Science.gov

Sample records for investment casting process

  1. Prediction of ALLOY SHRINKAGE FACTORS FOR THE INVESTMENT CASTING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of alloy shrinkage factors (SFs) related to the investment casting process. The dimensions of the A356 aluminum alloy casting were determined from the numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and deformation phenomena. The investment casting process was carried out using wax patterns of unfilled wax and shell molds that were made of fused silica with a zircon prime coat. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured, in order to determine the actual tooling allowances. Several numerical simulations were carried out, to assess the level of accuracy for the casting shrinkage. The solid fraction threshold, at which the transition from the fluid dynamics to the solid dynamics occurs, was found to be important in predicting shrinkage factors (SFs). It was found that accurate predictions were obtained for all measued dimensions when the shell mold was considered a deformable material.

  2. Advanced investment cast processing for gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.; Govern, C.

    1995-12-31

    Investment casting of gamma titanium aluminide alloys has become the near-term process of choice for component manufacture. This is largely due to its near-net shape processing capabilities which allow cast gamma components to be manufactured at a lower cost when compared to wrought or powder methods. Many papers have been published discussing the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure of HIP processed samples. However, the relationship between casting parameters and resultant microstructures has not been widely discussed. An L9 DOE casting experiment was performed to examine mold preheat, furnace atmosphere, shell type and gating design parameters. It was determined that mold preheat had a very significant effect on as-cast and as-HIP processed microstructures. Mold preheats of 70 F and 750 F produced HIP Processed microstructures containing 80 to >90% equiaxed gamma grains and 2,100 F mold preheats produced structures containing 10--30% equiaxed gamma grains. The results of this experiment will be presented, including optical microstructures and microprobe analysis.

  3. Mineral processing techniques for recycling investment casting shell

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Nilsen, David N.; Dahlin, David C.; Hunt, Alton H.; Collins, W. Keith

    2002-01-01

    The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy used materials characterization and minerals beneficiation methods to separate and beneficially modify spent investment-mold components to identify recycling opportunities and minimize environmentally sensitive wastes. The physical and chemical characteristics of the shell materials were determined and used to guide bench-scale research to separate reusable components by mineral-beneficiation techniques. Successfully concentrated shell materials were evaluated for possible use in new markets.

  4. Application of process modeling to improve the competitiveness of investment castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overfelt, Tony; Tu, John; Aimone, Paul; Mueller, Boyd

    1996-03-01

    The aerospace and automotive industries are the largest users of computer-aided design, engineering, and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems for designing and manufacturing component parts. Many producers of metal castings are adopting the technology to strengthen business relationships with their aerospace and automotive OEM customers by reducing new product development times, improving yields of existing processes, and reducing costs. One key limitation of the technology is that the accuracies of even the basic heat and fluid flow models must be enhanced by improving the input property databases for the many commercial casting alloys of interest. Accurate models require accurate input thermophysical and related property data such as thermal conductivity, specific heat, latent heat, density, surface tension, emissivity, viscosity, and contact conductance between the metal and the mold. This paper describes the economic impacts of the casting industry and how CAD/CAE/CAM technology is revolutionizing business practices in foundries. A specific example of an CAE model of a production investment casting will be presented. In addition, the commercial potential of low-g measurements of key thermophysical properties will be discussed.

  5. Effects of material variables and process parameters on properties of investment casting shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumurugoti, Priyatham

    Manufacture of investment casting shells is a complex process. The choice of raw materials - refractory powders or grains, binders and additives - affects the properties of investment casting shells. In this study, different systems of shells were prepared, according to a design of experiments, with commercially available raw materials that differ in chemistry, particle size or particle size distribution. Shell strength was measured in green, fired and cooled, and hot conditions and the results were analyzed for strength -- material property relation. Various microstructures of polished cross sections of these shells were characterized using scanning electron microscope. It was determined that the amount of matrix holding the stucco grains was dominant factor affecting green strength. Fired and hot strengths were observed to vary depending on interactions between different phases of matrix and stucco. In addition to the material properties, control of shell building parameters is critical to achieve quality shells. Process parameters affect strength of the shell by providing a means to change the relative amounts of stucco, slurry and porosity. To study the microstructural variations, shells were prepared by varying process parameters like slurry viscosity and stucco size. Data from image analysis of different microstructures were correlated to their respective fired strengths. It was determined that the shells prepared from high viscosity slurry and fine stucco had the highest strength.

  6. Effects of process variables on the properties of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics formed by investment casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, M. W.; Taylor, T. D.; Leigh, H. D.; Wise, S. A.; Buckley, J. D.; Vasquez, P.; Buck, G. M.; Hicks, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    An investment casting process has been developed to produce net-shape, superconducting ceramics. In this work, a factorial experiment was performed to determine the critical process parameters for producing cast YBa2Cu3O7 ceramics with optimum properties. An analysis of variance procedure indicated that the key variables in casting superconductive ceramics are the particle size distribution and sintering temperature. Additionally, the interactions between the sintering temperature and the other process parameters (e.g., particle size distribution and the use of silver dopants) were also found to influence the density, porosity, and critical current density of the fired ceramics.

  7. Combination Of Investment And Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creeger, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications, including incorporation of centrifugal casting, made in investment-casting process reducing scrap rate. Used to make first- and second-stage high-pressure-fuel-turbopump nozzles, containing vanes with thin trailing edges and other thin sections. Investment mold spun for short time while being filled, and stopped before solidification occurs. Centrifugal force drives molten metal into thin trailing edges, ensuring they are filled. With improved filling, preheat and pour temperatures reduced and solidification hastened so less hot tearing.

  8. Advanced Pattern Material for Investment Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    F. Douglas Neece Neil Chaudhry

    2006-02-08

    Cleveland Tool and Machine (CTM) of Cleveland, Ohio in conjunction with Harrington Product Development Center (HPDC) of Cincinnati, Ohio have developed an advanced, dimensionally accurate, temperature-stable, energy-efficient and cost-effective material and process to manufacture patterns for the investment casting industry. In the proposed technology, FOPAT (aFOam PATtern material) has been developed which is especially compatible with the investment casting process and offers the following advantages: increased dimensional accuracy; increased temperature stability; lower cost per pattern; less energy consumption per pattern; decreased cost of pattern making equipment; decreased tooling cost; increased casting yield. The present method for investment casting is "the lost wax" process, which is exactly that, the use of wax as a pattern material, which is then melted out or "lost" from the ceramic shell. The molten metal is then poured into the ceramic shell to produce a metal casting. This process goes back thousands of years and while there have been improvements in the wax and processing technology, the material is basically the same, wax. The proposed technology is based upon an established industrial process of "Reaction Injection Molding" (RIM) where two components react when mixed and then "molded" to form a part. The proposed technology has been modified and improved with the needs of investment casting in mind. A proprietary mix of components has been formulated which react and expand to form a foam-like product. The result is an investment casting pattern with smooth surface finish and excellent dimensional predictability along with the other key benefits listed above.

  9. Effect of Friction Stir Processing on Fatigue Behavior of an Investment Cast Al-7Si-0.6 Mg Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Baumann, John B.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-02-01

    Cast aluminum alloys in general show poor fatigue performance due to presence of defects. Friction stir processing (FSP) can be used as a tool for enhancing mechanical properties of cast alloys by eliminating such defects. In the present study FSP led to a five times improvement in fatigue life of an investment cast Al-7Si-0.6Mg hypoeutectic alloy. The reason for such enhancement was linked to closure of casting porosity which acted as crack nucleation sites in the as-cast condition. Porosity acted as notches in the as-cast alloy and led to an order of magnitude higher crack growth rate. As FSP eliminated the porosity and refined Si particles, crack growth rate dropped due to the elimination of the notch effect together with increased crack path tortuosity. Finally, short crack behavior was noted in both cast and FSP specimens. The critical crack length where transition from short crack to long crack behavior took place is related to respective microstructural characteristic dimensions.

  10. Neutron radiography inspection of investment castings.

    PubMed

    Richards, W J; Barrett, J R; Springgate, M E; Shields, K C

    2004-10-01

    Investment casting, also known as the lost wax process, is a manufacturing method employed to produce near net shape metal articles. Traditionally, investment casting has been used to produce structural titanium castings for aero-engine applications with wall thickness less than 1 in (2.54 cm). Recently, airframe manufacturers have been exploring the use of titanium investment casting to replace components traditionally produced from forgings. Use of titanium investment castings for these applications reduces weight, cost, lead time, and part count. Recently, the investment casting process has been selected to produce fracture critical structural titanium airframe components. These airframe components have pushed the traditional inspection techniques to their physical limits due to cross sections on the order of 3 in (7.6 cm). To overcome these inspection limitations, a process incorporating neutron radiography (n-ray) has been developed. In this process, the facecoat of the investment casting mold material contains a cocalcined mixture of yttrium oxide and gadolinium oxide. The presence of the gadolinium oxide, allows for neutron radiographic imaging (and eventual removal and repair) of mold facecoat inclusions that remain within these thick cross sectional castings. Probability of detection (POD) studies have shown a 3 x improvement of detecting a 0.050 x 0.007 in2 (1.270 x 0.178 mm2) inclusion of this cocalcined material using n-ray techniques when compared to the POD using traditional X-ray techniques. Further, it has been shown that this n-ray compatible mold facecoat material produces titanium castings of equal metallurgical quality when compared to the traditional materials. Since investment castings can be very large and heavy, the neutron radiography facilities at the University of California, Davis McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (UCD/MNRC) were used to develop the inspection techniques. The UCD/MNRC has very unique facilities that can handle large

  11. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  12. The effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of investment cast titanium aluminum vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilchak, Adam L.

    The use of investment cast titanium components is becoming increasingly common in the aerospace industry due to the ability to produce large, one-piece components with complex geometries that were previously fabricated by mechanically fastening or welding multiple smaller parts together. However, the coarse, fully lamellar microstructure typical of investment cast alpha + beta titanium alloys results in relatively poor fatigue strength compared to forged titanium products. As a result, investment castings are not considered for use in fatigue limited structures. In recent years, friction stir processing has emerged as a solid state metalworking technique capable of substantial microstructure refinement in aluminum and nickel-aluminum-bronze alloys. The purpose of the present study is to determine the feasibility of friction stir processing and assess its effect on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the most widely used alpha + beta titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V. Depending on processing parameters, including tool travel speed, rotation rate and geometry, the peak temperature in the stir zone was either above or below the beta transus. The resulting microstructures consisted of either ˜1 mum equiaxed a grains, ˜25 mum prior beta grains containing a colony alpha + beta microstructure or a combination of 1 mum equiaxed alpha and fine, acicular alpha + beta. The changes in microstructure were characterized with scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The texture in the stir zone was nearly random for all processing conditions, however, several components of ideal simple shear textures were observed in both the hexagonal close packed alpha and the body centered cubic beta phases which provided insight into the operative grain refinement mechanisms. Due to the relatively small volume of material affected by friction stir processing, conventionally sized test specimens were unable to be machined from the stir zone

  13. Fiber reinforcement of investment cast parts

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, M.; Neussl, E.; Schaedlich-Stubenrauch, J.; Sahm, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    For 3 years now the Foundry-Institute (Giesserei-Institut) of the Aachen Institute of Technology has worked on the development of a new, low-cost production process for longfiber-reinforced light alloy components. The process baseline is oriented on the precision casting process in its investment casting mode, also known as lost wax process. The investment casting process is well known as a typical near-net-shape process for the manufacture of high-quality cast components, predominantly for applications in the aerospace industry (structured components, turbine blades and parts etc.) and enjoys significant growth rates during the last decades. After preliminary studies on the modification of single process substeps R & D work concentrated on the final-shape production of Al-components (Al-alloys A356, A357, 201 etc.) reinforced with long ceramic fibers. Both SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based fibers of several producers were used. Main interest focuses on techniques for a selective reinforcement of main stress sections. Without using conventional sintered preforms the fibers are infiltrated with molten metal under a support pressure of less than 1 MPa. Combined with a new developed wax pattern technique test specimens with a nearly homogeneous fiber distribution were produced. In addition, even reactive matrix alloys did not lead to destructive interface reactions. In most cases sufficient bonding between fibers and matrix could be observed. Following to these positive tendencies a considerable improvement of mechanical properties could be measured for longfiber reinforced Al-alloys. Both tensile strength and elastic modulus could be increased up to 100% compared with the unreinforced matrix alloy. Latest work concentrated on the production of small representative components for potential applications.

  14. Effects of processing variables on the creep behavior of investment cast Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, M.M.; Jones, P.E.; Porter, W.J. III; Eylon, D.

    1995-12-31

    Intermetallics based on ordered {gamma}-TiAl are being considered for the replacement of steels and nickel-based superalloys for high temperature aerospace and automotive applications. This study investigates the creep behavior of investment cast Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr with microstructures ranging from duplex to nearly lamellar. Constant load creep tests were conducted in air at temperatures of 650 C and 760 C and at stress levels of 104MPa, 155MPa, and 207MPa. The effects of cooling rates during casting, aluminum content, oxygen level, and microstructure on creep properties are discussed. The activation energy for creep and stress exponent are also reported.

  15. Physical Simulation of Investment Casting of Complex Shape Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimian, Mehdi; Milenkovic, Srdjan; Maestro, Laura; De Azua, Aitor Eguidazu Ruiz; Sabirov, Ilchat

    2015-05-01

    Development of investment casting process has been a challenge for manufacturers of complex shape parts. Numerous experimental casting trials are typically carried out to determine the optimum casting parameters for fabrication of high-quality products. In this work, it is demonstrated that physical simulation of investment casting can successfully predict microstructure and hardness in as-cast complex shape parts. The physical simulation tool consists of a thermal model and melting/solidification experiments in thermo-mechanical simulator. The thermal model is employed to predict local cooling rate during solidification at each point of a casting. Melting/solidification experiments are carried out under controlled cooling rates estimated by the thermal model. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of the solidified specimens is performed; the obtained results predict the local microstructure and mechanical properties of the casting. This concept is applied to investment casting of complex shape nozzle guide vanes from Mar-M247 Ni-based superalloy. Experimental casting trials are performed and the outcomes of physical simulation tool are validated against experimental results. It is shown that phase composition, secondary dendrite arm spacing, grain size, γ/ γ' eutectic size and volume fraction, size and shape of carbide particles, and local microhardness can be predicted at each point of the casting via physical simulation.

  16. Some Investigations on Hardness of Investment Casting Process After Advancements in Shell Moulding for Reduction in Cycle Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Mahajan, V.

    2014-07-01

    In the present work surface hardness investigations have been made on acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) pattern based investment castings after advancements in shell moulding for replication of biomedical implants. For the present study, a hip joint, made of ABS material, was fabricated as a master pattern by fused deposition modelling (FDM). After preparation of master pattern, mold was prepared by deposition of primary (1°), secondary (2°) and tertiary (3°) coatings with the addition of nylon fibre (1-2 cm in length of 1.5D). This study outlines the surface hardness mechanism for cast component prepared from ABS master pattern after advancement in shell moulding. The results of study highlight that during shell production, fibre modified shells have a much reduced drain time. Further the results are supported by cooling rate and micro structure analysis of casting.

  17. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  18. Investment cast AISI H13 tooling for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R.

    1995-07-01

    While many techniques exist for production of soft tooling, for die casting there is limited recent experience with cast tooling. The most common US alloy used for manufacture of die casting tooling is wrought AISI H13. If the performance of the cast material is comparable to the wrought counterpart, the use of investment cast HI 3 tooling directly from patterns made via rapid prototyping is of considerable interest. A metallurgical study of investment cast H13 was conducted to evaluate the mechanical behavior in simulated die casting applications. Variable thickness plate investment castings of AISI H13 hot work die steel were produced and characterized in the as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The characterization included light microscopy and mechanical testing. Wrought samples of standard and premium grade H13 were heat-treated and characterized similarly for comparison. Microstructural differences were observed in as-cast samples produced in different section thicknesses. Dendrite cell size and carbide morphology constituted the most prominent microstructural differences observed. After a full heat-treatment, microstructural differences between the wrought material and cast materials were slight regardless of section thickness.The mechanical properties of the cast and heat-treated material proved similar to the properties of the standard heat-treated wrought material. A thermal fatigue testing unit was to con-elate the heat checking susceptibility of H13 steel to its processing and consequent microstructural condition. Surface hardness decreased significantly with thermal cycling, and heat checking was observed in as few as 50 cycles. Thermal softening and thermal fatigue susceptibility were quantified and discussed relative to the microstructural conditions created by processing and heat-treatment. It was found that the premium grade wrought H13 steel provided the best overall resistance to heat checking.

  19. Rapid Tooling via Investment Casting and Rapid Prototype Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael D.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this work to develop the materials processing and design technologies required to reduce the die development time for metal mold processes from 12 months to 3 months, using die casting of Al and Mg as the example process. Sandia demonstrated that investment casting, using rapid prototype patterns produced from Stereo lithography or Selective laser Sintering, was a viable alternative/supplement to the current technology of machining form wrought stock. A demonstration die insert (ejector halt) was investment cast and subsequently tested in the die casting environment. The stationary half of the die insert was machined from wrought material to benchmark the cast half. The two inserts were run in a die casting machine for 3,100 shots of aluminum and at the end of the run no visible difference could be detected between the cast and machined inserts. Inspection concluded that the cast insert performed identically to the machined insert. Both inserts had no indications of heat checking or degradation.

  20. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2005-09-01

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to

  1. Rapid prototyping: A paradigm shift in investment casting

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Pardo, B.T.

    1996-09-01

    The quest for fabricating complex metal parts rapidly and with minimal cost has brought rapid prototyping (RP) processes to the forefront of the investment casting industry. Relatively recent advances in DTM Corporation`s selective laser sintering (SLS) and 3D Systems stereolithography (SL) processes have had a significant impact on the overall quality of patterns produced using these rapid prototyping processes. Sandia National Laboratories uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype and small lot production parts in support of a program called FASTCAST. The SLS process is used to fabricate patterns from materials such as investment casting wax, polycarbonate, and a new material called TrueForm PM{trademark}. With the timely introduction of each of these materials, the quality of patterns fabricated has improved. The development and implementation of SL QuickCast{trademark} software has enabled this process to produce highly accurate patterns for use in investment casting. This paper focuses on the successes with these new pattern materials and the infrastructure required to cast rapid prototyping patterns successfully. In addition, a brief overview of other applications of rapid prototyping at Sandia will be discussed.

  2. Efficient Runner Networks for Investment Castings

    SciTech Connect

    GIVLER,RICHARD C.; SAYLORS,DAVID B.

    2000-07-18

    We present a computational method that finds an efficient runner network for an investment casting, once the gate locations have been established. The method seeks to minimize a cost function that is based on total network volume. The runner segments are restricted to lie in the space not occupied by the part itself. The collection of algorithms has been coded in C and runner designs have been computed for several real parts, demonstrating substantial reductions in rigging volume.

  3. Face Coat Materials Through Sessile Drop and Investment Casting Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Yuan, Chen; Blackburn, Stuart; Withey, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Investment casting is uniquely suited to the manufacture of Ti alloys for the production of near net-shape components, reducing material waste, and machining costs. Because of the high reactivity of titanium and its based alloy, the molds which are used in the investment casting process require high chemical inertness, which results in them being very costly and non-recyclable. In order to reduce the cost of these molds, traditionally using yttria as the face coat, two alternative molds are developed in this study with face coat materials of Y2O3-Al2O3 and Y2O3-Al2O3-ZrO2. The slurry properties and chemical inertness of the face coats were evaluated for viscosity, thermal expansion, friability, and phase development. The chemical inertness of these two molds were determined using both the sessile drop test and investment casting to identify the levels of interaction with a Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb-0.2B alloy. The results illustrated that the molds using Y2O3-Al2O3 and Y2O3-Al2O3-ZrO2 as the face coats both showed excellent sintering properties and chemical inertness when compared to the yttria face coat. They can consequently be used as two alternative face coats for the investment casting of TiAl alloys.

  4. Improving Metal Casting Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Don Sirois, an Auburn University research associate, and Bruce Strom, a mechanical engineering Co-Op Student, are evaluating the dimensional characteristics of an aluminum automobile engine casting. More accurate metal casting processes may reduce the weight of some cast metal products used in automobiles, such as engines. Research in low gravity has taken an important first step toward making metal products used in homes, automobiles, and aircraft less expensive, safer, and more durable. Auburn University and industry are partnering with NASA to develop one of the first accurate computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials used in a manufacturing process called casting. Ford Motor Company's casting plant in Cleveland, Ohio is using NASA-sponsored computer modeling information to improve the casting process of automobile and light-truck engine blocks.

  5. FInal Report - Investment Casting Shell Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Von Richards

    2003-12-01

    This project made a significant contribution to the understanding of the investment casting shell cracking problem. The effects of wax properties on the occurrence of shell cracking were demonstrated and can be measured. The properties measured include coefficient of thermal expansion, heating rate and crystallinity of the structure. The important features of production molds and materials properties have been indicated by case study analysis and fractography of low strength test bars. It was found that stress risers in shell cavity design were important and that typical critical flaws were either oversize particles or large pores just behind the prime coat. It was also found that the true effect of fugitive polymer fibers was not permeability increase, but rather a toughening mechanism due to crack deflection.

  6. Evaluation of the Inertness of Investment Casting Molds Using Both Sessile Drop and Centrifugal Casting Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Yuan, Chen; Green, Nick; Withey, Paul

    2013-02-01

    The investment casting process is an economic production method for engineering components in TiAl-based alloys and offers the benefits of a near net-shaped component with a good surface finish. An investigation was undertaken to develop three new face coat systems based on yttria, but with better sintering properties. These face coat systems were mainly based on an yttria-alumina-zirconia system (Y2O3-0.5 wt pct Al2O3-0.5 wt pct ZrO2), an yttria-fluoride system (Y2O3-0.15 wt pct YF3), and an yttria-boride system (Y2O3-0.15 wt pct B2O3). After sintering, the chemical inertness of the face coat was first tested and analyzed using a sessile drop test through the metal wetting behavioral change for each face coat surface. Then, the interactions between the shell and metal were studied by centrifugal investment casting TiAl bars. Although the sintering aids in yttria can decrease the chemical inertness of the face coat, the thickness of the interaction layer in the casting was less than 10 μm; therefore, these face coats still can be possible face coat materials for investment casting TiAl alloys.

  7. Analysis of Different Inhibitors for Magnesium Investment Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Dorca, N.; Sarriegi Etxeberria, H.; Hurtado, I.; Andres, U.; Rodriguez, P.; Arruebarrena, G.

    2012-01-01

    Investment casting of magnesium is a well suited process for the production of aeronautic and automotive components. But still, this process has not been properly developed. One reason for that are the reactions between the Mg melt and the ceramics of the mould that produce a non-desired oxide layer on the part surface. These reactions can be inhibited by the use of silica-free slurries with a higher stability than conventional ones. Another way is using inhibitors, chemical compounds based in fluorides that react with the melt, creating a protective surface layer in the casting. With the aim of developing a reaction-free process, alumina moulds with a stepped geometry have been constructed. These provide different interface conditions. Conventional SF6, non-conventional KBF4 and NaBF4 and environmentally friendly FK inhibitors have been tested on. As a result, KBF4 has been identified as the most suitable inhibitor for magnesium investment casting. Furthermore, the analysis of the cooling curve of different interfaces has provided essential information about the reaction mechanism of the inhibitors.

  8. Energy Saving Melting andRevert Reduction Technology (E0SMARRT): Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimension for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Cannell; Dr. Mark Samonds; Adi Sholapurwalla; Sam Scott

    2008-11-21

    The investment casting process is an expendable mold process where wax patterns of the part and rigging are molded, assembled, shelled and melted to produce a ceramic mold matching the shape of the component to be cast. Investment casting is an important manufacturing method for critical parts because of the ability to maintain dimensional shape and tolerances. However, these tolerances can be easily exceeded if the molding components do not maintain their individual shapes well. In the investment casting process there are several opportunities for the final casting shape to not maintain the intended size and shape, such as shrinkage of the wax in the injection tool, the modification of the shape during shell heating, and with the thermal shrink and distortion in the casting process. Studies have been completed to look at the casting and shell distortions through the process in earlier phases of this project. Dr. Adrian Sabau at Oak Ridge National Labs performed characterizations and validations of 17-4 PH stainless steel in primarily fused silica shell systems with good agreement between analysis results and experimental data. Further tasks provided material property measurements of wax and methodology for employing a viscoelastic definition of wax materials into software. The final set of tasks involved the implementation of the findings into the commercial casting analysis software ProCAST, owned and maintained by ESI Group. This included: o the transfer of the wax material property data from its raw form into separate temperature-dependent thermophysical and mechanical property datasets o adding this wax material property data into an easily viewable and modifiable user interface within the pre-processing application of the ProCAST suite, namely PreCAST o and validating the data and viscoelastic wax model with respect to experimental results

  9. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  10. Thermal behaviour of casting investment during setting.

    PubMed

    Wakasa, K; Yamaki, M

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the thermal reactions of silica-sol liquids for mixing investment powders using differential thermal analysis (DTA) and also the setting behaviour of the mixed powders using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The silica-sol liquids showed the appearance of vapourization (around 100 degrees C as a peak temperature) and combustion (200-300 degrees C) in DTA measurement. Mixed silica-sol investment exhibited the setting behaviour with an exotherm in the DSC measurement representing that greater peak time, setting time and heat in mixed investment than with gypsum-bonded investment.

  11. Processing of IN-718 Lattice Block Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2002-01-01

    Recently a low cost casting method known as lattice block casting has been developed by JAM Corporation, Wilmington, Massachusetts for engineering materials such as aluminum and stainless steels that has shown to provide very high stiffness and strength with only a fraction of density of the alloy. NASA Glenn Research Center has initiated research to investigate lattice block castings of high temperature Ni-base superalloys such as the model system Inconel-718 (IN-718) for lightweight nozzle applications. Although difficulties were encountered throughout the manufacturing process , a successful investment casting procedure was eventually developed. Wax formulation and pattern assembly, shell mold processing, and counter gravity casting techniques were developed. Ten IN-718 lattice block castings (each measuring 15-cm wide by 30-cm long by 1.2-cm thick) have been successfully produced by Hitchiner Gas Turbine Division, Milford, New Hampshire, using their patented counter gravity casting techniques. Details of the processing and resulting microstructures are discussed in this paper. Post casting processing and evaluation of system specific mechanical properties of these specimens are in progress.

  12. Fastcast: Integration and application of rapid prototyping and computational simulation to investment casting

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Atwood, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    The emergence of several rapid prototyping and manufacturing (RP and M) technologies is having a dramatic impact on investment casting. While the most successful of the rapid prototyping technologies are almost a decade old, relatively recent process advances in their application have produced some remarkable success in utilizing their products as patterns for investment castings. Sandia National Laboratories has been developed highly coupled experimental and computational capabilities to examine the investment casting process with the intention of reducing the amount of time required to manufacture castings, and to increase the quality of the finished product. This presentation will begin with process aspects of RP and M pattern production and handling, shell fabrication, burnout, and casting. The emphasis will be on how the use of Stereolithography (SL) or Selective Laser Sintered (SLS) patterns differs from more traditional wax pattern processes. Aspects of computational simulation to couple design, thermal analysis, and mold filling will be discussed. Integration of these topics is probably the greatest challenge to the use of concurrent engineering principles with investment casting. Sandia has conducted several experiments aimed at calibrating computer codes and providing data for input into these simulations. Studies involving materials as diverse as stainless steel and gold have been conducted to determine liquid metal behavior in molds via real time radiography. The application of these experiments to predictive simulations will be described.

  13. Experimental measurement of investment shell properties and use of the data in casting simulation software

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.J.; Sayers, K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development of a systematic program of experimental measurement of relevant properties of mould materials, conducted with the express purpose of generating data for use in casting (filling and solidification) simulation software. In particular the thermophysical properties of the ceramic shell built up for the investment casting process are measured. These properties include specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, gas permeability, density and surface emissivity. Much of the experimental measurements are taken as a function of temperature, up to the temperature at which moulds are typically fired or preheated. Typical results are presented. The data so generated is then used in a casting simulation model to simulate the investment casting of a prosthetic device. The results of the simulation are presented, and comparisons are made with measurements and observations from an experimental casting of the same part. In this way both the reliability of the data and the accuracy of the filling and solidification model are validated.

  14. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-04-01

    Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were

  15. Comparative analysis of constraints and caste differences in brain investment among social paper wasps

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Sean; Clifford, Marie; Molina, Yamile

    2011-01-01

    We compared species mean data on the size of functionally distinct brain regions to test the relative rates at which investment in higher-order cognitive processing (mushroom body calyces) versus peripheral sensory processing (optic and antennal lobes) increased with increasing brain size. Subjects were eusocial paper wasps from queen and worker castes of 10 species from different genera. Relative investment in central processing tissue increased with brain size at a higher rate than peripheral structure investment, demonstrating that tissue devoted to higher-order cognitive processing is more constrained by brain size. This pattern held for raw data and for phylogenetically independent contrasts. These findings suggest that there is a minimum necessary investment in peripheral sensory processing brain tissue, with little to gain from additional investment. In contrast, increased brain size provides opportunities to invest in additional higher-order cognitive processing tissue. Reproductive castes differed within species in brain tissue investment, with higher central-to-peripheral brain tissue ratios in queens than in workers. Coupled with previous findings that paper wasp queen, but not worker, brain architecture corresponds to ecological and social variation, queen brain evolution appears to be most strongly shaped by cognitive demands, such as social interactions. These evolutionary patterns of neural investment echo findings in other animal lineages and have important implications, given that a greater investment in higher-order processing has been shown to increase the prevalence of complex and flexible behaviors across the animal kingdom. PMID:21482775

  16. The effect on cast post dimensions of casting investment and airborne particle abrasion.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Danya; German, Matthew J; Wassell, Robert W

    2011-09-01

    Cast posts can sometimes prove difficult to seat fully during fitting. This study compared two different liquid/water dilutions for phosphate bonded investment and the effect of controlled airborne particle abrasion on resulting post diameter. After measuring polymeric post patterns (n = 18), 3 groups were invested using concentrated solution and 3 groups using dilute solution. After casting they were weighed and remeasured then exposed to airborne particle abrasion. Both solutions produced oversized cast posts. Mean diameter reduction during airborne particle abrasion was 8 microm/10s taking an average of 41s to reach precast size. Where a post pattern fits tightly, airborne particle abrasion for 70s should reduce the casting sufficiently to accommodate the cement lute.

  17. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Cannell; Adrian S. Sabau

    2005-09-30

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The first part of the project involved preparation of reports on the state of the art at that time for all the areas under consideration (die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy). The primary R&D focus during Phase I was on the wax material since the least was known about it. The main R&D accomplishments during this phase were determination of procedures for obtaining the thermal conductivity and viscoelastic properties of an unfilled wax and validating those procedures. Phase II focused on die-wax and shell-alloy systems. A wax material model was developed based on results obtained during the previous R&D phase, and a die-wax model was successfully incorporated into and used in commercial computer programs. Current computer simulation programs have complementary features. A viscoelastic module was available in ABAQUS but unavailable in ProCAST, while the mold-filling module was available in ProCAST but unavailable in ABAQUS. Thus, the numerical simulation results were only in good qualitative agreement with experimental results, the predicted shrinkage factors being approximately 2.5 times larger than those measured. Significant progress was made, and results showed that the testing and modeling of wax material had great potential for industrial applications. Additional R&D focus was placed on one shell-alloy system. The fused-silica shell mold and A356 aluminum alloy were considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. It was very important to obtain accurate temperature data from actual castings, and significant effort was made to obtain temperature profiles in

  18. Investigation of Oxide Bifilms in Investment Cast Superalloy IN100: Part II. Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Max A.; Fuchs, Gerhard E.

    2016-05-01

    Oxide bifilms are a proposed casting inclusion reported to have been observed in vacuum investment cast polycrystalline Ni-based superalloys. Ongoing research seeks to determine if current superalloy casting practices can result in the formation of oxide bifilms, and subsequently if it is possible to observe and characterize this phenomenon. The effect of casting atmosphere, turbulence, filtering, hot isostatic pressing, and heat treatment has been investigated to identify the critical parameters that have been reported to result in bifilm formation in Ni-based superalloy IN100. Scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were utilized to characterize samples from each casting condition. In situ ultrahigh vacuum Auger fractography did not indicate the presence of bifilms on the fracture behavior of IN100 in any processing condition. SAM analysis identified a sulfur-enriched monolayer on the surface of dendritic casting porosity, and identified heterogeneous Ti oxycarbide inclusions in air cast IN100. SEM analysis also indicated the presence of Ti oxycarbide inclusions in air cast IN100, and determined that these inclusion structures consist of fine blocky external M(Ti, Mo)C carbide enveloping an internal core of alumina. HR-TEM analysis indicated that none of the oxycarbide inclusion interfaces exist as discontinuous unbound interfaces, and that the internal alumina core is an ultra-fine polycrystalline structure.

  19. Investigation of Oxide Bifilms in Investment Cast Superalloy IN100: Part I. Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Gerhard E.; Kaplan, Max A.

    2016-05-01

    Oxide bifilms are a proposed casting inclusion reported to have been observed in vacuum investment cast polycrystalline Ni-based superalloys. Ongoing research seeks to determine if current superalloy casting practices can result in the formation of oxide bifilms, and subsequently if it is possible to observe and characterize this phenomenon. The effects of casting atmosphere, turbulence, filtering, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and heat treatment have been investigated to identify the critical parameters that have been reported to result in bifilm formation in Ni-based superalloys. Room temperature tensile and room temperature fatigue testing are used to identify the effects of each casting and processing parameter on casting defect formation and the resultant effects on mechanical properties. Characterization of mechanical test specimens seeks to identify the role of casting defects and microstructural features on the fracture mechanisms of the specimen conditions analyzed, and in particular, evidence of bifilm formation and the chemical composition(s) of oxide bifilms. Analyzed tensile and fatigue data did not indicate an influence of bifilms on the tensile or fatigue strength of vacuum processed IN100. Bifilms were not observed, via the characterization methods utilized, to be an active mechanism in tensile or fatigue fracture.

  20. Surface modification of investment cast-316L implants: microstructure effects.

    PubMed

    El-Hadad, Shimaa; Khalifa, Waleed; Nofal, Adel

    2015-03-01

    Artificial femur stem of 316L stainless steel was fabricated by investment casting using vacuum induction melting. Different surface treatments: mechanical polishing, thermal oxidation and immersion in alkaline solution were applied. Thicker hydroxyapatite (HAP) layer was formed in the furnace-oxidized samples as compared to the mechanically polished ones. The alkaline treatment enhanced the precipitation of HAP on the samples. It was also observed that the HAP precipitation responded differently to the different phases of the microstructure. The austenite phase was observed to have more homogeneous and smoother layer of HAP. In addition, the growth of HAP was sometimes favored on the austenite phase rather than on ferrite phase.

  1. The Effect of Thermal Cycling on the Surface Roughness of Dental Casting Investments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    ceramometal alloys, cast into the various dental investment samples, was also evaluated. Finally, the roughness average measurement method was evaluated for...adaptability to dental casting investments. Ten epoxy resin dies were fabricated from the surface of six dental investment products after they were set...against a smooth reference surface. Ten additional epoxy resin dies were fabricated from the six dental investment samples after they were set

  2. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.

  3. Characterization of oxide bifilms and nonmetallic inclusions in investment cast superalloy IN100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Max A.

    Oxide bifilms are a proposed casting inclusion reported to have been observed in vacuum investment cast polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys. This investigation seeks to determine if current superalloy casting methods can result in the formation of oxide bifilms, and subsequently if it is possible to observe and characterize this phenomenon. The effect of casting atmosphere, turbulence, filtering, HIP, and heat treatment have been investigated to identify the critical parameters that may result in bifilm formation in Ni-based superalloy IN100. Bifilms have been reported to impact mechanical behavior and fracture characteristics of cast superalloys, therefore tensile and fatigue testing was used in an effort to identify the effects of each casting and processing parameter on bifilm formation. Characterization of mechanical test specimens sought to identify the role of bifilms in the fracture mechanics of the conditions utilized, as well as the prevalence of bifilm formation and the chemical composition(s) of oxide bifilms. The characterization methods used were SEM, EDS, SAM, AES, STEM, BF-TEM, and HR-TEM. Tensile and fatigue test data did not indicate an influence of bifilms on the mechanical behavior of IN100, however there was a considerable impact due to the formation of Ti oxycarbide inclusions. Statistical analysis confirmed that vacuum and argon cast material under conditions expected to cause abundant bifilm formation exhibit no measurable debit to mechanical properties as compared to conditions anticipated to prevent/remediate bifilms. Bifilms were not identified during metallographic characterization or fractographic analysis of mechanical test specimens. In-situ ultrahigh vacuum Auger fractography also did not indicate the presence of bifilms in the fracture behavior of IN100 in any processing condition. However, a sulfur-enriched monolayer has been identified on the surface of dendritic casting porosity, as characterized by Auger analysis. Metallographic

  4. FRICTION STIR MICROSTRUCTURAL MODIFICATION OF INVESTMENT CAST F357

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, s.; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chou, H. N.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-02-09

    A hypoeutectic Al-Si alloy has been friction stir processed in this study using various run parameter combinations. Tensile test results indicate at least three times improvement in ductility value over as-cast T6 condition because of refinement in Si particle size. Si particle size and shape has been quantified and correlated with mechanical properties. Tool rotation rate seems to have the most significant effect on properties. Higher tool rotation rate resulted in more uniform and homogeneous microstructure though some anomaly is observed at very high tool rotation rate.

  5. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  6. Effect of selected physical properties of waxes on investments and casting shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Yamagishi, T; Oshida, Y; Munoz, C A

    1996-02-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between flow characteristics, bending strength, and softening temperature of paraffin and dental inlay waxes to casting shrinkage when patterns were invested with a phosphate-bonded investment. This study found that the casting shrinkage decreased as the flow of the wax pattern increased. If a low flow wax is used or if there is a need for a thick pattern, the size of the casting ring should be increased. When wax patterns are formed for cast restorations, it is important to select the type of wax with the most desirable properties for the margin and the occlusal portions. Moreover, to accurately fabricate castings, it is necessary to understand the physical properties of the chosen waxes.

  7. The dependence of tensile ductility on investment casting parameters in gamma titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Raban, R.; Rishel, L.L.; Pollock, T.M.

    1999-07-01

    Plates of three gamma titanium aluminide alloys have been investment cast with a wide variety of casting conditions designed to influence cooling rates. These alloys include Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nv, Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb+0.5at%B and Ti-45Al-2Cr-2Nb+0.9at%B. Cooling rates have been estimated with the use of thermal data from casting experiments, along with the UES ProCAST simulation package. Variations in cooling rate significantly influenced the microstructure and tensile properties of all three alloys.

  8. Effect of porosity on ductility variation in investment cast 17-4PH.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Robert D.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grant, Richard P.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Susan, Donald Francis

    2005-02-01

    The stainless steel alloy 17-4PH contains a martensitic microstructure and second phase delta ({delta}) ferrite. Strengthening of 17-4PH is attributed to Cu-rich precipitates produced during age hardening treatments at 900-1150 F (H900-H1150). For wrought 17-4PH, the effects of heat treatment and microstructure on mechanical properties are well-documented [for example, Ref. 1]. Fewer studies are available on cast 17-4PH, although it has been a popular casting alloy for high strength applications where moderate corrosion resistance is needed. Microstructural features and defects particular to castings may have adverse effects on properties, especially when the alloy is heat treated to high strength. The objective of this work was to outline the effects of microstructural features specific to castings, such as shrinkage/solidification porosity, on the mechanical behavior of investment cast 17-4PH. Besides heat treatment effects, the results of metallography and SEM studies showed that the largest effect on mechanical properties is from shrinkage/solidification porosity. Figure 1a shows stress-strain curves obtained from samples machined from castings in the H925 condition. The strength levels were fairly similar but the ductility varied significantly. Figure 1b shows an example of porosity on a fracture surface from a room-temperature, quasi-static tensile test. The rounded features represent the surfaces of dendrites which did not fuse or only partially fused together during solidification. Some evidence of local areas of fracture is found on some dendrite surfaces. The shrinkage pores are due to inadequate backfilling of liquid metal and simultaneous solidification shrinkage during casting. A summary of percent elongation results is displayed in Figure 2a. It was found that higher amounts of porosity generally result in lower ductility. Note that the porosity content was measured on the fracture surfaces. The results are qualitatively similar to those found by

  9. Rapid tooling for functional prototyping of metal mold processes: Literature review on cast tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, M.D.; Hochanadel, P.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report is a literature review on cast tooling with the general focus on AISI H13 tool steel. The review includes processing of both wrought and cast H13 steel along with the accompanying microstructures. Also included is the incorporation of new rapid prototyping technologies, such as Stereolithography and Selective Laser Sintering, into the investment casting of tool steel. The limiting property of using wrought or cast tool steel for die casting is heat checking. Heat checking is addressed in terms of testing procedures, theories regarding the mechanism, and microstructural aspects related to the cracking.

  10. Neutron computed tomography investigation of the porosity on the titanium femoral knee investment casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayoga, B. T.; Suyitno; Dharmastiti, R.; Akbar, F.; Juliani

    2017-02-01

    Rotational velocity in the centrifugal casting is one of the factors that affect to the porosity of the femoral knee cast. The objective of this research is to investigate the internal porosity of as-cast femoral knee prostheses. CP-titanium femoral knee was cast using vertical centrifugal investment casting. The three rotational velocities parameter utilized in the vertical centrifugal casting were 45, 55 and 65 rpm. Neutron computed tomography characterization was conducted to investigate the size, percentage, and location of pores. The maximum size of pores in casting with the rotational velocity of 45, 55, and 65 rpm are 14.78 mm3, 14.98 mm3, and, 14.65 mm3, respectively. The percentage of pores in the casting with the rotational velocity of 45, 55, and 65 rpm are 1.78%, 2.78% and, 1.78% respectively. The size and percentage of the pores for casting at the rotational velocity of 65 rpm are smaller than the size and percentage of the casting at 45 and 55 rpm.

  11. Casting Process Developments for Improving Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mahallawy, Nahed A.; Taha, Mohamed A.

    1985-09-01

    This paper presents a short synopsis of the important developments in casting/solidification processes, as well as the important advances in the conventional methods. These developments are discussed related to quality aspects. The position of each process with respect to practice, as well as expected gains in cost, are examined. The paper briefly features the author's work on innovative processes (directional solidification, rheocasting, squeeze-casting and rapid solidification) as well as work of other investigators on developments in conventional methods.

  12. Properties of experimental titanium cast investment mixing with water reducing agent solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zutai; Ding, Ning; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Han-Cheol, Cho; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a dental investment for titanium casting. ZrO(2) and Al(2)O(3) were selected as refractory materials to prepare three investments (Codes: A-C) according to the quantity of Zr. Al(2)O(3) cement was used as a binder at a ratio of 15%, they were mixed with special mixing liquid. B1 was used as a control mixed with water. Fundamental examinations were statistically evaluated. A casting test was performed with investment B. Fluidities, setting times, and green strengths showed no remarkable differences; however, they were significantly different from those of B1. Expansion values for A, B, C, and B1 at 850°C were 1.03%±0.08%, 1.96%±0.17%, 4.35%±0.23%, and 1.50%±0.28%, respectively. Castings were covered by only small amounts of mold materials. The hardness test showed no significant differences between castings from B and the ones from commercial investments. The experimental special mixing liquid effectively reduced the water/powder ratio and improved the strength and thermal expansion.

  13. [Development of dental quick casting with zircon-phosphoric acid investments].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, R

    1990-03-01

    The application of zircon (ZrSiO4) that has high refractoriness, high thermal conductivity and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, to quick casting investment was studied. Various zircon powders and phosphoric acid solutions were tested with respect to the higher thermal shock resistance. The formulation and properties of zircon-phosphoric acid investment materials such as water/powder ratio, fluidity of slurry, setting time, setting expansion, thermal expansion, thermal analysis, green and fired compressive strength were measured. Formulation of zircon slurry for coating was zircon flower #600 30%, zircon flower #350 10%, and zircon sand CP 60%, and that for sanding was zircon flower #200. The mixing liquid was 15% phosphoric acid and liquid/powder ratio was 0.1. The slurry using phosphoric acid had good fluidity and good workability. The 24-hour green strength was 1 MPa, fired strength was 10 MPa, 24-hour setting expansion was -0.04% and the thermal expansion at 1000 degrees C was 0.31%. Immediately after coating with zircon slurry, the coating layer was dried, sintered and dewaxed by thermal shock. The thermal shock consisted of the following four-step manipulations. The first is hot air drying (50 degrees C, 5 minutes), the second is heat shock (900 degrees C, 3 seconds), the third is redrying (220 degrees C, 3 minutes) and the fourth is dewaxing (550 degrees C, 3 minutes). Small casting of pure titanium and K-metal could be done successfully by the quick casting method using the zircon-phosphoric acid investments. It was found that the total expansion of the secondary investments influenced the casting adapatability.

  14. Fabrication of low-cost, cementless femoral stem 316L stainless steel using investment casting technique.

    PubMed

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Suhasril, Andril Arafat; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Omar, Mohd Afian; Abd Kader, Ab Saman; Mohd Noor, Alias; A Harris, Arief Ruhullah; Abdul Majid, Norazman

    2014-07-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a flourishing orthopedic surgery, generating billions of dollars of revenue. The cost associated with the fabrication of implants has been increasing year by year, and this phenomenon has burdened the patient with extra charges. Consequently, this study will focus on designing an accurate implant via implementing the reverse engineering of three-dimensional morphological study based on a particular population. By using finite element analysis, this study will assist to predict the outcome and could become a useful tool for preclinical testing of newly designed implants. A prototype is then fabricated using 316L stainless steel by applying investment casting techniques that reduce manufacturing cost without jeopardizing implant quality. The finite element analysis showed that the maximum von Mises stress was 66.88 MPa proximally with a safety factor of 2.39 against endosteal fracture, and micromotion was 4.73 μm, which promotes osseointegration. This method offers a fabrication process of cementless femoral stems with lower cost, subsequently helping patients, particularly those from nondeveloped countries.

  15. Application of Rapid Prototyping to the Investment Casting of Test Hardware (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project No. 98-08)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. G.; Wells, D.

    2000-01-01

    Investment casting masters of a selected propulsion hardware component, a fuel pump housing, were rapid prototyped on the several processes in-house, along with the new Z-Corp process acquired through this project. Also, tensile samples were prototyped and cast using the same significant parameters. The models were then shelled in-house using a commercial grade zircon-based slurry and stucco technique. Next, the shelled models were fired and cast by our in-house foundry contractor (IITRI), with NASA-23, a commonly used test hardware metal. The cast models are compared by their surface finish and overall appearance (i.e., the occurrence of pitting, warping, etc.), as well as dimensional accuracy.

  16. Soda-lime glass as a binder in reusable experimental investment for dental castings.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Satoshi; Zhang, Zutai; Aida, Yoshiteru; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, different glasses were investigated to improve reusable investments. Borosilicate glass (BSG) powder and soda-lime glass (SLG) powder were prepared by milling broken beakers and microscope slides, respectively, and used in experimental investments (I-BSG, I-SLG) by blending glass powder (10 wt%) with cristobalite (90 wt%). Some properties and casting fits were evaluated with commercial gypsum-bonded investment as the control. Both BSG and SLG were mainly composed of Si, but SLG had a large Ca content. The glass transition temperatures were approximately 800°C (BSG) and 700°C (SLG). Experimental investments with heating showed the significantly (p<0.05) higher expansion than that of the control. The compressive strength of I-SLG was higher than that of I-BSG, and increased with temperature. The MOD inlay obtained from I-SLG had a significantly smaller gap than that from I-BSG, and was comparable to the control. These results suggest SLG could be applied clinically as a reusable dental investment.

  17. Gypsum-bonded alumina dental investment for high-fusing casting.

    PubMed

    Yan, M; Takahashi, H

    1998-09-01

    In this study, we developed a new gypsum-bonded investment for high-fusing alloys. The investment was composed of gypsum as a binder and alumina as a refractory. Effects of type of alumina powder and gypsum content on characteristics of the gypsum-bonded alumina investment were investigated. Obtained characteristics of this experimental investment were as follows: fluidities ranged from 48.8 to 88.9 mm; setting times ranged from 21.2 to more than 120 minutes; setting expansions ranged from 0.4 to 1.3%; green strengths showed 0.5 to 4.5 MPa; fired strengths ranged from 0.2 to 1.7 MPa; thermal expansions after firing were -1.60 to 2.16%. Thermal expansion occurred because of the chemical reaction between Al2O3 and CaO decomposed from gypsum. These results suggest that this gypsum-bonded alumina investment with 20 or 25 mass% gypsum content possessed the fundamental properties for high-fusing alloy casting.

  18. Process for slip casting textured tubular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, Greg A.; Trumble, Kevin P.; Bowman, Keith J.

    2002-01-01

    A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

  19. The effect of microstructure on the thermal fatigue resistance of investment cast and wrought AISI H13 hot work die steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.

    1995-07-01

    Variable thickness plate investment castings of AISI H13 hot work die steel were pour and characterized in the as-cast and heat treated conditions. The characterization included light microscopy and mechanical testing. Wrought samples of standard and premium grade H13 steel were heat treated and characterized similarly for comparison. Microstructural differences were observed in as-cast samples poured to different section thicknesses. Dendrite cell size and carbide morphology constituted the most prominent microstructural differences observed. After a full heat treatment, however, Microstructural differences between the wrought material and cast materials were slight regardless of section thickness. The mechanical properties of the cast and heat treated material proved similar to the properties of the standard heat treated wrought material. A thermal fatigue testing unit was designed and built to correlate the heat checking susceptibility of AISI H13 steel to its processing and consequent microstructural condition. Surface hardness decreased significantly with thermal cycling, and heat checking was noticed in as few as 50 cycles. Thermal softening and thermal fatigue susceptibility were quantified and discussed relative to the microstructural conditions created by processing and heat treatment. It was found that the premium grade wrought H13 steel provided the best overall resistance to heat checking; however, the heat-treat cast and as-cast H13 tool steel (made from standard grade wrought H13 tool steel) provided comparable resistance to heat checking in terms Of area fraction of heat checking and maximum crack length.

  20. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys Part 2. Application of developed investment for type 4 gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Akira; Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Goto, Shin-ichi; Kato, Katuma; Yara, Atushi; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the developed investment for the prevention of blackening of a cast Type 4 gold and to analyze the oxides on its surface in relation to the blackening of the alloy. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which boron (B) or aluminum (Al) was added as a reducing agent. A Type 4 gold alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the additives was evaluated from the color difference (deltaE*) between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. B and Al were effective to prevent the blackening of a Type 4 gold alloy and the color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. The prevention of the blackening of the gold alloy can be achieved by restraining the formation of CuO.

  1. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Evaluation of an Investment Cast Al-Be Alloy for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; McGill, P. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum-Beryllium metal matrix composite materials are useful due to their desirable performance characteristics for aerospace applications. Desirable characteristics of this material includes light-weight, dimensional stability, stiffness, good vibration damping characteristics, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and workability, This material is 3.5 times stiffer and 22% lighter than conventional aluminum alloys. electro-optical systems, advanced sensor and guidance components for flight and satellite systems, components for light-weight high-performance aircraft engines, and structural components for helicopters. Aluminum-beryllium materials are now available in the form of near net shape investment castings. In this materials properties characterization study, the cryogenic tensile and fracture properties of an investment casting alloy, Beralcast 363, were determined. Tensile testing was performed at 21 C (70 F), -73.3 C (-100 F), -195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F), and fracture (K(sub lc) and da/dN) testing was performed at -73.3 C (-100 F), -195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F). Their use is attractive for weight critical structural applications such as advanced

  2. Effects of magnesia and potassium sulfate on gypsum-bonded alumina dental investment for high-fusing casting.

    PubMed

    Yan, M; Takahashi, H

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the characteristics of gypsum-bonded alumina investments using magnesia and potassium sulfate as chemical additives. Magnesia content improved fluidity, delayed setting reaction, increased green strength, and decreased setting expansion, when mixed with distilled water. When the investment was mixed with potassium sulfate, the setting time and setting expansion were reduced, and the thermal expansion increased, however, the green strength decreased. Therefore, the investment with a small amount of magnesia mixed with potassium sulfate was considered a suitable composition, having adequate setting behavior, enough green strength and sufficient compensate expansion for casting.

  3. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y. Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M. Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Conventional investing and casting techniques are time-consuming and usually requires 2–4 h for completion. Accelerated nonstandard, casting techniques have been reported to achieve similar quality results in significantly less time, namely, in 30–40 min. During casting, it is essential to achieve compensation for the shrinkage of solidifying alloy by investment expansion. The metal casting ring restricts the thermal expansion of investment because the thermal expansion of the ring is lesser than that of the investment. The use of casting ring was challenged with the introduction of the ringless technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 test samples of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) cast copings were obtained from the patterns fabricated using inlay casting wax. The 20 wax patterns were invested using metal ring and 20 wax patterns were invested using the ringless investment system. Of both the groups, 10 samples underwent conventional casting, and the other 10 underwent accelerated casting. The patterns were casted using the induction casting technique. All the test samples of cast copings were evaluated for vertical marginal gaps at four points on the die employing a stereo optical microscope. Results: The vertical marginal discrepancy data obtained were tabulated. Mean and standard deviations were obtained. Vertical discrepancies were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significantly different. The data obtained were found to be very highly significant (P < 0.001). Mean vertical gap was the maximum for Group II (53.64 μm) followed by Group IV (47.62 μm), Group I (44.83 μm) and Group III (35.35 μm). Conclusion: The Ni-Cr cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had

  4. Cast Double Base Propellants: Process Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-02-01

    thc rate of dilatation, of the casting powder and its .’ate of penetration by casting liquid, 2. 2. To measure the rate of dilatation of the...powders a)d fini.shed charges, 2.4. To dctcrminc the r,ate of solution of the casti)g owdcr in thc castino llquid, 2.5. To measturc the chrngo iu...O aad humidity cabiact ( sect a t 20OC. , 5 5 --c lat:v* hCum-’IitY) fo t ea,t 24 hours befo-re coiiencin-g the test. The gralcz L-u-o thc ):) mo,,sur

  5. CAST2D: A finite element computer code for casting process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D has the following features in addition to all the features contained in the TOPAZ2D and NIKE2D codes: (1) a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm (i.e., slide line) that calculates the thermal contact resistance across the part-mold interface as a function of interface pressure and gap opening; (2) a new phase change algorithm, the delta function method, that is a robust method for materials undergoing isothermal phase change; (3) a constitutive model that transitions between fluid behavior and solid behavior, and accounts for material volume change on phase change; and (4) a modified plot file data base that allows plotting of thermal variables (e.g., temperature, heat flux) on the deformed geometry. Although the code is specialized for casting modeling, it can be used for other thermal stress problems (e.g., metal forming).

  6. Mould filling of Ag-Pd-Cu-Au and Ag-Zn-Sn-In alloy castings made using a rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Inoue, Shoko; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Watanabe, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2008-12-01

    Mandibular premolar-shaped wax patterns of full crowns with a marginal angle of 300 were prepared. Two semiprecious alloys were cast using a rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material or a conventional gypsum-bonded investment. A precise impression was taken and cut into four segments. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the mould filling of each segment. The mould filling of the silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy was worse than that of the silver-zinc-tin-indium alloy. The mould filling of both alloys cast with the rapidly prepared gypsum-bonded investment material was superior to that using the conventional investment.

  7. Process improvement as an investment: Measuring its worth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Frank; Jeletic, Kellyann

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses return on investment (ROI) generated from software process improvement programs. It details the steps needed to compute ROI and compares these steps from the perspective of two process improvement approaches: the widely known Software Engineering Institute's capability maturity model and the approach employed by NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL). The paper then describes the specific investments made in the SEL over the past 18 years and discusses the improvements gained from this investment by the production organization in the SEL.

  8. Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young

    2013-08-20

    Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

  9. [Application of gypsum-bonded investment containing niobium carbide on casting of alloy for metal-ceramic restoration].

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, S; Ban, S; Hasegawa, J; Hayashi, S; Iiyama, K; Yamamura, Y

    1990-07-01

    Experimental gypsum-bonded investments containing 0.5-5.0 wt% NbC were prepared by mechanical mixing of each powder. Setting and thermal expansion measurement, compressive strength and casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloy for metal-ceramic restoration were investigated. Analysis of NbC during heating was carried out by X-ray diffraction, TG-DTA and SEM. NbC was oxidized to Nb2O5 with a volume change between 300-600 degrees C, as in the following equation: 2NbC + 4 1/2O2----Nb2O5 + 2CO2 The theoretical volume of 1/2Nb2O5 calculated from the lattice constants according to JCPDS file was approximately 4 times larger than that of NbC. The experimental investments of 70 wt% cristobalite and 30 wt% gypsum containing 2.0, 3.0 and 5.0 wt% NbC showed large thermal expansion of 7.0, 10.0 and 13.0% respectively. The investment containing 2.0 wt% NbC showed nearly the same casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloys for metal-ceramic restoration as the commercial phosphate-bonded investment.

  10. Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

  11. Effect of Annealing Temperature on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hot Swaged cp-Ti Produced by Investment Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Khaled M.; Mhaede, Mansour; Wagner, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of hot swaging (SW) and annealing treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of commercially pure titanium (grade 4) produced by investment casting. During SW at 700 °C, the diameter of the cast titanium bars was reduced from 25 to 8.5 mm in 14 steps. After SW, material was annealed for 1 h at 500, 700, or 870 °C. The as-cast samples showed a typical microstructure consisting of a variety of α-morphologies, while the hot swaged samples exhibited a kinked lamellar microstructure. Annealing at 500 °C did not significantly change this microstructure, while annealing at both 700 and 870 °C led to recrystallization and formation of equiaxed microstructures. The cast bars exhibited a typical hard α-layer in near-surface regions with maximum depth and maximum hardness of 720 μm and 660 HV0.5, respectively. Due to SW, the tensile strength of the as-cast material drastically increased from 605 to 895 MPa. Annealing at 500 °C decreased this tensile strength slightly from 895 to 865 MPa while annealing at 700 °C led to a further pronounced drop in tensile strength from 865 to 710 MPa. No additional decrease in tensile strength was observed by increasing the annealing temperature from 700 to 870 °C. The tensile ductility of the as-cast and hot swaged samples was approximately the same in the range of 0.05 to 0.11, while the annealed samples showed values in the range of 0.25 to 0.53. In addition, the as-cast and hot swaged samples revealed a brittle cleavage fracture surfaces. However, the annealed samples showed a transgranular ductile fracture with formation of dimples.

  12. Surface hardening of two cast irons by friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hidetoshi; Yamaguchi, Yasufumi; Kikuchi, Toshifumi; Kiguchi, Shoji; Nogi, Kiyoshi

    2009-05-01

    The Friction Stir Processing (FSP) was applied to the surface hardening of cast irons. Flake graphite cast iron (FC300) and nodular graphite cast iron (FCD700) were used to investigate the validity of this method. The matrices of the FC300 and FC700 cast irons are pearlite. The rotary tool is a 25mm diameter cylindrical tool, and the travelling speed was varied between 50 and 150mm/min in order to control the heat input at the constant rotation speed of 900rpm. As a result, it has been clarified that a Vickers hardness of about 700HV is obtained for both cast irons. It is considered that a very fine martensite structure is formed because the FSP generates the heat very locally, and a very high cooling rate is constantly obtained. When a tool without an umbo (probe) is used, the domain in which graphite is crushed and striated is minimized. This leads to obtaining a much harder sample. The hardness change depends on the size of the martensite, which can be controlled by the process conditions, such as the tool traveling speed and the load. Based on these results, it was clarified that the FSP has many advantages for cast irons, such as a higher hardness and lower distortion. As a result, no post surface heat treatment and no post machining are required to obtain the required hardness, while these processes are generally required when using the traditional methods.

  13. Application of particle method to the casting process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Zulaida, Y. M.; Anzai, K.

    2012-07-01

    Casting processes involve many significant phenomena such as fluid flow, solidification, and deformation, and it is known that casting defects are strongly influenced by the phenomena. However the phenomena complexly interacts each other and it is difficult to observe them directly because the temperature of the melt and other apparatus components are quite high, and they are generally opaque; therefore, a computer simulation is expected to serve a lot of benefits to consider what happens in the processes. Recently, a particle method, which is one of fully Lagrangian methods, has attracted considerable attention. The particle methods based on Lagrangian methods involving no calculation lattice have been developed rapidly because of their applicability to multi-physics problems. In this study, we combined the fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification simulation programs, and tried to simulate various casting processes such as continuous casting, centrifugal casting and ingot making. As a result of continuous casting simulation, the powder flow could be calculated as well as the melt flow, and the subsequent shape of interface between the melt and the powder was calculated. In the centrifugal casting simulation, the mold was smoothly modeled along the shape of the real mold, and the fluid flow and the rotating mold are simulated directly. As a result, the flow of the melt dragged by the rotating mold was calculated well. The eccentric rotation and the influence of Coriolis force were also reproduced directly and naturally. For ingot making simulation, a shrinkage formation behavior was calculated and the shape of the shrinkage agreed well with the experimental result.

  14. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  15. Porosity of dental phosphate-bonded investments after setting and heating processes.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Kenzo; Bae, Ji-Young; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2012-01-01

    Porosities of set and burnout compacts of phosphate-bonded investments were determined. A gas pycnometer was used to measure the volumes, and hence the densities, of fine powders and porous compacts. Porosities of set and burnout compacts were then obtained from these data for as-received powders and dry set compacts by a numerical simulation method, subsequently leading on to the estimated compositions of conventional and rapid-heating investments used in this study. Excess water content in the hardening investment compact was evaluated as a function of setting time elapsed from the start of mixing. Porosities were about 24-32% for set compacts and 43% for burnout compacts, which well agreed with the numerically computed results. It was concluded that the functional composition of investment powder needed to achieve the optimal porosity as well as process parameters such as water-powder (W/P) ratio and keeping time of mixed investment casting slurry before heat treatment could be determined using the numerical simulation method developed in this study.

  16. AMCC casting development, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    PCC successfully cast and performed nondestructive testing, FPI and x-ray, on seventeen AMCC castings. Destructive testing, lab analysis and chemical milling, was performed on eleven of the castings and the remaining six castings were shipped to NASA or Aerojet. Two of the six castings shipped, lots 015 and 016, were fully processed per blueprint requirements. PCC has fully developed the gating and processing parameters of this part and feels the part could be implemented into production, after four more castings have been completed to ensure the repeatability of the process. The AMCC casting has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or thermal gradient control. This method of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. The alloy, JBK75, is a relatively new alloy in the investment casting arena and required our engineering staff to learn the gating, processing, and dimensional characteristics of the material.

  17. Effect of Process Parameters, Casting Thickness, and Alloys on the Interfacial Heat-Transfer Coefficient in the High-Pressure Die-Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Shou-Mei; Liu, Bai-Cheng; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2008-12-01

    The heat transfer at the metal-die interface is believed to have great influence on the solidification process and cast structure of the high-pressure die-casting (HPDC) process. The present article focused on the effects of process parameters, casting thickness, and alloys on the metal-die interfacial heat-transfer coefficient (IHTC) in the HPDC process. Experiment was carried out on a cold-chamber die-casting machine with two casting alloys AM50 and ADC12. A special casting, namely, “step-shape” casting, was used and cast against a H13 steel die. The IHTC was determined using an inverse approach based on the temperature measurements inside the die. Results show that the IHTC is different at different steps and changes as the solidification of the casting proceeds. Process parameters only influence the IHTC in its peak value, and for both AM50 and ADC12 alloys, a greater fast shot velocity leads to a greater IHTC peak value at steps 1 and 2. The initial die surface temperature has a more prominent influence on the IHTC peak values at the thicker steps, especially step 5. Results also show that a closer contact between the casting and die could be achieved when the casting alloy is ADC12 instead of AM50, which consequently leads to a higher IHTC.

  18. Characterization of Spray Lubricants for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-01-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. The cooling effects of the die lubricant were investigated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), heat flux sensors (HFS), and infrared imaging. The evolution of the heat flux and pictures taken using a high speed infrared camera revealed that lubricant application was a transient process. The short time response of the HFS allows the monitoring and data acquisition of the surface temperature and heat flux without additional data processing. A similar set of experiments was performed with deionized water in order to assess the lubricant effect. The high heat flux obtained at 300 C was attributed to the wetting and absorbant properties of the lubricant. Pictures of the spray cone and lubricant flow on the die were also used to explain the heat flux evolution.

  19. Lab experiments on the innovative rapid thick strip casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Richard; Senk, Dieter

    2012-05-01

    Rapid thick strip casting (RTSC) by Anton Hulek, Inventmetall®, is an innovative concept for the production of hot strips with a final as-cast thickness of about 25 mm before rolling. The innovation of the mechanism consists in a vertical mould performing a caterpillar motion. This moving mould has an unconventional parallelogram-shaped cross-section. The conventional rectangular shape is formed in the shaping machine, which is placed straight below the mould. Further elements of the technology are state-of-the-art. For the investigation of this new casting system theoretical calculations were complemented with practical experiments. The investigation focused mainly on two key aspects: the characteristics of the mould and the shaping process. For the practical analysis a static mould with three pairs of elements in laboratory scale was developed and commissioned by the Dept. of Ferrous Metallurgy @ RWTH Aachen University. The shaping experiments were carried out in model scale with two different materials and in variable boundary conditions. The results of these experiments delivered important mechanical as well as thermal informations about the casting system.

  20. Liquid Metal Processing and Casting Experiences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we will discuss some of the early pioneering work as well as some of our more recent research. The Albany Research Center (ARC) has been involved with the melting and processing of metals since it was established in 1942. In the early days, hardly anything was known about melting refractory or reactive metals and as such, virtually everything had to be developed in-house. Besides the more common induction heated air-melt furnaces, ARC has built and/or utilized a wide variety of furnaces including vacuum arc remelt ingot and casting furnaces, cold wall induction furnaces, electric arc furnaces, cupola furnaces and reverberatory furnaces. The melt size of these furnaces range from several grams to a ton or more. We have used these furnaces to formulate custom alloys for wrought applications as well as for such casting techniques as spin casting, investment casting and lost foam casting among many. Two early spin-off industrializations were Wah Chang (wrought zirconium alloys for military and commercial nuclear applications) and Oremet (both wrought and cast Ti). Both of these companies are now part of the ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corporation.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of cast magnesium matrix composites by vacuum stir casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Manchang; Li, Peiyong; Han, Jianmin

    2003-04-01

    A vacuum stir casting process is developed to produce SiCp reinforced cast magnesium matrix composites. This process can eliminate the entrapment of external gas onto melt and oxidation of magnesium during stirring synthesis. Two composites with Mg-Al9Zn and Mg-Zn5Zr alloys as matrices and 15 vol.% SiC particles as reinforcement are obtained. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the composites and the unreinforced alloys in as-cast and heat treatment conditions are analyzed and evaluated. In 15 vol.% SiCp reinforced Mg-Al9Zn alloy-based composite (Mg-Al9Zn/15SiCp), SiC particles distribute homogenously in the matrix and are well bonded with magnesium. In 15 vol.% SiCp reinforced Mg-Zn5Zr alloy-based composite (Mg-Zn5Zr/15SiCp), some agglomerations of SiC particles can be seen in the microstructure. In the same stirring process conditions, SiC reinforcement is more easily wetted by magnesium in the Mg-Al9Zn melt than in the Mg-Zn5Zr melt. The significant improvement in yield strength and elastic modulus for two composites has been achieved, especially for the Mg-Al9Zn/15SiCp composite in which yield strength and elastic modulus increase 112 and 33%, respectively, over the unreinforced alloy, and increase 24 and 21%, respectively, for the Mg-Zn5Zr/15SiCp composite. The strain-hardening behaviors of the two composites and their matrix alloys were analyzed based on the microstructure characteristics of the materials.

  2. Process modelings and simulations of heavy castings and forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dianzhong; Sun, Mingyue; Wang, Pei; Kang, Xiuhong; Fu, Paixian; Li, Yiyi

    2013-05-01

    The Materials Process Modeling Division, IMR, CAS has been promoting for more than 10 years research activities on modeling and experimental studies on heavy castings and forgings. In this report, we highlight some selected achievements and impacts in this area: To satisfy domestic strategic requirements, such as nuclear and hydraulic power, marine projects and high speed rail, we have developed a number of casting and forging technologies, which combine advanced computing simulations, X-ray real time observation techniques and industrial-scaled trial experiments. These technologies have been successfully applied in various industrial areas and yielded a series of scientific and technological breakthroughs and innovation. Important examples of this strategic research include the hot-processing technologies of the Three Gorge water turbine runner, marine crankshaft manufacturers, backup rolls for hot rolling mills and the production of hundreds-ton steel ingot.

  3. Casting defects of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in vertical centrifugal casting processes with graphite molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Limin; Xu, Daming; Li, Min; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2012-02-01

    Numerical simulation and experimental investigation are utilized to analyze the casting defects of Ti-6Al-4V alloy formed under different vertical centrifugal casting conditions in graphite molds. Mold rotating rates of 0, 110 and 210 rpm are considered in experimental process. Results show that centrifugal forces have significant effects on the quantity of both macropores and microdefects (micropores, microcracks and inclusions). The relative amount of all macro- and micro-scopic casting defects decreases from 62.4 % to 24.8 % with the increasing of the centrifugal force, and the macropore quantity in stepped casting decreases exponentially with the increase of the gravitation coefficient. The relative proportions of both micropores and microcracks decrease with the mold-rotating rate increase, but the relative proportion of inclusions increases significantly. Besides this, the mold-filling sequence is proved to be an important factor in casting quality control.

  4. Vacuum forming of thermoplastic sheet results in low-cost investment casting patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, A. E., Jr.

    1964-01-01

    Vacuum forming of a sheet of thermoplastic material around a mandrel conforming to the shape of the finished object provides a pattern for an investment mold. The thickness of the metal part is determined by the thickness of the plastic pattern.

  5. Simulation and Experiment on Direct Continuous Casting Process of Lead Frame Copper Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guojie, Huang; Shuisheng, Xie; Lei, Cheng

    2010-06-01

    Direct Continuous Casting (D.C.C) is an important method in casting lead frame copper alloy. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the D.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1413 K˜1413 K, the casting speed is between 8 m/h˜10 m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 4.2 m/s˜4.6 m/s. And the depth of liquid-solid boundary is measured in different casting temperature and casting speed by experiments. The results show the actual measurements have a little deviation with the numerical simulation. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the actual experiments.

  6. Investment casting using multi-jet modelling patterns: the thermogravimetric analysis of visijet® SR200 UV curable acrylate plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsa, M. N.; Ibrahim, M.; Sharif, S.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid Prototyping (RP) technology is actively studied to be implemented in Investment Casting (IC) process. Nowadays RP techniques are studied for their feasibility as IC master patterns, in terms of pattern collapsibility and drainage during burnout. The purpose of the study is to determine the characteristic of Visijet® SR200 acrylate material during burnout process. Traditional IC patterns made from wax have properties that limit their application in precision casting, especially for parts with thin geometries that readily break or deform when handled or dipped in the refractory slurry. Furthermore, it is not economical when producing a small number of parts. Non wax patterns fabricated for IC process, revealed ceramic shell cracking due to excessive thermal expansions, incomplete collapsibility of pattern during burnout, residual ash and poor surface finish. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to measured the weight loss of acrylate material as the temperature was increased. TGA measured the change of material's mass as it is heated. It represents the decomposition temperature after being subjected to varying temperatures, as well as the amount of residual ash. In this experiment, the temperature range was from 20°C to 700°C with 5°C increment. Experiment results show the values of material's optimum reaction temperature and decomposing temperature of Visijet® SR200 acrylate. The percentages of remaining materials were also monitored throughout the process to obtain the amount of residual ash. All of the temperature values obtained is a resemblance for the actual burnout process and can be used as references.

  7. Porosity of dental gypsum-bonded investments in setting and heating process.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Kenzo; Bae, Ji-Young; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2012-02-03

    The porosity of gypsum-bonded investments for set and heated compacts was measured and theoretically computed quantitatively, because porosity is an effective factor for determining the strength, setting/heating expansion, and permeability of compacts at casting. A helium gas pycnometer was used to measure the solid volume of fine powders, powder-water mixtures, and porous compacts. The compositions of the conventional cristobalite investment and rapid-heating type investment were estimated from the measured solid densities of the as-received powders and the set investments. The porosity and water content of the set investments were determined from the experimental data. Excess water content in the set investment was calculated in relation to the elapsed time from the start of mixing with water. The experimental porosities of the set and heated investments were about 40% for dry set >compacts and about 50% for fired compacts, which well agreed with the numerically computed estimations, respectively.

  8. Minimization of Macrosegregation in DC Cast Ingots Through Jet Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Samuel R.; Allanore, Antoine

    2016-10-01

    With an increase in demand for aluminum alloys, industrial suppliers are seeking to increase the size and speed of casting processes. Unfortunately operating the existing Direct-Chill (DC) process in such conditions tends to enhance metallurgical defects. Perhaps the most recognized of these defects is macrosegregation, whose effects are permanent once the material is solidified. In order to facilitate the expansion of the DC process without increasing the presence of macrosegregation, a novel jet mixing method to distribute the liquid metal is presented. The governing equations for this process are derived and the operating parameters necessary to minimize the centerline macrosegregation are predicted. The results of commercial-scale tests are presented, validating the predictive equations and performance of this process.

  9. Heat treatment of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel; Part 2: Isothermal aging kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J. . Physical and Joining Metallurgy Dept.); Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The hardening response of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel has been evaluated by hardness measurements following aging in the temperature range normally specified for this alloy (510 C to 593 C). A new relationship between fraction transformed and hardness was developed, and analysis of the data in terms of the kinetics of precipitation, in a manner similar to that frequently applied to other precipitation-hardenable martensitic steels, yielded low time exponents and a low value for the apparent activation energy. The values of the time exponents were 0.49, 0.37, 0.56, and 0.53 at 510 C, 538 C, 566 C, and 593 C, respectively, and that for the apparent activation energy was 139 kJ/mole. As has been proposed for other maraging type steels, these estimates suggest that [beta]-NiAl precipitates along or near dislocations and that growth of the precipitates is dominated by dislocation pipe diffusion. However, these predictions were neither supported nor refuted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of difficulties in imaging the [beta]-NiAl precipitates at the aging times and temperatures used. Further, analysis of the data using the formalism of Wert and Zener for the growth of precipitates with interfering diffusion fields indicated that the estimates of fraction transformed from hardness data are not fully appropriate for maraging type steels. Consideration of the nature of the Avrami analysis and the electron microscopy results suggests that other phenomena, including dislocation recovery and reversion of martensite to austenite, occur at rates sufficient to convolute the Avrami analysis. It is further suggested that these results cast doubt on the fundamental implications of previous analyses of precipitation kinetics in age-hardening martensitic steels.

  10. Influence of Refiner in ZA-12 Alloys During Centrifugal Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, P. N.; Shailesh, Rao A.; Jagath, M. C.; Channakeshavalu, K.

    2014-05-01

    The behavior of the molten melt plays a predominant role in determining the quality cast product. In continuous casting, addition of refiner 1% (Al+Ti+B2) onto the molten metal increases its mechanical properties as a result of the nucleation within the process. In this article, the effect of refiners in the centrifugal casting process was studied. Eutectic ZA-12 alloys were taken for our experiment and cast at various rotational speeds (400 rpm, 600 rpm, and 800 rpm) with and without the addition of refiners. Rather than increase in the solidification rate as in continuous casting, these refiners diminish the solidification rate, which in turn forms an irregular-shaped cast tube. The microstructure and hardness for the entire cast specimen were discussed finally.

  11. Heat treatment of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel: Part I. Mechanical properties and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochanadel, P. W.; Edwards, G. R.; Robino, C. V.; Cieslak, M. J.

    1994-04-01

    The microstructure of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel heat-treated to various conditions was studied using light and electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The mechanical properties were investigated by using uniaxial tensile testing, hardness testing, and Charpy impact testing. The Β-NiAl strengthening precipitates, though detectable by electron diffraction, were difficult to resolve by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in specimens aged at low temperatures (566 °C and below). A high dislocation density was observed in the lath martensitic structure. The higher strength and lower ductility observed at low aging temperatures was attributed to both the high dislocation density and the precipitation of Β-NiAl. When samples were aged at high temperatures (> 566 °C), a lower dislocation density and a reverted austenite fraction on the order of 15 pct were observed. Spherical Β-NiAl precipitates were observed in the overaged condition. The decrease in strength and corresponding increase in ductility observed in samples aged at temperatures above 566 °C were attributed to the reverted austenite and recovery. Mechanical properties were improved when the homogenizing temperature and time were increased. Electron probe microanalysis quantified the increased homogeneity realized by increasing homogenizing temperature and time. Elimination of the refrigeration step, which normally follows the solution treatment, did not degrade the mechanical properties. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed only minor decreases in the fraction of retained austenite when refrigeration followed the solution treatment.

  12. Composite Materials Processing of Cast Iron and Ceramics Using Compo-Casting Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Yoshihiro; Sumimoto, Haruyoshi

    The compo-casting technology of ceramics and cast iron is expected to be one of the major casting technologies that can expand the application fields of cast iron. This technique allows the heat energy of the molten metal to be utilized to produce cast iron products which are added with functions of ceramic materials. The largest problem in compo-casting technology is generation of cracks caused by thermal shock. Although this crack generation can be prevented by reducing the thermal stress by means of preheating ceramics, the necessary preheating temperature is considerably high and its precise controlling is difficult at the practical foundry working sites. In this study, we tried to numerically predict the critical preheating temperature of ceramics using the thermal stress analysis in unsteady heat transfer and the Newman's diagram, and found that the preheating of ceramics to reduce thermal stress could be substituted with placing an appropriate cast iron cover around the ceramics. Excellent results were obtained by using a method whereby a ceramic bar was covered with a flake graphite cast iron cover and fixed in a sand mold and then molten metal was poured. Then, two or three ceramics were examined at the same time under the compocasting condition. As a result, three specimens could be done at the same time by adjusting the cover space to 15mm. Moreover, irregular shape ceramics were examined under the compocasting condition. As a result, the compocasting could be done by devising the cover shape. In each condition, it was confirmed that the cover shape made from the analytical result was effective to the compocasting by doing the thermometry of the specimens.

  13. Engineering scale demonstration of a prospective Cast Stone process

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Fowley, M.; Hansen, E.; Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Williams, M.

    2014-09-30

    This report documents an engineering-scale demonstration with non-radioactive simulants that was performed at SRNL using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. Over three days, the SCPF was used to fill a 1600 gallon container, staged outside the facility, with simulated Cast Stone grout. The container, staged outside the building approximately 60 ft from the SCPF, was instrumented with x-, y-, and z-axis thermocouples to monitor curing temperature. The container was also fitted with two formed core sampling vials. For the operation, the targeted grout production rate was 1.5 gpm. This required a salt solution flow rate of approximately 1 gpm and a premix feed rate of approximately 580 lb/h. During the final day of operation, the dry feed rate was increased to evaluate the ability of the system to handle increased throughput. Although non-steady state operational periods created free surface liquids, no bleed water was observed either before or after operations. The final surface slope at a fill height of 39.5 inches was 1-1.5 inches across the 8.5 foot diameter container, highest at the final fill point and lowest diametrically opposed to the fill point. During processing, grout was collected in cylindrical containers from both the mixer discharge and the discharge into the container. These samples were stored in a humid environment either in a closed box proximal to the container or inside the laboratory. Additional samples collected at these sampling points

  14. Thermal casting process for the preparation of membranes

    DOEpatents

    Caneba, G.T.M.; Soong, D.S.

    1985-07-10

    Disclosed is a method for providing anisotropic polymer membrane from a binary polymer/solvent solution using a thermal inversion process. A homogeneous binary solution is cast onto a support and cooled in such a way as to provide a differential in cooling rate across the thickness of the resulting membrane sheet. Isotropic or anisotropic structures of selected porosities can be produced, depending on the initial concentration of polymer in the selected solvent and on the extent of the differential in cooling rate. This differential results in a corresponding gradation in pore size. The method may be modified to provide a working skin by applying a rapid, high-temperature pulse to redissolve a predetermined thickness of the membrane at one of its faces and then freezing the entire structure.

  15. Heat treatment of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel: Part II. Isothermal aging kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robino, C. V.; Cieslak, M. J.; Hochanadel, P. W.; Edwards, G. R.

    1994-04-01

    The hardening response of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel has been evaluated by hardness measurements following aging in the temperature range normally specified for this alloy (510 °C to 593 °C). A new relationship between fraction transformed and hardness was developed, and analysis of the data in terms of the kinetics of precipitation, in a manner similar to that frequently applied to other precipitation-hardenable martensitic steels, yielded low time exponents and a low value for the apparent activation energy. The values of the time exponents were 0.49, 0.37, 0.56, and 0.53 at 510 °C, 538 °C, 566 °C, and 593 °C, respectively, and that for the apparent activation energy was 139 kJ/mole. As has been proposed for other maraging type steels, these estimates suggest that Β-NiAl precipitates along or near dislocations and that growth of the precipitates is dominated by dislocation pipe diffusion. However, these predictions were neither supported nor refuted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of difficulties in imaging the Β-NiAl precipitates at the aging times and temperatures used. Further, analysis of the data using the formalism of Wert and Zener for the growth of precipitates with interfering diffusion fields indicated that the estimates of fraction transformed from hardness data are not fully appropriate for maraging type steels. Consideration of the nature of the Avrami analysis and the electron microscopy results suggests that other phenomena, including dislocation recovery and reversion of martensite to austenite, occur at rates sufficient to convolute the Avrami analysis. It is further suggested that these results cast doubt on the fundamental implications of previous analyses of precipitation kinetics in age-hardening martensitic steels. Although the Avrami analysis was found not to provide a tenable description of the precipitation kinetics, it does provide a reasonable methodology for portrayal of the hardening response

  16. Investigation of the beryllia ceramics molding process by the hot casting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhapbasbaev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Sattinova, Z. K.

    2013-03-01

    Results of mathematical simulation of the ceramics molding process by the hot casting method are presented. The mathematical model describes the motion of beryllia liquid thermoplastic slurry in a form-building cavity subject to solidification. Velocity and temperature profiles providing homogeneous properties of the beryllia ceramics in the process of molding by the hot casting method are obtained.

  17. Numerical simulation on austenitization of cast steel during heating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Han, Z. Q.; Liu, B. C.; Zhao, Y. R.; Shen, B. Z.; Zhang, L. Z.

    2012-07-01

    A cellular automaton model has been developed to simulate the austenitization process of ASTM A216 WCA cast steel during heating process. The dissolution of pearlite and the transformation of ferrite into austenite were simulated. The calculation domain was divided into square cells, which are characterized by certain attributes that represent the status of each cell: pearlite (P), ferrite (α), austenite (γ) or γ /α interface. The dissolution of pearlite was described by nucleation and growth of austenite. A mixed-mode model in multicomponent system was employed to calculate the growth velocity of the γ /α interface. According to Burke and Turnbull's theory, austenite grain coarsening induced by γ /γ grain boundary migration was simulated. To validate the model, dilatometric and quenching experiments were carried out. The dilatometric experiment was conducted using a Gleeble1500D with a sample 8 mm in diameter. The temperature of the sample was measured using thermocouples welded on the sample surface. In the quenching experiments, steel samples were heated to different temperatures then dropped into a water tank immediately, and the microstructure of the samples was examined to determine the fraction of the austenite. The simulated results were compared with the experimental results and the capability of the model for quantitatively predicting the microstructure evolution of the steel in heating process was assessed.

  18. Software Analytical Instrument for Assessment of the Process of Casting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franěk, Zdeněk; Kavička, František; Štětina, Josef; Masarik, Miloš

    2010-06-01

    The paper describes the original proposal of ways of solution and function of the program equipment for assessment of the process of casting slabs. The program system LITIOS was developed and implemented in EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel Ostrava on the equipment of continuous casting of steel (further only ECC). This program system works on the data warehouse of technological parameters of casting and quality parameters of slabs. It enables an ECC technologist to analyze the course of casting melt and with using statistics methods to set the influence of single technological parameters on the duality of final slabs. The system also enables long term monitoring and optimization of the production.

  19. Report of Separate Effects Testing for Modeling of Metallic Fuel Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Crapps, Justin M.; Galloway, Jack D.; Decroix, David S.; Korzekwa, David A.; Aikin, Robert M. Jr.; Unal, Cetin; Fielding, R.; Kennedy, R

    2012-06-29

    In order to give guidance regarding the best investment of time and effort in experimental determination of parameters defining the casting process, a Flow-3D model of the casting process was used to investigate the most influential parameters regarding void fraction of the solidified rods and solidification speed for fluid flow parameters, liquid heat transfer parameters, and solid heat transfer parameters. Table 1 summarizes the most significant variables for each of the situations studied. A primary, secondary, and tertiary effect is provided for fluid flow parameters (impacts void fraction) and liquid heat transfer parameters (impacts solidification). In Table 1, the wetting angle represents the angle between the liquid and mold surface as pictured in Figure 1. The viscosity is the dynamic viscosity of the liquid and the surface tension is the property of the surface of a liquid that allows it to resist an external force. When only considering solid heat transfer properties, the variations from case to case were very small. Details on this conclusion are provided in the section considering solid heat transfer properties. The primary recommendation of the study is to measure the fluid flow parameters, specifically the wetting angle, surface tension, and dynamic viscosity, in order of importance, as well as the heat transfer parameters latent heat and specific heat of the liquid alloy. The wetting angle and surface tension can be measured simultaneously using the sessile drop method. It is unclear whether there is a temperature dependency in these properties. Thus measurements for all three parameters are requested at 1340, 1420, and 1500 degrees Celsius, which correspond to the minimum, middle, and maximum temperatures of the liquid alloy during the process. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient between the mold and liquid metal, the latent heat of transformation, and the specific heat of the liquid metal all have strong influences on solidification. These

  20. Ecological stabilization of thickened wastewater sludge from CAST process.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y B; Wu, X H; Liu, Zh Sh; Liu, J Zh; Lin, Y Z

    2008-01-01

    Wastewater sludge ecological stabilization (WWSES) pilot scale experiments were conducted for thickening treatment and disposal of sludge which came from Cyclic Activated Sludge Technology (CAST) process. The study was performed over the periods from June to November 2005 and from May to November 2006, on a bed of 80 m2. The sludge loadings were stopped for the winter from December 2005 and resumed in May 2006. The results shows that dried sludge layer has higher permeation coefficients of 0.15-1.3 m/h. It is suggested that the percolate did not filtrate downwards evenly, part of percolate filtrates downwards along stems, roots and cracks existing in dried sludge which have lower flow resistance. The relationship of dried sludge thickness and operation time is in accord with quadratic equation under fluctuating sludge loadings. Linear regression equation can indicate dried sludge thickness variation under fixed sludge loading. In comparison with natural ones, coarse protein content of Phragmites australis roots in the system is twice as high, coarse fiber content of roots, coarse fat content of stems and leaf are obviously higher; and coarse protein content of Typha augustifolia in the system are obviously higher, while coarse fat and coarse fiber contents have no significant difference.

  1. Numerical simulation of the solidification processes of copper during vacuum continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, D. C.; Hwang, W. S.

    2012-03-01

    A numerical simulation method is used to analyze the microstructure evolution of 8-mm-diameter copper rods during the vacuum continuous casting (VCC) process. The macro-microscopic coupling method is adopted to develop a temperature field model and a microstructure prediction model. The effects of casting parameters, including casting speed, pouring temperature, cooling rate, and casting dimension on the location and shape of the solid-liquid (S/L) interface and solidified microstructure are considered. Simulation results show that the casting speed has a large effect on the position and shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology. With an increase of casting speed, the shape of the S/L interface changes from a planar shape into an elliptical shape or a narrow, pear shape, and the grain morphology indicates a change from axial growth to axial-radial growth or completely radial growth. The simulation predictions agree well with the microstructure observations of cast specimens. Further analysis of the effects of other casting parameters on the position and shape of the S/L interface reveals that the casting dimension has more influence on the position and shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology than do pouring temperature and cooling rate. The simulation results can be summarized to obtain a discriminant of shape factor (η), which defines the shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology.

  2. Numerical simulation of casting process to assist in defects reduction in complex steel tidal power component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, E. J.; Zhao, S. C.; Wang, L. P.; Wu, T.; Xin, B. P.; Tan, J. J.; Jia, H. L.

    2016-03-01

    In order to reduce defects and improve casting quality, ProCAST software is performed to study the solidification process of discharge bowl. Simulated results of original casting process show that the hot tearing is serious at the intersection of blades and outer or inner rings. The shrinkage porosity appears at the bottom of discharge bowl and the transition area of wall thickness. Based on the formation mechanisms of the defects, the structure of chills attached on the outer surface of discharge bowl casting is optimized. The thickness of chills ranges from 25mm to 35mm. The positions of chills corresponded to the outer surface of the T-shaped parts. Compared to the original casting design (without chills), the hot tearing and shrinkage porosity of the discharge bowl are greatly improved with addition of chills.

  3. Development of a low cost permanent mold casting process for TiAl automotive valves

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.E.; Porter, W.J. III; Eylon, D.; Colvin, G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews progress made in the development of a low cost permanent mold casting process for TiAl automotive valves. The issues studied include mold life, mold/metal reaction, shrinkage void control, dimensional control, and post casting processes. More than 800 Ti-47Al-2Nb-1.75 Cr (at%) valves were produced by gravity, centrifugal, and pressure assisted casting methods on a laboratory scale. Microstructures, tensile, creep, and fatigue properties of as-HIP and as-heat treated valves are described. Process scale up challenges identified in this work are also discussed.

  4. Multiphysics modeling of the steel continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.

    This work develops a macroscale, multiphysics model of the continuous casting of steel. The complete model accounts for the turbulent flow and nonuniform distribution of superheat in the molten steel, the elastic-viscoplastic thermal shrinkage of the solidifying shell, the heat transfer through the shell-mold interface with variable gap size, and the thermal distortion of the mold. These models are coupled together with carefully constructed boundary conditions with the aid of reduced-order models into a single tool to investigate behavior in the mold region, for practical applications such as predicting ideal tapers for a beam-blank mold. The thermal and mechanical behaviors of the mold are explored as part of the overall modeling effort, for funnel molds and for beam-blank molds. These models include high geometric detail and reveal temperature variations on the mold-shell interface that may be responsible for cracks in the shell. Specifically, the funnel mold has a column of mold bolts in the middle of the inside-curve region of the funnel that disturbs the uniformity of the hot face temperatures, which combined with the bending effect of the mold on the shell, can lead to longitudinal facial cracks. The shoulder region of the beam-blank mold shows a local hot spot that can be reduced with additional cooling in this region. The distorted shape of the funnel mold narrow face is validated with recent inclinometer measurements from an operating caster. The calculated hot face temperatures and distorted shapes of the mold are transferred into the multiphysics model of the solidifying shell. The boundary conditions for the first iteration of the multiphysics model come from reduced-order models of the process; one such model is derived in this work for mold heat transfer. The reduced-order model relies on the physics of the solution to the one-dimensional heat-conduction equation to maintain the relationships between inputs and outputs of the model. The geometric

  5. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baicheng; Xu, Qingyan; Jing, Tao; Shen, Houfa; Han, Zhiqiang

    2011-04-01

    The development of the aviation, energy and automobile industries requires an advanced integrated product/process R&D systems which could optimize the product and the process design as well. Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is a promising approach to fulfill this requirement and make the product and process development efficient, economic, and environmentally friendly. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes, including mathematical models as well as engineering applications are presented in the paper. Dendrite morphology of magnesium and aluminum alloy of solidification process by using phase field and cellular automaton methods, mathematical models of segregation of large steel ingot, and microstructure models of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade casting are studied and discussed. In addition, some engineering case studies, including microstructure simulation of aluminum casting for automobile industry, segregation of large steel ingot for energy industry, and microstructure simulation of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade castings for aviation industry are discussed.

  6. PREFACE: MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.

    2015-06-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 - 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan

  7. Numerical simulation of the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Augthun, M; Wagner, I; Sahm, P R; Spiekermann, H

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of this paper were to simulate the casting process of titanium tooth crowns and bridges; to predict and control porosity defect. A casting simulation software, MAGMASOFT, was used. The geometry of the crowns with fine details of the occlusal surface were digitized by means of laser measuring technique, then converted and read in the simulation software. Both mold filling and solidification were simulated, the shrinkage porosity was predicted by a "feeding criterion", and the gas pore sensitivity was studied based on the mold filling and solidification simulations. Two types of dental prostheses (a single-crown casting and a three-unit-bridge) with various sprue designs were numerically "poured", and only one optimal design for each prosthesis was recommended for real casting trial. With the numerically optimized design, real titanium dental prostheses (five replicas for each) were made on a centrifugal casting machine. All the castings endured radiographic examination, and no porosity was detected in the cast prostheses. It indicates that the numerical simulation is an efficient tool for dental casting design and porosity control.

  8. Computational modeling of structure of metal matrix composite in centrifugal casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Zagorski, Roman

    2007-04-07

    The structure of alumina matrix composite reinforced with crystalline particles obtained during centrifugal casting process are studied. Several parameters of cast process like pouring temperature, temperature, rotating speed and size of casting mould which influent on structure of composite are examined. Segregation of crystalline particles depended on other factors such as: the gradient of density of the liquid matrix and reinforcement, thermal processes connected with solidifying of the cast, processes leading to changes in physical and structural properties of liquid composite are also investigated. All simulation are carried out by CFD program Fluent. Numerical simulations are performed using the FLUENT two-phase free surface (air and matrix) unsteady flow model (volume of fluid model - VOF) and discrete phase model (DPM)

  9. Evaluation of Interfacial Interactions Between Ti-6Al-4V and Mold Use Ti-Added Backup Coat in Investment Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Chai, Lianjing; Wu, Guoqing; Wang, Hong; Nan, Hai

    2016-05-01

    In this article, the chemical inertness of shell using Ti-added mullite backup coat against molten Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) alloy was investigated. The metal/shell interfacial microstructures and compositions were characterized using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, roughness tester, and X-ray diffractometer; the hardened layer thickness was evaluated using a microhardness tester. By adding titanium powder into the mullite backup coat, the alpha case and hardened layer thickness of the Ti64 castings were largely reduced with good surface finishing. Silicon ions, from the backup coat, penetrated into the alloy and coarsened the β lath at the metal/shell interfacial area. The Ti powder in the mullite backup coat oxidized and interacted with silica during mold firing and casting, which reduced the silicon and oxygen concentrations at the metal/shell interfacial area. The oxygen penetration depth is thicker than the alpha case layer thickness, and around 0.26 wt pct, oxygen can obviously coarsen the alpha lath at the metal/shell interfacial area during investment casting.

  10. Materials processing threshold report: 2. Use of low gravity for cast iron process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankhouser, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Potential applications of a low gravity environment of interest to the commercial producers of cast iron were assessed to determine whether low gravity conditions offer potential opportunities to producers for improving cast iron properties and expanding the use of cast irons. The assessment is limited to the gray and nodular types of iron, however, the findings are applicable to all cast irons. The potential advantages accrued through low gravity experiments with cast irons are described.

  11. A Thermal Simulation Method for Solidification Process of Steel Slab in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Honggang; Chen, Xiangru; Han, Qingyou; Han, Ke; Zhai, Qijie

    2016-10-01

    Eighty years after the invention of continuous cast of steels, reproducibility from few mm3 samples in the laboratory to m3 product in plants is still a challenge. We have engineered a thermal simulation method to simulate the continuous casting process. The temperature gradient ( G L ) and dendritic growth rate ( v) of the slab were reproduced by controlling temperature and cooling intensity at hot and chill end, respectively, in our simulation samples. To verify that our samples can simulate the cast slab in continuous casting process, the heat transfer, solidification structure, and macrosegregation of the simulating sample were compared to those of a much larger continuous casting slab. The morphology of solid/liquid interface, solidified shell thickness, and dendritic growth rate were also investigated by in situ quenching the solidifying sample. Shell thickness ( δ) determined by our quenching experiment was related to solidification time ( τ) by equation: δ = 4.27 × τ 0.38. The results indicated that our method closely simulated the solidification process of continuous casting.

  12. A Statistics-Based Cracking Criterion of Resin-Bonded Silica Sand for Casting Process Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huimin; Lu, Yan; Ripplinger, Keith; Detwiler, Duane; Luo, Alan A.

    2017-02-01

    Cracking of sand molds/cores can result in many casting defects such as veining. A robust cracking criterion is needed in casting process simulation for predicting/controlling such defects. A cracking probability map, relating to fracture stress and effective volume, was proposed for resin-bonded silica sand based on Weibull statistics. Three-point bending test results of sand samples were used to generate the cracking map and set up a safety line for cracking criterion. Tensile test results confirmed the accuracy of the safety line for cracking prediction. A laboratory casting experiment was designed and carried out to predict cracking of a cup mold during aluminum casting. The stress-strain behavior and the effective volume of the cup molds were calculated using a finite element analysis code ProCAST®. Furthermore, an energy dispersive spectroscopy fractographic examination of the sand samples confirmed the binder cracking in resin-bonded silica sand.

  13. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route.

  14. Process Modeling of Low-Pressure Die Casting of Aluminum Alloy Automotive Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, C.; Duan, J.; Yao, L.; Maijer, D. M.; Cockcroft, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    Although on initial inspection, the aluminum alloy automotive wheel seems to be a relatively simple component to cast based on its shape, further insight reveals that this is not the case. Automotive wheels are in a select group of cast components that have strict specifications for both mechanical and aesthetic characteristics due to their important structural requirements and their visibility on a vehicle. The modern aluminum alloy automotive wheel continues to experience tightened tolerances relating to defects to improve mechanical performance and/or the physical appearance. Automotive aluminum alloy wheels are assessed against three main criteria: wheel cosmetics, mechanical performance, and air tightness. Failure to achieve the required standards in any one of these categories will lead to the wheel either requiring costly repair or being rejected and remelted. Manufacturers are becoming more reliant on computational process modeling as a design tool for the wheel casting process. This article discusses and details examples of the use of computational process modeling as a predictive tool to optimize the casting process from the standpoint of defect minimization with the emphasis on those defects that lead to failure of aluminum automotive wheels, namely, macroporosity, microporosity, and oxide films. The current state of applied computational process modeling and its limitations with regard to wheel casting are discussed.

  15. The Influence of ZrO2 Concentration in an Yttria-Based Face Coat for Investment Casting a Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb-0.2TiB Alloy Using a Sessile Drop Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu; Yuan, Chen; Blackburn, Stuart; Withey, Paul A.

    2015-03-01

    Investment casting is widely used to cast near-net shape components, reducing material waste and process cost. Due to the high reactivity of titanium and its alloys, in order to reduce the interaction between the mold and molten titanium, very costly materials are used in the mold face coat. In order to reduce the material cost while maintaining the chemical inertness of the face coat, ZrO2 was added into an yttria-based face coat in different concentrations in this study. The face coat properties of the different systems were analyzed using dilatometry and XRD. The chemical inertness of the different face coat systems were tested using a sessile drop test using a Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb-0.2TiB alloy, and the interactions between the face coat and the alloy were analyzed by the interfacial microstructures, contact angle, and hardness changes. The results showed that small amounts of ZrO2 can be added into yttria without changing the chemical inertness of the face coat. High amounts of ZrO2 in the face coat can interact with TiAl alloy to form different interaction products. Meanwhile, both Y2O3 and ZrO2 filler materials were observed to dissolve in molten TiAl during the sessile drop test.

  16. Thermodynamic Behavior Research Analysis of Twin-roll Casting Lead Alloy Strip Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chengcan; Rui, Yannian

    2017-03-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of twin-roll casting (TRC) lead alloy strip process directly affects the forming of the lead strip, the quality of the lead strip and the production efficiency. However, there is little research on the thermodynamics of lead alloy strip at home and abroad. The TRC lead process is studied in four parameters: the pouring temperature of molten lead, the depth of molten pool, the roll casting speed, and the rolling thickness of continuous casting. Firstly, the thermodynamic model for TRC lead process is built. Secondly, the thermodynamic behavior of the TRC process is simulated with the use of Fluent. Through the thermodynamics research and analysis, the process parameters of cast rolling lead strip can be obtained: the pouring temperature of molten lead: 360-400 °C, the depth of molten pool: 250-300 mm, the roll casting speed: 2.5-3 m/min, the rolling thickness: 8-9 mm. Based on the above process parameters, the optimal parameters(the pouring temperature of molten lead: 375-390 °C, the depth of molten pool: 285-300 mm, the roll casting speed: 2.75-3 m/min, the rolling thickness: 8.5-9 mm) can be gained with the use of the orthogonal experiment. Finally, the engineering test of TRC lead alloy strip is carried out and the test proves the thermodynamic model is scientific, necessary and correct. In this paper, a detailed study on the thermodynamic behavior of lead alloy strip is carried out and the process parameters of lead strip forming are obtained through the research, which provide an effective theoretical guide for TRC lead alloy strip process.

  17. Part I: In-situ fluorometric quantification of microalgal neutral lipids. Part II: Thermal degradation behavior of investment casting polymer patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongfang

    Research described in this dissertation covers two topics. Part-I is focused on in-situ determination of neutral lipid content of microalgae using a lipophilic fluorescent dye. The traditional Nile red stain-based method for detecting microalgal intracellular lipids is limited due to varying composition and thickness of rigid cell walls. In this study, the addition of dilute acid and heating of solution, were found to greatly enhance staining efficiency of Nile red for microalgal species evaluated. Oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion stabilized by a non-ionic surfactant was employed as a pseudo-standard that mimics lipid-bearing microalgal cells suspended in water. The average neutral lipid contents determined were very close to the results obtained by traditional gravimetric method and solid phase extraction. Part II of the dissertation explores thermo-physico-chemical properties of polymeric pattern materials, including expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam, polyurethane foam, and epoxy stereolithography (SLA) patterns, that are used in investment casting. Density, elastic modulus, expansion coefficient, thermal degradation behavior, etc. were experimentally investigated for their effects on metal casting quality. The reduction in toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) generated during thermal decomposition of polyurethane pattern was achieved by increasing either oxidant level or residence time in heated zone. Thermal degradation kinetics of the pattern materials were examined with a thermogravimetric analysis and activation energies were determined by Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods.

  18. Solidification Microstructure of AISI M2 High Speed Steel Manufactured by the Horizontal Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. F.; Fang, F.; Jiang, J. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, AISI M2 high speed steel is produced by the horizontal continuous casting process. The difference of solidification microstructure in ingots by mould casting and continuous casting has been examined by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution electron microscope (HREM). The results show that the as-cast structure consists of iron matrix and networks of M2C eutectic carbides, which are greatly refined in the continuous casting ingot compared to the case of ingot by mould casting. Meanwhile, the morphology of M2C eutectic carbides changes from the plate-like shape into the fibrous one. Micro-twining and stacking faults are observed in the plate-like M2C, whereas they are rarely identified in the fibrous M2C. Based on the characteristic of morphology and microstructure, it is expected that the plate-like M2C is a faceted phase while the fibrous M2C is a non-faceted phase.

  19. HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM, L L

    2005-07-13

    Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

  20. Process for Producing a Cast Article from a Hypereutectic Aluminum-Silicon Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A process for making a cast article from an aluminum alloy includes first casting an article from an alloy having the following composition, in weight percent: Silicon (Si) 14.0-25.0, Copper (CU) 5.5-8.0, Iron (Fe) 0-0.8, Magnesium (Mg) 0.5-1.5, Nickel (Ni) 0.05-1.2, Manganese (Mn) 0-1.0, Titanium (Ti) 0.05-1.2, Zirconium (Zr) 0.12-1.2, Vanadium (V) 0.05-1.2, Zinc (Zn) 0-0.9, Phosphorus (P) 0.001-0.1, Aluminum, balance. In this alloy the ration of Si:Mg is 15-35, and the ratio of Cu:Mg is 4-15. After an article is cast from the alloy, the cast article is aged at a temperature within the range of 400 F to 500 F for a time period within the range of four to 16 hours. It has been found especially advantageous if the cast article is first exposed to a solutionizing step prior to the aging step. This solutionizing step is carried out by exposing the cast article to a temperature within the range of 875 F to 1025 F for a time period of fifteen minutes to four hours. It has also been found to be especially advantageous if the solutionizing step is followed directly with a quenching step, wherein the cast article is quenched in a quenching medium such as water at a temperature within the range of 120 F to 300 F. The resulting cast article is highly suitable in a number of high temperature applications, such as heavy-duty pistons for internal combustion engines.

  1. Development of an Optimization Methodology for the Aluminum Alloy Wheel Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianglan; Reilly, Carl; Maijer, Daan M.; Cockcroft, Steve L.; Phillion, Andre B.

    2015-08-01

    An optimization methodology has been developed for the aluminum alloy wheel casting process. The methodology is focused on improving the timing of cooling processes in a die to achieve improved casting quality. This methodology utilizes (1) a casting process model, which was developed within the commercial finite element package, ABAQUS™—ABAQUS is a trademark of Dassault Systèms; (2) a Python-based results extraction procedure; and (3) a numerical optimization module from the open-source Python library, Scipy. To achieve optimal casting quality, a set of constraints have been defined to ensure directional solidification, and an objective function, based on the solidification cooling rates, has been defined to either maximize, or target a specific, cooling rate. The methodology has been applied to a series of casting and die geometries with different cooling system configurations, including a 2-D axisymmetric wheel and die assembly generated from a full-scale prototype wheel. The results show that, with properly defined constraint and objective functions, solidification conditions can be improved and optimal cooling conditions can be achieved leading to process productivity and product quality improvements.

  2. Evaluation of a Heat Flux Sensor for Spray Cooling for the Die Casting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wu, Zhuoxi

    2007-02-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. In this paper, a new technique for measuring the heat flux during lubricant application is evaluated. Data from experiments conducted using water spray are first presented. Water spray experiments were conducted for different initial plate temperatures. Measurements were conducted for the application of two different lubricants, of dilution ratios of 1/15 and 1/50 of lubricant in water. The measurement uncertainties were documented. The results show that the surface temperature decreases initially very fast. Numerical simulation results confirmed that the abrupt temperature drop is not an artifact but illustrates the thermal shock experienced by the dies during the initial stages of lubricant application. The lubricant experiments show that the sensor can be successfully used for testing die lubricants with typical dilution ratios encountered in the die casting process.

  3. Sealing micropores in thin castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mersereau, G. A.; Nitzschke, G. O.; Ochs, H. L.; Sutch, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Microscopic pores in thin-walled aluminum castings are sealed by impregnation pretreatment. Technique was developed for investment castings used in hermetically sealed chassic for electronic circuitry. Excessively high leakage rates were previously measured in some chassis.

  4. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sang-Sub; Mun, Jae-Chul; Kim, Tae-Won; Kang, Chung-Gil

    2014-12-01

    In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  5. Polymer-melt interactions during casting formation in the lost foam process

    SciTech Connect

    Shivkumar, S.; Yao, X.; Makhlouf, M.

    1995-07-01

    The lost foam casting process utilizes injection modeled polymeric foam patterns for the production of metallic components. Foamed polymer patterns of the desired shape are coated with a water-based refractory slurry, dried and embedded in unbonded sand. Molten metal is poured directly on the coated polymer. The polymer undergoes thermal degradation and is gradually replaced by the liquid metal to yield the casting after solidification. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) is the most common pattern material used in commercial practice. The use of EPS patterns with ferrous castings may result in the formation of carbonaceous defects in the casting. Consequently, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and copolymers of EPS and PMMA have been developed for ferrous castings. The thermal degradation of the foamed pattern results in the formation of gaseous degradation products and of a partially depolymerized viscous residue. The fraction of viscous residue increased with temperature and is essentially constant above about 650 C. During the filling of EPS patterns, nearly 60% of the polymer is converted to the viscous residue and 40% is transformed to gaseous products. In the case of PMM, almost 60% of the polymer undergoing degradation at the metal front is transformed to gaseous products. The melt flow velocity during the filling of the mold generally increases with temperature.

  6. A high resolution finite volume method for efficient parallel simulation of casting processes on unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.B.; Turner, J.A.; Mosso, S.J.; Ferrell, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    We discuss selected aspects of a new parallel three-dimensional (3-D) computational tool for the unstructured mesh simulation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) casting processes. This tool, known as {bold Telluride}, draws upon on robust, high resolution finite volume solutions of metal alloy mass, momentum, and enthalpy conservation equations to model the filling, cooling, and solidification of LANL castings. We briefly describe the current {bold Telluride} physical models and solution methods, then detail our parallelization strategy as implemented with Fortran 90 (F90). This strategy has yielded straightforward and efficient parallelization on distributed and shared memory architectures, aided in large part by new parallel libraries {bold JTpack9O} for Krylov-subspace iterative solution methods and {bold PGSLib} for efficient gather/scatter operations. We illustrate our methodology and current capabilities with source code examples and parallel efficiency results for a LANL casting simulation.

  7. The Influence of Casting Conditions on the Microstructure of As-Cast U-10Mo Alloys: Characterization of the Casting Process Baseline

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-12-13

    Sections of eight plate castings of uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) were sent from Y-12 to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for microstructural characterization. This report summarizes the results from this study.

  8. Achieving High Strength and High Ductility in Friction Stir-Processed Cast Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Panigrahi, Sushanta K.; Mishra, Rajiv S.

    2013-08-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is emerging as an effective tool for microstructural modification and property enhancement. As-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy was friction stir processed with one-pass and two-pass to examine the influence of processing conditions on microstructural evolution and corresponding mechanical properties. Grain refinement accompanied with development of strong basal texture was observed for both processing conditions. Ultrafine-grained (UFG) AZ91 was achieved under two-pass FSP with fine precipitates distributed on the grain boundary. The processed UFG AZ91 exhibited a high tensile strength of ~435 MPa (117 pct improvement) and tensile fracture elongation of ~23 pct. The promising combination of strength and ductility is attributed to the elimination of casting porosity, and high density of fine precipitates in an UFG structure with quite low dislocation density. The effects of grain size, precipitate, and texture on deformation behavior have been discussed.

  9. The potential of centrifugal casting for the production of near net shape uranium parts

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, E.

    1993-09-01

    This report was written to provide a detailed summary of a literature survey on the near net shape casting process of centrifugal casting. Centrifugal casting is one potential casting method which could satisfy the requirements of the LANL program titled Near Net Shape Casting of Uranium for Reduced Environmental, Safety and Health Impact. In this report, centrifugal casting techniques are reviewed and an assessment of the ability to achieve the near net shape and waste minimization goals of the LANL program by using these techniques is made. Based upon the literature reviewed, it is concluded that if properly modified for operation within a vacuum, vertical or horizontal centrifugation could be used to safely cast uranium for the production of hollow, cylindrical parts. However, for the production of components of geometries other than hollow tubes, vertical centrifugation could be combined with other casting methods such as semi-permanent mold or investment casting.

  10. Biostratinomic processes for the development of mud-cast logs in Carboniferous and Holocene swamps

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, R.A.; Demko, T.M.; Liu, Yuejin; Keefer, W.D.; Abston, S.L. )

    1989-08-01

    Prostrate trees are common features of fossil forest litters, and are frequently preserved as mud-casts. Specimens of Carboniferous mud-cast trees and a mud-filled incipient cast of a Holocene Taxodium have been investigated to determine the biostratinomic processes responsible for their formation. These processes are complex. Hollowing of tree trunks may take place during life or by degradation after death. Once the trunk has fallen, the hollow cavity is supported by surrounding wood and/or bark tissues and acts as a conduit for sediment-laden waters. Leaf litter may be preserved on bedding surfaces. The infilling sequence of horizontal, parallel bedded, fine-grained sediment is deposited from suspended load during multiple overbank flooding events. These results differ from experimentally produced pith casts in which the sediment grain size is of fine sand. In Holocene specimens, alluvial mud within the log may provide a substrate for infaunal invertebrates. No evidence of infaunal burrowing in Carboniferous analogues exists.

  11. Design and Processing of Bimetallic Aluminum Alloys by Sequential Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karun, Akhil S.; Hari, S.; Ebhota, Williams S.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Pillai, U. T. S.; Pai, B. C.

    2017-01-01

    Sequential casting is a facile and fairly new technique to produce functionally graded materials (FGMs) and components by controlled mold filling process. In the present investigation, functionally graded bimetallic aluminum alloys are produced by sequential gravity casting using A390-A319 and A390-A6061 alloy combinations. The control in pouring time between two melts has shown a significant effect on the quality and nature of interface bonding. The microstructure reveals good interface miscibility achieved through diffusion bonding between the alloys. A higher hardness of 160 BHN in the A390 region is obtained in both sequential cast systems, and a minimum value of 105 and 91 BHN is observed in the A319 and A6061 regions, respectively. The tensile and compression strength for A390-A319 are 337 and 490 MPa, whereas for A390-A6061, they are 364 and 401 MPa, respectively, which are significantly higher compared with the standard values of the base alloys, which confirms strong interface bonding. The A390 region shows higher wear resistance compared with other regions of the sequential cast system. The process described in this study is a potential and efficient approach to create good bonding between two different aluminum alloys to develop advanced functional and structural materials.

  12. Characterization of a grain size refinement process in cast uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Elena; Bridges, R.; Garlea, Vasile O; Carpenter, D; Hemphill, M.; Morrell, J

    2012-01-01

    The refinementofcoarsegrainsincasturaniumcanleadtowrought-likeproperties.Inthisstudy,a bquenchedprocessiscoupledwithashock-loadingtechniqueand a-annealingtomanipulateuranium s grain sizeandtheresultingmicrostructureshavebeencharacterized.Neutronpowderdiffractionhas been usedtoevaluatetheresidualstrainaccumulatedfromthethermo-mechanicaltreatments.Optical microscopyandelectronbackscattering(EBSD)inscanningelectronmicroscopyhavebeenemployed to evaluatethegrainsizevariationandthenatureofdeformationmechanisms,respectively.Large strain anisotropyatthelatticelevelwasobservedonshock-loadedspecimens.Thefinalstressrelief annealingdidnoteliminatealltheresidualstrain.Slipandtwinningwereobservedopticallyonthe shockedspecimenswhileEBSDindicatesthatalthough{130},{172},and{112}deformationtwinswere identified,anunusualtypeoftwinning {176} /o5124 was foundtobedominant.Itisbelievedthat the magnitudeofenergyappliedfavoredtheoccurrenceofthe{176}twininthepolycrystalline uranium.Averagegrainsizeofcasturaniumunderwentasignificantreductionto 92 mm attheendof the process.Theoverallresultsindicatetheshock-loadingapproachasapromisingsteptoward controllingcasturaniumgrainsizeandthusitsmechanicalproperties.

  13. Process development for producing fine-grain casting in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Malik, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    Assessment of grain growth kinetics at temperatures near the melting point and investigation into the use of potential nucleating agents in combination with the naturally occurring BeO led to the definition of critical low-g experiments which would help to determine whether one or both of these possibilities are valid and whether space processing would be able to yield fine grain ingot beryllium.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Filling Process During Twin-Roll Strip Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Qinghua; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Jieyu

    2014-01-01

    The modeling and controlling of flow and solidification of melt metal in the filling process is important for obtaining the optimal pool level and the formation of the solidified metal layer on the surface of twin-rolls during the twin-roll strip casting. The proper delivery system and processing parameters plays a key role to control flow characteristics in the initial filling stage of the twin-roll strip casting process. In this paper, a commercial CFD software was employed to simulate the transient fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidifications behaviors during the pouring stage of twin-roll strip casting process using different delivery systems. A 3D model was set up to solve the coupled set of governing differential equations for mass, momentum, and energy balance. The transient free-surface problem was treated with the volume of fluid approach, a k-ɛ turbulence model was employed to handle the turbulence effect and an enthalpy method was used to predict phase change during solidification. The predicted results showed that a wedge-shaped delivery system might have a beneficial impact on the distribution of molten steel and solidification. The predicted surface profile agreed well with the measured values in water model.

  15. Surface modification of cast inconel 740 superalloy by heat-assisted friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Yeon; Jung, Woo-Sang; Lee, Won-Sik; Byeon, Jai-Won

    2016-07-01

    Cast In740 Ni-based alloy with large grains generally show remarkable high temperature strength. However, this alloy is still have insufficient surface microstructure-dependent properties. In this study, for improvement of surface properties, surface modification of a cast In740 Ni-based superalloy was successfully performed by friction stir processing using a conventional two-horsepower milling machine and by additional heating to facilitate plastic flow of the hard alloy. Without using a high-power heavy stirring machine, a notable reduction in grain size of 2.9 μm was achieved and a corresponding 30% increase in Vickers hardness was observed. The microstructure in the stir zone was analyzed in terms of the grain size and precipitate distribution. The result of the potential dynamic polarization test and in-situ acoustic emission monitoring show that electrochemical corrosion resistance was improved by this surface modification process.

  16. [Orthogonal test analysis of compressive strength of porous hydroxylapatite prepared by gel-casting process].

    PubMed

    Han, Yanjun; Li, Musen; Lü, Yupeng; Song, Yunjing; Chen, Y; Low, H

    2004-10-01

    Porous hydroxylapatite (HA) has excellent osseous inductive ability. It has been prepared by gel-casting process, which is feasible and can make complex ceramic material. According to the result of orthogonal test based on the compressive strength, the order and the level of the factors, including monomer HA, initiator MBAM, catalyst APS and water, were dealt with. The effects of drying and sintering technique on the properties of porous hydroxylapatite were also researched. The results showed that the order of every factor in the gel-casting process is as follows, AM-APS, MBAM, H2O. Based on the determined level of each factor, the suitable slurry constituents and drying and sintering technologies were selected, and the porous hydroxylapatite with compressive strength of 6-7 MPa was produced.

  17. Structure-property-processing correlations in freeze-cast composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-05-01

    Surprisingly few reports have been published, to date, on the structure-property-processing correlations observed in freeze-cast materials directionally solidified from polymer solutions, or ceramic or metal slurries. The studies that exist focus on properties of sintered ceramics, that is materials whose structure was altered by further processing. In this contribution, we report first results on correlations observed in alumina-chitosan-gelatin composites, which were chosen as a model system to test and compare the effect of particle size and processing parameters on their mechanical properties at a specific composition. Our study reveals that highly porous (>90%) hybrid materials can be manufactured by freeze casting, through the self-assembly of a polymer and a ceramic phase that occurs during directional solidification, without the need of additional processing steps such as sintering or infiltration. It further illustrates that the properties of freeze-cast hybrid materials can independently be tailored at two levels of their structural hierarchy, allowing for the simultaneous optimization of both mechanical and structural requirements. An increase in freezing rate resulted in decreases in lamellar spacing, cell wall thickness, pore aspect ratio and cross-sectional area, as well as increases in both Young's modulus and compressive yield strength. The mechanical properties of the composite scaffolds increased with an increasing particle size. The results show that both structure and mechanical properties of the freeze-cast composites can be custom-designed and that they are thus ideally suited for a large variety of applications that require high porosity at low or medium load-bearing capacity.

  18. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  19. Development of an Innovative Laser-Assisted Coating Process for Extending Lifetime of Metal Casting Dies. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Madhav Rao Gonvindaraju

    1999-10-18

    Die casting dies used in the metal casting industry fail due to thermal fatigue cracking accompanied by the presence of residual tensile stresses, corrosion, erosion and wear of die surfaces. This phase 1 SBIR Final Report summarize Karta Technologies research involving the development of an innovative laser coating technology for metal casting dies. The process involves depositing complex protective coatings of nanocrystalline powders of TiC followed by a laser shot peening. The results indicate a significant improvement in corrosion and erosion resistance in molten aluminum for H13 die casting die steels. The laser-coated samples also showed improved surface finish, a homogeneous and uniform coating mircrostructure. The technology developed in this research can have a significant impact on the casting industry by saving the material costs involved in replacing dies, reducing downtime and improving the quality.

  20. Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the Continuous Casting Bloom in the Heavy Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cheng; Wu, Chen-hui; Zhu, Miao-yong

    2016-12-01

    A two-stage sequential heavy reduction (HR) method, in which the reduction amount was increased both before and after the solidification end, is presented to simultaneously improve the homogeneity and compactness of the continuous casting bloom. With bearing steel GCr15 chosen as the specific research steel, a three-dimensional thermal-mechanical finite element model was developed to simulate and analyze the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the continuous casting bloom during the HR process. In order to ensure the accuracy of the simulation, the constitutive model parameters were derived from the experimental results. The predicted temperature distribution and shell thickness were verified using a thermal infrared camera and nail shooting results, respectively. The real measured relationship between the HR pressure and amount were applied to verify the mechanical model. The explorative application results showed that the quality of the bloom center and compactness of rolled bars have both been significantly improved after the HR was applied.

  1. Influence of Multiple Bionic Unit Coupling on Sliding Wear of Laser-Processed Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Sui, Qi; Zhao, Kai; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Luquan

    2017-03-01

    In this study, in effort to improve the sliding wear resistance of gray cast iron under wet lubrication conditions, specimens with different bionic units were manufactured and modified according to bionic theory. Inspired by the structure and appearance of biological wear-resistant skin, two kinds of bionic units were processed by laser on the specimen surfaces. We investigated the wear resistance properties of the samples via indentation method and then observed the wear surface morphology of specimens and the stress distributions. The results indicated that coupling the bionic units enhanced the wear resistance of the cast iron considerably compared to the other samples. We also determined the mechanism of wear resistance improvement according to the results.

  2. Fatigue behaviour of friction stir processed AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; De Marco, P.P.

    2007-03-15

    The room temperature fatigue properties of AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting (HPDC) as cast, heat treated, friction stir processed (FSP) and FSP and heat treated were studied. The fatigue properties of the material were evaluated for the HPDC magnesium alloy in the as-received state and after a solution treatment at 415 deg. C for 2 h and an ageing treatment at 220 deg. C for 4 h. The heat treatment resulted in a significant increase in the fatigue properties of the HPDC material, while no significance influence of heat treatment was recorded in the FSP condition. The morphology of fracture surfaces was examined by employing a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM)

  3. Freeze casting of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds. I. Processing and general microstructure.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Dogan, Fatih; Bal, B Sonny

    2008-07-01

    Freeze casting of aqueous suspensions on a cold substrate was investigated as a method for preparing hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds with unidirectional porosity. In the present paper, we report on the ability to manipulate the microstructure of freeze-cast constructs by controlling the processing parameters. Constructs prepared from aqueous suspensions (5-20 volume percent particles) on a steel substrate at -20 degrees C had a lamellar-type microstructure, consisting of plate-like HA and unidirectional pores oriented in the direction of freezing. Sintering for 3 h at 1350 degrees C produced constructs with dense HA lamellas, porosity of approximately 50%, and inter-lamellar pore widths of 5-30 microm. The thickness of the HA lamellas decreased but the width of the pores increased with decreasing particle concentration. Decreasing the substrate temperature from -20 degrees C to -196 degrees C produced a finer lamellar microstructure. The use of water-glycerol mixtures (20 wt % glycerol) as the solvent in the suspension resulted in the production of finer pores (1-10 microm) and a larger number of dendritic growth connecting the HA lamellas. On the other hand, the use of water-dioxane mixtures (60 wt % dioxane) produced a cellular-type microstructure with larger pores (90-110 microm). The ability to produce a uniaxial microstructure and its manipulation by controlling the processing parameters indicate the potential of the present freeze casting route for the production of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications.

  4. Bond Strength of Multicomponent White Cast Iron Coatings Applied by HVOF Thermal Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranho, Ossimar; Rodrigues, Daniel; Boccalini, Mario; Sinatora, Amilton

    2009-12-01

    Multicomponent white cast iron is a new alloy that belongs to system Fe-C-Cr-W-Mo-V, and because of its excellent wear resistance it is used in the manufacture of hot rolling mills rolls. To date, this alloy has been processed by casting, powder metallurgy, and spray forming. The high-velocity oxyfuel process is now also considered for the manufacture of components with this alloy. The effects of substrate, preheating temperature, and coating thickness on bond strength of coatings have been determined. Substrates of AISI 1020 steel and of cast iron with preheating of 150 °C and at room temperature were used to apply coatings with 200 and 400 μm nominal thickness. The bond strength of coatings was measured with the pull-off test method and the failure mode by scanning electron microscopic analysis. Coatings with thickness of 200 μm and applied on substrates of AISI 1020 steel with preheating presented bond strength of 87 ± 4 MPa.

  5. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Modeling of the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Processing of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Isac, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys have shown exceptional potential as structural materials for transportation applications. These alloys have proved to be good candidates to be processed as thin strips via the horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) process. The HSBC process is a near-net-shape casting technology, which involves casting molten metal directly into thin strips, close to the final product thickness, at higher cooling rates than conventional continuous casting and thin-slab casting processes. It offers an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly approach to the production of metal strips. Fluid mechanics and associated heat transfer are important aspects of any casting process, and the novel HSBC process is no exception. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 were performed, in order to assess the importance and effects of the various operational conditions of the HSBC process. This enabled process parameter optimization. Numerical predictions were validated against experimental casting results.

  6. AMCC casting development. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Combustion Chamber Casting (AMCC) has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or Thermal Gradient Control. This method, of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification, represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. Metallurgical integrity of the final four castings was very good. Only the areas of the parts that utilized 'TGC Shape & Location System #2' showed any significant areas of microshrinkage when evaluated by non-destructive tests. Alumina oxides detected by FPI on the 'float' surfaces (top sid surfaces of the casting during solidification) of the part were almost entirely less than the acceptance criteria of .032 inches in diameter. Destructive chem mill of the castings was required to determine the effect of the process variables used during the processing of these last four parts (with the exception of the 'Shape & Location of TGC' variable).

  7. High Wear Resistance of White Cast Iron Treated by Novel Process: Principle and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiaoshuai; Zuo, Xunwei; Liu, Yu; Chen, Nailu; Rong, Yonghua

    2015-12-01

    Based on microstructure desired, a novel process is proposed to treat Fe-2.4C-12.0Cr (mass pct) white cast iron balls, that is, destabilizing heat treatment following multicycle quenching and sub-critical treatment (De-MQ-Sct) process, and such a complex process is simply performed by alternate water quenching and air cooling. For comparison, the white cast iron balls also were treated by conventional normalization (NOR) process and Oil-quenching process, respectively. The partitioning of carbon from martensite to retained austenite during De-MQ-Sct process promotes the interaction between carbide precipitation and martensitic transformation, while this interaction is a unique effect only produced by multicycle quenching linking destabilizing and sub-critical treatments, which leads to more and finer secondary carbides and more carbon-enriched austenite in De-MQ-Sct sample than those in NOR or Oil-quenching sample. The average hardness of 60 HRC and impact toughness of 12.6 J/cm2 are obtained in De-MQ-Sct white cast iron balls, which are much higher than those in NOR and Oil-quenching ones. The wear behaviours measured by pin-on-disk wear tests indicate that the weight loss of De-MQ-Sct sample is only about one third of the NOR sample and one half of the Oil-quenching sample. Microstructural characterization reveals that high wear resistance related to hardness and toughness of the De-MQ-Sct balls are mainly attributed to the considerable fine secondary carbides and stable carbon-enriched retained austenite.

  8. PREFACE: MCWASP XIII: International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Due to fast-paced development in computer technologies during the last three decades, computer-based process modeling has become an important tool for the improvement of existing process technologies and the development of new, innovative technologies. With the help of numerical process simulations, complex and costly experimental trials can now be reduced to a minimum. For metallurgical processes in particular, computer simulations are of outstanding importance, as the flow and solidification of molten alloys or the formation of microstructure and defects can hardly be observed experimentally. Corresponding computer simulations allow us inside views into the key process phenomena and so offer great potential for optimization. In 1980 the conference series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up, and has now been continued by holding the 13th international conference on 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes', MCWASP XIII, in Schladming, Austria, from June 17-22 2012. Around 200 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 20 countries around the globe attended 78 oral and 50 poster presentations on different aspects of solidification-related modeling topics. Besides process-related sessions such as (i) Ingot and Shape Casting, (ii) Continuous Casting and Direct Chill Casting, (iii) Directional Solidification and Zone Melting, (iv) Welding, and (v) Centrifugal Casting, a larger focus was put on (vi) Experimental Investigation and In-Situ Observations. In recent years, this topic has been significantly strengthened as advanced synchrotron technologies allow fantastic in-situ observations of phenomena happening inside small metallic samples. These observations will definitely serve as a benchmark for the modeling community. Further macroscopic aspects of advanced solidification science were tackled in the sessions (vii) Electromagnetic Coupling, (viii) Thermomechanics, (ix

  9. Structure and properties of polypropylene cast films: Polymer type and processing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileva, Daniela; Gahleitner, Markus; Gloger, Dietrich

    2016-05-01

    The influence of processing parameters in a cast film extrusion process of thin films of isotactic polypropylene homopolymer and random propylene-ethylene copolymer was analyzed. Variation of the chill roll temperature allowed changing the supercooling of the melt and thus the generation of different crystal polymorphs of iPP. Additional focus was placed on the effect of flow induced crystallization via changing the output rate of the line. The crystal structure and morphology of the materials were evaluated and correlated to selected optical and mechanical properties.

  10. Influence of macromolecular architecture on necking in polymer extrusion film casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Pol, Harshawardhan; Banik, Sourya; Azad, Lal Busher; Doshi, Pankaj; Lele, Ashish; Thete, Sumeet

    2015-05-22

    Extrusion film casting (EFC) is an important polymer processing technique that is used to produce several thousand tons of polymer films/coatings on an industrial scale. In this research, we are interested in understanding quantitatively how macromolecular chain architecture (for example long chain branching (LCB) or molecular weight distribution (MWD or PDI)) influences the necking and thickness distribution of extrusion cast films. We have used different polymer resins of linear and branched molecular architecture to produce extrusion cast films under controlled experimental conditions. The necking profiles of the films were imaged and the velocity profiles during EFC were monitored using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. Additionally, the temperature profiles were captured using an IR thermography and thickness profiles were calculated. The experimental results are compared with predictions of one-dimensional flow model of Silagy et al{sup 1} wherein the polymer resin rheology is modeled using molecular constitutive equations such as the Rolie-Poly (RP) and extended Pom Pom (XPP). We demonstrate that the 1-D flow model containing the molecular constitutive equations provides new insights into the role of macromolecular chain architecture on film necking.{sup 1}D. Silagy, Y. Demay, and J-F. Agassant, Polym. Eng. Sci., 36, 2614 (1996)

  11. A study on atomic diffusion behaviours in an Al-Mg compound casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yongning; Chen, Yiqing; Yang, Chunhui

    2015-08-15

    Al and Mg alloys are main lightweight alloys of research interest and they both have superb material properties, i.e., low density and high specific strength, etc. Being different from Al alloys, the corrosion of Mg alloys is much more difficult to control. Therefore to combine merits of these two lightweight alloys as a composite-like structure is an ideal solution through using Al alloys as a protective layer for Mg alloys. Compound casting is a realistic technique to manufacture such a bi-metal structure. In this study, a compound casting technique is employed to fabricate bi-layered samples using Al and Mg and then the samples are analysed using electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) to determine diffusion behaviours between Al and Mg. The diffusion mechanism and behaviours between Al and Mg are studied numerically at atomic scale using molecular dynamics (MD) and parametric studies are conducted to find out influences of ambient temperature and pressure on the diffusion behaviours between Al and Mg. The results obtained clearly show the effectiveness of the compound casting process to increase the diffusion between Al and Mg and thus create the Al-base protection layer for Mg.

  12. Influence of macromolecular architecture on necking in polymer extrusion film casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, Harshawardhan; Banik, Sourya; Azad, Lal Busher; Thete, Sumeet; Doshi, Pankaj; Lele, Ashish

    2015-05-01

    Extrusion film casting (EFC) is an important polymer processing technique that is used to produce several thousand tons of polymer films/coatings on an industrial scale. In this research, we are interested in understanding quantitatively how macromolecular chain architecture (for example long chain branching (LCB) or molecular weight distribution (MWD or PDI)) influences the necking and thickness distribution of extrusion cast films. We have used different polymer resins of linear and branched molecular architecture to produce extrusion cast films under controlled experimental conditions. The necking profiles of the films were imaged and the velocity profiles during EFC were monitored using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. Additionally, the temperature profiles were captured using an IR thermography and thickness profiles were calculated. The experimental results are compared with predictions of one-dimensional flow model of Silagy et al1 wherein the polymer resin rheology is modeled using molecular constitutive equations such as the Rolie-Poly (RP) and extended Pom Pom (XPP). We demonstrate that the 1-D flow model containing the molecular constitutive equations provides new insights into the role of macromolecular chain architecture on film necking.1D. Silagy, Y. Demay, and J-F. Agassant, Polym. Eng. Sci., 36, 2614 (1996).

  13. Modeling of microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during the high pressure die casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengwu; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    Two important microstructure characteristics of high pressure die cast magnesium alloy are the externally solidified crystals (ESCs) and the fully divorced eutectic which form at the filling stage of the shot sleeve and at the last stage of solidification in the die cavity, respectively. Both of them have a significant influence on the mechanical properties and performance of magnesium alloy die castings. In the present paper, a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method was developed to simulate the microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Modeling of dendritic growth of magnesium alloy with six-fold symmetry was achieved by defining a special neighbourhood configuration and calculating of the growth kinetics from complete solution of the transport equations. Special attention was paid to establish a nucleation model considering both of the nucleation of externally solidified crystals in the shot sleeve and the massive nucleation in the die cavity. Meanwhile, simulation of the formation of fully divorced eutectic was also taken into account in the present CA model. Validation was performed and the capability of the present model was addressed by comparing the simulated results with those obtained by experiments.

  14. Study on Fabrication of AA4032/AA6069 Cladding Billet Using Direct Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing; Zhang, Haitao; Shao, Bo; Li, Lei; Liu, Xuan; Cui, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    AA4032/AA6069 cladding billet in size of φ130 mm/φ110 mm was prepared by the modified direct chill casting process, and the parametric effect on casting performance was investigated using numerical simulation. Microstructures, elements distribution, and mechanical properties of the bonding interface were examined. The results show that metallurgical bonding interface can be obtained with the optimal parameters: the casting speed of 130 to 140 mm/min, the internal liquid level height of 50 to 60 mm, and the contact height of 40 to 50 mm. The metallurgical bonding interface is free of any discontinuities due to the fact that the alloying elements diffused across the interface and formed Ni-containing phase. Tensile strength of the cladding billet reaches 225.3 MPa, and the fracture position was located in AA6069 side, suggesting that the interface bonding strength is higher than the strength of AA6069. The interfacial shearing strength is 159.3 MPa, indicating excellent metallurgical bonding.

  15. Evaluation of the Effects of Rotary Degassing Process Variables on the Quality of A357 Aluminum Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, M.; Ghobadi, M.; Eisaabadi B., Ghasem; Uludağ, Muhammet; Tiryakioğlu, Murat

    2016-12-01

    The effects of rotary degassing process variables on the melt and casting quality have been investigated using reduced pressure test results and quality index calculations from tensile data. The results showed that the effectiveness of the rotary degassing process of Al alloys is highly dependent on the combination of rotational speed and the gas flow rate, and that the wrong combination of these factors may result in no improvement or even degradation in quality of castings. For the first time, it has been found that the effectiveness of the pouring and filling system to produce high-quality castings can be characterized numerically. This new method of quantifying the casting system is introduced as a new quality improvement tool for materials and process engineers.

  16. Effect of Process Parameters on Abnormal Grain Growth during Friction Stir Processing of a Cast Al Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Baumann, John A.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-11-25

    The effects of process parameters and friction stir processing (FSP) run configurations on the stability of nugget microstructure at elevated temperatures were evaluated. Cast plates of an Al-7Si- 0.6Mg alloy were friction stir processed using a combination of tool rotation rates and tool traverse speeds. All single pass runs showed some extent of abnormal grain growth (AGG), whereas multi-pass runs were more resistant to AGG. Additionally, higher tool rpm was found to be beneficial for controlling AGG. These effects were analyzed by comparing the result of this work with other published results and AGG models.

  17. Effects of casting conditions and deformation processing on A356 aluminum and A356-20 vol. pct SiC composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, G. A.; Lewandowski, J. J.; Wallace, J. F.; Altmisoglu, A.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of casting conditions and deformation processing on the mechanical properties of unreinforced A356 aluminum and A356-20 vol pct SiC composite were investigated by tensile properties in these compounds fabricated by either sand casting or squeeze casting techniques followed by hot working to 33, 50, 90, and 95 percent reductions. The evolution of the microstructure and values of tensile properties were evaluated for the cast materials in each of the hot worked conditions. It was found that, while the deformation processing of the sand-cast composite resulted in banding of the Al and SiC particles within the microstructure, such features were not observed in the squeeze-cast microstructure. The tensile strengths of the squeeze cast materials was found to be higher than those of the sand cast materials, for both the unreinforced and composite samples, while increased amounts of deformation were found to improve the ductility of the composite.

  18. Evaluation of Centrifugal Casting Process Parameters for In Situ Fabricated Functionally Gradient Fe-TiC Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza; Sobhani, Manoochehr

    2013-10-01

    A gradient Fe-TiC composite was successfully produced via combination of in situ reaction with centrifugal casting techniques. Additionally, some of the effective parameters of the centrifugal casting process have been studied. Cast iron and ferrotitanium, which were used as raw materials, were melted using a high-frequency induction furnace coupled with centrifugal equipment. The microstructure and phase characterization of the fabricated composite was studied by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results show that the production of a pearlite matrix composite reinforced by TiC particles is feasible. The distribution of TiC in the pearlitic matrix is completely uneven as a result of density difference between molten medium and TiC in the centrifugal casting process.

  19. Investment Casting of Columbium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    This work was performed by Rom Metals Corporation, Albany, Oregon 97321, under the technical supervision of Mr. Starley Lopata and Dr. Robert D. French...34laced" structure. GB’s. Little or nomatri dLess overall ppt= Possible breaking Very fine & broken ppt. Less GB ppt, Noziceable absence of GB ppt in

  20. Study on Pot Forming of Induction Heater Type Rice Cookers by Forging Cast Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Ohashi, Osamu

    This paper describes a study result on pot fabrication by the forging cast process of stainless steel with aluminum. Rice cooked with the new bowl-shaped pot for the induction heater type rice cookers is better tasting than rice cooked with the conventional cylindrical one, due to the achievement of better heat conduction and convection. The conventional pot is made of the clad sheet, consisting of stainless steel and aluminum. However, it is rather difficult to form a bowl shape from the clad sheet, primarily due to the problem of a material spring back. The fabrication of a new type of a pot was made possible by means of the adoption of a forging cast process instead of the clad sheet. In this process, iron powder is inserted between stainless steel and aluminum in order to alleviate the large difference on the coefficient of expansion between each material. It was made clear that the application of two kinds of iron particle, namely 10 μm size powder on the stainless steel side and 44 μm on the aluminum side, enables the joints to become strong enough. The joint strength of the new pot by this fabrication process was confirmed by the tests of the shear strength and the fatigue tests together with the stress analysis.

  1. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  2. Study on Venture Capital Investment Risk Avoiding Base on Option Pricing in Agricultural Production and Processing Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xubo

    This paper uses the approaches and models of option theory to analyze two-stage venture capital investment in agricultural production and processing enterprises decision-making under uncertainty. Mathematics expressions of this two-stage venture capital investment decision-making are presented. An option value model about two-stage venture capital investment decision-making base on options pricing theory under the uncertainty is presented. Get the solution of option pricing model which we present.

  3. EBSD Study on Grain Boundary and Microtexture Evolutions During Friction Stir Processing of A413 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2016-07-01

    The as-cast Al alloys contain heterogeneous distributions of non-deforming particles due to non-equilibrium solidification effects. Therefore, these alloys have poor tribological and mechanical behaviors. It is well known that using friction stir processing (FSP), very fine microstructure is created in the as-cast Al alloys, while their wear resistance can be improved. In this research work, FSP is used to locally refine a surface layer of the coarse as-cast microstructure of cast A413 Al alloy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FSP on microstructure and microtexture evolutions in A413 cast Al alloy. The grain boundary character distribution, grain structure, and microtexture evolutions in as-cast and friction stir processed A413 Al alloy are analyzed by electron back scatter diffraction technique. It is found that with the FSP, the fraction of low ∑boundary such as ∑3, 7, and 9 are increased. The obtained results show that there are no deformation texture components in the structure of friction stir processed samples. However, some of the main recrystallization texture components such as BR and cubeND are formed during FSP which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization phenomenon due to the severe plastic deformation induced by the rotation of tool.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Infiltration and Solidification Processes for Squeeze Cast Al Composites with Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C. K.; Jang, J. H.; Han, K. S.

    2008-11-01

    An axisymmetric finite element (FE) model is developed for the process of squeeze casting the metal-matrix composites (MMCs). The flow in the mold, the infiltration into the porous preform, and the solidification of the molten metal are studied numerically. The saturated porous flow model is adopted to simulate metal infiltration into the fibrous preform. To track the fluid front during the mold filling and infiltration, the level-set method is used. The enthalpy method is used to deal with transient heat transfer, including phase changes. Also, a simple preform deformation model is used to predict the permeability change caused by preform compression during infiltration. A numerical model representing the experiment setup is proposed. The infiltration and cooling behaviors during a process were calculated using pure aluminum as the matrix and a Saffil fiber preform. To validate the assumptions used in the numerical model, a series of infiltration experiments was carried out. The infiltration kinetics and the preform deformation were studied at different inlet pressures and at different preheat temperatures of the aluminum and the mold. A comparison with the experimental data shows that the developed FE program successfully predicts the actual squeeze casting process.

  5. Mechanical Strength and Failure Characteristics of Cast Mg-9 pctAl-1 pctZn Alloys Produced by a Heated-Mold Continuous Casting Process: Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Ohfuji, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical properties and failure characteristics of a cast Mg alloy (AZ91: Mg-Al8.9-Zn0.6-Mn0.2) produced by a heated-mold continuous casting process (HMC) are investigated. In a modification of the original HMC process, the cooling of the liquid alloy by direct water spray is carried out in an atmosphere of high-purity argon gas. The HMC-AZ91 alloy exhibits excellent mechanical properties (high strength and high ductility) that are about twice as high as those for the same alloy produced by conventional gravity casting. The increased material strength and ductility of the HMC sample are attributed to nanoscale and microscale microstructural characteristics. The fine grains and tiny spherical eutectic structures ( e.g., Mg17Al12 and Al6Mn) distributed randomly in the matrix of the HMC alloy result in resistance to dislocation movement, leading to high tensile strength. Basal slip on (0001) planes in the relatively organized crystal orientation of the HMC alloy, as well as grain boundary sliding through tiny spherical eutectic structures, results in high ductility. Details of the failure mechanism under static loading in the HMC alloy are also discussed using failure models.

  6. The development of ultrahigh strength low alloy cast steels with increased toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Paul C.

    This work describes the initial work on the development of the next generation of ultrahigh strength low alloy (UHSLA) cast steels. These UHSLA cast steels have both ultrahigh strength levels and good impact toughness. The influence of heat treatment, secondary processing using hot isostatic processing (HIP), and chemical composition on the microstructure and properties of UHSLA cast steels have been evaluated. The extent of microsegregation reduction expected during the heat treatment of UHSLA cast steels has also been estimated by diffusion modeling. This new family of UHSLA cast steels is similar in composition and properties to UHSLA wrought steels. However, the heat treatment and secondary processing of the UHSLA cast steels is used to develop microstructures and properties typically developed through thermomechanical processing and heat treatment for wrought UHSLA steels. Two martensitic UHSLA steels, 4340+ (silicon modified 4340) and ES-1 were investigated for this study. For the 4340+ alloy, heat treatment variables evaluated include homogenization temperature and time, tempering temperature, and austempering temperature and time. For the ES-1 alloy, heat treatment variables evaluated include homogenization temperature and time, austenization temperature, cryogenic treatment, and tempering temperature. The effect of high temperature hot isostatic processing (HIP) on the 4340+ and ES- 1 alloys was also investigated. Tensile properties, charpy v-notch impact toughness (CVN), microstructures, and fractographs have all been characterized after heat treatment. The effects of HIP on microporosity reduction in the ES-1 alloy were also investigated. The experiments carried out on the investment cast 4340+ alloy have shown that increasing the homogenization temperature can increase CVN without changing the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) or yield strength (YS) of the cast material. By replacing the homogenization step in the conventional heat treatment process with

  7. Low-investment carbonization process for coals makes liquid, gas and boiler fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rammler, R.W.

    1981-11-09

    The advantages of carbonization are that it requires low investment compared with other liquefaction routes, and that the hydrogen requirement per ton of liquid product is low. The route should be considered only for tar-rich coals and where there is a market for the char produced. The Lurgi-Ruhrgas process, which has been used commercially for some years, is described. The development of large combined coal liquefaction and power plant is discussed.

  8. Colloidal processing, tape casting and sintering of PLZT for development of piezoceramic/polymer interlayered composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-Huei

    Piezoceramic/polymer composites possess many advantages as compared to single-phase piezoceramics. One typical form of the composites is the interlayered structure, where the main requirement is to obtain thin, flat and dense ceramic sheets. Tape casting is a reliable process for producing such high-quality sheets. The colloidal processing of tape casting slurries is a critical step to achieve uniform ceramic bodies. Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) was selected for making piezoceramic sheets due to its superior piezoelectric properties. The quality of green tapes depends mainly on the solvents and organic additives of tape casting slurries. The effects of xylenes/ethanol solvent mixtures on non-aqueous slurries were first investigated. Well-dispersed colloidal suspensions were obtained in xylenes-rich solvents with a minimum amount of menhaden fish oil as a dispersant. Adsorption of dispersant and PLZT solids content of unfired tapes are strongly affected by the solvent(s) utilized. Furthermore, when selecting solvent mixtures, one needs to consider other additives, such as binder that can affect the viscosity of slurries. Aqueous tape casting was performed using a polyelectrolyte dispersant, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) binders and various plasticizers. Zeta potential, conductivity and viscosity of PLZT suspensions containing dispersant were characterized. The effects of plasticizers and binders on properties of unfired tapes were also investigated. The tapes made from low molecular weight plasticizers showed higher plasticity. Glycerol was shown to be the most effective plasticizer for PVA. Strong hydrogen bonding in high hydrolysis PVA led to high strength and high bulk density of green tapes, but also caused deformation of the tapes after drying. There are many challenges for sintering PLZT tapes due to volatilization of PbO component at high temperatures and fragility of thin tapes. By using the proper setter powders and the sandwich method

  9. An evaluation of direct pressure sensors for monitoring the aluminum die casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project Die Cavity Instrumentation. One objective of that project was to evaluate thermal, pressure, and gas flow process monitoring sensors in or near the die cavity as a means of securing improved process monitoring and control and better resultant part quality. The objectives of this thesis are to (1) evaluate a direct cavity pressure sensor in a controlled production campaign at the GM Casting Advanced Development Center (CADC) at Bedford, Indiana; and (2) develop correlations between sensor responses and product quality in terms of the casting weight, volume, and density. A direct quartz-based pressure sensor developed and marked by Kistler Instrument Corp. was acquired for evaluating as an in-cavity liquid metal pressure sensor. This pressure sensor is designed for use up to 700 C and 2,000 bars (29,000 psi). It has a pressure overload capacity up to 2,500 bars (36,250 psi).

  10. Coupled turbulent flow, heat, and solute transport in continuous casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutalebi, M. Reza; Hasan, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1995-08-01

    A fully coupled fluid flow, heat, and solute transport model was developed to analyze turbulent flow, solidification, and evolution of macrosegregation in a continuous billet caster. Transport equations of total mass, momentum, energy, and species for a binary iron-carbon alloy system were solved using a continuum model, wherein the equations are valid for the solid, liquid, and mushy zones in the casting. A modified version of the low-Reynolds number k-ɛ model was adopted to incorporate turbulence effects on transport processes in the system. A control-volume-based finite-difference procedure was employed to solve the conservation equations associated with appropriate boundary conditions. Because of high nonlinearity in the system of equations, a number of techniques were used to accelerate the convergence process. The effects of the parameters such as casting speed, steel grade, nozzle configuration on flow pattern, solidification profile, and carbon segregation were investigated. From the computed flow pattern, the trajectory of inclusion particles, as well as the density distribution of the particles, was calculated. Some of the computed results were compared with available experimental measurements, and reasonable agreements were obtained.

  11. The mechanical response of a uranium-nobium alloy: a comparison of cast versus wrought processing

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, Carl M; Gray, George T., III; Cerreta, Ellen K; Aikin, Robert M; Chen, Shuh - Rong; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Korzekwa, Deniece R; Kelly, Ann M

    2009-02-13

    A rigorous experimentation and validation program is being undertaken to create constitutive models that elucidate the fundamental mechanisms controlling plasticity in uranium-6 wt.% niobium alloys (U-6Nb). The first, 'wrought', material produced by processing a cast ingot I'ia forging and forming into plate was studied. The second material investigated is a direct cast U-6Nb alloy. The purpose of the investigation is to detennine the principal differences, or more importantly, similarities, between the two materials due to processing. It is well known that parameters like grain size, impurity size and chemistry affect the deformation and failure characteristics of materials. Metallography conducted on these materials revealed that the microstructures are quite different. Characterization techniques like tension, compression, and shear were performed to find the principal differences between the materials as a function of stress state. Dynamic characterization using a split Hopkinson pressure bar in conjunction with Taylor impact testing was conducted to derive and thereafter validate constitutive material models. The Mechanical Threshold Strength Model is shown to accurately capture the constitutive response of these materials and Taylor cylinder tests are used to provide a robust way to verify and validate the constitutive model predictions of deformation by comparing finite element simulations with the experimental results. The primary differences between the materials will be described and predictions about material behavior will be made.

  12. Fabrication of TiO2/PU Superhydrophobic Film by Nanoparticle Assisted Cast Micromolding Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zheng, Jianyong; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Lotus-like surfaces have attracted great attentions in recent years for their wide applications in water repellency, anti-fog and self-cleaning. This paper introduced a novel process, nanoparticle assisted cast micromolding, to create polymer film with superhydrophobic surface. Briefly, waterborne polyurethane (WPU) sol and nano TiO2/WPU sol were each cast onto the featured surfaces of the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps replicated from fresh lotus leaves. After being dried and peeled off from the stamps, PU and TiO2/WPU replica films were created respectively. To the former, only high hydrophobic property was observed with static water contact angle (WCA) at 142.5 degrees. While to the later, superhydrophobic property was obtained with WCA more than 150 degrees and slide angle less than 3 degrees. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed that the PU replica film only had the micro-papillas and the TiO2/PU replica film not only had micro papillas but also had a large number of nano structures distributed on and between the micro-papillas. Such nano and micro hierarchical structures were very similar with those on the natural lotus leaf surface, thus was the main reason for causing superhydrophobic property. Although an elastic PDMS stamp from lotus leaf was used in herein process, hard molds may also be used in theory. This study supplied an alternative technique for large scale production of polymeric films with superhydrophobic.

  13. Processing, microstructure, and mechanical behavior of cast magnesium metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, A.

    1995-09-01

    Magnesium metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been receiving attention in recent years as an attractive choice for aerospace and automotive applications because of their low density and superior specific properties. This article presents a liquid mixing and casting process that can be used to produce SiC particulate-reinforced magnesium metal matrix composites via conventional foundry processes. Microstructural features, such as SiC particle distribution, grain refinement, and particle/matrix interfacial reactions of the cast magnesium matrix composites, are investigated, and the effects of solidification-process parameters and matrix alloys (pure Mg and Mg-9 pct Al-1 pct Zn alloy AZ91) on the microstructure are established. The results of this work suggest that in the solidification processing of MMCs, it is important to optimize the process parameters both to avoid excessive interfacial reactions and simultaneously achieve wetting, so that a good particle distribution and interfacial bonding are obtained. The tensile properties, strain hardening, and fracture behavior of the AZ91/SiC composites are also studied and the results are compared with those of the unreinforced AZ91 alloy. The strengthening mechanisms for AZ91/SiC composite, based on the proposed SiC particle/matrix interaction during deformation, are used to explain the increased yield strength and elastic modulus of the composite over the magnesium matrix alloy. The low ductility found in the composites is due to the early appearance of localized damages, such as particle cracking, matrix cracking, and occasionally interface debonding, in the fracture process of the composite.

  14. A fast and efficient adaptive parallel ray tracing based model for thermally coupled surface radiation in casting and heat treatment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainberg, J.; Schaefer, W.

    2015-06-01

    A new algorithm for heat exchange between thermally coupled diffusely radiating interfaces is presented, which can be applied for closed and half open transparent radiating cavities. Interfaces between opaque and transparent materials are automatically detected and subdivided into elementary radiation surfaces named tiles. Contrary to the classical view factor method, the fixed unit sphere area subdivision oriented along the normal tile direction is projected onto the surrounding radiation mesh and not vice versa. Then, the total incident radiating flux of the receiver is approximated as a direct sum of radiation intensities of representative “senders” with the same weight factor. A hierarchical scheme for the space angle subdivision is selected in order to minimize the total memory and the computational demands during thermal calculations. Direct visibility is tested by means of a voxel-based ray tracing method accelerated by means of the anisotropic Chebyshev distance method, which reuses the computational grid as a Chebyshev one. The ray tracing algorithm is fully parallelized using MPI and takes advantage of the balanced distribution of all available tiles among all CPU's. This approach allows tracing of each particular ray without any communication. The algorithm has been implemented in a commercial casting process simulation software. The accuracy and computational performance of the new radiation model for heat treatment, investment and ingot casting applications is illustrated using industrial examples.

  15. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Pint, Bruce A; Pankiw, Roman; Voke, Don

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  16. Aluminum-Silicon Alloy Having Improved Properties At Elevated Temperatures and Process for Producing Cast Articles Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A process for making a cast article from an aluminum alloy includes first casting an article from an alloy having the following composition, in weight percent: Silicon 11.0-14.0, Copper 5.6-8.0, Iron 0-0.8, Magnesium 0.5-1.5, Nickel 0.05-0.9, Manganese 0-1.0, Titanium 0.05-1.2, Zirconium 0.12-1.2, Vanadium 0.05-1.2, Zinc 0.05-0.9, Strontium 0.001-0.1, Aluminum balance . In this alloy the ratio of silicon to magnesium is 10 to 25, and the ratio of copper to magnesium is 4 to 15. After an article is cast from the alloy, the cast article is aged at a temperature within the range of 400F to 500F for a time period within the range of four to 16 hours. It has been found especially advantageous if the cast article is first exposed to a solutionizing step prior to the aging step. This solutionizing step is carried out by exposing the cast article to a temperature within the range of 900F to 1000F for a time period of fifteen minutes to four hours. It has also been found to be especially advantageous if the solutionizing step is followed directly with a quenching step, wherein the cast article is quenched in a quenching medium such as water at a temperature within the range of 120F to 300F. The resulting cast article is suitable in a number of high temperature applications, such as heavy-duty pistons for internal combustion engines.

  17. In-situ real time monitoring of the polymerization in gel-cast ceramic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Dieckman, S.L.; Bostrom, G.A.; Waterfield, L.G.; Raptis, A.C.; Omatete, O.O.

    1996-08-01

    Gelcasting requires making a mixture of a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers and casting it in a mold. Gelcasting is different from injection molding in that it separates mold filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging were used for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and gelcasting of alumina. {sup 1}H NMR spectra and images are obtained during polymerization of a mixture of soluble reactive acrylamide monomers. Polymerization was initiated by adding an initiator and an accelerator to form long- chain, crosslinked polymers. Multidimensional NMR imaging was used for in-situ monitoring of the process and for verification of homogeneous polymerization. Comparison of the modeled intensities with acquired images shows a direction extraction of T{sub 1} data from the images.

  18. Machinability of Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) Produced by Integrated Green Technology of Continuous Casting-Heat Treatment Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Meena, A.; El Mansori, M.; Ghidossi, P.

    2011-01-17

    This study presents the novel processing technique known as continuous casting-heat treatment processes to produce Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) which is a new class of ductile iron. ADI is characterized by improved mechanical properties but has low machinability as compared to other cast irons and steel of similar strength. The novel technique is developed by the integration of casting (in die casting) and heat treatment processes in foundry to save cost energy and time. Specimens just after casting were austenitized at 930 deg. C for 90 min and then austempered in fluidized bed at 380 deg. C for 90 and 120 min. Hence, the effect of austempering time on the morphology of retained austenite and mechanical properties of the material were examined and compared with conventionally produced ADI. Drilling tests were then carried out to evaluate the machinability of ADI in terms of cutting forces, chip micro-hardness, chip morphology and surface roughness. The mechanical properties of ADI austempered for 120 min have found to be better as compare to the ADI austempered for 90 min.

  19. Structure-Property-Processing Correlations in Freeze-Cast Hybrid Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunger, Philipp Malte

    Porous materials are highly sought after for applications ranging from catalyst carriers to tissue scaffolds. Most applications require clearly defined structural features and a specific mechanical performance. Therefore, it is essential to establish systematic structure-property-processing correlations to be able to tailor both structure and mechanical properties for a particular application. Because the introduction of porosity is detrimental to the mechanical performance of highly porous structures, it is necessary to generate a structure that allows for the mechanical properties to be maximized. One example for such a structure are honeycombs. In addition to the porosity and pore morphology, the scaffold's performance depends on the properties inherent to the material from which it is made. Polymeric foams possess high toughness but low stiffness, whereas ceramic foams possess high stiffness but low toughness. Natural composites like bone, antler and nacre have both high stiffness and high toughness. This unusual set of mechanical properties is thought to be intricately linked to the multi-level hierarchical composite structure present in these materials. Great potential for the fabrication of stiff, strong and tough porous scaffolds is thus seen in nacre-like composite materials with a hierarchical, honeycomb-like structure. Freeze casting is a method with which such hybrid materials can be made, adding the third dimension to nacre by forming a highly porous, hierarchical bulk material, with dense, nacre-like cell walls. The nacre-like cell walls self-assemble during the directional freezing of a water-based ceramic-polymer slurry. Reported here are structure-property-processing correlations observed in these materials. They are unusual, because they are, like nacre, solely glued by a polymeric phase and not processed further by sintering. The results illustrate several pathways to control both structure and mechanical properties in freeze-cast composites and

  20. Analysis and Evaluation of Novel Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Aerospace Alloy Strip Produced Using the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Sa; Celikin, Mert; Isac, Mihaiela; Guthrie, Roderick I. L.

    2015-04-01

    Horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) is a near net shape casting process in which molten metal is directly cast into thin strips, at high cooling rates (order of several 100 °C/s), with the potential for high volume, friction free, continuous production of metal strips. This casting process was used in the present work to produce strips of Al-Mg alloys in the AA5000 series, with additions of Sc and Zr. Such aluminum alloys show exceptional potential as a structural material for transportation/aerospace applications. To demonstrate the suitability of the HSBC process to manufacture competitive strip products of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr, the mechanical properties and microstructures of the strips produced using the HSBC process were compared with conventionally cast products. The effects of annealing on the mechanical properties of the strip-cast Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys were also investigated.

  1. Numerical simulation of casting processes: coupled mould filling and solidification using VOF and enthalpy-porosity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Ole; Turnow, Johann; Kornev, Nikolai; Hassel, Egon

    2016-12-01

    Within the scope of industrial casting applications a numerical model for the simultaneous mould filling and solidification process has been formulated, implemented in a finite volume code and successfully validated using analytical and experimental data. In order to account for the developing of free surface flow and the liquid/solid phase change, respectively, the volume-of-fluid and enthalpy-porosity method have been coupled under a volume averaging framework on a fixed Eulerian grid. The coupled method captures the basic physical effects of a combined mould filling and solidification process and provides a trustful method for comprehensive casting simulations.

  2. Thermal casting process for the preparation of anisotropic membranes and the resultant membrane

    DOEpatents

    Caneba, Gerard T. M.; Soong, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A method for providing anisotropic polymer membranes from a binary polymer/solvent solution using a thermal inversion process. A homogeneous binary solution is cast onto a support and cooled in such a way as to provide a differential in cooling rate across the thickness of the resulting membrane sheet. Isotropic or anisotropic structures of selected porosities can be produced, depending on the initial concentration of polymer in the selected solvent and on the extent of the differential in cooling rate. This differential results in a corresponding gradation in pore size. The method may be modified to provide a working skin by applying a rapid, high-temperature pulse to redissolve a predetermined thickness of the membrane at one of its faces and then freezing the entire structure.

  3. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cell (WBC) casts are more common with acute kidney infections. Your provider will tell you more about your results. Risks There are no risks with this test. Alternative Names Hyaline casts; Granular casts; Renal tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the ...

  4. Analysis of Monolith Cores from an Engineering Scale Demonstration of a Prospective Cast Stone Process

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C. L.; Cozzi, A. D.; Hill, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    The primary disposition path of Low Activity Waste (LAW) at the DOE Hanford Site is vitrification. A cementitious waste form is one of the alternatives being considered for the supplemental immobilization of the LAW that will not be treated by the primary vitrification facility. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has been directed to generate and collect data on cementitious or pozzolanic waste forms such as Cast Stone. This report documents the coring and leach testing of monolithic samples cored from an engineering-scale demonstration (ES Demo) with non-radioactive simulants. The ES Demo was performed at SRNL in October of 2013 using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft. diameter x 3.25 ft. high container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average LAW composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. In 2014 core samples originally obtained approximately six months after filling the ES Demo were tested along with bench scale molded samples that were collected during the original pour. A latter set of core samples were obtained in late March of 2015, eighteen months after completion of the original ES Demo. Core samples were obtained using a 2” diameter x 11” long coring bit. The ES Demo was sampled in three different regions consisting of an outer ring, a middle ring and an inner core zone. Cores from these three lateral zones were further segregated into upper, middle and lower vertical segments. Monolithic core samples were tested using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1315, which is designed to provide mass transfer rates

  5. Effect of Rotational Speeds on the Cast Tube During Vertical Centrifugal Casting Process on Appearance, Microstructure, and Hardness Behavior for Al-2Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shailesh Rao, A.; Tattimani, Mahantesh S.; Rao, Shrikantha S.

    2015-04-01

    The flow of molten metal plays a crucial role in determining casting quality. During rotation of the mold, melt flow around its inner circumference determines the final configurations and properties of the cast tube. In this paper, Al-2Si alloy is cast in the vertical mold at the various rotational speeds of the mold. The uniform cylinder tube is formed at a rotational speed of 1000 rpm, while before and beyond this speed, irregular-shaped cast tube is formed. Finally, fine structured grain size with high hardness value is found in uniform cast tube compared with others.

  6. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  7. A Neuroeconomics Analysis of Investment Process with Money Flow Information: The Error-Related Negativity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuicui; Vieito, João Paulo; Ma, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    This investigation is among the first ones to analyze the neural basis of an investment process with money flow information of financial market, using a simplified task where volunteers had to choose to buy or not to buy stocks based on the display of positive or negative money flow information. After choosing "to buy" or "not to buy," participants were presented with feedback. At the same time, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to record investor's brain activity and capture the event-related negativity (ERN) and feedback-related negativity (FRN) components. The results of ERN suggested that there might be a higher risk and more conflict when buying stocks with negative net money flow information than positive net money flow information, and the inverse was also true for the "not to buy" stocks option. The FRN component evoked by the bad outcome of a decision was more negative than that by the good outcome, which reflected the difference between the values of the actual and expected outcome. From the research, we could further understand how investors perceived money flow information of financial market and the neural cognitive effect in investment process.

  8. A Neuroeconomics Analysis of Investment Process with Money Flow Information: The Error-Related Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuicui; Vieito, João Paulo; Ma, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    This investigation is among the first ones to analyze the neural basis of an investment process with money flow information of financial market, using a simplified task where volunteers had to choose to buy or not to buy stocks based on the display of positive or negative money flow information. After choosing “to buy” or “not to buy,” participants were presented with feedback. At the same time, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to record investor's brain activity and capture the event-related negativity (ERN) and feedback-related negativity (FRN) components. The results of ERN suggested that there might be a higher risk and more conflict when buying stocks with negative net money flow information than positive net money flow information, and the inverse was also true for the “not to buy” stocks option. The FRN component evoked by the bad outcome of a decision was more negative than that by the good outcome, which reflected the difference between the values of the actual and expected outcome. From the research, we could further understand how investors perceived money flow information of financial market and the neural cognitive effect in investment process. PMID:26557139

  9. Microstructure Analysis on 6061 Aluminum Alloy after Casting and Diffuses Annealing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Q.; Sun, W. L.; Xing, Y. Q.

    One factory using semi-continuous casting process produce the ф200×6000 mm 6061 aluminium alloy barstock, and then rotary forged for car wheels. 6061 distorting aluminium alloy is an forged aluminum alloy, and mainly containing Mg, Si, Cu and other alloying elements. The main strengthening phase is Mg2Si, and also has few phase of (FeMn) 3Si2Al15. In order to eliminate the segregation and separation which present in the crystal boundary, and make the distortion to be uniform, and does not present ear and fracture defects after the forging. So the 6061 distorting aluminium alloy adopt the diffusion annealing heat treatment before the forging process.According to the current conditions, we use the diffusion annealing which have the different heating temperature and different holding time.The best process we can obtain from the test which can improve the production efficiency and reduce the material waste, improve the mechanical properties, and eliminate the overheated film on the surface.Then,we using OM,SEM and EDS to analyse the microstructure and the chemical composition of compound between the surface and centre. The result shows that the amount of segregation were different in the surface and in the center, and the different diffusion annealing can cause the phase change in the surface and the center.

  10. The study of flow pattern and phase-change problem in die casting process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Wei, H.; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    The flow pattern and solidification phenomena in die casting process have been investigated in the first phase study. The flow pattern in filling process is predicted by using a VOF (volume of fluid) method. A good agreement with experimental observation is obtained for filling the water into a die cavity with different gate geometry and with an obstacle in the cavity. An enthalpy method has been applied to solve the solidification problem. By treating the latent heat implicitly into the enthalpy instead of explicitly into the source term, the CPU time can be reduced at least 20 times. The effect of material properties on solidification fronts is tested. It concludes that the dependence of properties on temperature is significant. The influence of the natural convection over the diffusion has also been studied. The result shows that the liquid metal solidification phenomena is diffusion dominant, and the natural convection can affect the shape of the interface. In the second phase study, the filling and solidification processes will be considered simultaneously.

  11. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    SciTech Connect

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D.

    2010-06-15

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  12. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D.

    2010-06-01

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  14. Metal particle compaction during drop-substrate impact for inkjet printing and drop-casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, I.; Amarandei, G.; Nash, C.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2016-02-01

    Direct coating methods using metal particles from aqueous solutions or solvent-based inks become central in the roll-to-roll fabrication processes as these methods can lead to continuous or pre-defined conductive layers on a large variety of substrates. For good electrical conductivity, the metal particles have to be brought into contact, and traditionally, additional sintering treatments are required. Such treatments can degrade the sensitive substrates as paper or polymer films. In this study, the possibility of obtaining conductive layers at room temperature is investigated for direct coating methods with an emphasis on drop-casting and inkjet printing. Thus, it is shown that electrical conductive layers can be achieved if the metal particles can compact during the drop-substrate impact interaction. It is theoretically shown that the compaction process is directly related to the particle and ink drop size, the initial fractional particle loading of the ink, solvent viscosity, and drop velocity. The theoretical predictions on compaction are experimentally validated, and the particle compaction's influence on changes in the electrical conductivity of the resulting layers is demonstrated.

  15. Process-directed self-assembly of multiblock copolymers: Solvent casting vs spray coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Q.; Tang, J.; Müller, M.

    2016-10-01

    Using computer simulation of a soft, coarse-grained model and self-consistent field theory we investigate how collapsed, globular chain conformations in the initial stages of structure formation, which are produced by spray-coating, affect the single-chain structure and morphology of microphase-separated multiblock copolymers. Comparing spray-coated films with films that start from a disordered state of Gaussian chains, we observe that the collapsed molecular conformations in the initial stage give rise to (1) a smaller fraction of blocks that straddle domains (bridges), (2) a significant reduction of the molecular extension normal to the internal interfaces, and (3) a slightly larger lamellar domain spacing in the final morphology. The relaxation of molecular conformations towards equilibrium is very protracted for both processes - solvent casting and spray coating. These findings illustrate that the process conditions of the copolymer materials may significantly affect materials properties (such as mechanical properties) because the system does not reach thermal equilibrium on the relevant time scales.

  16. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  17. The direct strip casting concept: A low-cost, high-productivity solution for flat products of all steel grades

    SciTech Connect

    Reichelt, W.; Urlau, U.; Burstroem, E.; Nystroem, R.

    1996-12-31

    The Direct Strip Casting concept is characterized by a high degree of flexibility as regards the types of steel to be cast, at the same time guaranteeing a high production rate and low investment costs. It has been planned to cast strips of all steel grades with a thickness of approx. 10 mm. These strips will not be directly transferred to a cold rolling mill but will undergo two or three hot passes before being wound into a coil. A comparison of the economic feasibility of the DSC process with other near net shape casting processes shows that this process is suitable for small as well as large production rates (up to million tpy/strand) because of the low investment and operating costs. Casting and rolling tests performed in a pilot casting machine and in a casting machine for laboratory purposes show potentially that: the crucial element of the DSC process, the belt caster, is sufficiently stable to attain the required final strip geometry already at the time of casting; the hot shaping envisaged in the DSC concept is sufficient to remove a lack of symmetry that may arise during casting; and the rolling passes envisaged in the DSC concept are necessary and yet at the same time adequate for achieving material properties, for example, sufficiently high r-values for deep drawing grades.

  18. Correlation of solar cell electrical properties with material characteristics of silicon cast by the ubiquitous crystallization process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, S.; Leung, D.; Morrison, A.; Stika, K.; Yoo, H.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells were fabricated using a conservative 'baseline' process on 1-3 Omega-cm p-type silicon from ingots cast by the ubiquitous crystallization process. Conversion efficiencies of the cells were measured, as well as spectral response and minority carrier diffusion length. Adjacent slices from the same ingot were studied for their grain size, dislocation distribution, and impurity distribution. Cell performance was related to the observed structural features, as well as to the chemical structure of the ingot.

  19. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at the end

  20. Center Segregation with Final Electromagnetic Stirring in Billet Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dongbin; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-02-01

    With a multiphase solidification model built, the effect of F-EMS parameters on center segregation was investigated in 160 mm × 160 mm billet continuous casting process. In the model, the initial growth of equiaxed grains which could move freely with liquid was treated as slurry, while the coherent equiaxed zone was regarded as porous media. The results show that the stirring velocity is not the main factor influencing center segregation improvement, which is more affected by current intensity and stirring pool width. Because solute transport is controlled by solidification rate as stirring pool width is 73 mm, center segregation declines continuously with current intensity increasing. As liquid pool width decreases to 61 mm and less latent heat needs to dissipate in the later solidification, the center segregation could be improved more obviously by F-EMS. Due to center liquid solute enrichment and liquid phase accumulation in the stirring zone, center segregation turns to rise reversely with higher current intensity and becomes more serious with stirring pool width further decreasing to 43 mm. As the stirring pool width is 25 mm, the positive segregation has already formed and solute could still concentrate with weak stirring, leading to center segregation deterioration. With the optimized current intensity (400 A) and stirring pool width (61 mm) set for continuous mode, center segregation improvement is better than that of alternative mode.

  1. Fabrication of glass photonic crystal fibers with a die-cast process.

    PubMed

    Guiyao, Zhou; Zhiyun, Hou; Shuguang, Li; Lantian, Hou

    2006-06-20

    We demonstrate a novel method for the fabrication of glass photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with a die-cast process. SF6 glass is used as the material for PCFs, and the die is made of heat-resisting alloy steel, whose inner structure matches the PCF's structure. The die is put vertically in the vessel with SF6 glass, and the vacuum hose is attached to the top of the die. The die and glass are put in the furnace to heat at 870 K. The die is slowly filled with the softening glass under vacuum conduction until it is full. It is kept in the furnace to anneal at a rate of 20 K/h to remove the thermal stress that could lead to cracks. The outer tube of the die is taken apart when its temperature is close to room temperature, and the fused glass bundle is etched in an acidic solution to remove the heat-resisting alloy steel rods. Thus, the etched bundle is ready to use as a PCF preform. The PCF is observed in the generation of a supercontinuum, with the flat plateau in the spectrum of the output emission stretching from 400 to 1400 nm by experimental measurement. The transmission loss is 0.2-0.3 dB/m at wavelengths of 420-900 nm.

  2. Process for casting hard-faced, lightweight camshafts and other cylindrical products

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Wilson, Rick D.

    1996-01-01

    A process for casting a hard-faced cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft includes the steps of: (a) preparing a composition formed from a molten base metal and an additive in particle form and having a hardness value greater than the hardness value of the base metal; (b) introducing the composition into a flask containing a meltable pattern of a cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft to be manufactured and encased in sand to allow the composition to melt the pattern and assume the shape of the pattern within the sand; and (c) rotating the flask containing the pattern about the longitudinal axes of both the flask and the pattern as the molten base metal containing the additive in particle form is introduced into the flask to cause particles of the additive entrained in the molten base metal to migrate by centrifugal action to the radial extremities of the pattern and thereby provide a cylindrical product having a hardness value greater at it's radial extremities than at its center when the molten base metal solidifies.

  3. Isotope biogeochemical assessment of natural biodegradation processes in open cast pit mining landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Christina; Knöller, Kay; Koschorreck, Matthias; Ussath, Maria; Hoth, Nils

    2014-05-01

    In Germany, a major share of the energy production is based on the burning of lignite from open cast pit mines. The remediation and re-cultivation of the former mining areas in the Lusatian and Central German lignite mining district is an enormous technical and economical challenge. After mine closures, the surrounding landscapes are threatened by acid mine drainage (AMD), i.e. the acidification and mineralization of rising groundwater with metals and inorganic contaminants. The high content of sulfur (sulfuric acid, sulfate), nitrogen (ammonium) and iron compounds (iron-hydroxides) deteriorates the groundwater quality and decelerates sustainable development of tourism in (former) mining landscapes. Natural biodegradation or attenuation (NA) processes of inorganic contaminants are considered to be a technically low impact and an economically beneficial solution. The investigations of the stable isotope compositions of compounds involved in NA processes helps clarify the dynamics of natural degradation and provides specific informations on retention processes of sulfate and nitrogen-compounds in mine dump water, mine dump sediment, and residual pit lakes. In an active mine dump we investigated zones where the process of bacterial sulfate reduction, as one very important NA process, takes place and how NA can be enhanced by injecting reactive substrates. Stable isotopes signatures of sulfur and nitrogen components were examined and evaluated in concert with hydrogeochemical data. In addition, we delineated the sources of ammonium pollution in mine dump sediments and investigated nitrification by 15N-labeling techniques to calculate the limit of the conversion of harmful ammonium to nitrate in residual mining lakes. Ultimately, we provided an isotope biogeochemical assessment of natural attenuation of sulfate and ammonium at mine dump sites and mining lakes. Also, we estimated the risk potential for water in different compartments of the hydrological system. In

  4. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT: A Framework for Assessing and Improving Process Maturity. Exposure Draft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    1. Each IT investment board is created and defined with board membership integrating both IT and business knowledge . 2. Each IT investment board...in-depth courses. Activity 1: Each IT investment board is created and defined with board membership integrating both IT and business knowledge . The...ensure that individuals with business knowledge and experience are involved as stakeholders in this activity. Activity 3: Strategic changes to the

  5. Casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Messer, Regina L

    2004-04-01

    Although the role of dental casting alloys has changed in recent years with the development of improved all-ceramic materials and resin-based composites, alloys will likely continue to be critical assets in the treatment of missing and severely damaged teeth. Alloy shave physical, chemical, and biologic properties that exceed other classes of materials. The selection of the appropriate dental casting alloy is paramount to the long-term success of dental prostheses,and the selection process has become complex with the development of many new alloys. However, this selection process is manageable if the practitioner focuses on the appropriate physical and biologic properties, such as tensile strength, modulus of elasticity,corrosion, and biocompatibility, and avoids dwelling on the less important properties of alloy color and short-term cost. The appropriate selection of an alloy helps to ensure a longer-lasting restoration and better oral health for the patient.

  6. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  7. Influence of rotational speed of centrifugal casting process on appearance, microstructure, and sliding wear behaviour of Al-2Si cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda, P. G.; Shailesh, Rao A.; Rao, Shrikantha S.

    2010-02-01

    Although the manner in which the molten metal flows plays a major role in the formation of the uniform cylinder in centrifugal casting, not much information is available on this topic. The flow in the molten metal differs at various rotational speeds, which in turn affects the final casting. In this paper, the influence of the flow of molten metal of hyper eutectic Al-2Si alloys at various rotational speeds is discussed. At an optimum speed of 800 rpm, a uniform cylinder was formed. For the rotational speeds below and above these speeds, an irregular shaped casting was formed, which is mainly due to the influence of melt. Primary á-Al particles were formed in the tube periphery at low rotational speed, and their sizes and shapes were altered with changes in rotational speeds. The wear test for the inner surface of the casting showed better wear properties for the casting prepared at the optimum speed of rotation.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of an as-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy processed by equal channel angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. W.; Ding, R. G.; Chiu, Y. L.; Hodgson, M. A.; Gao, W.

    2009-08-01

    An as-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy was processed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 593K and its microstructure and mechanical properties were studied using electron microscopy and room temperature tensile tests, respectively. It has been found that after the first pass of ECAP, the grain size of the alloy shows a bi-modal distribution, containing fine grains of about 14 μm and large dendrite structure. The dendritic structure completely disappeared after two passes of ECAP. The average grain size of the alloy after six passes of ECAP becomes less than 10 μm. The yield stress of the alloy has significantly increased from 65 MPa of the as-cast alloy to 135 MPa after the first pass of ECAP, but does not show much change with further ECAP. However, the elongation to failure measured from the alloy processed by the first pass of ECAP is similar to that measured from the as-cast alloy. A noticeable increase of the elongation to failure has been observed after the second pass of ECAP, which then remains at the similar level with further ECAP process. The fractography of the tensile tested samples have been studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) microscope. The facture surface of the as-cast alloy is predominated by cleavages. Although not predominantly, cleavage has also been frequently observed in the alloy processed by one pass of ECAP. With further ECAP process, the facture surface becomes profuse in dimples, characteristic of ductile facture, consistent with the ductility change observed. FIB observation suggests that the cracking is mainly initiated at the blocky particles.

  9. Statistical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Processing Variables on Shrinkage Incidence During Solidification of Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. M.; Natxiondo, A.; Nieves, J.; Zabala, A.; Sertucha, J.

    2017-04-01

    The study of shrinkage incidence variations in nodular cast irons is an important aspect of manufacturing processes. These variations change the feeding requirements on castings and the optimization of risers' size is consequently affected when avoiding the formation of shrinkage defects. The effect of a number of processing variables on the shrinkage size has been studied using a layout specifically designed for this purpose. The β parameter has been defined as the relative volume reduction from the pouring temperature up to the room temperature. It is observed that shrinkage size and β decrease as effective carbon content increases and when inoculant is added in the pouring stream. A similar effect is found when the parameters selected from cooling curves show high graphite nucleation during solidification of cast irons for a given inoculation level. Pearson statistical analysis has been used to analyze the correlations among all involved variables and a group of Bayesian networks have been subsequently built so as to get the best accurate model for predicting β as a function of the input processing variables. The developed models can be used in foundry plants to study the shrinkage incidence variations in the manufacturing process and to optimize the related costs.

  10. Combined multi-nozzle deposition and freeze casting process to superimpose two porous networks for hierarchical three-dimensional microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica E; Hunger, Philipp M; Wang, Chengyang; Hamid, Qudus; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Sun, Wei

    2014-03-01

    An engineered three-dimensional scaffold with hierarchical porosity and multiple niche microenvironments is produced using a combined multi-nozzle deposition-freeze casting technique. In this paper we present a process to fabricate a scaffold with improved interconnectivity and hierarchical porosity. The scaffold is produced using a two-stage manufacturing process which superimposes a printed porous alginate (Alg) network and a directionally frozen ceramic-polymer matrix. The combination of two processes, multi-nozzle deposition and freeze casting, provides engineering control of the microenvironment of the scaffolds over several length scales; including the addition of lateral porosity and the ratio of polymer to ceramic microstructures. The printed polymer scaffold is submerged in a ceramic-polymer slurry and subsequently, both structures are directionally frozen (freeze cast), superimposing and patterning both microenvironments into a single hierarchical architecture. An optional additional sintering step removes the organic material and densifies the ceramic phase to produce a well-defined network of open pores and a homogenous cell wall material composition. The techniques presented in this contribution address processing challenges, such as structure definition, reproducibility and fine adjustments of unique length scales, which one typically encounters when fabricating topological channels between longitudinal and transverse porous networks.

  11. Statistical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Processing Variables on Shrinkage Incidence During Solidification of Nodular Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, J. M.; Natxiondo, A.; Nieves, J.; Zabala, A.; Sertucha, J.

    2017-01-01

    The study of shrinkage incidence variations in nodular cast irons is an important aspect of manufacturing processes. These variations change the feeding requirements on castings and the optimization of risers' size is consequently affected when avoiding the formation of shrinkage defects. The effect of a number of processing variables on the shrinkage size has been studied using a layout specifically designed for this purpose. The β parameter has been defined as the relative volume reduction from the pouring temperature up to the room temperature. It is observed that shrinkage size and β decrease as effective carbon content increases and when inoculant is added in the pouring stream. A similar effect is found when the parameters selected from cooling curves show high graphite nucleation during solidification of cast irons for a given inoculation level. Pearson statistical analysis has been used to analyze the correlations among all involved variables and a group of Bayesian networks have been subsequently built so as to get the best accurate model for predicting β as a function of the input processing variables. The developed models can be used in foundry plants to study the shrinkage incidence variations in the manufacturing process and to optimize the related costs.

  12. Effect of Stress Ratio on the Fatigue Behavior of a Friction Stir Processed Cast Al-Si-Mg Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Baumann, John B.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of friction stir processing (FSP) on the fatigue life of a cast Al-7Si-0.6Mg alloy at a stress ratio of R=0 was evaluated. Two types of specimen geometry were used for the FSPed condition, through-thickness processed and partial thickness processed. FSP enhanced the fatigue life by a factor of 15 for the through thickness processed samples at lower stress amplitudes. This is different from the FSP specimens tested at R=-1 and similar stress amplitudes where a 5 times improvement in fatigue life was observed. In light of these observations, various closure mechanisms were examined.

  13. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1993-01-01

    Because of high rejection rates for large structural castings (e.g., the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate Turbopump Design Program), a reliable casting simulation computer code is very desirable. This code would reduce both the development time and life cycle costs by allowing accurate modeling of the entire casting process. While this code could be used for other types of castings, the most significant reductions of time and cost would probably be realized in complex investment castings, where any reduction in the number of development castings would be of significant benefit. The casting process is conveniently divided into three distinct phases: (1) mold filling, where the melt is poured or forced into the mold cavity; (2) solidification, where the melt undergoes a phase change to the solid state; and (3) cool down, where the solidified part continues to cool to ambient conditions. While these phases may appear to be separate and distinct, temporal overlaps do exist between phases (e.g., local solidification occurring during mold filling), and some phenomenological events are affected by others (e.g., residual stresses depend on solidification and cooling rates). Therefore, a reliable code must accurately model all three phases and the interactions between each. While many codes have been developed (to various stages of complexity) to model the solidification and cool down phases, only a few codes have been developed to model mold filling.

  14. Thermal analysis on Al7075/Al2O3 metal matrix composites fabricated by stir casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, S.; Shajin, S.; Gnanavel, C.

    2017-03-01

    Metal matrix Composites (MMC’s) have evoked a keen interest in recent times for various applications in aerospace, renewable energy and automotive industries due to their superior strength, low cost, easy availability and high temperature resistance [1]. The crack and propagation occurs in conventional materials without any appreciable indication in a short span. Hence composite materials are preferred nowadays to overcome this problem [2]. The process of metal matrix composites (MMC’s) is to unite the enviable attributes of metals and ceramics. The Stir casting method is used for producing aluminium metal matrix composites (AMC’s). A key challenge of the process is to spread the ceramic particles to achieve a defect free microstructure [2]. By carefully selecting stir casting processing specification, such as stirring time, temperature of the melt and blade angle, the desired microstructure can be obtained. The focus of this work is to develop a high strength particulate strengthen aluminium metal matrix composites, and Al7075 was selected which can offer high strength without much disturbing ductility of metal matrix [4]. The composites will be examined using standard metallurgical and mechanical tests. The cast composites are analysed to Laser flash analysis (LFA) to determine Thermal conductivity [5]. Also changes in microstructure are determined by using SEM analysis.

  15. Influence of Process Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Friction-Stir-Processed Mg-Gd-Y-Zr Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2012-06-01

    Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (wt pct) casting was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) at a constant rotation rate of 800 rpm and varied travel speeds of 25, 50, and 100 mm/minute. FSP resulted in the generation of fine-grained microstructure and fundamental dissolution of coarse Mg5(Gd,Y) phase at the grain boundaries, thereby enhancing the tensile properties significantly at both room and elevated temperatures. The grain size of the FSP samples decreased with the increasing travel speed, whereas the microstructure heterogeneity with the banded structure (onion rings) became evident at a higher travel speed. Tensile elongation of the FSP samples increased as the travel speed increased, whereas the highest strengths were obtained at the medium travel speed of 50 mm/minute. Higher strengths and greater elongations were observed for the FSP samples in the transverse direction (TD) than in the longitudinal direction (LD). After post-FSP aging, the strengths of the FSP samples were increased significantly with the TD and LD exhibiting the same strengths; however, the elongation was decreased remarkably with the TD having higher elongation than the LD. A variation of the tensile properties was discussed in detail based on the microstructure heterogeneity and fracture surfaces.

  16. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  17. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Improved Die Casting Process to Preserve the Life of the Inserts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam, PI; Xuejun Zhu, Sr. Research Associate

    2012-09-30

    The goal of this project was to study the combined effects of die design, proper internal cooling and efficient die lubricants on die life. The project targeted improvements in die casting insert life by: Optomized Die Design for Reduced Surface Temperature: The life of die casting dies is significantly shorter when the die is exposed to elevated temperature for significant periods of time. Any die operated under conditions leading to surface temperature in excess of 1050oF undergoes structural changes that reduce its strength. Optimized die design can improve die life significantly. This improvement can be accomplished by means of cooling lines, baffles and bubblers in the die. A key objective of the project was to establish criteria for the minimal distance of the cooling lines from the surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. The Uddeholm Dievar steel evaluated in this program showed superior resistance to thermal fatigue resistance. Based on the experimental evidence, cooling lines could be placed as close as 0.5" from the surface. Die Life Extension by Optimized Die Lubrication: The life of die casting dies is affected by additions made to its surface with the proper lubricants. These lubricants will protect the surface from the considerable temperature peaks that occur when the molten melt enters the die. Dies will reach a significantly higher temperature without this lubricant being applied. The amount and type of the lubricant are critical variables in the die casting process. However, these lubricants must not corrode the die surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. Chem- Trend participated in the program with die

  18. Process-conditioned investing with incomplete information using maximum causal entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebart, Brian D.

    2012-05-01

    Investing to optimally maximize the growth rate of wealth based on sequences of event outcomes has many information-theoretic interpretations. Namely, the mutual information characterizes the benefit of additional side information being available when making investment decisions [1] in settings where the probabilistic relationships between side information and event outcomes are known. Additionally, the relative variant of the principle of maximum entropy [2] provides the optimal investment allocation in the more general setting where the relationships between side information and event outcomes are only partially known [3]. In this paper, we build upon recent work characterizing the growth rates of investment in settings with inter-dependent side information and event outcome sequences [4]. We consider the extension to settings with inter-dependent event outcomes and side information where the probabilistic relationships between side information and event outcomes are only partially known. We introduce the principle of minimum relative causal entropy to obtain the optimal worst-case investment allocations for this setting. We present efficient algorithms for obtaining these investment allocations using convex optimization techniques and dynamic programming that illustrates a close connection to optimal control theory.

  19. Evolution of halictine castes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knerer, Gerd

    1980-03-01

    Social halictine bees have female castes that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female caste differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female caste system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, caste differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.

  20. Effect of casting methods on accuracy of peridental restorations.

    PubMed

    Finger, W; Kota, K

    1982-06-01

    The present study has shown that the accuracy of peridental gold alloy castings depends 1) on the type of casting machine used, 2) on the diameter of the casting sprue, and 3) on the strength properties of the investment material. The dependence between the accuracy and the three factors mentioned is based on erosion of the investment mold by the inflow of the liquid casting alloy. The vacuum casting technique proved to be a more gentle casting method than centrifugal and vacuum/pressure techniques.

  1. Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Ultrasonic Assisted Cast Magnesium 1wt% Silicon Carbide Nano-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Ari

    The goal of this dissertation is to establish an understanding of processing -- microstructure -- mechanical behavior relationship in Mg-1wt% SiC metal matrix nano-composites fabricated via an ultrasonic assisted casting process, with the emphasis on the effect of the distribution of nanoparticles on this relationship. Ultrasonic assisted casting has been proved as an effective technique to distribute nanoparticles in Mg metal matrix nano-composites (MMNCs). Mg MMNCs reinforced with 1 wt% SiC nanoparticles, were cast by ultrasonic cavitation-based dispersion methods. Microstructural analyses of as cast specimens were conducted to characterize the grain size, shape and distribution, SiC nanoparticle size and distribution, and nanoparticle-matrix interface. Average grain size for the ultrasonic assisted cast composite specimens was 72 mum compared to 181 mum for pure Mg samples prepared by the same method. The average measured SiC nanoparticle size was 66 nm. TEM studies showed good local dispersion of SiC nanoparticles, with only a few small, widely spaced clusters. HRTEM showed a clean interface between SiC nanoparticles and the Mg matrix, with no evidence of secondary phases. The yield strength of Mg-1 wt% SiC nanocomposites was 67 MPa, which showed improvement from 47 MPa for the pure Mg samples. This extra strengthening is due to Orowan and Hall-Petch effects. Fatigue experiments were conducted to characterize the cyclic stress-strain response of pure Mg and Mg-1wt% SiC samples at 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6% plastic strain amplitudes. The analyses of the cyclic stress response curves and hysteresis loops, combined with post failure TEM analyses provided an understanding of the role of twinning, and twin-particle interactions on the cyclic deformation behavior of Mg MMNCs. Tensile twinning and basal slip are the main forms of deformation mechanisms under compression, followed by detwinning and basal slip in subsequent tension. Fatigue lives of Mg MMNCs are comparable to

  2. Effect of casting methods on castability of pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, J; Zhang, J Z; Okazaki, M

    1993-12-01

    Two types of patterns were tested for castability: 1) polyester mesh pattern (20mm x 22mm with 100 open squares) and 2) 20mm x 20mm wax plates 1.0 and 1.5 mm in thickness. These materials were invested using a pre-arranged commercial phosphate-bonded investment for titanium. Three different types of casting machines were selected: 1) a pressure-type casting machine with separate melting and casting chambers, 2) a pressure-type casting machine with one chamber and 3) a centrifugal-type casting machine at 3000 rpm. Pure titanium (> 99.5%) was cast into the molds at a mold temperature of 100 degrees C. The castability of mesh pattern was evaluated in terms of the number of cast segment, and the cast plate was evaluated using X-ray transparent images by a digital imaging technique. The centrifugal casting method showed the best castability among these three casting methods.

  3. In-depth study of mold heat transfer for the high speed continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heetae; Hwang, Jong-Yeon; Cho, Jung-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Mold heat transfer during the commercial high speed continuous casting up to 7 m/min was investigated in order to clarify the influence of various operating conditions such as casting speed, mold flux, mold thickness, thickness and height of mold coated layer and so on. A simple, but practical formula of heat flux has been derived in terms of those operating conditions by analyzing the heat flux data obtained in CEM® (Compact Endless Casting and Rolling Mill) caster based on simplified one dimensional heat transfer model. Especially, impact of mold parameters such as mold thickness, mold coated layer thickness and its height on the heat flux can be linearly expressed in the empirical formula derived. Heat flux ratio (HR), the ratio of the narrow face heat flux to the wide face one, is one of the important indicators to evaluate whether the solidified shell is evenly robust or not. Averaged HR in CEM® caster is around 0.87, which varies according to the caster specifications and operating conditions. It is suggested that the mold taper should be adjusted to maintain the HR as close to 0.87 as possible.

  4. Assessment of Computer Simulation Software and Process Data for High Pressure Die Casting of Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Hatfield, Edward C; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Kuwana, Kazunori; Viti, Valerio; Hassan, Mohamed I; Saito, Kozo

    2007-09-01

    Computer software for the numerical simulation of solidification and mold filling is an effective design tool for cast structural automotive magnesium components. A review of commercial software capabilities and their validation procedures was conducted. Aside form the software assessment, the program addressed five main areas: lubricant degradation, lubricant application, gate atomization, and heat transfer at metal mold interfaces. A test stand for lubricant application was designed. A sensor was used for the direct measurement of heat fluxes during lubricant application and casting solidification in graphite molds. Spray experiments were conducted using pure deionized water and commercial die lubricants. The results show that the sensor can be used with confidence for measuring heat fluxes under conditions specific to the die lube application. The data on heat flux was presented in forms suitable for use in HPDC simulation software. Severe jet breakup and atomization phenomena are likely to occur due to high gate velocities in HPDC. As a result of gate atomization, droplet flow affects the mold filling pattern, air entrapment, skin formation, and ensuing defects. Warm water analogue dies were designed for obtaining experimental data on mold filling phenomena. Data on break-up jet length, break-up pattern, velocities, and droplet size distribution were obtained experimentally and was used to develop correlations for jet break-up phenomena specific to die casting gate configurations.

  5. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  6. Measurement of Heat Flux and Heat Transfer Coefficient Due to Spray Application for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant spray application experiments were conducted for the die casting process. The heat flux was measured in situ using a differential thermopile sensor for three application techniques. First, the lubricant was applied under a constant flowrate while the nozzle was held in the same position. Second, the lubricant was applied in a pulsed, static manner, in which the nozzle was held over the same surface while it was turned on and off several times. Third, the lubricant was applied in a sweeping manner, in which the nozzle was moved along the die surface while it was held open. The experiments were conducted at several die temperatures and at sweep speeds of 20, 23, and 68 cm/s. The heat flux data, which were obtained with a sensor that was located in the centre of the test plate, were presented and discussed. The sensor can be used to evaluate lubricants, monitor the consistency of die lubrication process, and obtain useful process data, such as surface temperature, heat flux, and heat transfer coefficients. The heat removed from the die surface during lubricant application is necessary for (a) designing the cooling channels in the die, i.e. their size and placement, and (b) performing accurate numerical simulations of the die casting process.

  7. Improving Microstructure and Mechanical Properties for Large-Diameter 7075 Aluminum Alloy Ingots by a Forced Convection Stirring Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Mingfan; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Li, Yangde; Li, Weirong

    2017-04-01

    A simple process so-called forced convection stirring casting (FCSC) was proposed to prepare large-diameter 7075 Al alloy ingots. The flow behavior, temperature, and composition fields of the melt in the FCSC process were simulated. The macromorphology, macrosegregation, microstructure, and mechanical properties of the ingots prepared by the FCSC were studied and compared with those prepared by normal casting (NC). The results showed that in the FCS device, the strong convection caused by the axial flow and circular flow rapidly promoted the uniformity of the temperature and composition fields of the melt. Microstructures of the FCSC ingots from the edge to the center were all nearly spherical grains, which were much finer and more uniform than that of the NC ingots. The rotation speed played an important role in the microstructure of the FCSC ingots, and the grains became finer and rounder as the speed increasing. The FCSC process effectively eliminated cracks, improved macrosegregation, and decreased the eutectic phase area fraction and the average grain boundary thickness of ingots. Mechanical properties of the ingots prepared by the FCSC are far better than that of the NC ingots.

  8. Improving Microstructure and Mechanical Properties for Large-Diameter 7075 Aluminum Alloy Ingots by a Forced Convection Stirring Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Mingfan; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Li, Yangde; Li, Weirong

    2017-01-01

    A simple process so-called forced convection stirring casting (FCSC) was proposed to prepare large-diameter 7075 Al alloy ingots. The flow behavior, temperature, and composition fields of the melt in the FCSC process were simulated. The macromorphology, macrosegregation, microstructure, and mechanical properties of the ingots prepared by the FCSC were studied and compared with those prepared by normal casting (NC). The results showed that in the FCS device, the strong convection caused by the axial flow and circular flow rapidly promoted the uniformity of the temperature and composition fields of the melt. Microstructures of the FCSC ingots from the edge to the center were all nearly spherical grains, which were much finer and more uniform than that of the NC ingots. The rotation speed played an important role in the microstructure of the FCSC ingots, and the grains became finer and rounder as the speed increasing. The FCSC process effectively eliminated cracks, improved macrosegregation, and decreased the eutectic phase area fraction and the average grain boundary thickness of ingots. Mechanical properties of the ingots prepared by the FCSC are far better than that of the NC ingots.

  9. Evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the processing route for grain-oriented electrical steels using strip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Yao, Sheng-Jie; Sun, Yu; Gao, Fei; Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Guo-Huai; Li, Lei; Geng, Dian-Qiao; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2015-08-15

    In the present work, a regular grade GO sheet was produced successively by strip casting, hot rolling, normalizing annealing, two-stage cold rolling with intermediate annealing, primary recrystallization annealing, secondary recrystallization annealing and purification. The aim of this paper was to characterize the evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the new processing route by comprehensive utilization of optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that a fine microstructure with the ferrite grain size range of 7–12 μm could be obtained in the primary recrystallization annealed sheet though a very coarse microstructure was produced in the initial as-cast strip. The main finding was that the “texture memory” effect on Goss texture started on the through-thickness intermediate annealed strip after first cold rolling, which was not similar to the “texture memory” effect on Goss texture starting on the surface layers of the hot rolled strip in the conventional production route. As a result, the origin of Goss nuclei capable of secondary recrystallization lied in the grains already presented in Goss orientation in the intermediate annealed strip after first cold rolling. Another finding was that fine and dispersive inhibitors (mainly AlN) were easy to be produced in the primary recrystallization microstructure due to the initial rapid solidification during strip casting and the subsequent rapid cooling, and the very high temperature reheating usually used before hot rolling in the conventional production route could be avoided. - Highlights: • A regular grade grain-oriented electrical steel was produced. • Evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor was characterized. • Origin of Goss nuclei lied in the intermediate annealed strip. • A fine primary recrystallization microstructure could be produced. • Effective inhibitors were easy to be obtained in the new processing route.

  10. Distributed cognition and social brains: reductions in mushroom body investment accompanied the origins of sociality in wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae).

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sean; Bulova, Susan J; DeLeon, Sara; Khodak, Paulina; Miller, Skye; Sulger, Elisabeth

    2015-07-07

    The social brain hypothesis assumes the evolution of social behaviour changes animals' ecological environments, and predicts evolutionary shifts in social structure will be associated with changes in brain investment. Most social brain models to date assume social behaviour imposes additional cognitive challenges to animals, favouring the evolution of increased brain investment. Here, we present a modification of social brain models, which we term the distributed cognition hypothesis. Distributed cognition models assume group members can rely on social communication instead of individual cognition; these models predict reduced brain investment in social species. To test this hypothesis, we compared brain investment among 29 species of wasps (Vespidae family), including solitary species and social species with a wide range of social attributes (i.e. differences in colony size, mode of colony founding and degree of queen/worker caste differentiation). We compared species means of relative size of mushroom body (MB) calyces and the antennal to optic lobe ratio, as measures of brain investment in central processing and peripheral sensory processing, respectively. In support of distributed cognition predictions, and in contrast to patterns seen among vertebrates, MB investment decreased from solitary to social species. Among social species, differences in colony founding, colony size and caste differentiation were not associated with brain investment differences. Peripheral lobe investment did not covary with social structure. These patterns suggest the strongest changes in brain investment--a reduction in central processing brain regions--accompanied the evolutionary origins of eusociality in Vespidae.

  11. Energy use in selected metal casting facilities - 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Eppich, Robert E.

    2004-05-01

    This report represents an energy benchmark for various metal casting processes. It describes process flows and energy use by fuel type and processes for selected casting operations. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency in casting.

  12. Precision cast vs. wrought superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Borofka, J. C.; Casey, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    While cast polycrystalline superalloys recommend themselves in virtue of better 'buy-to-fly' ratios and higher strengthening gamma-prime volume fractions than those of wrought superalloys, the expansion of their use into such critical superalloy applications as gas turbine hot section components has been slowed by insufficient casting process opportunities for microstructural control. Attention is presently drawn, however, to casting process developments facilitating the production of defect-tolerant superalloy castings having improved fracture reliability. Integrally bladed turbine wheel and thin-walled turbine exhaust case near-net-shape castings have been produced by these means.

  13. Elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting process characterization for the fabrication of arrays of concave refractive microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, L.; Van Overmeire, S.; Van Erps, J.; Ottevaere, H.; Debaes, C.; Thienpont, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete and precise quantitative characterization of the different process steps used in an elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting technique. We use the latter replication technique to fabricate concave replicas from an array of convex thermal reflow microlenses. During the inverse elastomeric moulding we obtain a secondary silicone mould of the original silicone mould in which the master component is embedded. Using vacuum casting, we are then able to cast out of the second mould several optical transparent poly-urethane arrays of concave refractive microlenses. We select ten particular representative microlenses on the original, the silicone moulds and replica sample and quantitatively characterize and statistically compare them during the various fabrication steps. For this purpose, we use several state-of-the-art and ultra-precise characterization tools such as a stereo microscope, a stylus surface profilometer, a non-contact optical profilometer, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a Twyman-Green interferometer and an atomic force microscope to compare various microlens parameters such as the lens height, the diameter, the paraxial focal length, the radius of curvature, the Strehl ratio, the peak-to-valley and the root-mean-square wave aberrations and the surface roughness. When appropriate, the microlens parameter under test is measured with several different measuring tools to check for consistency in the measurement data. Although none of the lens samples shows diffraction-limited performance, we prove that the obtained replicated arrays of concave microlenses exhibit sufficiently low surface roughness and sufficiently high lens quality for various imaging applications.

  14. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  15. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOEpatents

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  16. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOEpatents

    Scheffer, Karl D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  17. DOE applied to study the effect of process parameters on silicon spacing in lost foam Al-Si-Cu alloy casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganpour, A.; Idris, M. H.; Izman, S.; Jafari, H.

    2012-09-01

    Lost foam casting as a relatively new manufacturing process is extensively employed to produce sound complicated castings. In this study, an experimental investigation on lost foam casting of an Al-Si-Cu aluminium cast alloy was conducted. The research was aimed in evaluating the effect of different pouring temperatures, slurry viscosities, vibration durations and sand grain sizes on eutectic silicon spacing of thin-wall castings. A stepped-pattern was used in the study and the focus of the investigations was at the thinnest 3 mm section. A full two-level factorial design experimental technique was used to plan the experiments and afterwards identify the significant factors affecting casting silicon spacing. The results showed that pouring temperature and its interaction with vibration time have pronounced effect on eutectic silicon phase size. Increasing pouring temperature coarsened the eutectic silicon spacing while the higher vibration time diminished coarsening effect. Moreover, no significant effects on silicon spacing were found with variation of sand size and slurry viscosity.

  18. Model Investigations on the Stability of the Steel-Slag Interface in Continuous-Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, René; Schwarze, Rüdiger; Heller, Hans P.; Scheller, Piotr R.

    2013-02-01

    In the continuous-casting mold, the mold powder in contact with the liquid steel surface forms a liquid slag layer. The flow along the steel-slag interface generates shear stress at the interface, waves, and leads to fingerlike protrusions of liquid slag into steel. Reaching a critical flow velocity and thereby shear stress, the protrusions can disintegrate into slag droplets following the flow in the liquid steel pool. These entrained droplets can form finally nonmetallic inclusions in steel material, cause defects in the final product, and therefore, should be avoided. In the current work, the stability of a liquid-liquid interface without mass transfer between phases was investigated in cold model study using a single-roller driven flow in oil-water systems with various oil properties. Applying the similarity theory, two dimensionless numbers were identified, viz. capillary number Ca and the ratio of kinematic viscosities ν 1/ ν 2, which are suitable to describe the force balance for the problem treated. The critical values of the dimensionless capillary number Ca* marking the start of lighter phase entrainment into the heavier fluid, are determined over a wide range of fluid properties. The dimensionless number ν 1/ ν 2 was defined as the ratio of kinematic viscosities of the lighter phase ν 1 and heavier phase ν 2. The ratios of kinematic viscosities of different steel-slag systems were calculated using measured thermophysical properties. With the knowledge of thermophysical properties of steel-slag systems, Ca* for slag entrainment as a function of v 1/ v 2 is derived. Assuming no reaction between the phases and no interfacial flow, slag entrainment should not occur under the usual casting conditions.

  19. Producing Nanocomposite Layer on the Surface of As-Cast AZ91 Magnesium Alloy by Friction Stir Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, P.; Besharati Givi, M. K.; Faraji, G.

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is an effective tool to produce a surface composite layer with enhanced mechanical properties and modified microstructure of as-cast and sheet metals. In the present work, the mechanical and microstructural properties of as-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy were enhanced by FSP and an AZ91/SiC surface nanocomposite layer has been produced using 30 nm SiC particles. Effect of the FSP pass number on the microstructure, grain size, microhardness, and powder distributing pattern of the surface developed has been investigated. The developed surface nanocomposite layer presents a higher hardness, an ultra fine grain size and a better homogeneity. Results show that, increasing the number of FSP passes enhances distribution of nano-sized SiC particles in the AZ91 matrix, decreases the grain size, and increases the hardness significantly. Also, changing of the tool rotating direction results much uniform distribution of the SiC particles, finer grains, and a little higher hardness.

  20. Effect of Friction Stir Processing on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ91C Magnesium Cast Alloy Weld Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Behzad; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Enayati, Mohammad Hossein; Sabooni, Soheil; Vallant, Rudolf

    2016-07-01

    In this study, friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to the GTAW (TIG)-welded AZ91C cast alloy to refine the microstructure and optimize the mechanical properties of the weld zone. Microstructural investigation of the samples was performed by optical microscopy and the phases in the microstructure were determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructural evaluations showed that FSP destroys the coarse dendritic microstructure. Furthermore, it dissolves the secondary hard and brittle β-Mg17Al12 phase existing at grain boundaries of the TIG weld zone. The closure and decrease in amount of porosities along with the elimination of the cracks in the microstructure were observed. These changes were followed by a significant grain refinement to an average value of 11 µm. The results showed that the hardness values increased to the mean ones, respectively, for as-cast (63 Hv), TIG weld zone (67 Hv), and stir zone (79 Hv). The yield and ultimate strength were significantly enhanced after FSP. The fractography evaluations, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicated to a transition from brittle to ductile fracture surface after applying FSP to the TIG weld zone.

  1. Development of Secondary Recrystallization in high permeability grain oriented Silicon steel produced by Thin Slab Casting and Rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. F.; Liu, S. M.; Guo, F.; He, J. Z.; Lu, B.; Dong, R. F.

    2017-02-01

    Texture evolution during high temperature annealing process in high permeability grain oriented(Hi-B)silicon steel, produced by Thin Slab Casting and Rolling(TSCR) process, was investigated using macro-/microtexture analysis. Goss texture appears in ODF at 800°C, the intensity of Goss texture is very weak until 950°CGoss grains grow abnormally during 980°C∼1000°C, grain size reached centimeter level at 1000°C instead of Primary Grains, Goss grains were obtained fully at 1020°C, Secondary recrystallization completed at 1040°C The deviation angle of Goss grain orientation decreases gradually with increasing temperature, and it reached the minimum at 1040°C.

  2. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  3. Final Technical Report Quantification and Standardization of Pattern Properties for the Control of the Lost Foam Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Michaels

    2005-09-30

    This project takes a fresh look at the ''white side'' of the lost foam casting process. We have developed the gel front hypothesis for foam pyrolysis behavior and the magnetic metal pump method for controlling lost foam casting metal fill event. The subject of this report is work done in the improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process. The original objective of this project was to improve the control of metal fill by understanding the influence of foam pattern and coating properties on the metal fill event. Relevant pattern properties could then be controlled, providing control of the metal fill event. One of the original premises of this project was that the process of metal fill was relatively well understood. Considerable previous work had been done to develop fluid mechanical and heat transfer models of the process. If we could just incorporate measured pattern properties into these models we would be able predict accurately the metal fill event. As we began to study the pyrolysis behavior of EPS during the metal fill event, we discovered that the chemical nature of this event had been completely overlooked in previous research. Styrene is the most prevalent breakdown product of EPS pyrolysis and it is a solvent for polystyrene. Much of the styrene generated by foam pyrolysis diffuses into intact foam, producing a molten gel of mechanically entangled polystyrene molecules. Much of the work of our project has centered on validation of this concept and producing a qualitative model of the behavior of EPS foam undergoing pyrolysis in a confined environment. A conclusion of this report is that styrene dissolution in EPS is a key phenomenon in the pyrolysis process and deserves considerable further study. While it is possible to continue to model the metal fill event parametrically using empirical data, we recommend that work be undertaken by qualified researchers to directly characterize and quantify this phenomenon for the benefit of modelers, researchers, and

  4. Distributed cognition and social brains: reductions in mushroom body investment accompanied the origins of sociality in wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Sean; Bulova, Susan J.; DeLeon, Sara; Khodak, Paulina; Miller, Skye; Sulger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The social brain hypothesis assumes the evolution of social behaviour changes animals' ecological environments, and predicts evolutionary shifts in social structure will be associated with changes in brain investment. Most social brain models to date assume social behaviour imposes additional cognitive challenges to animals, favouring the evolution of increased brain investment. Here, we present a modification of social brain models, which we term the distributed cognition hypothesis. Distributed cognition models assume group members can rely on social communication instead of individual cognition; these models predict reduced brain investment in social species. To test this hypothesis, we compared brain investment among 29 species of wasps (Vespidae family), including solitary species and social species with a wide range of social attributes (i.e. differences in colony size, mode of colony founding and degree of queen/worker caste differentiation). We compared species means of relative size of mushroom body (MB) calyces and the antennal to optic lobe ratio, as measures of brain investment in central processing and peripheral sensory processing, respectively. In support of distributed cognition predictions, and in contrast to patterns seen among vertebrates, MB investment decreased from solitary to social species. Among social species, differences in colony founding, colony size and caste differentiation were not associated with brain investment differences. Peripheral lobe investment did not covary with social structure. These patterns suggest the strongest changes in brain investment—a reduction in central processing brain regions—accompanied the evolutionary origins of eusociality in Vespidae. PMID:26085587

  5. [Casting faults and structural studies on bonded alloys comparing centrifugal castings and vacuum pressure castings].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P; Küfmann, W

    1978-07-01

    The casting processes in use today such as centrifugal casting and vacuum pressure casting were compared with one another. An effort was made to answer the question whether the occurrence of shrink cavities and the mean diameter of the grain of the alloy is dependent on the method of casting. 80 crowns were made by both processes from the baked alloys Degudent Universal, Degudent N and the trial alloy 4437 of the firm Degusa. Slice sections were examined for macro and micro-porosity and the structural appearance was evaluated by linear analysis. Statistical analysis showed that casting faults and casting structure is independent of the method used and their causes must be found in the conditions of casting and the composition of the alloy.

  6. Control of Crystal Morphology for Mold Flux During High-Aluminum AHSS Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUO, Jing; SEO, Myung-Duk; SHI, Cheng-Bin; CHO, Jung-Wook; KIM, Seon-Hyo

    2016-08-01

    In the present manuscript, the efforts to control the crystal morphology are carried out aiming at improving the lubrication of lime-alumina-based mold flux for casting advanced high-strength steel with high aluminum. Jackson α factors for crystals of melt crystallization in multi-component mold fluxes are established and reasonably evaluated by applying thermodynamic databases to understand the crystal morphology control both in lime-alumina-based and lime-silica-based mold fluxes. The results show that Jackson α factor and supercooling are the most critical factors to determine the crystal morphology in a mold flux. Crystals precipitating in mold fluxes appear with different morphologies due to their different Jackson α factors and are likely to be more faceted with higher Jackson α factor. In addition, there is a critical supercooling degree for crystal morphology dendritic transition. When the supercooling over the critical value, the crystals transform from faceted shape to dendritic ones in morphology as the kinetic roughening occurs. Typically, the critical supercooling degrees for cuspidine dendritic transition in the lime-silica-based mold fluxes are evaluated to be between 0.05 and 0.06. Finally, addition of a small amount of Li2O in the mold flux can increase the Jackson α factor and decrease the supercooling for cuspidine precipitation; thus, it is favorable to enhance a faceted cuspidine crystal.

  7. Resource-saving technologies of making advanced cast and deformable superalloys with allowance for processing all types of wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablov, E. N.; Sidorov, V. V.; Kablov, D. E.; Min, P. G.; Rigin, V. E.

    2016-12-01

    The results of thermodynamic analysis of the vacuum-melt-ceramic system and experimental investigations of using up to 100% wastes during vacuum-induction melting are presented. An important role of rare-earth and alkaline-earth metals and heat treatment is shown for effective refining of a melt from impurities and gases. As a result, a resource-saving technology of making advanced cast and deformable nickel superalloys is developed with allowance for processing all types of wastes, including off-grade wastes. The developed technology of refining wastes under vacuum makes it possible to manufacture the alloys that fully meet the requirements of alloy specifications from 100% wastes. This technology is now used for the mass production of nickel superalloys in a research complex at FGUP VIAM.

  8. Influences of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welded cast A319 aluminium alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, M.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

    2009-04-01

    Fusion welding of cast A319 (Al-Si-Cu) alloy will lead to many problems including porosity, micro-fissuring, and hot cracking. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) can be used to weld A319 alloy without these defects. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of FSW process parameters on the tensile strength of A319 alloy welded joints. Joints were made using different combinations of tool rotation speed, welding speed, and axial force, each at four levels. The quality of weld zone was analyzed using macrostructure and microstructure analysis. Tensile strength of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the weld zone microstructure. The joint fabricated with a 1200 rpm tool rotation speed, 40 mm/min welding speed, and 4 kN axial force showed superior tensile strength compared with the other joints.

  9. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  10. A three-dimensional hybrid finite element-volume tracking model for mould filling in casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, D. M.

    1999-04-01

    Metal casting is a complicated process in which flow momentum plays a crucial role in the mould filling process due to the high velocity of the liquid metal. Inertia and gravity effects may cause splashing, jetting or undesirable filling of the metal flow into the mould cavity. When considering complex parts, the accurate prediction of mould filling behaviour using empirical knowledge and intuition is nearly impossible. Therefore, numerical modelling and simulation are essential to predict such a complex physical problem and assist in part with mould design. A mould filling analysis can help the mould designer to determine the size and location of the gate as well as a proper runner system design for ensuring a complete and balanced filling of the part. Such an analysis can also be used to predict potential product defects, such as air entrapment, porosities, and help in correct positioning of overflows and venting systems. A three-dimensional finite element model combined with a volume tracking method has been developed in this work to simulate the cavity filling for casting processes. A mixed formulation based on a four node tetrahedral element with a bubble function at the centroid (P1+/P1) is employed to solve the flow equations. Such a finite element provides a small dimension of the element matrices and satisfies the Brezzi-Babuska condition to ensure a stable solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. A slip boundary condition combined with a friction model is implemented to better simulate the metal flow near the mould walls. An algebraic model is used to account for the turbulence effects during the mould filling. The flow fronts are tracked by a volume tracking method developed for the tetrahedral elements. This method can handle complicated flow front shapes and complex situations like merging and separation of flow fronts. The combination of a volume tracking technique with a FEM flow solver in three-dimensional unstructured meshes constitutes the major

  11. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  12. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Wilkening, D.; Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B.

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  13. Development of Casting Process for Pressings of Pistons of Car Augmented Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, V. F.; Denisov, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Results of a study aimed at formation of a single-phase fine-grained structure in pistons during their production process involving isostatic pressing of liquid metal prior to the start of crystallization, pressing of the crystallizing metal, and holding under pressure in the process of cooling to the shop temperature are presented.

  14. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  15. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    possible today. Extensive work was conducted on casting of semi-solid alloys when highly fluid (’ Rheocasting ’) and when thixotropically gelled...Thixocasting’). In initial phases of the program, copper base alloys and cast iron alloys were prepared with special non-dendritic Rheocast structure by batch...processing. Compatibility studies were carried out to select materials suitable for preparing cast iron with the Rheocast structure. Design

  16. Microstructural Evolution and Local Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Processed Mg-3Gd-1Zn Cast Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbaghian, M.; Mahmudi, R.

    2016-05-01

    Microstructural evolution, hardness, and shear strength of the cast plates of GZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated after friction stir processing (FSP). Due to severe plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, FSP breaks the dendrites and results in a fine homogenous structure in the stirred zone (SZ) having average grain sizes of about 4.0 and 2.5 μm in the one and two-pass FSPed plates, respectively. As a novel approach, strength of the processed plates was examined by shear punch testing in three regions of the SZ on the surface layer, namely, center line (CL), retreating side (RS), and advancing side (AS). FSP showed great potential in the enhancement of SZ ultimate shear strength from 114 to about 152 and 155 MPa in the one and two-pass FSPed materials, respectively. The same trend was observed in hardness values of the SZ, where the average hardness of the base material increased from 41 to 60 and 68 Vickers after one and two passes of FSP, respectively. The variations in the shear strength of the CL, RS, and AS zones of the SZ were about 5% for the first pass of FSP, the effect which was decreased to less than 2% after two passes of FSP.

  17. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  18. Investment Avenues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Priyanka

    2012-11-01

    Investors are a heterogeneous group, they may be large or small, rich or poor, expert or lay man and not all investors need equal degree of protection (Mayya, 1996). An investor has three objectives while investing his money, namely safety of invested money, liquidity position of invested money and return on investment. The return on investment may further be divided into capital gain and the rate of return on investment as interest or dividend. Among all investment options available, securities are considered the most challenging as well as rewarding. Securities include shares, debentures, derivatives, units of mutual funds, Government securities etc. An investor may be an individual or corporate legal entity investing funds with a view to derive maximum economic advantage from investment such as rate of return, capital appreciation, marketability, tax advantage and convenience of investment.The Capital market facilitates mobilization of savings of individuals and pools them into reservoir of capital which can be used for the economic development of a country. An efficient capital market is essential for raising capital by the corporate sector of the economy and for the protection of the interest of investors in corporate securities. There arises a need to strike a balance between raising of capital for economic development on one side and protection of investors on the other. Unless the interests of investors are protected, raising of capital, by corporates is not possible. Like, the primary objective of a senior citizenís asset allocation is the generation of regular income.

  19. Method For Removing Volatile Components From A Gel-Cast Ceramic Article

    DOEpatents

    Klug, Frederic Joseph; DeCarr, Sylvia Marie

    2004-09-07

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  20. Friction Stir Processing of As-Cast AA5083: Superplastic Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    2005), pp. 1-78. [23] J.-Q. Su, T.W. Nelson and C.J. Sterling, “Microstructure evolution during FSW /FSP of high strength aluminum alloys...TERMS Friction Stir Processing, Superplasticity, Elevated Temperature, Aluminum , Grain Refinement, Strain Rate 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...3 A. ALUMINUM ALLOY 5083............................................................................3 B. SUPERPLASTICITY

  1. Microstructure evolution of eutectic Al-Cu strips by high-speed twin-roll strip casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Seshadev; Ghosh, Sudipto

    2015-10-01

    In the present investigation, microstructural evolutions of functionally graded eutectic Al-Cu strips prepared by high-speed twin-roll strip caster at different casting speeds and liquid melt superheats were studied. The as-cast sample was subjected to scanning electron microscope to study the evolution of microstructure of the strip at different casting speeds and liquid melt superheats. At different casting speeds, non-equilibrium eutectic structure observed on the Al-Cu eutectic strip consists of lamellar as well as wavy structure with a distinct boundary. The lamellar microstructure consists of alternating layers of well-bonded α-Al phase and θ-Al2Cu phase. The globular flowery structure within the eutectic matrix was observed on the strip at different liquid melt superheats. The microhardness of the as-cast strip was studied by Vickers hardness tester, and it was found that hardness value increases with increasing casting speed and decreases with increasing liquid melt superheat.

  2. Documenting investment policy boosts safety, returns.

    PubMed

    Kovener, R R

    1992-02-01

    The process and responsibility for a healthcare organization's investment decisions should be clearly documented in an investment policy. Any investment policy should contain at least seven elements: how investments relate to the organization's mission; responsibilities of involved parties; long- and short-term objectives; desired balance between return and risk; proportions of a portfolio held in stocks, bonds, and other investments; disposition of donated assets; desired investment reports; and the process for keeping the policy current.

  3. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  4. A model of amorphous and nano-crystalline ribbon processing by planar-flow casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yu B.; Shumakov, A. N.; Filonov, M. R.; Anikin, Yu A.

    2008-02-01

    This paper provides a mathematical model describing the processing of amorphous and nano-crystalline ribbon. The developed model is based on averaging of the equations of non-equilibrium thermodynamics over a forming zone. The model describes an effect of the various technological parameters on the geometry and temperature of the zone. These parameters are: the overpressure, the speed of rotation of a cooling disc, the value of a gap, the thickness of a nozzle, the initial overheating, the atmosphere pressure, and the evenness of the disc surface. Model allows to take into account various random factors such as vibrations, etc. Considered time-dependent quantities are: the temperature of the formation zone, the length of the zone, the thickness of the ribbon, the curvature radius of the rear part of the zone, the nozzle outflow speed. Model takes into account the following physical properties as determining the process: viscosity, density, surface tension, heat capacity, temperature of solidification, heat transfer. Relief of the free and contact surfaces can also be regarded as parameters of the model. Correlation between the quantities mentioned above is considered without introduction of any phenomenological constants.

  5. Environment, Trade, and Investment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environment, trade, and investment are fundamentally linked as the environment provides many basic inputs of economic activity – forests, fisheries, metals, minerals – as well as the energy used to process those materials.

  6. A Political Investment: Revisiting Race and Racism in the Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollock, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws upon a two-year Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded study into the educational strategies of the black middle classes to examine the role of race and racism in the research process. Specifically, it explores how my political positioning and experiences of racism, as a black female scholar, shaped not only my…

  7. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  8. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... moving. The outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, ... color! These casts are lighter and stronger than plaster casts. Plaster casts are usually white and made ...

  9. Some properties of a stir-cast Ni-Cr based dental alloy.

    PubMed

    Boswell, P G; Stevens, L

    1980-06-01

    A Ni-Cr based crown and bridge alloy has been successfully stir-cast into small investment mould spaces using a modified induction melting and casting machine. Stir-casting produced substantial improvements to the mechanical properties of the cast alloy. A model for the development of the stir-cast microstructure is described and the clinical significance of the improvements in the alloy's properties is discussed.

  10. A comparative study of the centrifugal and vacuum-pressure techniques of casting removable partial denture frameworks.

    PubMed

    Shanley, J J; Ancowitz, S J; Fenster, R K; Pelleu, G B

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate two techniques for casting accuracy on removable partial denture frameworks: centrifugal casting and vacuum-pressure casting. A standard metal die with predetermined reference points in a horizontal plane was duplicated in refractory investment. The casts were waxed, and castings of nickel-chrome alloy were fabricated by the two techniques. Both the casts and the castings were measured between the reference points with a measuring microscope. With both casting methods, the differences between the casts and the castings were significant, but no significant differences were found between castings produced by the two techniques. Vertical measurements at three designated points also showed no significant differences between the castings. Our findings indicate that dental laboratories should be able to use the vacuum-pressure method of casting removable partial denture frameworks and achieve accuracy similar to that obtained by the centrifugal method of casting.

  11. [Stocking process for consumables and investement goods in the Italian public health service (part II)].

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Fulvio; Ameri, Cinzia; Tarchini, Renzo; Granata, Antonio; Zuccardi Merli, Mara

    2013-01-01

    The necessity for fairness and transparency during the processes of supply of consumables and capital goods within the Italian Health Service together with that of containing costs in line with budget reductions, are points outlined in the 2006 public and European Union allocation codes and related procedures. These include methods to guarantee open, limited negotiation both without or after the official announcement for competitive bidding has been made, plus mediation and framework agreement. The publicizing of announcements of bidding to potential Health Service suppliers, criteria for applicant selection and selection of personnel to comprise the panels who effectively make the choice of suppliers, are all phases that are carefully regulated at a legal level. Even small expenditures (down to 20,000) are covered by these regulations. An overview of specific responsibilities, the institution of boards of physicians and the application of sanctions ends the present review.

  12. [Stocking process for consumables and investement goods in the public health service (first part)].

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Fulvio; Ameri, Cinzia; Tarchini, Renzo; Granata, Antonio; Zuccardi Merli, Mara

    2013-01-01

    Hospital procedures to stock tools and equipment supplies for day-by-day clinical diagnosis and treatment place physicians to face up with their ones responsibilities. Nephrologists have to deal with dialysis machines, related technology updating and associated consumables. Overall they have to cope with local health service reality, which looks for progressive doctors skill improvement at lowest or no cost at all. Aim of the first part of this review is to analyze all these issues according European Union, Italian and local main lines and associated laws. Moreover, will be reviewed purchase strategies always looking at patient wellness as final aim of the entire process. They will be illustrated sequences of administrative measures, recent Central Commissioning Headquarters, and laws that since 2006 have defined the related procedures (i.e. open, limited, negotiated, and competitive).

  13. A Novel Method to Reduce Time Investment When Processing Videos from Camera Trap Studies

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, Kristijn R. R.; Reijniers, Jonas; Breno, Matteo; Leirs, Herwig

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps have proven very useful in ecological, conservation and behavioral research. Camera traps non-invasively record presence and behavior of animals in their natural environment. Since the introduction of digital cameras, large amounts of data can be stored. Unfortunately, processing protocols did not evolve as fast as the technical capabilities of the cameras. We used camera traps to record videos of Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber). However, a large number of recordings did not contain the target species, but instead empty recordings or other species (together non-target recordings), making the removal of these recordings unacceptably time consuming. In this paper we propose a method to partially eliminate non-target recordings without having to watch the recordings, in order to reduce workload. Discrimination between recordings of target species and non-target recordings was based on detecting variation (changes in pixel values from frame to frame) in the recordings. Because of the size of the target species, we supposed that recordings with the target species contain on average much more movements than non-target recordings. Two different filter methods were tested and compared. We show that a partial discrimination can be made between target and non-target recordings based on variation in pixel values and that environmental conditions and filter methods influence the amount of non-target recordings that can be identified and discarded. By allowing a loss of 5% to 20% of recordings containing the target species, in ideal circumstances, 53% to 76% of non-target recordings can be identified and discarded. We conclude that adding an extra processing step in the camera trap protocol can result in large time savings. Since we are convinced that the use of camera traps will become increasingly important in the future, this filter method can benefit many researchers, using it in different contexts across the globe, on both videos and photographs. PMID:24918777

  14. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  15. Paper Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrasjid, Dorine A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an art project, based on the work of artist Chew Teng Beng, in the molding of wet paper on a plaster cast to create embossed paper designs. The values of such a project are outlined, including a note that its tactile approach makes it suitable to visually handicapped students. (SJL)

  16. CASTING FURNACES

    DOEpatents

    Ruppel, R.H.; Winters, C.E.

    1961-01-01

    A device is described for casting uranium which comprises a crucible, a rotatable table holding a plurality of molds, and a shell around both the crucible and the table. The bottom of the crucible has an eccentrically arranged pouring hole aligned with one of the molds at a time. The shell can be connected with a vacuum.

  17. Mathematical modeling of the evolution of thermal field during start-up phase of the direct chill casting process for AA5182 sheet ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Joydeep

    The control of the thermal cooling conditions at the start-up phase of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process for aluminum sheet ingots is difficult, and is critical from the standpoint of defect formation. Firstly, boiling water heat transfer governs the secondary cooling experienced by the ingot surfaces as they emerge from the mould. This results in varying rates of heat transfer from the ingot faces as the surface temperature of the ingot changes with time during the start-up phase. Moreover, if the ingot surface temperature at locations below the point of water impingement is high enough to promote film boiling, the water is ejected away from the surface. This can result in a sudden decrease in heat transfer and the formation of local hot spots. Also, the chill water may enter into the gap formed between the ingot base and the bottom block with the evolution of the butt curl. This process of water incursion alters the heat transfer from the base of the ingot, and in turn affects the surface temperature of the ingot faces. A comprehensive mathematical model has been developed to describe heat transfer during the start-up phase of the D.C. casting process. The model, based on the commercial finite element package ABAQUS, includes primary cooling to the mould, secondary cooling to water, and ingot base cooling. The algorithm used to account for secondary cooling to the water includes boiling curves that are a function of surface temperature, water flow rate, impingement point temperature, and position relative to the point of water impingement. In addition, the secondary cooling algorithm accounts for water ejection, which can occur at low water flow rates (low heat extraction rates). The algorithm used to describe ingot base cooling includes the drop in contact heat transfer due to base deformation (butt curl), and also the increase in heat transfer due to the process of water incursion between the ingot base and bottom block. The model has been extensively

  18. Improved Slip Casting Of Ceramic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Vasquez, Peter; Hicks, Lana P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique of investment slip casting developed for making precise ceramic wind-tunnel models. Needed in wind-tunnel experiments to verify predictions of aerothermodynamical computer codes. Ceramic materials used because of their low heat conductivities and ability to survive high temperatures. Present improved slip-casting technique enables casting of highly detailed models from aqueous or nonaqueous solutions. Wet shell molds peeled off models to ensure precise and undamaged details. Used at NASA Langley Research Center to form superconducting ceramic components from nonaqueous slip solutions. Technique has many more applications when ceramic materials developed further for such high-strength/ temperature components as engine parts.

  19. A simple calibration approach based on film-casting for confocal Raman microscopy to support the development of a hot-melt extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Netchacovitch, L; Thiry, J; De Bleye, C; Dumont, E; Dispas, A; Hubert, C; Krier, F; Sacré, P-Y; Evrard, B; Hubert, Ph; Ziemons, E

    2016-07-01

    When developing a new formulation, the development, calibration and validation steps of analytical methods based on vibrational spectroscopy are time-consuming. For each new formulation, real samples must be produced and a "reference method" must be used in order to determine the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) content of each sample. To circumvent this issue, the paper presents a simple approach based on the film-casting technique used as a calibration tool in the framework of hot-melt extrusion process. Confocal Raman microscopic method was successfully validated for the determination of itraconazole content in film-casting samples. Then, hot-melt extrusion was carried out to produce real samples in order to confront the results obtained with confocal Raman microscopy and Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC). The agreement between both methods was demonstrated using a comparison study based on the Bland and Altman's plot.

  20. LBM-LES Simulation of the Transient Asymmetric Flow and Free Surface Fluctuations under Steady Operating Conditions of Slab Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Li, Qiang; Kuang, S. B.; Zou, Zongshu

    2017-02-01

    Transient flow structures in a continuous casting mold can strongly influence the slag entrainment in liquid steel and the bubbles capture in the initial solidified shell, both of which are associated with the quality of the final product. This paper presents a numerical study of the turbulent flow with a top free surface in the continuous casting mold at a meso-scale level by a three-dimensional combined approach of Free Surface Lattice Boltzmann Method and Large Eddy Simulation (FSLBM-LES). The validity of the model is verified by the good agreement between the calculated results and the measurements from various water experiments in terms of the flow velocity and free surface profile. The mathematical model is then used to reveal the transient and spatiotemporal asymmetric characteristics associated with the transient flow field and the free surface fluctuation, although the steady state operation is considered during the continuous casting process. The results show that the locations of the jets of liquid steel from the two out ports of the Submerged Entry Nozzle (SEN) always fluctuate alternatively within a certain range, and periodically deviate from the design angle of the SEN within the same time period. The oscillating behavior of the jets promotes the asymmetric flow patterns and multi-scale vortices at both sides of the SEN. By introducing the Q-criterion in the results analysis, the formation, development, and shedding of the coherent structure (CS) of the turbulent flow are quantitatively characterized. The interaction between the transient flow patterns and the fluctuations of the top free surface as well as the evolution of the transient profile and velocities of the free surface are also demonstrated. The results obtained from the current study suggest that the FSLBM-LES model offers a promising way to study the complex flows and related transfer phenomena in the continuous casting process.

  1. Slip-Cast Superconductive Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-casting technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-casting but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based castings do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.

  2. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  3. Prediction of Microporosity in Shrouded Impeller Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S. Nelson, C.D.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Morris Bean and Company was to link computer models of heat and fluid flow with previously developed quality criteria for the prediction of microporosity in a Al-4.5% Cu alloy shrouded impeller casting. The results may be used to analyze the casting process design for the commercial production of 206 o alloy shrouded impeller castings. Test impeller castings were poured in the laboratory for the purpose of obtaining thermal data and porosity distributions. Also, a simulation of the test impeller casting was conducted and the results validated with porosity measurements on the test castings. A comparison of the predicted and measured microporosity distributions indicated an excellent correlation between experiments and prediction. The results of the experimental and modeling studies undertaken in this project indicate that the quality criteria developed for the prediction of microporosity in Al-4.5% Cu alloy castings can accurately predict regions of elevated microporosity even in complex castings such as the shrouded impeller casting. Accordingly, it should be possible to use quality criteria for porosity prediction in conjunction with computer models of heat and fluid flow to optimize the casting process for the production of shrouded impeller castings. Since high levels of microporosity may be expected to result in poor fatigue properties, casting designs that are optimized for low levels of microporosity should exhibit superior fatigue life.

  4. Casting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  5. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  6. How to convince your manager to invest in an HIS preimplementation methodology for appraisal of material, process and human costs and benefits.

    PubMed

    Bossard, B; Renard, J M; Capelle, P; Paradis, P; Beuscart, M C

    2000-01-01

    Investing in information technology has become a crucial process in hospital management today. Medical and administrative managers are faced with difficulties in measuring medical information technology costs and benefits due to the complexity of the domain. This paper proposes a preimplementation methodology for evaluating and appraising material, process and human costs and benefits. Based on the users needs and organizational process analysis, the methodology provides an evaluative set of financial and non financial indicators which can be integrated in a decision making and investment evaluation process. We describe the first results obtained after a few months of operation for the Computer-Based Patient Record (CPR) project. Its full acceptance, in spite of some difficulties, encourages us to diffuse the method for the entire project.

  7. Computer simulation applied to jewellery casting: challenges, results and future possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberto, Dario; Klotz, Ulrich E.

    2012-07-01

    Computer simulation has been successfully applied in the past to several industrial processes (such as lost foam and die casting) by larger foundries and direct automotive suppliers, while for the jewelry sector it is a procedure which is not widespread, and which has been tested mainly in the context of research projects. On the basis of a recently concluded EU project, the authors here present the simulation of investment casting, using two different softwares: one for the filling step (Flow-3D®), the other one for the solidification (PoligonSoft®). A work on material characterization was conducted to obtain the necessary physical parameters for the investment (used for the mold) and for the gold alloys (through thermal analysis). A series of 18k and 14k gold alloys were cast in standard set-ups to have a series of benchmark trials with embedded thermocouples for temperature measurement, in order to compare and validate the software output in terms of the cooling curves for definite test parts. Results obtained with the simulation included the reduction of micro-porosity through an optimization of the feeding channels for a controlled solidification of the metal: examples of the predicted porosity in the cast parts (with metallographic comparison) will be shown. Considerations on the feasibility of applying the casting simulation in the jewelry sector will be reached, underlining the importance of the software parametrization necessary to obtain reliable results, and the discrepancies found with the experimental comparison. In addition an overview on further possibilities of application for the CFD in jewellery casting, such as the modeling of the centrifugal and tilting processes, will be presented.

  8. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    high- lights of the earlier reports and much detail about Rheocast - ing and the casting of aluminum containing superalloys by Hitchiner’s patented...Augmented Hipo-v Procer-s EVALUATION OF RHEOCASTING WITH TFT: CTA PROCESS fU.S. Pat. 3,863,706) . Introduction to Rheocasting ... Rheocasting ...Drawing of suspension Bomb Lug. 13 Apparatus used to CLA pour Rheocast aluminum. 14 collection of parts cast by CLA process in semi- solid 35 5 aluminum

  9. The Investment Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John H.

    1997-01-01

    The investment committee of the college or university governing board is charged with determining, overseeing, and assessing the policies and processes by which institutional funds are invested. The committee has fiduciary duty to ensure that the terms of investment of donors' gifts are met and to maximize investment returns within an appropriate…

  10. Government Strategic Support for Investment Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turekulova, Assiya N.; Mukhambetova, Lyazzat K.; Doshan, Almagul S.; Issabekov, Baurzhan N.; Chimgentbayeva, Gulbakyt K.; Turegeldinova, Aliya Zh.

    2016-01-01

    When system risks are high most investors choose to exit the market; however, there are some contrarian investors who opt to make investments. The authors analyzed the main goals of the investment process and measures that should be provided by the government to stimulate investments and innovation especially by means of investment banking. The…

  11. Capillarity in metal casting mold filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilden, Jon L.

    In metal casting processes, surface tension of the molten metal typically resists filling of the metal into the mold. The effects are greater for smaller mold cavities, and ultimately, the smallest cavities may not be filled. Surface tension forces can be overcome by applying pressure (head) to the molten metal, thus forcing metal into the cavities. However, a pressure-window will exist, too little pressure resulting in non-filled cavities and too much pressure resulting in penetration of the mold, which is itself porous. Filling-pressure windows are investigated for cylindrical-shaped mold cavities on both a theoretical and experimental basis. The lower bound of the filling pressure window is examined by treating cylindrical mold cavities as cylinders lined with packed spheres representing mold particles. The upper bound is examined by treating the mold as a 3-D array of close-packed spheres. The experimental work concerns industrial-scale vacuum investment casting of superalloy IN718 into molds containing various cylindrical mold cavities at various heights (heads). The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the numerical modeling predictions for filling of rough (sphere-lined) cylindrical mold cavities.

  12. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  13. Effects of colloidal silica suspension mixing on porosity of phosphate-bonded investments after setting and heating processes.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Young; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    A numerical simulation model, which was based on the setting and heating reactions of the binder phase of phosphate-bonded investment compacts, was developed to compute the porosities of set and burnout compacts. Densities and concentrations of microsilica particles in dilute suspension were measured and input into the simulation model. Validity of the model was confirmed by experimental results, that is, colloidal silica suspensions were prepared using different silica concentrations and mixed with investment powders. Porosities of these set and burnout compacts were experimentally measured. Effects of these factors on the porosity of compacts were examined using the developed simulation model: liquid/powder (L/P) ratio, concentration of microsilica particles in colloidal silica suspension, and ratio of binder component (NH₄H₂PO₄) in investment powder. It was concluded that numerical simulation is a viable tool for dental materials research.

  14. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze casting is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze casting can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-cast materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  15. Influence of casting procedures on the corrosion resistance of clinical dental alloys containing palladium.

    PubMed

    Viennot, Stéphane; Lissac, Michèle; Malquarti, Guillaume; Dalard, Francis; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro corrosion resistance in artificial saliva of two palladium-silver alloys (a Pd-Ag (Pors on 4) and an Ag-Pd (Palliag LTG)), with and without casting defects; 1 nickel-chrome alloy and 1 high-gold alloy, cast under recommended conditions, served as controls. For each of the palladium-based alloys, three specimens corresponding to three different casting conditions were used: under recommended conditions, with the use of a graphite-containing investment and crucible, and by reusing the sprues and sprue button. The electrochemical tests were run in Fusayama-Meyer artificial saliva. The open-circuit potential was recorded in mV/SCE at t=24h. Then, potentiodynamic polarization was performed to measure the polarization resistance (R(p)) in kOmega cm(2) and the corrosion current (i(corr)) in microA cm(-2). Data were evaluated with one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons test (alpha=0.05). In addition, each specimen was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Compared to the control alloys, the electrochemical experiments in artificial saliva indicated satisfactory corrosion resistance for the Pd-Ag and Ag-Pd alloys; these results are related to their high noble metal content and stable substructure. The Pd-Ag alloy displayed superior electrochemical properties to those of the Ag-Pd alloy regardless of the casting condition. The use of the graphite-containing crucible and investment during the cast process did not dramatically reduce the corrosion resistance values, but the reuse of sprues and the sprue button did. The optimal corrosion resistance values were obtained for the alloys cast according to the recommended conditions.

  16. Laser surface texturing of cast iron steel: dramatic edge burr reduction and high speed process optimisation for industrial production using DPSS picosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneel, David; Kearsley, Andrew; Karnakis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present picosecond DPSS laser surface texturing optimisation of automotive grade cast iron steel. This application attracts great interest, particularly in the automotive industry, to reduce friction between moving piston parts in car engines, in order to decrease fuel consumption. This is accomplished by partially covering with swallow microgrooves the inner surface of a piston liner and is currently a production process adopting much longer pulse (microsecond) DPSS lasers. Lubricated interface conditions of moving parts require from the laser process to produce a very strictly controlled surface topography around the laser formed grooves, whose edge burr height must be lower than 100 nm. To achieve such a strict tolerance, laser machining of cast iron steel was investigated using an infrared DPSS picosecond laser (10ps duration) with an output power of 16W and a repetition rate of 200 kHz. The ultrashort laser is believed to provide a much better thermal management of the etching process. All studies presented here were performed on flat samples in ambient air but the process is transferrable to cylindrical geometry engine liners. We will show that reducing significantly the edge burr below an acceptable limit for lubricated engine production is possible using such lasers and remarkably the process window lies at very high irradiated fluences much higher that the single pulse ablation threshold. This detailed experimental work highlights the close relationship between the optimised laser irradiation conditions as well as the process strategy with the final size of the undesirable edge burrs. The optimised process conditions are compatible with an industrial production process and show the potential for removing extra post)processing steps (honing, etc) of cylinder liners on the manufacturing line saving time and cost.

  17. Computer cast blast modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; McGill, M.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-07-01

    Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. The more overburden removed by explosives, the less blasted material there is left to be transported with mechanical equipment, such as draglines and trucks. In order to optimize the percentage of rock that is cast, a higher powder factor than normal is required plus an initiation technique designed to produce a much greater degree of horizontal muck movement. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC, applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARCstation 10--41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC computer. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

  18. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    t^ ~cMnrc.pVbU of evaluating rheocasting as tell as more conventional casting techniques has been designed and is presently under construction...construction. The immediate objective of this machine is to study rheocasting and conventional casting with respect to .processing and properties. The...used in small, bottom-pour ladles. The stirring required by the Rheocasting proce- dures is to be accomplished by the paddle assembly shown in Figure

  19. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  20. Investigation on the Effect of Mold Constraints and Cooling Rate on Residual Stress During the Sand-Casting Process of 1086 Steel by Employing a Thermomechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghani, Amir; Davami, Parviz; Varahram, Naser; Shabani, Mohsen Ostad

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the effects of mold constraints and cooling rate on residual stress were analyzed during the shaped casting process. For this purpose, an H-shaped sample was designed in which the contraction of its middle portion is highly restricted by the mold during the cooling process. The effects of an increasing cooling rate combined with mold constraints were analyzed by reducing the thickness of the middle portion in the second sample. A three-dimensional coupled temperature-displacement analysis was performed in finite-element code ABAQUS to simulate residual stress distribution, and then numerical results were verified by the hole-drilling strain-gauge method. It was concluded that the mold constraints have a greater effect on the values of residual stress than the cooling rate (thin section) in steel sand casting. Increasing the cooling rate would increase the amount of residual stress, only in the presence of mold constraints. It is also suggested that employing the elastic-plastic stress model for the sand mold will satisfy the experimental results and avoid exaggerated values of residual stress in simulation.

  1. Interplay of processing, morphological order, and charge-carrier mobility in polythiophene thin films deposited by different methods: comparison of spin-cast, drop-cast, and inkjet-printed films.

    PubMed

    Wong, Loke-Yuen; Png, Rui-Qi; Silva, F B Shanjeera; Chua, Lay-Lay; Repaka, D V Maheswar; Shi-Chen; Gao, Xing-Yu; Ke, Lin; Chua, Soo-Jin; Wee, Andrew T S; Ho, Peter K H

    2010-10-05

    The dependence of morphology and polymer-chain orientation of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rrP3HT) thin films on processing conditions have been widely studied. However, their possible variation across the film thickness direction remains largely unknown. We report here a marked difference in the optical dielectric (n,k) spectra between the top and bottom interfaces of spin-cast (sc) rrP3HT films deposited from chlorobenzene solutions. These spectra were obtained from reflection variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry using a self-consistent graded optical model with self-imposed Kramers-Krönig consistency. The top interface shows a red-shifted absorption that is characteristic of better order than at the bottom, across a wide range of film thicknesses. This disparity diminishes in drop-cast (dc) and multipass inkjet-printed (ijp) films, and disappears in amorphous films such as those of polystyrene and of a green-emitting phenyl-substituted poly(p-phenylenevinylene). The (n,k) spectra also reveal that crystallinity increases across sc < dc < ijp films. This is supported by cross section scanning electron microscopy of the cleaved edges and measurement of the microroughness of both the film interfaces. Furthermore, optical anisotropy decreases across sc > dc > ijp films. Finally, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy also shows the frontier chains in ijp and dc films are more isotropically oriented than those in sc films. These results suggest that semicrystalline conjugated polymer films can be produced far from equilibrium. This explains the marked variation in their (opto)electronic properties between the top and bottom surfaces that has sometimes been found depending on the film deposition method. In particular, an unusually pronounced crystallization is induced by ijp. We label this marked ijp-induced crystallization the "ijp morphology", which appears to be general, as it is found also in single-inkjet-droplet films. It appears

  2. Centrifugal slip casting of components

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, G.A.; Roeder, R.K.; Trumble, K.P.; Bowman, K.J.

    1996-05-01

    Research in layered and functionally gradient materials has emerged because of the increasing demand for high-performance engineering materials. Many techniques have been used to produce layered and functionally gradient components. Common examples include thermal spray processing, powder processing, chemical and physical vapor deposition, high-temperature or combustion synthesis, diffusion treatments, microwave processing and infiltration. Of these techniques, powder processing routes offer excellent microstructural control and product quality, and they are capable of producing large components. Centrifugal slip casting is a powder-processing technique combining the effects of slip casting and centrifugation. In slip casting, consolidation takes place as fluid is removed by the porous mold. Particles within the slip move with the suspending fluid until reaching the mold wall, at which point they are consolidated. In centrifugation, particles within the slip move through the fluid at a rate dependent upon the gravitational force and particle drag.

  3. Investing in Youth: Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. This report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth…

  4. Investing in Youth: Latvia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. This report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth…

  5. Investing in Youth: Lithuania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The present report on Lithuania is the fourth of a new…

  6. Study on the microstructural evolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy in a vertical twin-roll casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Hu, Xiao-Dong; Han, Bing; Deng, Xiao-Hu; Ju, Dong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Finite element method was employed to calculate the macroflow velocity and temperature distribution of the pool domain's biting zone in twin-roll casting. Macroanalysis results were inducted as boundary conditions into microanalysis. Phase field method (PFM) was adopted to investigate the microstructure evolution. Based on the Kim-Kim-Suzuki model, the effect of metal flow velocity was coupled on the solute gradient item, and the real physical parameters of AZ31 were inducted into the numerical calculation. We used the marker and cell method in the discrete element solution of microstructural pattern prediction of AZ31 magnesium alloys. The different flow velocity values that predicted the columnar dendrite evolution were discussed in detail. Numerical simulation results were also compared with the experiment analysis. The microstructure obtained by PFM agrees with the actual pattern observed via optical microscopy.

  7. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  8. Some Metallurgical Issues Concerning Austenite Conditioning in Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels Processed by Near-Net-Shape Casting and Direct Rolling Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Ibabe, Jose M.

    2016-08-01

    As thin slab direct rolling technologies are moving to the production of higher quality steel grades, chemical compositions based on Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo become a good option. However, with the use of multiple microalloying additions, the as-cast austenite conditioning becomes more complex. This paper analyzes some of the microstructural features that should be taken into account during the as-cast austenite conditioning in Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo microalloyed steel grades. In the case of Nb-Ti grades, it has been observed that the process parameters during solidification and post-solidification steps affect the austenite evolution during hot rolling. This is due to the differences in the size and volume fraction of TiN particles that can be formed. Fine TiN precipitates have been shown to be able to delay recrystallization kinetics. Moreover, the solute drag effect of Ti cannot be ignored in the case of hyperstoichiometric Ti/N ratios. It is observed that Nb-Ti grades tend to have lower non-recrystallization temperatures compared to Nb grades, which means that pancaking of the austenite is more difficult for these steels. The opposite is observed for the Nb-Mo grades, although in both cases the behavior is affected by the nominal content of Nb.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of High-Temperature Constitutive Equations and Hot Processing Maps for As-Cast SA508-3 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Dashan; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Lingling; Gao, Liang; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-11-01

    The hot deformation behavior and hot workability characteristics of as-cast SA508-3 steel were studied by modeling the constitutive equations and developing hot processing maps. The isothermal compression experiments were carried out at temperatures of 950°C, 1050°C, 1150°C, and 1250°C and strain rates of 0.001 s-1, 0.01 s-1, 0.1 s-1, and 1 s-1 respectively. The two-stage flow stress models were established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening, and the solution of activation energy for hot deformation was 355.0 kJ mol-1 K-1. Based on the dynamic material model, the power dissipation and instability maps were developed separately at strains of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. The power dissipation rate increases with both the increase of temperature and the decrease of strain rate, and the instable region mainly appears on the conditions of low temperature and high strain rate. The optimal hot working parameters for as-cast SA508-3 steel are 1050-1200°C/0.001-0.1 s-1, with about 25-40% peak efficiency of power dissipation.

  10. Effects of Friction Stir Processing Parameters and In Situ Passes on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Al-Si-Mg Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, G. R.; Ni, D. R.; Ma, Z. Y.; Li, S. X.

    2014-11-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to modify the microstructure of an as-cast A356 alloy. The effects of rotation rate, travel speed, in situ FSP pass, FSP direction, and artificial aging on microstructures and tensile properties were investigated. FSP broke up the coarse eutectic Si phase into 2.5 to 3.5 μm particles and distributed them homogeneously, and resulted in the dissolution of the coarse Mg2Si particles and the elimination of porosity, thereby improving both the strength and the ductility of the casting. Increasing the rotation rate was beneficial to breaking up and dissolving the particles, but it contributed little to eliminating the porosity. The travel speed did not affect the size of the particles apparently, but lower speed was beneficial to eliminating the porosity. 2-pass FSP showed an obvious advantage in the microstructure modification and tensile properties compared with the single-pass. However, a further increase of FSP passes only resulted in slight improvement. The FSP direction of the following pass did not show distinct effect on the microstructure and tensile properties. After post-FSP artificial aging, the strengthening phase (β″-Mg2Si) precipitated, which increased the strength and decreased the ductility of the FSP samples.

  11. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  12. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  13. Effect of Some Parameters on the Cast Component Properties in Hot Chamber Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rupinder; Singh, Harvir

    2016-04-01

    Hot chamber die casting process is designed to achieve high dimensional accuracy for small products by forcing molten metal under high pressure into reusable moulds, called dies. The present research work is aimed at study of some parameters (as a case study of spring adjuster) on cast component properties in hot chamber die casting process. Three controllable factors of the hot chamber die casting process (namely: pressure at second phase, metal pouring temperature and die opening time) were studied at three levels each by Taguchi's parametric approach and single-response optimization was conducted to identify the main factors controlling surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the casting. Castings were produced using aluminium alloy, at recommended parameters through hot chamber die casting process. Analysis shows that in hot chamber die casting process the percentage contribution of second phase pressure, die opening time, metal pouring temperature for surface hardness is 82.48, 9.24 and 6.78 % respectively. While in the case of weight of cast component the contribution of second phase pressure is 94.03 %, followed by metal pouring temperature and die opening time (4.58 and 0.35 % respectively). Further for dimensional accuracy contribution of die opening time is 76.97 %, metal pouring temperature is 20.05 % and second phase pressure is 1.56 %. Confirmation experiments were conducted at an optimal condition showed that the surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the castings were improved significantly.

  14. Final report on Expendable Pattern Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Expendable Pattern Casting (EPC) process is a potential casting process breakthrough which could dramatically improve the competitiveness of the US foundry industry. Cooperatively supported by US Industry and the Department of Energy and managed by the American Foundrymen's Society, a project was started in May 1989 to develop and optimize expendable pattern casting technology. Four major tasks were conducted in the first phase of the project. Those tasks involved: (1) reviewing published literature to determine the major problems in the EPC process, (2) evaluating factors influencing sand flow and compaction, (3) evaluating and comparing factors influencing sand flow and compaction, (3) evaluating and comparing casting precision obtained in the EPC process with that obtained in other processes, and (4) identifying critical parameters that control dimensional precision and defect formation in EP castings. 26 refs., 27 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Improved ceramic slip casting technique. [application to aircraft model fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A primary concern in modern fluid dynamics research is the experimental verification of computational aerothermodynamic codes. This research requires high precision and detail in the test model employed. Ceramic materials are used for these models because of their low heat conductivity and their survivability at high temperatures. To fabricate such models, slip casting techniques were developed to provide net-form, precision casting capability for high-purity ceramic materials in aqueous solutions. In previous slip casting techniques, block, or flask molds made of plaster-of-paris were used to draw liquid from the slip material. Upon setting, parts were removed from the flask mold and cured in a kiln at high temperatures. Casting detail was usually limited with this technique -- detailed parts were frequently damaged upon separation from the flask mold, as the molded parts are extremely delicate in the uncured state, and the flask mold is inflexible. Ceramic surfaces were also marred by 'parting lines' caused by mold separation. This adversely affected the aerodynamic surface quality of the model as well. (Parting lines are invariably necessary on or near the leading edges of wings, nosetips, and fins for mold separation. These areas are also critical for flow boundary layer control.) Parting agents used in the casting process also affected surface quality. These agents eventually soaked into the mold, the model, or flaked off when releasing the case model. Different materials were tried, such as oils, paraffin, and even an algae. The algae released best, but some of it remained on the model and imparted an uneven texture and discoloration on the model surface when cured. According to the present invention, a wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell

  16. A Study on Hot Tearing Behavior of Al-1 Wt Pct Cu Alloy Under Various Strain Rates During Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Majid; Alizadeh, Mostafa; Ahmadi, Ali R.

    2017-04-01

    Objective of this work is to study the generation of hot tears during solidification of Al-1 wt pct Cu alloy, which contain both columnar and equiaxed structures at various strain rates. To reach this goal, an experimental test was designed for applying tensile load on the solidifying shell. The shells were loaded at various pull-rates of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mm/s. The produced samples were studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy probe and metallography techniques. SEM images revealed that both segregated hot tear ( i.e., filled or healed crack) and open hot tears were formed. Hot tears had created severely segregated zones with high concentration of Cu and Fe elements formed in between dendrite arms along the primary grain boundaries. In all cases, open hot tears were formed due to cracking of the segregated zones. With increasing strain rate, lengths of segregated hot tears were increased, moving closer toward the center of the cast. At the highest strain rate, segregated hot tears were formed in the equiaxed grain region along the primary grain boundary.

  17. Reline 33 year old kettle for more corrosive process at about 1/3 cost of new unit: lightweight foamed glass block protects corroded cast iron cover

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    This article presents a solution to a chemical plant's need for a lining material to reline a 33 year old kettle that would be resistant to attack by aqueous bromine and hydrochloric, nitrous, and bromic acid. The solution was to use an elastomeric polyisobutylene sheeting as a primary lining for the kettle. The problem was also solved by using a light weight foamed glass block which protected the corroded cast iron dome cover for the kettle. Installation of the two-step lining for the kettle and cover by Chemsteel Construction Company of New Kensington, PA was completed in 5 weeks. The cost was about 1/3 as much as fabricating, installing, and lining a new steel 5000 gal vessel. The kettle has been in service about 12 months and the acid brick/polyisobutylene membrance liner shows no signs of damage from the highly corrosive chemicals and elevated temperatures required for the process change.

  18. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION TO ENSURE MAXIMUM PRODUCTION AND QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Iron/Phosphorus Alloys for Continuous Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous casting becomes practicable because of reduced eutectic temperature. Experimental ferrous alloy has melting point about 350 degrees C lower than conventional steels, making possible to cast structural members and eliminating need for hot rolling. Product has normal metal structure and good physical properties. Process used to make rails, beams, slabs, channels, and pipes.

  20. An investigation of squeeze-cast alloy 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Alloy 718 billets produced by the squeeze-cast process have been evaluated for use as potential replacements for propulsion engine components which are normally produced from forgings. Alloy 718 billets were produced using various processing conditions. Structural characterizations were performed on 'as-cast' billets. As-cast billets were then homogenized and solution treated and aged according to conventional heat-treatment practices for this alloy. Mechanical property evaluations were performed on heat-treated billets. As-cast macrostructures and microstructures varied with squeeze-cast processing parameters. Mechanical properties varied with squeeze-cast processing parameters and heat treatments. One billet exhibited a defect free, refined microstructure, with mechanical properties approaching those of wrought alloy 718 bar, confirming the feasibility of squeeze-casting alloy 718. However, further process optimization is required, and further structural and mechanical property improvements are expected with process optimization.

  1. Evolution of aluminide coating microstructure on nickel-base cast superalloy CM-247 in a single-step high-activity aluminizing process

    SciTech Connect

    Das, D.K.; Joshi, S.V.; Singh, V.

    1998-08-01

    This study deals with the aluminizing of a directionally cast Ni-base superalloy, namely CM-247, by a single-step process using a high-activity pack. It is observed that significant incorporation of Al into the substrate surface during aluminizing continues over a period of about 1 hour and is not restricted merely to the first few minutes, as reported in the literature. Based on the microstructural details of the coatings formed at various stages of aluminizing, it is concluded that the coating growth in the above process takes place primarily by inward Al diffusion initially, followed by an intermediate stage when the growth involves both inward Al and outward Ni diffusion. In the final stages, the outward diffusion of Ni dominates the coating formation process. The above mechanism of coating formation is different from the one that prevails in the conventional two-step high-activity coating process in that the reaction front for the formation of NiAl remains spatially stationary despite the outward diffusion of nickel during the intermediate stage. It is also shown in the present study that the content of the Al source in the pack affects the coating structure significantly. It is further demonstrated that the microstructure of the aluminide coatings depends not only on the amount of Al incorporated in the sample during aluminizing but also on the time over which the uptake of this Al takes place.

  2. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  3. Rapid prototype fabrication processes for high-performance thrust cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, K.; Chwiedor, T.; Diab, J.; Williams, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Thrust Cell Technologies Program (Air Force Phillips Laboratory Contract No. F04611-92-C-0050) is currently being performed by Rocketdyne to demonstrate advanced materials and fabrication technologies which can be utilized to produce low-cost, high-performance thrust cells for launch and space transportation rocket engines. Under Phase 2 of the Thrust Cell Technologies Program (TCTP), rapid prototyping and investment casting techniques are being employed to fabricate a 12,000-lbf thrust class combustion chamber for delivery and hot-fire testing at Phillips Lab. The integrated process of investment casting directly from rapid prototype patterns dramatically reduces design-to-delivery cycle time, and greatly enhances design flexibility over conventionally processed cast or machined parts.

  4. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  5. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  6. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.

  7. Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

    2000-05-01

    There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

  8. Application of TRIZ Theory in Patternless Casting Manufacturing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Gan, Dequan; Jiang, Ping; Tian, Yumei

    The ultimate goal of Patternless Casting Manufacturing (referred to as PCM) is how to obtain the casts by casting the sand mold directly. In the previous PCM, the resin content of sand mold is much higher than that required by traditional resin sand, so the casts obtained are difficult to be sound and qualified products, which limits the application of this technique greatly. In this paper, the TRIZ algorithm is introduced to the innovation process in PCM systematically.

  9. The continuous production of stir cast material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamoen, A.

    1986-06-01

    The production of AlSi8 extrusion billets using a semicontinuous caster is described. The continuous casting process and the process parameters are outlined. The mathematical model, developed to calculate the temperature distribution within the billet during casting as a function of the process parameters, is explained. Quality control focussed on inversion segregation which causes the formation of a surface layer with a different structure and composition, imposing peeling of billets. Product development focussed on the production of stir-cast material of the same AlSi8 alloy. The use of AlSi8 as a wrought alloy by modification of the structure by stirring is discussed.

  10. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

  11. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    produce porosity-free parts and to evaluate the Rheocasting and Thixocasting processes from both a technical and economical point of view. Analytical...and computer models were developed for solutionizing of Rheocast and conventional cast (dendritic) alloys. The predictions were compared with

  12. Optimizing strength and fracture toughness of a cast titanium alloy through heat treatment and microstructure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Amy C.

    The relationship between the microstructure and tensile ductility and fracture toughness for cast Ti-5111 was determined and compared to that of hot-rolled and annealed Ti-5111. Graphite mold cast Ti-5111 plate material was examined in the as-received condition and after six different heat treatments involving elevated temperature anneals followed by an air or furnace cool. Three investment cast Ti-5111 plates were also examined after annealing followed by either a fan cool, air cool, or furnace cool. All castings developed a lamellar colony microstructure consisting of aligned lamellae of alpha and beta phases. Altering the cooling rate from the annealing temperature had the most influence on the microstructure such that plates with a slower cooling rate typically developed coarser grain boundary alpha, larger alpha colonies, thicker alpha laths, and greater volume fractions of alpha phase. The average prior beta grain size for the graphite mold cast specimens ranged from 920 mum to 1360 mum, while that for the investment cast specimens was approximately 1750 mum. The tensile behavior of the castings was characterized by a crack initiation and propagation process where the ductility was often limited by the strain required to initiate a large crack. The cracks formed along planar slip bands that crossed alpha colonies or in some cases, entire prior beta grains. Thus, reducing the alpha colony size and prior beta grain size should improve the casting ductility by limiting the length of slip-induced cracks. Due to the large grain and colony sizes present in the castings, the strength and ductility was observed to be sensitive to specimen size such that a smaller tensile diameter (i.e. 3.2 mm as compared to 12.5 mm) decreased the tensile and yield strengths due to the high fraction of large grains located on the specimen surface that can yield by predominantly single slip. The scatter in ductility values in the smaller specimens was significantly greater as a result

  13. Numerical study of porosity in titanium dental castings.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Sahm, P R; Augthun, M; Spiekermann, H; Schädlich-Stubenrauch, J

    1999-09-01

    A commercial software package, MAGMASOFT (MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Aachen, Germany), was used to study shrinkage and gas porosity in titanium dental castings. A geometrical model for two simplified tooth crowns connected by a connector bar was created. Both mold filling and solidification of this casting model were numerically simulated. Shrinkage porosity was quantitatively predicted by means of a built-in feeding criterion. The risk of gas pore formation was investigated using the numerical filling and solidification results. The results of the numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which were carried out on a centrifugal casting machine with an investment block mold. The block mold was made of SiO2 based slurry with a 1 mm thick Zr2 face coat to reduce metal-mold reactions. Both melting and casting were carried out under protective argon (40 kPa). The finished castings were sectioned and the shrinkage porosity determined. The experimentally determined shrinkage porosity coincided with the predicted numerical simulation results. No apparent gas porosity was found in these model castings. Several running and gating systems for the above model casting were numerically simulated. An optimized running and gating system design was then experimentally cast, which resulted in porosity-free castings.

  14. Synthesis of aluminum-rich coatings on new high-temperature cast austenitic steel CF8C-Plus by a pack cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex Keith

    2011-12-01

    In this research, a pack cementation process is developed for coating the newly developed cast austenitic steel CF8C-Plus. The developed coating process is capable of producing pack particle free coatings on large fatigue test specimens in a horizontal laboratory tube furnace as well as smaller oxidation and creep test samples. Several methods for the production of the pack powder free Al-rich coating are presented and evaluated for samples of both sizes. The developed coating is intended to compete with coatings of a similar quality produced with chemical vapor deposition and slurry coating methods. Additionally, because CF8C-Plus has only recently become available there is currently no available data on the effect of the fabrication of an Al-rich coating on the substrates properties. This research used advanced characterization methods to evaluate the coating surface and cross-sectional features. These methods include scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. This is the first time that this information has been made available to the scientific community. Also, the oxidation performance of the coating will be tested and compared to other coatings developed with CVD and slurry coating methods and the preliminary results of the effect of the coating on the alloys fatigue performance will be presented.

  15. Women's Political Empowerment and Investments in Primary Schooling in India.

    PubMed

    Halim, Nafisa; Yount, Kathryn M; Cunningham, Solveig A; Pande, Rohini P

    2016-02-01

    Using a national district-level dataset of India composed of information on investments in primary schooling (data from the District Information Survey for Education [DISE, 2007/8]) and information on demographic characteristics of elected officials (data from the Election Commission of India [ECI, 2000/04]), we examined the relationship between women's representation in State Legislative Assembly (SLA) seats and district-level investments in primary schooling. We used OLS regressions adjusting for confounders and spatial autocorrelation, and estimated separate models for North and South India. Women's representation in general SLA seats typically was negatively associated with investments in primary-school amenities and teachers; women's representation in SLA seats reserved for under-represented minorities, i.e., scheduled castes and scheduled tribes, typically was positively associated with investments in primary schooling, especially in areas addressing the basic needs of poor children. Women legislators' gender and caste identities may shape their decisions about redistributive educational policies.

  16. Riser Feeding Evaluation Method for Metal Castings Using Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nadiah

    One of the design aspects that continues to create a challenge for casting designers is the optimum design of casting feeders (risers). As liquid metal solidifies, the metal shrinks and forms cavities inside the casting. In order to avoid shrinkage cavities, risers are added to the casting shape to supply additional molten metal when shrinkage occurs during solidification. The shrinkage cavities in the casting are compensated by controlling the cooling rate to promote directional solidification. This control can be achieved by designing the casting such that the cooling begins at the sections that are farthest away from the risers and ends at the risers. Therefore, the risers will solidify last and feed the casting with the molten metal. As a result, the shrinkage cavities formed during solidification are in the risers which are later removed from the casting. Since casting designers have to usually go through iterative processes of validating the casting designs which are very costly due to expensive simulation processes or manual trials and errors on actual casting processes, this study investigates more efficient methods that will help casting designers utilize their casting experiences systematically to develop good initial casting designs. The objective is to reduce the casting design method iterations; therefore, reducing the cost involved in that design processes. The aim of this research aims at finding a method that can help casting designers design effective risers used in sand casting process of aluminum-silicon alloys by utilizing the analysis of solidification simulation. The analysis focuses on studying the significance of pressure distribution of the liquid metal at the early stage of casting solidification, when heat transfer and convective fluid flow are taken into account in the solidification simulation. The mathematical model of casting solidification was solved using the finite volume method (FVM). This study focuses to improve our

  17. Biomaterials by freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schecter, Matthew; Donius, Amalie E; Hunger, Philipp M

    2010-04-28

    The functional requirements for synthetic tissue substitutes appear deceptively simple: they should provide a porous matrix with interconnecting porosity and surface properties that promote rapid tissue ingrowth; at the same time, they should possess sufficient stiffness, strength and toughness to prevent crushing under physiological loads until full integration and healing are reached. Despite extensive efforts and first encouraging results, current biomaterials for tissue regeneration tend to suffer common limitations: insufficient tissue-material interaction and an inherent lack of strength and toughness associated with porosity. The challenge persists to synthesize materials that mimic both structure and mechanical performance of the natural tissue and permit strong tissue-implant interfaces to be formed. In the case of bone substitute materials, for example, the goal is to engineer high-performance composites with effective properties that, similar to natural mineralized tissue, exceed by orders of magnitude the properties of its constituents. It is still difficult with current technology to emulate in synthetic biomaterials multi-level hierarchical composite structures that are thought to be the origin of the observed mechanical property amplification in biological materials. Freeze casting permits to manufacture such complex, hybrid materials through excellent control of structural and mechanical properties. As a processing technique for the manufacture of biomaterials, freeze casting therefore has great promise.

  18. The role of water in slip casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  19. Effect of process parameters on properties of Al-Si alloys cast by Rapid Slurry Formation (RSF) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratke, L.; Sharma, A.; Kohli, D.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid slurry formation is a semi-solid metal forming technique, which is based on a so-called solid enthalpy exchange material (EEM). It is a fascinating technology offering the opportunity to manufacture net-shaped metal components of complex geometry in a single forming operation. At the same time, high mechanical properties can be achieved due to the unique microstructure and flow behaviour. The major process parameters used in the RSF process are rotation speed of the EEM, melt superheat, amount of EEM added (determining fs), and holding time. The process parameters can be well controlled with clear effects on the microstructure. There is a lack of theoretical modelling of the morphological evolution in these two-phase slurries.

  20. Fractal analysis of complex microstructure in castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.Z.; Lipp, D.C.; Hellawell, A.

    1995-12-31

    Complex microstructures in castings are usually characterized descriptively which often raises ambiguity and makes it difficult to relate the microstructure to the growth kinetics or mechanical properties in processing modeling. Combining the principle of fractal geometry and computer image processing techniques, it is feasible to characterize the complex microstructures numerically by the parameters of fractal dimension, D, and shape factor, a, without ambiguity. Procedures of fractal measurement and analysis are described, and a test case of its application to cast irons is provided. The results show that the irregular cast structures may all be characterized numerically by fractal analysis.

  1. Vacuum casting of thick polymeric films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1979-01-01

    Bubble formation and layering, which often plague vacuum-evaporated films, are prevented by properly regulating process parameters. Vacuum casting may be applicable to forming thick films of other polymer/solvent solutions.

  2. The Investment Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Is marketing an expense or an investment? Most accountants will claim that marketing is an expense, and clearly that seems true when cutting the checks to fund these efforts. When it is done properly, marketing is the best investment. A key principle to Smart Marketing is the Investment Paradigm. The Investment Paradigm is understanding that every…

  3. Effect of processing parameters on surface finish for fused deposition machinable wax patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a study on the effect of material processing parameters used in layer-by-layer material construction on the surface finish of a model to be used as an investment casting pattern. The data presented relate specifically to fused deposition modeling using a machinable wax.

  4. Effects of the pouring temperature on the formation of the bonding zone between AZ91 and AlSi17 in the compound casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mola, R.; Bucki, T.; Dziadoń, A.

    2017-02-01

    The compound casting process was used to join AZ91 magnesium alloy to AlSi17 aluminium alloy. Liquid AZ91 was poured onto a solid AlSi17 insert placed in a steel mould heated to 370 °C. The experimental results showed that the temperature of the AZ91 melt affected the formation of the bonding zone between the two alloys. A continuous bonding zone was formed by applying a pouring temperature of 650 °C. The use of higher temperatures, i.e. 680 °C and 700 °C, did not lead to the formation of a continuous metallurgical transition zone at the AZ91/AlSi17 interface. The bonding zone was analysed using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) detector. The structural constituents of the bonding zone near the AlSi17 alloy were: an Al3Mg2 intermetallic phase, primary Si particles surrounded by a rim of an Mg2Si intermetallic phase and fine Mg2Si particles. The area of the bonding zone that was adjacent to the AZ91 alloy had a eutectic structure composed of an Mg17Al12 intermetallic phase and a solid solution of Al and Si in Mg.

  5. Glovebox Advanced Casting System Casting Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, Randall Sidney

    2016-03-01

    Casting optimization in the GACS included three broad areas; casting of U-10Zr pins, incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier, and development of a permanent crucible coating. U-10Zr casting was improved over last year’s results by modifying the crucible design to minimize contact with the colder mold. Through these modifications casting of a three pin batch was successful. Incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier also was optimized through furnace chamber pressure changes during the casting cycle to reduce gas pressures in the mold cavities which led to three full length pins being cast which incorporated FCCI barriers of three different thicknesses. Permanent crucible coatings were tested against a base case; 1500°C for 10 minutes in a U-20Pu-10Zr molten alloy. None of the candidate coating materials showed evidence of failure upon initial visual examination. In all areas of work a large amount of characterization will be needed to fully determine the effects of the optimization activities. The characterization activities and future work will occur next year.

  6. Ladle and Continuous Casting Process Models for Reduction of SiO2 in SiO2-Al2O3-CaO Slags by Al in Fe-Al(-Si) Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jiwon; Sridhar, S.; Fruehan, Richard J.

    2015-02-01

    Based on a mixed control or two-phase mass transfer model considering mass transport in the metal and the slag phases, process models for ladle and continuous castor mold were developed to predict the changes in the metal and the slag chemistry and viscosity. In the ladle process model, the rate of reaction is primarily determined by stirring gas flow rate, which greatly alters the mass transports of the metal and the slag phases. In the continuous casting process model, the effects of the Al, Si, and SiO2 contents in the incoming flow of the fluid phases, casting speed, mold flux consumption rate, and depth of the liquid mold flux pool on the steady-state compositions of the metal and the mold flux were assessed.

  7. Heat Transfer Model of Directional Solidification by LMC Process for Superalloy Casting Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liu; Liao, Dunming; Lu, Yuzhang; Chen, Tao

    2016-09-01

    With the rapid development of the aviation industry, the turbine blade, a critical component of the aeronautical engine, has come to be widely produced by liquid-metal cooling (LMC) process. A temperature- and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was used to represent the heat convection between the shell and the cooling liquid, and an improved Monte Carlo ray-tracing approach was adopted to handle the boundary of radiation heat transfer. Unstructured mesh was used to fit the irregular shell boundary, and the heat transfer model of directional solidification by LMC process based on finite element method (FEM) was established. The concept of local matrix was here proposed to guarantee computational efficiency. The pouring experiments of directional solidification by LMC process were carried out, then simulation and experimental results were compared here. The accuracy of the heat transfer model was validated by the cooling curves and grain morphology, and the maximum relative error between simulation and experimental cooling curve was 2 pct. The withdrawal rate showed an important influence on the shape of solidification interface, and stray grain is liable to be generated on the bottom of platform at an excessive withdrawal rate.

  8. Durability and Damage Tolerance of Aluminum Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    casting alloys A357 and A201. On completion of the program, revisions to material, process, and DADT specifications will be recommended, if necessary...and the effects of process variables on the properties of A357 -T6 and A201-T7 castings were described. This second interim report covers additional...damage tolerance properties of A357 -T6 and A201-T7 produced using the specifications selected earlier [1] in Task 2 were determined. These alloys were

  9. From SRI to ESG: The Changing World of Responsible Investing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Lauren; Griswold, John S.; Jarvis, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Thoughtful investment professionals continue to debate whether a portfolio's long-term performance can be enhanced by including environmental, social, and governance (ESG) considerations in the security selection process, but responsible investing is more than a passing trend. The terms socially-responsible investing, mission-related investing,…

  10. 13 CFR 301.7 - Investment Assistance application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Investment Assistance application... COMMERCE ELIGIBILITY, INVESTMENT RATE AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS Application Requirements; Evaluation Criteria § 301.7 Investment Assistance application. (a) The EDA Investment Assistance process begins...

  11. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-03-01

    One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

  12. Cast Aluminum Bonding Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    fabricated using P?-’r;est11 bur)ld II19 te(hnll I Oly with 6 cIsL nqs. The cast a lumi num alloy used was A357 . The sur- face preparation was phosphoric acid...from a cast aluminum alloy designated A357 . The bonding surfaces of the adherends were prepared using PAA. One primer and two adhesives considered...System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 18 11 Bond Area of 350°F Adhesive System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 19 vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 A357 Chemical

  13. The Development of CaO-SiO2-B2O3-based Fluorine-Free Mold Flux for a Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-09-01

    Designing and developing high-performance fluorine-free (F-free) mold flux has become a hot topic in steel continuous casting processes, with concerns of environment protection and energy saving. In conventional commercial mold flux, fluorine plays important roles on the properties as it works as a fluxing agent; however, it tends to cause serious environmental and health problems. In this paper, a new F-free mold flux based on the CaO-SiO2-B2O3 slag system has been introduced through summarizing previous works. The melting temperature range of F-free mold flux decreases with the addition of Na2O/Li2O and B2O3; the viscosity and heat flux decrease with the increase of basicity and Na2O/Li2O, as well as the decrease of B2O3 contents. Also, the crystallization temperatures of F-free mold fluxes increase with the increase of basicity and Na2O/Li2O content. The analyses of EDS and XRD show that Ca11Si4B2O22 and Ca14Mg2(SiO4)8 are the two main precipitated crystalline phases in F-free mold fluxes, and that the Ca11Si4B2O22 is a common and stable crystalline phase in the designed F-free mold fluxes system that shows the potential to replace Ca4Si2O7F2 in conventional flourine-containing mold fluxes.

  14. Characterization of Ni-Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Teng, Fu-Yuan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni-Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, "casting mold," significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni-Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni-Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties.

  15. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  16. Cast segment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diem, H. G.; Studhalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation program to determine feasibility of fabricating segmented rocket engine thrust chambers using low cost, lightweight castings extends state of the art in areas of casting size and complexity, and in ability to provide thin sections and narrow, deep, cooling channels. Related developments are discussed.

  17. Higher Education's Caste System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the history of the present caste system in higher education. He shows how the public's perception of this caste system is based on image and not usually on the quality of teaching and curriculum in colleges and universities. Finally, he discusses a model for accessibility to higher education and how higher…

  18. A cast orientation index.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, J R; Mahanna, G K

    1994-12-01

    This article describes a technique that allows multiple master casts to be precisely oriented to the same path of insertion and withdrawal. This technique is useful in situations where multiple fixed prosthodontic preparations require surveyed restorations and a single master cast is not available.

  19. Embedding Optical Fibers In Cast Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibler, William N.; Atkins, Robert A.; Lee, Chung E.; Taylor, Henry F.

    1995-01-01

    Use of metal strain reliefs eliminates breakage of fibers during casting process. Technique for embedding fused silica optical fibers in cast metal parts devised. Optical fiber embedded in flange, fitting, or wall of vacuum or pressure chamber, to provide hermetically sealed feedthrough for optical transmission of measurement or control signals. Another example, optical-fiber temperature sensor embedded in metal structural component to measure strain or temperature inside component.

  20. Specialized Investment Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Robert S.

    1970-01-01

    The informational needs of the investing public should be met by the public library. Suggestions for specialized investment information services with broad appeal, technical charts, and advisory services which public libraries might consider purchasing. (JS)

  1. Partnering for Quality under the Workforce Investment Act: A Tool Kit for One-Stop System Building. Module 5: Building a Process for Continuous Improvement. Training Manual with Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Deborah; Koller, Vinz; Kozumplik, Richalene; Lawrence, Mary Ann

    This document is part of a five-module training package to help employment and training service providers comply with the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and develop a one-stop training and employment services system. It consists of the participant workbook, trainer manual, and activity worksheets for a module on building a process for…

  2. Causal Inferences from Mining ToxCast Data and the Biomedical Literature for Molecular Pathways and Cellular Processes in Cleft Palate (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sixty-five chemicals in the ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) dataset have been linked to cleft palate based on data from ToxRefDB (rat or rabbit prenatal developmental toxicity studies) or from literature reports. These compounds are structurally diverse and thus likely to...

  3. Investments in random environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Barrientos, Jesús Emeterio; Cantero-Álvarez, Rubén; Matias Rodrigues, João F.; Schweitzer, Frank

    2008-03-01

    We present analytical investigations of a multiplicative stochastic process that models a simple investor dynamics in a random environment. The dynamics of the investor's budget, x(t) , depends on the stochasticity of the return on investment, r(t) , for which different model assumptions are discussed. The fat-tail distribution of the budget is investigated and compared with theoretical predictions. We are mainly interested in the most probable value xmp of the budget that reaches a constant value over time. Based on an analytical investigation of the dynamics, we are able to predict xmpstat . We find a scaling law that relates the most probable value to the characteristic parameters describing the stochastic process. Our analytical results are confirmed by stochastic computer simulations that show a very good agreement with the predictions.

  4. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' PIPE OPERATOR SPRAYING A POWDER TO HELP SOLIDIFY THE PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Microstructure/property studies supporting development of low cost processes for TiAl automotive valves

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.E.; Porter, W.J. III; Keller, M.M.; Eylon, D.

    1995-07-01

    Lightweight gamma titanium aluminide automotive valves may significantly improve engine performance and fuel economy. However, low cost mass production processes must be developed to realize these gains. Permanent mold casting processes and low cost heat treatments are being developed to enable commercial introduction of TiAl automotive valves. Microstructural development, tensile, creep, and high cycle fatigue properties of permanent mold Ti-47Al-2Nb-1.75Cr (at%) castings are compared with investment castings of similar size. A recommendation is made to use as-HIP castings for components not designed to damage tolerant criteria. This work was performed as pan of a vertically integrated team effort to transfer aerospace TiAl technology to the automotive market.

  6. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration

  7. Afresh look at capital investments.

    PubMed

    Levy, Alexis; Lawrence, Jennifer; Shiple, David

    2009-03-01

    Hospitals should focus on optimizing performance in five primary areas of capital investment: facilities, IT, physician networks, service lines, and clinical equipment/technology. Hospitals require a broad evaluation framework to help identify the key issues and concerns associated with each area. Discipline is critical to this process, so that every area receives its due consideration.

  8. Symptomatic stent cast.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  9. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  10. Moldless casting by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-09-01

    The principle of laser cladding involves the use of high power carbon-dioxide lasers and powder deposition technology to provide wear and corrosion resistant surface coatings to engineering components. By injecting metal powder into a laser generated melt pool on a moving substrate a solidified metal track can be produced. Deposition of successive tracks produces a multi-layer build. Laser direct casting (LDC) utilizes a coaxial nozzle enabling consistent omnidirectional deposition to produce 3D components from a selection of metal powders. The influence of the principal process parameters over the process features namely, powder catchment efficiency, beam shape and build rates are presented with several successfully generated 3D components. Nickel, stainless steel and satellite powders were deposited at laser powders of 0.4 to 1.4 kW and speeds of 500 to 1000 mm/min achieving build rates of 3 to 9 mm3/s. Fully dense metallurgical structures have been produced with no cracking or porosity and powder catchment efficiencies up to 85% have been achieved.

  11. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  12. Applying MHD technology to the continuous casting of steel slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eiichi

    1995-05-01

    The application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the continuous casting process started with the electromagnetic stirring of the stand pool with a traveling magnetic field. It has now advanced to the electromagnetic stirring of molten steel in the mold and the control of molten steel flow by an in-mold direct current magnetic field brake. These applied MHD techniques are designed to further improve the continuous casting process capability. They improve the surface quality of cast steel by homogenizing the meniscus temperature, stabilizing initial solidification, and cleaning the surface layer. They also improve the internal quality of cast steel by preventing inclusions from penetrating deep into the pool and promoting the flotation of argon bubbles. Applied MHD technology is still advancing in scope and methods in addition to the improvement of conventional continuously cast slab qualities. The continuous casting of bimetallic slab by suppressing mixing in the pool is one example of this progress.

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Surface Roughness of Castings Produced Using ZCast Direct Metal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, M.; Singh, R.

    2015-04-01

    Aim of this investigation is to develop a mathematical model for predicting surface roughness of castings produced using ZCast process by employing Buckingham's π-theorem. A relationship has been proposed between surface roughness of castings and shell wall thickness of the shell moulds fabricated using 3D printer. Based on model, experiments were performed to obtain the surface roughness of aluminium, brass and copper castings produced using ZCast process based on 3D printing technique. Based on experimental data, three best fitted third-degree polynomial equations have been established for predicting the surface roughness of castings. The predicted surface roughness values were then calculated using established best fitted equations. An error analysis was performed to compare the experimental and predicted data. The average prediction errors obtained for aluminium, brass and copper castings are 10.6, 2.43 and 3.12 % respectively. The obtained average surface roughness (experimental and predicted) values of castings produced are acceptable with the sand cast surface roughness values range (6.25-25 µm).

  14. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  15. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  16. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  17. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  18. Microbiological Study of Cast Posts before Cementation

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Garces, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    This study identifies the most common microorganisms present in type III gold cast posts related to pulpal disease and evaluates the sterilization/disinfection method before cementation in the root canal. Forty-five type III gold cast posts were aseptically collected in sterile sealed plastic bags and taken to the microbiology laboratory to carry out the study: fifteen cast posts had no treatment, fifteen were disinfected (immersion in 70% alcohol during 15 minutes), and fifteen were autoclaved at 121°C for 15 minutes by using saturated steam under 15 psi pressure. By using a two-proportion z-test, the difference was statistically significant (p > 0.05) and demonstrates that, in spite of the aseptic pattern used in the cast post collection and laboratory procedures, some cast posts arrive contaminated at the consulting office. The disinfection process worked out in a high percentage and demonstrated that the sterilization by autoclaving eliminated completely the pathogenic microbiota without affecting the cast post shape and integrity that could compromise their final fitting. PMID:28316625

  19. Precision Casting via Advanced Simulation and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program was conducted to develop and commercially implement selected casting manufacturing technologies to enable significant reductions in the costs of castings, increase the complexity and dimensional accuracy of castings, and reduce the development times for delivery of high quality castings. The industry-led R&D project was cost shared with NASA's Aerospace Industry Technology Program (AITP). The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American, Inc. served as the team lead with participation from Lockheed Martin, Ford Motor Company, Howmet Corporation, PCC Airfoils, General Electric, UES, Inc., University of Alabama, Auburn University, Robinson, Inc., Aracor, and NASA-LeRC. The technical effort was organized into four distinct tasks. The accomplishments reported herein. Task 1.0 developed advanced simulation technology for core molding. Ford headed up this task. On this program, a specialized core machine was designed and built. Task 2.0 focused on intelligent process control for precision core molding. Howmet led this effort. The primary focus of these experimental efforts was to characterize the process parameters that have a strong impact on dimensional control issues of injection molded cores during their fabrication. Task 3.0 developed and applied rapid prototyping to produce near net shape castings. Rocketdyne was responsible for this task. CAD files were generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototype patterns were fabricated using SLS and SLA, and castings produced and evaluated. Task 4.0 was aimed at developing technology transfer. Rocketdyne coordinated this task. Casting related technology, explored and evaluated in the first three tasks of this program, was implemented into manufacturing processes.

  20. Centrifugal Casting Features/Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chirita, G.; Soares, D.; Cruz, D.; Silva, F. S.; Stefanescu, I.

    2008-02-15

    This paper deals with the study of centrifugal effects on aluminium castings under high G values. Most of the studies in this domain (FGMs obtained by centrifugal casting) deal with functionally graded composites reinforced with a solid phase such as silicon particles or others. However, in this study it will be shown that unreinforced aluminium alloys may be significantly influenced by the centrifugal effect and that functionally graded castings are also obtained. It has been observed that the centrifugal effect may increase in some alloys, depending on the relative position in the castings, the rupture strength by approx. 50%, and rupture strain by about 300%, as compared to the gravity casting technique. The Young's modulus may also increase by about 20%. It has also been reported that in vertical centrifugal castings there are mainly three aspects that affect the components thus obtained, namely: fluid dynamics; vibration (inherent to the system); and centrifugal force. These features have a different effect on the castings depending on the aluminium alloy. In this paper, an analysis of the most important effects of the centrifugal casting process on metallurgical features is conducted. A solidification characterization at several points along the mould will be made in order to have an accurate idea of both the fluid dynamics inside the mould during the casting and the solidification behavior in different parts of the component. These two analyses will be related to the metallurgical properties (phase distribution; SDAS; eutectic silicon content and shape, pores density and shape) along the component and mainly along the direction of the centrifugal pressure. A comparison between castings obtained by both centrifugal casting technique and gravity casting technique is made for reference (gravity casting)

  1. Transmission Investment: A Primer

    SciTech Connect

    McGarvey, Joe

    2006-10-15

    This primer highlights recent trends in transmission investment, summarizes the division of jurisdictional authority over transmission, and presents four alternative models for transmission ownership. (author)

  2. Heat exchanger-ingot casting/slicing process, phase 1: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1977-01-01

    A controlled growth, heat-flow and cool-down process is described that yielded silicon with a high degree of single crystallinity. Even when the seed melted out, very large grains formed. Solar cell samples made from cast material yielded conversion efficiency of over 9%. Representative characterizations of grown silicon demonstrated a dislocation density of less than 100/sq cm and a minority carrier diffusion length of 31 micron. The source of silicon carbide in silicon ingots was identified to be from graphite retainers in contact with silica crucibles. Higher growth rates were achieved with the use of a graphite plug at the bottom of the silica crucible.

  3. Computer simulation using CaPS of an aluminum plate casting

    SciTech Connect

    Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Chuzhoy, L.; Nastac, L.

    1995-12-31

    A simulation of a benchmark test casting has been performed with the CaPS-3D casting process simulator software. The test casting was made at the University of Birmingham in the UK and for the 7th International Conference on the Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes. The measured results were not available prior to the simulation, hence the simulation is a blind prediction.

  4. Computer simulation with CaPS of an aluminum plate casting

    SciTech Connect

    Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Chuzhoy, L.; Nastac, L.

    1995-12-31

    A simulation of a benchmark test casting has been performed with the CaPS-3D casting process simulator software. The test casting was made at the University of Birmingham in the UK for the 7th International Conference on the Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes. The measured results were not available prior to the simulation, hence the simulation is a blind prediction.

  5. INTERNAL ADAPTATION OF CAST TITANIUM CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Sicknan Soares; Adabo, Gelson Luis; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Fonseca, Renata Garcia

    2007-01-01

    As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm). For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height) was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430°C, 515°C and 600°C. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3) for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X) and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm2). The data for each experimental condition (n=8) were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05). The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD) of internal misfit were obtained for the 430°C/100%: (7.25 mm2 ±1.59) and 600°C/100% (8.8 mm2 ±2.25) groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit. PMID:19089139

  6. The Impact of a Holistic Conditional Cash Transfer Program in New York City on Parental Financial Investment, Student Time Use, and Educational Processes and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aber, J. Lawrence; Morris, Pamela; Wolf, Sharon; Berg, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impacts of Opportunity New York City-Family Rewards, the first holistic conditional cash transfer (CCT) program evaluated in the United States, on parental financial investments in children, and high school students' academic time use, motivations and self-beliefs, and achievement outcomes. Family Rewards, launched by the…

  7. Structure-processing correlations and mechanical properties in freeze-cast Ti-6Al-4V with highly aligned porosity and a lightweight Ti-6Al-4V-PMMA composite with excellent energy absorption capability

    DOE PAGES

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.

    2017-02-12

    In contrast to freeze-cast ceramics and polymers, few freeze-cast metals have been described, to date. This systematic study on structure-processing correlations in freeze-cast Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds reports how processing parameters determine the architecture formed during the directional solidification of water-based metal slurries and after sintering. Additionally, sedimentation in the slurry during freezing and volume shrinkage during burnout and sintering were found to significantly affect both structure and properties of the scaffolds. In using two freezing rates, 1 and 10 °C min-1, two water-based polymer solutions as binders (chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose) and two different metal volume fractions in the slurry, 20more » and 30 vol%, Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds could be prepared with pore length, width, and porosity ranging from 41 to 523 μm, 14.5–76.5 μm, and 65 to 34%, respectively. Their compressive strength, stiffness, and toughness (work to 20% strain) fall in the range of 83–412 MPa, 7–29 GPa, and 14–122 MJ m-3, respectively. In order to improve the properties a select composition was infiltrated with poly(methyl methacrylate). This increased the average yield strength by a factor of 2.3 from 83 to 193 MPa and the average toughness (work to 50% strain) by a factor of 2.7 from 28.1 to 76.8 MJ m-3.« less

  8. Dimensional accuracy of small gold alloy castings. Part 1. A brief history and the behaviour of inlay waxes.

    PubMed

    Morey, E F

    1991-08-01

    Part 1 reviews published studies which relate to materials and techniques contributing to the dimensional accuracy of small dental castings. A brief history of the cire perdue or lost-wax method of casting alloys and the development of modern dental casting materials and techniques are presented. Data on the behaviour of inlay wax, in particular its contraction and distortion, are reviewed as is the extensive literature about the casting shrinkage of gold alloys (Part 2) and the setting and thermal expansion of investments under both laboratory and practical conditions (Part 3). Part 4 discusses the role of the casting ring and its asbestos liner. Asbestos as a liner has now largely been replaced by two alternative materials, one based on cellulose and the other on ceramic fibres. The limited literature on the effect of these newer materials on casting accuracy is also reviewed, as their introduction may require significant changes in the traditional technology of dental casting.

  9. Investment in Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    Operating a financial investment company in an unstable economy is not easy. But the right training at Vanguard ensures satisfied customers. The company made an investment of its own in learning and development that paid off big in 2009. The learning offerings, both innovative and efficient, keep its workers updated on strategies that bring…

  10. Investing in Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors Association, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Investing in Innovation" provides a snapshot of trends in the states and identifies a wide range of strategies now employed. California's big investments, such as $3 billion for stem cell research, have already grabbed national headlines. But states like Arizona, Indiana and North Dakota, which haven't historically been big research and…

  11. "Split Cast Mounting: Review and New Technique".

    PubMed

    Gundawar, S M; Pande, Neelam A; Jaiswal, Priti; Radke, U M

    2014-12-01

    For the fabrication of a prosthesis, the Prosthodontist meticulously performs all the steps. The laboratory technician then make every effort/strives to perform the remaining lab procedures. However when the processed dentures are remounted on the articulator, some changes are seen. These changes may be divided into two categories: Pre-insertion and post-insertion changes, which deal with the physical properties of the materials involved (Parker, J Prosthet Dent 31:335-342, 1974). Split cast mounting is the method of mounting casts on the articulator. It is essentially a maxillary cast constructed in two parts with a horizontal division. The procedure allows for the verification of the accuracy of the initial mounting and the ease of removal and replacement of the cast. This provides a precise means of correcting the changes in occlusion occurring as a result of the processing technique (Nogueira et al., J Prosthet Dent 91:386-388, 2004). Instability of the split mounting has always been a problem to the Prosthodontist thereby limiting its use. There are various materials mentioned in the literature. The new technique by using Dowel pins and twill thread is very easy, cheaper and simple way to stabilize the split mounting. It is useful and easy in day to day laboratory procedures. The article presents different methods of split cast mounting and the new procedure using easily available materials in prosthetic laboratory.

  12. The effect of asbestos-alternatives on the accuracy of cast veneer crowns.

    PubMed

    Yli-Urpo, A; Oilo, G; Syverud, M

    1982-01-01

    The effect of three different lining materials on the investment expansion during the casting procedure, was compared. The accuracy of the castings was assessed by measuring slits at the gingival shoulder of a cast veneer crown. The liners were made of asbestosos, paper and a glassfiber material. They were used with a gypsum bonded and a phosphate bonded investment material using a regular type III and a high-fusing alloy. The glass-fiber material seemed to give a good and reproducible accuracy with both investments. The effect of this liner seemed to be comparable or better than that of the conventional asbest material. The paper liner sometimes allowed a sufficient expansion, but with varying results. Additional problems were connected to this material as it was burnt to ash during the mould heating procedure.

  13. 8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD WAS USED IN FOUNDRY OPERATIONS THAT CAST PLUTONIUM EITHER AS INGOTS SUITABLE FOR ROLLING AND FURTHER WROUGHT PROCESSING OR INTO SHAPES AMENABLE TO DIRECT MACHINING OPERATIONS. (5/6/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. High-resolution airway morphometry from polyurethane casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Gordon R.; Vargas, John; Hoford, John D.; Craft, Jeanne; Shroff, Sunil; McRae, Karen M.

    1995-05-01

    An airway cast was made and imbedded in a solid polyurethane block of a contrasting color. The block was sequentially milled and photographed. The sequential photographs were scanned to create an image database which was analyzed on VIDA; a multidimensional image analysis software package. The technique shows promise as a semi-automated process for generating a high resolution morphometric database from airway casts.

  15. 126. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING CAST SHED NO. 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING CAST SHED NO. 2, FURNACE NO. 2, STOVES, POWER HOUSE, STACKS, FURNACE NO. 1 CAST SHED. FURNACE NO. 2 IS IN PROCESS OF RESTORATION. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. 91. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SCRAP HOUSE AND CAST HOUSE, BUILDINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SCRAP HOUSE AND CAST HOUSE, BUILDINGS 101 AND 72; BUILDING 101 IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH HOUSED SCRAP METAL CLEANING AND PROCESSING FACILITIES; BUILDING 72 AT RIGHT CENTER HOUSED MELTING FURNACES AND CONTINUOUS CASTING MACHINERY - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  17. AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS THEY MOVE IN BINS ALONG TRACKS IN THE OVEN BOTTOM IN THE MALLEABLE ANNEALING BUILDING. THIS PROCESS TRANSFORMS BRITTLE WHITE IRON CASTINGS INTO SOFTER, STRONGER MALLEABLE IRON. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. X-Ray Computed Tomography of Full-Scale Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-31

    Description Defect Type A. Sandcasting , Aluminum Alloy 030106 Reservoir Manifold Porosity 030117 Coupon Porosity 030125 Coupon Voids, Porosity...the radiograph to features. The IQI most commonly used is the plaque penetrameter [9,101. The penetrameter is a thin sheet of material (the same or...products. These numbers scale very well for all sizes of foundries and even for different types of foundries such as sandcasting and investment casting

  19. Method for casting polyethylene pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Short lengths of 7-cm ID polyethylene pipe are cast in a mold which has a core made of room-temperature-vulcanizable (RTV) silicone. Core expands during casting and shrinks on cooling to allow for contraction of the polyethylene.

  20. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    castings. Liquid-solid slurries were cast Rheocasting ) to evaluate cast- ing properties and opportunities for enhanced mold life with a reduced temperature...pouring temperature, 600 0C mold temperature, all-metal mold. Figure 29 Schem.atic of rheocasting attachment for vacuum melting furnace. Motor and gear...33 Alumina paddle and rheocasting . Paddle cracked during itirring. Casting did not fill, probably due to poor stirring of melt. Figure 34 ZrO 2

  1. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  2. Agile Manufacturing Development of Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Consortium was tasked by GE Transportation Systems (GETS) with development of the IFE, a complex ductile iron casting for a commercial loco- motive that... ductile iron foundry with this tooling, it was clear that castings with acceptable quality could not be made. These castings were on the GE...requirements. Therefore, the design specifies a thin - walled casting with complex structures and the requirements demand tight dimensional tolerances and

  3. Modeling of casting microstructures and defects

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Summers, L.T.; Eckels, D.J.; Sahai, V.

    1997-09-26

    Casting is an ancient art that has been a trial-and-error process for more than 4000 years. To predict the size, shape, and quality of a cast product, casting manufacturers typically cast full-size prototypes. If one part of the process is done incorrectly, the entire process is repeated until an acceptable product is achieved. One way to reduce the time, cost, and waste associated with casting is to use computer modeling to predict not only the quality of a product on the macro- scale, such as distortion and part shape, but also on the micro-scale such as grain defects. Modeling of solidification is becoming increasingly feasible with the advent of parallel computers. There are essentially two approaches to solidification modeling.The first is that of macro-modeling where heat transfer codes model latent heat release during solidification as a constant and based solely on the local temperature. This approach is useful in predicting large scale distortion and final part shape. The second approach, micro-modeling, is more fundamental. The micro-models estimate the latent heat release during solidification using nucleation and grain growth kinetics. Micro-models give insight into cast grain morphology and show promise in the future to predict engineering properties such as tensile strength. The micro-model solidification kinetics can be evaluated using first principles or they can be evaluated using experiments. This work describes an implementation of a micro-model for uranium which uses experimental results to estimate nucleation and growth kinetics.

  4. Evaluation of the castability of a Co-Cr-Mo-W alloy varying the investing technique.

    PubMed

    Carreiro, Adriana da Fonte Porto; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello de; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the castability of Co-Cr-Mo-W (Remanium 2000), Ni-Cr (Durabond) and Co-Cr-Mo (Vera PDI) alloys invested with either conventional (phosphate- and silica-based) or mixed investing techniques. A 10 X 10 mm square-shaped nylon net containing 100 open squares served as a template for construction of wax patterns, which were invested with phosphate-based investment (Termocast), silica-based investment (Refrafil) and mixed investing technique (2-mm layer phosphate investment plus filling with silica investment). Forty-five cast specimens (5 per experimental condition) were obtained and sandblasted with aluminum oxide. The number of completely reproduced cast segments was counted to obtain a percentage designated "castability value", which indicated the accuracy of the alloy to reproduce mold details. Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that, comparing the alloys, Remanium 2000 had statistically similar castability (p>0.05) to Vera PDI and lower than Durabond (p<0.05). Considering the mixed technique results, Remanium 2000 yielded lower castability value (p<0.05) than Durabond and Vera PDI alloys, which showed similar results to each other (p>0.05). In conclusion, the castability of the Co-Cr-Mo-W alloy (Remanium 2000) was comparable to that of the Co-Cr alloy (Vera PDI) and worse than that of the Ni-Cr alloy (Durabond). Except for Remanium 2000, the mixed investing technique considerably improved the accuracy of the alloys to reproduce cast details, compared to the phosphate-based investment. The mixed investing technique appears as a viable alternative to improve castability of base metal alloys without decreasing the surface quality of the metallic pieces.

  5. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  6. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines.

  7. The x-ray telescope of CAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, M.; Bräuninger, H.; Cebrián, S.; Davenport, M.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Englhauser, J.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, P.; Hartmann, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joux, J. N.; Kang, D.; Königsmann, K.; Kotthaus, R.; Papaevangelou, T.; Lasseur, C.; Lippitsch, A.; Lutz, G.; Morales, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Strüder, L.; Vogel, J.; Zioutas

    2007-06-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) has been in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting x-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type x-ray mirror system. With the x-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders of magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant gaγγ can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints gaγγ < 1 × 10-10 GeV-1.

  8. ToxCast Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  9. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  10. Microporosity in casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-06-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. Samples from each series were sectioned longitudinally, mounted, polished and examined microscopically for evidence of microporosity.

  11. ShakeCast Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Kuo-Wan; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users? facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  12. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  13. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  14. Modeling microstructure development in gray cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettsch, David D.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.

    1994-05-01

    Recent years have seen increasing use of solidification process modeling as a tool to aid in the analysis and elimination of manufacturing defects in castings. Grain size and other microstructural features such as second-phase morphology and distribution are the primary factors in determining the mechanical properties in cast metals. In this work, a representation of nucleation and growth kinetics for gray cast irons, based on a statistical description of the microstructure, has been coupled with a commercial finite-element method code for transient heat-flow calculation to determine microstructure. Features predicted include eutectic cell size, fractions of gray and white iron, graphite morphology, percent pearlite, percent ferrite, and pearlite spacing. The predicted microstructure can then be used to determine the strength and fatigue properties using published correlations. The theoretical development and results of the finite-elementbased model will be discussed and compared with experimental results.

  15. On the damping capacity of cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of experimental data on the amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) in terms of various theoretical models has revealed a staged character and the main mechanisms of the processes of energy dissipation in graphite with increasing amplitude of vibrations upon cyclic loading. It is shown that the level of the damping capacity of lamellar cast iron depends on the relationship between the elastic and strength characteristics of graphite and the matrix phase. In cast irons with a rigid matrix structure (pearlite, martensite), the energy dissipation is determined by the volume fraction and morphology of the initial graphite phase. In cast irons with a softer metallic phase (ferrite), the contact interaction of graphite inclusions with the matrix and the properties of the matrix introduce additional sources of high damping.

  16. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    PubMed

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  17. Method for removing volatile components from a ceramic article, and related processes

    DOEpatents

    Klug, Frederic Joseph; DeCarr, Sylvia Marie

    2002-01-01

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  18. Solidification Structure and Macrosegregation of Billet Continuous Casting Process with Dual Electromagnetic Stirrings in Mold and Final Stage of Solidification: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Coupling macroscale heat transfer and fluid flow with microscale grain nucleation and crystal growth, a mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was established to study the SWRT82B steel solidification structure and macrosegregation in 160 mm × 160 mm billet continuous casting with dual electromagnetic stirrings in mold and final stage of solidification (M-EMS and F-EMS). In the model, the phases of liquid, columnar, and equiaxed were treated separately and the initial growing equiaxed phase, which could move freely with liquid, was regarded as slurry. To obtain the equiaxed grains nucleation and columnar front evolution, the unit tracking method and the columnar front tracking model were built. The model was validated by magnetic induction intensity of stirrer, billet surface temperature, and carbon segregation. The equiaxed phase evolution and the solute transport with effect of fluid flow and grains transport were described in this article. The results show that the equiaxed phase ratio will not increase obviously with higher current intensity of M-EMS, while the negative segregation near the strand surface becomes more serious. The negative segregation zone near the billet center and the center positive segregation come into being with the effect of equiaxed grains sedimentation and liquid thermosolutal flow. It is also found that the liquid solute transport in the F-EMS zone becomes the main factor with higher current intensity rather than the solidification rate, and therefore, the final billet center segregation decreases first and then turns to rise with the current intensity. The optimal current intensities of M-EMS and F-EMS proposed for SWRT82B billet continuous casting are 200 and 400 A, respectively.

  19. Spray casting project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

  20. Cast Aluminum Primary Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    ABSTRAC R A A A357 cast aluminum alloy forward fuselage pressure bulkhead has been developed and manufactured for the AMST-YC-14 aircraft. This work...urring in castings. Test coupons were! removed from castings containing defU-ts and subjected to repeated loads. The shift of the S-N curve for A357 ...selected for the casting is A357 . The cast bulkhead (Fig 2) measures approximately 2.29 m (7.5 ft) by 1.37 m (4.5 ft). It is designed to replace the

  1. Modeling Sustainment Investment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    2015 Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Modeling Sustainment ... Sustainment Investment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Modeling Sustainment Investment May 2015

  2. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary toolless pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  3. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Gentz, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and Fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub element tests will be presented.

  4. Metal Matrix Composite LOX Turbopump Housing Via Novel Tool-Less Net-Shape Pressure Infiltration Casting Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Lee, Jonathan; Bhat, Biliyar; Wells, Doug; Gregg, Wayne; Marsh, Matthew; Genge, Gary; Forbes, John; Salvi, Alex; Cornie, James A.; Sung, Michael; Zhang, Shi-Yu; Gentz, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) offer relatively higher specific strength, specific stiffness, lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and lower density as compared with conventional alloys. These unique properties make them very attractive for aerospace turbomachinery applications where there is ever increasing emphasis to reduce weight and cost, and to increase engine performance. Through a joint effort between NASA and Metal Matrix Cast Composites, Inc., a complex liquid oxygen (LOX) compatible turbopump housing is being redesigned and manufactured from hybrid (particulate and fibers) Aluminum MMC. To this end, a revolutionary tool-less pressure infiltration casting technology is being perfected. Ceramic preforms for the composite are 3-dimensionally printed using a stereolithography file, acquired from a CAD model. The preforms are then invested into a refractory material and pressure infiltrated with liquid metal. After casting, the refractory material is washed away leaving behind a near net-shape composite part. Benefits of this process include increased composite uniformity, no mold machining, short time from design to part, properties matching traditional methods, ability to make previously impossible to manufacture parts and no size limitations with a newly developed joining technology. The results of materials, manufacturing and design optimizations, preform joining, and sub-element tests will be presented.

  5. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94–1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  6. Inference of optimal speed for sound centrifugal casting of Al-12Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agari, Shailesh Rao; Mukunda, P. G.; Rao, Shrikantha S.; Sudhakar, K. G.

    2011-05-01

    True centrifugal casting is a standard casting technique for the manufacture of hollow, intricate and sound castings without the use of cores. The molten metal or alloy poured into the rotating mold forms a hollow casting as the centrifugal forces lift the liquid along the mold inner surface. When a mold is rotated at low and very high speeds defects are found in the final castings. Obtaining the critical speed for sound castings should not be a matter of guess or based on experience. The defects in the casting are mainly due to the behavior of the molten metal during the teeming and solidification process. Motion of molten metal at various speeds and its effect during casting are addressed in this paper. Eutectic Al-12Si alloy is taken as an experiment fluid and its performance during various rotational speeds is discussed.

  7. Grindability of alpha-case formed on cast titanium.

    PubMed

    Koike, Marie; Jacobson, David; Chan, Kwai S; Okabe, Toru

    2009-09-01

    The hardened alpha-case (alpha-case) layer inevitably forms on the surface of titanium castings when prepared by investment casting. Because the hardness of the alpha-case is incomparable to that of the interior structure, the perception exists that the alpha-case is difficult to remove during cutting, grinding and polishing. Grindability (ease of grinding) of cast cpTi and cast Ti-6Al-4V was evaluated by grinding cast specimens incrementally using a SiC abrasive wheel. The present study revealed that the presence of the brittle alpha-case with lower fracture toughness is beneficial in grinding titanium. The alpha-case on the ductile cpTi can be ground much easier than its bulk interior structure. In less ductile Ti-6Al-4V, the grinding rate is much higher than that of cpTi, and the alpha-case and its interior structure are at similar levels since the fracture toughness of its alpha-case and the bulk material is not large enough.

  8. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, John C.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification.

  9. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.C.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-11-12

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification. 5 figures.

  10. A new freeze casting technique for ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kiyoshi

    A new freeze casting technique for ceramics capable of manufacturing near room temperature with a sublimable vehicle has been developed in order to eliminate expensive processes under extremely cold temperatures in the conventional freeze casting. Fluid concentrated slurries of Al2O 3 powder in molten camphene (C10H16) were successfully prepared at 55°C with a small amount of a dispersant. These slurries were quickly solidified (frozen) at room temperature to yield a rigid solid green body, where the frozen camphene was easily removed by sublimation (freeze-drying) with negligible shrinkage. Sintering was successfully conducted without any special binder burnout process to yield dense sintered bodies (over 98% T.D). An organic alloy with a eutectic composition in the naphthalene (C 10H8)-camphor (C10H16O) binary system with a eutectic temperature of 31°C was also found to be a successful vehicle for the new ceramic freeze casting. The fabrication processes are almost the same as those with camphene. It was found that vehicles with off-eutectic compositions resulted in large voids in the sintered body due to the ceramic particle rejection by pro-eutectic crystals during freezing. At the eutectic composition, fine lamellar microstructure in the solidified vehicle inhibits the particle rejection. The proposed advantages of the new freeze casting technique with a sublimable vehicle include; (1) elimination of extremely cold temperatures used in conventional freeze casting; (2) elimination of troublesome binder burnout process; and (3) fast manufacturing cycle due to quick solidification. Porous ceramic bodies with unique interconnected pore channels were fabricated by the new freeze casting with lower solid content. The unique channels surrounded by fully dense walls have nearly circular cross-sections unlike conventional aqueous freeze casting. The porosity and the channel diameters are controllable by the solid content in the slurry. The unique channels are

  11. Technetium Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Asmussen, Robert M.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-10-15

    The cementitious material known as Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. Two radionuclides of particular concern in these waste streams are technetium-99 (99Tc) and iodine-129 (129I). These radioactive tank waste components contribute the most to the environmental impacts associated with the cleanup of the Hanford site. A recent environmental assessment of Cast Stone performance, which assumes a diffusion controlled release of contaminants from the waste form, calculates groundwater in excess of the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for both contaminants. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of both 99Tc and 129I in Cast Stone. One method to improve the performance of Cast Stone is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc and I, therefore reducing their diffusion out of Cast Stone. In this paper, we present results of Tc and I removal from solution with various getters with batch sorption experiments conducted in deionized water (DIW) and a highly caustic 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. In general, the data show that the selected getters are effective in DIW but their performance is comprised when experiments are performed with the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. Reasons for the mitigated performance in the LAW simulant may be due to competition with Cr present in the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant and to a pH effect.

  12. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    1996-01-01

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  13. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1996-12-24

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

  14. Simulation Study of Al-1Mn/Al-10Si Circular Clad Ingots Prepared by Direct Chill Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li; Kang, Huijun; Chen, Zongning; Fu, Ying; Wang, Tongmin

    2016-02-01

    A modified direct chill casting process based on Novelis FusionTM Technology co-casting process was used recently to prepare Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingots. In the current study, a comprehensive simulation model was developed to investigate the direct chill casting process for preparing the Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingots, and a parametric study and experimental research of the direct chill casting process was conducted to explore potential success and failure casting conditions. The simulation results revealed the bonding mechanism of the Al-1Mn/Al-10Si interface in the direct chill casting process and identified the effect of certain parameters on casting performance. The results indicated that the effect of casting speed and Al-1Mn casting temperature on the variations of the minimum solid fraction of Al-1Mn at the interface is stronger than that of cooling water flow rate in inner mold, while Al-10Si casting temperature is the weakest of the four casting parameters. The corresponding experimental results verified that Al-1Mn/Al-10Si circular clad ingot with acceptable metallurgical bonding can be successfully prepared by direct chill casting process under the proper casting parameters. The thickness of diffusion zone is about 40 μm, and the fractured position in tensile test was located in the Al-1Mn alloy side which indicated the strength of the interfacial region is higher than that of Al-1Mn alloy.

  15. Advanced Casting Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    water , aged 5 hrs on 155 C. Fig. 15 Time required for 19 mm thick test slab casting, poured in sand, to cool...fraction rare earth could be solution treated, quenched and artificially aged to give high tensile properties at room temperature, which were well...Strength. MagnesiumrZincrRare. Earth . Alloys In parallel with the development of silver containing alloy systems, further improvements were obtained

  16. USGS ShakeCast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David; Lin, Kuo-Wan

    2007-01-01

    Automating, Simplifying, and Improving the Use of ShakeMap for Post-Earthquake Decisionmaking and Response. ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  17. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  18. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  19. Effect of flask vibration time on casting integrity, Surface Penetration and Coating Inclusion in lost foam casting of Al-Si Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Karimian, Majid; Idris, M. H.; Ourdjini, A.; Muthu, Kali

    2011-01-17

    The paper presents the result of an experimental investigation conducted on medium aluminum silicon alloy casting- LM6, using no-vacuum assisted lost foam casting process. The study is directed for establishing the relationship between the flask vibrations times developed for molded sample on the casting integrity, surface penetration and coating inclusion defects of the casting. Four different flask vibration times namely 180, 120, 90 and 60 sec. were investigated. The casting integrity was investigated in terms of fulfilling in all portions and edges. The surface penetration was measured using optical microscope whilst image analyzer was used to quantify the percentage of coating inclusion in the casting. The results show that vibration time has significant influence on the fulfilling as well as the internal integrity of the lost foam casting. It was found that the lower vibration time produced comparatively sound casing.

  20. The effect of processing parameters and solid concentration on the mechanical and microstructural properties of freeze-casted macroporous hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Farhangdoust, S; Zamanian, A; Yasaei, M; Khorami, M

    2013-01-01

    The design and fabrication of macroporous hydroxyapatite scaffolds, which could overcome current bone tissue engineering limitations, have been considered in recent years. In the current study, controlled unidirectional freeze-casting at different cooling rates was investigated. In the first step, different slurries with initial hydroxyapatite concentrations of 7-37.5 vol.% were prepared. In the next step, different cooling rates from 2 to 14 °C/min were applied to synthesize the porous scaffold. Additionally, a sintering temperature of 1350 °C was chosen as an optimum temperature. Finally, the phase composition (by XRD), microstructure (by SEM), mechanical characteristics, and the porosity of sintered samples were assessed. The porosity of the sintered samples was in a range of 45-87% and the compressive strengths varied from 0.4 MPa to 60 MPa. The mechanical strength of the scaffolds increased as a function of initial concentration, cooling rate, and sintering temperature. With regards to mechanical strength and pore size, the samples with the initial concentration and the cooling rate of 15 vol.% and 5 °C/min, respectively, showed better results.

  1. Carburizer Effect on Cast Iron Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janerka, Krzysztof; Kondracki, Marcin; Jezierski, Jan; Szajnar, Jan; Stawarz, Marcin

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the effect of carburizing materials on cast iron solidification and crystallization. The studies consisted of cast iron preparation from steel scrap and different carburizers. For a comparison, pig iron was exclusively used in a solid charge. Crystallization analysis revealed the influence of the carburizer material on the crystallization curves as well as differences in the solidification paths of cast iron prepared with the use of different charge materials. The carburizers' influence on undercooling during the eutectic crystallization process was analyzed. The lowest undercooling rate was recorded for the melt with pig iron, then for synthetic graphite, natural graphite, anthracite, and petroleum coke (the highest undercooling rate). So a hypothesis was formulated that eutectic cells are created most effectively with the presence of carbon from pig iron (the highest nucleation potential), and then for the graphite materials (crystallographic similarity with the carbon precipitation in the cast iron). The most difficult eutectic crystallization is for anthracite and petroleum coke (higher undercooling is necessary). This knowledge can be crucial when the foundry plant is going to change the solid charge composition replacing the pig iron by steel scrap and the recarburization process.

  2. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST) Phase VI. Technology Transfer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    system and ultimately fill the mold cavity to produce a casting. The fluidity of a given metal is measured with standard fluidity test molds. One...showed that the pouring temperature for large, thin-wall aluminum castings must be (1) high enough to provide sufficient fluidity for complete filling of...castings should have the following specific characteristics: good flowability , permeability, tensile strength, and compressive strength; high hot

  3. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST). Phase I. Preliminary Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    49 26 Assumed Crack Growth Rate -- A357 . . . . . . . . . .. 50 27 Flaw Growth at Hole of Gear Attachment Point .... .... 52 28 A357 S-N...wo TABLES Number ?Ile 1 Statistics on.16 Classes of A357 Aluminum Casting Data .. 14 2 "CAST" Preliminary Design Allowables .. .. .. ....... 20 3...damage tolerance criteria; development of preliminary design allowables data for A357 aluminum casting alloy to be used for design until completion

  4. Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.

    2000-08-01

    The Cast Metal Coalition, composed of more than 22 research providers and universities and 149 industrial partners, has completed a four-year research and development partnership with the Department of Energy. This report provides brief summaries of the 29 projects performed by the Coalition. These projects generated valuable information in such aspects of the metals industry as process prediction technologies, quality control, improved alloys, product machinability, and casting process improvements.

  5. [Are investment activity and backlog in investments risks for university medicine in Germany?].

    PubMed

    Amann, I; Heyder, R; Strehl, R

    2009-08-01

    University medicine in Germany requires significantly higher funding and investment because its tasks not only include health care but also research and teaching. However, over recent decades less and less funding compared to the development of the turnover has been available. This trend is due to decreasing public funding. The diminishing funding has caused a major backlog of investment at German university hospitals. The first part of the article summarizes the investments policies at university hospitals and other hospitals. The second part describes the investment needs in university medicine and exposes risk factors for research, education and health care due to the process of investment planning and realization. Goal-oriented solutions are shown to facilitate investments. The third part discusses several risks caused by insufficient investments in university medicine. There are special risks for research, teaching, and the capacity for innovation in university medicine besides economical and medical risks. Some policies and financial strategies to overcome the backlog in investments are presented. After a summary, the article concludes with some practical examples of further measures to ensure sustainable funding.

  6. Watering the investment tree

    SciTech Connect

    Heumann, J.M.

    1997-04-01

    Recycling investment forums have started to catch hold across the US as a means of educating investors about the benefits of recycling businesses, while helping those businesses obtain the startup of expansion funding they need. Recycling investment forums are designed to bring together recycling business entrepreneurs with investors, financiers, and economic development officials for their mutual benefit. But will investors shell out the money, and will investment forums be successful in increasing opportunities for recycling businesses? All small, start-up business need funding to be successful. A great idea or innovative program can wither on the vine if it does not get the financial support it needs to grow. Recycling businesses are no exception, and many also face additional challenges beyond those faced by the average small business. Recycling businesses are newer and have no proven track record of success, and many investors are wary of taking a chance on an unknown entity.

  7. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5

  8. Thermal Modelling In Pressure Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasgado, M. T. Alonso; Davey, K.; Watari, H.

    2004-06-01

    The pressure die casting process is cyclic and the temperature levels in the die are principally dictated by the total energy received from the casting. It is thus extremely important that any solidification model for the casting is able to predict energy extraction rates to a high degree of accuracy. In this paper an efficient three dimensional hybrid thermal model for the pressure die casting process is described. The finite element method (FEM) is used for modelling heat transfer in the casting, coupled to a boundary element (BE) model for the die. The FEM can efficiently account for the non-linearity introduced by the release of latent heat on solidification, whereas the BEM is ideally suited for modelling linear heat conduction in the die, as surface temperatures are of principal importance. The FE formulation for the casting is based on a control volume capacitance method, which is shown to provide high accuracy and stability. This method is similar to the apparent and effective heat capacitance methods, which are popular approaches used where conduction predominates over other heat transfer mechanisms. These methods involve the specification of element or nodal capacitances to accommodate for the release of latent heat. Unfortunately they suffer from a major drawback in that energy is not correctly transported through elements and so providing a source of inaccuracy. The control volume capacitance method allows for the transport of mass arising from volumetric shrinkage and ensures that energy is correctly transported. The BE model caters for surface phenomena such as boiling in the cooling channels, which is important, as this effectively controls the manner in which energy is extracted. The die temperature is decomposed into two components, one a steady-state part and the other a time-dependent perturbation. This approach enables the transient die temperatures to be calculated in an efficient way, since only die surfaces close to the die cavity are

  9. Observations of Tool-Workpiece Interactions during Friction Stir Processing of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilchak, A. L.; Juhas, M. C.; Williams, J. C.

    2007-02-01

    Significant tool wear manifested as submicron tungsten-rich particles was observed in the workpiece after friction stir processing (FSP) of investment cast Ti-6Al-4V on both the surface and in the bulk of the stir zone. The tool was manufactured from a tungsten alloy, which stabilizes the β phase and can locally suppress the β transus. A postprocessing α/β heat treatment was performed to demonstrate the microstructure effects of tungsten dissolution.

  10. Valuing uncertain cash flows from investments that enhance energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Abadie, Luis M; Chamorro, José M; González-Eguino, Mikel

    2013-02-15

    There is a broad consensus that investments to enhance energy efficiency quickly pay for themselves in lower energy bills and spared emission allowances. However, investments that at first glance seem worthwhile usually are not undertaken. One of the plausible, non-excluding explanations is the numerous uncertainties that these investments face. This paper deals with the optimal time to invest in an energy efficiency enhancement at a facility already in place that consumes huge amounts of a fossil fuel (coal) and operates under carbon constraints. We follow the Real Options approach. Our model comprises three sources of uncertainty following different stochastic processes which allows for application in a broad range of settings. We assess the investment option by means of a three-dimensional binomial lattice. We compute the trigger investment cost, i.e., the threshold level below which immediate investment would be optimal. We analyze the major drivers of this decision thus aiming at the most promising policies in this regard.

  11. High density tape casting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is provided for casting thin sheets (or tapes) of particles bound together, that are used for oxygen membranes and other applications, which enables the particles to be cast at a high packing density in a tape of uniform thickness. A slurry contains the particles, a binder, and a solvent, and is cast against the inside walls of a rotating chamber. Prior to spraying the slurry against the chamber walls, a solvent is applied to a container. The solvent evaporates to saturate the chamber with solvent vapor. Only then is the slurry cast. As a result, the slurry remains fluid long enough to spread evenly over the casting surface formed by the chamber, and for the slurry particles to become densely packed. Only then is the chamber vented to remove solvent, so the slurry can dry. The major novel feature is applying solvent vapor to a rotating chamber before casting slurry against the chamber walls.

  12. Comparing project investments

    SciTech Connect

    Wirasinghe, E.

    1988-06-01

    HPI managers are often faced with the nightmare of deciding on which projects to invest their limited capital. There usually are more potential projects than money available for investment. A typical strategy is in two parts: select a method to rank the projects; consider corporate policy to make a choice. This discussion highlights various ways to rank projects. After a discussion of some ranking methods, three cases are presented where it appears the wrong project was selected - either because of incorrect advice or because data were intentionally manipulated.

  13. Invest in Family*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilesh; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The family is an integral part of one's life. It is very essential that every individual employed or unemployed invests time therein. The family is a source of support and growth for an individual, and the lack of family support or loneliness may be a causative factor in the genesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In India, family plays a paramount role when it comes to mental health of the individual. Tips on how one should invest time in one's family along with the role of a family in one's personal and social structure are discussed. PMID:25838732

  14. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  15. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  16. Freeze Tape Casting of Functionally Graded Porous Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofie, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Freeze tape casting is a means of making preforms of ceramic sheets that, upon subsequent completion of fabrication processing, can have anisotropic and/or functionally graded properties that notably include aligned and graded porosity. Freeze tape casting was developed to enable optimization of the microstructures of porous ceramic components for use as solid oxide electrodes in fuel cells: Through alignment and grading of pores, one can tailor surface areas and diffusion channels for flows of gas and liquid species involved in fuel-cell reactions. Freeze tape casting offers similar benefits for fabrication of optimally porous ceramics for use as catalysts, gas sensors, and filters.

  17. The Properties of Ammonium Dinitramine (ADN): Part 2: Melt Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahma, A.; Edvinsson, H.; Östmark, H.

    2010-04-01

    A melt casting technique for ammonium dinitramine (ADN) and ADN/aluminum was developed. ADN proved relatively easy to cast, when 1% of magnesium oxide was used as a stabilizer and crystallization kernels. Densities of ADN/MgO 99/1 were 92 to 97% of theoretical mean density (TMD) and those of ADN/Al/MgO 64/35/1 were between 95 and 99% of TMD. Sedimentation of Al in the melt was prevented and the particle wetting was ensured by selecting a suitable particle size for Al. No gelling agents or other additives were used. The casting process and factors influencing it are discussed.

  18. Gaining an Investment Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitz, William T.

    2000-01-01

    Recommendations for investing college/university endowment funds focus on identifying structural and skill-based competitive advantages. These include the long institutional time horizon and the ability to endure short-term volatility. Implications for endowment management are applied to selecting an endowment manager and asset allocation. (DB)

  19. Strategic Investments Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, Doug

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the organizational hierarchy for strategic management and strategic investments at NASA. The presentation also relates these topics to the budgets it submits to Congress, strategies for space exploration research and development, and systems analysis.

  20. Beyond the Investment Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The current policy interest in early childhood education and care is driven by an investment narrative, a story of quality and high returns emerging from a dominant neoliberal political economy. This short note expresses deep reservations about this narrative, and hints at another narrative that foregrounds democracy, experimentation and…

  1. Energy Investment: Beyond Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald T.; Amarant, John

    2005-01-01

    People vary considerably in their work performance as well as their overall approach to work. At one extreme are the outstanding performers, who approach work with enthusiasm and energy, and, at the other extreme, are those who seem to do only what is necessary to get by. Organizatins often invest a good deal of energy in trying to improve the…

  2. The Effect of Casting Ring Liner Length and Prewetting on the Marginal Adaptation and Dimensional Accuracy of Full Crown Castings

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Hamdi, Osama A.; Al-Shahrani, Abdulaziz A.; Alhasaniah, Sultan

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of varying cellulose casting ring liner length and its prewetting on the marginal adaptation and dimensional accuracy of full veneer metal castings. Materials and Methods: The master die was milled in stainless steel to fabricate the wax pattern. Sixty wax patterns were fabricated with a uniform thickness of 1.5 mm at an occlusal surface and 1 mm axial surface, cervical width at 13.5 mm, and 10 mm cuspal height. The samples were divided into six groups (n = 10). Groups I and II samples had the full-length cellulose prewet and dry ring liner, respectively. The groups III and IV had 2 mm short prewet and dry cellulose ring liner, respectively, whereas groups V and VI were invested in 6 mm short ring liner. The wax patterns were immediately invested in phosphate bonded investment, and casting procedure was completed with nickel-chrome alloy. The castings were cleaned and mean score of measurements at four reference points for marginal adaption, casting height, and cervical width was calculated. The marginal adaption was calculated with Imaje J software, whereas the casting height and cervical width was determined using a digital scale. The data was subjected to one-way analysis of varaince and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 software. Results: The group II had the best marginal adaption with a gap of 63.786 μm followed by group I (65.185 μm), group IV (87.740 μm), and group III (101.455 μm). A large marginal gap was observed in group V at 188.871 μm. Cuspal height was more accurate with group V (10.428 mm), group VI (10.421 mm), and group II (10.488 mm). The cervical width was approximately similar in group I, group III, and group V. Statistically significant difference was observed in Tukey post hoc analysis between group V and group VI with all the other groups with regards to marginal adaptation. Conclusion: The dry cellulose ring liners provided better marginal

  3. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard bandage that's usually made of material like fiberglass or plaster. Casts keep bones in place while ... water. Plaster of Paris casts are heavier than fiberglass casts and don't hold up as well ...

  4. Cast Care: Do's and Don'ts

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically lighter and more durable than are traditional plaster casts. Air circulates more freely inside a fiberglass ... Also, X-rays penetrate fiberglass casts better than plaster casts. This is helpful if your child's doctor ...

  5. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    MedlinePlus

    ... that's usually made of material like fiberglass or plaster. Casts keep bones in place while they heal. ... Types of Casts Casts usually are made of: Plaster of Paris: This heavy white powder forms a ...

  6. An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

    2006-12-31

    An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

  7. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  8. Education and Caste in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  9. Designing a successful investment program.

    PubMed

    Karpinski, J P

    1997-02-01

    Healthcare organizations have various asset pool funds that can be invested to increase nonoperating revenues. In order to maximize the long-term success of investment efforts, healthcare organizations need to develop comprehensive investment management programs. Such programs identify the assets that can be invested, establish the level of risk each asset type can be exposed to, and match long-term and short-term investment opportunities to the appropriate asset pool. Programs can be managed internally or outsourced to investment management firms with objectives and procedures that are compatible with those of the healthcare organizations' investment policies and guidelines. These policies and guidelines must address asset allocation. Oversight committees must be established to monitor investment performance and reallocate assets, as needed, to take advantage of market movements.

  10. Maritime Cast Shop Integrated Improvement Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-20

    traditional tactic of improving “one casting at a time.” The proposal included four elements integrated into a program designed to improve the upgrade...Software Tools – off the shelf technology to improve mold design  Technical Processes Assessment – deploy industry best practice technologies...source. The third party used the 3-D CAD drawings produced by the MCS and evaluated mold design using physics based solidification software. The MCS

  11. IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

    1963-12-31

    A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

  12. Innovative method for casting steel armorplate

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, P.C.; Hansen, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines, through an Interagency Agreement with the US Tank-Automotive Command (TACOM), has successfully developed a steel expendable pattern casting process (EPC) for the manufacture of armorplate. The new armor is lighter and more ballistically effective than conventional rolled homogeneous armor (RHA), and costs less. An applique armor spinoff from the program was field-tested during the Gulf War. The applique armor withstood direct impacts from enemy munitions without failure.

  13. Development of dental casting and porcelainizing techniques for titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, M.

    1986-01-01

    Casting of titanium metals has been difficult due to their high chemical reactivity at elevated temperatures. Thus, special melting and mold materials are needed. This study investigated molds, Ti alloys, and porcelain applications, utilizing a new dental casting machine, Castmatic. It involved argon-arc melting and subsequent argon/vacuum pressurized casting. Special refractory oxides such as yttria or Zirconia A were utilized for a face coat under phosphate bonded silica investment. Studies of Ti alloys (Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-15V, Ti-20Cu and Ti-30Pd) involved metallography, phase identification (XRD), hardness, tensile tests, and electrochemical-corrosion tests. Preliminary porcelain studies included an experimental low fusing porcelain along with commercial low fusing porcelains. The bond was evaluated by three-point bending tests and SEM/EDX observations. The yttria face coat was inert, but lacked the necessary mechanical and thermal stability. The face coat, consisting of Zirconia A and zirconium acetate binder, was stable and resulted in less mold reactivity, good internal soundness, but slightly rough surfaces. Metallographs revealed quite larger grains in the cast structure, than in the wrought forms. XRD analysis showed that quasi-equilibrium phases present.

  14. Investing in Software Sustainment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-30

    ååì~ä=^Åèìáëáíáçå= oÉëÉ~êÅÜ=póãéçëáìã= qÜìêëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=ff= = Investing in Software Sustainment Robert Ferguson, Software Engineering...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investing in Software Sustainment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In many government weapon systems, sustaining software depends heavily on organic engineering efforts. This is different

  15. Cast iron-base alloy for cylinder/regenerator housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witter, Stewart L.; Simmons, Harold E.; Woulds, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    NASACC-1 is a castable iron-base alloy designed to replace the costly and strategic cobalt-base X-40 alloy used in the automotive Stirling engine cylinder/generator housing. Over 40 alloy compositions were evaluated using investment cast test bars for stress-rupture testing. Also, hydrogen compatibility and oxygen corrosion resistance tests were used to determine the optimal alloy. NASACC-1 alloy was characterized using elevated and room temperature tensile, creep-rupture, low cycle fatigue, heat capacity, specific heat, and thermal expansion testing. Furthermore, phase analysis was performed on samples with several heat treated conditions. The properties are very encouraging. NASACC-1 alloy shows stress-rupture and low cycle fatigue properties equivalent to X-40. The oxidation resistance surpassed the program goal while maintaining acceptable resistance to hydrogen exposure. The welding, brazing, and casting characteristics are excellent. Finally, the cost of NASACC-1 is significantly lower than that of X-40.

  16. The Effects of Externally Solidified Product on Wave Celerity and Quality of Die Cast Products

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll Mobley; Yogeshwar Sahai; Jerry Brevick

    2003-10-10

    The cold chamber die casting process is used to produce essentially all the die cast aluminum products and about 50% of the die cast magnesium products made today. Modeling of the cold chamber die casting process and metallographic observations of cold chamber die cast products indicate that typically 5 to 20% of the shot weight is solidified in the shot sleeve before or during cavity filling. The protion of the resulting die casting which is solidified in the shot sleeve is referred to as externally solidified product, or, when identified as a casting defect, as cold flakes. This project was directed to extending the understanding of the effects of externally solidified product on the cold chamber die casting process and products to enable the production of defect-free die castings and reduce the energy associated with these products. The projected energy savings from controlling the fraction of externally solidified product in die cast components is 40 x 10 Btu through the year 2025.

  17. Worrier or warrior? Taking control of your investment plan.

    PubMed

    Blau, Joel M; Paprocki, Ronald J

    2015-01-01

    The current economic and investment environment may seem different from before, but historically there has been uncertainty in most, if not all, time periods. The basis for selecting investments should be the needs, temperament, and available resources of each individual or family. Experience has taught that the most appropriate investment for one person often is far less suited for someone else. Advice given in the media or from other investors unfamiliar with your particular situation adds to the confusion. In this article, we discuss choosing the most appropriate investments for your specific situation and how the process can be made easier by carefully considering, and answering, six questions.

  18. Precision of Fit of Titanium and Cast Implant Frameworks Using a New Matching Formula

    PubMed Central

    Sierraalta, Marianella; Vivas, Jose L.; Razzoog, Michael E.; Wang, Rui-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. Fit of prosthodontic frameworks is linked to the lifetime survival of dental implants and maintenance of surrounding bone. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the precision of fit of milled one-piece Titanium fixed complete denture frameworks to that of conventional cast frameworks. Material and Methods. Fifteen casts fabricated from a single edentulous CAD/CAM surgical guide were separated in two groups and resin patterns simulating the framework for a fixed complete denture developed. Five casts were sent to dental laboratories to invest, cast in a Palladium-Gold alloy and fit the framework. Ten casts had the resin pattern scanned for fabrication of milled bars in Titanium. Using measuring software, positions of implant replicas in the definitive model were recorded. The three dimensional spatial orientation of each implant replica was matched to the implant replica. Results. Results demonstrated the mean vertical gap of the Cast framework was 0.021 (+0.004) mm and 0.012 (0.002) mm determined by fixed and unfixed best-fit matching coordinate system. For Titanium frameworks they were 0.0037 (+0.0028) mm and 0.0024 (+0.0005) mm, respectively. Conclusions. Milled one-piece Titanium fixed complete denture frameworks provided a more accurate precision of fit then traditional cast frameworks. PMID:22550486

  19. Relative benefits of potential autonomy technology investments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, W. P.; Elfes, A.; Hutsberger, T.; Rodriguez, G.; Weisbin, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a framework that looks at both cost and risk early in the design process in order to determine the investment strategy in new technology development that will lead to the lowest risk mission possible which enables desired science return within a given budget.

  20. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  1. Volatile species retention during metallic fuel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, and although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Based on these results it is very probable that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  2. 12 CFR 615.5140 - Eligible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Investment Management § 615.5140 Eligible investments. (a... exceed five (5) percent of the investment company's total portfolio. (e) Other investments approved...

  3. Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-05

    Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

  4. A new method to acquire 3-D images of a dental cast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongke; Yi, Yaxing; Zhu, Zhen; Li, Hua; Qin, Yongyuan

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced our newly developed method to acquire three-dimensional images of a dental cast. A rotatable table, a laser-knife, a mirror, a CCD camera and a personal computer made up of a three-dimensional data acquiring system. A dental cast is placed on the table; the mirror is installed beside the table; a linear laser is projected to the dental cast; the CCD camera is put up above the dental cast, it can take picture of the dental cast and the shadow in the mirror; while the table rotating, the camera records the shape of the laser streak projected on the dental cast, and transmit the data to the computer. After the table rotated one circuit, the computer processes the data, calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of the dental cast's surface. In data processing procedure, artificial neural networks are enrolled to calibrate the lens distortion, map coordinates form screen coordinate system to world coordinate system. According to the three-dimensional coordinates, the computer reconstructs the stereo image of the dental cast. It is essential for computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. In comparison with other systems in service, for example, laser beam three-dimensional scanning system, the characteristic of this three-dimensional data acquiring system: a. celerity, it casts only 1 minute to scan a dental cast; b. compact, the machinery is simple and compact; c. no blind zone, a mirror is introduced ably to reduce blind zone.

  5. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Robert S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  6. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

  7. Rapid Cycle Casting of Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Figs. 10 and 11 show carbon segregation as a function of a N at casting temperatures of 1185 0 C and 1360°C. 5.7.5 Macrosegregation for non-ideal...casting temperature. Run# T a N Carbon Segregation , % 0 C L 7.5mm L 35mn L =65nm L =90nm R53 1185 .3900 11 -2 -2 -2 R52 1185 .0860 17 -3 -3 -3 R51 1185...superheated shot and melt; superheat = 66cc and casting temperature = 1198 C. Run# tI Carbon segregation , % sL = 29mm L = 43mm L = 80mm L =98mm Rl 0.35

  8. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; Baker, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  9. Application of statistical methods for analyzing the relationship between casting distortion, mold filling, and interfacial heat transfer in sand molds

    SciTech Connect

    Y. A. Owusu

    1999-03-31

    This report presents a statistical method of evaluating geometric tolerances of casting products using point cloud data generated by coordinate measuring machine (CMM) process. The focus of this report is to present a statistical-based approach to evaluate the differences in dimensional and form variations or tolerances of casting products as affected by casting gating system, molding material, casting thickness, and casting orientation at the mold-metal interface. Form parameters such as flatness, parallelism, and other geometric profiles such as angularity, casting length, and height of casting products were obtained and analyzed from CMM point cloud data. In order to relate the dimensional and form errors to the factors under consideration such as flatness and parallelism, a factorial analysis of variance and statistical test means methods were performed to identify the factors that contributed to the casting distortion at the mold-metal interface.

  10. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important since it must

  11. End-processing nucleases and phosphodiesterases: An elite supporting cast for the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vijay; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2016-07-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is an error-prone DNA double-strand break repair pathway that is active throughout the cell cycle. A substantial fraction of NHEJ repair events show deletions and, less often, insertions in the repair joints, suggesting an end-processing step comprising the removal of mismatched or damaged nucleotides by nucleases and other phosphodiesterases, as well as subsequent strand extension by polymerases. A wide range of nucleases, including Artemis, Metnase, APLF, Mre11, CtIP, APE1, APE2 and WRN, are biochemically competent to carry out such double-strand break end processing, and have been implicated in NHEJ by at least circumstantial evidence. Several additional DNA end-specific phosphodiesterases, including TDP1, TDP2 and aprataxin are available to resolve various non-nucleotide moieties at DSB ends. This review summarizes the biochemical specificities of these enzymes and the evidence for their participation in the NHEJ pathway.

  12. 13 CFR 301.4 - Investment rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Investment rates. 301.4 Section... ELIGIBILITY, INVESTMENT RATE AND APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS Investment Rates and Matching Share Requirements § 301.4 Investment rates. (a) Minimum Investment Rate. There is no minimum Investment Rate for a...

  13. Casting Using A Polystyrene Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Guenther, Bengamin; Vranas, Thomas; Veneris, Peter; Joyner, Michael

    1993-01-01

    New technique for making metal aircraft models saves significant amount of time and effort in comparison with conventional lost-wax method. Produces inexpensive, effective wind-tunnel models. Metal wind-tunnel model cast by use of polystyrene pattern.

  14. Caste determination through mating in primitively eusocial societies.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Eric R; Field, Jeremy

    2013-10-21

    Eusocial animal societies are typified by the presence of a helper (worker) caste which predominantly cares for young offspring in a social group while investing little in their own direct reproduction. A key question is what determines whether an individual becomes a worker or leaves to initiate her own reproduction. In some insects, caste is determined nutritionally during development. In others, and in vertebrate societies, adults are totipotent and the cues that determine caste are less well known. The mate limitation hypothesis (MLH) states that a female's mating status acts as a cue for caste determination: females that mate become reproductives, while those that fail to mate become workers. The MLH is consistent with empirical observations in sweat bees showing that over the course of the nesting season, there are increases in both the proportion of females that become reproductives and the frequency of males in the mating pool. We modelled a foundress's offspring sex-ratio strategy to investigate whether an increasingly male-biased operational sex-ratio over time is evolutionarily stable under the MLH. Our results indicate that such a pattern could occur if early workers were more valuable than late workers. This pattern was then more likely if male mortality was high, if worker mortality was low, if the value of a worker was high and if the period over which workers can help was short. Our results suggest that the MLH can be evolutionarily stable, but only under restrictive conditions. Manipulative experiments are now required to investigate whether mating determines caste in nature.

  15. [Setting characteristics of calcia-bonded investments by hydration].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, F; Watari, F; Nomoto, S

    1989-07-01

    Calcium oxide (CaO) slurry mixed with water hardens and expands by hydration. The authors used this setting characteristic as a binder of zirconia-refractory investments. If a mixed slurry was placed in air, unreacted residual calcia powders absorbed water and reverted to calcium hydroxide (Ca (OH)2). This resulted in a large setting expansion that continued for several days. A carbon dioxide (CO2) gas atmosphere controlled this expansion of calcia. When mixed slurry was placed in a carbon dioxide gas atmosphere, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was formed and prevented the further hydration of unreacted calcium oxide. Thus setting expansion values were controlled. The combined expansion of setting and thermal expansion, in CaO-CO2-bonded zirconia investments, was about 1.5-2.5%. On the whole, calcium oxide is expected to be a good binder for high temperature dental casting refractory.

  16. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  17. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  18. The Good Investment.

    PubMed

    Prescott, John E; Fresne, Julie A; Youngclaus, James A

    2017-01-24

    The authors reflect on the article in this issue entitled "Borrow or Serve? An Economic Analysis of Options for Financing a Medical School Education" by Marcu and colleagues, which makes a compelling case that a medical school education is a good investment, no matter what financing option students use, from federal service programs to federal loans. The lead author of this Commentary shares lessons learned from his own medical school education, which was funded by an Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship, and from his current position interacting with medical students across the United States.Regardless of the financing path they choose, all students should understand basic financial concepts and the details of the various pathways that are available to pay for their medical school education, as well as how each could potentially impact their own future and that of their families. One underappreciated aspect of financing a medical school education is that federal repayment scenarios can link loan payments to income, rather than debt levels, which means that all physicians are able to afford their loan payments no matter what specialty they practice, what they are paid, or where they live.Medical education, while expensive, remains the good investment. An MD degree can lead to a lifetime of personal fulfillment and societal contributions. Everyone, with rare exceptions, accepted to a U.S. medical school will be able to finance their medical education via a path that aligns with their personal values and priorities.

  19. Electromagnetic continuous casting project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Rote, D.M.; Misra, B.; Praeg, W.F.; Hull, J.R.; Turner, L.R.; Shah, V.L.; Lari, R.J.; Gopalsami, N.; Wiencek, T.

    1988-10-01

    This report describes the work on development of an electromagnetic casting process for steel, which was carried out at Argonne National Laboratory between January 1985 and December 1987. This effort was concerned principally with analysis and design work on magnet technology, liquid metal feed system, coolant system, and sensors and process controllers. Experimentation primarily involved (1) electromagnetic studies to determine the conditions and controlling parameters for stable levitation and (2) feed-system studies to establish important parameters that control and influence fluid flow from the liquid metal source to the caster. 73 refs., 91 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Indirect Fabrication of Lattice Metals with Thin Sections Using Centrifugal Casting.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jiwon; Ju, Jaehyung; Thurman, James

    2016-05-14

    One of the typical methods to manufacture 3D lattice metals is the direct-metal additive manufacturing (AM) process such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In spite of its potential processing capability, the direct AM method has several disadvantages such as high cost, poor surface finish of final products, limitation in material selection, high thermal stress, and anisotropic properties of parts. We propose a cost-effective method to manufacture 3D lattice metals. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed protocol on fabrication of 3D lattice metals having a complex shape and a thin wall thickness; e.g., octet truss made of Al and Cu alloys having a unit cell length of 5 mm and a cell wall thickness of 0.5 mm. An overall experimental procedure is divided into eight sections: (a) 3D printing of sacrificial patterns (b) melt-out of support materials (c) removal of residue of support materials (d) pattern assembly (e) investment (f) burn-out of sacrificial patterns (g) centrifugal casting (h) post-processing for final products. The suggested indirect AM technique provides the potential to manufacture ultra-lightweight lattice metals; e.g., lattice structures with Al alloys. It appears that the process parameters should be properly controlled depending on materials and lattice geometry, observing the final products of octet truss metals by the indirect AM technique.