Hossein; Sabooni, Soheil; Vallant, Rudolf

    2016-07-01

    In this study, friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to the GTAW (TIG)-welded AZ91C cast alloy to refine the microstructure and optimize the mechanical properties of the weld zone. Microstructural investigation of the samples was performed by optical microscopy and the phases in the microstructure were determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructural evaluations showed that FSP destroys the coarse dendritic microstructure. Furthermore, it dissolves the secondary hard and brittle β-Mg17Al12 phase existing at grain boundaries of the TIG weld zone. The closure and decrease in amount of porosities along with the elimination of the cracks in the microstructure were observed. These changes were followed by a significant grain refinement to an average value of 11 µm. The results showed that the hardness values increased to the mean ones, respectively, for as-cast (63 Hv), TIG weld zone (67 Hv), and stir zone (79 Hv). The yield and ultimate strength were significantly enhanced after FSP. The fractography evaluations, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicated to a transition from brittle to ductile fracture surface after applying FSP to the TIG weld zone.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow Processes in Continuous Casting: Results from the LIMMCAST-Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmel, K.; Kratzsch, C.; Asad, A.; Schurmann, D.; Schwarze, R.; Eckert, S.

    2017-07-01

    The present paper reports about numerical simulations and model experiments concerned with the fluid flow in the continuous casting process of steel. This work was carried out in the LIMMCAST project in the framework of the Helmholtz alliance LIMTECH. A brief description of the LIMMCAST facilities used for the experimental modeling at HZDR is given here. Ultrasonic and inductive techniques and the X-ray radioscopy were employed for flow measurements or visualizations of two-phase flow regimes occurring in the submerged entry nozzle and the mold. Corresponding numerical simulations were performed at TUBAF taking into account the dimensions and properties of the model experiments. Numerical models were successfully validated using the experimental data base. The reasonable and in many cases excellent agreement of numerical with experimental data allows to extrapolate the models to real casting configurations. Exemplary results will be presented here showing the effect of electromagnetic brakes or electromagnetic stirrers on the flow in the mold or illustrating the properties of two-phase flows resulting from an Ar injection through the stopper rod.

  3. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  4. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  5. Process-scale modelling of microstructure in direct chill casting of aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedel, M.; Heyvaert, L.; Založnik, M.; Combeau, H.; Daloz, D.; Lesoult, G.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of an alloy being related to its microstructure, the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the grain structure formation in direct chill casting is crucial. However, the grain size prediction by modelling is difficult since a variety of multi-scale coupled phenomena have to be considered. Nucleation and growth of the grains are interrelated, and the macroscopic transport phenomena such as the motion of grains and inoculant particles with the flow impact the nucleation-gowth competition. Thus we propose to study the grain size distribution of a 5182 alloy industrial scale slab of 510 mm thickness, both non-inoculated and inoculated with Al-3Ti-1B, for which experimental grain size measurements are available. We use a volume-averaged two-phase multi-scale model that describes nucleation from inoculant particles and grain growth, fully coupled with macroscopic transport phenomena: fluid flow induced by natural convection and solidification shrinkage, heat, mass and solute mass transport, grains and inoculant particles motion. We analyze the effect of liquid and grain motion as the effect of grain morphology on microstructure formation and we show in which extent those phenomena are responsible for the grain size distribution observed experimentally. The effect of the refiner level is also studied.

  6. HFIR Fuel Casting Support

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul Jacob; Solis, Eunice Martinez

    Process exploration for fuel production for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using cast LEU-10wt.%Mo as an initial processing step has just begun. This project represents the first trials concerned with casting design and quality. The studies carried out over the course of this year and information contained in this report address the initial mold development to be used as a starting point for future operations. In broad terms, the final billet design is that of a solid rolling blank with an irregular octagonal cross section. The work covered here is a comprehensive view of the initial attempts to producemore » a sound casting. This report covers the efforts to simulate, predict, cast, inspect, and revise the initial mold design.« less

  7. Working capital management in the process of financial support of investment and construction projects and of the construction material industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilochkina, Nadezhda; Lukmanova, Inessa; Roshchina, Olga; Voytolovskiy, Nikolay

    2018-03-01

    The article presents the analysis of working capital in the process of financial support of high-rise construction investment projects. The factors influencing the choice of the working capital management model were analyzed, the reasons of the change in the requirement for the values of current assets in the process of construction of high-rise facilities were determined. The author has developed the scheme of interrelation between production, operational and financial activity cycles of enterprises implementing investment projects of unique buildings and structures and made a comparative description of their financing sources.

  8. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  9. Use of Friction Stir Processing for Improving Heat-Affected Zone Liquation Cracking Resistance of a Cast Magnesium Alloy AZ91D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, G. M.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a cast magnesium alloy AZ91D was friction stir processed. Detailed microstructural studies and Gleeble hot ductility tests were conducted on the as-cast and the FSPed samples to comparatively assess their heat-affected zone liquation cracking behavior. The results show that the use of FSP as a pretreatment to fusion welding can strikingly improve the heat-affected zone liquation cracking resistance of alloy AZ91D by reducing the amount and size of the low-melting eutectic β (Mg17Al12) as well as by refining the matrix grain size.

  10. A comparison of the accuracy of patterns processed from an inlay casting wax, an auto-polymerized resin and a light-cured resin pattern material.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Praveen; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena A

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, inlay casting waxes have been used to fabricate patterns for castings. Newer resin pattern materials offer greater rigidity and strength, allowing easier laboratory and intraoral adjustment without the fear of pattern damage. They also claim to possess a greater dimensional stability when compared to inlay wax. This study attempted to determine and compare the marginal accuracy of patterns fabricated from an inlay casting wax, an autopolymerized pattern resin and a light polymerized pattern resin on storage off the die for varying time intervals. Ten patterns each were fabricated from an inlay casting wax (GC Corp., Tokyo, Japan), an autopolymerized resin pattern material (Pattern resin, GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan) and a light-cured resin pattern material (Palavit GLC, Hereaus Kulzer GmbH, Germany). The completed patterns were stored off the die at room temperature. Marginal gaps were evaluated by reseating the patterns on their respective dies and observing it under a stereomicroscope at 1, 12, and 24 h intervals after pattern fabrication. The results revealed that the inlay wax showed a significantly greater marginal discrepancy at the 12 and 24 h intervals. The autopolymerized resin showed an initial (at 1 h) marginal discrepancy slightly greater than inlay wax, but showed a significantly less marginal gap (as compared to inlay wax) at the other two time intervals. The light-cured resin proved to be significantly more dimensionally stable, and showed minimal change during the storage period. The resin pattern materials studied, undergo a significantly less dimensional change than the inlay waxes on prolonged storage. They would possibly be a better alternative to inlay wax in situations requiring high precision or when delayed investment (more than 1 h) of patterns can be expected.

  11. An experimental AWTS process and comparisons of ONERA T2 and 0.3-m TCT AWTS data for the ONERA CAST-10 aerofoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen; Jenkins, Renaldo

    1989-01-01

    An experimental Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS) process is described. Comparisons of the ONERA T2 and the 0.3-m TCT (transonic cryogenic tunnel) AWTS data for the ONERA CAST-10 airfoil are presented. Most of the 0.3-m TCT data is new and preliminary and no sidewall boundary layer control is involved. No conclusions are given.

  12. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS asmore » a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.« less

  13. Development of Casting Process for Pressings of Pistons of Car Augmented Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, V. F.; Denisov, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Results of a study aimed at formation of a single-phase fine-grained structure in pistons during their production process involving isostatic pressing of liquid metal prior to the start of crystallization, pressing of the crystallizing metal, and holding under pressure in the process of cooling to the shop temperature are presented.

  14. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  15. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M [Livermore, CA; Sampayan, Stephen [Manteca, CA; Slenes, Kirk [Albuquerque, NM; Stoller, H M [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  16. The Design and Construction Process of a Test Stand for Casting the Power Steering’S Housing with the Use of the Pdcpd Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Grabowski, Ł.

    2018-01-01

    The use of new technologies and materials in various industries is a natural process that is directly related to the very high rate of development of these technologies. Certain industries decide to much faster introduce new technologies and materials. One of such branches is the automotive industry, whose representatives are very energetically looking for both financial savings and savings resulting from the vehicles mass reduction. An economically justified approach to construction materials is leading the search for new solutions and materials. The use of a modern material such as the two-component PDCPD composite shows hitherto unknown possibilities of producing subassemblies of many different constructions. The possibility of using a modern composite material with parameters comparable to that of metals and significantly lighter, can be an excellent alternative in the selection of materials for many parts of motor vehicles. The potentiality of precise casting of tolerated surfaces will allow to reduce the operations related to machining process, which is an indispensable part of the production process of elements that are cast of metal. This article describes the process of designing and building a test stand for precise positioning of power steering gear components at the stage of casting their housing. The article presents the principle of operation of the test stand and the process of preparation for the casting and the cast itself will be rudely described. Due to the implementation of research as part of a research project with an industrial partner, the article will only describe some operations. This is related to the confidentiality of the project.

  17. Microstructural Evolution and Local Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Processed Mg-3Gd-1Zn Cast Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbaghian, M.; Mahmudi, R.

    2016-05-01

    Microstructural evolution, hardness, and shear strength of the cast plates of GZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated after friction stir processing (FSP). Due to severe plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, FSP breaks the dendrites and results in a fine homogenous structure in the stirred zone (SZ) having average grain sizes of about 4.0 and 2.5 μm in the one and two-pass FSPed plates, respectively. As a novel approach, strength of the processed plates was examined by shear punch testing in three regions of the SZ on the surface layer, namely, center line (CL), retreating side (RS), and advancing side (AS). FSP showed great potential in the enhancement of SZ ultimate shear strength from 114 to about 152 and 155 MPa in the one and two-pass FSPed materials, respectively. The same trend was observed in hardness values of the SZ, where the average hardness of the base material increased from 41 to 60 and 68 Vickers after one and two passes of FSP, respectively. The variations in the shear strength of the CL, RS, and AS zones of the SZ were about 5% for the first pass of FSP, the effect which was decreased to less than 2% after two passes of FSP.

  18. Analysis of Porosity Defects in Aluminum as Part Handle Motor Vehicle Lever Processed by High-pressure Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggraini, L.; Sugeng

    2018-05-01

    This research discusses the testing and analysis of cracking Aluminum (Al) material. Al as a handle lever was used for a braking device on a motor vehicle. Cracking of handle lever due to the part content of porosity from hydrogen gas. The existence of the H2 can be caused by the casting process and dies design that is less perfect, especially at the gate or brisket and overflow. This research is to optimize the process of making Al part handle lever, and the construction dies by following the standard. The results of these improvements were reevaluated through the chemical and mechanical testing properties stages, such as density test and tensile test on the workpiece as part handle lever. The loads on the tensile test are 25 kg and 35 kg, and the tensile test result has met the standard set by the motor vehicle company. The optimization result has the porosity defect can be reduced by 99 %. Therefore the best part handle lever can be produced.

  19. Friction Stir Processing of As-Cast AA5083: Superplastic Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    3 A. ALUMINUM ALLOY 5083............................................................................3 B. SUPERPLASTICITY...ALUMINUM ALLOY 5083 The United States Navy is always considering the most effective and cost effective materials and manufacturing processes. These...desires have lead to a long-term interest in aluminum alloys for naval shipbuilding and design. The 5 -series aluminum alloys (Al-Mg system) are widely

  20. Microstructure and Properties of Cobalt-and Zinc-Containing Magnetic Magnesium Alloys Processed by High-Pressure Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Christian; Demminger, Christian; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    The inherent magnetic properties of lightweight alloys based on magnesium and cobalt offer a novel way in order to measure mechanical loads throughout the entire structural component using the magnetoelastic effect. Because the solubility of cobalt in the magnesium matrix is negligible, the magnetic properties mainly originate from Co-rich precipitates. Thus, the size and distribution of Co-containing phases within the alloy's microstructure wields a major influence on the amplitude of the load-sensitive properties which can be measured by employing the harmonic analysis of eddy-current signals. In this study, Mg-Co-based alloys are produced by several casting methods which allow the application of different cooling rates, e.g. gravity die casting and high-pressure die casting. The differences between the manufactured alloys' micro- and phase structures are compared depending on the applied cooling rate and the superior magnetic and mechanical properties of the high-pressure die cast material are demonstrated.

  1. The Decision-Making Process for Families Investing in Higher Education: A Family Systems Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Erin M.

    2017-01-01

    When families consider investing in their children's education they must weigh the perceived costs against the potential benefits, which becomes increasingly difficult as the cost of higher education continues to rise. Using a family systems approach, this phenomenological study explored the central research question, "How do families…

  2. Application of the lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of the mold filling process in the casting industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szucki, Michal; Suchy, J. S.; Lelito, J.; Malinowski, P.; Sobczyk, J.

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this work is the development of the lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of the mold filling process. The authors present a simplified approach to the modeling of liquid metal-gas flows with particular emphasis on the interactions between these phases. The boundary condition for momentum transfer of the moving free surface to the gaseous phase is shown. Simultaneously, the method for modeling influence of gas back pressure on a position and shape of the interfacial boundary is explained in details. The problem of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) stability is also analyzed. Since large differences in viscosity of both fluids are a source of the model instability, the so-called fractional step (FS) method allowing to improve the computation stability is applied. The presented solution is verified on the bases of the available reference data and the results of experiments. It is shown that the model describes properly such effects as: gas bubbles formation and air back pressure, accompanying liquid-gas flows in the casting mold. At the same time the proposed approach is easy to be implemented and characterized by a lower demand of operating memory as compared to typical LBM models of two-phase flows.

  3. Tribological Characteristics of Submicron SiC(p)-GR(p)/Zn-35Al-1Mg Composites in Semisolidification Casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Fang, Z. W.; Li, L. X.

    2018-05-01

    Uniform SiC(p)-GR(p)/Zn-35Al-1Mg composites were prepared by powder pressing and semisolidification stirring-casting process by adding submicron silicon carbide and graphite reinforcement particles in an aluminum-zinc alloy matrix. Micro Vickers hardness and microstructures of the novel composites were studied, and their wear properties and wear temperature were measured for different load and friction conditions. The results show that silicon carbide and graphite particles homogeneously mix in the matrix, while contained silicon carbide particles improve the matrix hardness to 8.4%, graphite improves the matrix hardness to 16.8%, but two of them, combined, reduce the matrix hardness to 7.6%; the rate of temperature rise of the zinc-aluminum matrix alloy is the highest than the other three composites and is up to 48.5° C/s at 1.69MPa. At 0.56MPa and sliding 26.4km, the graphite composite anti-wear effect is optimal, while at 1.13MPa, the wear resistance of silicon carbide and graphite compound particles is the best; in the other case of only silicon carbide particles, the wear resistance is increased to 35% at 1.69MPa and 26.4km, and its anti-wear effects are excellent.

  4. Paper Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrasjid, Dorine A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an art project, based on the work of artist Chew Teng Beng, in the molding of wet paper on a plaster cast to create embossed paper designs. The values of such a project are outlined, including a note that its tactile approach makes it suitable to visually handicapped students. (SJL)

  5. CASTING FURNACES

    DOEpatents

    Ruppel, R.H.; Winters, C.E.

    1961-01-01

    A device is described for casting uranium which comprises a crucible, a rotatable table holding a plurality of molds, and a shell around both the crucible and the table. The bottom of the crucible has an eccentrically arranged pouring hole aligned with one of the molds at a time. The shell can be connected with a vacuum.

  6. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  7. Integrated Assessment and Improvement of the Quality Assurance System for the Cosworth Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, Dilon

    The purpose of this study was to improve the Quality Assurance (QA) System at the Nemak Windsor Aluminum Plant (WAP). The project used Six Sigma method based on Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC). Analysis of in process melt at WAP was based on chemical, thermal, and mechanical testing. The control limits for the W319 Al Alloy were statistically recalculated using the composition measured under stable conditions. The "Chemistry Viewer" software was developed for statistical analysis of alloy composition. This software features the Silicon Equivalency (SiBQ) developed by the IRC. The Melt Sampling Device (MSD) was designed and evaluated at WAP to overcome traditional sampling limitations. The Thermal Analysis "Filters" software was developed for cooling curve analysis of the 3XX Al Alloy(s) using IRC techniques. The impact of low melting point impurities on the start of melting was evaluated using the Universal Metallurgical Simulator and Analyzer (UMSA).

  8. Casting methods

    DOEpatents

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  9. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  10. Method For Removing Volatile Components From A Gel-Cast Ceramic Article

    DOEpatents

    Klug, Frederic Joseph; DeCarr, Sylvia Marie

    2004-09-07

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  11. Improved Slip Casting Of Ceramic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Vasquez, Peter; Hicks, Lana P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique of investment slip casting developed for making precise ceramic wind-tunnel models. Needed in wind-tunnel experiments to verify predictions of aerothermodynamical computer codes. Ceramic materials used because of their low heat conductivities and ability to survive high temperatures. Present improved slip-casting technique enables casting of highly detailed models from aqueous or nonaqueous solutions. Wet shell molds peeled off models to ensure precise and undamaged details. Used at NASA Langley Research Center to form superconducting ceramic components from nonaqueous slip solutions. Technique has many more applications when ceramic materials developed further for such high-strength/ temperature components as engine parts.

  12. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kinds of Casts? Most casts are made of fiberglass. Fiberglass is a kind of plastic that can be ... to the body part. It dries hard. Some fiberglass casts are waterproof. Doctors only use this type ...

  13. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze casting is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze casting can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-cast materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  14. The effect of casting conditions on the biaxial flexural strength of glass-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A; Shareef, M Y; Walsh, J M; Hatton, P V; van Noort, R; Hill, R G

    1998-11-01

    To assess the effect of mould and glass casting temperatures on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of two different types of castable glass-ceramic, using existing laboratory equipment and techniques. Two castable glass-ceramic materials were evaluated. One glass (LG3) is based on SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-CaO-CaF2, and is similar in composition to glasses used in the manufacture of glass-ionomer cements. The other glass (SG3) is based on SiO2-K2O-Na2O-CaO-CaF2, and is a canasite-based material. Both materials were used to produce discs of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness using the same lost-wax casting process as used for metal castings. Mould temperatures of between 500 degrees C and 1000 degrees C and glass casting temperatures of between 1100 degrees C and 1450 degrees C were evaluated. The cast discs were cerammed and the biaxial flexural strength determined with a Lloyd 2000 R tester. A significant difference was found for the BFS in the range of mould temperatures evaluated, with the optimum investment mould temperature being 590 degrees C for LG3 and 610 degrees C for SG3 (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.019, respectively). No significant differences were seen between any of the glass casting temperatures evaluated. The mould temperature for castable glass-ceramic materials produced using the lost-wax casting process can have a significant effect on BFS. The optimum mould temperature may differ slightly depending on the type of material being used. The glass casting temperature of these materials does not appear to have a significant effect on BFS.

  15. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  16. Laser surface texturing of cast iron steel: dramatic edge burr reduction and high speed process optimisation for industrial production using DPSS picosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneel, David; Kearsley, Andrew; Karnakis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present picosecond DPSS laser surface texturing optimisation of automotive grade cast iron steel. This application attracts great interest, particularly in the automotive industry, to reduce friction between moving piston parts in car engines, in order to decrease fuel consumption. This is accomplished by partially covering with swallow microgrooves the inner surface of a piston liner and is currently a production process adopting much longer pulse (microsecond) DPSS lasers. Lubricated interface conditions of moving parts require from the laser process to produce a very strictly controlled surface topography around the laser formed grooves, whose edge burr height must be lower than 100 nm. To achieve such a strict tolerance, laser machining of cast iron steel was investigated using an infrared DPSS picosecond laser (10ps duration) with an output power of 16W and a repetition rate of 200 kHz. The ultrashort laser is believed to provide a much better thermal management of the etching process. All studies presented here were performed on flat samples in ambient air but the process is transferrable to cylindrical geometry engine liners. We will show that reducing significantly the edge burr below an acceptable limit for lubricated engine production is possible using such lasers and remarkably the process window lies at very high irradiated fluences much higher that the single pulse ablation threshold. This detailed experimental work highlights the close relationship between the optimised laser irradiation conditions as well as the process strategy with the final size of the undesirable edge burrs. The optimised process conditions are compatible with an industrial production process and show the potential for removing extra post)processing steps (honing, etc) of cylinder liners on the manufacturing line saving time and cost.

  17. Effect of processing parameters on the earing and mechanical properties of strip cast type 3004 Al alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Said, O. S.; Zeihen, A.; Ruprich, M.; Quattrocchi, J.; Thomas, M.; H. Shin, K.; O'Brien, M.; Johansen, D.; Tijoe, W. H.; Ruhl, D.

    1995-06-01

    Electrical resistivity, superficial hardness, tensile testing, and quantitative metallography techniques were used in this study. The strip cast type 3004 aluminum alloy received sixteen different thermomechanical treatments before cups were drawn. The top edges of the drawn cups were not flat. Rather there were high points or ears with valleys between them. The homogenization temperature varied form 510 to 621 °C at 24 h. Some samples received an additional 426 °C/24 h homogenization anneal. Most specimens were rolled along the longitudinal direction of the as-cast material, and some were rolled in the transverse direction. Most samples were recrystallized at 454 °C for 24 h in addition to the homogenization treatment. Some were recrystallized for 168 h. All samples were subsequently rolled to 0.33 mm for cup drawing and percent earing determination. The percent earing results of some samples were less than 1.5%, but the mechanical strength was also lowered. The high-temperature recrystallization anneal of 454 °C was the controlling factor in determining the earing and mechanical strength of the final rolled sheet.

  18. Effect of processing parameters on the earing and mechanical properties of strip cast type 3004 Al alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Said, O. S.; Zeihen, A.; Ruprich, M.; Quattrocchi, J.; Thomas, M.; Shin, K. H.; O'Brien, M.; Johansen, D.; Tijoe, W. H.; Ruhl, D.

    1994-02-01

    Electrical resistivity, superficial hardness, tensile testing, and quantitative metallography techniques were used in this study. The strip cast type 3004 aluminum alloy received sixteen different thermomechanical treatments before cups were drawn. The top edges of the drawn cups were not flat. Rather, there were high points or ears with valleys between them. The homogenization temperature varied from 510 to 621 °C at 24 h. Some samples received an additional 426 °C/24 h homogenization anneal. Most specimens were rolled along the longitudinal direction of the as-cast material, and some were rolled in the transverse direction. Most samples were recrystallized at 454 °C for 24 h in addition to the homogenization treatment. Some were recrystallized for 168 h. All samples were subsequently rolled to 0.33 mm for cup drawing and percent earing determination. The percent earing results of some samples were less than 1.5%, but the mechanical strength was also lowered. The high-temperature recrystallization anneal of 454 °C was the controlling factor in determining the earing and mechanical strength of the final rolled sheet.

  19. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting formmore » of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.« less

  20. A Political Investment: Revisiting Race and Racism in the Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollock, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws upon a two-year Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded study into the educational strategies of the black middle classes to examine the role of race and racism in the research process. Specifically, it explores how my political positioning and experiences of racism, as a black female scholar, shaped not only my…

  1. Effect of Starting As-cast Structure on the Microstructure-Texture Evolution During Subsequent Processing and Finally Ridging Behavior of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Pranabananda; Patra, Sudipta; Mitra, Rahul; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2018-03-01

    Effect of the initial as-cast structure on the microstructure-texture evolution during thermomechanical processing of 409L grade ferritic stainless steel was studied. Samples from the regions of cast slab having `columnar,' `equiaxed,' and a mixture of `columnar' and `equiaxed' grains were subjected to two different processing schedules: one with intermediate hot-band annealing before cold-rolling followed by final annealing, and another without any hot-band annealing. EBSD study reveals that large columnar crystals with cube orientation are very difficult to deform and recrystallize uniformly. Resultant variations in ferrite grain structure and retention of cube-textured band in cold-rolled and annealed sheet contribute to ridging behavior during stretch forming. Initial equiaxed grain structure is certainly beneficial to reduce or even eliminate ridging defect by producing uniform ferrite grain structure, free from any texture banding. Application of hot-band annealing treatment is also advantageous as it can maximize the evolution of beneficial gamma-fiber texture and eliminate the ridging defect in case of completely `equiaxed' starting structure. Such treatment reduces the severity of ridging even if the initial structure contains typically mixed `columnar-equiaxed' grains.

  2. Effect of Starting As-cast Structure on the Microstructure-Texture Evolution During Subsequent Processing and Finally Ridging Behavior of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Pranabananda; Patra, Sudipta; Mitra, Rahul; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2018-06-01

    Effect of the initial as-cast structure on the microstructure-texture evolution during thermomechanical processing of 409L grade ferritic stainless steel was studied. Samples from the regions of cast slab having `columnar,' `equiaxed,' and a mixture of `columnar' and `equiaxed' grains were subjected to two different processing schedules: one with intermediate hot-band annealing before cold-rolling followed by final annealing, and another without any hot-band annealing. EBSD study reveals that large columnar crystals with cube orientation are very difficult to deform and recrystallize uniformly. Resultant variations in ferrite grain structure and retention of cube-textured band in cold-rolled and annealed sheet contribute to ridging behavior during stretch forming. Initial equiaxed grain structure is certainly beneficial to reduce or even eliminate ridging defect by producing uniform ferrite grain structure, free from any texture banding. Application of hot-band annealing treatment is also advantageous as it can maximize the evolution of beneficial gamma-fiber texture and eliminate the ridging defect in case of completely `equiaxed' starting structure. Such treatment reduces the severity of ridging even if the initial structure contains typically mixed `columnar-equiaxed' grains.

  3. Investigation on the Effect of Mold Constraints and Cooling Rate on Residual Stress During the Sand-Casting Process of 1086 Steel by Employing a Thermomechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghani, Amir; Davami, Parviz; Varahram, Naser; Shabani, Mohsen Ostad

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the effects of mold constraints and cooling rate on residual stress were analyzed during the shaped casting process. For this purpose, an H-shaped sample was designed in which the contraction of its middle portion is highly restricted by the mold during the cooling process. The effects of an increasing cooling rate combined with mold constraints were analyzed by reducing the thickness of the middle portion in the second sample. A three-dimensional coupled temperature-displacement analysis was performed in finite-element code ABAQUS to simulate residual stress distribution, and then numerical results were verified by the hole-drilling strain-gauge method. It was concluded that the mold constraints have a greater effect on the values of residual stress than the cooling rate (thin section) in steel sand casting. Increasing the cooling rate would increase the amount of residual stress, only in the presence of mold constraints. It is also suggested that employing the elastic-plastic stress model for the sand mold will satisfy the experimental results and avoid exaggerated values of residual stress in simulation.

  4. Evaluation of three variables affecting the casting of base metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Wight, T A; Grisius, R J; Gaugler, R W

    1980-04-01

    All the vented samples with sprue widths of 2 mm or more were defect free, whereas the corresponding unvented samples had extensive voids and porosity in all but one casting. All castings with a sprue width of 1 mm were defective regardless of whether or not vents were used. The thickness of the investment above the pattern had no effect on casting results.

  5. Investment Avenues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Priyanka

    2012-11-01

    Investors are a heterogeneous group, they may be large or small, rich or poor, expert or lay man and not all investors need equal degree of protection (Mayya, 1996). An investor has three objectives while investing his money, namely safety of invested money, liquidity position of invested money and return on investment. The return on investment may further be divided into capital gain and the rate of return on investment as interest or dividend. Among all investment options available, securities are considered the most challenging as well as rewarding. Securities include shares, debentures, derivatives, units of mutual funds, Government securities etc. An investor may be an individual or corporate legal entity investing funds with a view to derive maximum economic advantage from investment such as rate of return, capital appreciation, marketability, tax advantage and convenience of investment.The Capital market facilitates mobilization of savings of individuals and pools them into reservoir of capital which can be used for the economic development of a country. An efficient capital market is essential for raising capital by the corporate sector of the economy and for the protection of the interest of investors in corporate securities. There arises a need to strike a balance between raising of capital for economic development on one side and protection of investors on the other. Unless the interests of investors are protected, raising of capital, by corporates is not possible. Like, the primary objective of a senior citizenís asset allocation is the generation of regular income.

  6. Modern technologies of processing municipal solid waste: investing in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantseva, A.; Berezyuk, M.; Savchenko, N.; Rumyantseva, E.

    2017-06-01

    The problem of effective municipal solid waste (MSW) management is known to all the municipal entities of the Russian Federation. The problem is multifaceted and complex. The article analyzes the dynamics of municipal solid waste formation and its utilization within the territory of the EU and Russia. The authors of the paper suggest a project of a plant for processing municipal solid waste into a combustible gas with the help of high temperature pyrolysis. The main indicators of economic efficiency are calculated.

  7. A novel method to reduce time investment when processing videos from camera trap studies.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Kristijn R R; Reijniers, Jonas; Breno, Matteo; Leirs, Herwig

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps have proven very useful in ecological, conservation and behavioral research. Camera traps non-invasively record presence and behavior of animals in their natural environment. Since the introduction of digital cameras, large amounts of data can be stored. Unfortunately, processing protocols did not evolve as fast as the technical capabilities of the cameras. We used camera traps to record videos of Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber). However, a large number of recordings did not contain the target species, but instead empty recordings or other species (together non-target recordings), making the removal of these recordings unacceptably time consuming. In this paper we propose a method to partially eliminate non-target recordings without having to watch the recordings, in order to reduce workload. Discrimination between recordings of target species and non-target recordings was based on detecting variation (changes in pixel values from frame to frame) in the recordings. Because of the size of the target species, we supposed that recordings with the target species contain on average much more movements than non-target recordings. Two different filter methods were tested and compared. We show that a partial discrimination can be made between target and non-target recordings based on variation in pixel values and that environmental conditions and filter methods influence the amount of non-target recordings that can be identified and discarded. By allowing a loss of 5% to 20% of recordings containing the target species, in ideal circumstances, 53% to 76% of non-target recordings can be identified and discarded. We conclude that adding an extra processing step in the camera trap protocol can result in large time savings. Since we are convinced that the use of camera traps will become increasingly important in the future, this filter method can benefit many researchers, using it in different contexts across the globe, on both videos and photographs.

  8. Electroslag Treatment of Liquid Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, V. A.

    2018-01-01

    The processes that occur in the liquid metal-slag system during electroslag treatment of cast iron are studied from an electrochemical standpoint. The role of electrolysis in the electroslag process is shown, and a method for producing high-strength cast iron with globular graphite using electrolysis of a slag containing magnesium oxides and fluorides is proposed and tested.

  9. A novel highly porous ceramic foam with efficient thermal insulation and high temperature resistance properties fabricated by gel-casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiahong; Wang, Guixiang; Tang, Di; Qiu, Ya; Sun, Nali; Liu, Wenqiao

    2018-01-01

    The design of super thermal insulation and high-temperature resistant materials for high temperature furnaces is crucial due to the energy crisis and the huge wasting. Although it is told that numerous studies have been reported about various of thermal insulation materials prepared by different methods, the applications of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic foams fabricated through tert-butyl alcohol (TBA)-based gel-casting process in bulk thermal isolators were barely to seen. In this paper, highly porous yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic foams were fabricated by a novel gel-casting method using tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as solvent and pore-forming agent. Different raw material ratio, sintering temperature and soaking time were all investigated to achieve optimal thermal insulation and mechanical properties. We can conclude that porosity drops gradually while compressive strength increases significantly with the rising temperature from 1000-1500°C. With prolonged soaking time, there is no obvious change in porosity but compressive strength increases gradually. All specimens have uniformly distributed pores with average size of 0.5-2μm and show good structural stability at high temperature. The final obtained ceramic foams displayed an outstanding ultra-low thermal conductivity property with only 200.6 °C in cold surface while the hot side was 1000 °C (hold 60 min to keep thermal balance before testing) at the thickness of 10 mm.

  10. Mathematical Modeling of High-Temperature Constitutive Equations and Hot Processing Maps for As-Cast SA508-3 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Dashan; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Lingling; Gao, Liang; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-11-01

    The hot deformation behavior and hot workability characteristics of as-cast SA508-3 steel were studied by modeling the constitutive equations and developing hot processing maps. The isothermal compression experiments were carried out at temperatures of 950°C, 1050°C, 1150°C, and 1250°C and strain rates of 0.001 s-1, 0.01 s-1, 0.1 s-1, and 1 s-1 respectively. The two-stage flow stress models were established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening, and the solution of activation energy for hot deformation was 355.0 kJ mol-1 K-1. Based on the dynamic material model, the power dissipation and instability maps were developed separately at strains of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. The power dissipation rate increases with both the increase of temperature and the decrease of strain rate, and the instable region mainly appears on the conditions of low temperature and high strain rate. The optimal hot working parameters for as-cast SA508-3 steel are 1050-1200°C/0.001-0.1 s-1, with about 25-40% peak efficiency of power dissipation.

  11. Fracture Analysis of Cast Steel Sling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghui

    2018-02-01

    The fracture reasons of ZG270-500 cast steel sling are analyzed through such means as macroscopic morphology analysis, chemical composition analysis, and microscopic metallography analysis. Results: coarse Widmanstatten structure and casting defects occurring in casting and subsequent heat treatment process reduce the strength, plasticity and toughness of the steel, which is the main reason of brittle fracture of the sling during work, and corresponding improvement suggestions are proposed herein.

  12. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  13. Federal Investment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sheila; Tawil, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    The federal government pays for a wide range of goods and services that are expected to be useful some years in the future. Those purchases, called investment, fall into three categories: physical capital, research and development (R&D), and education and training. There are several economic rationales for federal investment. It can provide…

  14. Environment, Trade, and Investment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environment, trade, and investment are fundamentally linked as the environment provides many basic inputs of economic activity – forests, fisheries, metals, minerals – as well as the energy used to process those materials.

  15. Quality Management and Control of Low Pressure Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dianxi; Zhang, Yanbo; Yang, Xiufan; Chen, Zhaosong; Jiang, Zelan

    2018-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the history of low pressure casting and summarizes the major production processes of low pressure casting. It briefly introduces the quality management and control of low pressure cast aluminum alloy. The main processes include are: preparation of raw materials, Melting, refining, physical and chemical analysis, K-mode inspection, sand core, mold, heat treatment and so on.

  16. Improved ceramic slip casting technique. [application to aircraft model fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A primary concern in modern fluid dynamics research is the experimental verification of computational aerothermodynamic codes. This research requires high precision and detail in the test model employed. Ceramic materials are used for these models because of their low heat conductivity and their survivability at high temperatures. To fabricate such models, slip casting techniques were developed to provide net-form, precision casting capability for high-purity ceramic materials in aqueous solutions. In previous slip casting techniques, block, or flask molds made of plaster-of-paris were used to draw liquid from the slip material. Upon setting, parts were removed from the flask mold and cured in a kiln at high temperatures. Casting detail was usually limited with this technique -- detailed parts were frequently damaged upon separation from the flask mold, as the molded parts are extremely delicate in the uncured state, and the flask mold is inflexible. Ceramic surfaces were also marred by 'parting lines' caused by mold separation. This adversely affected the aerodynamic surface quality of the model as well. (Parting lines are invariably necessary on or near the leading edges of wings, nosetips, and fins for mold separation. These areas are also critical for flow boundary layer control.) Parting agents used in the casting process also affected surface quality. These agents eventually soaked into the mold, the model, or flaked off when releasing the case model. Different materials were tried, such as oils, paraffin, and even an algae. The algae released best, but some of it remained on the model and imparted an uneven texture and discoloration on the model surface when cured. According to the present invention, a wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell

  17. How to convince your manager to invest in an HIS preimplementation methodology for appraisal of material, process and human costs and benefits.

    PubMed Central

    Bossard, B.; Renard, J. M.; Capelle, P.; Paradis, P.; Beuscart, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    Investing in information technology has become a crucial process in hospital management today. Medical and administrative managers are faced with difficulties in measuring medical information technology costs and benefits due to the complexity of the domain. This paper proposes a preimplementation methodology for evaluating and appraising material, process and human costs and benefits. Based on the users needs and organizational process analysis, the methodology provides an evaluative set of financial and non financial indicators which can be integrated in a decision making and investment evaluation process. We describe the first results obtained after a few months of operation for the Computer-Based Patient Record (CPR) project. Its full acceptance, in spite of some difficulties, encourages us to diffuse the method for the entire project. PMID:11079851

  18. An investigation of squeeze-cast alloy 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Alloy 718 billets produced by the squeeze-cast process have been evaluated for use as potential replacements for propulsion engine components which are normally produced from forgings. Alloy 718 billets were produced using various processing conditions. Structural characterizations were performed on 'as-cast' billets. As-cast billets were then homogenized and solution treated and aged according to conventional heat-treatment practices for this alloy. Mechanical property evaluations were performed on heat-treated billets. As-cast macrostructures and microstructures varied with squeeze-cast processing parameters. Mechanical properties varied with squeeze-cast processing parameters and heat treatments. One billet exhibited a defect free, refined microstructure, with mechanical properties approaching those of wrought alloy 718 bar, confirming the feasibility of squeeze-casting alloy 718. However, further process optimization is required, and further structural and mechanical property improvements are expected with process optimization.

  19. The Tensile and Shear Bond Strengths of Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) Processed on Electrolytically Etched Ticonium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    METHYL NETHACRYLATE) PROCESSED ON ELECTROLYTICALLY ETCHED TICONIUM A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of The University of Texas Graduate School of...were cast utilizing the manufacturer’s directions for investment, burnout , and casting. Two groups of metal specimens were prepared: 20 for...STRENGTHS OF POLY (METHYL METHACRYLATE) PROCESSED ON ELECTROLYTICALLY ETCHED TICONIUM JOHN EDWARD ZURASKY, M.S. The University of Texas Graduate School

  20. Ohno continuous casting

    SciTech Connect

    Soda, H.; McLean, A.; Motoyasu, G.

    1995-04-01

    Production of net-shape products directly from the liquid is an attractive manufacturing route for alloys that are difficult to process or that cannot be rolled, drawn, or extruded. Developed at the Chiba Institute of Technology in Japan, the Ohno Continuous Casting (OCC) approach not only provides significant cost savings, but also has the potential to create new products. OCC process equipment includes a melting furnace, crucible, mold level-control block, cooling device, and pinch rolls. OCC is currently used to produce copper rods and wires for audio and video cables, and aluminum alloy welding rods for hard-surfacing applications. For example, Mitsuimore » Engineering and Ship Building Co. has used OCC to produce copper tubing products with internal fins and partitions for applications such as heat exchanger tubes and induction coils.« less

  1. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  2. Application of TRIZ Theory in Patternless Casting Manufacturing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Gan, Dequan; Jiang, Ping; Tian, Yumei

    The ultimate goal of Patternless Casting Manufacturing (referred to as PCM) is how to obtain the casts by casting the sand mold directly. In the previous PCM, the resin content of sand mold is much higher than that required by traditional resin sand, so the casts obtained are difficult to be sound and qualified products, which limits the application of this technique greatly. In this paper, the TRIZ algorithm is introduced to the innovation process in PCM systematically.

  3. Glovebox Advanced Casting System Casting Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, Randall Sidney

    2016-03-01

    Casting optimization in the GACS included three broad areas; casting of U-10Zr pins, incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier, and development of a permanent crucible coating. U-10Zr casting was improved over last year’s results by modifying the crucible design to minimize contact with the colder mold. Through these modifications casting of a three pin batch was successful. Incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier also was optimized through furnace chamber pressure changes during the casting cycle to reduce gas pressures in the mold cavities which led to three full length pins being cast which incorporated FCCI barriers of three different thicknesses.more » Permanent crucible coatings were tested against a base case; 1500°C for 10 minutes in a U-20Pu-10Zr molten alloy. None of the candidate coating materials showed evidence of failure upon initial visual examination. In all areas of work a large amount of characterization will be needed to fully determine the effects of the optimization activities. The characterization activities and future work will occur next year.« less

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Anode-Supported YSZ Thin Film Electrolyte by Co-Tape Casting and Co-Sintering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. L.; Fu, C. J.; Chan, S. H.; Pasciak, G.

    2011-06-01

    In this study, a co-tape casting and co-sintering process has been developed to prepare yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte films supported on Ni-YSZ anode substrates in order to substantially reduce the fabrication cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Through proper control of the process, the anode/electrolyte bilayer structures with a size of 7.8cm × 7.8cm were achieved with good flatness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation indicated that the YSZ electrolyte film was about 16 μm in thickness, highly dense, crack free and well-bonded to the anode support. The electrochemical properties of the prepared anode-supported electrolyte film was evaluated in a button cell mode incorporating a (LaSr)MnO3-YSZ composite cathode. With humidified hydrogen as the fuel and stationary air as the oxidant, the cell demonstrated an open-circuit voltage of 1.081 V and a maximum power density of 1.01 W/cm2 at 800°C. The obtained results represent the important progress in the development of anode-supported intermediate temperature SOFC with reduced fabrication cost.

  5. The role of water in slip casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  6. Riser Feeding Evaluation Method for Metal Castings Using Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nadiah

    One of the design aspects that continues to create a challenge for casting designers is the optimum design of casting feeders (risers). As liquid metal solidifies, the metal shrinks and forms cavities inside the casting. In order to avoid shrinkage cavities, risers are added to the casting shape to supply additional molten metal when shrinkage occurs during solidification. The shrinkage cavities in the casting are compensated by controlling the cooling rate to promote directional solidification. This control can be achieved by designing the casting such that the cooling begins at the sections that are farthest away from the risers and ends at the risers. Therefore, the risers will solidify last and feed the casting with the molten metal. As a result, the shrinkage cavities formed during solidification are in the risers which are later removed from the casting. Since casting designers have to usually go through iterative processes of validating the casting designs which are very costly due to expensive simulation processes or manual trials and errors on actual casting processes, this study investigates more efficient methods that will help casting designers utilize their casting experiences systematically to develop good initial casting designs. The objective is to reduce the casting design method iterations; therefore, reducing the cost involved in that design processes. The aim of this research aims at finding a method that can help casting designers design effective risers used in sand casting process of aluminum-silicon alloys by utilizing the analysis of solidification simulation. The analysis focuses on studying the significance of pressure distribution of the liquid metal at the early stage of casting solidification, when heat transfer and convective fluid flow are taken into account in the solidification simulation. The mathematical model of casting solidification was solved using the finite volume method (FVM). This study focuses to improve our

  7. Advanced Casting Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    components with consequent cost and weight benefits but there is traditionally a reluctance by designers to trust castings. The object of the...Specialist Meeting was to present the current state of developments of advanced casting technology, and to bring together designers and materials and...significantly in the near future. The discussion highlighted areas needing further attention, which included: — Designers need to design for casting, not

  8. Vacuum casting of thick polymeric films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1979-01-01

    Bubble formation and layering, which often plague vacuum-evaporated films, are prevented by properly regulating process parameters. Vacuum casting may be applicable to forming thick films of other polymer/solvent solutions.

  9. Effect of Casting Material on the Cast Pressure After Sequential Cast Splitting.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aaron; Shaw, K Aaron; Boomsma, Shawn E; Cameron, Craig D

    2017-01-01

    Circumferential casting is a vital component of nonoperative fracture management. These casts are commonly valved to release pressure and decrease the risk of complications from swelling. However, little information exists regarding the effect of different casting supplies on the pressure within the cast. Seventy-five long-arm casts were performed on human volunteers, divided between 5 experimental groups with 15 casts in each groups. Testing groups consisted of 2 groups with a plaster short-arm cast overwrapped with fiberglass to a long arm with either cotton or synthetic cast padding. The 3 remaining groups included fiberglass long-arm casts with cotton, synthetic, or waterproof cast padding. A pediatric blood pressure cuff bladder was placed within the cast and inflated to 100 mm Hg. After inflation, the cast was sequentially released with pressure reading preformed after each stage. Order of release consisted of cast bivalve, cast padding release, and cotton stockinet release. After release, the cast was overwrapped with a loose elastic bandage. Difference in pressure readings were compared based upon the cast material. Pressures within the cast were found to decrease with sequential release of cast. The cast type had no effect of change in pressure. Post hoc testing demonstrated that the type of cast padding significantly affected the cast pressures with waterproof padding demonstrating the highest pressure readings at all time-points in the study, followed by synthetic padding. Cotton padding had the lowest pressure readings at all time-points. Type of cast padding significantly influences the amount of pressure within a long-arm cast, even after bivalving the cast and cutting the cast padding. Cotton cast padding allows for the greatest change in pressure. Cotton padding demonstrates the greatest change in pressure within a long-arm cast after undergoing bivalve. Synthetic and waterproof cast padding should not be used in the setting of an acute fracture to

  10. Government Strategic Support for Investment Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turekulova, Assiya N.; Mukhambetova, Lyazzat K.; Doshan, Almagul S.; Issabekov, Baurzhan N.; Chimgentbayeva, Gulbakyt K.; Turegeldinova, Aliya Zh.

    2016-01-01

    When system risks are high most investors choose to exit the market; however, there are some contrarian investors who opt to make investments. The authors analyzed the main goals of the investment process and measures that should be provided by the government to stimulate investments and innovation especially by means of investment banking. The…

  11. The Investment Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John H.

    1997-01-01

    The investment committee of the college or university governing board is charged with determining, overseeing, and assessing the policies and processes by which institutional funds are invested. The committee has fiduciary duty to ensure that the terms of investment of donors' gifts are met and to maximize investment returns within an appropriate…

  12. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiatedmore » with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.« less

  13. Computed Tomography For Internal Inspection Of Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Timothy L.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography used to detect internal flaws in metal castings before machining and otherwise processing them into finished parts. Saves time and money otherwise wasted on machining and other processing of castings eventually rejected because of internal defects. Knowledge of internal defects gained by use of computed tomography also provides guidance for changes in foundry techniques, procedures, and equipment to minimize defects and reduce costs.

  14. Effect of Zn Concentration on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Mg-Si-Zn Alloys Processed by Gravity Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longfei; Ji, Shouxun; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Yun; Dong, Xixi; Yang, Wenchao; Midson, Stephen; Kang, Yonglin

    2018-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-8.1Mg-2.6Si-(0.08 to 4.62)Zn alloys (in wt pct) have been investigated by the permanent mold casting process. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the τ-Mg32(Al, Zn)49 phase forms when the Zn content is 1.01 wt pct. With higher Zn contents of 2.37 and 3.59 wt pct, the η-MgZn2 and τ-Mg32(Al, Zn)49 phases precipitate in the microstructure, and the η-MgZn2 phase forms when the Zn content is 4.62 wt pct. Metallurgical analysis shows that the η-MgZn2 and τ-Mg32(Al, Zn)49 phases strengthen the Al-8.1Mg-2.6Si-(0.08 to 4.62)Zn alloys. After solutionizing at 510 °C for 180 minutes and aging at 180 °C for 90 minutes, the η'-MgZn2 phase precipitates in the α-Al matrix, which significantly enhances the mechanical properties. Addition of 3.59 wt pct Zn to the Al-8.1Mg-2.6Si alloy with heat treatment increases the yield strength from 96 to 280 MPa, increases the ultimate tensile strength from 267 to 310 MPa, and decreases the elongation from 9.97 to 1.74 pct.

  15. Casting of Ti-6Al-4V alloy compared with pure Ti in an Ar-arc casting machine.

    PubMed

    Syverud, M; Okabe, T; Herø, H

    1995-10-01

    Dental prostheses of Ti are normally cast in pure Ti. Some appliances, however, require higher yield strength. Casting of Ti alloys is of interest in such cases. The objective of the present work was to study the quality of castings made of Ti-6Al-4V compared with those made of pure Ti. Casting was made into a mold kept at room temperature using a MgO-Al2O3 investment. A standardized five-unit bridge was cast, consisting of two cylindrical crowns with sharp margins and three pontics. The overall mold filling was satisfactory. The margins of the casting alloys were, however, more rugged and incomplete than those of pure Ti. The most likely reason for this difference is the increased formation of dendrites in the alloy and thus more resistance to fluid flow. Furthermore, the sprue of the alloy was also found to contain some spherical, internal pores. Such pores were rare in the pure Ti castings. The surface reactions were found to be minimal for both of the materials. Increased casting deficiencies observed in the cast bridges of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, compared with pure Ti, were: 1) the margins of the crowns in the bridge were less complete and 2) there was a tendency to an increased internal porosity, particularly in the sprues.

  16. Effect of pressure difference on the quality of titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Watkins, J H; Nakajima, H; Atsuta, M; Okabe, T

    1997-03-01

    In casting titanium using a two-compartment casting machine, Herø et al. (1993) reported that the pressure difference between the melting chamber and the mold chamber affected the soundness of the castings. This study tested the hypothesis that differences in pressure produce castings with various amounts of porosity and different mechanical properties values. Plastic dumbbell-shaped patterns were invested with an alumina-based, phosphate-bonded investment material. Both chambers of the casting machine were evacuated to 6 x 10(-2) torr; the argon pressure difference was then adjusted to either 50, 150, 300, or 450 torr. The porosity of the cast specimens was determined by x-ray radiography and quantitative image analysis. Tensile strength and elongation were measured by means of a universal testing machine at a strain rate of 1.7 x 10(-4)/s. The fractured surfaces were examined by SEM. Changes in Vickers hardness with depth from the cast surface were measured on polished cross-sections of the specimens. Raising the argon pressure difference to 300 and 450 torr caused a significant increase in internal porosity and a resultant decrease in the engineering tensile strength and elongation. The highest tensile strength (approximately 540 MPa), elongation (approximately 10%), bulk hardness (HV50g 209), and lowest porosity level (approximately 0.8%) occurred in the specimens cast at 150 torr. Turbulence of the metal during casting was thought to be responsible for the increase in porosity levels with the increase in argon pressure difference. By choosing an argon pressure difference (around 150 torr) suitable for this geometry, we could produce castings which have adequate mechanical properties and low porosity levels.

  17. Constitutive Modeling of the Flow Stress of GCr15 Continuous Casting Bloom in the Heavy Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cheng; Wang, Zilin; Wu, Chenhui; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2018-04-01

    According to the calculation results of a 3D thermomechanical-coupled finite-element (FE) model of GCr15 bearing steel bloom during a heavy reduction (HR) process, the variation ranges in the strain rate and strain under HR were described. In addition, the hot deformation behavior of the GCr15 bearing steel was studied over the temperature range from 1023 K to 1573 K (750 °C to 1300 °C) with strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 s-1 in single-pass thermosimulation compression experiments. To ensure the accuracy of the constitutive model, the temperature range was divided into two temperature intervals according to the fully austenitic temperature of GCr15 steel [1173 K (900 °C)]. Two sets of material parameters for the constitutive model were derived based on the true stress-strain curves of the two temperature intervals. A flow stress constitutive model was established using a revised Arrhenius-type constitutive equation, which considers the relationships among the material parameters and true strain. This equation describes dynamic softening during hot compression processes. Considering the effect of glide and climb on the deformation mechanism, the Arrhenius-type constitutive equation was modified by a physically based approach. This model is the most accurate over the temperatures ranging from 1173 K to 1573 K (900 °C to 1300 °C) under HR deformation conditions (ignoring the range from 1273 K to 1573 K (1000 °C to 1300 °C) with a strain rate of 0.1 s-1). To ensure the convergence of the FE calculation, an approximated method was used to estimate the flow stress at temperatures greater than 1573 K (1300 °C).

  18. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal

    One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuummore » during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.« less

  19. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  20. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route.

    PubMed

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Kamada, Hiroto; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-21

    Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%-78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE) analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  1. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route

    PubMed Central

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Kamada, Hiroto; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%–78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE) analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis. PMID:28788573

  2. Modelling the Cast Component Weight in Hot Chamber Die Casting using Combined Taguchi and Buckingham's π Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rupinder

    2018-02-01

    Hot chamber (HC) die casting process is one of the most widely used commercial processes for the casting of low temperature metals and alloys. This process gives near-net shape product with high dimensional accuracy. However in actual field environment the best settings of input parameters is often conflicting as the shape and size of the casting changes and one have to trade off among various output parameters like hardness, dimensional accuracy, casting defects, microstructure etc. So for online inspection of the cast components properties (without affecting the production line) the weight measurement has been established as one of the cost effective method (as the difference in weight of sound and unsound casting reflects the possible casting defects) in field environment. In the present work at first stage the effect of three input process parameters (namely: pressure at 2nd phase in HC die casting; metal pouring temperature and die opening time) has been studied for optimizing the cast component weight `W' as output parameter in form of macro model based upon Taguchi L9 OA. After this Buckingham's π approach has been applied on Taguchi based macro model for the development of micro model. This study highlights the Taguchi-Buckingham based combined approach as a case study (for conversion of macro model into micro model) by identification of optimum levels of input parameters (based on Taguchi approach) and development of mathematical model (based on Buckingham's π approach). Finally developed mathematical model can be used for predicting W in HC die casting process with more flexibility. The results of study highlights second degree polynomial equation for predicting cast component weight in HC die casting and suggest that pressure at 2nd stage is one of the most contributing factors for controlling the casting defect/weight of casting.

  3. Accuracy of ringless casting and accelerated wax-elimination technique: a comparative in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rahul; Al-Keraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Kathuria, Nidhi; Gandhi, P V; Bhide, S V

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ringless casting and accelerated wax-elimination techniques can be combined to offer a cost-effective, clinically acceptable, and time-saving alternative for fabricating single unit castings in fixed prosthodontics. Sixty standardized wax copings were fabricated on a type IV stone replica of a stainless steel die. The wax patterns were divided into four groups. The first group was cast using the ringless investment technique and conventional wax-elimination method; the second group was cast using the ringless investment technique and accelerated wax-elimination method; the third group was cast using the conventional metal ring investment technique and conventional wax-elimination method; the fourth group was cast using the metal ring investment technique and accelerated wax-elimination method. The vertical marginal gap was measured at four sites per specimen, using a digital optical microscope at 100× magnification. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA to determine statistical significance. The vertical marginal gaps of castings fabricated using the ringless technique (76.98 ± 7.59 μm) were significantly less (p < 0.05) than those castings fabricated using the conventional metal ring technique (138.44 ± 28.59 μm); however, the vertical marginal gaps of the conventional (102.63 ± 36.12 μm) and accelerated wax-elimination (112.79 ± 38.34 μm) castings were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The ringless investment technique can produce castings with higher accuracy and can be favorably combined with the accelerated wax-elimination method as a vital alternative to the time-consuming conventional technique of casting restorations in fixed prosthodontics. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability frommore » Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.« less

  5. Investing in Youth: Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. This report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth…

  6. Investing in Youth: Lithuania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The present report on Lithuania is the fourth of a new…

  7. Investing in Youth: Latvia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. This report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth…

  8. Embedding Optical Fibers In Cast Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibler, William N.; Atkins, Robert A.; Lee, Chung E.; Taylor, Henry F.

    1995-01-01

    Use of metal strain reliefs eliminates breakage of fibers during casting process. Technique for embedding fused silica optical fibers in cast metal parts devised. Optical fiber embedded in flange, fitting, or wall of vacuum or pressure chamber, to provide hermetically sealed feedthrough for optical transmission of measurement or control signals. Another example, optical-fiber temperature sensor embedded in metal structural component to measure strain or temperature inside component.

  9. Symptomatic stent cast.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  10. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  11. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties and Marginal Fit of Crowns Fabricated Using Commercially Pure Titanium and FUS-Invest

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinshuang; Wang, Xianli; Xing, Helin; Guo, Tianwen; Dong, Chaofang

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanical properties and single crown accuracy of the tailor-made Fourth University Stomatology investment (FUS-invest) for casting titanium. Background. Current investment for casting titanium is not optimal for obtaining high-quality castings, and the commercially available titanium investment is costly. Methods. Titanium specimens were cast using the tailor-made FUS-invest. The mechanical properties were tested using a universal testing machine. Fractured castings were characterized by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. 19 titanium crowns were produced using FUS-invest and another 19 by Symbion. The accuracy of crowns was evaluated. Results. The mechanical properties of the titanium cast by FUS-invest were elastic modulus 125.6 ± 8.8 GPa, yield strength 567.5 ± 11.1 MPa, tensile strength 671.2 ± 15.6 MPa, and elongation 4.6 ± 0.2%. For marginal fit, no significant difference (P > 0.05) was found at four marker points of each group. For internal fit, no significant difference (P > 0.05) was found between two groups, whereas significant difference (P < 0.01) was found at different mark point of each group. Conclusions. The mechanical properties of titanium casted using FUS-invest fulfilled the ISO 9693 criteria. The marginal and internal fit of the titanium crowns using either the FUS-invest or Symbion were similar. PMID:28913355

  12. Rapid prototype fabrication processes for high-performance thrust cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, K.; Chwiedor, T.; Diab, J.; Williams, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Thrust Cell Technologies Program (Air Force Phillips Laboratory Contract No. F04611-92-C-0050) is currently being performed by Rocketdyne to demonstrate advanced materials and fabrication technologies which can be utilized to produce low-cost, high-performance thrust cells for launch and space transportation rocket engines. Under Phase 2 of the Thrust Cell Technologies Program (TCTP), rapid prototyping and investment casting techniques are being employed to fabricate a 12,000-lbf thrust class combustion chamber for delivery and hot-fire testing at Phillips Lab. The integrated process of investment casting directly from rapid prototype patterns dramatically reduces design-to-delivery cycle time, and greatly enhances design flexibility over conventionally processed cast or machined parts.

  13. Causal Inferences from Mining ToxCast Data and the Biomedical Literature for Molecular Pathways and Cellular Processes in Cleft Palate (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sixty-five chemicals in the ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) dataset have been linked to cleft palate based on data from ToxRefDB (rat or rabbit prenatal developmental toxicity studies) or from literature reports. These compounds are structurally diverse and thus likely to...

  14. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  15. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  16. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  17. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  18. Characterization of Ni-Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Teng, Fu-Yuan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni-Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, "casting mold," significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni-Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni-Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Netcast™ Shape Casting Technology: A Technological Breakthrough that Enhances the Cost Effectiveness of Aluminum Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mark; Bruski, Richard; Groszkiewicz, Daniel; Wagstaff, Bob

    A new Direct Chill (DC) casting process is introduced to semi-continuous casting where near net shaped ingots are solidified. This process is currently being used at Alcan Engineered Cast Products (ECP) facility in Jonquiere, Canada, sectioned, then forged at Alcoa Automotive, Kentucky Casting Center (KCC). Finished forgings are machined and assembled into the Ford D/EW98 platform as suspension components. A brief description of the process and the implications on the forging process are presented.

  20. Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Robert Alan; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Lee, Ching-Pang; Abuaf, Nesim; Hasz, Wayne Charles

    2002-01-01

    Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

  1. Whose crazy investment in sex?

    PubMed

    Mandlis, Lane R

    2011-01-01

    By probing the processes of exclusion of transsexuals from the political sphere, this article offers contributions to social and political theory through an examination of the processes of exclusion from the category "human." This article considers how the erasure of investment in their own embodied sex constructs a platform from which to blame others for sex/gender variance, as well as to justify that blaming. Bringing together Giorgio Agamben, Georges Bataille, Judith Butler, and Nikolas Rose with transphobia, medicalization in psychiatry, law, and ethopolitics, this article questions whose investment in sexed embodiment counts and why that investment might be seen as "crazy."

  2. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. Thismore » closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without

  3. Optimal investment horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, I.; Jensen, M. H.; Johansen, A.

    2002-06-01

    In stochastic finance, one traditionally considers the return as a competitive measure of an asset, i.e., the profit generated by that asset after some fixed time span Δt, say one week or one year. This measures how well (or how bad) the asset performs over that given period of time. It has been established that the distribution of returns exhibits ``fat tails'' indicating that large returns occur more frequently than what is expected from standard Gaussian stochastic processes [1-3]. Instead of estimating this ``fat tail'' distribution of returns, we propose here an alternative approach, which is outlined by addressing the following question: What is the smallest time interval needed for an asset to cross a fixed return level of say 10%? For a particular asset, we refer to this time as the investment horizon and the corresponding distribution as the investment horizon distribution. This latter distribution complements that of returns and provides new and possibly crucial information for portfolio design and risk-management, as well as for pricing of more exotic options. By considering historical financial data, exemplified by the Dow Jones Industrial Average, we obtain a novel set of probability distributions for the investment horizons which can be used to estimate the optimal investment horizon for a stock or a future contract.

  4. Increasing the reliability and quality of important cast products made of chemically active metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varfolomeev, M. S.; Moiseev, V. S.; Shcherbakova, G. I.

    2017-01-01

    A technology is developed to produce highly thermoresistant ceramic monoxide corundum molds using investment casting and an aluminum-organic binder. This technology is a promising trend in creating ceramic molds for precision complex-shape casting of important ingots made of high-alloy steels, high-temperature and titanium alloys, and refractory metals. The use of the casting molds that have a high thermal and chemical resistance to chemically active metals and alloys under high-temperature casting minimizes the physicochemical interaction and substantially decreases the depth of the hard-to-remove metal oxide layer on important products, which increases their service properties.

  5. Precision Casting via Advanced Simulation and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program was conducted to develop and commercially implement selected casting manufacturing technologies to enable significant reductions in the costs of castings, increase the complexity and dimensional accuracy of castings, and reduce the development times for delivery of high quality castings. The industry-led R&D project was cost shared with NASA's Aerospace Industry Technology Program (AITP). The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American, Inc. served as the team lead with participation from Lockheed Martin, Ford Motor Company, Howmet Corporation, PCC Airfoils, General Electric, UES, Inc., University of Alabama, Auburn University, Robinson, Inc., Aracor, and NASA-LeRC. The technical effort was organized into four distinct tasks. The accomplishments reported herein. Task 1.0 developed advanced simulation technology for core molding. Ford headed up this task. On this program, a specialized core machine was designed and built. Task 2.0 focused on intelligent process control for precision core molding. Howmet led this effort. The primary focus of these experimental efforts was to characterize the process parameters that have a strong impact on dimensional control issues of injection molded cores during their fabrication. Task 3.0 developed and applied rapid prototyping to produce near net shape castings. Rocketdyne was responsible for this task. CAD files were generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototype patterns were fabricated using SLS and SLA, and castings produced and evaluated. Task 4.0 was aimed at developing technology transfer. Rocketdyne coordinated this task. Casting related technology, explored and evaluated in the first three tasks of this program, was implemented into manufacturing processes.

  6. Effects of Casting Conditions on End Product Defects in Direct Chill Casted Hot Rolling Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorulmaz, Arda; Yüksel, Çağlar; Erzi, Eraz; Dispinar, Derya

    Direct chill casting is a reliable casting process for almost any wrought aluminum alloy for subsequent deformation via hot rolling to supply vital industries such as aerospace, automotive, construction, packaging and maritime. While some defects occur during casting, like hot tearing, some others like surface defect causing blisters, appear after hot rolling process or annealing after final cold rolling steps. It was found that some of these defects are caused by melt impurities formed from entrained folded aluminum oxides or bifilms. A study in a hot rolling casting facility was carried out with different melt cleaning practices, launder and molten metal transferring designs. Bifilm index and reduced pressure test were used for determining melt cleanliness measurement. It was found that porous plug gas diffusons for degassing are more effective than lance type degassers and a design towards less turbulent molten metal flow from furnace to mould cavity are necessary for reducing defects caused by bifilms.

  7. Noise Reduction to Reduce Patient Anxiety During Cast Removal: Can We Decrease Patient Anxiety With Cast Removal by Wearing Noise Reduction Headphones During Cast Saw Use?

    PubMed

    Mahan, Susan T; Harris, Marie S; Lierhaus, Anneliese M; Miller, Patricia E; DiFazio, Rachel L

    Noise reduction headphones decrease the sound during cast removal. Their effectiveness in decreasing anxiety has not been studied. Compare pediatric patients' anxiety levels during cast removal with and without utilization of noise reduction headphones combined with use of a personal electronic device. Quality improvement project. Patients randomly assigned to noise reduction headphone group or standard care group during cast removal. Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability Scale and heart rate were evaluated prior to, during, and after cast removal. Data were compared across groups. Fifty patients were included; 25 per group. No difference detected between the 2 groups in Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability Scale score prior to (p = .05) or after cast removal (p = .30). During cast removal, the headphone group had lower FLACC Scale scores (p = .03). Baseline heart rate was lower in the headphone group prior to (p = .02) and after (p = .005) cast removal with no difference during cast removal (p = .24). Utilizing noise reduction headphones and a personal electronic device during the cast removal process decreases patient anxiety.

  8. Effect of processing parameters on surface finish for fused deposition machinable wax patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a study on the effect of material processing parameters used in layer-by-layer material construction on the surface finish of a model to be used as an investment casting pattern. The data presented relate specifically to fused deposition modeling using a machinable wax.

  9. Obtaining of High Cr Content Cast Iron Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, C.; Bejinariu, C.; Carcea, I.; Cimpoesu, N.; Chicet, D. L.; Savin, C.

    2017-06-01

    We have obtained, through the classic casting process, 3 highly chromium-based experimental alloys proposed for replacing the FC 250 classical cast iron in braking applications. Casting was carried out in an induction furnace and cast into moulds made of KALHARTZ 8500 resin casting mixture and HARTER hardener at SC RanCon SRL Iasi. It is known that the microstructure of the cast iron is a combination of martensite with a small amount of residual austenite after the heat treatment of the ingot. In the case of high-alloy chromium alloys, the performance of the material is due to the presence of M7C3 carbides distributed in the iron matrix Resistance to machining and deformation is based on alloy composition and microstructure, while abrasion resistance will depend on properties and wear conditions.

  10. Women's Political Empowerment and Investments in Primary Schooling in India.

    PubMed

    Halim, Nafisa; Yount, Kathryn M; Cunningham, Solveig A; Pande, Rohini P

    2016-02-01

    Using a national district-level dataset of India composed of information on investments in primary schooling (data from the District Information Survey for Education [DISE, 2007/8]) and information on demographic characteristics of elected officials (data from the Election Commission of India [ECI, 2000/04]), we examined the relationship between women's representation in State Legislative Assembly (SLA) seats and district-level investments in primary schooling. We used OLS regressions adjusting for confounders and spatial autocorrelation, and estimated separate models for North and South India. Women's representation in general SLA seats typically was negatively associated with investments in primary-school amenities and teachers; women's representation in SLA seats reserved for under-represented minorities, i.e., scheduled castes and scheduled tribes, typically was positively associated with investments in primary schooling, especially in areas addressing the basic needs of poor children. Women legislators' gender and caste identities may shape their decisions about redistributive educational policies.

  11. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Srikanth; Revathi, Kakkirala; Reddy, S Kranthikumar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  12. Heat exchanger-ingot casting/slicing process, phase 1: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1977-01-01

    A controlled growth, heat-flow and cool-down process is described that yielded silicon with a high degree of single crystallinity. Even when the seed melted out, very large grains formed. Solar cell samples made from cast material yielded conversion efficiency of over 9%. Representative characterizations of grown silicon demonstrated a dislocation density of less than 100/sq cm and a minority carrier diffusion length of 31 micron. The source of silicon carbide in silicon ingots was identified to be from graphite retainers in contact with silica crucibles. Higher growth rates were achieved with the use of a graphite plug at the bottom of the silica crucible.

  13. CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) AND KEEPERS OF THE CAST HOUSE FLOOR, S.L. KIMBROUGH AND DAVID HOLMES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Blast Furnace No. 8, North of Valley Road, West of Ensley-Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  14. "Split Cast Mounting: Review and New Technique".

    PubMed

    Gundawar, S M; Pande, Neelam A; Jaiswal, Priti; Radke, U M

    2014-12-01

    For the fabrication of a prosthesis, the Prosthodontist meticulously performs all the steps. The laboratory technician then make every effort/strives to perform the remaining lab procedures. However when the processed dentures are remounted on the articulator, some changes are seen. These changes may be divided into two categories: Pre-insertion and post-insertion changes, which deal with the physical properties of the materials involved (Parker, J Prosthet Dent 31:335-342, 1974). Split cast mounting is the method of mounting casts on the articulator. It is essentially a maxillary cast constructed in two parts with a horizontal division. The procedure allows for the verification of the accuracy of the initial mounting and the ease of removal and replacement of the cast. This provides a precise means of correcting the changes in occlusion occurring as a result of the processing technique (Nogueira et al., J Prosthet Dent 91:386-388, 2004). Instability of the split mounting has always been a problem to the Prosthodontist thereby limiting its use. There are various materials mentioned in the literature. The new technique by using Dowel pins and twill thread is very easy, cheaper and simple way to stabilize the split mounting. It is useful and easy in day to day laboratory procedures. The article presents different methods of split cast mounting and the new procedure using easily available materials in prosthetic laboratory.

  15. Structure-processing correlations and mechanical properties in freeze-cast Ti-6Al-4V with highly aligned porosity and a lightweight Ti-6Al-4V-PMMA composite with excellent energy absorption capability

    DOE PAGES

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.

    2017-02-12

    In contrast to freeze-cast ceramics and polymers, few freeze-cast metals have been described, to date. This systematic study on structure-processing correlations in freeze-cast Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds reports how processing parameters determine the architecture formed during the directional solidification of water-based metal slurries and after sintering. Additionally, sedimentation in the slurry during freezing and volume shrinkage during burnout and sintering were found to significantly affect both structure and properties of the scaffolds. In using two freezing rates, 1 and 10 °C min -1, two water-based polymer solutions as binders (chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose) and two different metal volume fractions in the slurry,more » 20 and 30 vol%, Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds could be prepared with pore length, width, and porosity ranging from 41 to 523 μm, 14.5–76.5 μm, and 65 to 34%, respectively. Their compressive strength, stiffness, and toughness (work to 20% strain) fall in the range of 83–412 MPa, 7–29 GPa, and 14–122 MJ m -3, respectively. In order to improve the properties a select composition was infiltrated with poly(methyl methacrylate). This increased the average yield strength by a factor of 2.3 from 83 to 193 MPa and the average toughness (work to 50% strain) by a factor of 2.7 from 28.1 to 76.8 MJ m -3.« less

  16. Structure-processing correlations and mechanical properties in freeze-cast Ti-6Al-4V with highly aligned porosity and a lightweight Ti-6Al-4V-PMMA composite with excellent energy absorption capability

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.

    In contrast to freeze-cast ceramics and polymers, few freeze-cast metals have been described, to date. This systematic study on structure-processing correlations in freeze-cast Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds reports how processing parameters determine the architecture formed during the directional solidification of water-based metal slurries and after sintering. Additionally, sedimentation in the slurry during freezing and volume shrinkage during burnout and sintering were found to significantly affect both structure and properties of the scaffolds. In using two freezing rates, 1 and 10 °C min -1, two water-based polymer solutions as binders (chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose) and two different metal volume fractions in the slurry,more » 20 and 30 vol%, Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds could be prepared with pore length, width, and porosity ranging from 41 to 523 μm, 14.5–76.5 μm, and 65 to 34%, respectively. Their compressive strength, stiffness, and toughness (work to 20% strain) fall in the range of 83–412 MPa, 7–29 GPa, and 14–122 MJ m -3, respectively. In order to improve the properties a select composition was infiltrated with poly(methyl methacrylate). This increased the average yield strength by a factor of 2.3 from 83 to 193 MPa and the average toughness (work to 50% strain) by a factor of 2.7 from 28.1 to 76.8 MJ m -3.« less

  17. ToxCast Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  18. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  19. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  20. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  1. ShakeCast Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Kuo-Wan; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users? facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  2. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  3. Microstructural Evolution in Intensively Melt Sheared Direct Chill Cast Al-Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Rao, A. K. Prasada; Patel, J. B.; Scamans, G. M.; Fan, Z.

    The work presented here introduces the novel melt conditioned direct chill casting (MC-DC) technology, where intensive melt shearing is applied to the conventional direct-chill casting process. MC-DC casting can successfully produce high quality Al-alloy billets. The results obtained from 80 mm diameter billets cast at speed of 200 mm/min show that MC-DC casting of Al-alloys, substantially refines the microstructure and reduces macro-segregation. In this paper, we present the preliminary results and discuss microstructural evolution during MC-DC casting of Al-alloys.

  4. Producing Hybrid Metal Composites by Combining Additive Manufacturing and Casting

    DOE PAGES

    Pawlowski, Alex E.; Splitter, Derek A.; Muth, Thomas R.; ...

    2017-10-01

    Additive manufacturing by itself provides many benefits, but by combining different materials processing techniques like traditional casting with additive manufacturing to create hybrid processes, custom materials can be tailor-made and mass produced for applications with specific performance needs.

  5. Casting materials and their application in research and teaching.

    PubMed

    Haenssgen, Kati; Makanya, Andrew N; Djonov, Valentin

    2014-04-01

    From a biological point of view, casting refers to filling of anatomical and/or pathological spaces with extraneous material that reproduces a three-dimensional replica of the space. Casting may be accompanied by additional procedures such as corrosion, in which the soft tissue is digested out, leaving a clean cast, or the material may be mixed with radiopaque substances to allow x-ray photography or micro computed topography (µCT) scanning. Alternatively, clearing of the surrounding soft tissue increases transparency and allows visualization of the casted cavities. Combination of casting with tissue fixation allows anatomical dissection and didactic surgical procedures on the tissue. Casting materials fall into three categories namely, aqueous substances (India ink, Prussian blue ink), pliable materials (gelatins, latex, and silicone rubber), or hard materials (methyl methacrylates, polyurethanes, polyesters, and epoxy resins). Casting has proved invaluable in both teaching and research and many phenomenal biological processes have been discovered through casting. The choice of a particular material depends inter alia on the targeted use and the intended subsequent investigative procedures, such as dissection, microscopy, or µCT. The casting material needs to be pliable where anatomical and surgical manipulations are intended, and capillary-passable for ultrastructural investigations.

  6. The Investment Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Is marketing an expense or an investment? Most accountants will claim that marketing is an expense, and clearly that seems true when cutting the checks to fund these efforts. When it is done properly, marketing is the best investment. A key principle to Smart Marketing is the Investment Paradigm. The Investment Paradigm is understanding that every…

  7. Rough case-based reasoning system for continues casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wenbin; Lei, Zhufeng

    2018-04-01

    The continuous casting occupies a pivotal position in the iron and steel industry. The rough set theory and the CBR (case based reasoning, CBR) were combined in the research and implementation for the quality assurance of continuous casting billet to improve the efficiency and accuracy in determining the processing parameters. According to the continuous casting case, the object-oriented method was applied to express the continuous casting cases. The weights of the attributes were calculated by the algorithm which was based on the rough set theory and the retrieval mechanism for the continuous casting cases was designed. Some cases were adopted to test the retrieval mechanism, by analyzing the results, the law of the influence of the retrieval attributes on determining the processing parameters was revealed. A comprehensive evaluation model was established by using the attribute recognition theory. According to the features of the defects, different methods were adopted to describe the quality condition of the continuous casting billet. By using the system, the knowledge was not only inherited but also applied to adjust the processing parameters through the case based reasoning method as to assure the quality of the continuous casting and improve the intelligent level of the continuous casting.

  8. On the damping capacity of cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of experimental data on the amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) in terms of various theoretical models has revealed a staged character and the main mechanisms of the processes of energy dissipation in graphite with increasing amplitude of vibrations upon cyclic loading. It is shown that the level of the damping capacity of lamellar cast iron depends on the relationship between the elastic and strength characteristics of graphite and the matrix phase. In cast irons with a rigid matrix structure (pearlite, martensite), the energy dissipation is determined by the volume fraction and morphology of the initial graphite phase. In cast irons with a softer metallic phase (ferrite), the contact interaction of graphite inclusions with the matrix and the properties of the matrix introduce additional sources of high damping.

  9. Direct Cast U-6Nb – 2017 Progress on Cylindrical Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Aikin, Jr., Robert M.

    2017-10-04

    This report describes work to further develop a sound technical basis and best practices for mold design and process parameters for the Direct Casting of U-6wt%Nb components. One major challenge to the production of U-6Nb components is the propensity for niobium segregation during casting and solidification. This is especially true for cylindrical castings where the vertical side walls allow flotation of Nb resulting in severe inverse macrosegregation. In this work, a small (120 mm diameter by 180 mm tall) and large cylinder (250 mm diameter by 310 mm tall) are examined with a focus on reducing, or eliminating, niobium segregation.more » It is demonstrated that counter gravity casting (top-to-bottom solidification) can be used to minimize segregation in the small cylinder. Attempts to counter gravity cast the large cylinder were unsuccessful, in large part due to size limitations of the current furnace. A path forward for casting of the large cylinders is discussed.« less

  10. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  11. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  12. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  13. Casting and Splinting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-21

    mcludmg suggost1ons klr reducing lite burden, to the Department ar Defense. Executive Service Director> lte (07,IJ4-0188). Respondents should be...Orthoglass) Casting Material );;:- Fiberglass , .... • \\ \\ General Principles )- Measure out dry material at extremity being treated ~Plaster...shrinks slightly when wet; If too long can fold ends back ~Can be measured on contralateral extremity > Apply 2-3 layers of webril, avoid wrinkles

  14. Casting copper to tungsten for high-power arc lamp cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    Voids forming at interface when copper is cast onto tungsten can be eliminated by adding wetting agent during casting process. Small amount of copper and nickel are cast onto thoriated tungsten insert, insert is recast with more copper to form electrode. Good thermal conductance results in long-lived cathode.

  15. Effect of surface contamination on adhesive bonding of cast pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Watanabe, E; Yoshida, K; Okabe, T

    1999-03-01

    There is little information regarding bond strengths of resin cements to cast titanium surfaces contaminated by investment material. This study examined the effect of surface contamination on the shear bond strength of resin cements to cast titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Two types of disks were cast from commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingots using an argon-arc pressure casting unit and a phosphate-bonded Al2 O3 /LiAlSiO6 investment. After casting, disks were subjected to 3 surface treatments: (1) cast surface sandblasted (50 microm-sized Al2 O3 ) for 30 seconds; (2) metal surface sanded with silicon-carbide paper (600 grit) after grinding the contaminated cast surface (approximately 200 microm in thickness); and (3) metal surface sandblasted for 30 seconds after treatment 2. Surface structures were examined after each treatment with SEM and optical microscopy. Each type of disk was then bonded with 2 types of luting materials. Bonded specimens were subjected to thermocycling for up to 50,000 cycles, and shear bond strengths were determined after 0 (baseline) and 50,000 thermocycles. Results were statistically analyzed with 3-way ANOVA (P <.05). Microscopic observation of cast CP-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V exhibited noticeable structures on the cast surfaces apparently contaminated with investment material. However, there were no statistical differences (P >.05) in the bond strengths of both cements between contaminated (treatment 1) and uncontaminated surfaces (treatment 3) for both metals at baseline and after 50,000 thermocycles. The bond strength of specimens sanded with silicon-carbide paper (treatment 2) deteriorated dramatically after 50,000 thermocycles. Contamination of the cast metal surfaces by elements of the investment during casting did not affect bond strengths of the luting materials to CP-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V.

  16. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-01

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94-1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  17. 13 CFR 301.7 - Investment Assistance application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Investment Assistance application... COMMERCE ELIGIBILITY, INVESTMENT RATE AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS Application Requirements; Evaluation Criteria § 301.7 Investment Assistance application. (a) The EDA Investment Assistance process begins with...

  18. From SRI to ESG: The Changing World of Responsible Investing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Lauren; Griswold, John S.; Jarvis, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Thoughtful investment professionals continue to debate whether a portfolio's long-term performance can be enhanced by including environmental, social, and governance (ESG) considerations in the security selection process, but responsible investing is more than a passing trend. The terms socially-responsible investing, mission-related investing,…

  19. Technetium Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2015-10-15

    The cementitious material known as Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. Two radionuclides of particular concern in these waste streams are technetium-99 (99Tc) and iodine-129 (129I). These radioactive tank waste components contribute the most tomore » the environmental impacts associated with the cleanup of the Hanford site. A recent environmental assessment of Cast Stone performance, which assumes a diffusion controlled release of contaminants from the waste form, calculates groundwater in excess of the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for both contaminants. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of both 99Tc and 129I in Cast Stone. One method to improve the performance of Cast Stone is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc and I, therefore reducing their diffusion out of Cast Stone. In this paper, we present results of Tc and I removal from solution with various getters with batch sorption experiments conducted in deionized water (DIW) and a highly caustic 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. In general, the data show that the selected getters are effective in DIW but their performance is comprised when experiments are performed with the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. Reasons for the mitigated performance in the LAW simulant may be due to competition with Cr present in the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant and to a pH effect.« less

  20. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Alan W. Camb; Prof. Anthony Rollett

    2001-08-31

    To determine the potential for strip casting in the steel industry and to develop the fundamental knowledge necessary to allow the role of strip casting in the modern steel industry to be understood. Based upon a study of carbon steel strip castings that were either produced for the program at British Steel or were received from a pre-commercial production machine, the following conclusions were made. Strip casting of carbon steels is technically feasible for sheet material from slightly less than 1 mm thick to 3 mm thick, and, assuming that it is economically viable, it will be first applied inmore » carbon steel markets that do not require stringent surface quality or extensive forming. The potential of strip casting as a casting process to be developed for steel castings is very high as the cast strip has some very novel characteristics. Direct cast carbon strip has better surface quality, shape and profile than any other casting process currently available. The more rapidly solidified structure of direct cast strip tends to be strong with low ductility; however, with adequate thermal treatment, it is possible to develop a variety of properties from the same grade. The process is more amenable at this time to production tonnages per year of the order of 500,000 tons and as such will first find niche type applications. This technology is an additional technology for steel production and will be in addition to, rather than a replacement for, current casting machines.« less

  1. Experimental investigation on in-situ microwave casting of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman Mishra, Radha; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2018-04-01

    The in-situ microwave casting of metallic materials is a recently developed casting process. The process works on the principles of hybrid microwave heating and is accomplished inside the applicator cavity. The process involves – melting of the charge, in-situ pouring and solidification of the melt. The electromagnetic and thermal properties of the charge affects microwave-material interaction and hence melting of the charge. On the other hand, cooling conditions inside the applicator controls solidification process. The present work reports on in-situ casting of copper developed inside a multimode cavity at 2.45 GHz using 1400 W. The molten metal was allowed to get poured in-situ inside a graphite mold and solidification was carried out in the same mold inside the applicator cavity. The interaction of microwave with the charge during exposure was studied and the role of oxide layer during meltingthe copper blocks has been presented. The developed in-situ cast was characterized to access the cast quality. Microstructural study revealed the homogeneous and dense structure of the cast. The X-ray diffraction pattern indicated presence of copper in different orientations with (1 1 1) as the dominant orientation. The average micro indentation hardness of the casts was found 93±20 HV.

  2. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, John C.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification.

  3. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.C.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-11-12

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification. 5 figures.

  4. Structure and properties of stir-cast zinc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    LeHuy, H.; Blain J.; Masounave, J.

    Stir casting (or rheocasting) of ZA-27 zinc alloys was investigated experimentally. By vigorously agitating the alloys during cooling, the dendrites that were forming were fragmented giving a unique structure composed of spherical and rosette shaped particles suspended in the remaining liquid. Under high shear rates ({center dot}{gamma} = 300s{sup {minus}1} or more) the slurries with primary particle concentrations as high as 60% displayed viscosities as low as 20 poises and could easily be casted. The effects of processing variables such as shearing and cooling rates and casting temperatures were studied. Their relative importance on the rheological and microstructural behavior ofmore » the stir cast alloys are discussed. Results from viscosity measurements on slurries show that non-dendritical ZA-27 alloys obey a power law fluid model. Finally, results from mechanical and compressive studies carried out on solidified slurries are discussed and compared to conventional casted and wrought alloy properties.« less

  5. Partnering for Quality under the Workforce Investment Act: A Tool Kit for One-Stop System Building. Module 5: Building a Process for Continuous Improvement. Training Manual with Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Deborah; Koller, Vinz; Kozumplik, Richalene; Lawrence, Mary Ann

    This document is part of a five-module training package to help employment and training service providers comply with the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and develop a one-stop training and employment services system. It consists of the participant workbook, trainer manual, and activity worksheets for a module on building a process for…

  6. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    1996-01-01

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  7. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1996-12-24

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

  8. The effect of processing parameters and solid concentration on the mechanical and microstructural properties of freeze-casted macroporous hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Farhangdoust, S; Zamanian, A; Yasaei, M; Khorami, M

    2013-01-01

    The design and fabrication of macroporous hydroxyapatite scaffolds, which could overcome current bone tissue engineering limitations, have been considered in recent years. In the current study, controlled unidirectional freeze-casting at different cooling rates was investigated. In the first step, different slurries with initial hydroxyapatite concentrations of 7-37.5 vol.% were prepared. In the next step, different cooling rates from 2 to 14 °C/min were applied to synthesize the porous scaffold. Additionally, a sintering temperature of 1350 °C was chosen as an optimum temperature. Finally, the phase composition (by XRD), microstructure (by SEM), mechanical characteristics, and the porosity of sintered samples were assessed. The porosity of the sintered samples was in a range of 45-87% and the compressive strengths varied from 0.4 MPa to 60 MPa. The mechanical strength of the scaffolds increased as a function of initial concentration, cooling rate, and sintering temperature. With regards to mechanical strength and pore size, the samples with the initial concentration and the cooling rate of 15 vol.% and 5 °C/min, respectively, showed better results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the marginal fit of metal copings fabricated on three different marginal designs using conventional and accelerated casting techniques: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sharad; Parkash, Hari; Bhargava, Akshay; Gupta, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Abundant resources and techniques have been used for complete coverage crown fabrication. Conventional investing and casting procedures for phosphate-bonded investments require a 2- to 4-h procedure before completion. Accelerated casting techniques have been used, but may not result in castings with matching marginal accuracy. The study measured the marginal gap and determined the clinical acceptability of single cast copings invested in a phosphate-bonded investment with the use of conventional and accelerated methods. One hundred and twenty cast coping samples were fabricated using conventional and accelerated methods, with three finish lines: Chamfer, shoulder and shoulder with bevel. Sixty copings were prepared with each technique. Each coping was examined with a stereomicroscope at four predetermined sites and measurements of marginal gaps were documented for each. A master chart was prepared for all the data and was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version. Evidence of marginal gap was then evaluated by t-test. Analysis of variance and Post-hoc analysis were used to compare two groups as well as to make comparisons between three subgroups . Measurements recorded showed no statistically significant difference between conventional and accelerated groups. Among the three marginal designs studied, shoulder with bevel showed the best marginal fit with conventional as well as accelerated casting techniques. Accelerated casting technique could be a vital alternative to the time-consuming conventional casting technique. The marginal fit between the two casting techniques showed no statistical difference.

  10. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, Randall Sidney; Tolman, David Donald

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  11. Investment in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motooka, Takeshi

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental problems of investment in rural education in the present developing countries are analyzed. Needs of rural education are outlined and financial considerations related to investment in the improvement of rural educational programs are discussed. (SM)

  12. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  13. Work environment investments: outcomes from three cases.

    PubMed

    Rydell, Alexis; Andersson, Ing-Marie

    2017-09-27

    Work environment investments are important in order to create a healthy and safe workplace. This article presents findings from a seven-step interventions process aimed at examining and following-up work environment investments in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), with a particular focus on air contaminants. Three different cases were analyzed and included in the study: (a) an educational center for welding; (b) a paint station in furniture manufacturing; (c) a joinery in furniture manufacturing. The results show that the work environment investments were highly appreciated by the employees and managers, but at the same time the investment could be optimized through markedly decreased exposure levels for the worker. Factors such as follow-ups of the investment, education and training in how to use the equipment, worker involvement in the process and leadership engagement are important in order to optimize work environment investments.

  14. Cast abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Kelly D; Goucher, Nicholas R

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a case in which a pediatric patient wounded his ankle when he stuck an object inside the cast while trying to scratch himself. The wound became infected and resulted in a limb-threatening abscess. Although most patients treated with casts do not have any significant problems, it is important to emphasize cast care instructions to young patients and their parents. In addition, it may be equally important to advise patients about safe methods to alleviate itching, such as blowing cool air under the cast. In this way, the risk of serious infectious complications can be minimized.

  15. Rapid Cycle Casting of Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    C’, and at temperature T, are Infiltrated by !L amougt of liquid of composition C’., such that ,C, 4 f+.C’L - X. V. 7 average carbon content of the...maximum liquid penetration was 100 mm at an infiltration pressure of 755 kPa. The average casting composition was 0.94 w/o carbon . The segregation at...content* at four casting locations. 2. Results The casting composition ( carbon content) as a function of casting location is given in Table D-IV. The

  16. Effect of flask vibration time on casting integrity, Surface Penetration and Coating Inclusion in lost foam casting of Al-Si Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Karimian, Majid; Idris, M. H.; Ourdjini, A.

    2011-01-17

    The paper presents the result of an experimental investigation conducted on medium aluminum silicon alloy casting- LM6, using no-vacuum assisted lost foam casting process. The study is directed for establishing the relationship between the flask vibrations times developed for molded sample on the casting integrity, surface penetration and coating inclusion defects of the casting. Four different flask vibration times namely 180, 120, 90 and 60 sec. were investigated. The casting integrity was investigated in terms of fulfilling in all portions and edges. The surface penetration was measured using optical microscope whilst image analyzer was used to quantify the percentage ofmore » coating inclusion in the casting. The results show that vibration time has significant influence on the fulfilling as well as the internal integrity of the lost foam casting. It was found that the lower vibration time produced comparatively sound casing.« less

  17. Grindability of alpha-case formed on cast titanium.

    PubMed

    Koike, Marie; Jacobson, David; Chan, Kwai S; Okabe, Toru

    2009-09-01

    The hardened alpha-case (alpha-case) layer inevitably forms on the surface of titanium castings when prepared by investment casting. Because the hardness of the alpha-case is incomparable to that of the interior structure, the perception exists that the alpha-case is difficult to remove during cutting, grinding and polishing. Grindability (ease of grinding) of cast cpTi and cast Ti-6Al-4V was evaluated by grinding cast specimens incrementally using a SiC abrasive wheel. The present study revealed that the presence of the brittle alpha-case with lower fracture toughness is beneficial in grinding titanium. The alpha-case on the ductile cpTi can be ground much easier than its bulk interior structure. In less ductile Ti-6Al-4V, the grinding rate is much higher than that of cpTi, and the alpha-case and its interior structure are at similar levels since the fracture toughness of its alpha-case and the bulk material is not large enough.

  18. Improved Safety and Cost Savings from Reductions in Cast-Saw Burns After Simulation-Based Education for Orthopaedic Surgery Residents.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S; Lynch, Hayley; Jamieson, Katherine; Yu-Moe, C Winnie; Roussin, Christopher

    2017-09-06

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of simulation training aimed at reducing cast-saw injuries. Third-year orthopaedic residents underwent simulation-based instruction on distal radial fracture reduction, casting, and cast removal using an oscillating saw. The analysis compared incidences of cast-saw injuries and associated costs before and after the implementation of the simulation curriculum. Actual and potential costs associated with cast-saw injuries included wound care, extra clinical visits, and potential total payment (indemnity and expense payments). Curriculum costs were calculated through time-derived, activity-based accounting methods. The researchers compared the costs of cast-saw injuries and the simulation curriculum to determine overall savings and return on investment. In the 2.5 years prior to simulation, cast-saw injuries occurred in approximately 4.3 per 100 casts cut by orthopaedic residents. For the 2.5-year period post-simulation, the injury rate decreased significantly to approximately 0.7 per 100 casts cut (p = 0.002). The total cost to implement the casting simulation was $2,465.31 per 6-month resident rotation. On the basis of historical data related to cast-saw burns (n = 6), total payments ranged from $2,995 to $25,000 per claim. The anticipated savings from averted cast-saw injuries and associated medicolegal payments in the 2.5 years post-simulation was $27,131, representing an 11-to-1 return on investment. Simulation-based training for orthopaedic surgical residents was effective in reducing cast-saw injuries and had a high theoretical return on investment. These results support further investment in simulation-based training as cost-effective means of improving patient safety and clinical outcomes. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  19. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    PubMed

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  20. The development of high strength corrosion resistant precipitation hardening cast steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Rachel A.

    , give poor estimates of secondary phases in PHCSS. No measureable retained austenite was observed in any of the CB7Cu-1 steels studied, in spite of the fact that austenite is predicted by the constitution diagrams. A designed experiment using computationally derived phase equilibrium diagrams and actual experimental tests on CB7Cu of different compositions suggests that the ferrite phase is less stable than the constitution diagrams for austenitic stainless steels suggest. Delta ferrite was also more stable in slower-cooled sand cast material as compared to thin, fast-cooled investment cast material. High temperature solutionizing treatments were effective in dissolving delta ferrite at temperatures above 1900°F (˜1040°C). Delta ferrite dissolution was found to proceed at high rates during initial dissolution, and then was found to slow after 1 hour. Diffusion during the later stages is well-predicted by classical diffusion models. Repeated solution treatments were found to modestly increase both ductility and strength, likely due to subgrain refinement through austenite regrowth. Multistaged aging provided superior strength and toughness increases over similarly peak-aged and near peak-aged material aged at a single temperature. Peak-aged material fractography suggested that low energy quasi-cleavage fracture was likely due to age precipitate embrittlement along with some nucleation of MnS particulates at prior austenite grain boundaries. Yield strengths approaching 190 ksi (1310MPa) can be achieved in CB7Cu-1 if appropriate best-practices "+" processing techniques are used. This includes hot isostatic processing to reduce solidification segregation and heal microporosity, high temperature homogenization for effective age hardening and ferrite reduction, double-cycle solutionizing for structure refinement, and multistaged age strengthening for finer precipitate control. The experimental prototype 11-11PH (Fe-Ni-Cr-Ti-Mo) casting alloys was cast and was found to be

  1. Manufacturing Processes for Long-Life Gas Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppin, G. S.; Danesi, W. P.

    1986-07-01

    Dual-alloy turbine wheels produced by solid-state diffusion bonding of vacuum investment cast blade rings of one superalloy to preconsolidated powder metal hubs of a second superalloy have the long cyclic lives characteristic of wrought or powder superalloys combined with the high creep strength and net-shape blades characteristic of cast superalloys. A wide variety of superalloys and turbine configurations are compatible with this technology. Improved temperature capability turbine blades and vanes of the MAR-M 247 alloy made by directional solidification casting processes are now in volume production for Garrett gas turbines. Single-crystal alloys derivative to MAR-M 247 further extend the temperature capability of turbine blades and have been successfully engine tested. These blades are produced by a relatively simple modification of the processes used to manufacture directionally solidified blades.

  2. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  3. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and Fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub element tests will be presented.

  4. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; hide

    2002-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary toolless pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  5. Education and Caste in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  6. Rheology of composite solid propellants during motor casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. J.; Smith, P. L.; Klager, K.

    1978-01-01

    In a study conducted to evaluate flow parameters of uncured solid composite propellants during motor casting, two motors (1.8M-lb grain wt) were cast with a PBAN propellant exhibiting good flow characteristics in a 260-in. dia solid rocket motor. Attention is given to the effects of propellant compositional and processing variables on apparent viscosity as they pertain to rheological behavior and grain defect formation during casting. It is noted that optimized flow behavior is impaired with solid propellant loading. Non-Newtonian pseudoplastic flow is observed, which is dependent upon applied shear stress and the age of the uncured propellant.

  7. Freeze Tape Casting of Functionally Graded Porous Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofie, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Freeze tape casting is a means of making preforms of ceramic sheets that, upon subsequent completion of fabrication processing, can have anisotropic and/or functionally graded properties that notably include aligned and graded porosity. Freeze tape casting was developed to enable optimization of the microstructures of porous ceramic components for use as solid oxide electrodes in fuel cells: Through alignment and grading of pores, one can tailor surface areas and diffusion channels for flows of gas and liquid species involved in fuel-cell reactions. Freeze tape casting offers similar benefits for fabrication of optimally porous ceramics for use as catalysts, gas sensors, and filters.

  8. Fractography of cast gypsum.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Yamane, M

    1982-02-01

    A fractographical study of dental cast gypsum was made in order to correlate the mechanical properties with the microstructure. Wet specimens fractured under tensile stress showed intercrystalline fracture and the tensile strength depended on the porosity present. Thus, it was assumed that tensile strength was dependent on the contact area between individual gypsum crystals and changes in porosity approximated to changes in contact area. Strength differences among specimens of a given W/P ratio, therefore, can be related to differences in intercrystalline contact areas. These theoretical considerations suggest that the classification of dental die stone and dental stone into high and low strength types based on strength properties only would be more practical and less confusing than at present.

  9. Fuzzy control strategy for secondary cooling of continuous steel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirian, G. O.; Gheorghiu, C. A.; Hepuţ, T.; Rob, R.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to create an original fuzzy solution on the existing structure of the control system of continuous casting that eliminates fissures in the poured material from the secondary cooling of steel. For this purpose a system was conceived with three fuzzy database decision rules, which by analyzing a series of measurements taken from the process produces adjustments in the rate of flow of the cooling water and the speed of casting and determine the degree of risk of the wire. In the specialized literature on the national plan and the world, there is no intelligent correction in the rate of flow of the cooling water and the speed of casting in the secondary cooling of steel. The database of rules was made using information collected directly from the installation process of continuous casting of the Arcelor Mittal Hunedoara.

  10. IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

    1963-12-31

    A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

  11. [A surface reacted layer study of titanium-zirconium alloy after dental casting].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Guo, T; Li, Z; Li, C

    2000-10-01

    To investigate the influence of the mold temperature on the surface reacted layer of Ti-Zr alloy castings. Ti-Zr alloy was casted into a mold which was made of a zircon (ZrO2.SiO2) for inner coating and a phosphate-bonded material for outer investing with a casting machine (China) designed as vacuum, pressure and centrifuge. At three mold temperatures (room temperature, 300 degrees C, 600 degrees C) the Ti-Zr alloy was casted separately. The surface roughness of the castings was calculated by instrument of smooth finish (China). From the surface to the inner part the Knoop hardness and thickness in reacted layer of Ti-Zr alloy casting was measured. The structure of the surface reacted layer was analysed by SEM. Elemental analyses of the interfacial zone of the casting was made by element line scanning observation. The surface roughness of the castings was increased significantly with the mold temperature increasing. At a higher mold temperature the Knoop hardness of the reactive layer was increased. At the three mold temperature the outmost surface was very hard, and microhardness data decreased rapidly where they reached constant values. The thickness was about 85 microns for castings at room temperature and 300 degrees C, 105 microns for castings at 600 degrees C. From the SEM micrograph of the Ti-Zr alloy casting, the surface reacted layer could be divided into three different layers. The first layer was called non-structure layer, which thickness was about 10 microns for room temperature group, 20 microns for 300 degrees C and 25 microns for 600 degrees C. The second layer was characterized by coarse-grained acicular crystal, which thickness was about 50 microns for three mold temperatures. The third layer was Ti-Zr alloy. The element line scanning showed non-structure layer with higher level of element of O, Al, Si and Zr, The higher the mold temperature during casting, the deeper the Si permeating and in the second layer the element Si could also be found

  12. The Impact of a Holistic Conditional Cash Transfer Program in New York City on Parental Financial Investment, Student Time Use, and Educational Processes and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aber, J. Lawrence; Morris, Pamela; Wolf, Sharon; Berg, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impacts of Opportunity New York City-Family Rewards, the first holistic conditional cash transfer (CCT) program evaluated in the United States, on parental financial investments in children, and high school students' academic time use, motivations and self-beliefs, and achievement outcomes. Family Rewards, launched by the…

  13. Triple Plate Mold Final Report: Optimization of the Mold Design and Casting Parameters for a Thin U-10mo Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Aikin, Jr., Robert M.

    This work describes the experiments and modeling that have been performed to improve and try to optimize the simultaneous casting of three plates of U-10wt%Mo in a single coil vacuum induction melting (VIM) furnace. The plates of interest are 280 mm wide by 203 mm tall by 5 mm thick (11" x 8" x 0.2"). The initial mold design and processing parameters were supplied by Y-12. The mold and casting cavity were instrumented with a number of thermocouples, and the casting performed to determine the thermal history of the mold and casting. The resulting cast plates were radiographed and numerousmore » defects identified. Metallography was performed to help identify the nature of the radiographically observed defects. This information was then used to validate a mold filling and solidification model of that casting. Based on the initial casting, good casting design practice, and process simulation of several design alternatives, a revised design was developed with the goal of minimizing casting defects such as porosity. The redesigned mold had a larger hot-top and had its long axis along the horizontal direction. These changes were to try to develop a strong thermal gradient conducive to good feeding and minimization of micro- and macroporosity in the cast plates. An instrumented casting was then performed with the revised mold design and a linear distributor. This design yielded cast plates with significantly less radiographically identified defects. Unfortunately, there was significant variation in plate weight and metal content in their hot-tops. Fluid flow simulations were then performed on this mold/distributor design. This helped identify the issue with this linear distributor design. Additional simulations were then performed on candidate distributor redesigns and a preferred distributor annular design was identified. This improved annular design was used to produce a third instrumented casting with favorable results. These refined designs and their radiographic

  14. Trade and investment liberalization, food systems change and highly processed food consumption: a natural experiment contrasting the soft-drink markets of Peru and Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Baker, Phillip; Friel, Sharon; Schram, Ashley; Labonte, Ron

    2016-06-02

    Free trade agreements (FTAs) can affect food environments and non-communicable disease risks through altering the availability of highly-processed foods. Few studies have quantified such effects. Using a natural experiment this paper quantifies changes in Peru's soft-drink market before/after entry into the US-Peru FTA, compared with Bolivia, a county with no such agreement. Difference-in-difference models were used to test for between country differences in the rate of per capita foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows, soft-drink imports, the volumes of various soft-drinks sold, and the volumes of sugar from soft-drinks before/after FTA ratification (2006) and enforcement (2009). In Peru average per capita FDI-inflows rose from US$103.11 in the pre-ratification period to US$269.79 post-ratification, with little change in Bolivia. This corresponded with a 122 % increase in Peruvian soft-drink production. There was a significant between-country difference in FDI-inflows pre-/post-ratification (DID:1.07, 95 % CI:0.19-1.96; p = 0.01). Despite little difference in total per capita soft-drink sales volumes there was a significant between-country difference in per capita sugar from soft-drinks pre-/post enforcement (DID:-0.99, 95 % CI: -1.91-0.06; p = 0.03) with stagnated growth in Peru and continued growth in Bolivia. This resulted from stagnated sugar sweetened carbonates growth and increased bottled water, juice and sports & energy drinks growth in Peru, with continued carbonates growth in Bolivia. There was a significant between-country difference in per capita carbonates (DID: -1.44, 95 % CI: -2.52-0.36, p = 0.01) and bottled water (DID:0.63; 95 % CI: -0.01-1.26; p = 0.04) sales volumes. The FTA may have resulted in increased FDI-inflows and soft-drink production and also contributed to the diversification of soft drinks produced and sold in Peru with some positive (stagnated carbonates and increased bottled water) and some negative (increased

  15. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

  16. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  17. Fabrication of titanium removable dental prosthesis frameworks with a 2-step investment coating method.

    PubMed

    Koike, Mari; Hummel, Susan K; Ball, John D; Okabe, Toru

    2012-06-01

    Although pure titanium is known to have good biocompatibility, a titanium alloy with better strength is needed for fabricating clinically acceptable, partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP) frameworks. The mechanical properties of an experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy cast with a 2-step investment technique were examined for RDP framework applications. Patterns for tests for various properties and denture frameworks for a preliminary trial casting were invested with a 2-step coating method using 2 types of mold materials: a less reactive spinel compound (Al(2)O(3)·MgO) and a less expensive SiO(2)-based material. The yield and tensile strength (n=5), modulus of elasticity (n=5), elongation (n=5), and hardness (n=8) of the cast Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy were determined. The external appearance and internal porosities of the preliminary trial castings of denture frameworks (n=2) were examined with a conventional dental radiographic unit. Cast Ti-6Al-4V alloy and commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) were used as controls. The data for the mechanical properties were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA (α=.05). The yield strength of the cast Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy was 851 MPa and the hardness was 356 HV. These properties were comparable to those of the cast Ti-6Al-4V and were higher than those of CP Ti (P<.05). One of the acrylic resin-retention areas of the Ti-5Al-5Cu frameworks was found to have been incompletely cast. The cast biocompatible experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy exhibited high strength when cast with a 2-step coating method. With a dedicated study to determine the effect of sprue design on the quality of castings, biocompatible Ti-5Al-5Cu RDP frameworks for a clinical trial can be produced. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  19. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; Baker, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  20. Method for removing volatile components from a ceramic article, and related processes

    DOEpatents

    Klug, Frederic Joseph; DeCarr, Sylvia Marie

    2002-01-01

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  1. The Effect of Casting Ring Liner Length and Prewetting on the Marginal Adaptation and Dimensional Accuracy of Full Crown Castings.

    PubMed

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Hamdi, Osama A; Al-Shahrani, Abdulaziz A; Alhasaniah, Sultan

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of varying cellulose casting ring liner length and its prewetting on the marginal adaptation and dimensional accuracy of full veneer metal castings. The master die was milled in stainless steel to fabricate the wax pattern. Sixty wax patterns were fabricated with a uniform thickness of 1.5 mm at an occlusal surface and 1 mm axial surface, cervical width at 13.5 mm, and 10 mm cuspal height. The samples were divided into six groups ( n = 10). Groups I and II samples had the full-length cellulose prewet and dry ring liner, respectively. The groups III and IV had 2 mm short prewet and dry cellulose ring liner, respectively, whereas groups V and VI were invested in 6 mm short ring liner. The wax patterns were immediately invested in phosphate bonded investment, and casting procedure was completed with nickel-chrome alloy. The castings were cleaned and mean score of measurements at four reference points for marginal adaption, casting height, and cervical width was calculated. The marginal adaption was calculated with Imaje J software, whereas the casting height and cervical width was determined using a digital scale. The data was subjected to one-way analysis of varaince and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 software. The group II had the best marginal adaption with a gap of 63.786 μm followed by group I (65.185 μm), group IV (87.740 μm), and group III (101.455 μm). A large marginal gap was observed in group V at 188.871 μm. Cuspal height was more accurate with group V (10.428 mm), group VI (10.421 mm), and group II (10.488 mm). The cervical width was approximately similar in group I, group III, and group V. Statistically significant difference was observed in Tukey post hoc analysis between group V and group VI with all the other groups with regards to marginal adaptation. The dry cellulose ring liners provided better marginal adaptation in comparison to prewet cellulose ring

  2. The Effect of Casting Ring Liner Length and Prewetting on the Marginal Adaptation and Dimensional Accuracy of Full Crown Castings

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Hamdi, Osama A.; Al-Shahrani, Abdulaziz A.; Alhasaniah, Sultan

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of varying cellulose casting ring liner length and its prewetting on the marginal adaptation and dimensional accuracy of full veneer metal castings. Materials and Methods: The master die was milled in stainless steel to fabricate the wax pattern. Sixty wax patterns were fabricated with a uniform thickness of 1.5 mm at an occlusal surface and 1 mm axial surface, cervical width at 13.5 mm, and 10 mm cuspal height. The samples were divided into six groups (n = 10). Groups I and II samples had the full-length cellulose prewet and dry ring liner, respectively. The groups III and IV had 2 mm short prewet and dry cellulose ring liner, respectively, whereas groups V and VI were invested in 6 mm short ring liner. The wax patterns were immediately invested in phosphate bonded investment, and casting procedure was completed with nickel-chrome alloy. The castings were cleaned and mean score of measurements at four reference points for marginal adaption, casting height, and cervical width was calculated. The marginal adaption was calculated with Imaje J software, whereas the casting height and cervical width was determined using a digital scale. The data was subjected to one-way analysis of varaince and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 software. Results: The group II had the best marginal adaption with a gap of 63.786 μm followed by group I (65.185 μm), group IV (87.740 μm), and group III (101.455 μm). A large marginal gap was observed in group V at 188.871 μm. Cuspal height was more accurate with group V (10.428 mm), group VI (10.421 mm), and group II (10.488 mm). The cervical width was approximately similar in group I, group III, and group V. Statistically significant difference was observed in Tukey post hoc analysis between group V and group VI with all the other groups with regards to marginal adaptation. Conclusion: The dry cellulose ring liners provided better marginal

  3. Optimization to Develop Multiple Response Microstructure and Hardness of Ductile Iron Casting by using GRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabnure, Bahubali Bhupal; Shinde, Vasudev Dhondiram; Kolhapure, Rakesh Ramchandra

    2018-05-01

    Ductile irons are important engineering materials because of its high strength to weight ratio and castability. The ductile iron castings are used widely for automobile applications due to their wide spectrum of property range. Weight reduction is important in automobile to improve its fuel efficiency which can be achieved by thinning down the casting sections without altering its functionality. Generally, automobile castings are having varying section thickness. Varying thickness castings offers different cooling rates while solidification of the casting. The solidification cooling rate decides the final microstructure of the cast components. Cooling rate was found to affect directly the amount of pearlite and ultimately the as cast properties in varying thickness ductile iron castings. In view of this, the automobile impeller casting is selected for study in the present work as it consists of varying section thickness in which small sections are connected to central hub. The casting solidification simulations were performed and analyzed. The solidification cooling rates were analyzed further to correlate the experimental processing parameters. The samples from poured castings were analyzed for microstructure and hardness at different section thickness. Multiple response optimization of microstructure and hardness was carried out by combined Taguchi and Grey Relational Analysis (GRA). Contribution of input variables on the output variables is attained using ANOVA.

  4. Characterization and Evaluation of Incorporation the Casting Sand in Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanelato, E. B.; Azevedo, A. R. G.; Alexandre, J.; Xavier, C. G.; Monteiro, S. N.; Mendonça, T. A. O.

    The process of casting metals and alloys occurs through the fusion of this metal and its subsequent casting into a mold with the dimensions and geometry close to the final piece. Most foundries use sand casting molds for making you. This work aims to characterize and evaluate the foundry sand to allow its use in segments of Civil Engineering, creating a viable destination for a residue is that discarded. The following characterization tests were performer: particle size, chemical analysis, X-ray Diffraction and Density Real grain. For the execution of the test specimens was used to 1:3 cement and sand, and the incorporation of 10% and 20% of the total mass replacing the sand, and the trace reference. The results show that best results in compression and bending tests were obtained by replacing 10 % of common sand for sand casting.

  5. 21 CFR 880.6185 - Cast cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cast cover. 880.6185 Section 880.6185 Food and....6185 Cast cover. (a) Identification. A cast cover is a device intended for medical purposes that is made of waterproof material and placed over a cast to protect it from getting wet during a shower or a...

  6. Investing in Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors Association, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Investing in Innovation" provides a snapshot of trends in the states and identifies a wide range of strategies now employed. California's big investments, such as $3 billion for stem cell research, have already grabbed national headlines. But states like Arizona, Indiana and North Dakota, which haven't historically been big research and…

  7. Considerations in Duplex Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Arthur; Goen, Tom

    Problems of duplex investment are noted in the introduction to this booklet designed to provide a technique by which the investment decision can be approached, develop estimates of typical costs and returns under differing conditions, and encourage investors to analyze objectives and conditions before the decision to buy or build is made. A…

  8. Missouri airport investment study

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    The studys purpose is to provide MoDOT with insight to the potential ROI for airport : investments in terms of economic development. To do so, this study addresses two central : objectives: first, an approach to evaluate airport investments; and s...

  9. The Investment Policy Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John S.; Jarvis, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Successful investing for long-term funds requires a strategic plan. This is true despite--indeed, because of--the fact that the future is unknowable. The plan must be specific, embodying in concrete terms the best thinking of the board of trustees about the investment pool, its goals and purposes; but it also needs to be sufficiently flexible to…

  10. Investing in Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Directions for Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Discusses why it is essential to look at costs related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty not simply as a critical expense, but as part of an intentional investment strategy meant to produce an important and significant value-added benefit. Offers advice on planning, financing, and assessing this investment. (EV)

  11. Investment in Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    Operating a financial investment company in an unstable economy is not easy. But the right training at Vanguard ensures satisfied customers. The company made an investment of its own in learning and development that paid off big in 2009. The learning offerings, both innovative and efficient, keep its workers updated on strategies that bring…

  12. Crew Autonomous Scheduling Test (CAST)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-18

    iss052e016190 (July 18, 2017) --- Astronaut Peggy Whitson is photographed sitting in front of the Cupola windows during the final Crew Autonomous Scheduling Test (CAST) session. The CAST investigation analyzes whether crews can develop plans in a reasonable period of time with appropriate input, whether proximity of planners to the planned operations increases efficiency, and if crew members are more satisfied when given a role in plan development.

  13. Vascular corrosion casting technique steps.

    PubMed

    Verli, Flaviana Dornela; Rossi-Schneider, Tissiana Raquel; Schneider, Felipe Luís; Yurgel, Liliane Soares; de Souza, Maria Antonieta Lopes

    2007-01-01

    The vascular corrosion casting technique produces a replica of vascular beds of normal or pathological tissues. Once associated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), this technique provides details of the three-dimensional anatomic arrangement of the vascular replica, which is the main advantage of this method. The present study is intended to describe the steps of the vascular corrosion casting technique and the different ways to perform them. them.

  14. Simulation of investment returns of toll projects.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-08-01

    This research develops a methodological framework to illustrate key stages in applying the simulation of investment returns of toll projects, acting as an example process of helping agencies conduct numerical risk analysis by taking certain uncertain...

  15. Do scheduled caste and scheduled tribe women legislators mean lower gender-caste gaps in primary schooling in India?

    PubMed

    Halim, Nafisa; Yount, Kathryn M; Cunningham, Solveig

    2016-07-01

    Despite India's substantial investments in primary schooling, gaps in schooling persist across gender and caste-with scheduled caste and scheduled tribe (SC/ST) girls being particularly disadvantaged. The representation of SC/ST women in state legislatures may help to mitigate this disadvantage. Specifically, because of her intersecting gender and caste/tribe identities, a SC/ST woman legislator might maintain a strong sense of solidarity especially with SC/ST girls and women, and support legislative policies benefitting SC/ST girls. Consequently, for this reason, we expect that living in a district where SC/ST women represent in state legislatures in a higher proportion may increase SC/ST girls' primary school completion, progression and performance. We tested this hypothesis using district-level data between 2000 and 2004 from the Indian Election Commission, the 2004/5 India Human Development Survey, and the Indian Census of 2001. As expected, the representation of SC/ST women in state legislatures was positively associated with SC/ST girls' grade completion and age-appropriate grade progression but was apparent not SC/ST girls' primary-school performance. SC/ST women's representation in state legislatures may reduce gender-caste gaps in primary-school attainment in India. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Cast iron-base alloy for cylinder/regenerator housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witter, Stewart L.; Simmons, Harold E.; Woulds, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    NASACC-1 is a castable iron-base alloy designed to replace the costly and strategic cobalt-base X-40 alloy used in the automotive Stirling engine cylinder/generator housing. Over 40 alloy compositions were evaluated using investment cast test bars for stress-rupture testing. Also, hydrogen compatibility and oxygen corrosion resistance tests were used to determine the optimal alloy. NASACC-1 alloy was characterized using elevated and room temperature tensile, creep-rupture, low cycle fatigue, heat capacity, specific heat, and thermal expansion testing. Furthermore, phase analysis was performed on samples with several heat treated conditions. The properties are very encouraging. NASACC-1 alloy shows stress-rupture and low cycle fatigue properties equivalent to X-40. The oxidation resistance surpassed the program goal while maintaining acceptable resistance to hydrogen exposure. The welding, brazing, and casting characteristics are excellent. Finally, the cost of NASACC-1 is significantly lower than that of X-40.

  17. Control system of water flow and casting speed in continuous steel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirian, G. O.; Gheorghiu, C. A.; Hepuţ, T.; Chioncel, C.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the results of research based on real data taken from the installation process at Arcelor Mittal Hunedoara. Using Matlab Simulink an intelligent system is made that takes in data from the process and makes real time adjustments in the rate of flow of the cooling water and the speed of casting that eliminates fissures in the poured material from the secondary cooling of steel. Using Matlab Simulink simulation environment allowed for qualitative analysis for various real world situations. Thus, compared to the old method of approach for the problem of cracks forming in the crust of the steel in the continuous casting, this new method, proposed and developed, brings safety and precision in this complex process, thus removing any doubt on the existence or non-existence of cracks and takes the necessary steps to prevent and correct them.

  18. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' formore » evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important since it

  19. A new method to acquire 3-D images of a dental cast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongke; Yi, Yaxing; Zhu, Zhen; Li, Hua; Qin, Yongyuan

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced our newly developed method to acquire three-dimensional images of a dental cast. A rotatable table, a laser-knife, a mirror, a CCD camera and a personal computer made up of a three-dimensional data acquiring system. A dental cast is placed on the table; the mirror is installed beside the table; a linear laser is projected to the dental cast; the CCD camera is put up above the dental cast, it can take picture of the dental cast and the shadow in the mirror; while the table rotating, the camera records the shape of the laser streak projected on the dental cast, and transmit the data to the computer. After the table rotated one circuit, the computer processes the data, calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of the dental cast's surface. In data processing procedure, artificial neural networks are enrolled to calibrate the lens distortion, map coordinates form screen coordinate system to world coordinate system. According to the three-dimensional coordinates, the computer reconstructs the stereo image of the dental cast. It is essential for computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. In comparison with other systems in service, for example, laser beam three-dimensional scanning system, the characteristic of this three-dimensional data acquiring system: a. celerity, it casts only 1 minute to scan a dental cast; b. compact, the machinery is simple and compact; c. no blind zone, a mirror is introduced ably to reduce blind zone.

  20. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    DOEpatents

    Filippi, Arthur M.; Sprecace, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  1. A novel akermanite/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) porous composite scaffold fabricated via a solvent casting-particulate leaching method improved by solvent self-proliferating process

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yao; Zhang, Mengjiao; Chen, Xianchun; Pu, Ximing; Liao, Xiaoming; Huang, Zhongbing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Desirable scaffolds for tissue engineering should be biodegradable carriers to supply suitable microenvironments mimicked the extracellular matrices for desired cellular interactions and to provide supports for the formation of new tissues. In this work, a kind of slightly soluble bioactive ceramic akermanite (AKT) powders were aboratively selected and introduced in the PLGA matrix, a novel l-lactide modified AKT/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (m-AKT/PLGA) composite scaffold was fabricated via a solvent casting-particulate leaching method improved by solvent self-proliferating process. The effects of m-AKT contents on properties of composite scaffolds and on MC3T3-E1 cellular behaviors in vitro have been primarily investigated. The fabricated scaffolds exhibited three-dimensional porous networks, in which homogenously distributed cavities in size of 300–400 μm were interconnected by some smaller holes in a size of 100–200 μm. Meanwhile, the mechanical structure of scaffolds was reinforced by the introduction of m-AKT. Moreover, alkaline ionic products released by m-AKT could neutralize the acidic degradation products of PLGA, and the apatite-mineralization ability of scaffolds could be largely improved. More valuably, significant promotions on adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 have been observed, which implied the calcium, magnesium and especially silidous ions released sustainably from composite scaffolds could regulate the behaviors of osteogenesis-related cells. PMID:28798869

  2. A novel akermanite/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) porous composite scaffold fabricated via a solvent casting-particulate leaching method improved by solvent self-proliferating process.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yao; Zhang, Mengjiao; Chen, Xianchun; Pu, Ximing; Liao, Xiaoming; Huang, Zhongbing; Yin, Guangfu

    2017-08-01

    Desirable scaffolds for tissue engineering should be biodegradable carriers to supply suitable microenvironments mimicked the extracellular matrices for desired cellular interactions and to provide supports for the formation of new tissues. In this work, a kind of slightly soluble bioactive ceramic akermanite (AKT) powders were aboratively selected and introduced in the PLGA matrix, a novel l-lactide modified AKT/poly (lactic- co -glycolic acid) (m-AKT/PLGA) composite scaffold was fabricated via a solvent casting-particulate leaching method improved by solvent self-proliferating process. The effects of m-AKT contents on properties of composite scaffolds and on MC3T3-E1 cellular behaviors in vitro have been primarily investigated. The fabricated scaffolds exhibited three-dimensional porous networks, in which homogenously distributed cavities in size of 300-400 μm were interconnected by some smaller holes in a size of 100-200 μm. Meanwhile, the mechanical structure of scaffolds was reinforced by the introduction of m-AKT. Moreover, alkaline ionic products released by m-AKT could neutralize the acidic degradation products of PLGA, and the apatite-mineralization ability of scaffolds could be largely improved. More valuably, significant promotions on adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 have been observed, which implied the calcium, magnesium and especially silidous ions released sustainably from composite scaffolds could regulate the behaviors of osteogenesis-related cells.

  3. The effect of nano-SiC on characteristics of ADC12/nano-SiC composite with Sr and TiB addition produced by stir casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anne Zulfia, S.; Salshabia, Nadella; Dhaneswara, Donanta; Utomo, Budi Wahyu

    2018-05-01

    ADC12 reinforced nano SiC has been successfully produced by stir casting process. Nano SiC was added into ADC12 alloy varied from 0.05 to 0.3 vf-% while Al-5Ti-1B and Sr were kept constant at 0.04 and 0.02 wt-% respectively to all composites. Mg was added 10 wt% to improve reinforce's wettability. The addition of Al-5Ti-1B to the alloy was as grain refiner while Sr was added to modify Mg2Si. All composites were characterized both microstructures analysis and mechanical properties include tensile strength, hardness, wear rate, impact strength, and porosity. The highest properties of composites was obtained at 0.3 vf-% nano SiC addition with UTS of 155.4 MPa, hardness of 46.16 HRB, impact strength of 0.22 J/mm2, and wear rate of 1.71 × 10-5 mm3/m. Tensile strength and hardness increased as grain size and porosities decreased. The highest wear resistance was investigated on the composition with the highest hardness. Impact strength decreased due to increasing volume fraction of nano-SiC. The phases present in microsturucture was dominantly Mg2Si which also affected mechanical properties of these composites.

  4. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  5. Freeze Casting for Assembling Bioinspired Structural Materials.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qunfeng; Huang, Chuanjin; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2017-12-01

    Nature is very successful in designing strong and tough, lightweight materials. Examples include seashells, bone, teeth, fish scales, wood, bamboo, silk, and many others. A distinctive feature of all these materials is that their properties are far superior to those of their constituent phases. Many of these natural materials are lamellar or layered in nature. With its "brick and mortar" structure, nacre is an example of a layered material that exhibits extraordinary physical properties. Finding inspiration in living organisms to create bioinspired materials is the subject of intensive research. Several processing techniques have been proposed to design materials mimicking natural materials, such as layer-by-layer deposition, self-assembly, electrophoretic deposition, hydrogel casting, doctor blading, and many others. Freeze casting, also known as ice-templating, is a technique that has received considerable attention in recent years to produce bioinspired bulk materials. Here, recent advances in the freeze-casting technique are reviewed for fabricating lamellar scaffolds by assembling different dimensional building blocks, including nanoparticles, polymer chains, nanofibers, and nanosheets. These lamellar scaffolds are often infiltrated by a second phase, typically a soft polymer matrix, a hard ceramic matrix, or a metal matrix. The unique architecture of the resultant bioinspired structural materials displays excellent mechanical properties. The challenges of the current research in using the freeze-casting technique to create materials large enough to be useful are also discussed, and the technique's promise for fabricating high-performance nacre-inspired structural materials in the future is reviewed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Fabrication of cast particle-reinforced metals via pressure infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klier, E. M.; Mortensen, A.; Cornie, J. A.; Flemings, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    A new casting process for fabrication of particle-reinforced metals is presented whereby a composite of particulate reinforcing phase in metal is first produced by pressure infiltration. This composite is then diluted in additional molten metal to obtain the desired reinforcement volume fraction and metal composition. This process produces a pore-free as-cast particulate metal-matrix composite. This process is demonstrated for fabrication of magnesium-matrix composites containing SiC reinforcements of average diameter 30, 10 and 3 microns. It is compared with the compocasting process, which was investigated as well for similar SiC particles in Mg-10 wt pct Al, and resulted in unacceptable levels of porosity in the as-cast composite.

  7. Precision of Fit of Titanium and Cast Implant Frameworks Using a New Matching Formula

    PubMed Central

    Sierraalta, Marianella; Vivas, Jose L.; Razzoog, Michael E.; Wang, Rui-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. Fit of prosthodontic frameworks is linked to the lifetime survival of dental implants and maintenance of surrounding bone. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the precision of fit of milled one-piece Titanium fixed complete denture frameworks to that of conventional cast frameworks. Material and Methods. Fifteen casts fabricated from a single edentulous CAD/CAM surgical guide were separated in two groups and resin patterns simulating the framework for a fixed complete denture developed. Five casts were sent to dental laboratories to invest, cast in a Palladium-Gold alloy and fit the framework. Ten casts had the resin pattern scanned for fabrication of milled bars in Titanium. Using measuring software, positions of implant replicas in the definitive model were recorded. The three dimensional spatial orientation of each implant replica was matched to the implant replica. Results. Results demonstrated the mean vertical gap of the Cast framework was 0.021 (+0.004) mm and 0.012 (0.002) mm determined by fixed and unfixed best-fit matching coordinate system. For Titanium frameworks they were 0.0037 (+0.0028) mm and 0.0024 (+0.0005) mm, respectively. Conclusions. Milled one-piece Titanium fixed complete denture frameworks provided a more accurate precision of fit then traditional cast frameworks. PMID:22550486

  8. Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-03-27

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in themore » HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of additional LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with waste acceptance criteria for the IDF disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long term performance of the waste form in the IDF disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF

  9. Multimodal freight investment criteria.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-07-01

    Literature was reviewed on multi-modal investment criteria for freight projects, examining measures and techniques for quantifying project benefits and costs, as well as ways to describe the economic importance of freight transportation. : A limited ...

  10. Immigration Through Investment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Richard S.

    1978-01-01

    To qualify as an investor exempt from the labor certification requirement, the applicant must essentially establish, by documentary evidence, that he has made an investment or outlay of capital, totaling at least $40,000. (NQ)

  11. Investment, regulation, and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Stuart J; McDonald, Jillian; Falck-Zepeda, Jose

    2014-01-01

    As with any technological innovation, time refines the technology, improving upon the original version of the innovative product. The initial GM crops had single traits for either herbicide tolerance or insect resistance. Current varieties have both of these traits stacked together and in many cases other abiotic and biotic traits have also been stacked. This innovation requires investment. While this is relatively straight forward, certain conditions need to exist such that investments can be facilitated. The principle requirement for investment is that regulatory frameworks render consistent and timely decisions. If the certainty of regulatory outcomes weakens, the potential for changes in investment patterns increases.   This article provides a summary background to the leading plant breeding technologies that are either currently being used to develop new crop varieties or are in the pipeline to be applied to plant breeding within the next few years. Challenges for existing regulatory systems are highlighted. Utilizing an option value approach from investment literature, an assessment of uncertainty regarding the regulatory approval for these varying techniques is undertaken. This research highlights which technology development options have the greatest degree of uncertainty and hence, which ones might be expected to see an investment decline. PMID:24499745

  12. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoyinu, Yemi

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloymore » systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.« less

  13. Strain Rate Dependency of Bronze Metal Matrix Composite Mechanical Properties as a Function of Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lloyd; Joyce, Peter; Radice, Joshua; Gregorian, Dro; Gobble, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of tungsten carbide (WC)-filled bronze castings fabricated by centrifugal and sedimentation-casting techniques are examined, in this study. Both casting techniques are an attempt to produce a functionally graded material with high wear resistance at a chosen surface. Potential applications of such materials include shaft bushings, electrical contact surfaces, and brake rotors. Knowledge of strain rate-dependent mechanical properties is recommended for predicting component response due to dynamic loading or impact events. A brief overview of the casting techniques for the materials considered in this study is followed by an explanation of the test matrix and testing techniques. Hardness testing, density measurement, and determination of the volume fraction of WC particles are performed throughout the castings using both image analysis and optical microscopy. The effects of particle filling on mechanical properties are first evaluated through a microhardness survey of the castings. The volume fraction of WC particles is validated using a thorough density survey and a rule-of-mixtures model. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) testing of various volume fraction specimens is conducted to determine strain dependence of mechanical properties and to compare the process-property relationships between the two casting techniques. The baseline performances of C95400 bronze are provided for comparison. The results show that the addition of WC particles improves microhardness significantly for the centrifugally cast specimens, and, to a lesser extent, in the sedimentation-cast specimens, largely because the WC particles are more concentrated as a result of the centrifugal-casting process. Both metal matrix composites (MMCs) demonstrate strain rate dependency, with sedimentation casting having a greater, but variable, effects on material response. This difference is attributed to legacy effects from the casting process, namely

  14. Fan Fuel Casting Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, Seth D.

    LANL was approached to provide material and design guidance for a fan-shaped fuel element. A total of at least three castings were planned. The first casting is a simple billet mold to be made from high carbon DU-10Mo charge material. The second and third castings are for optimization of the actual fuel plate mold. The experimental scope for optimization is only broad enough for a second iteration of the mold design. It is important to note that partway through FY17, this project was cancelled by the sponsor. This report is being written in order to capture the knowledge gained shouldmore » this project resume at a later date.« less

  15. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptablemore » for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF« less

  16. Investing in river health.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J

    2002-01-01

    Rivers provide society with numerous returns. These relate to both the passive and extractive uses of the resources embodied in river environments. Some returns are manifest in the form of financial gains whilst others are non-monetary. For instance, rivers are a source of monetary income for those who harvest their fish. The water flowing in rivers is extracted for drinking and to water crops and livestock that in turn yield monetary profits. However, rivers are also the source of non-monetary values arising from biological diversity. People who use them for recreation (picnicking, swimming, boating) also receive non-monetary returns. The use of rivers to yield these returns has had negative consequences. With extraction for financial return has come diminished water quantity and quality. The result has been a diminished capacity of rivers to yield (non-extractive) environmental returns and to continue to provide extractive values. A river is like any other asset. With use, the value of an asset depreciates because its productivity declines. In order to maintain the productive capacity of their assets, managers put aside from their profits depreciation reserves that can be invested in the repair or replacement of those assets. Society now faces a situation in which its river assets have depreciated in terms of their capacity to provide monetary and non-monetary returns. An investment in river "repair" is required. But, investment means that society gives up something now in order to achieve some benefit in the future. Society thus has to grapple wih the choice between investing in river health and other investments--such as in hospitals, schools, defence etc. - as well as between investing in river health and current consumption--such as on clothes, food, cars etc. A commonly used aid for investment decision making in the public sector is benefit cost analysis. However, its usefulness in tackling the river investment problem is restricted because it requires all

  17. Cause and Prevention of Explosions Involving DC Casting of Aluminum Sheet Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Ray T.; Ekenes, J. Martin

    The casting of aluminum alloy sheet ingot and T-bar presents the potential for some of the most volatile situations that can occur in DC (direct chill) and EMC (Electromagnetic) casting processes. Aluminum Association explosion incident data from over 300 explosions spanning a twenty-year period were reviewed and analyzed looking for common factors and repetitive reasons for explosions. Analysis of explosions occurring during the three stages of sheet ingot casting, `start of cast', `steady state' and `end of cast', were examined and prioritized. Case studies illustrate the need for understanding both technical and non-technical factors contributing to explosions involving molten metal. This paper identifies the major causes of explosions involving DC casting of aluminum alloy sheet ingot and makes recommendations for how to prevent the recurrence of such events and minimize the risk of injury.

  18. Simulation of the Continuous Casting and Cooling Behavior of Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhipu; Ju, Dongying

    2017-04-17

    The development of melt spinning technique for preparation of metallic glasses was summarized. The limitations as well as restrictions of the melt spinning embodiments were also analyzed. As an improvement and variation of the melt spinning method, the vertical-type twin-roll casting (VTRC) process was discussed. As the thermal history experienced by the casting metals to a great extent determines the qualities of final products, cooling rate in the quenching process is believed to have a significant effect on glass formation. In order to estimate the ability to produce metallic glasses by VTRC method, temperature and flow phenomena of the melt in molten pool were computed, and cooling rates under different casting conditions were calculated with the simulation results. Considering the fluid character during casting process, the material derivative method based on continuum theory was adopted in the cooling rate calculation. Results show that the VTRC process has a good ability in continuous casting metallic glassy ribbons.

  19. Simulation of the Continuous Casting and Cooling Behavior of Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhipu; Ju, Dongying

    2017-01-01

    The development of melt spinning technique for preparation of metallic glasses was summarized. The limitations as well as restrictions of the melt spinning embodiments were also analyzed. As an improvement and variation of the melt spinning method, the vertical-type twin-roll casting (VTRC) process was discussed. As the thermal history experienced by the casting metals to a great extent determines the qualities of final products, cooling rate in the quenching process is believed to have a significant effect on glass formation. In order to estimate the ability to produce metallic glasses by VTRC method, temperature and flow phenomena of the melt in molten pool were computed, and cooling rates under different casting conditions were calculated with the simulation results. Considering the fluid character during casting process, the material derivative method based on continuum theory was adopted in the cooling rate calculation. Results show that the VTRC process has a good ability in continuous casting metallic glassy ribbons. PMID:28772779

  20. Development of High-Performance Cast Crankshafts. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Mark E

    The objective of this project was to develop technologies that would enable the production of cast crankshafts that can replace high performance forged steel crankshafts. To achieve this, the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the new material needs to be 850 MPa with a desired minimum Yield Strength (YS; 0.2% offset) of 615 MPa and at least 10% elongation. Perhaps more challenging, the cast material needs to be able to achieve sufficient local fatigue properties to satisfy the durability requirements in today’s high performance gasoline and diesel engine applications. The project team focused on the development of cast steel alloysmore » for application in crankshafts to take advantage of the higher stiffness over other potential material choices. The material and process developed should be able to produce high-performance crankshafts at no more than 110% of the cost of current production cast units, perhaps the most difficult objective to achieve. To minimize costs, the primary alloy design strategy was to design compositions that can achieve the required properties with minimal alloying and post-casting heat treatments. An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) based approach was utilized, rather than relying only on traditional trial-and-error methods, which has been proven to accelerate alloy development time. Prototype melt chemistries designed using ICME were cast as test specimens and characterized iteratively to develop an alloy design within a stage-gate process. Standard characterization and material testing was done to validate the alloy performance against design targets and provide feedback to material design and manufacturing process models. Finally, the project called for Caterpillar and General Motors (GM) to develop optimized crankshaft designs using the final material and manufacturing processing path developed. A multi-disciplinary effort was to integrate finite element analyses by engine designers and geometry

  1. Quiet breathing in hindlimb casted mice.

    PubMed

    Receno, Candace N; Roffo, Katelynn E; Mickey, Marisa C; DeRuisseau, Keith C; DeRuisseau, Lara R

    2018-06-07

    The hindlimb casting model was developed to study skeletal muscle reloading following a period of unloading. It is unknown if ventilation parameters of mice are affected by the casting model. We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb casted mice have similar ventilatory patterns compared to mice with the casts removed. Male CD-1 mice underwent 14 days of hindlimb immobilization via plaster casting. Breathing parameters were obtained utilizing unrestrained barometric plethysmography (UBP). Breathing traces were analyzed with Ponemah software for breathing frequency, tidal volume (TV), and minute ventilation (MV). Frequency, TV and MV did not show any differences in quiet breathing patterns during or post-casting in mice. Thus, the hindlimb casting model does not complicate breathing during and after casting and should not interfere with the unloading and reloading of skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established. (3) For castings procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties by test of coupons cut from the...

  3. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... established. (3) For castings procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties by test of coupons cut from the...

  4. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... established. (3) For castings procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties by test of coupons cut from the...

  5. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established. (3) For castings procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties by test of coupons cut from the...

  6. Endowments: Investing in Education's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald A.

    1996-01-01

    A discussion of college endowment fund management looks at a trend toward successful investments in the last year and focuses on the increasing financial sophistication of historically black institutions. Trends include less conservative investing, more trustee involvement in investment decision making, and use of investment counselors. (MSE)

  7. Simple Guidelines for Sound Investing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domini, Amy L.

    1985-01-01

    Investment strategies for colleges and universities are discussed. Colleges must begin their strategic investment planning with regular sources of income to ensure year-to-year survival. Cash management, short-term investment, investment grade, and creating endowment are discussed. (MLW)

  8. Indirect Fabrication of Lattice Metals with Thin Sections Using Centrifugal Casting.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jiwon; Ju, Jaehyung; Thurman, James

    2016-05-14

    One of the typical methods to manufacture 3D lattice metals is the direct-metal additive manufacturing (AM) process such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In spite of its potential processing capability, the direct AM method has several disadvantages such as high cost, poor surface finish of final products, limitation in material selection, high thermal stress, and anisotropic properties of parts. We propose a cost-effective method to manufacture 3D lattice metals. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed protocol on fabrication of 3D lattice metals having a complex shape and a thin wall thickness; e.g., octet truss made of Al and Cu alloys having a unit cell length of 5 mm and a cell wall thickness of 0.5 mm. An overall experimental procedure is divided into eight sections: (a) 3D printing of sacrificial patterns (b) melt-out of support materials (c) removal of residue of support materials (d) pattern assembly (e) investment (f) burn-out of sacrificial patterns (g) centrifugal casting (h) post-processing for final products. The suggested indirect AM technique provides the potential to manufacture ultra-lightweight lattice metals; e.g., lattice structures with Al alloys. It appears that the process parameters should be properly controlled depending on materials and lattice geometry, observing the final products of octet truss metals by the indirect AM technique.

  9. Indirect Fabrication of Lattice Metals with Thin Sections Using Centrifugal Casting

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Jiwon; Ju, Jaehyung; Thurman, James

    2016-01-01

    One of the typical methods to manufacture 3D lattice metals is the direct-metal additive manufacturing (AM) process such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In spite of its potential processing capability, the direct AM method has several disadvantages such as high cost, poor surface finish of final products, limitation in material selection, high thermal stress, and anisotropic properties of parts. We propose a cost-effective method to manufacture 3D lattice metals. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed protocol on fabrication of 3D lattice metals having a complex shape and a thin wall thickness; e.g., octet truss made of Al and Cu alloys having a unit cell length of 5 mm and a cell wall thickness of 0.5 mm. An overall experimental procedure is divided into eight sections: (a) 3D printing of sacrificial patterns (b) melt-out of support materials (c) removal of residue of support materials (d) pattern assembly (e) investment (f) burn-out of sacrificial patterns (g) centrifugal casting (h) post-processing for final products. The suggested indirect AM technique provides the potential to manufacture ultra-lightweight lattice metals; e.g., lattice structures with Al alloys. It appears that the process parameters should be properly controlled depending on materials and lattice geometry, observing the final products of octet truss metals by the indirect AM technique. PMID:27214495

  10. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J. Brock

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  11. The fractography of casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    Several types of casting alloys were fractured using various loading modes (uniaxial tension, bending, impact, and torsion, and cyclic stressing), and the corresponding mechanical properties were determined. The unetched and etched fracture surfaces and the microstructures were examined using conventional techniques. The types of casting alloys that were the subjects f these investigations include gray iron, ductile iron, cast steel, and aluminum-base alloys (A380, A356, and 319). The fractographic studies have yielded these generalizations regarding the topography of the fracture surfaces. In the case of low-ductility alloys such as gray iron and the aluminum-base alloys, the tensile edge of amore » fracture surface produced by a stress system with a strong bending-moment component has a highly irregular contour, whereas the compressive edge of the fracture surface is quite straight and parallel to the bend axis. On the other hand, the periphery of a fracture surface produced by uniaxial tension has a completely irregular contour. The fracture surface produced by cyclic loading of a gray iron does not display any macroscopic evidence (such as a thumb nail) of the loading mode. However, the fracture surface of each of the other casting alloys displays clear, macroscopic evidence of failure induced by fatigue. The aluminum-base alloys fracture completely within the interdendritic region of the microstructure when subjected to monotonic loading by uniaxial tension or bending, whereas a fatigue crack propagates predominantly through the primary crystals of the microstructure.« less

  12. Casting Freedom, 1860-1862

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Thomas Crawford, an American Sculptor, created the full-size figure of Freedom in clay. Molds were made, from which a full-size positive plaster model was cast in five main sections. This model is on view today in the basement rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. Clark Mills was a self-taught American sculptor with experience in casting…

  13. Math: Objectives Guide. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The guide lists math objectives needed for independent living by secondary special education students. One of a series of Project CAST (Community and School Together) life skills manuals, the guide outlines basic competencies in terms of goal statements, behavioral objectives, and specialized vocabulary for the following areas: money, making…

  14. Vancomycin-Associated Cast Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Yosu; Louis, Kevin; Jouanneau, Chantal; Placier, Sandrine; Esteve, Emmanuel; Bazin, Dominique; Rondeau, Eric; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Wolfromm, Alice; Gosset, Clément; Boueilh, Anna; Burbach, Maren; Frère, Perrine; Verpont, Marie-Christine; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Langui, Dominique; Daudon, Michel; Frochot, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Vancomycin is a widely prescribed antibiotic, but the exact nature of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity is unclear, in particular when considering the frequent coadministration of aminoglycosides. We describe here the initial case of a 56-year-old woman with normal renal function developing unexplained ARF without hypovolemia after administration of vancomycin without coadministration of aminoglycosides. Studying the patient’s renal biopsy specimen, we ascertained that obstructive tubular casts composed of noncrystal nanospheric vancomycin aggregates entangled with uromodulin explained the vancomycin-associated ARF. We developed in parallel a new immunohistologic staining technique to detect vancomycin in renal tissue and confirmed retrospectively that deleterious vancomycin-associated casts existed in eight additional patients with acute tubular necrosis in the absence of hypovolemia. Concomitant high vancomycin trough plasma levels had been observed in each patient. We also reproduced experimentally the toxic and obstructive nature of vancomycin-associated cast nephropathy in mice, which we detected using different in vivo imaging techniques. In conclusion, the interaction of uromodulin with nanospheric vancomycin aggregates represents a new mode of tubular cast formation, revealing the hitherto unsuspected mechanism of vancomycin-associated renal injury. PMID:28082518

  15. Vancomycin-Associated Cast Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luque, Yosu; Louis, Kevin; Jouanneau, Chantal; Placier, Sandrine; Esteve, Emmanuel; Bazin, Dominique; Rondeau, Eric; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Wolfromm, Alice; Gosset, Clément; Boueilh, Anna; Burbach, Maren; Frère, Perrine; Verpont, Marie-Christine; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Langui, Dominique; Daudon, Michel; Frochot, Vincent; Mesnard, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Vancomycin is a widely prescribed antibiotic, but the exact nature of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity is unclear, in particular when considering the frequent coadministration of aminoglycosides. We describe here the initial case of a 56-year-old woman with normal renal function developing unexplained ARF without hypovolemia after administration of vancomycin without coadministration of aminoglycosides. Studying the patient's renal biopsy specimen, we ascertained that obstructive tubular casts composed of noncrystal nanospheric vancomycin aggregates entangled with uromodulin explained the vancomycin-associated ARF. We developed in parallel a new immunohistologic staining technique to detect vancomycin in renal tissue and confirmed retrospectively that deleterious vancomycin-associated casts existed in eight additional patients with acute tubular necrosis in the absence of hypovolemia. Concomitant high vancomycin trough plasma levels had been observed in each patient. We also reproduced experimentally the toxic and obstructive nature of vancomycin-associated cast nephropathy in mice, which we detected using different in vivo imaging techniques. In conclusion, the interaction of uromodulin with nanospheric vancomycin aggregates represents a new mode of tubular cast formation, revealing the hitherto unsuspected mechanism of vancomycin-associated renal injury. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Reducing the Incidence of Cast-related Skin Complications in Children Treated With Cast Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Difazio, Rachel L; Harris, Marie; Feldman, Lanna; Mahan, Susan T

    2017-12-01

    Cast immobilization remains the mainstay of pediatric orthopaedic care, yet little is known about the incidence of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization. The purposes of this quality improvement project were to: (1) establish a baseline rate of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization, (2) identify trends in children who experienced cast-related skin complications, (3) design an intervention aimed at decreasing the rate of cast-related skin complications, and (4) determine the effectiveness of the intervention. A prospective interrupted time-series design was used to determine the incidence of cast-related skin complications overtime and compare the rates of skin complications before and after an intervention designed to decrease the incidence of cast-related heel complications. All consecutive patients who were treated with cast immobilization from September 2012 to September 2014 were included. A cast-related skin complications data collection tool was used to capture all cast-related skin complications. A high rate of heel events was noted in our preliminary analysis and an intervention was designed to decrease the rate of cast-related skin complications, including the addition of padding during casting and respective provider education. The estimated cast-related skin events rate for all patients was 8.9 per 1000 casts applied. The rate for the total preintervention sample was 13.6 per 1000 casts which decreased to 6.6 in the postintervention sample. When examining the heel-only group, the rate was 17.1 per 1000 lower extremity casts applied in the preintervention group and 6.8 in the postintervention group. Incorporating padding to the heel of lower extremity cast was an effective intervention in decreasing the incidence of cast-related skin complications in patients treated with cast immobilization. Level II.

  17. Tuning the properties of polyhydroxybutyrate films using acetic acid via solvent casting

    PubMed Central

    Anbukarasu, Preetam; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) films were fabricated using acetic acid as an alternative to common solvents such as chloroform. The PHB films were prepared using a solvent casting process at temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 160 °C. The crystallinity, mechanical properties and surface morphology of the films cast at different temperatures were characterized and compared to PHB films cast using chloroform as a solvent. Results revealed that the properties of the PHB film varied considerably with solvent casting temperature. In general, samples processed with acetic acid at low temperatures had comparable mechanical properties to PHB cast using chloroform. This acetic acid based method is environmentally friendly, cost efficient and allows more flexible processing conditions and broader ranges of polymer properties than traditional methods. PMID:26640089

  18. Tuning the properties of polyhydroxybutyrate films using acetic acid via solvent casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbukarasu, Preetam; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2015-12-01

    Biodegradable polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) films were fabricated using acetic acid as an alternative to common solvents such as chloroform. The PHB films were prepared using a solvent casting process at temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 160 °C. The crystallinity, mechanical properties and surface morphology of the films cast at different temperatures were characterized and compared to PHB films cast using chloroform as a solvent. Results revealed that the properties of the PHB film varied considerably with solvent casting temperature. In general, samples processed with acetic acid at low temperatures had comparable mechanical properties to PHB cast using chloroform. This acetic acid based method is environmentally friendly, cost efficient and allows more flexible processing conditions and broader ranges of polymer properties than traditional methods.

  19. Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil; Morando, C.N.

    2011-01-15

    The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using opticalmore » microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.« less

  20. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5940 Cast component. (a) Identification. A cast component is a...

  1. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5940 Cast component. (a) Identification. A cast component is a...

  2. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5940 Cast component. (a) Identification. A cast component is a...

  3. The Ins and Outs of Relief Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on clay casting that introduces students to relief sculpture. The unit takes three 45 to 50 minute class periods three weeks apart. Discusses each class session in detail: (1) creating the casting; (2) turning out and rinsing the casting; and (3) enriching the surface with color. (CMK)

  4. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    MedlinePlus

    ... a waterproof plastic cast protector instead of plastic bags. You can buy this at a drugstore. Keep the cast completely out of the water by propping it up on the side of the tub. If the cast or liner gets splashed, gently blow air into it from a hair dryer on the ...

  5. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... the cast heel, toe cap, cast support, and walking iron. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls...

  6. 21 CFR 888.5940 - Cast component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cast component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... the cast heel, toe cap, cast support, and walking iron. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls...

  7. How to Avoid Cast Saw Complications.

    PubMed

    Halanski, Matthew A

    2016-06-01

    As casts are routinely used in pediatric orthopaedics, casts saws are commonly used to remove such casts. Despite being a viewed as the "conservative" and therefore often assumed safest treatment modality, complications associated with the use of casts and cast saws occur. In this manuscript, we review the risk factors associated with cast saw injuries. Cast saw injuries are thermal or abrasive (or both) in nature. Thermal risk factors include: cast saw specifications (including a lack of attached vacuum), use of a dull blade, cutting in a concavity, too thin padding, and overly thick casting materials. Risk factors associated with abrasive injuries include: sharp blades, thin padding, and cutting over boney prominences. Because nearly all clinicians contact the skin with the blade during cast removal, appropriate "in-out technique" is critical. Such technique prevents a hot blade from remaining in contact with the skin for any significant time, diminishing the risk of burn. Similarly, using such technique prevents "dragging the blade" that may pull the skin taught, cutting it. It may be useful to teach proper technique as perforating a cast rather than cutting a cast.

  8. A comparative study of the microstructures observed in statically cast and continuously cast Bi-In-Sn ternary eutectic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S.; Soda, H.; McLean, A.

    2000-01-01

    A ternary eutectic alloy with a composition of 57.2 pct Bi, 24.8 pct In, and 18 pct Sn was continuously cast into wire of 2 mm diameter with casting speeds of 14 and 79 mm/min using the Ohno Continuous Casting (OCC) process. The microstructures obtained were compared with those of statically cast specimens. Extensive segregation of massive Bi blocks, Bi complex structures, and tin-rich dendrites was found in specimens that were statically cast. Decomposition of {radical}Sn by a eutectoid reaction was confirmed based on microstructural evidence. Ternary eutectic alloy with a cooling rate of approximately 1 C/min formed a doublemore » binary eutectic. The double binary eutectic consisted of regions of BiIn and decomposed {radical}Sn in the form of a dendrite cell structure and regions of Bi and decomposed {radical}Sn in the form of a complex-regular cell. The Bi complex-regular cells, which are a ternary eutectic constituent, existed either along the boundaries of the BiIn-decomposed {radical}Sn dendrite cells or at the front of elongated dendrite cell structures. In the continuously cast wires, primary Sn dendrites coupled with a small Bi phase were uniformly distributed within the Bi-In alloy matrix. Neither massive Bi phase, Bi complex-regular cells, no BiIn eutectic dendrite cells were observed, resulting in a more uniform microstructure in contrast to the heavily segregated structures of the statically cast specimens.« less

  9. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Thangirala, Mani

    The Steam Turbine critical stationary structural components are high integrity Large Shell and Valve Casing heavy section Castings, containing high temperature steam under high pressures. Hence to support the development of advanced materials technology for use in an AUSC steam turbine capable of operating with steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F) and 35 Mpa (5000 psia), Casting alloy selection and evaluation of mechanical, metallurgical properties and castability with robust manufacturing methods are mandated. Alloy down select from Phase 1 based on producability criteria and creep rupture properties tested by NETL-Albany and ORNL directed the consortium to investigate cast properties of Haynesmore » 282 and Haynes 263. The goals of Task 4 in Phase 2 are to understand a broader range of mechanical properties, the impact of manufacturing variables on those properties. Scale up the size of heats to production levels to facilitate the understanding of the impact of heat and component weight, on metallurgical and mechanical behavior. GE Power & Water Materials and Processes Engineering for the Phase 2, Task 4.0 Castings work, systematically designed and executed casting material property evaluation, multiple test programs. Starting from 15 lbs. cylinder castings to world’s first 17,000 lbs. poured weight, heavy section large steam turbine partial valve Haynes 282 super alloy casting. This has demonstrated scalability of the material for steam Turbine applications. Activities under Task 4.0, Investigated and characterized various mechanical properties of Cast Haynes 282 and Cast Nimonic 263. The development stages involved were: 1) Small Cast Evaluation: 4 inch diam. Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 Cylinders. This provided effects of liquidus super heat range and first baseline mechanical data on cast versions of conventional vacuum re-melted and forged Ni based super alloys. 2) Step block castings of 300 lbs. and 600 lbs. Haynes 282 from 2 foundry heats were evaluated

  10. Software Computes Tape-Casting Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    2003-01-01

    Tcast2 is a FORTRAN computer program that accelerates the setup of a process in which a slurry containing metal particles and a polymeric binder is cast, to a thickness regulated by a doctor blade, onto fibers wound on a rotating drum to make a green precursor of a metal-matrix/fiber composite tape. Before Tcast2, setup parameters were determined by trial and error in time-consuming multiple iterations of the process. In Tcast2, the fiber architecture in the final composite is expressed in terms of the lateral distance between fibers and the thickness-wise distance between fibers in adjacent plies. The lateral distance is controlled via the manner of winding. The interply spacing is controlled via the characteristics of the slurry and the doctor-blade height. When a new combination of fibers and slurry is first cast and dried to a green tape, the shrinkage from the wet to the green condition and a few other key parameters of the green tape are measured. These parameters are provided as input to Tcast2, which uses them to compute the doctor-blade height and fiber spacings needed to obtain the desired fiber architecture and fiber volume fraction in the final composite.

  11. Do scheduled caste and scheduled tribe women legislators mean lower gender-caste gaps in primary schooling in India?

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Nafisa; Yount, Kathryn M.; Cunningham, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    Despite India’s substantial investments in primary schooling, gaps in schooling persist across gender and caste—with scheduled caste and scheduled tribe (SC/ST) girls being particularly disadvantaged. The representation of SC/ST women in state legislatures may help to mitigate this disadvantage. Specifically, because of her intersecting gender and caste/tribe identities, a SC/ST woman legislator might maintain a strong sense of solidarity especially with SC/ST girls and women, and support legislative policies benefitting SC/ST girls. Consequently, for this reason, we expect that living in a district where SC/ST women represent in state legislatures in a higher proportion may increase SC/ST girls’ primary school completion, progression and performance. We tested this hypothesis using district-level data between 2000 and 2004 from the Indian Election Commission, the 2004/5 India Human Development Survey, and the Indian Census of 2001. As expected, the representation of SC/ST women in state legislatures was positively associated with SC/ST girls’ grade completion and age-appropriate grade progression but was apparent not SC/ST girls’ primary-school performance. SC/ST women’s representation in state legislatures may reduce gender-caste gaps in primary-school attainment in India. PMID:27194655

  12. Development of Nanostructured Austempered Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panneerselvam, Saranya

    Austempered Ductile Cast Iron is emerging as an important engineering materials in recent years because of its excellent combination of mechanical properties such as high strength with good ductility, good fatigue strength and fracture toughness together with excellent wear resistance. These combinations of properties are achieved by the microstructure consisting of acicular ferrite and high carbon austenite. Refining of the ausferritic microstructure will further enhance the mechanical properties of ADI and the presence of proeutectoid ferrite in the microstructure will considerably improve the ductility of the material. Thus, the focus of this investigation was to develop nanostructured austempered ductile cast iron (ADI) consisting of proeutectoid ferrite, bainitic ferrite and high carbon austenite and to determine its microstructure-property relationships. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile test samples were prepared as per ASTM standards, subjected to various heat treatments and the mechanical tests including the tensile tests, plane strain fracture toughness tests, hardness tests were performed as per ASTM standards. Microstructures were characterized by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM. Nanostructured ADI was achieved by a unique heat treatment consisting of austenitization at a high temperature and subsequent plastic deformation at the same austenitizing temperature followed by austempering. The investigation also examined the effect of cryogenic treatment, effect of intercritical austenitizing followed by single and two step austempering, effect of high temperature plastic deformation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the low alloyed ductile cast iron. The mechanical and thermal stability of the austenite was also investigated. An analytical model has been developed to understand the crack growth process associated with the stress induced transformation of retained austenite to martensite.

  13. Caste load and the evolution of reproductive skew.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive skew theory seeks to explain how reproduction is divided among group members in animal societies. Existing theory is framed almost entirely in terms of selection, though nonadaptive processes must also play some role in the evolution of reproductive skew. Here I propose that a genetic correlation between helper fecundity and breeder fecundity may frequently constrain the evolution of reproductive skew. This constraint is part of a wider phenomenon that I term "caste load," which is defined as the decline in mean fitness caused by caste-specific selection pressures, that is, differential selection on breeding and nonbreeding individuals. I elaborate the caste load hypothesis using quantitative and population genetic arguments and individual-based simulations. Although selection can sometimes erode genetic correlations and resolve caste load, this may be constrained when mutations have similar pleiotropic effects on breeder and helper traits. I document evidence for caste load, identify putative genomic adaptations to it, and suggest future research directions. The models highlight the value of considering adaptation within the boundaries imposed by genetic architecture and incidentally reaffirm that monogamy promotes the evolutionary transition to eusociality.

  14. Producing Foils From Direct Cast Titanium Alloy Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, T. A.; Gaspar, T. A.; Sukonnik, I. M.; Semiatan, S. L.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J. A.; Fraser, H. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of producing high-quality, thin-gage, titanium foil from direct cast titanium strip. Melt Overflow Rapid Solidification Technology (MORST) was used to cast several different titanium alloys into 500 microns thick strip, 10 cm wide and up to 3 m long. The strip was then either ground, hot pack rolled or cold rolled, as appropriate, into foil. Gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) was cast and ground to approximately 100 microns thick foil and alpha-2 titanium aluminide (Ti3AI) was cast and hot pack rolled to approximately 70 microns thick foil. CP Ti, Ti6Al2Sn4Zr2Mo, and Ti22AI23Nb (Orthorhombic), were successfully cast and cold-rolled into good quality foil (less than 125 microns thick). The foils were generally fully dense with smooth surfaces, had fine, uniform microstructures, and demonstrated mechanical properties equivalent to conventionally produced titanium. By eliminating many manufacturing steps, this technology has the potential to produce thin gage, titanium foil with good engineering properties at significantly reduced cost relative to conventional ingot metallurgy processing.

  15. Soft cast versus rigid cast for treatment of distal radius buckle fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Witney-Lagen, Caroline; Smith, Christine; Walsh, Graham

    2013-04-01

    Buckle fractures are extremely common and their optimum management is still under debate. This study aimed to ascertain whether buckle fractures of the distal radius can be safely and effectively treated in soft cast with only a single orthopaedic outpatient clinic appointment. A total of 232 children with buckle fractures of the distal radius were included in the study. 111 children with 112 distal radius fractures were treated in full rigid cast and 121 children with 123 fractures were treated with soft cast. The rigid cast children attended outpatient clinic for removal of cast at 3 weeks. Soft casts were removed by parents unwinding the cast at home after 3 weeks. Follow-up was conducted prospectively by telephone questionnaire at an average of 6 weeks post-injury. Outcome data were available for 117 children treated in soft cast and for 102 children treated in rigid cast. The most common mechanism of injury was a fall sustained from standing or running, followed by falls from bikes and then trampoline accidents. Overall, both groups recovered well. Overall satisfaction with the outcome of treatment was 97.4% in soft cast and 95.2% in rigid cast. Casts were reported as comfortable by 95.7% in soft cast and 93.3% in rigid cast. Cast changes were required for 6.8% of soft casts and 11.5% of rigid casts. The most frequent cause for changing rigid casts was getting the cast wet. None of the improved scores seen in the soft cast group were statistically significant. No re-fractures were seen in either group. Nearly all (94.9%) children in soft cast did bathe, shower or swim in their cast. Parents of both groups preferred treatment with soft cast (p < 0.001). Reasons given for preferring the soft cast included the ability to get the cast wet, avoidance of the plaster saw and not having to take time off work to attend a follow-up visit for cast removal. Buckle fractures of the distal radius can be safely and effectively treated in soft cast with only a single

  16. Computational Multi-Scale Modeling of the Microstructure and Segregation of Cast Mg Alloys at Low Superheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastac, Laurentiu; El-Kaddah, Nagy

    It is well known that casting at low superheat has a strong influence on the solidification structures of the cast alloy. Recent studies on casting magnesium AZ alloys at low superheat using the Magnetic Suspension Melting (MSM) process have shown that the cast alloy exhibit a fine globular grain structure, and the grain size depend on the cooling rate. This paper describes a stochastic mesoscopic model for predicting the grain structure and segregation in cast alloys at low superheat. This model was applied to predict the globular solidification morphology and solute redistribution of Al in cast Mg AZ31B alloy at different cooling rates. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the observed grain structure and Al segregation. This makes the model a very useful tool for optimizing the solidification structure of cast magnesium alloys.

  17. [Are investment activity and backlog in investments risks for university medicine in Germany?].

    PubMed

    Amann, I; Heyder, R; Strehl, R

    2009-08-01

    University medicine in Germany requires significantly higher funding and investment because its tasks not only include health care but also research and teaching. However, over recent decades less and less funding compared to the development of the turnover has been available. This trend is due to decreasing public funding. The diminishing funding has caused a major backlog of investment at German university hospitals. The first part of the article summarizes the investments policies at university hospitals and other hospitals. The second part describes the investment needs in university medicine and exposes risk factors for research, education and health care due to the process of investment planning and realization. Goal-oriented solutions are shown to facilitate investments. The third part discusses several risks caused by insufficient investments in university medicine. There are special risks for research, teaching, and the capacity for innovation in university medicine besides economical and medical risks. Some policies and financial strategies to overcome the backlog in investments are presented. After a summary, the article concludes with some practical examples of further measures to ensure sustainable funding.

  18. Rheology of composite solid propellants during motor casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klager, K.; Rogers, C. J.; Smith, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of casting studies are reviewed so as to define the viscosity criteria insuring the fabrication of defect-free grains. The rheology of uncured propellants is analyzed showing that a realistic assessment of a propellant's flow properties must include measurement of viscosity as a function of shear stress and time after curing agent. Methods for measuring propellant viscosity are discussed, with particular attention given to the Haake-Rotovisko rotational viscometer. The effects of propellant compositional and processing variables on apparent viscosity are examined, as are results relating rheological behavior to grain defect formation during casting.

  19. Determining casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts by computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiehua; Oberdorfer, Bernd; Habe, Daniel; Schumacher, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Three types of near-net shape casting aluminum parts were investigated by computed tomography to determine casting defects and evaluate quality. The first, second, and third parts were produced by low-pressure die casting (Al-12Si-0.8Cu-0.5Fe-0.9Mg-0.7Ni-0.2Zn alloy), die casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), and semi-solid casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), respectively. Unlike die casting (second part), low-pressure die casting (first part) significantly reduced the formation of casting defects (i.e., porosity) due to its smooth filling and solidification under pressure. No significant casting defect was observed in the third part, and this absence of defects indicates that semi-solid casting could produce high-quality near-net shape casting aluminum parts. Moreover, casting defects were mostly distributed along the eutectic grain boundaries. This finding reveals that refinement of eutectic grains is necessary to optimize the distribution of casting defects and reduce their size. This investigation demonstrated that computed tomography is an efficient method to determine casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts.

  20. Airport Capacity Investment Handbook

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1978-12-01

    This handbook provides a methodology for estimating the benefits and costs of capacity-related investments in airports in the United States. The procedures are laid out in a series of worksheets. The user provides certain basic information such as ex...

  1. Strategic Investments Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, Doug

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the organizational hierarchy for strategic management and strategic investments at NASA. The presentation also relates these topics to the budgets it submits to Congress, strategies for space exploration research and development, and systems analysis.

  2. Energy Investment: Beyond Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald T.; Amarant, John

    2005-01-01

    People vary considerably in their work performance as well as their overall approach to work. At one extreme are the outstanding performers, who approach work with enthusiasm and energy, and, at the other extreme, are those who seem to do only what is necessary to get by. Organizatins often invest a good deal of energy in trying to improve the…

  3. Investing in Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews several studies examining long-term academic, economic, and social benefits of investment in early childhood education. Includes the High/Scope Perry Preschool Project, the Chicago Child-Parent Center Program, the Abecedarian Project, and Head Start. (Contains 10 references.) (PKP)

  4. Method and apparatus for casting conductive and semiconductive materials

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for casting conductive and semiconduce materials. The apparatus includes a plurality of conductive members arranged to define a container-like area having a desired cross-sectional shape. A portion or all of the conductive or semiconductive material which is to be cast is introduced into the container-like area. A means is provided for inducing the flow of an electrical current in each of the conductive members, which currents act collectively to induce a current flow in the material. The induced current flow through the conductive members is in a direction substantially opposite to the induced current flow in the material so that the material is repelled from the conductive members during the casting process.

  5. Casting Characteristics of High Cerium Content Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D; Rios, O R; Sims, Z C

    This paper compares the castability of the near eutectic aluminum-cerium alloy system to the aluminum-silicon and aluminum-copper systems. The alloys are compared based on die filling capability, feeding characteristics and tendency to hot tear in both sand cast and permanent mold applications. The castability ranking of the binary Al–Ce systems is as good as the aluminum-silicon system with some deterioration as additional alloying elements are added. In alloy systems that use cerium in combination with common aluminum alloying elements such as silicon, magnesium and/or copper, the casting characteristics are generally better than the aluminum-copper system. In general, production systems formore » melting, de-gassing and other processing of aluminum-silicon or aluminum-copper alloys can be used without modification for conventional casting of aluminum-cerium alloys.« less

  6. Direct metal laser sintering: a digitised metal casting technology.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, K Vijay; Nandini, V Vidyashree

    2013-12-01

    Dental technology is undergoing advancements at a fast pace and technology is being imported from various other fields. One such imported technology is direct metal laser sintering technology for casting metal crowns. This article will discuss the process of laser sintering for making metal crowns and fixed partial dentures with a understanding of their pros and cons.

  7. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  8. Effect of molybdenum, vanadium, boron on mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron in as-cast condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurjaman, F.; Sumardi, S.; Shofi, A.; Aryati, M.; Suharno, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this experiment, the effect of the addition carbide forming elements on high chromium white cast iron, such as molybdenum, vanadium and boron on its mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated. The high chromium white cast iron was produced by casting process and formed in 50 mm size of grinding balls with several compositions. Characterization of these grinding balls was conducted by using some testing methods, such as: chemical and microstructure analysis, hardness, and impact test. From the results, the addition of molybdenum, vanadium, and boron on high chromium white cast iron provided a significant improvement on its hardness, but reduced its toughness. Molybdenum induced fully austenitic matrix and Mo2C formation among eutectic M7C3 carbide. Vanadium was dissolved in the matrix and carbide. While boron was played a role to form fine eutectic carbide. Grinding balls with 1.89 C-13.1 Cr-1.32 Mo-1.36 V-0.00051 B in as-cast condition had the highest hardness, which was caused by finer structure of eutectic carbide, needle like structure (upper bainite) matrix, and martensite on its carbide boundary.

  9. IT investments can add business value.

    PubMed

    Williams, Terry G

    2002-05-01

    Investment in information technology (IT) is costly, but necessary to enable healthcare organizations to improve their infrastructure and achieve other improvement initiatives. Such an investment is even more costly, however, if the technology does not appropriately enable organizations to perform business processes that help them accomplish their mission of providing safe, high-quality care cost-effectively. Before committing to a costly IT investment, healthcare organizations should implement a decision-making process that can help them choose, implement, and use technology that will provide sustained business value. A seven-step decision-making process that can help healthcare organizations achieve this result involves performing a gap analysis, assessing and aligning organizational goals, establishing distributed accountability, identifying linked organizational-change initiatives, determining measurement methods, establishing appropriate teams to ensure systems are integrated with multidisciplinary improvement methods, and developing a plan to accelerate adoption of the IT product.

  10. A cost and returns evaluation of alternative dairy products to determine capital investment and operational feasibility of a small-scale dairy processing facility.

    PubMed

    Becker, K M; Parsons, R L; Kolodinsky, J; Matiru, G N

    2007-05-01

    This study examines the economic feasibility of 50- and 500-cow dairy processing facilities for fluid milk, yogurt, and cheese. Net present value and internal rate of return calculations for projected costs and returns over a 10-yr period indicate that larger yogurt and cheese processing plants offer the most profitable prospects, whereas a smaller yogurt plant would break even. A smaller cheese plant would have insufficient returns to cover the cost of capital, and fluid milk processing at either scale is economically infeasible. Economic success in processing is greatly contingent upon individual business, financial management, and marketing skills.

  11. Search for chameleons with CAST

    DOE PAGES

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Arik, M.; Aune, S.; ...

    2015-07-28

    In this paper we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (β m) and to photons (β γ) via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons tomore » photons of β γ≲10 11 for 1< β m < 10 6.« less

  12. Casting for infantile scoliosis: the pitfall of increased peak inspiratory pressure.

    PubMed

    Dhawale, Arjun A; Shah, Suken A; Reichard, Samantha; Holmes, Laurens; Brislin, Robert; Rogers, Kenneth; Mackenzie, William G

    2013-01-01

    Serial cast correction is a popular treatment option for progressive infantile scoliosis. Body casting can lead to chest and abdominal expansion restriction and result in decreased chest wall compliance. There are no studies evaluating the effects of casting on ventilation in infantile scoliosis. This study examines changes in peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) during serial casting for infantile scoliosis. We retrospectively reviewed data obtained from 37 serial Cotrel elongation, derotation, and flexion cast corrections in patients with infantile scoliosis. Patient demographics, radiographic measurements, and anesthesia data were recorded. Anesthesia technique was standardized: children were intubated with rigid endotracheal tubes (ETTs); tidal volume was held constant at 8 to 10 cm(3)/kg using volume control ventilation; and PIP was recorded at baseline, after cast application before window cutout, and after window cutout before extubation. Any complications were documented. We assessed the PIP changes with a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). The mean age at first casting was 21.8 months (range, 12 to 42 mo) and mean follow-up since first casting was 22.4 months (range, 13 to 40 mo) with mean major Cobb angle of 53±15 degrees. The mean PIP was 15.5±4.9 cm H(2)O before casting, 31.9±7.9 cm H(2)O after cast application, and 20.4±5.6 cm H2O after making windows. There was a 106% increase after casting and 32% increase after window cutout from the baseline PIP levels. There was a significant difference in PIP on repeated measures ANOVA (P<0.0001). Intraoperatively, there was difficulty in maintaining ventilation during 2 procedures and 1 hypotensive episode. One patient developed hypoxemia after casting and another had delayed difficulty in breathing. Casting resulted in an increased PIP due to transient restrictive pulmonary process; after windows were cut out, the PIP reduced but not to baseline. In patients with underlying pulmonary disease, the

  13. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  14. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  15. Aluminum Alloy and Article Cast Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy, which has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 14 - 25.0, Copper 5.5 - 8.0, Iron 0.05 - 1.2, Magnesium 0.5 - 1.5, Nickel 0.05 - 0.9, Manganese 0.05 - 1.0, Titanium 0.05 - 1.2, Zirconium 0.05 - 1.2, Vanadium 0.05 - 1.2, Zinc 0.05 - 0.9, Phosphorus 0.001 - 0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10 - 25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4 - 15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2, crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix and containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  16. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  17. Cellularized Cellular Solids via Freeze-Casting.

    PubMed

    Christoph, Sarah; Kwiatoszynski, Julien; Coradin, Thibaud; Fernandes, Francisco M

    2016-02-01

    The elaboration of metabolically active cell-containing materials is a decisive step toward the successful application of cell based technologies. The present work unveils a new process allowing to simultaneously encapsulate living cells and shaping cell-containing materials into solid-state macroporous foams with precisely controlled morphology. Our strategy is based on freeze casting, an ice templating materials processing technique that has recently emerged for the structuration of colloids into macroporous materials. Our results indicate that it is possible to combine the precise structuration of the materials with cellular metabolic activity for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  19. Capital Investment Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Title V, P.L. 97-248). o-r,/t:AA --TP,- -? -4o’s.3 US. Department 1fice of the Administrator 800 Independence Ave. S W of Transportation Washington. 0 C...20591 Federal Avicjion Administration As our Nation’s air transportation system grows in response to domestic and international demand, the Federal...FAA c𔃻| Strategic Plai which is consistent with the Secretary of Transportation’s National Transportation Policy. Capital investment in aviation

  20. Pensions, investments, and taxation.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Having for retirement has become increasingly challenging with retirement plan rules changing along with taxes and investment choices. The only certainty is that everyone needs to save money in order to be able to stop working. The best plan for a small business can be complex and confusing but rewarding if designed properly. There are a number of options available and many factors to consider in choosing the most appropriate plan.

  1. Timing of major transportation investments

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-08-01

    This report offers a broad overview of timing research as it applies to major : transportation investments. Specific emphasis is given to major public transit : investments. The report is designed to provide planners and decision-makers : with a bett...

  2. Investment Vehicles for School Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    School administrators are advised to invest school funds for maximum return, coupled with safety and flexibility. The advantages and disadvantages of a variety of investment instruments are explained. (MLF)

  3. Endowments: Investing in the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Michael; Ambler, Marjane

    1996-01-01

    Reports that tribal colleges face annual deficits since Congress fails to provide the support authorized by the Tribally Controlled Community College Assistance Act. Discusses the use of endowments as a means of covering those deficits, covering investment philosophies and policies, investment manager selection, and investment monitoring. (MAB)

  4. Modeling and simulation of clutch pressure plate casting using alternate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhuraj, H. N.; Bharath, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    Clutch Pressure Plate is a stress bearing component in the clutch assembly. Cast iron alloys like FG300, G2500 are commonly used for clutch pressure plate castings. These materials have high compressive strength, low tensile strength & no ductility but these cost high for the manufacturers. There is a need for alternate material so as to reduce cost, defects in castings without losing the life and effectiveness of the clutch plate. The work carried out here is modeling the clutch pressure plate using CAD tool. And then the casting process is simulated by casting simulation for fluid flow and solidification analysis by trying alternate material. Here the castability of the alternate material En-Gjs-400-15 and the commonly used material FG300 for the clutch pressure plate component is analyzed by designing and optimizing a proper gating system.

  5. Microstructure and Corrosion Characterization of Squeeze Cast AM50 Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, Deepika; Tiwari, Shashank; Sundarraj, Suresh; Luo, Alan A.

    2010-12-01

    Squeeze casting of magnesium alloys potentially can be used in lightweight chassis components such as control arms and knuckles. This study documents the microstructural analysis and corrosion behavior of AM50 alloys squeeze cast at different pressures between 40 and 120 MPa and compares them with high-pressure die cast (HPDC) AM50 alloy castings and an AM50 squeeze cast prototype control arm. Although the corrosion rates of the squeeze cast samples are slightly higher than those observed for the HPDC AM50 alloy, the former does produce virtually porosity-free castings that are required for structural applications like control arms and wheels. This outcome is extremely encouraging as it provides an opportunity for additional alloy and process development by squeeze casting that has remained relatively unexplored for magnesium alloys compared with aluminum. Among the microstructural parameters analyzed, it seems that the β-phase interfacial area, indicating a greater degree of β network, leads to a lower corrosion rate. Weight loss was the better method for determining corrosion behavior in these alloys that contain a large fraction of second phase, which can cause perturbations to an overall uniform surface corrosion behavior.

  6. Experimental Procedure for Warm Spinning of Cast Aluminum Components.

    PubMed

    Roy, Matthew J; Maijer, Daan M

    2017-02-01

    High performance, cast aluminum automotive wheels are increasingly being incrementally formed via flow forming/metal spinning at elevated temperatures to improve material properties. With a wide array of processing parameters which can affect both the shape attained and resulting material properties, this type of processing is notoriously difficult to commission. A simplified, light-duty version of the process has been designed and implemented for full-size automotive wheels. The apparatus is intended to assist in understanding the deformation mechanisms and the material response to this type of processing. An experimental protocol has been developed to prepare for, and subsequently perform forming trials and is described for as-cast A356 wheel blanks. The thermal profile attained, along with instrumentation details are provided. Similitude with full-scale forming operations which impart significantly more deformation at faster rates is discussed.

  7. Experimental Procedure for Warm Spinning of Cast Aluminum Components

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Matthew J.; Maijer, Daan M.

    2017-01-01

    High performance, cast aluminum automotive wheels are increasingly being incrementally formed via flow forming/metal spinning at elevated temperatures to improve material properties. With a wide array of processing parameters which can affect both the shape attained and resulting material properties, this type of processing is notoriously difficult to commission. A simplified, light-duty version of the process has been designed and implemented for full-size automotive wheels. The apparatus is intended to assist in understanding the deformation mechanisms and the material response to this type of processing. An experimental protocol has been developed to prepare for, and subsequently perform forming trials and is described for as-cast A356 wheel blanks. The thermal profile attained, along with instrumentation details are provided. Similitude with full-scale forming operations which impart significantly more deformation at faster rates is discussed. PMID:28190063

  8. Method for casting thin metal objects

    DOEpatents

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2015-04-14

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  9. Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-05

    Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations andmore » leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.« less

  10. Investing in a master's degree.

    PubMed

    Hodges, L C; Ganchorre, C; Hodges, E A

    1997-10-01

    One of the most important decisions you will ever make is the decision to invest your time and money in a master's degree. It is a big investment and often requires real sacrifice for you and your family. Since this decision is of paramount importance over the life of your career, it should be approached as a major topic to research. The first step in the process is a thorough review of your own goals and career expectations. Once you decide returning to graduate school is right for you, then you must turn your attention to finding the school that meets your goals for specialized study, as well as the location that best suits your lifestyle. A good place to start the search is in the library among a number of up-to-date references on master's nursing programs. A second source is the Internet. To find out more about the school locations, two good sources are the city's chamber of commerce and the Internet. Acquiring a master's degree in nursing will be a challenge, but one that will pay big dividends in your future nursing career.

  11. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; hide

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the effort by Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc. to redesign turbopump housing joints using metal matrix composite material and a toolless net-shape pressure infiltration casting technology. Topics covered include: advantage of metal matrix composites for propulsion components, baseline pump design and analysis, advanced toolless pressure infiltration casting process, subscale pump housing, preform splicing and joining for large components, and fullscale pump housing redesign.

  12. Development of a New Membrane Casting Apparatus for Studying Macrovoid Defects in Low-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hanyong; Hwang, Sun-Tak; Krantz, William B.; Greenberg, Alan R.; Khare, Vivek; Zartman, Jeremiah; Todd, Paul W.

    2002-01-01

    A new membrane-casting apparatus is developed for studying macrovoid defects in polymeric membranes made by the wet- and dry-casting process in low-gravity. Macrovoids are large (10-50 micron), open cavities interspersed among the smaller pores in the substructure under the gelled skin surface layer of the cast membrane. Although their occurrence is considered endemic to the wet- and dry-casting process since they can lead to compaction or skin rupture in the membrane process, recent studies suggest several useful applications such as transdermal and osmotic drug delivery systems, miniature bioreactors, etc. However, lack of knowledge about the macrovoid formation mechanism is an obstacle to further development of applications using them. An on-going debate is the role of the surface-tension-driven solutocapillary convection during macrovoid formation. The rapid growth of macrovoids within 1-5 seconds and the high polymer concentration in and near macrovoids make it difficult to explain the mechanism of macrovoid growth by diffusion alone, which is the widely accepted hypothesis proposed by Reuvers et al. The hypothesis advanced by our research group can explain this rapid growth via a mechanism that involves diffusion from the casting solution in the meta-stable region to the macrovoid enhanced by solutocapillary convection induced by the steep nonsolvent concentration gradient in the vicinity of the macrovoid. Since macrovoid growth is hypothesized to be the interplay of a solutocapillary-induced driving force counteracted by viscous drag and buoyancy, eliminate the latter provides a means for testing this hypothesis. Moreover, free convection mass transfer in the nonsolvent immersion bath used to cause phase-separation in membrane casting complicates developing a model for both the wet-casting process and macrovoid growth. The low-g environment minimizes gravitationally induced free convection thereby permitting a tractable solution to the ternary diffusion

  13. Producing thin strips by twin-roll casting—part I: Process aspects and quality issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ben Q.

    1995-05-01

    This two-part paper discusses recent advances in research and development for the direct production of coilable thin strips by twin-roll casting in both the aluminum and steel industries. While the former is empowering the casters to approach the theoretical productivity limit, the latter is striving to put pilot casters into commercial operation. These intensive R&D efforts are derived from the advantages, both economic and metallurgical, offered by the process. As twin-roll casting combines solidification and hot rolling into a single operation, the process requires low capital investment and low operational cost. Also, because of the high solidification rate attained in the process, the thin strips produced have a refined metallurgical structure, characterized by columnar and equiaxed zones with fine intermetallic particles. The enthusiasm about twin-roll casting is now being spread worldwide. This paper focuses on the process aspects and quality control of twin-roll casting. Part II, which will appear in the August issue, will review process modeling and pilot-plant development activities.

  14. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwai S; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-05-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic-plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an alpha, alpha+beta or beta microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability.

  15. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-01-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic–plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an α, α+β or β microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability. PMID:17224314

  16. Fabrication of silk fibroin film using centrifugal casting technique for corneal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Chae; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Ok Joo; Kim, Jung-Ho; Ju, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jung Min; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Su Hyeon; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    Films prepared from silk fibroin have shown potential as biomaterials in tissue engineering applications for the eye. Here, we present a novel process for fabrication of silk fibroin films for corneal application. In this work, fabrication of silk fibroin films was simply achieved by centrifugal force. In contrast to the conventional dry casting method, we carried out the new process in a centrifuge with a rotating speed of 4000 rpm, where centrifugal force was imposed on an aluminum tube containing silk fibroin solution. In the present study, we also compared the surface roughness, mechanical properties, transparency, and cell proliferation between centrifugal and dry casting method. In terms of surface morphology, films fabricated by the centrifugal casting have less surface roughness than those by the dry casting. For elasticity and transparency, silk fibroin films obtained from the centrifugal casting had favorable results compared with those prepared by dry casting. Furthermore, primary human corneal keratocytes grew better in films prepared by the centrifugal casting. Therefore, our results suggest that this new fabrication process for silk fibroin films offers important potential benefits for corneal tissue regeneration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    casting from entrapped air. This fact, together with the lower amount of solidification shrinkage of semi-solid alloys , results in the now firmly...compositions and solidification ranges. Figures 5 and 6 illustrate -24- typical quenched microstructures obtained for several of the alloys investi...COBALT SUPERALLOY Cu - 10%Sn - 2%Zn Fe - 2.6%C - 3.2% Si Fe - 17%Cr - l% Si l%Mn - 1.1%C Fe - 17%Cr - USi l%Mn - 0.6%C Fe - 18.5%Cr - 9.5% Ni 0.08

  18. Relative benefits of potential autonomy technology investments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, W. P.; Elfes, A.; Hutsberger, T.; Rodriguez, G.; Weisbin, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a framework that looks at both cost and risk early in the design process in order to determine the investment strategy in new technology development that will lead to the lowest risk mission possible which enables desired science return within a given budget.

  19. Process for Making Ceramic Mold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An improved process for slip casting molds that can be more economically automated and that also exhibits greater dimensional stability is disclosed. The process involves subjecting an investment pattern, preferably made from wax, to successive cycles of wet-dipping in a slurry of colloidal, silica-based binder and dry powder-coating, or stuccoing with plaster of Paris or calcium sulfate mixtures to produce a multi-layer shell over the pattern. The invention as claimed entails applying a primary and a secondary coating to the investment pattern. At least two wet-dipping on in a primary slurry and dry-stuccoing cycles provide the primary coating, and an additional two wet-dippings and dry-stuccoing cycles provide the secondary, or back-up, coating. The primary and secondary coatings produce a multi-layered shell pattern. The multi-layered shell pattern is placed in a furnace first to cure and harden, and then to vaporize the investment pattern, leaving a detailed, high precision shell mold.

  20. Release of ToxCastDB and ExpoCastDB databases

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has released two databases - the Toxicity Forecaster database (ToxCastDB) and a database of chemical exposure studies (ExpoCastDB) - that scientists and the public can use to access chemical toxicity and exposure data. ToxCastDB users can search and download data from over 50...

  1. Worrier or warrior? Taking control of your investment plan.

    PubMed

    Blau, Joel M; Paprocki, Ronald J

    2015-01-01

    The current economic and investment environment may seem different from before, but historically there has been uncertainty in most, if not all, time periods. The basis for selecting investments should be the needs, temperament, and available resources of each individual or family. Experience has taught that the most appropriate investment for one person often is far less suited for someone else. Advice given in the media or from other investors unfamiliar with your particular situation adds to the confusion. In this article, we discuss choosing the most appropriate investments for your specific situation and how the process can be made easier by carefully considering, and answering, six questions.

  2. Limitation of Shrinkage Porosity in Aluminum Rotor Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Se-Weon; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Ik; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kang, Chang-Seog

    Aluminum rotor prone to have many casting defects especially large amount of air and shrinkage porosity, which caused eccentricity, loss and noise during motor operation. Many attempts have been made to develop methods of shrinkage porosity control, but still there are some problems to solve. In this research, the process of vacuum squeeze die casting is proposed for limitation of defects. The 6 pin point gated dies which were in capable of local squeeze at the end ring were used. Influences of filling patterns on HPDC were evaluated and the important process control parameters were high injection speed, squeeze length, venting and process conditions. By using local squeeze and vacuum during filling and solidification, air and shrinkage porosity were significantly reduced and the feeding efficiency at the upper end ring was improved 10%. As a result of controlling the defects, the dynamometer test showed improved motor efficiency by more than 4%.

  3. The Good Investment.

    PubMed

    Prescott, John E; Fresne, Julie A; Youngclaus, James A

    2017-07-01

    The authors reflect on the article in this issue entitled "Borrow or Serve? An Economic Analysis of Options for Financing a Medical School Education" by Marcu and colleagues, which makes a compelling case that a medical school education is a good investment, no matter what financing option students use, from federal service programs to federal loans. The lead author of this Commentary shares lessons learned from his own medical school education, which was funded by an Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship, and from his current position interacting with medical students across the United States.Regardless of the financing path they choose, all students should understand basic financial concepts and the details of the various pathways that are available to pay for their medical school education, as well as how each could potentially impact their own future and that of their families. One underappreciated aspect of financing a medical school education is that federal repayment scenarios can link loan payments to income, rather than debt levels, which means that all physicians are able to afford their loan payments no matter what specialty they practice, what they are paid, or where they live.Medical education, while expensive, remains the good investment. An MD degree can lead to a lifetime of personal fulfillment and societal contributions. Everyone, with rare exceptions, accepted to a U.S. medical school will be able to finance their medical education via a path that aligns with their personal values and priorities.

  4. Upgrade Recycling of Cast Iron Scrap Chips towards β-FeSi₂ Thermoelectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Laila, Assayidatul; Nanko, Makoto; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2014-09-04

    The upgrade recycling of cast-iron scrap chips towards β-FeSi₂ thermoelectric materials is proposed as an eco-friendly and cost-effective production process. By using scrap waste from the machining process of cast-iron components, the material cost to fabricate β-FeSi₂ is reduced and the industrial waste is recycled. In this study, β-FeSi₂ specimens obtained from cast iron scrap chips were prepared both in the undoped form and doped with Al and Co elements. The maximum figure of merit ( ZT ) indicated a thermoelectric performance of approximately 70% in p-type samples and nearly 90% in n-type samples compared to β-FeSi₂ prepared from pure Fe and other published studies. The use of cast iron scrap chips to produce β-FeSi₂ shows promise as an eco-friendly and cost-effective production process for thermoelectric materials.

  5. Ranking independent timber investments by alternative investment criteria

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Mills; Gary E. Dixon

    1982-01-01

    A sample of 231 independent timber investments were ranked by internal rate of return, present net worth per acre and the benefit cost ratio—the last two discounted by 3, 6.4. 7.5. and 10 percent—to determine if the different criteria had a practical influence on timber investment ranking. The samples in this study were drawn from a group of timber investments...

  6. The Role of Indian Caste Identity and Caste Inconsistent Norms on Status Representation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Sekerdej, Maciek; von Hecker, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The Indian caste system is a complex social structure wherein social roles like one’s profession became ‘hereditary,’ resulting in restricted social mobility and fixed status hierarchies. Furthermore, we argue that the inherent property of caste heightens group identification with one’s caste. Highly identified group members would protect the identity of the group in situations when group norms are violated. In this paper, we were interested in examining the consequence of caste norm violation and how an individual’s status is mentally represented. High caste norms are associated with moral values while the lower caste norms are associated with immorality. We predicted a ‘black sheep effect,’ that is, when high caste individuals’ group identity (caste norm violation condition) is threatened their salient high caste identity would increase, thereby resulting in devaluing the status of their fellow in-group member if the latter is perceived as perpetrator. We presented participants with a social conflict situation of a victim and a perpetrator that is ‘Caste norm consistent’ (Lower caste individual as a perpetrator and higher caste individual as a victim) and vice versa ‘Caste norm inconsistent’ condition (higher caste individual as perpetrator and lower caste individual as a victim). Then, participants had to choose from nine pictorial depictions representing the protagonists in the story on a vertical line, with varying degrees of status distance. Results showed evidence for the black sheep effect and, furthermore, revealed that no other identity (religious, national, and regional) resulted in devaluing the status of fellow in-group member. These results help us understand the ‘black sheep’ effect in the context of moral norms and status representation and are discussed in the framework of the Indian society. PMID:28408896

  7. The Role of Indian Caste Identity and Caste Inconsistent Norms on Status Representation.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Sekerdej, Maciek; von Hecker, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The Indian caste system is a complex social structure wherein social roles like one's profession became 'hereditary,' resulting in restricted social mobility and fixed status hierarchies. Furthermore, we argue that the inherent property of caste heightens group identification with one's caste. Highly identified group members would protect the identity of the group in situations when group norms are violated. In this paper, we were interested in examining the consequence of caste norm violation and how an individual's status is mentally represented. High caste norms are associated with moral values while the lower caste norms are associated with immorality. We predicted a 'black sheep effect,' that is, when high caste individuals' group identity (caste norm violation condition) is threatened their salient high caste identity would increase, thereby resulting in devaluing the status of their fellow in-group member if the latter is perceived as perpetrator. We presented participants with a social conflict situation of a victim and a perpetrator that is ' Caste norm consistent' (Lower caste individual as a perpetrator and higher caste individual as a victim) and vice versa 'Caste norm inconsistent' condition (higher caste individual as perpetrator and lower caste individual as a victim). Then, participants had to choose from nine pictorial depictions representing the protagonists in the story on a vertical line, with varying degrees of status distance. Results showed evidence for the black sheep effect and, furthermore, revealed that no other identity (religious, national, and regional) resulted in devaluing the status of fellow in-group member. These results help us understand the 'black sheep' effect in the context of moral norms and status representation and are discussed in the framework of the Indian society.

  8. Modeling on Fluid Flow and Inclusion Motion in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-08-01

    During the centrifugal continuous casting process, unreasonable casting parameters can cause violent level fluctuation, serious gas entrainment, and formation of frozen shell pieces at the meniscus. Thus, in the current study, a three-dimensional multiphase turbulent model was established to study the transport phenomena during centrifugal continuous casting process. The effects of nozzle position, casting and rotational speed on the flow pattern, centrifugal force acting on the molten steel, level fluctuation, gas entrainment, shear stress on mold wall, and motion of inclusions during centrifugal continuous casting process were investigated. Volume of Fluid model was used to simulate the molten steel-air two-phase. The level fluctuation and the gas entrainment during casting were calculated by user-developed subroutines. The trajectory of inclusions in the rotating system was calculated using the Lagrangian approach. The results show that during centrifugal continuous casting, a large amount of gas was entrained into the molten steel, and broken into bubbles of various sizes. The greater the distance to the mold wall, the smaller the centrifugal force. Rotation speed had the most important influence on the centrifugal force distribution at the side region. Angular moving angle of the nozzle with 8° and keeping the rotation speed with 60 revolutions per minute can somehow stabilize the level fluctuation. The increase of angular angle of nozzle from 8 to 18 deg and rotation speed from 40 to 80 revolutions per minute favored to decrease the total volume of entrained bubbles, while the increase of distance of nozzle moving left and casting speed had reverse effects. The trajectories of inclusions in the mold were irregular, and then rotated along the strand length. After penetrating a certain distance, the inclusions gradually moved to the center of billet and gathered there. More work, such as the heat transfer, the solidification, and the inclusions entrapment

  9. Development of the Electromagnetic Continuous Casting Technology for of Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Pyo; Kim, Myoung-Gyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Gyu-Chang

    Currently, magnesium billets produced by ingot casting or direct chill casting process, result in low-quality surfaces and low productivity, Continuous casting technology to solve these problem has not only high-quality surface billets with fine-grained and homogeneous microstructure but also cost down. The latent heat of fusion per weight (J/g) of magnesium is similar to other metals, however, considering the heat emitted to the mold surface during continuous casting in meniscus region and converting it to the latent heat of fusion per volume, magnesium will be rapidly solidified in the mold during continuous casting, which induces subsequent surface defect formation. In this study, electromagnetic casting and stirring (EMC and EMS) techniques are proposed to control solidification process conveniently by compensating the low latent heat of solidification by volume and to fabricate magnesium billet with high-quality surface. This technique was extended to large scale billets up to 300 mm diameter and continuous casting was successfully conducted. Then magnesium billet was used for the fabrication of prototype automobile pulley.

  10. 13 CFR 301.4 - Investment rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Investment rates. 301.4 Section... ELIGIBILITY, INVESTMENT RATE AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS Investment Rates and Matching Share Requirements § 301.4 Investment rates. (a) Minimum Investment Rate. There is no minimum Investment Rate for a Project...

  11. 13 CFR 301.4 - Investment rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Investment rates. 301.4 Section... ELIGIBILITY, INVESTMENT RATE AND PROPOSAL AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS Investment Rates and Matching Share Requirements § 301.4 Investment rates. (a) Minimum Investment Rate. There is no minimum Investment Rate for a...

  12. 13 CFR 301.4 - Investment rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Investment rates. 301.4 Section... ELIGIBILITY, INVESTMENT RATE AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS Investment Rates and Matching Share Requirements § 301.4 Investment rates. (a) Minimum Investment Rate. There is no minimum Investment Rate for a Project...

  13. 13 CFR 301.4 - Investment rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Investment rates. 301.4 Section... ELIGIBILITY, INVESTMENT RATE AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS Investment Rates and Matching Share Requirements § 301.4 Investment rates. (a) Minimum Investment Rate. There is no minimum Investment Rate for a Project...

  14. 13 CFR 301.4 - Investment rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Investment rates. 301.4 Section... ELIGIBILITY, INVESTMENT RATE AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS Investment Rates and Matching Share Requirements § 301.4 Investment rates. (a) Minimum Investment Rate. There is no minimum Investment Rate for a Project...

  15. Evaluation of the microstructure, secondary dendrite arm spacing, and mechanical properties of Al-Si alloy castings made in sand and Fe-Cr slag molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Murthy, I.; Babu Rao, J.

    2017-07-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast A356 (Al-Si) alloy castings were investigated. A356 alloy was cast into three different molds composed of sand, ferrochrome (Fe-Cr) slag, and a mixture of sand and Fe-Cr. A sodium silicate-CO2 process was used to make the necessary molds. Cylindrical-shaped castings were prepared. Cast products with no porosity and a good surface finish were achieved in all of the molds. These castings were evaluated for their metallography, secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), and mechanical properties, including hardness, compression, tensile, and impact properties. Furthermore, the tensile and impact samples were analyzed by fractography. The results show that faster heat transfer in the Fe-Cr slag molds than in either the silica sand or mixed molds led to lower SDAS values with a refined microstructure in the products cast in Fe-Cr slag molds. Consistent and enhanced mechanical properties were observed in the slag mold products than in the castings obtained from either sand or mixed molds. The fracture surface of the slag mold castings shows a dimple fracture morphology with a transgranular fracture nature. However, the fracture surfaces of the sand mold castings display brittle fracture. In conclusion, products cast in Fe-Cr slag molds exhibit an improved surface finish and enhanced mechanical properties compared to those of products cast in sand and mixed molds.

  16. PRODUCTION OF SLIP CAST CALCIA HOLLOWWARE

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

    1963-12-31

    A method for producing slip cast calcia hollow ware in which a dense calcia grain is suspended in isobutyl acetate or a mixture of tertiary amyl alcohol and o-xylene is presented. A minor amount of triethanolamine and oleic acid is added to the suspension vehicle as viscosity adjusting agents and the suspension is cast in a plaster mold, dried, and fired. (AEC)

  17. Performance of prestressed girders cast with LWSCC.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-01

    Bond of prestressing steel has been a much debated topic since the 1950s. Limited data are available on the transfer and development length of strands cast in self : consolidating concrete (SCC) and even less for strands cast in light weight, self-co...

  18. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  19. The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jo; Scott, Fiona; Stott, Carol; Allison, Carrie; Bolton, Patrick; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Brayne, Carol

    2005-01-01

    The Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test (CAST) is a parental questionnaire to screen for autism spectrum conditions. In this validation study, the CAST was distributed to 1925 children aged 5-11 in mainstream Cambridgeshire schools. A sample of participants received a full diagnostic assessment, conducted blind to screen status. The sensitivity of…

  20. Study of FES/CAST/HGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Cummings, Rick; Jones, Brian

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity materials processing program has been instrumental in providing the crystal growth community with an experimental environment to better understand the phenomena associated with the growing of crystals. In many applications one may pursue the growth of large single crystals which cannot be grown on earth due to convective driven flows. A microgravity environment is characterized by neither convection of buoyancy. Consequently superior crystals are able to be grown in space. On the other hand, since neither convection nor buoyancy dominates the fluid flow in a microgravity environment, then lesser dominating phenomena can affect crystal growth, such as surface driven flows or diffusion limited solidification. In the case of experiments that are to be flown in space using the Fluid Experiments System (FES), diffusion limited growth should be the dominating phenomenon. The use of holographic and Schlieren optical techniques for studying the concentration gradients in solidification processes has been used by several investigators over the years. The Holographic Ground System (HGS) facility at MSFC has been a primary resource in researching this capability. Consequently scientific personnel have been able to utilize these techniques in both ground based research and in space experiments. An important event in the scientific utilization of the HGS facilities was the TGS (triglycine sulfate) Crystal Growth and the Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiments that were flown on the International Microgravity Lab (IML) mission in March of this year. The preparation and processing of these space observations are the primary experiments reported in this work. This project provides some ground-based studies to optimize on the holographic techniques used to acquire information about the crystal growth processes flown on IML. Since the ground-based studies will be compared with the space-based experimental results, it is necessary to conduct

  1. INDIAN CASTE SYSTEM: HISTORICAL AND PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWS.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Madhusudana Rao

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the historical origins and transformations of India's caste system. Surveying the complex developments over many centuries, it points out that three positions have been taken in this regard. One suggests that the caste one is born into can be transcended within one's lifetime by performing good deeds. The other declares caste to be immutable forever. And, the third says that one can be reborn into a higher caste if one lives a virtuous life. Moving on to the sociopolitical realm, the paper notes how these positions have been used and exploited. The paper then attempts to anchor the existence and purpose of the Hindu caste system in Freud's ideas about group psychology and Klein's proposals of splitting and projective identification. The paper also deploys the large group psychology concepts of Volkan and the culturally nuanced psychoanalytic anthropology of Roland and Kakar. It concludes with delineating some ameliorative strategies for this tragic problem in the otherwise robust democratic society of India.

  2. Bile Cast Nephropathy Caused by Obstructive Cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Aniort, Julien; Poyet, Anaïs; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Philipponnet, Carole; Heng, Anne-Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major complication in patients with liver disease. Although hepatorenal syndrome is frequently involved, bile cast nephropathy, characterized by tubular bile cast formation, has been scarcely described in the setting of severe liver failure. Few renal histology studies are available in these patients. We describe a case of bile cast nephropathy in a patient with obstructive cholestasis caused by stones in the common bile duct. The kidney biopsy confirmed this diagnosis, with several green casts in tubular lumens, tubular injury, and bilirubin composition of the tubular casts with Hall stain. The patient had no confounding cause of kidney failure, and complete kidney recovery followed removal of the bile duct obstruction. This case shows that severe cholestasis is sufficient to cause AKI, and that AKI can be reversible after treatment of the biliary obstruction. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and Implementation of the Casting of Rods Made of Refractory Cast Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, I. V.; Urin, S. L.; Ivanyuk, A. S.; Nesterov, A. N.; Bogdanov, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    The problems of the production of a so-called casting rod blank made of a refractory casting alloy in the vacuum induction furnaces of AO Metallurgical Plant Electrostal are considered. A unique technology of casting and subsequent treatment of as-cast rod blanks made of refractory alloys is developed, tested, and optimized. As a result of the developed and performed measures for the production of metal products in the Consarc furnace, the ingot-to-product yield increases by 15% as compared to metal casting in an ISV-1.0 furnace. As a result, we have widened the range of cast alloy grades and are going to cast metals for the manufacture of blanks of other sizes and ranges of alloy an steel grades.

  4. NASA's Hypersonic Investment Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles

    2002-01-01

    NASA has established long term goals for access to space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goal for third-generation launch systems represents significant reduction in cost and improved safety over the current first generation system. The Advanced Space Transportation Office (ASTP) at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonic Investment Area (HIA), third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframe, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations and system analysis. These technologies are being matured through research and both ground and flight-testing. This paper provides an overview of the HIA program plans and recent accomplishments.

  5. The multisensory body revealed through its cast shadows.

    PubMed

    Pavani, Francesco; Galfano, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    One key issue when conceiving the body as a multisensory object is how the cognitive system integrates visible instances of the self and other bodies with one's own somatosensory processing, to achieve self-recognition and body ownership. Recent research has strongly suggested that shadows cast by our own body have a special status for cognitive processing, directing attention to the body in a fast and highly specific manner. The aim of the present article is to review the most recent scientific contributions addressing how body shadows affect both sensory/perceptual and attentional processes. The review examines three main points: (1) body shadows as a special window to investigate the construction of multisensory body perception; (2) experimental paradigms and related findings; (3) open questions and future trajectories. The reviewed literature suggests that shadows cast by one's own body promote binding between personal and extrapersonal space and elicit automatic orienting of attention toward the body-part casting the shadow. Future research should address whether the effects exerted by body shadows are similar to those observed when observers are exposed to other visual instances of their body. The results will further clarify the processes underlying the merging of vision and somatosensation when creating body representations.

  6. The multisensory body revealed through its cast shadows

    PubMed Central

    Pavani, Francesco; Galfano, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    One key issue when conceiving the body as a multisensory object is how the cognitive system integrates visible instances of the self and other bodies with one’s own somatosensory processing, to achieve self-recognition and body ownership. Recent research has strongly suggested that shadows cast by our own body have a special status for cognitive processing, directing attention to the body in a fast and highly specific manner. The aim of the present article is to review the most recent scientific contributions addressing how body shadows affect both sensory/perceptual and attentional processes. The review examines three main points: (1) body shadows as a special window to investigate the construction of multisensory body perception; (2) experimental paradigms and related findings; (3) open questions and future trajectories. The reviewed literature suggests that shadows cast by one’s own body promote binding between personal and extrapersonal space and elicit automatic orienting of attention toward the body-part casting the shadow. Future research should address whether the effects exerted by body shadows are similar to those observed when observers are exposed to other visual instances of their body. The results will further clarify the processes underlying the merging of vision and somatosensation when creating body representations. PMID:26042079

  7. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  8. Microstructural analysis of aluminum high pressure die castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Maria Diana

    Microstructural analysis of aluminum high pressure die castings (HPDC) is challenging and time consuming. Automating the stereology method is an efficient way in obtaining quantitative data; however, validating the accuracy of this technique can also pose some challenges. In this research, a semi-automated algorithm to quantify microstructural features in aluminum HPDC was developed. Analysis was done near the casting surface where it exhibited fine microstructure. Optical and Secondary electron (SE) and backscatter electron (BSE) SEM images were taken to characterize the features in the casting. Image processing steps applied on SEM and optical micrographs included median and range filters, dilation, erosion, and a hole-closing function. Measurements were done on different image pixel resolutions that ranged from 3 to 35 pixel/μm. Pixel resolutions below 6 px/μm were too low for the algorithm to distinguish the phases from each other. At resolutions higher than 6 px/μm, the volume fraction of primary α-Al and the line intercept count curves plateaued. Within this range, comparable results were obtained validating the assumption that there is a range of image pixel resolution relative to the size of the casting features at which stereology measurements become independent of the image resolution. Volume fraction within this curve plateau was consistent with the manual measurements while the line intercept count was significantly higher using the computerized technique for all resolutions. This was attributed to the ragged edges of some primary α-Al; hence, the algorithm still needs some improvements. Further validation of the code using other castings or alloys with known phase amount and size may also be beneficial.

  9. Development of volume deposition on cast iron by additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Niyanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Jordan, Brian H.

    2016-11-10

    ORNL partnered with Cummins to demonstrate the feasibility of using additive manufacturing techniques to help develop repair techniques for refurbished cast iron engine blocks. Cummins is interested in the refurbished engine business due to the increased cost savings and reduced emissions. It is expected that by refurbishing engines could help reduce the green house gas emissions by as much as 85%. Though such repair techniques are possible in principle there has been no major industry in the automotive sector that has deployed this technology. Therefore phase-1 would seek to evaluate the feasibility of using the laser directed energy deposition techniquemore » to repair cast iron engine blocks. The objective of the phase-1 would be to explore various strategies and understand the challenges involved. During phase-1 deposits were made using Inconel-718, Nickel, Nr-Cr-B braze filler. Inconel 718 builds showed significant cracking in the heat-affected zone in the cast iron. Nickel was used to reduce the cracking in the cast iron substrate, however the Ni builds did not wet the substrate sufficiently resulting in poor dimensional tolerance. In order to increase wetting the Ni was alloyed with the Ni-Cr-B braze to decrease the surface tension of Ni. This however resulted in significant cracks in the build due to shrinkage stresses associated with multiple thermal cycling. Hence to reduce the residual stresses in the builds the DMD-103D equipment was modified and the cast iron block was pre heated using cartridge heaters. Inconel-718 alloyed with Ni was deposited on the engine block. The pre-heated deposits showed a reduced susceptibility to cracking. If awarded the phase-2 of the project would aim to develop process parameters to achieve a crack free deposit engine block.« less

  10. Porosity inside a metal casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Pores and voids often form in metal castings on Earth (above) making them useless. A transparent material that behaves at a large scale in microgravity the way that metals behave at the microscopic scale on Earth, will help show how voids form and learn how to prevent them. Scientists are using the microgravity environment on the International Space Station to study how these bubbles form, move and interact. The Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) in the Microgravity Science Glovebox aboard the International Space Station uses a transparent material called succinonitrile that behaves like a metal to study this problem. Video images sent to the ground allow scientists to watch the behavior of the bubbles as they control the melting and freezing of the material. The bubbles do not float to the top of the material in microgravity, so they can study their interactions.

  11. The Economics of an Investment in Kaizen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visuwan, Danupun

    2010-10-01

    Kaizen has been widely accepted as a continuous process improvement with the gradualist approach. This paper presents the research carried out to explore the pattern of an investment in Kaizen to enhance overall profit. System dynamics-based simulation has been employed with an optimization technique, a Steepest Ascent approach, to improve experimental variables e.g. the amount of spending on prevention and appraisal activities, the time and the amount to reduce the investment which results in maximum Net Present Value (NPV) of profit. The simulation model in this study is based on a Thai automobile manufacturer as a case study company. The result suggests that the investment in Kaizen should spend on activities to eliminate and detect all defects in the early phase and then reduce economically when the process is under controlled. It can be named as the `Hybrid quality improvement', which was proved in this study that it provides greater overall profit than the Stepwise Kaizen and the constant spending. This study also presents the behavior of quality costs and profit against time scale along the different patterns of the investment in Kaizen.

  12. Computation material science of structural-phase transformation in casting aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golod, V. M.; Dobosh, L. Yu

    2017-04-01

    Successive stages of computer simulation the formation of the casting microstructure under non-equilibrium conditions of crystallization of multicomponent aluminum alloys are presented. On the basis of computer thermodynamics and heat transfer during solidification of macroscale shaped castings are specified the boundary conditions of local heat exchange at mesoscale modeling of non-equilibrium formation the solid phase and of the component redistribution between phases during coalescence of secondary dendrite branches. Computer analysis of structural - phase transitions based on the principle of additive physico-chemical effect of the alloy components in the process of diffusional - capillary morphological evolution of the dendrite structure and the o of local dendrite heterogeneity which stochastic nature and extent are revealed under metallographic study and modeling by the Monte Carlo method. The integrated computational materials science tools at researches of alloys are focused and implemented on analysis the multiple-factor system of casting processes and prediction of casting microstructure.

  13. Scale Rules for Macrosegregation during Direct-Chill Casting of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, Dmitry G.; Du, Qiang; Katgerman, Laurens

    2008-05-01

    An analysis of published experimental and numerical results shows that there is a scaling relationship between the magnitude and direction of centerline segregation in direct-chill (DC) cast billets from aluminum alloys and the process parameters, i.e., billet diameter and casting speed. It seems that there is always a range of these process parameters where the centerline segregation is positive, and there is a threshold when the centerline segregation vanishes. Numerical simulations of macrosegregation during DC casting of a binary Al-Cu alloy were performed at different ratios of casting speed and billet diameter. The macrosegregation model takes into account only two mechanisms of macrosegregation, i.e., thermosolutal convection and shrinkage-induced flow. The results of these computer simulations fit well to the dependence obtained using numerous reference data. The results are discussed in terms of the contribution of different mechanisms of macrosegregation and the shape of the billet sump.

  14. Deburring die-castings by wet vibratory plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeschbart, H. M.

    1980-02-01

    A wet vibratory procedure for the removal of burrs from die castings is described. In this process synthetic abrasive chips and detergent solutions are agitated with the work in such a way as to produce a spiral circulatory movement. Details of various forms of vibrator basin and shapes of abrasive are illustrated. The automation of deburring is illustrated through the application of vibrators of spiral design in combination with transport and drying devices.

  15. Deburring die-castings by wet vibratory plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeschbart, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A wet vibratory procedure for the removal of burrs from die castings is described. In this process synthetic abrasive chips and detergent solutions are agitated with the work in such a way as to produce a spiral circulatory movement. Details of various forms of vibrator basin and shapes of abrasive are illustrated. The automation of deburring is illustrated through the application of vibrators of spiral design in combination with transport and drying devices.

  16. Casting copper to tungsten for high power arc lamp cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A method for making 400-kW arc lamp cathodes is described. The cathodes are made by casting a 1.75-in. diameter copper body onto a thoriated tungsten insert. The addition of 0.5-percent nickel to the copper prevents voids from forming at the copper-tungsten interface. Cathodes made by this process have withstood more than 110 hours of operation in a 400-kW arc lamp.

  17. Micro-structure and Air-tightness of Squeeze Casting Motor housing for New Energy Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y. F.; Kang, Z. Q.; Jiang, W. F.; Wang, K. W.; Sha, D. L.; Li, M. L.; Sun, J.

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the performance of automobile parts, the influence of squeeze casting process parameters on casting defects, material structure and air-tightness of aluminum alloy motor housing for new energy vehicle was studied. The results show that the density of the castings increases with the increase in pressure and mold temperature. With increase in pouring temperature, it increases first and then decreases. Pressure has the greatest influence on the density of the castings. Under a certain pressure, with moderate increase in casting temperature and mold temperature, the grain growth begins to increase; the dendrites become less, the new α - Al grains are spherical and granular, the micro-structure is uniform. Also, with increase in pressure, this effect is more pronounced, the air-tightness of castings improve. In conclusion, when the pressure is 110MPa, pouring temperature is 680° C, mold temperature is 280° C, pressure holding for 30s, and punch speed of 0.1m/s, there is no clear shrinkage in the casting, the structure is uniform, the qualified rate of air-tightness of production reaches 86%, and the performance is excellent.

  18. Ageless Aluminum-Cerium-Based Alloys in High-Volume Die Casting for Improved Energy Efficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Stromme, Eric T.; Henderson, Hunter B.; Sims, Zachary C.; ...

    2018-04-25

    Strong chemical reactions between Al and Ce lead to the formation of intermetallics with exceptional thermal stability. The rapid formation of intermetallics directly from the liquid phase during solidification of Al-Ce alloys leads to an ultrafine microconstituent structure that effectively strengthens as-cast alloys without further microstructural optimization via thermal processing. Die casting is a high-volume manufacturing technology that accounts for greater than 40% of all cast Al products, whereas Ce is highly overproduced as a waste product of other rare earth element (REE) mining. Reducing heat treatments would stimulate significant improvements in manufacturing energy efficiency, exceeding (megatonnes/year) per large-scale heat-treatmentmore » line. In this study, multiple compositions were evaluated with wedge mold castings to test the sensitivity of alloys to the variable solidification rate inherent in high-pressure die casting. Once a suitable composition was determined, it was successfully demonstrated at 800 lbs/h in a 600-ton die caster, after which the as-die cast parts performed similarly to ubiquitous A380 in the same geometry without requiring heat treatment. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the compatibility of Al REE alloys with high-volume die-casting applications with minimal heat treatments.« less

  19. Ageless Aluminum-Cerium-Based Alloys in High-Volume Die Casting for Improved Energy Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromme, Eric T.; Henderson, Hunter B.; Sims, Zachary C.; Kesler, Michael S.; Weiss, David; Ott, Ryan T.; Meng, Fanqiang; Kassoumeh, Sam; Evangelista, James; Begley, Gerald; Rios, Orlando

    2018-06-01

    Strong chemical reactions between Al and Ce lead to the formation of intermetallics with exceptional thermal stability. The rapid formation of intermetallics directly from the liquid phase during solidification of Al-Ce alloys leads to an ultrafine microconstituent structure that effectively strengthens as-cast alloys without further microstructural optimization via thermal processing. Die casting is a high-volume manufacturing technology that accounts for greater than 40% of all cast Al products, whereas Ce is highly overproduced as a waste product of other rare earth element (REE) mining. Reducing heat treatments would stimulate significant improvements in manufacturing energy efficiency, exceeding (megatonnes/year) per large-scale heat-treatment line. In this study, multiple compositions were evaluated with wedge mold castings to test the sensitivity of alloys to the variable solidification rate inherent in high-pressure die casting. Once a suitable composition was determined, it was successfully demonstrated at 800 lbs/h in a 600-ton die caster, after which the as-die cast parts performed similarly to ubiquitous A380 in the same geometry without requiring heat treatment. This work demonstrates the compatibility of Al REE alloys with high-volume die-casting applications with minimal heat treatments.

  20. Caste- and development-associated gene expression in a lower termite

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Michael E; Wu-Scharf, Dancia; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Bennett, Gary W

    2003-01-01

    Background Social insects such as termites express dramatic polyphenism (the occurrence of multiple forms in a species on the basis of differential gene expression) both in association with caste differentiation and between castes after differentiation. We have used cDNA macroarrays to compare gene expression between polyphenic castes and intermediary developmental stages of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes. Results We identified differentially expressed genes from nine ontogenic categories. Quantitative PCR was used to quantify precise differences in gene expression between castes and between intermediary developmental stages. We found worker and nymph-biased expression of transcripts encoding termite and endosymbiont cellulases; presoldier-biased expression of transcripts encoding the storage/hormone-binding protein vitellogenin; and soldier-biased expression of gene transcripts encoding two transcription/translation factors, two signal transduction factors and four cytoskeletal/muscle proteins. The two transcription/translation factors showed significant homology to the bicaudal and bric-a-brac developmental genes of Drosophila. Conclusions Our results show differential expression of regulatory, structural and enzyme-coding genes in association with termite castes and their developmental precursor stages. They also provide the first glimpse into how insect endosymbiont cellulase gene expression can vary in association with the caste of a host. These findings shed light on molecular processes associated with termite biology, polyphenism, caste differentiation and development and highlight potentially interesting variations in developmental themes between termites, other insects, and higher animals. PMID:14519197