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Sample records for involved field radiotherapy

  1. Patterns of failure after involved field radiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo-Jie; Li, Hong-Wei; He, Bin; Wang, Geng-Ming; Cai, Han-Fei; Duan, Shi-Miao; Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Cui, Zhen; Jiang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze the patterns of failure and the treatment effects of involved-field irradiation (IFI) on patients treated with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to determine whether IFI is practicable in these patients. A total of 79 patients with locally advanced ESCC underwent three dimensional conformal (3D)CRT) or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using IFI or elective nodal irradiation (ENI) according to the target volume. The patterns of failure were defined as local/regional, in-field, out)of)field regional lymph node (LN) and distant failure. With a median follow)up of 32.0 months, failures were observed in 66 (83.6%) patients. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure (55.8 vs 52.8%) and in)field regional lymph node failure (25.6 vs 19.4%) showed no statistically significant difference between the IFI and the ENI group (p=0.526 and 0.215, respectively). Out)of)field nodal relapse rate of only 7.0% was seen in the IFI group. Three)year survival rates for the ENI and IFI group were 22.2 and 18.6%, respectively (p=0.240), and 3)year distant metastasis rates were 27.8 and 32.6%, respectively (p=0.180). The lung V10, V20, V30 and mean lung dose of the ENI group were greater than those of the IFI group, while the mean lung dose and V10 had statistically significant difference. The patterns of failure and survival rates in the IFI group were similar as in the ENI group; the regional recurrence and distant metastasis are the main cause of treatment failure. IFI is feasible for locally advanced ESCC. Further investigation is needed to increase local control and decrease distant metastasis in these patients.

  2. Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease After Involved Node Radiotherapy Versus Mantle Field for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Petersen, Peter M.; Specht, Lena

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are known to have increased cardiac mortality and morbidity. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease after involved node radiotherapy (INRT) is currently unresolved, inasmuch as present clinical data are derived from patients treated with the outdated mantle field (MF) technique. Methods and Materials: We included all adolescents and young adults with supradiaphragmatic, clinical Stage I-II HL treated at our institution from 2006 to 2010 (29 patients). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and INRT to 30 to 36 Gy. We then simulated a MF plan for each patient with a prescribed dose of 36 Gy. A logistic dose-response curve for the 25-year absolute excess risk of cardiovascular disease was derived and applied to each patient using the individual dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean doses to the heart, four heart valves, and coronary arteries were significantly lower for INRT than for MF treatment. However, the range in doses with INRT treatment was substantial, and for a subgroup of patients, with lymphoma below the fourth thoracic vertebrae, we estimated a 25-year absolute excess risk of any cardiac event of as much as 5.1%. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a potential for individualizing treatment by selecting the patients for whom INRT provides sufficient cardiac protection for current technology; and a subgroup of patients, who still receive high cardiac doses, who would benefit from more advanced radiation technique.

  3. Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease After Involved Node Radiotherapy Versus Mantle Field for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are known to have increased cardiac mortality and morbidity. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease after involved node radiotherapy (INRT) is currently unresolved, inasmuch as present clinical data are derived from patients treated with the outdated mantle field (MF) technique. Methods and Materials: We included all adolescents and young adults with supradiaphragmatic, clinical Stage I-II HL treated at our institution from 2006 to 2010 (29 patients). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and INRT to 30 to 36 Gy. We then simulated a MF plan for each patient with a prescribed dose of 36 Gy.more » A logistic dose-response curve for the 25-year absolute excess risk of cardiovascular disease was derived and applied to each patient using the individual dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean doses to the heart, four heart valves, and coronary arteries were significantly lower for INRT than for MF treatment. However, the range in doses with INRT treatment was substantial, and for a subgroup of patients, with lymphoma below the fourth thoracic vertebrae, we estimated a 25-year absolute excess risk of any cardiac event of as much as 5.1%. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a potential for individualizing treatment by selecting the patients for whom INRT provides sufficient cardiac protection for current technology; and a subgroup of patients, who still receive high cardiac doses, who would benefit from more advanced radiation technique.« less

  4. Quality control of involved field radiotherapy in the HD 13 and HD 14 trials : Report of the radiotherapy panel of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG).

    PubMed

    Kriz, J; Baues, C; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Haverkamp, U; Herfart, K; Lukas, P; Plütschow, A; Schmidberger, H; Staar, S; Fuchs, M; Engert, A; Eich, H T

    2017-02-01

    As part of the foundation of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) in 1978, a central radiotherapy (RT) reference centre was established to evaluate and to improve the quality of treatment. During the study generations, the quality assurance programs (QAP) were continued and adapted to the demands of each study. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the results of the fifth study generation and to compare them to the previous findings. With the start of the fourth GHSG study generation (HD10-12), a central prospective review of all diagnostic images was established to create an individual treatment plan for each early stage study patient. The quality of involved field RT was retrospectively evaluated by an expert panel of radiation oncologists. In the fifth study generation (HD13-15), the retrospective review of radiotherapy performed was refined and the results were compared with the findings of the fourth generation. The expert panel analyzed the RT planning and application of 1037 (28 %) patients (HD13 n = 465, HD14 n = 572). Simulation films were available in 85 % of cases and verification films in 87 %. RT was assessed as major violation in 46 % (HD13 = 38 %, HD14 = 52 %), minor violation in 9 % (HD13 = 9 %, HD14 = 9 %) and according to the protocol in 45 % (HD13 = 52 %, HD14 = 38 %). The value for QAP of RT within the GHSG trials is well known. Still there were several protocol violations. In the future, the QAP program has to be adapted to the requirements of "modern RT" in malignant lymphoma.

  5. Involved Node, Site, Field and Residual Volume Radiotherapy for Lymphoma: A Comparison of Organ at Risk Dosimetry and Second Malignancy Risks.

    PubMed

    Murray, L; Sethugavalar, B; Robertshaw, H; Bayman, E; Thomas, E; Gilson, D; Prestwich, R J D

    2015-07-01

    Recent radiotherapy guidelines for lymphoma have included involved site radiotherapy (ISRT), involved node radiotherapy (INRT) and irradiation of residual volume after full-course chemotherapy. In the absence of late toxicity data, we aim to compare organ at risk (OAR) dose-metrics and calculated second malignancy risks. Fifteen consecutive patients who had received mediastinal radiotherapy were included. Four radiotherapy plans were generated for each patient using a parallel pair photon technique: (i) involved field radiotherapy (IFRT), (ii) ISRT, (iii) INRT, (iv) residual post-chemotherapy volume. The radiotherapy dose was 30 Gy in 15 fractions. The OARs evaluated were: breasts, lungs, thyroid, heart, oesophagus. Relative and absolute second malignancy rates were estimated using the concept of organ equivalent dose. Significance was defined as P < 0.005. Compared with ISRT, IFRT significantly increased doses to lung, thyroid, heart and oesophagus, whereas INRT and residual volume techniques significantly reduced doses to all OARs. The relative risks of second cancers were significantly higher with IFRT compared with ISRT for lung, breast and thyroid; INRT and residual volume resulted in significantly lower relative risks compared with ISRT for lung, breast and thyroid. The median excess absolute risks of second cancers were consistently lowest for the residual technique and highest for IFRT in terms of thyroid, lung and breast cancers. The risk of oesophageal cancer was similar for all four techniques. Overall, the absolute risk of second cancers was very similar for ISRT and INRT. Decreasing treatment volumes from IFRT to ISRT, INRT or residual volume reduces radiation exposure to OARs. Second malignancy modelling suggests that this reduction in treatment volumes will lead to a reduction in absolute excess second malignancy. Little difference was observed in second malignancy risks between ISRT and INRT, supporting the use of ISRT in the absence of a pre

  6. Involved-Field Radiotherapy versus Elective Nodal Irradiation in Combination with Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Bao, Yong; Ma, Hong-Lian; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yan; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qi-Chao; Xie, Cong-Hua

    2013-01-01

    This prospective randomized study is to evaluate the locoregional failure and its impact on survival by comparing involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) with elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. It appears that higher dose could be delivered in IFRT arm than that in ENI arm, and IFRT did not increase the risk of initially uninvolved or isolated nodal failures. Both a tendency of improved locoregional progression-free survival and a significant increased overall survival rate are in favor of IFRT arm in this study. PMID:23762840

  7. Dosimetric Comparison of Involved-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Photon Radiotherapy and Breast-Sparing Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Female Pediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L., E-mail: dandolin@iupui.edu; Hoene, Ted; Xiao, Lu

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the potential reduction in breast dose for young girls with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) treated with breast-sparing proton therapy (BS-PT) as compared with three-dimensional conformal involved-field photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The Clarian Health Cancer Registry was queried for female pediatric patients with the diagnosis of HL who received radiotherapy at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center during 2006-2009. The original CT simulation images were obtained, and 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans delivering 21 Gy or cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 14 fractions were created for each patient. Dose-volume histogram data were collected for both 3D-CRT and BS-PTmore » plans and compared by paired t test for correlated samples. Results: The cancer registry provided 10 female patients with Ann Arbor Stage II HL, aged 10-18 years at the time of treatment. Both mean and maximum breast dose were significantly less with BS-PT compared with 3D-CRT: 0.95 CGE vs. 4.70 Gy (p < 0.001) and 21.07 CGE vs. 23.11 Gy (p < 0.001), respectively. The volume of breast receiving 1.0 Gy/CGE and 5.0 Gy/CGE was also significantly less with BS-PT, 194 cm{sup 3} and 93 cm{sup 3}, respectively, compared with 790 cm{sup 3} and 360 cm{sup 3} with 3D-CRT (p = 0.009, 0.013). Conclusion: Breast-sparing proton therapy has the potential to reduce unnecessary breast dose in young girls with HL by as much as 80% relative to involved-field 3D-CRT.« less

  8. Dosimetric Comparison of Involved-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Photon Radiotherapy and Breast-Sparing Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Female Pediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Hoene, Ted; Xiao, Lu; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey; Chang, Andrew L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the potential reduction in breast dose for young girls with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) treated with breast-sparing proton therapy (BS-PT) as compared with three-dimensional conformal involved-field photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The Clarian Health Cancer Registry was queried for female pediatric patients with the diagnosis of HL who received radiotherapy at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center during 2006-2009. The original CT simulation images were obtained, and 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans delivering 21 Gy or cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 14 fractions were created for each patient. Dose-volume histogram data were collected for both 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans and compared by paired t test for correlated samples. Results: The cancer registry provided 10 female patients with Ann Arbor Stage II HL, aged 10-18 years at the time of treatment. Both mean and maximum breast dose were significantly less with BS-PT compared with 3D-CRT: 0.95 CGE vs. 4.70 Gy (p < 0.001) and 21.07 CGE vs. 23.11 Gy (p < 0.001), respectively. The volume of breast receiving 1.0 Gy/CGE and 5.0 Gy/CGE was also significantly less with BS-PT, 194 cm{sup 3} and 93 cm{sup 3}, respectively, compared with 790 cm{sup 3} and 360 cm{sup 3} with 3D-CRT (p = 0.009, 0.013). Conclusion: Breast-sparing proton therapy has the potential to reduce unnecessary breast dose in young girls with HL by as much as 80% relative to involved-field 3D-CRT.

  9. Treatment-related acute esophagitis for patients with locoregionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with involved-field radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ad, Voichita; Leiby, Benjamin; Witek, Matthew; Xiao, Ying; Cui, Yunfeng; Dai, Yang; Cao, Junsheng; Axelrod, Rita; Campling, Barbara; Both, Stefan; Werner-Wasik, Maria

    2014-10-01

    To explore the incidence and risk factors for treatment-related acute esophagitis associated with involved-field radiation therapy (RT) delivered concurrently with chemotherapy for patients with locoregionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Forty-nine consecutive patients diagnosed with locoregionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were treated using involved-field RT. Radiotherapy target volumes included the primary lung tumor and involved mediastinal lymphadenopathy as defined on imaging studies including computed tomography of the chest and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography. The patients were treated to a median total dose of 63 Gy (range, 55.8 to 74 Gy) using daily fractions of 1.8 or 2.0 Gy. No elective radiotherapy of mediastinal lymph nodes was used. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was delivered to all patients. Treatment-related toxicity was evaluated during the course of RT and subsequent follow-up visits. Thirty-one (63%) patients were female and 18 (37%) were male. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 68 years (range, 36 to 83 y). Thirty-one patients (63%) developed treatment-related acute esophagitis: 24 patients (49%) grade 2 and 7 (14%) patients grade 3 esophagitis, with the peak occurring during the seventh week of radiotherapy. No grade ≥ 4 esophagitis was seen in this cohort. Eighteen patients (37%) did not develop radiation-induced esophagitis associated with their course of chemoradiotherapy. In the univariate analysis, age at the time of diagnosis, radiation dose per fraction, and total volume of the esophagus were significantly associated with the risk of acute esophagitis. Increasing age reduced the risk of acute esophagitis (odds ratio [OR] for 10-y increase = 0.40) as did increasing total esophagus volume (OR for 10-U increase = 0.27). Dose per fraction of 1.8 Gy was associated with lower risk of acute esophagitis when compared with dose per fraction of 2 Gy (OR = 0.19). Marginal

  10. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Annemarie T; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-05-01

    Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute radiation esophagitis caused by high-dose involved field radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin and vinorelbine for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yuuki; Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Inaba, Koji; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kubota, Kaoru; Murakami, Naoya; Morota, Madoka; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Tamura, Tomohide; Nemoto, Kenji; Itami, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Purpose of this study is to obtain dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors and threshold values for radiation esophagitis caused by high-dose involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) with concurrent chemotherapy in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thirty-two patients treated by 66 Gy/33 Fr, 72 Gy/36 Fr, and 78 Gy/39 Fr thoracic radiotherapy without elective nodal irradiation plus concurrent cisplatin and vinorelvine were reviewed. Acute radiation esophagitis was evaluated according to common terminology criteria for adverse events version 4.0, and correlations between grade 2 or worse radiation esophagitis and DVH parameters were investigated. Grade 0-1, 2, 3, and 4-5 of radiation esophagitis were seen in 11 (34.4%), 20 (62.5%), 1 (3.1%), and 0 (0%) of the patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that whole esophagus V35 is a predictor of radiation esophagitis (OR = 0.74 [95%CI; 0.60-0.91], p = 0.006). There is a significant difference (38.4% vs. 89.4%, p = 0.027) in the cumulative rates of acute esophagitis according to V35 values of more than 20% versus less. As compared with other factors concerning patient and tumor and treatment factors, V35 ≤ 20% of the esophagus was an independent predictor (HR 5 0.29 [95%CI; 0.09-0.85], p 5 0.025). In conclusion, whole esophagus V35 < 20% is proposed in high-dose IFRT with concurrent chemotherapy for stage III NSCLC patients.

  12. Predicted Risk of Radiation-Induced Cancers After Involved Field and Involved Node Radiotherapy With or Without Intensity Modulation for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma in Female Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Damien C., E-mail: damien.weber@unige.ch; Johanson, Safora; Peguret, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the excess relative risk (ERR) of radiation-induced cancers (RIC) in female patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) female patients treated with conformal (3DCRT), intensity modulated (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc (RA) radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans for 10 early-stage HL female patients were computed for 3DCRT, IMRT, and RA with involved field RT (IFRT) and involvednode RT (INRT) radiation fields. Organs at risk dose--volume histograms were computed and inter-compared for IFRT vs. INRT and 3DCRT vs. IMRT/RA, respectively. The ERR for cancer induction in breasts, lungs, and thyroid was estimated using both linear and nonlinear models. Results:more » The mean estimated ERR for breast, lung, and thyroid were significantly lower (p < 0.01) with INRT than with IFRT planning, regardless of the radiation delivery technique used, assuming a linear dose-risk relationship. We found that using the nonlinear model, the mean ERR values were significantly (p < 0.01) increased with IMRT or RA compared to those with 3DCRT planning for the breast, lung, and thyroid, using an IFRT paradigm. After INRT planning, IMRT or RA increased the risk of RIC for lung and thyroid only. Conclusions: In this comparative planning study, using a nonlinear dose--risk model, IMRT or RA increased the estimated risk of RIC for breast, lung, and thyroid for HL female patients. This study also suggests that INRT planning, compared to IFRT planning, may reduce the ERR of RIC when risk is predicted using a linear model. Observing the opposite effect, with a nonlinear model, however, questions the validity of these biologically parameterized models.« less

  13. Involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT) versus elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy for 239 esophageal cancers: a single institutional retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Omori, Mami; Imae, Toshikazu; Okuma, Kae; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-08-14

    This retrospective study on early and locally advanced esophageal cancer was conducted to evaluate locoregional failure and its impact on survival by comparing involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) with elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy. We assessed all patients with esophageal cancer of stages I-IV treated with definitive radiotherapy from June 2000 to March 2014. Between 2000 and 2011, ENI was used for all cases excluding high age cases. After Feb 2011, a prospective study about IFRT was started, and therefore IFRT was used since then for all cases. Concurrent chemotherapy regimen was nedaplatin (80 mg/m(2) at D1 and D29) and 5-fluorouracil (800 mg/m(2) at D1-4 and D29-32). Of the 239 consecutive patients assessed (120 ENI vs. 119 IFRT), 59 patients (24.7%) had stage IV disease and all patients received at least one cycle of chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 34.0 months. There were differences in 3-year local control (44.8% vs. 55.5%, p = 0.039), distant control (53.8% vs. 69.9%, p = 0.021) and overall survival (34.8% vs. 51.6%, p = 0.087) rates between ENI vs. IFRT, respectively. Patients treated with IFRT (8 %) demonstrated a significantly lower risk (p = 0.047) of high grade late toxicities than with ENI (16%). IFRT did not increase the risk of initially uninvolved or isolated nodal failures (27.5% in ENI and 13.4% in IFRT). Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Both tendencies of improved loco-regional progression-free survival and a significant increased overall survival rate favored the IFRT arm over the ENI arm in this study.

  14. SU-F-P-52: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Trials Comparing Elective Nodal Irradiation with Involved-Field Irradiation for Conformal Or Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Zhang, R; Zhou, Z; Qiao, X

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer by a metaanalysis. Methods: Wanfang, CNKI, VIP, CBM databases, PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were searched to identify the controlled clinical trials of elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. The obtained data were analyzed using Stata 11.0. The difference between two groups was estimated by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: A total of 12 controlled clinical trials involving 1095 esophageal cancer patients, which were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the elective nodal irradiation group reduced the rates of out-field failure comparing with involved-field irradiation group (OR=3.727, P=0.007). However, the rates of ≥grades 3 acute radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were significantly higher in the elective nodal irradiation group than in the involved-field irradiation group (OR=0.348, P=0.001, OR=0.385, P=0.000). 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates (OR=0.966, P=0.837, OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732P=0.098) and 1-, 3-, 5-year survival rates were similar in the two groups ( OR=0.966, P=0.837; OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732, P=0.098; OR=0.952, P=0.756; OR=1.149, P=0.422; OR=0.768, P=0.120). It is the same with the rates of distant metastasis (OR=0.986, P=0.937). Conclusion: Compared with involved-field irradiation, the elective nodal irradiation can reduce the rates of out-field failure for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. However, its advantage of local control and survival rates is not obvious and it increases the incidence

  15. SU-F-P-52: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Trials Comparing Elective Nodal Irradiation with Involved-Field Irradiation for Conformal Or Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Zhang, R; Zhou, Z

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer by a metaanalysis. Methods: Wanfang, CNKI, VIP, CBM databases, PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were searched to identify the controlled clinical trials of elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. The obtained data were analyzed using Stata 11.0. The difference between two groups was estimated by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: A total of 12 controlled clinical trials involving 1095 esophagealmore » cancer patients, which were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the elective nodal irradiation group reduced the rates of out-field failure comparing with involved-field irradiation group (OR=3.727, P=0.007). However, the rates of ≥grades 3 acute radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were significantly higher in the elective nodal irradiation group than in the involved-field irradiation group (OR=0.348, P=0.001, OR=0.385, P=0.000). 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates (OR=0.966, P=0.837, OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732P=0.098) and 1-, 3-, 5-year survival rates were similar in the two groups ( OR=0.966, P=0.837; OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732, P=0.098; OR=0.952, P=0.756; OR=1.149, P=0.422; OR=0.768, P=0.120). It is the same with the rates of distant metastasis (OR=0.986, P=0.937). Conclusion: Compared with involved-field irradiation, the elective nodal irradiation can reduce the rates of out-field failure for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. However, its advantage of local control and survival rates is not obvious and it increases the

  16. A prospective study of reduced-dose three-course CHOP followed by involved-field radiotherapy for patients 70 years old or more with localized aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, Naoto; Oguchi, Masahiko; Isobe, Koichi

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: We conducted a multicenter prospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of reduced-dose three-course CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone) followed by involved-field radiotherapy for elderly patients with localized aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The primary endpoint was compliance with the combined modality. Methods and Materials: This study included untreated patients, {>=}70 years old, with diffuse aggressive lymphoma, Stage IA or contiguous nonbulky Stage IIA. 80%-CHOP (cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m{sup 2}, doxorubicin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, vincristine 1.1 mg/m{sup 2}, and prednisolone at 80 mg/day for 5 days) was repeated every 3 weeks. After three cycles of chemotherapy, involved-field radiotherapy was performedmore » with a radiation dose of 30-50 Gy in 15-28 fractions. Results: Twenty-four patients with a median age of 75 years (range, 70-84 years) were enrolled. The compliance rate of the protocol study was 87.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67.6-97.3). Three patients received only two cycles of chemotherapy because of toxicity or second neoplasm. There were no deaths caused by severe toxicity. The 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 83.1% (95% CI, 75.4-90.8) and 82.9% (95% CI, 75.1-90.6), respectively. Conclusion: Three-course 80%-CHOP followed by involved-field radiotherapy may be safe for administration to elderly patients over 70 years old. The next step is to evaluate three-course 80%-CHOP and rituximab followed by radiotherapy in elderly patients with localized disease.« less

  17. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi; Chiba, Yasutaka

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gymore » in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.« less

  18. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  19. Long-term outcomes for patients with limited stage follicular lymphoma: involved regional radiotherapy versus involved node radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Belinda A; Voss, Nick; Woods, Ryan; Gascoyne, Randy D; Morris, James; Pickles, Tom; Connors, Joseph M; Savage, Kerry J

    2010-08-15

    Given the indolent behavior of follicular lymphoma (FL), it is controversial whether limited stage FL can be cured using radiotherapy (RT). Furthermore, the optimal RT field size is unclear. The authors of this report investigated the long-term outcomes of patients with limited stage FL who received RT alone and studied the impact of reducing the RT field size from involved regional RT (IRRT) to involved node RT with margins up to 5 cm (INRTinvolved lymph node group plus>or=1 adjacent, uninvolved lymph node group(s). INRTinvolved lymph node(s) with margins60 years, stage IA disease in 76% of patients, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in 7% of patients, grade 3A tumors in 12% of patients, and lymph node size>or=5 cm in 19% of patients. The 2 RT groups were IRRT (142 patients; 60%) and INRTor=5 cm (P=.008) and male gender (P=.042). Risk factors for OS were age>60 years (P<.001), elevated LDH (P=.007), lymph nodes>or=5 cm (P=.016), and grade 3A tumors (P=.036). RT field size did not have an impact on PFS or OS. Disease recurrence after 10 years was uncommon in patients who had limited stage FL, suggesting that a cure is possible. Reducing RT fields to INRT

  20. Mild Toxicity and Favorable Prognosis of High-Dose and Extended Involved-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Patients With Early-Stage Nasal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hua; Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi Province; Li Yexiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The value of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to assess the dosimetric parameters, toxicity, and treatment outcomes of patients with nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 42 patients with early-stage nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma underwent definitive high-dose and extended involved-field IMRT with or without combination chemotherapy. The median radiation dose to the primary tumor was 50 Gy. The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated in all patients. The locoregional control, overall survival, and progression-free survivalmore » were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The average mean dose delivered to the planning target volume was 55.5 Gy. Only 1.3% and 2.5% of the planning target volume received <90% and 95% of the prescribed dose, respectively, indicating excellent planning target volume coverage. The mean dose and average dose to the parotid glands was 15 Gy and 14 Gy, respectively. With a median follow-up time of 27 months, the 2-year locoregional control, overall survival, and progression-free survivalrate was 93%, 78%, and 74%, respectively. No Grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusions: High-dose and extended involved-field IMRT for patients with early-stage nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma showed favorable locoregional control, overall survival, and progression-free survival, with mild toxicity. The dose constraints of IMRT for the parotid glands can be limited to <20 Gy in these patients.« less

  1. Involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) versus elective nodal irradiation (ENI) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of incidence of elective nodal failure (ENF).

    PubMed

    Li, Ruijian; Yu, Liang; Lin, Sixiang; Wang, Lina; Dong, Xin; Yu, Lingxia; Li, Weiyi; Li, Baosheng

    2016-09-21

    The use of involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) has generated concern about the increasing incidence of elective nodal failure (ENF) in contrast to elective nodal irradiation (ENI). This meta-analysis aimed to provide more reliable and up-to-date evidence on the incidence of ENF between IFRT and ENI. We searched three databases for eligible studies where locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients received IFRT or ENI. Outcome of interest was the incidence of ENF. The fixed-effects model was used to pool outcomes across the studies. There were 3 RCTs and 3 cohort studies included with low risk of bias. There was no significant difference in incidence of ENF between IFRT and ENI either among RCTs (RR = 1.38, 95 % CI: 0.59-3.25, p = 0.46) or among cohort studies (RR = 0.99, 95 % CI: 0.46-2.10, p = 0.97). There was also no significant difference in incidence of ENF between IFRT and ENI when RCTs and cohort studies were combined (RR = 1.15, 95 % CI: 0.65-2.01, p = 0.64). I 2 of test for heterogeneity was 0 %. This meta-analysis provides more reliable and stable evidence that there is no significant difference in incidence of ENF between IFRT and ENI.

  2. Feasibility of Elective Nodal Irradiation (ENI) and Involved Field Irradiation (IFI) in Radiotherapy for the Elderly Patients (Aged ≥ 70 Years) with Esophageal Squamous Cell Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis from a Single Institute.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wang; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Fang; Han, Anqin; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis to assess the feasibility of involved field irradiation (IFI) in elderly patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). We performed a retrospective review of the records of elderly patients (≥ 70 years) with unresectable ESCC and no distant metastases who received treatment with radiotherapy between January 2009 and March 2013. According to the irradiation volume, patients were allocated into either the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) group or the IFI group. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and treatment-related toxicities were compared between the two groups. A total of 137 patients were enrolled. Fifty-four patients (39.4%) were allocated to the ENI group and 83 patients (60.6%) to the IFI group, the median doses in the two groups were 60 Gy and 59.4 Gy, respectively. For the entire group, the median survival time (MST) and PFS were 16 months and 12 months, respectively. The median PFS and 3-year PFS rate in the ENI group were 13 months and 20.6%, compared to 11 months and 21.0% in the IFI groups (p = 0.61). The MST and 3-year OS rate in the ENI and IFI groups were 17 months and 26.4% and 15.5 months and 21.7%, respectively (p = 0.25). The rate of grade ≥ 3 acute irradiation esophagitis in the ENI group was significantly higher than that in the IFI group (18.5% vs. 6.0%; p = 0.027). Other grade ≥ 3 treatment-related toxicities did not significantly differ between the two groups. IFI resulted in decreased irradiation toxicities without sacrificing OS in elderly patients with ESCC.

  3. Feasibility of Elective Nodal Irradiation (ENI) and Involved Field Irradiation (IFI) in Radiotherapy for the Elderly Patients (Aged ≥ 70 Years) with Esophageal Squamous Cell Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis from a Single Institute

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Fang; Han, Anqin; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a retrospective analysis to assess the feasibility of involved field irradiation (IFI) in elderly patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective review of the records of elderly patients (≥ 70 years) with unresectable ESCC and no distant metastases who received treatment with radiotherapy between January 2009 and March 2013. According to the irradiation volume, patients were allocated into either the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) group or the IFI group. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and treatment-related toxicities were compared between the two groups. Results A total of 137 patients were enrolled. Fifty-four patients (39.4%) were allocated to the ENI group and 83 patients (60.6%) to the IFI group, the median doses in the two groups were 60 Gy and 59.4 Gy, respectively. For the entire group, the median survival time (MST) and PFS were 16 months and 12 months, respectively. The median PFS and 3-year PFS rate in the ENI group were 13 months and 20.6%, compared to 11 months and 21.0% in the IFI groups (p = 0.61). The MST and 3-year OS rate in the ENI and IFI groups were 17 months and 26.4% and 15.5 months and 21.7%, respectively (p = 0.25). The rate of grade ≥ 3 acute irradiation esophagitis in the ENI group was significantly higher than that in the IFI group (18.5% vs. 6.0%; p = 0.027). Other grade ≥ 3 treatment-related toxicities did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusions IFI resulted in decreased irradiation toxicities without sacrificing OS in elderly patients with ESCC. PMID:26636574

  4. Could radiotherapy effectiveness be enhanced by electromagnetic field treatment?

    PubMed

    Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Salinas-Asensio, María del Mar; Calvente, Irene; Ríos-Arrabal, Sandra; León, Josefa; Román-Marinetto, Elisa; Olea, Nicolás; Núñez, María Isabel

    2013-07-17

    One of the main goals in radiobiology research is to enhance radiotherapy effectiveness without provoking any increase in toxicity. In this context, it has been proposed that electromagnetic fields (EMFs), known to be modulators of proliferation rate, enhancers of apoptosis and inductors of genotoxicity, might control tumor recruitment and, thus, provide therapeutic benefits. Scientific evidence shows that the effects of ionizing radiation on cellular compartments and functions are strengthened by EMF. Although little is known about the potential role of EMFs in radiotherapy (RT), the radiosensitizing effect of EMFs described in the literature could support their use to improve radiation effectiveness. Thus, we hypothesized that EMF exposure might enhance the ionizing radiation effect on tumor cells, improving the effects of RT. The aim of this paper is to review reports of the effects of EMFs in biological systems and their potential therapeutic benefits in radiotherapy.

  5. Could Radiotherapy Effectiveness Be Enhanced by Electromagnetic Field Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Artacho-Cordón; del Mar, Salinas-Asensio María; Irene, Calvente; Sandra, Ríos-Arrabal; Josefa, León; Elisa, Román-Marinetto; Nicolás, Olea; Isabel, Núñez María

    2013-01-01

    One of the main goals in radiobiology research is to enhance radiotherapy effectiveness without provoking any increase in toxicity. In this context, it has been proposed that electromagnetic fields (EMFs), known to be modulators of proliferation rate, enhancers of apoptosis and inductors of genotoxicity, might control tumor recruitment and, thus, provide therapeutic benefits. Scientific evidence shows that the effects of ionizing radiation on cellular compartments and functions are strengthened by EMF. Although little is known about the potential role of EMFs in radiotherapy (RT), the radiosensitizing effect of EMFs described in the literature could support their use to improve radiation effectiveness. Thus, we hypothesized that EMF exposure might enhance the ionizing radiation effect on tumor cells, improving the effects of RT. The aim of this paper is to review reports of the effects of EMFs in biological systems and their potential therapeutic benefits in radiotherapy. PMID:23867611

  6. Long term outcome of localized aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with a short weekly chemotherapy regimen (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, bleomycin, vincristine, and prednisone) and involved field radiotherapy: result of a Gruppo Italiano Multiregionale per lo Studio dei Linfomi e Leucenie (GIMURELL) study.

    PubMed

    Cabras, Maria Giuseppina; Mamusa, Angela Maria; Vitolo, Umberto; Freilone R, Roberto; Dessalvi, Paolo; Orsucci, Lorella; Tonso, Anna; Levis, Alessandro; Liberati, Marina; Lay, Giancarlo; Angelucci, Emanuele

    2009-09-01

    Recently, management of limited stage diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) is trending toward a low intensity chemotherapy approach. Since 1993 we have used a brief weekly (6 weeks) chemotherapy scheme (Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, Bleomycin, Vincristine, and Prednisone = ACOP-B) followed by involved field radiotherapy in 207 consecutive patients with well defined localized DLCL without age limit (median 57 years, range 18-85). Treatment was completed as designed in 183 of 207 patients (88%). One hundred and ninety-nine patients (96%) achieved complete remission. At a median follow-up of 66 months 170 patients are alive (82%), 168 of them free of disease. Twenty-nine patients experienced relapse after achieving a complete remission. Kaplan-Meier, risk of relapse was 24% after 13 years. Thirty (14.5%) patients have died, 14 (6.8%) due to lymphoma progression, one due to regimen toxicity and 15 (7.2%) from other causes while remaining in complete remission. The probability of overall survival and event free survival at 13 years was 78% (95% CI 70-87%) and 63% (95% CI 50-75), respectively. Crude rate of secondary malignancy was 5.26 /1000 person-years. The ACOP-B regimen plus involved field radiotherapy is well tolerated both short and long term and is an effective chemotherapy scheme for very well defined limited stage aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas in all age categories.

  7. Implementation of small field radiotherapy dosimetry for spinal metastase case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofikoh, Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to know dose profile of small field radiotherapy in the spinal metastase case with source axis distance (SAD) techniques. In addition, we evaluated and compared the dose planning of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and conventional techniques to measurements with Exradin A16 and Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimeters. The results showed that film EBT3 had a highest precision and accuracy with the average of the standard deviation of ±1.7 and maximum discrepancy of 2.6 %. In addition, the average value of Full Wave Half Maximum (FWHM) and its largest deviation in small field size of 0.8 x 0.8 cm2 are 0.82 cm and 16.3 % respectively, while it was found around 2.36 cm and 3 % for the field size of 2.4 x 2.4 cm2. The comparison between penumbra width and the collimation was around of 37.1 % for the field size of 0.8 x 0.8 cm2, while it was found of 12.4 % for the field size of 2.4 x 2.4 cm2.

  8. Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  9. Quantification of static magnetic field effects on radiotherapy ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, J.; O'Grady, F.; Young, R.; Duane, S.; Budgell, G. J.

    2017-03-01

    Integrated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and radiotherapy (RT) delivery machines are currently being developed, with some already in clinical use. It is anticipated that the strong magnetic field used in some MR-RT designs will have a significant impact on routine measurements of dose in the MR-linac performed using ionization chambers, which provide traceability back to a primary standard definition of dose. In particular, the presence of small air gaps around ionization chambers may introduce unacceptably high uncertainty into these measurements. In this study, we investigate and quantify the variation attributable to air gaps for several routinely-used cylindrical ionization chambers in a magnetic field, as well as the effect of the magnetic field alone on the response of the chambers. The measurements were performed in a Co-60 beam, while the ionization chambers were positioned in custom-made Perspex phantoms between the poles of an electromagnet, which was capable of generating magnetic fields of up to 2 T field strength, although measurements were focused around 1.5 T. When an asymmetric air gap was rotated at cardinal angles around the ionization chambers investigated here, variation of up to 8.5  ±  0.2 percentage points (PTW 31006 chamber) was observed in an applied magnetic field of 1.5 T. The minimum peak-to-peak variation was 1.1  ±  0.1% (Exradin A1SL). When the same experiment was performed with a well-defined air gap of known position using the PTW 30013 chamber, a variation of 3.8  ±  0.2% was observed. When water was added to the phantom cavity to eliminate all air gaps, the variation for the PTW 30013 was reduced to 0.2  ±  0.01%.

  10. Quantification of static magnetic field effects on radiotherapy ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Agnew, J; O'Grady, F; Young, R; Duane, S; Budgell, G J

    2017-03-07

    Integrated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and radiotherapy (RT) delivery machines are currently being developed, with some already in clinical use. It is anticipated that the strong magnetic field used in some MR-RT designs will have a significant impact on routine measurements of dose in the MR-linac performed using ionization chambers, which provide traceability back to a primary standard definition of dose. In particular, the presence of small air gaps around ionization chambers may introduce unacceptably high uncertainty into these measurements. In this study, we investigate and quantify the variation attributable to air gaps for several routinely-used cylindrical ionization chambers in a magnetic field, as well as the effect of the magnetic field alone on the response of the chambers. The measurements were performed in a Co-60 beam, while the ionization chambers were positioned in custom-made Perspex phantoms between the poles of an electromagnet, which was capable of generating magnetic fields of up to 2 T field strength, although measurements were focused around 1.5 T. When an asymmetric air gap was rotated at cardinal angles around the ionization chambers investigated here, variation of up to 8.5  ±  0.2 percentage points (PTW 31006 chamber) was observed in an applied magnetic field of 1.5 T. The minimum peak-to-peak variation was 1.1  ±  0.1% (Exradin A1SL). When the same experiment was performed with a well-defined air gap of known position using the PTW 30013 chamber, a variation of 3.8  ±  0.2% was observed. When water was added to the phantom cavity to eliminate all air gaps, the variation for the PTW 30013 was reduced to 0.2  ±  0.01%.

  11. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Dröge, L H; Hinsche, T; Canis, M; Alt-Epping, B; Hess, C F; Wolff, H A

    2014-02-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting.

  12. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  13. A Dosimetric Evaluation of Conventional Helmet Field Irradiation Versus Two-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; Shiao, Stephen L.; Knisely, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.knisely@yale.edu

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric differences between conventional two-beam helmet field irradiation (external beam radiotherapy, EBRT) of the brain and a two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who received helmet field irradiation at our institution were selected for study. External beam radiotherapy portals were planned per usual practice. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields were created using the identical field angles as the EBRT portals. Each brain was fully contoured along with the spinal cord to the bottom of the C2 vertebral body. This volume was then expanded symmetrically by 0.5 cm to construct the planning target volume. An IMRT plan was constructed using uniform optimization constraints. For both techniques, the nominal prescribed dose was 3,000 cGy in 10 fractions of 300 cGy using 6-MV photons. Comparative dose-volume histograms were generated for each patient and analyzed. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved dose uniformity over EBRT for whole brain radiotherapy. The mean percentage of brain receiving >105% of dose was reduced from 29.3% with EBRT to 0.03% with IMRT. The mean maximum dose was reduced from 3,378 cGy (113%) for EBRT to 3,162 cGy (105%) with IMRT. The mean percent volume receiving at least 98% of the prescribed dose was 99.5% for the conventional technique and 100% for IMRT. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces dose inhomogeneity, particularly for the midline frontal lobe structures where hot spots occur with conventional two-field EBRT. More study needs to be done addressing the clinical implications of optimizing dose uniformity and its effect on long-term cognitive function in selected long-lived patients.

  14. Determination of the optimal method for the field-in-field technique in breast tangential radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-07-01

    Several studies have reported the usefulness of the field-in-field (FIF) technique in breast radiotherapy. However, the methods for the FIF technique used in these studies vary. These methods were classified into three categories. We simulated a radiotherapy plan with each method and analyzed the outcomes. In the first method, a pair of subfields was added to each main field: the single pair of subfields method (SSM). In the second method, three pairs of subfields were added to each main field: the multiple pairs of subfields method (MSM). In the third method, subfields were alternately added: the alternate subfields method (ASM). A total of 51 patients were enrolled in this study. The maximum dose to the planning target volume (PTV) (Dmax) and the volumes of the PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100%) were calculated. The thickness of the breast between the chest wall and skin surface was measured, and patients were divided into two groups according to the median. In the overall series, the average V100% with ASM (60.3%) was significantly higher than with SSM (52.6%) and MSM (48.7%). In the thin breast group as well, the average V100% with ASM (57.3%) and SSM (54.2%) was significantly higher than that with MSM (43.3%). In the thick breast group, the average V100% with ASM (63.4%) was significantly higher than that with SSM (51.0%) and MSM (54.4%). ASM resulted in better dose distribution, regardless of the breast size. Moreover, planning for ASM required a relatively short time. ASM was considered the most preferred method. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  15. Self-reported Conflicts of Interest and Trial Sponsorship of Clinical Trials in Prostate Cancer Involving Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Hamstra, Dan A; Feng, Felix Y; Arruda, Fernando Freire; Gadia, Rafael; Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Marta, Gustavo Nader; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Silva, João Luis Fernandes da; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Spratt, Daniel E

    2018-01-01

    To examine the association between trial sponsorship and conflicts of interest (COI) with clinical trial conclusions for prostate cancer trials related to radiotherapy. The MEDLINE database was searched for all prostate cancer clinical trials published between 2004 and 2013 and identified 1396 studies. Two investigators independently identified trials published in the English language of ≥30 patients, and extracted relevant data. Clinical trials were classified according to trial characteristics, sponsorship source and type, COI, and study conclusion, and analyzed by univariable and multivariable logistic regression. Of 240 eligible trials, 160 (67.5%) evaluated drugs without radiotherapy, 60 (25%) involved radiotherapy, and 18 (7.5%) involved procedures without radiotherapy. Of the 60 radiotherapy trials eligible for analysis, positive sponsorship and potential COI were present in 58.3% and 20% of trials, respectively. Study conclusions were positive, negative, or neutral in 78.3%, 5%, and 16.7% of trials, respectively. No association was found between positive conclusions and either industry support of potential COI. Positive conclusions were reported in 86.7% and 83.3% of trials with sponsorship and COI, respectively, as compared with 75.6% and 77.1% of those without sponsorship (P=0.37) and COI (P=0.64). Sponsorship was significantly associated with radiotherapy trials combined with drugs (odds ratio 5.5, P=0.01) and higher-risk disease (odds ratio 4.71, P=0.01). The presence of sponsorship was associated with radiotherapy trials involving drugs or studying higher-risk prostate cancer. However, there were no identified associations between study conclusion and sponsorship type or COI.

  16. Local field radiotherapy without elective nodal irradiation for postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Takuya; Yamazaki, Hideya; Suzuki, Gen; Aibe, Norihiro; Masui, Koji; Tatekawa, Kotoha; Sasaki, Naomi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Satoaki; Yamada, Kei

    2017-09-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer; however, the optimal treatment field remains controversial. This study aims to evaluate the outcome of local field radiotherapy without elective nodal irradiation for postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer. We retrospectively investigated 35 patients treated for a postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer with local field radiotherapy between December 2008 and March 2016. The median irradiation dose was 60 Gy (range: 50-67.5 Gy). Thirty-one (88.6%) patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up period was 18 months (range: 5-94 months). The 2-year overall survival was 55.7%, with a median survival time of 29.9 months. In the univariate analysis, the maximal diameter ≤20 mm (P = 0.0383), solitary lesion (P = 0.0352), and the complete remission after treatment (P = 0.00411) had a significantly better prognosis. A total of 27 of 35 patients (77.1%) had progressive disease (loco-regional failure [n = 9], distant metastasis [n = 7], and both loco-regional failure and distant metastasis [n = 11]). No patients had Grade 3 or greater mucositis. Local field radiotherapy is a considerable treatment option for postoperative loco-regional recurrence of esophageal cancer.

  17. MR-guided breast radiotherapy: feasibility and magnetic-field impact on skin dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; den Hartogh, Mariska D.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; van Asselen, Bram

    2013-09-01

    The UMC Utrecht MRI/linac (MRL) design provides image guidance with high soft-tissue contrast, directly during radiotherapy (RT). Breast cancer patients are a potential group to benefit from better guidance in the MRL. However, due to the electron return effect, the skin dose can be increased in presence of a magnetic field. Since large skin areas are generally involved in breast RT, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the skin dose, for whole-breast irradiation (WBI) and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). In ten patients with early-stage breast cancer, targets and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on postoperative CT scans co-registered with MRI. The OARs included the skin, comprising the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions. Three intensity-modulated RT techniques were considered (2× WBI, 1× APBI). Individual beam geometries were used for all patients. Specially developed MRL treatment-planning software was used. Acceptable plans were generated for 0 T, 0.35 T and 1.5 T, using a class solution. The skin dose was augmented in WBI in the presence of a magnetic field, which is a potential drawback, whereas in APBI the induced effects were negligible. This opens possibilities for developing MR-guided partial-breast treatments in the MRL.

  18. Out-of-field doses in radiotherapy: Input to epidemiological studies and dose-risk models.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Out-of-field doses in radiotherapy have been increasingly studied in recent years because of the generally improved survival of patients who have received radiotherapy as part of their treatment for cancer and their subsequent risk of a second malignancy. This short article attempts to identify some current problems, challenges and opportunities for dosimetry developments in this field. Out-of-field doses and derived risk estimates contribute to general knowledge about radiation effects on humans as well as contributing to risk-benefit considerations for the individual patient. It is suggested that for input into epidemiological studies, the complete dose description (i.e. the synthesis of therapy and imaging doses from all the treatment and imaging modalities) is ideally required, although there is currently no common dosimetry framework which easily covers all modalities. A general strategy for out-of-field dose estimation requires development and improvement in several areas including (i) dosimetry in regions of steep dose gradient close to the field edge (ii) experimentally verified analytical and Monte Carlo models for out-of-field doses (iii) the validity of treatment planning system algorithms outside the field edge (iv) dosimetry of critical sub-structures in organs at risk (v) mixed field (including neutron) dosimetry in proton and ion radiotherapy and photoneutron production in high energy photon beams (vi) the most appropriate quantities to use in neutron dosimetry in a radiotherapy context and (vii) simplification of measurement methods in regions distant from the target volume. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van, E-mail: e.segarceanu@antoniusziekenhuis.nl; Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A.; Pillen, Sigrid

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. Onmore » ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.« less

  20. A Dosimetric Analysis of IMRT and Multistatic Fields Techniques for Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Soo Young; Lee, Mi Jo; Keum, Hyun Sup; Kim, Seung Jin; Youn, Seon Min

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric difference between intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using 3 or 5 beams and multistatic field technique (MSF) in radiotherapy of the left breast. We made comparative analysis of two kinds of radiotherapy that can achieve improved dose homogeneity. First is a MSF that uses both major and small irradiation fields at the same time. The other is IMRT using 3 or 5 beams with an inverse planning system using multiple static multileaf collimators. We made treatment plans for 16 early left breast cancer patients who were randomly selected and had undergone breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy, and analyzed them in the dosimetric aspect. For the mean values of V{sub 95} and dose homogeneity index, no statistically significant difference was observed among the three therapies. Extreme hot spots receiving >110% of prescribed dose were not found in any of the three methods. Using Tukey's test, IMRT showed a significantly larger increase in exposure dose to the ipsilateral lung and the heart than MSF in the low-dose area, but in the high-dose area, MSF showed a slight increase. To improve dose homogeneity, the application of MSF, which can be easily planned and applied more widely, is considered optimal as an alternative to IMRT for radiotherapy of early left breast cancer.

  1. Investigation of electron boost radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer: Is a direct electron field optimal?

    PubMed

    Aghili, M; Barzegartahamtan, M; Alikhassi, A; Mohammadpour, R

    2018-02-01

    Historically, electron boost dose mainly was delivered by a direct field in adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. In this prospective study, we investigated direct electron field, in terms of optimal coverage of tumour bed volume following localization using ultrasound and surgical clips. First, for all 24 patients, a breast sonographer drew perimeter of tumour bed on the breast skin. Then an electron boost field was outlined on the demarcated territory, and a lead wire marker compatible with CT scan was placed on the field borders by a 2cm margin. After CT scan simulation, all patients underwent adjuvant whole breast irradiation with 3D-conformal radiotherapy to 50Gy in 25 fractions. Then for boost radiotherapy, lead wire in CT images was countoured as electron boost field. Also, the tumour bed was contoured based on surgical clips (true clinical target volume and true planning target volume). Electron treatment planning was done for electron boost field. Finally isodose coverages for true planning target volume investigated. On average, 16.68% of clips planning target volume (true planning target volume; range: 0.00 to 95%) received 90% oor more of the prescribed dose when the electron treatment plan was made. Isodose curves does not provide adequate coverage on the tumour bed (clips planning target volume) when electron boost treatment planning was generated for electron boost field (en face electron field). In fact, a part of target (planning target volume-c) is missed and more doses is absorbed in normal tissue. Electron boost treatment planning (an en face electron field) following tumour bed localization using ultrasonography does not provide an optimized coverage of tumour bed volume. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. [Are extensive fields useful for radiotherapy of esophageal cancer?].

    PubMed

    Peyraga, G; Capitain, O; Rousseau, D; Rio, E; Septans, A-L; Baton, O; Marquis, A; Trémolières, P; Gustin, P; Ménager, É; Branger, F; Bressolette, M; Deutsch, É; Paumier, A

    2015-08-01

    Study of the pattern of relapse for locally advanced oesophageal cancer and analysis of the local recurrences according to irradiated volume. We performed a monocentric retrospective study of patients treated in the integrated centre of oncology (Angers, France). Two treatment strategies were used: concurrent chemoradiation alone or followed by surgery. Recurrences were classified as: locoregional, either isolated or associated with distant metastasis, and metastatic only. Locoregional relapses were subclassified as in-field, out-field, or mixed. Between March 2004 and October 2011, 168 patients were treated: 130 by chemoradiation, and 38 by chemoradiation followed by surgery. The median supero-inferior margins added to the gross tumour volume in order to create the planning tumour volume was 5cm (range: 0.5-21). Sixty-two percent of patients (n=104) relapsed: 82 locoregional relapses (49%), including 45 isolated relapses (27%) and 37 associated with distant metastasis relapses (22%), and 22 metastatic relapses (13%). From the 82 locoregional relapses, only four isolated relapses were exclusively out-field. With 5cm supero-inferior margins added to gross tumour volume, less than 3% of patients had an isolated out-field recurrence. However, half of the patients suffered in-field local recurrence and one third had metastases. These findings advocate for a limited prophylactic nodal irradiation. Trials are ongoing to assess dose escalation or surgery in order to increase local control. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Surface dose measurements in and out of field: Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Lonski, Peta; Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick; Kron, Tomas

    2017-12-01

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6MV, 6MV FFF, 10MV, 10MV FFF and 18MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Precision radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of brain tumors. This study aimed to identify global research trends in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for precision radiotherapy for brain tumors containing the key words cerebral tumor, brain tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, imaging-guided radiotherapy, dose-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic brachytherapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: 2002-2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers or book chapters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. RESULTS: The stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and imaging-guided radiotherapy are three major methods of precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. There were 260 research articles addressing precision radiotherapy for brain tumors found within the Web of Science. The USA published the most papers on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors, followed by Germany and France. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University were the most prolific research institutes for publications on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. Among the top 13 research institutes publishing in this field, seven

  5. Prognostic Value of Prevertebral Space Involvement in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Based on Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Guanqun; Mao YanPing; Chen Lei

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of prevertebral space involvement (PSI) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of data from 506 biopsy-proven, nonmetastatic NPCs was performed. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations and received IMRT as their primary treatment. Results: In this series, 161 NPC patients (31.8%) had PSI. Parapharyngeal space (p < 0.001), skull base (p < 0.001), and paranasal sinuses (p = 0.009) were associated with PSI after multivariate analysis. The 4-year overall survival (OS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) for NPC patients withmore » and without PSI was 69.1% and 89.2% (p < 0.0001), 83.9% and 96.4% (p < 0.0001), and 71.6% and 89.6% (p < 0.0001), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified PSI as an independent negative prognostic factor for both OS (HR = 1.478-4.380; p = 0.001) and DMFS (HR = 1.389-4.174; p = 0.002). Patients with PSI had similar survival rates in OS and DMFS (p = 0.241 and p = 0.493, respectively) to that of T4 disease, while the differences between PSI and T3 disease in both OS and DMFS were distinctly significant (p = 0.029 and p = 0.029, respectively). Conclusions: For NPC patients treated with IMRT, PSI was found to be an independent prognostic factor for both OS and DMFS. It seems reasonable that PSI should be classified as a T4 disease on the basis of the current American Joint Committee on Cancer staging classification criteria.« less

  6. Adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer: A sequential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Kwon, Janice; D'Souza, David

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiotherapy for women with advanced endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective cohort study of women with Stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) and carboplatin (350 mg/m{sup 2}) every 3 weeks, followed sequentially by external beam radiotherapy (RT) to the pelvis (45 Gy), followed by an additional two cycles of chemotherapy. Para-aortic RT and/or HDR vault brachytherapy (BT) were added at the discretion of the treating physician. Results: Thirty-three patients (median age,more » 63 years) received treatment between April 2002 and June 2005. Median follow-up was 21 months. Stage distribution was as follows: IIIA (21%), IIIC (70%), IVB (9%). Combination chemotherapy was successfully administered to 30 patients (91%) and 25 patients (76%), before and after RT respectively. Nine patients (27%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 chemotherapy toxicities. All patients completed pelvic RT; 19 (58%) received standard 4-field RT and 14 (42%) received intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Ten (30%) received extended field radiation. Four patients (12%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 RT toxicities. Six (18%) patients developed chronic RT toxicity. There were no treatment-related deaths. Two-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 55%. There was only one pelvic relapse (3%). Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with combination chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer was well tolerated. This protocol may be suitable for further evaluation in a clinical trial.« less

  7. Consideration of the radiation dose delivered away from the treatment field to patients in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael L.; Kron, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Radiation delivery to cancer patients for radiotherapy is invariably accompanied by unwanted radiation to other parts of the patient’s body. Traditionally, considerable effort has been made to calculate and measure the radiation dose to the target as well as to nearby critical structures. Only recently has attention been focused also on the relatively low doses that exist far from the primary radiation beams. In several clinical scenarios, such doses have been associated with cardiac toxicity as well as an increased risk of secondary cancer induction. Out-of-field dose is a result of leakage and scatter and generally difficult to predict accurately. The present review aims to present existing data, from measurements and calculations, and discuss its implications for radiotherapy. PMID:21731221

  8. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  9. [The control of radiation protection in the field of radiotherapy by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN)].

    PubMed

    Godet, J-L

    2007-11-01

    During the last months, several incidents at radiotherapy services occurred in France; one of these accidents led to the death of several patients or required further heavy surgical acts. In this context, ASN (Autorité de sûreté nucléaire) issued an experimental guide for the notification of radiation protection events and achieved, in dialogue with professional organisations, a new scale intended to facilitate public information on radiotherapy incidents. ASN is also fully involved in the preparation of the action plan managed by the Health ministry in order to improve the safety of treatment in radiotherapy.

  10. Supplemental computational phantoms to estimate out-of-field absorbed dose in photon radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle J.; Tannous, Jaad; Nabha, Racile; Feghali, Joelle Ann; Ayoub, Zeina; Jalbout, Wassim; Youssef, Bassem; Taddei, Phillip J.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a straightforward method of supplementing patient anatomy and estimating out-of-field absorbed dose for a cohort of pediatric radiotherapy patients with limited recorded anatomy. A cohort of nine children, aged 2–14 years, who received 3D conformal radiotherapy for low-grade localized brain tumors (LBTs), were randomly selected for this study. The extent of these patients’ computed tomography simulation image sets were cranial only. To approximate their missing anatomy, we supplemented the LBT patients’ image sets with computed tomography images of patients in a previous study with larger extents of matched sex, height, and mass and for whom contours of organs at risk for radiogenic cancer had already been delineated. Rigid fusion was performed between the LBT patients’ data and that of the supplemental computational phantoms using commercial software and in-house codes. In-field dose was calculated with a clinically commissioned treatment planning system, and out-of-field dose was estimated with a previously developed analytical model that was re-fit with parameters based on new measurements for intracranial radiotherapy. Mean doses greater than 1 Gy were found in the red bone marrow, remainder, thyroid, and skin of the patients in this study. Mean organ doses between 150 mGy and 1 Gy were observed in the breast tissue of the girls and lungs of all patients. Distant organs, i.e. prostate, bladder, uterus, and colon, received mean organ doses less than 150 mGy. The mean organ doses of the younger, smaller LBT patients (0–4 years old) were a factor of 2.4 greater than those of the older, larger patients (8–12 years old). Our findings demonstrated the feasibility of a straightforward method of applying supplemental computational phantoms and dose-calculation models to estimate absorbed dose for a set of children of various ages who received radiotherapy and for whom anatomies were largely missing in their original

  11. SU-E-T-17: A Comparison of Forward and Field in Field Intensity Modulation Radiotherapy Planning for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Sun, T; Chen, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference in forward intensity modulation radiotherapy(fIMRT) and field in field IMRT (FIF IMRT)planning for breast cancer. Methods: Ten patients received radiotherapy are selected.For each patient,two treatment plans(fIMRT and FIF IMRT) were designed with Varian Eclipse ver11.0 treatment planning system.Evaluate the dose parameters of targets, organs at risk (OAR), monitor units and treatment time, using dose-volume histogram (DVH). Results: There were no significant difference were found in conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of PTV,V5,V10,V20,V30,V40,V50 of heart, lung and monitor unit(MU)(P>0.05).The differences were significant in the treatment time(fIMRT=8.3min,FIF IMRT=2.5,p<0.05). Conclusion: FIF IMRT is equal to fIMRTmore » in dosimetril evaluation. Due to much less delivery time,FIF IMRT is an efficient technique in treating patients by reduceing the uncomfortable influnce which could effect the treatment.« less

  12. SU-E-T-17: A Comparison of Forward and Field in Field Intensity Modulation Radiotherapy Planning for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Sun, T; Chen, J; Zhang, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference in forward intensity modulation radiotherapy(fIMRT) and field in field IMRT (FIF IMRT)planning for breast cancer. Methods: Ten patients received radiotherapy are selected.For each patient,two treatment plans(fIMRT and FIF IMRT) were designed with Varian Eclipse ver11.0 treatment planning system.Evaluate the dose parameters of targets, organs at risk (OAR), monitor units and treatment time, using dose-volume histogram (DVH). Results: There were no significant difference were found in conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of PTV,V5,V10,V20,V30,V40,V50 of heart, lung and monitor unit(MU)(P>0.05).The differences were significant in the treatment time(fIMRT=8.3min,FIF IMRT=2.5,p<0.05). Conclusion: FIF IMRT is equal to fIMRT in dosimetril evaluation. Due to much less delivery time,FIF IMRT is an efficient technique in treating patients by reduceing the uncomfortable influnce which could effect the treatment.

  13. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jung, Nuri Hyun; Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-09-01

    Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field.

  14. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Materials and Methods Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. Results With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. Conclusion RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field. PMID:26484306

  15. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Follow-up Thallium-201 scintigraphy after mantle field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pierga, J.Y.; Girinski, T.; Henry-Amar, M. ); Maunoury, C.; Valette, H.; Tchernia, G.; Desgrez, A. ); Socie, G. Hopital St Louis, Paris ); Cosset, J.M. Institut Curie, Paris )

    1993-04-02

    Assessment of the long-term cardiac effects of mediastinal radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease, by Thallium scintigraphy. 32 patients (14 males and 18 females) who underwent mantle field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease were included in this study. Twenty patients received 4 fractions of 2.5 Gy per week and 12, five fraction of 2 Gy per week, delivered on alternate days. All the patients, except three, performed exercise testing electrocardiogram and Thallium-201 tomoscintigraphy. The average time interval from completion of treatment to the study was 7 years (range 3--13 years). No patients had clinical symptoms of cardiac disease. Mean age at the time of the study was 35 years (range 23--48 years). Two electrocardiograms revealed left bundle branch block and the patients were excluded from the study. Only one out of 27 exercise electrocardiograms was abnormal in a patient with mitral valve prolapse, who was also excluded from the study. Twenty-six scintigraphies were evaluable. Twenty-two (85%) were clearly abnormal with partial or complete redistribution on delayed images. The anterior region was affected in 19 of these cases (86%). Four explorations were undoubtedly normal. Coronary angiography was not performed for ethical reasons in these asymptomatic patients. Despite possible false positive tests, the high rate of abnormality (85%) in this small series is striking. These preliminary data justify larger studies and a close long-term follow-up of these patients. 24 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Dosimetry and field matching for radiotherapy to the breast and superclavicular fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, Elizabeth

    Radiotherapy for early breast cancer aims to achieve local disease control and decrease loco-regional recurrence rates. Treatment may be directed to breast or chest wall alone or, include regional lymph nodes. When using tangential fields to treat the breast a separate anterior field directed to the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (SCF) is needed to treat nodal areas. The complex geometry of this region necessitates matching of adjacent radiation fields in three dimensions. The potential exists for zones of overdosage or underdosage along the match line. Cosmetic results may be compromised if treatment fields are not accurately aligned. Techniques for field matching vary between centres in the UK. A study of dosimetry across the match line region using different techniques, as reported in the multi-centre START Trial Quality Assurance (QA) programme, was undertaken. A custom-made anthropomorphic phantom was designed to assess dose distribution in three dimensions using film dosimetry. Methods with varying degrees of complexity were employed to match tangential and SCF beams. Various techniques combined half beam blocking and machine rotations to achieve geometric alignment. Matching of asymmetric beams allowed a single isocentre technique to be used. Where field matching was not undertaken a gap between tangential and SCF fields was employed. Results demonstrated differences between techniques in addition to variations within the same technique between different centres. Geometric alignment techniques produced more homogenous dose distributions in the match region than gap techniques or those techniques not correcting for field divergence. For this multi-centre assessment of match plane techniques film dosimetry used in conjunction with a breast shaped phantom provided relative dose information. This study has highlighted the difficulties of matching treatment fields to achieve homogenous dose distribution through the region of the match plane and the degree of

  18. Radiation Field Design and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence Following Definitive Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Susie A.; Schuster, David M.; Mister, Donna; Liu Tian; Godette, Karen; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. Methods and Materials: We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as {>=}95% of the LRR volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose to {>=}95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Results: Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Conclusions: Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer.

  19. [Exclusive radiotherapy for a facial basal cell carcinoma with trigeminal ganglion involvement].

    PubMed

    Longeac, M; Lapeyre, M; Delbet Dupas, C; Barthélémy, I; Pham Dang, N

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinomas with symptomatic perineural invasion are rare entities. We report the case of a 60year-old man (with a grafted kidney), surgically treated in 2007 for a sclerodermiform basal cell carcinoma infiltrating the left nostril. Five years later, a painful left hemifacial hypoesthesia associated with an ulcus rodens of the nasolabial fold appeared. A biopsy confirmed a recurrence. MRI showed an enhancement of the trigeminal ganglion. The patient had a trigeminal perineural invasion secondary to a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma. He received a local intensity-modulated radiotherapy alone (70Gy in 33 sessions), administered from the skin tumour to the skull base. Three years after the end of treatment, the patient is in radiological and clinical remission, with partial recovery of the hypoesthesia. Evolution was marked by iterative corneal ulcers and decreased visual acuity. Modalities of treatment by surgery and/or radiation therapy and complications are poorly described in the literature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Abdominal pillow for the sparing of small bowel in four-field conventional pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Saynak, M; Kucucuk, S; Aslay, I

    2008-01-01

    From 2003 through 2004, 88 patients with gynecological cancer were referred to Istanbul University Oncology Institute for pelvic radiation therapy. All patients underwent small bowel evaluation within the pelvic radiotherapy field in both the supine and prone positions with and without an abdominal pillow. The small bowel area included in radiation fields and intestinal movement were compared on PA films. All patients were treated by using the abdominal pillow. The median external beam pelvic radiation dose of 5040cGy (range, 3220-5400cGy) was administered. The mean distance of upward displacement of small bowel in the prone position on abdominal pillow compared with in the prone position alone and in the supine position was 3.6 cm (range, 0-14 cm) and 4.7 cm (range, 0-14 cm). Using the abdominal pillow, the mean small bowel area was reduced by 45% and 55% compared to the prone position alone and the supine position, respectively (p = 0.0001). In patients who had pelvic surgery intestinal movement was significantly reduced. The incidence of G1, G2 and G3 acute radiation toxicity was 18%, 36% and 3%, respectively. This study demonstrates that the small intestines can be displaced out of the radiation field by an abdominal pillow in the prone position. Also, this noninvasive technique provides for reduction of acute gastrointestinal morbidity.

  1. The Impact of Radiotherapy Fields in the Treatment of Patients With Choroid Plexus Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazloom, Ali; Wolff, Johannes E.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive literature review and analysis of cases dealing with choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) to determine the optimal radiotherapy (RT) treatment field. Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English language articles from 1979 to 2008 was performed, yielding 33 articles with 56 patients who had available data regarding RT treatment field. The median age at diagnosis was 2.7 years (range, 1 month-53 years). Of 54 patients with data regarding type of surgery, 21 (38.9%) had complete resection. Chemotherapy was delivered to 27 (48%) as part of initial therapy. The RT treatment volume was the craniospinal axis in 38 (68%), whole brain in 9 (16%), and tumor/tumor bed in 9 (16%). Median follow-up for surviving patients was 40 months. Results: The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 59.5% and 37.2%, respectively. Complete resection (p = 0.035) and use of craniospinal irradiation (CSI; p = 0.025) were found to positively affect PFS. The 5-year PFS for patients who had CSI vs. whole brain and tumor/tumor bed RT were 44.2% and 15.3%. For the 19 patients who relapsed, 9 (47%) had a recurrence in the RT field, 6 (32%) had a recurrence outside the RT field, and 4 (21%) had a recurrence inside and outside the irradiated field. Conclusion: Patients with CPC who received CSI had better PFS compared with those receiving less than CSI. This study supports the use of CSI in the multimodality management of patients with CPC.

  2. Percent positive axillary involvement predicts for the development of brain metastasis in high-risk patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer receiving post-mastectomy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atahan, Ibtisam Lale; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Yildiz, Ferah; Gurkaynak, Murat; Selek, Ugur; Sari, Sait; Hayran, Mutlu

    2008-01-01

    We retrospectively assessed the predictive factors for brain metastasis in high-risk breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy after mastectomy. Between January 1994 and 2002, the medical charts of nonmetastatic breast cancer patients receiving post-mastectomy radiotherapy were evaluated. The clinical and pathologic features of patients who developed brain metastasis as the first site metastatic disease were compared with nonmetastatic patients treated at the same time period. All eligible patients in this study were treated with postoperative radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy. Age, stage, percent positive lymph node involvement, number of lymph node metastasis, primary tumor size, grade, surgical margin status, estrogen receptor status, and perinodal fat tissue invasion were analyzed as predictive factors for brain metastasis. Statistical analyses were performed by using Log-rank test and Cox's regression analysis. Median follow-up-time was 61 months. In this period, 32 out of 957 patients (3.3%) developed brain metastasis. In univariate analysis percent positive axillary lymph node involvement (p < 0.001), primary tumor size (p < 0.001), number of lymph node metastasis (p = 0.01), and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002 stage (p < 0.001) were found to be predictive for brain metastasis. Multivariate analysis revealed that only the primary tumor size and percent positive lymph node involvement were significant predictive factors for the development of brain metastasis. The primary tumor size and percent positive lymph node involvement increases the risk of brain metastasis in patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer receiving postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  3. Early clinical outcome with concurrent chemotherapy and extended-field, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Beriwal, Sushil; Gan, Gregory N; Heron, Dwight E; Selvaraj, Raj N; Kim, Hayeon; Lalonde, Ron; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P

    2007-05-01

    To assess the early clinical outcomes with concurrent cisplatin and extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) for carcinoma of the cervix. Thirty-six patients with Stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with EF-IMRT were evaluated. The pelvic lymph nodes were involved in 19 patients, and of these 19 patients, 10 also had para-aortic nodal disease. The treatment volume included the cervix, uterus, parametria, presacral space, upper vagina, and pelvic, common iliac, and para-aortic nodes to the superior border of L1. Patients were assessed for acute toxicities according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. All late toxicities were scored with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late toxicity score. All patients completed the prescribed course of EF-IMRT. All but 2 patients received brachytherapy. Median length of treatment was 53 days. The median follow-up was 18 months. Acute Grade > or = 3 gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and myelotoxicity were seen in 1, 1, and 10 patients, respectively. Thirty-four patients had complete response to treatment. Of these 34 patients, 11 developed recurrences. The first site of recurrence was in-field in 2 patients (pelvis in 1, pelvis and para-aortic in 1) and distant in 9 patients. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, disease-free survival, overall survival, and Grade > or = 3 toxicity rates for the entire cohort were 80%, 51%, 65%, and 10%, respectively. Extended-field IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy was tolerated well, with acceptable acute and early late toxicities. The locoregional control rate was good, with distant metastases being the predominant mode of failure. We are continuing to accrue a larger number of patients and longer follow-up data to further extend our initial observations with this approach.

  4. Breast dosimetry in transverse and longitudinal field MRI-Linac radiotherapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, S. R.; Esmaeeli, A. D.; Pouladian, M.; Sardari, D.; Bagheri, S.; Monfared, A. S.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In the framework of developing the integration of a MRI-Linac system, configurations of MRI-Linac units were simulated in order to improve the dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using transverse and longitudinal magnetic field geometries of Lorentz force for both medial and lateral tangential fields. Methods: In this work, the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized to compare dose distributions in breast radiotherapy for Linac-MR systems in the transverse and longitudinal geometries within humanoid phantoms across a range of magnetic field strengths of 0.5 and 1.5 T. The dose increment due to scattering from the coils was investigated for both geometries as well. Computed tomography images of two patients were used for MC simulations. One patient had intact breast while the other was mastectomized. In the simulations, planning and methods of chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical planning. Results: In a longitudinal geometry, the magnetic field is shown to restrict the lateral spread of secondary electrons to the lung, heart, and contralateral organs, which reduced the mean dose of the ipsilateral lung and heart by means of 17.2% and 6% at 1.5 T, respectively. The transverse configuration exhibits a significant increase in tissue interface effects, which increased dose buildup in the entrance regions of the lateral and medial tangent beams to the planning target volume (PTV) and improved dose homogeneity within the PTV. The improved relative average homogeneity index for two patients to the PTV at magnetic field strength of 1.5 T with respect to no magnetic field case evaluated was 11.79% and 34.45% in the LRBP and TRBP geometries, respectively. In both geometries, the simulations show significant mean dose reductions in the contralateral breast and chest wall skin, respectively, by a mean of 16.6% and 24.9% at 0.5 T and 17.2% and 28.1% at 1.5 T in the transverse geometry, and 10.56% and 14.6% at 0.5 T and 11.3% and

  5. Who and What Does Involvement Involve? A Multi-Sited Field Study of Involvement of Relatives in Danish Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Oute, Jeppe; Petersen, Anders; Huniche, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    This article gives an account of aspects of a multi-sited field study of involvement of relatives in Danish psychiatry. By following metaphors of involvement across three sites of the psychiatric system-a family site, a clinical site and a policy site-the first author (J.O.) investigated how, and on what grounds, involvement of relatives is perceived in Danish psychiatry. Paradoxically, the current understanding of involvement of relatives fails to take into consideration the perspectives of the relatives per se and families that were being studied. By analyzing involvement from a discourse theoretical perspective laid out by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, the aim of this study is to show how the dominant discourse about involvement at the political and clinical sites is constituted by understandings of mentally ill individuals and by political objectives of involvement. The analysis elucidates how a psycho-ideological discourse positions the mentally ill person as weak, incapable, and ineffective. By contrast, the supporting relative is positioned as a strong, capable, and effective co-therapist. Furthermore, the analysis considers how this dominant discourse of involvement is constituted by a broader discourse of neoliberalism and market orientation, which justifies involvement as a subtle institutionalization of social control. The article highlights that the role of the relative as a co-therapist may be contested by the families' discourse, which emphasizes issues concerning the responsibility toward the mental health of the ill individual as well as toward the psychological milieu of the family.

  6. [Experimental determination of correction factors of four detectors used in small field radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, L; Essadok, A; Saidani, I; Mahdouani, M; Benna, M; Mahjoubi, K; Besbes, M; Benna, F

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this work is to determine experimentally the correction factors [Formula: see text] for four active commercial dosimeters: two microchambers and two diode detectors based on the output factor measured with radiochromic film for a radiotherapy linear accelerator equipped with circular cones. Initially, a radiochromic film dosimetry measurement protocol with an accuracy of 2% was developed to approach the "reference output factor". Afterwards, the corrective factors of four detectors were determined for two ionization chambers (PinPoint PTW 31016 3D, Micropoint Extradin A16) and two diodes (PTW T60017 Diode, PTW-60019 Micro-Diamond). These measurements were carried out under conical BrainLAB ® collimators defining circular fields with diameters equal to 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 17.5mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm and 45mm of a 6MV X-ray beam generated by the ClinaciX linear accelerator (Varian ® ). These factors are weakly dependent on the type of accelerator, whether the model and the collimation type. This allowed their comparisons with those published for the same type of detector and for an accelerator with the same index of beam quality. The correction factors obtained experimentally were comparable in maximum deviation of 1.9% with published ones of the works using the same type of detector (mark and model) and an accelerator delivering the same beam quality for the same field size at the measurement point. The measurement protocol using the EBT3 film, which was used as a passive dosimeter to determine the "reference output factor", was validated by comparing measured and published data of active detector correction factors. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Whole brain radiotherapy plus simultaneous in-field boost with image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain metastases of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Liu, Jia; Xue, Jianxin; Xu, Yong; Gong, Youling; Deng, Lei; Wang, Shichao; Zhong, Renming; Ding, Zhenyu; Lu, You

    2014-05-21

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus sequential focal radiation boost is a commonly used therapeutic strategy for patients with brain metastases. However, recent reports on WBRT plus simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) also showed promising outcomes. The objective of present study is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of WBRT plus SIB with image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for inoperable brain metastases of NSCLC. Twenty-nine NSCLC patients with 87 inoperable brain metastases were included in this retrospective study. All patients received WBRT at a dose of 40 Gy/20 f, and SIB boost with IG-IMRT at a dose of 20 Gy/5 f concurrent with WBRT in the fourth week. Prior to each fraction of IG-IMRT boost, on-line positioning verification and correction were used to ensure that the set-up errors were within 2 mm by cone beam computed tomography in all patients. The one-year intracranial control rate, local brain failure rate, and distant brain failure rate were 62.9%, 13.8%, and 19.2%, respectively. The two-year intracranial control rate, local brain failure rate, and distant brain failure rate were 42.5%, 30.9%, and 36.4%, respectively. Both median intracranial progression-free survival and median survival were 10 months. Six-month, one-year, and two-year survival rates were 65.5%, 41.4%, and 13.8%, corresponding to 62.1%, 41.4%, and 10.3% of intracranial progression-free survival rates. Patients with Score Index for Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases (SIR) >5, number of intracranial lesions <3, and history of EGFR-TKI treatment had better survival. Three lesions (3.45%) demonstrated radiation necrosis after radiotherapy. Grades 2 and 3 cognitive impairment with grade 2 radiation leukoencephalopathy were observed in 4 (13.8%) and 4 (13.8%) patients. No dosimetric parameters were found to be associated with these late toxicities. Patients received EGFR-TKI treatment had higher incidence of grades 2-3 cognitive impairment with grade 2

  8. Whole brain radiotherapy plus simultaneous in-field boost with image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain metastases of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus sequential focal radiation boost is a commonly used therapeutic strategy for patients with brain metastases. However, recent reports on WBRT plus simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) also showed promising outcomes. The objective of present study is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of WBRT plus SIB with image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for inoperable brain metastases of NSCLC. Methods Twenty-nine NSCLC patients with 87 inoperable brain metastases were included in this retrospective study. All patients received WBRT at a dose of 40 Gy/20 f, and SIB boost with IG-IMRT at a dose of 20 Gy/5 f concurrent with WBRT in the fourth week. Prior to each fraction of IG-IMRT boost, on-line positioning verification and correction were used to ensure that the set-up errors were within 2 mm by cone beam computed tomography in all patients. Results The one-year intracranial control rate, local brain failure rate, and distant brain failure rate were 62.9%, 13.8%, and 19.2%, respectively. The two-year intracranial control rate, local brain failure rate, and distant brain failure rate were 42.5%, 30.9%, and 36.4%, respectively. Both median intracranial progression-free survival and median survival were 10 months. Six-month, one-year, and two-year survival rates were 65.5%, 41.4%, and 13.8%, corresponding to 62.1%, 41.4%, and 10.3% of intracranial progression-free survival rates. Patients with Score Index for Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases (SIR) >5, number of intracranial lesions <3, and history of EGFR-TKI treatment had better survival. Three lesions (3.45%) demonstrated radiation necrosis after radiotherapy. Grades 2 and 3 cognitive impairment with grade 2 radiation leukoencephalopathy were observed in 4 (13.8%) and 4 (13.8%) patients. No dosimetric parameters were found to be associated with these late toxicities. Patients received EGFR-TKI treatment had higher incidence of grades 2–3

  9. Decreasing Temporal Lobe Dose With Five-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pituitary Macroadenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Parhar, Preeti K.; Duckworth, Tamara; Shah, Parinda

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To compare temporal lobe dose delivered by three pituitary macroadenoma irradiation techniques: three-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (3F IMRT), and a proposed novel alternative of five-field IMRT (5F IMRT). Methods and Materials: Computed tomography-based external beam radiotherapy planning was performed for 15 pituitary macroadenoma patients treated at New York University between 2002 and 2007 using: 3D-CRT (two lateral, one midline superior anterior oblique [SAO] beams), 3F IMRT (same beam angles), and 5F IMRT (same beam angles with additional right SAO and left SAO beams). Prescription dose was 45 Gy. Target volumes were: gross tumor volume (GTV)more » = macroadenoma, clinical target volume (CTV) = GTV, and planning target volume = CTV + 0.5 cm. Structure contouring was performed by two radiation oncologists guided by an expert neuroradiologist. Results: Five-field IMRT yielded significantly decreased temporal lobe dose delivery compared with 3D-CRT and 3F IMRT. Temporal lobe sparing with 5F IMRT was most pronounced at intermediate doses: mean V25Gy (% of total temporal lobe volume receiving {>=}25 Gy) of 13% vs. 28% vs. 29% for right temporal lobe and 14% vs. 29% vs. 30% for left temporal lobe for 5F IMRT, 3D-CRT, and 3F IMRT, respectively (p < 10{sup -7} for 5F IMRT vs. 3D-CRT and 5F IMRT vs. 3F IMRT). Five-field IMRT plans did not compromise target coverage, exceed normal tissue dose constraints, or increase estimated brain integral dose. Conclusions: Five-field IMRT irradiation technique results in a statistically significant decrease in the dose to the temporal lobes and may thus help prevent neurocognitive sequelae in irradiated pituitary macroadenoma patients.« less

  10. Dose enhancement in radiotherapy of small lung tumors using inline magnetic fields: A Monte Carlo based planning study

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Ge, Y.; Hardcastle, N.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Keall, P. J.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To report on significant dose enhancement effects caused by magnetic fields aligned parallel to 6 MV photon beam radiotherapy of small lung tumors. Findings are applicable to future inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems. Methods: A total of eight clinical lung tumor cases were recalculated using Monte Carlo methods, and external magnetic fields of 0.5, 1.0, and 3 T were included to observe the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and gross tumor volume (GTV). Three plans were 6 MV 3D-CRT plans while 6 were 6 MV IMRT. The GTV’s ranged from 0.8 to 16 cm{sup 3}, while the PTV’s ranged from 1 to 59 cm{sup 3}. In addition, the dose changes in a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were investigated for small beams. The central 20 cm of this phantom contained either water or lung density insert. Results: For single beams, an inline magnetic field of 1 T has a small impact in lung dose distributions by reducing the lateral scatter of secondary electrons, resulting in a small dose increase along the beam. Superposition of multiple small beams leads to significant dose enhancements. Clinically, this process occurs in the lung tissue typically surrounding the GTV, resulting in increases to the D{sub 98%} (PTV). Two isolated tumors with very small PTVs (3 and 6 cm{sup 3}) showed increases in D{sub 98%} of 23% and 22%. Larger PTVs of 13, 26, and 59 cm{sup 3} had increases of 9%, 6%, and 4%, describing a natural fall-off in enhancement with increasing PTV size. However, three PTVs bounded to the lung wall showed no significant increase, due to lack of dose enhancement in the denser PTV volume. In general, at 0.5 T, the GTV mean dose enhancement is around 60% lower than that at 1 T, while at 3 T, it is 5%–60% higher than 1 T. Conclusions: Monte Carlo methods have described significant and predictable dose enhancement effects in small lung tumor plans for 6 MV radiotherapy when an external inline magnetic field is included. Results of this study

  11. Dose enhancement in radiotherapy of small lung tumors using inline magnetic fields: A Monte Carlo based planning study

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M., E-mail: brad.oborn@gmail.com; Ge, Y.; Hardcastle, N.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To report on significant dose enhancement effects caused by magnetic fields aligned parallel to 6 MV photon beam radiotherapy of small lung tumors. Findings are applicable to future inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems. Methods: A total of eight clinical lung tumor cases were recalculated using Monte Carlo methods, and external magnetic fields of 0.5, 1.0, and 3 T were included to observe the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and gross tumor volume (GTV). Three plans were 6 MV 3D-CRT plans while 6 were 6 MV IMRT. The GTV’s ranged from 0.8 to 16 cm{sup 3}, whilemore » the PTV’s ranged from 1 to 59 cm{sup 3}. In addition, the dose changes in a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were investigated for small beams. The central 20 cm of this phantom contained either water or lung density insert. Results: For single beams, an inline magnetic field of 1 T has a small impact in lung dose distributions by reducing the lateral scatter of secondary electrons, resulting in a small dose increase along the beam. Superposition of multiple small beams leads to significant dose enhancements. Clinically, this process occurs in the lung tissue typically surrounding the GTV, resulting in increases to the D{sub 98%} (PTV). Two isolated tumors with very small PTVs (3 and 6 cm{sup 3}) showed increases in D{sub 98%} of 23% and 22%. Larger PTVs of 13, 26, and 59 cm{sup 3} had increases of 9%, 6%, and 4%, describing a natural fall-off in enhancement with increasing PTV size. However, three PTVs bounded to the lung wall showed no significant increase, due to lack of dose enhancement in the denser PTV volume. In general, at 0.5 T, the GTV mean dose enhancement is around 60% lower than that at 1 T, while at 3 T, it is 5%–60% higher than 1 T. Conclusions: Monte Carlo methods have described significant and predictable dose enhancement effects in small lung tumor plans for 6 MV radiotherapy when an external inline magnetic field is included. Results of

  12. Measurement and modeling of out-of-field doses from various advanced post-mastectomy radiotherapy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Heins, David; Zhao, Xiaodong; Sanders, Mary; Zhang, Rui

    2017-12-01

    More and more advanced radiotherapy techniques have been adopted for post-mastectomy radiotherapies (PMRT). Patient dose reconstruction is challenging for these advanced techniques because they increase the low out-of-field dose area while the accuracy of out-of-field dose calculations by current commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) is poor. We aim to measure and model the out-of-field radiation doses from various advanced PMRT techniques. PMRT treatment plans for an anthropomorphic phantom were generated, including volumetric modulated arc therapy with standard and flattening-filter-free photon beams, mixed beam therapy, 4-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and tomotherapy. We measured doses in the phantom where the TPS calculated doses were lower than 5% of the prescription dose using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The TLD measurements were corrected by two additional energy correction factors, namely out-of-beam out-of-field (OBOF) correction factor K OBOF and in-beam out-of-field (IBOF) correction factor K IBOF, which were determined by separate measurements using an ion chamber and TLD. A simple analytical model was developed to predict out-of-field dose as a function of distance from the field edge for each PMRT technique. The root mean square discrepancies between measured and calculated out-of-field doses were within 0.66 cGy Gy‑1 for all techniques. The IBOF doses were highly scattered and should be evaluated case by case. One can easily combine the measured out-of-field dose here with the in-field dose calculated by the local TPS to reconstruct organ doses for a specific PMRT patient if the same treatment apparatus and technique were used.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of a compact microbeam radiotherapy system based on carbon nanotube field emission technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Eric C.; Chang, Sha X.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiotherapy technique that has shown potent antitumor effects with minimal damage to normal tissue in animal studies. This unique form of radiation is currently only produced in a few large synchrotron accelerator research facilities in the world. To promote widespread translational research on this promising treatment technology we have proposed and are in the initial development stages of a compact MRT system that is based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. We report on a Monte Carlo based feasibility study of the compact MRT system design. Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using EGSnrc-based codes. The proposed small animal research MRT device design includes carbon nanotube cathodes shaped to match the corresponding MRT collimator apertures, a common reflection anode with filter, and a MRT collimator. Each collimator aperture is sized to deliver a beam width ranging from 30 to 200 {mu}m at 18.6 cm source-to-axis distance. Design parameters studied with Monte Carlo include electron energy, cathode design, anode angle, filtration, and collimator design. Calculations were performed for single and multibeam configurations. Results: Increasing the energy from 100 kVp to 160 kVp increased the photon fluence through the collimator by a factor of 1.7. Both energies produced a largely uniform fluence along the long dimension of the microbeam, with 5% decreases in intensity near the edges. The isocentric dose rate for 160 kVp was calculated to be 700 Gy/min/A in the center of a 3 cm diameter target. Scatter contributions resulting from collimator size were found to produce only small (<7%) changes in the dose rate for field widths greater than 50 {mu}m. Dose vs depth was weakly dependent on filtration material. The peak-to-valley ratio varied from 10 to 100 as the separation between adjacent microbeams varies from 150 to 1000 {mu}m. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of a compact microbeam radiotherapy system based on carbon nanotube field emission technology

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Eric C.; Chang, Sha X.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiotherapy technique that has shown potent antitumor effects with minimal damage to normal tissue in animal studies. This unique form of radiation is currently only produced in a few large synchrotron accelerator research facilities in the world. To promote widespread translational research on this promising treatment technology we have proposed and are in the initial development stages of a compact MRT system that is based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. We report on a Monte Carlo based feasibility study of the compact MRT system design. Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using EGSnrc-based codes. The proposed small animal research MRT device design includes carbon nanotube cathodes shaped to match the corresponding MRT collimator apertures, a common reflection anode with filter, and a MRT collimator. Each collimator aperture is sized to deliver a beam width ranging from 30 to 200 μm at 18.6 cm source-to-axis distance. Design parameters studied with Monte Carlo include electron energy, cathode design, anode angle, filtration, and collimator design. Calculations were performed for single and multibeam configurations. Results: Increasing the energy from 100 kVp to 160 kVp increased the photon fluence through the collimator by a factor of 1.7. Both energies produced a largely uniform fluence along the long dimension of the microbeam, with 5% decreases in intensity near the edges. The isocentric dose rate for 160 kVp was calculated to be 700 Gy/min/A in the center of a 3 cm diameter target. Scatter contributions resulting from collimator size were found to produce only small (<7%) changes in the dose rate for field widths greater than 50 μm. Dose vs depth was weakly dependent on filtration material. The peak-to-valley ratio varied from 10 to 100 as the separation between adjacent microbeams varies from 150 to 1000 μm. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate

  15. CNR considerations for rapid real-time MRI tumor tracking in radiotherapy hybrid devices: Effects of B0 field strength.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, K; De Zanche, N; Yip, E; Volotovskyy, V; Fallone, B G

    2016-08-01

    This work examines the subject of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), specifically between tumor and tissue background, and its dependence on the MRI field strength, B0. This examination is motivated by the recent interest and developments in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids where real-time imaging can be used to guide treatment beams. The ability to distinguish a tumor from background tissue is of primary importance in this field, and this work seeks to elucidate the complex relationship between the CNR and B0 that is too often assumed to be purely linear. Experimentally based models of B0-dependant relaxation for various tumor and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid real-time imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumors for spoiled gradient-echo, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), and single-shot half-Fourier fast spin echo sequences. Due to the pattern in which the relaxation properties of tissues are found to vary over B0 field (specifically the T1 time), there was always an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumor sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e., bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney, and liver tumors). In terms of CNR, lower B0 fields have been shown to perform as well or better than higher fields for some tumor sites due to superior T1 contrast. In other sites this effect was less pronounced, reversing the CNR advantage. This complex relationship between CNR and B0 reveals both low and high magnetic fields as viable options for tumor tracking in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids.

  16. Out-of-field organ doses and associated radiogenic risks from para-aortic radiotherapy for testicular seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis Berris, Theocharis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to (a) calculate the radiation dose to out-of-field organs from radiotherapy for stage I testicular seminoma and (b) estimate the associated radiogenic risks. Methods: Monte Carlo methodology was employed to model radiation therapy with typical anteroposterior and posteroanterior para-aortic fields on an anthropomorphic phantom simulating an average adult. The radiation dose received by all main and remaining organs that defined by the ICRP publication 103 and excluded from the treatment volume was calculated. The effect of field dimensions on each organ dose was determined. Additional therapy simulations were generated by introducing shielding blocks to protect the kidneys from primary radiation. The gonadal dose was employed to assess the risk of heritable effects for irradiated male patients of reproductive potential. The lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of radiotherapy-induced cancer were estimated using gender- and organ-specific risk coefficients for patient ages of 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old. The risk values were compared with the respective nominal risks. Results: Para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 5.0–538.6 mGy. Blocked field treatment led to a dose change up to 28%. The mean organ dose variation by increasing or decreasing the applied field dimensions was 18.7% ± 3.9% and 20.8% ± 4.5%, respectively. The out-of-field photon doses increased the lifetime intrinsic risk of developing thyroid, lung, bladder, prostate, and esophageal cancer by (0.1–1.4)%, (0.4–1.1)%, (2.5–5.4)%, (0.2–0.4)%, and (6.4–9.2)%, respectively, depending upon the patient age at exposure and the field size employed. A low risk for heritable effects of less than 0.029% was found compared with the natural incidence of these defects. Conclusions: Testicular cancer survivors are subjected to an increased risk for the induction of bladder and esophageal cancer following para-aortic radiotherapy. The

  17. Out-of-field organ doses and associated radiogenic risks from para-aortic radiotherapy for testicular seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Berris, Theocharis; Damilakis, John

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to (a) calculate the radiation dose to out-of-field organs from radiotherapy for stage I testicular seminoma and (b) estimate the associated radiogenic risks. Methods: Monte Carlo methodology was employed to model radiation therapy with typical anteroposterior and posteroanterior para-aortic fields on an anthropomorphic phantom simulating an average adult. The radiation dose received by all main and remaining organs that defined by the ICRP publication 103 and excluded from the treatment volume was calculated. The effect of field dimensions on each organ dose was determined. Additional therapy simulations were generated by introducing shielding blocksmore » to protect the kidneys from primary radiation. The gonadal dose was employed to assess the risk of heritable effects for irradiated male patients of reproductive potential. The lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of radiotherapy-induced cancer were estimated using gender- and organ-specific risk coefficients for patient ages of 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old. The risk values were compared with the respective nominal risks. Results: Para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 5.0–538.6 mGy. Blocked field treatment led to a dose change up to 28%. The mean organ dose variation by increasing or decreasing the applied field dimensions was 18.7% ± 3.9% and 20.8% ± 4.5%, respectively. The out-of-field photon doses increased the lifetime intrinsic risk of developing thyroid, lung, bladder, prostate, and esophageal cancer by (0.1–1.4)%, (0.4–1.1)%, (2.5–5.4)%, (0.2–0.4)%, and (6.4–9.2)%, respectively, depending upon the patient age at exposure and the field size employed. A low risk for heritable effects of less than 0.029% was found compared with the natural incidence of these defects. Conclusions: Testicular cancer survivors are subjected to an increased risk for the induction of bladder and esophageal cancer following para

  18. Coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy class solution for patients with prostate cancer with bilateral hip prostheses with and without nodal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young K., E-mail: Young.Lee@rmh.nhs.uk; McVey, Gerard P.; South, Chris P.

    2013-07-01

    Dose distributions for prostate radiotherapy are difficult to predict in patients with bilateral hip prostheses in situ, due to image distortions and difficulty in dose calculation. The feasibility of delivering curative doses to prostate using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with bilateral hip prostheses was evaluated. Planning target volumes for prostate only (PTV1) and pelvic nodes (PTV2) were generated from data on 5 patients. PTV1 and PTV2 dose prescriptions were 70 Gy and 60 Gy, respectively, in 35 fractions, and an additional nodal boost of 65 Gy was added for 1 plan. Rectum, bladder, and bowel were also delineated. Beammore » angles and segments were chosen to best avoid entering through the prostheses. Dose-volume data were assessed with respect to clinical objectives. The plans achieved the required prescription doses to the PTVs. Five-field IMRT plans were adequate for patients with relatively small prostheses (head volumes<60 cm{sup 3}) but 7-field plans were required for patients with larger prostheses. Bowel and bladder doses were clinically acceptable for all patients. Rectal doses were deemed clinically acceptable, although the V{sub 50} {sub Gy} objective was not met for 4/5 patients. We describe an IMRT solution for patients with bilateral hip prostheses of varying size and shape, requiring either localized or whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer.« less

  19. Coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy class solution for patients with prostate cancer with bilateral hip prostheses with and without nodal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young K.; McVey, Gerard P.; South, Chris P.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2013-07-01

    Dose distributions for prostate radiotherapy are difficult to predict in patients with bilateral hip prostheses in situ, due to image distortions and difficulty in dose calculation. The feasibility of delivering curative doses to prostate using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with bilateral hip prostheses was evaluated. Planning target volumes for prostate only (PTV1) and pelvic nodes (PTV2) were generated from data on 5 patients. PTV1 and PTV2 dose prescriptions were 70 Gy and 60 Gy, respectively, in 35 fractions, and an additional nodal boost of 65 Gy was added for 1 plan. Rectum, bladder, and bowel were also delineated. Beam angles and segments were chosen to best avoid entering through the prostheses. Dose-volume data were assessed with respect to clinical objectives. The plans achieved the required prescription doses to the PTVs. Five-field IMRT plans were adequate for patients with relatively small prostheses (head volumes<60 cm{sup 3}) but 7-field plans were required for patients with larger prostheses. Bowel and bladder doses were clinically acceptable for all patients. Rectal doses were deemed clinically acceptable, although the V{sub 50} {sub Gy} objective was not met for 4/5 patients. We describe an IMRT solution for patients with bilateral hip prostheses of varying size and shape, requiring either localized or whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  20. Sparkling Geomagnetic Field: Involving Schools in Geomagnetic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Rachel; Leonhardt, Roman; Leichter, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Solar activity will be reaching a maximum in 2013/2014 as the sun reaches the end of its cycle, bringing with it an opportunity to study in greater detail the effect of solar wind or "space weather" on our planet's magnetic field. Heightened solar activity leads to a larger amount of clouds of energetic particles bombarding the Earth. Although the Earth's magnetic field shields us from most of these particles, the field becomes distorted and compacted by the solar wind, which leads to magnetic storms that we detect from the surface. These storms cause aurorae at higher latitudes and can lead to widespread disruption of communication and navigation equipment all over the Earth when sufficiently strong. This project, "Sparkling Geomagnetic Field," is a part of Austria's Sparkling Science programme, which aims to involve schools in active scientific research to encourage interest in science from a young age. Researchers from the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in Vienna have worked hand-in-hand with three schools across Austria to set up regional geomagnetic stations consisting of state-of-the-art scalar and vector magnetometers to monitor the effects of the solar wind on the geomagnetic field. The students have been an active part of the research team from the beginning, first searching for a suitable location to set up the stations as well as later overseeing the continued running of the equipment and analysing the data output. Through this project the students will gain experience in contemporary scientific methods: data processing and analysis, field work, as well as equipment setup and upkeep. A total of three stations have been established with schools in Innsbruck, Tamsweg and Graz at roughly equal distances across Austria to run alongside the already active station in the Conrad Observatory near Vienna. Data acquisition runs through a data logger and software developed to deliver data in near realtime. This network allows for

  1. Field classes: key to involve and attract students to soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggler, Cristine Carole; Cardoso, Irene Maria; da Silva Lopes, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Soil genesis is a subject taught to students of Agrarian Sciences and Geography at the Federal University of Viçosa in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Each semester 200 to 250 students inscribe for it. It is organized as the first 60 hours course on soils for 1st and 2nd year's students. The course has a distinct pedagogical approach, which is based on Paulo Freire's education principles, known as socio constructivism. In such approach, learning environments and materials are prepared to stimulate dialogues and exchange of knowledge between students themselves, strengthening that their role is crucial to their own learning. During the course, students have different types of practical classes: indoors, in a class room or at the Earth Sciences museum and outdoors, in the field. In the class room they have the opportunity to handle materials -minerals, rocks, soils and maps-, follow demonstrations and perform small experiments. The classes given in the museum intend a broadening of the subjects approached in theoretical and practical classes. In the field classes the students are organized in small groups with the task to investigate soil formation by observation and description of geology, landscape, land use, soil expositions and some of the soil properties. Attracting students to soils involves looking at meanings and perceptions related to soils they bring with themselves and follow this up to sensitize and create awareness about their importance. With this aim, it is also included, as part of the evaluation, a final voluntary presentation that many of the students do. The presentation can be a song, a poem, a sketch or whatever they propose and create. Many of the presentations bring topics related to the new perception about soils they get during the semester and to ideas or questions raised in the field classes. A survey with the students showed that field classes are by far the preferred classes and they are considered more dynamic. Since students have less and less

  2. Comparison of onboard low-field magnetic resonance imaging versus onboard computed tomography for anatomy visualization in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noel, Camille E; Parikh, Parag J; Spencer, Christopher R; Green, Olga L; Hu, Yanle; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Onboard magnetic resonance imaging (OB-MRI) for daily localization and adaptive radiotherapy has been under development by several groups. However, no clinical studies have evaluated whether OB-MRI improves visualization of the target and organs at risk (OARs) compared to standard onboard computed tomography (OB-CT). This study compared visualization of patient anatomy on images acquired on the MRI-(60)Co ViewRay system to those acquired with OB-CT. Fourteen patients enrolled on a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and undergoing image-guided radiotherapy for cancer in the thorax (n = 2), pelvis (n = 6), abdomen (n = 3) or head and neck (n = 3) were imaged with OB-MRI and OB-CT. For each of the 14 patients, the OB-MRI and OB-CT datasets were displayed side-by-side and independently reviewed by three radiation oncologists. Each physician was asked to evaluate which dataset offered better visualization of the target and OARs. A quantitative contouring study was performed on two abdominal patients to assess if OB-MRI could offer improved inter-observer segmentation agreement for adaptive planning. In total 221 OARs and 10 targets were compared for visualization on OB-MRI and OB-CT by each of the three physicians. The majority of physicians (two or more) evaluated visualization on MRI as better for 71% of structures, worse for 10% of structures, and equivalent for 14% of structures. 5% of structures were not visible on either. Physicians agreed unanimously for 74% and in majority for > 99% of structures. Targets were better visualized on MRI in 4/10 cases, and never on OB-CT. Low-field MR provides better anatomic visualization of many radiotherapy targets and most OARs as compared to OB-CT. Further studies with OB-MRI should be pursued.

  3. Low-dose-area-constrained helical TomoTherapy-based whole breast radiotherapy and dosimetric comparison with tangential field-in-field IMRT.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jie; Liu, Zhikai; Yang, Bo; Hou, Xiaorong; Zhang, Fuquan

    2013-01-01

    To present a novel helical TomoTherapy-based method for whole breast radiotherapy that has better dosimetry and also has acceptable low-dose regions for lungs, heart, and contralateral breast compared with tangential field-in-field IMRT (FIF-IMRT). Ten patients with left-side breast cancer were planned with low-dose-area-constrained helical TomoTherapy (LDC-HT) and FIF-IMRT. Dosimetry was compared for all techniques. Coverage of the whole breast was adequate with both techniques. Homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) were better with LDC-HT. LDC-HT showed dosimetry advantages over FIF-IMRT for ipsilateral lung and heart in not only high-dose levels but also in low-dose levels such as V(10 Gy) and V(5 Gy). For contralateral lung, both techniques can provide good protection, although the mean dose of LDC-HT is higher than that of FIF-IMRT. With LDC-HT, we obtained adequate target coverage, better HI and CI of target volume, better sparing of organs at risk, and acceptably low-dose areas compared with FIF-IMRT. LDC-HT could be a feasible method in whole breast radiotherapy. Clinical benefits of LDC-HT need further investigation.

  4. Number and Location of Positive Nodes, Postoperative Radiotherapy, and Survival After Esophagectomy With Three-Field Lymph Node Dissection for Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Junqiang; Pan Jianji; Zheng Xiongwei; Zhu Kunshou; Li Jiancheng; Chen Mingqiang; Wang Jiezhong; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze influences of the number and location of positive lymph nodes and postoperative radiotherapy on survival for patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TE-SCC) treated with radical esophagectomy with three-field lymphadenectomy. Methods and Materials: A total of 945 patients underwent radical esophagectomy plus three-field lymph node dissection for node-positive TE-SCC at Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital between January 1993 and March 2007. Five hundred ninety patients received surgery only (S group), and 355 patients received surgery, followed 3 to 4 weeks later by postoperative radiotherapy (S+R group) to a median total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. We assessed potential associations among patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors and overall survival. Results: Five-year overall survival rates were 32.8% for the entire group, 29.6% for the S group, and 38.0% for the S+R group (p = 0.001 for S vs. S+R). Treatment with postoperative radiotherapy was particularly beneficial for patients with {>=}3 positive nodes and for those with metastasis in the upper (supraclavicular and upper mediastinal) region or both the upper and lower (mediastinal and abdominal) regions (p < 0.05). Postoperative radiotherapy was also associated with lower recurrence rates in the supraclavicular and upper and middle mediastinal regions (p < 0.05). Sex, primary tumor length, number of positive nodes, pathological T category, and postoperative radiotherapy were all independent predictors of survival. Conclusions: Postoperative radiotherapy was associated with better survival for patients with node-positive TE-SCC, particularly those with three or more positive nodes and positive nodes in the supraclavicular and superior mediastinal regions.

  5. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, P. H., E-mail: p.charles@qut.edu.au; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated intomore » additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very

  6. A general analytical solution to the geometrical problem of field matching in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, V; Arenas, M; Pons, F; Sempau, J

    2009-09-01

    Several authors studied the problem of geometrical matching of fields produced by medical linear accelerators. However, a general solution has yet to be published. Currently available solutions are based on parallelism arguments. This study provides a general solution, considering not only parallelism but also field sizes. A fixed field with arbitrary field size, gantry, collimator, and couch angle is considered, and another field with a fixed gantry angle is matched to it. A single reference system attached to the treatment couch is used, and two approaches are followed. In the first approach, fixed field sizes are assumed and parallelism of the adjacent field-side planes is imposed. In the second approach, fixed isocenter positions are considered and both parallelism and coincidence between field-side planes are required. When fixed field sizes are assumed, rotation angles are obtained; however, the isocenters may need to be shifted to make side planes coincident and therefore achieve a proper match. When fixed isocenter positions are considered, solutions for all parameters, including the field size, are obtained and an exact geometrical match is achieved. General expressions to the field-matching problem are found for the two approaches followed, fixed field sizes, and fixed isocenter positions. These results can be applied to any treatment technique and can easily be implemented in modern treatment planning systems.

  7. SU-E-T-279: A Novel Electron-Beam Combined with Magnetic Field Application for Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alezra, D; Nardi, E; Koren, S; Bragilovski, D; Orion, I

    2012-06-01

    The new beam and delivery system consists of an electron accelerator and a system of magnets (one or more). Introducing a transverse magnetic field in and near the tumor, causes the electrons to spiral in this region, thereby producing an effective peak in the depth dose distribution, within the tumor volume. Although the basic idea is not new, we suggest here for the first time, a viable as well as a workable, magnetic field configuration, which in addition to focusing the beam does not interfere with its propagation to the target. The electron accelerator: can be a linear accelerator or any other type electron accelerator, capable of producing different electron energies for different depths and dose absorption accumulation. The Field size can be as small as a pencil beam and as big as any of the other standard field sizes that are used in radiotherapy. The scatter filter can be used or removed. The dose rate accumulation can be as higher as possible.The magnets are able to produce magnetic fields. The order, direction, width, place, shape and number of the magnetic fields define the shape and the Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curve of the electron beam. Prototypes were successfully tested by means of computer simulation, using:COMSOL-Multiphsics for magnetic fields calculations. FLUKA package, for electron beam MC simulation. Our results suggest that by using an electron beam at different energies, combined with magnetic fields, we could modify the delivered dose. This is caused by manipulating the electron motion via the Lorentz force. The applied magnetic field, will focus the electron beam at a given depth and deposit the energy in a given volume and depth, where otherwise the electron energy will have spread deeper. The direction and magnitude of the magnetic fields will prevent the scattering of the electron beam and its absorption in remote volumes. In practice, we get a pseudo Bragg peak depth dose distribution, applying a relatively low cost system. The

  8. Impact of different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures in tangential field breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Tharmar, Ganesh; Julka, Pramod K; Rath, Goura K; Joshi, Rakesh C; Bansal, Anil K; Bisht, R K; Gopishankar, N; Pant, G S; Thulkar, S

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is an important concern in tangential field breast radiotherapy. In this study, the impact of three different breathing conditions on the dose to surrounding normal structures such as heart, ipsilateral lung, liver and contralateral breast has been assessed. Thirteen patients with early breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery (nine left-sided and four right-sided breast cancer patients) were selected in this study. Spiral CT scans were performed for all the three breathing conditions, viz., deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH), normal breathing phase (NB) and deep expiration breath-hold (DEBH). Conventional tangential fields were placed on the 3D-CT dataset, and the parameters such as V30 (volume covered by dose >30 Gy) for heart, V20 (volume covered by dose >20 Gy) for ipsilateral lung and V(50) (volume receiving >50% of the prescription dose) for heart and liver were studied. The average reduction in cardiac dose due to DIBH was 64% (range: 26.5-100%) and 74% (range: 37-100%) as compared to NB and DEBH respectively. For right breast cancer, DIBH resulted in excellent liver sparing. Our results indicate that in patients with breast cancer, delivering radiation in deep inspiration breath-hold condition can considerably reduce the dose to the surrounding normal structures, particularly heart and liver.

  9. Radiation dose and cancer risk to out-of-field and partially in-field organs from radiotherapy for symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are the most common benign tumors of the spine that may cause bone resorption. Megavoltage irradiation is usually the treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic VHs. The current study was conducted to estimate the risk for carcinogenesis from radiotherapy of this benign disease on the basis of the calculated radiation doses to healthy organs. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code was employed to simulate the irradiation with 6 MV x-rays of a VH presented in the cervical, upper thoracic, lower thoracic, and lumbar spine. The average radiation dose (D{sub av}) received by each critical organ located outside the primarily irradiated area was calculated. Three-dimensional treatment plans were also generated for the VHs occurring at the four different sites of the spinal cord based on patients’ computed tomography data. The organ equivalent dose (OED) to each radiosensitive structure, which was partly encompassed by the applied treatment fields, was calculated with the aid of differential dose–volume histograms. The D{sub av} and the OED values were combined with a linear-no-threshold model and a nonlinear mechanistic model, respectively, to estimate the organ-, age-, and gender-specific lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for cancer development. The estimated risks were compared with the respective nominal lifetime intrinsic risks (LIRs) for the unexposed population. Results: For a standard target dose of 34 Gy, the OED varied from 0.39–5.15 Gy by the organ of interest and the irradiation site. The D{sub av} range for the out-of-field organs was 4.9 × 10{sup −4} to 0.56 Gy. The LAR for the appearance of malignancies in the partially in-field organs after radiotherapy of male and female patients was (0.08%–1.8%) and (0.09%–1.9%), respectively. These risk values were 1.5–15.5 times lower when compared to the respective LIRs. The lifetime probability for out-of-field cancer induction in irradiated

  10. Radiation dose and cancer risk to out-of-field and partially in-field organs from radiotherapy for symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are the most common benign tumors of the spine that may cause bone resorption. Megavoltage irradiation is usually the treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic VHs. The current study was conducted to estimate the risk for carcinogenesis from radiotherapy of this benign disease on the basis of the calculated radiation doses to healthy organs. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code was employed to simulate the irradiation with 6 MV x-rays of a VH presented in the cervical, upper thoracic, lower thoracic, and lumbar spine. The average radiation dose (D{sub av}) received by eachmore » critical organ located outside the primarily irradiated area was calculated. Three-dimensional treatment plans were also generated for the VHs occurring at the four different sites of the spinal cord based on patients’ computed tomography data. The organ equivalent dose (OED) to each radiosensitive structure, which was partly encompassed by the applied treatment fields, was calculated with the aid of differential dose–volume histograms. The D{sub av} and the OED values were combined with a linear-no-threshold model and a nonlinear mechanistic model, respectively, to estimate the organ-, age-, and gender-specific lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for cancer development. The estimated risks were compared with the respective nominal lifetime intrinsic risks (LIRs) for the unexposed population. Results: For a standard target dose of 34 Gy, the OED varied from 0.39–5.15 Gy by the organ of interest and the irradiation site. The D{sub av} range for the out-of-field organs was 4.9 × 10{sup −4} to 0.56 Gy. The LAR for the appearance of malignancies in the partially in-field organs after radiotherapy of male and female patients was (0.08%–1.8%) and (0.09%–1.9%), respectively. These risk values were 1.5–15.5 times lower when compared to the respective LIRs. The lifetime probability for out-of-field cancer induction in

  11. Highly effective local control and palliation of mantle cell lymphoma with involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbluth, Benjamin D. . E-mail: rosenblb@mskcc.org; Yahalom, Joachim

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Although radiosensitivity of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) has been demonstrated in vitro, radiotherapy is rarely employed in treatment of MCL. We studied clinical responses of MCL patients treated with involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) predominantly for local control and/or palliation. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients (38 sites) treated with IFRT for MCL were retrospectively analyzed. Median age was 68. Seventeen patients had Stage IV/relapsed disease, 1 had Stage II, and 3 had Stage I disease. Most patients received prior chemotherapy, with an average of two combinations per patient. Mean number of sites treated per patient was two. Mean total dose was 30 Gy. Results: Mean follow-up was 13 months. Overall local response rate was 100%. Complete response was obtained in 64% of the sites and partial response in 36%. Average time to response was 20 days. Twenty-eight sites had a response before radiation therapy was complete. Of 16 sites associated with pre-IFRT pain or discomfort, 15 exhibited post-IFRT relief. Thirteen sites (34%) exhibited local progression, with a median time to progression of 10 months, and an average response duration of 9 months. Five patients experienced Grade II radiation-related toxicity. No Grade III toxicity was reported. Twelve-month overall survival for patients receiving IFRT was 55%. Conclusions: Radiotherapy provided effective and lasting local responses in MCL patients and was associated with minimal toxicity. Radiation doses required for most lesions were relatively low and responses were noticed early in the course of treatment. Radiation therapy should be considered early in the course of relapsing, refractory, or localized MCL.

  12. Lung dosimetry in a linac-MRI radiotherapy unit with a longitudinal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, C; Murray, B; Rathee, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-09-01

    There is interest in developing linac-MR systems for MRI-guided radiation therapy. To date, the designs for such linac-MR devices have been restricted to a transverse geometry where the static magnetic field is oriented perpendicular to the direction of the incident photon beam. This work extends possibilities in this field by proposing and examining by Monte Carlo simulations, a probable longitudinal configuration where the magnetic field is oriented in the same direction as the photon beam. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes with algorithms implemented to account for the magnetic field deflection of charged particles were used to compare dose distributions for linac-MR systems in transverse and longitudinal geometries. Specifically, the responses to a 6 MV pencil photon beam incident on water and lung slabs were investigated for 1.5 and 3.0 T magnetic fields. Further a five field lung plan was simulated in the longitudinal and transverse geometries across a range of magnetic field strengths from 0.2 through 3.0 T. In a longitudinal geometry, the magnetic field is shown to restrict the radial spread of secondary electrons to a small degree in water, but significantly in low density tissues such as lung in contrast to the lateral shift in dose distribution seen in the transverse geometry. These effects extend to the patient case, where the longitudinal configuration demonstrated dose distributions more tightly confined to the primary photon fields, which increased dose to the planning target volume (PTV), bettered dose homogeneity within a heterogeneous (in density) PTV, and reduced the tissue interface effects associated with the transverse geometry. Dosimetry issues observed in a transverse linac-MR geometry such as changes to the depth dose distribution and tissue interface effects were significantly reduced or eliminated in a longitudinal geometry on a representative lung plan. Further, an increase in dose to the PTV, resulting from the

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose perturbations in rotational-type radiotherapy due to a transverse magnetic field: A tomotherapy investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. M.; Geurts, M.; Smilowitz, J. B.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Several groups are exploring the integration of magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance with radiotherapy to reduce tumor position uncertainty during photon radiotherapy. The therapeutic gain from reducing tumor position uncertainty using intrafraction MR imaging during radiotherapy could be partially offset if the negative effects of magnetic field-induced dose perturbations are not appreciated or accounted for. The authors hypothesize that a more rotationally symmetric modality such as helical tomotherapy will permit a systematic mediation of these dose perturbations. This investigation offers a unique look at the dose perturbations due to homogeneous transverse magnetic field during the delivery of Tomotherapy{sup ®}more » Treatment System plans under varying degrees of rotational beamlet symmetry. Methods: The authors accurately reproduced treatment plan beamlet and patient configurations using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. This code has a thoroughly benchmarked electromagnetic particle transport physics package well-suited for the radiotherapy energy regime. The three approved clinical treatment plans for this study were for a prostate, head and neck, and lung treatment. The dose heterogeneity index metric was used to quantify the effect of the dose perturbations to the target volumes. Results: The authors demonstrate the ability to reproduce the clinical dose–volume histograms (DVH) to within 4% dose agreement at each DVH point for the target volumes and most planning structures, and therefore, are able to confidently examine the effects of transverse magnetic fields on the plans. The authors investigated field strengths of 0.35, 0.7, 1, 1.5, and 3 T. Changes to the dose heterogeneity index of 0.1% were seen in the prostate and head and neck case, reflecting negligible dose perturbations to the target volumes, a change from 5.5% to 20.1% was observed with the lung case. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the effect of external magnetic

  14. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 3: Qualitative and quantitative impact of scattered out-of-field radiation on MDA-MB-231 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zaleska, K; Suchorska, W M; Kowalik, A; Kruszyna, M; Jackowiak, W; Skrobala, A; Skorska, M; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    Patients who undergo external beam radiotherapy are at risk of developing second tumours due to scattered radiation outside the path of the primary beam. The aim of this study was to experimentally determine the in vitro radiobiological effects of scattered radiation in cells located outside the primary photon beam and to compare this to the effects that occur in cells inside the primary beam. The comparison was performed by assessing cell viability, DNA damage, and apoptosis. Cells from the human breast cancer line MDA-MB-231 were inserted in a water phantom and irradiated at varying doses (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0Gy). The cells were placed at two geometrical points: in the central beam axis and at 10cm out-of-field. The dose was constant in both geometrical points. Survival fraction, number of DNA double strand-breaks, and cleaved poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels were determined by clonogenic assay and flow cytometry. A slight, non-significant decrease of 3 to 5% in cell survival fraction was observed in cells irradiated outside the primary field. The number of PARP-positive cells and DNA double strand-breaks both increased after out-of-field irradiation. Scattered irradiation appears to induce an in vitro biological response on out-of-field cells that is stronger than the effect of primary radiation on in-field cells, independent of the bystander effect. These findings suggest that the biological response of healthy tissues outside the primary beam might be higher than previously believed. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Uilkema, Sander, E-mail: s.uilkema@nki.nl; Heide, Uulke van der; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: MRI guidance during radiotherapy has the potential to enable more accurate dose delivery, optimizing the balance between local control and treatment related toxicity. However, the presence of a permanent magnetic field influences the dose delivery, especially around air cavities. Here, electrons are able to return to the surface through which they entered the air cavity (electron return effect, ERE) locally resulting in dose hot- and cold-spots. Where RT of rectal cancer patients might benefit from MRI guidance for margin reduction, air cavities in and around the target volume are frequently present. The purpose of this research is to evaluatemore » the impact of the presence of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on dose delivery in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Ten patients treated with 5 × 5 Gy RT having large changes in pelvic air content were selected out of a cohort of 33 patients. On the planning CT, a 1.5 T, 6 MV, 7-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was created. This plan was subsequently recalculated on daily CT scans. For each daily CT, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} and bowel area V{sub 5Gy}, V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, and V{sub 25Gy} were calculated to evaluate the changes in dose distribution from fraction to fraction. For comparison, the authors repeated this procedure for the 0 T situation. To study the effect of changing air cavities separate from other anatomical changes, the authors also generated artificial air cavities in the CTV of one patient (2 and 5 cm diameter), in the high dose gradient region (2 cm), and in the low dose area (2 cm). Treatment plans were optimized without and with each simulated air cavity. For appearing and disappearing air cavities, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} were evaluated. The authors also evaluated the ERE separate from attenuation changes locally around appearing gas pockets. Results: For the ten patients, at 1.5 T, the V{sub 95%} was influenced by both

  16. A 1.5 T transverse magnetic field in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: Impact on the dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Uilkema, Sander Heide, Uulke van der; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Triest, Baukelien van; Nijkamp, Jasper; Moreau, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: MRI guidance during radiotherapy has the potential to enable more accurate dose delivery, optimizing the balance between local control and treatment related toxicity. However, the presence of a permanent magnetic field influences the dose delivery, especially around air cavities. Here, electrons are able to return to the surface through which they entered the air cavity (electron return effect, ERE) locally resulting in dose hot- and cold-spots. Where RT of rectal cancer patients might benefit from MRI guidance for margin reduction, air cavities in and around the target volume are frequently present. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact of the presence of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on dose delivery in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Ten patients treated with 5 × 5 Gy RT having large changes in pelvic air content were selected out of a cohort of 33 patients. On the planning CT, a 1.5 T, 6 MV, 7-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was created. This plan was subsequently recalculated on daily CT scans. For each daily CT, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} and bowel area V{sub 5Gy}, V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, and V{sub 25Gy} were calculated to evaluate the changes in dose distribution from fraction to fraction. For comparison, the authors repeated this procedure for the 0 T situation. To study the effect of changing air cavities separate from other anatomical changes, the authors also generated artificial air cavities in the CTV of one patient (2 and 5 cm diameter), in the high dose gradient region (2 cm), and in the low dose area (2 cm). Treatment plans were optimized without and with each simulated air cavity. For appearing and disappearing air cavities, the CTV V{sub 95%} and V{sub 107%} were evaluated. The authors also evaluated the ERE separate from attenuation changes locally around appearing gas pockets. Results: For the ten patients, at 1.5 T, the V{sub 95%} was influenced by both appearing and

  17. Prognostic significance of nodal involvement region in clinical stage IIIc breast cancer patients who received primary systemic treatment, surgery, and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Won; Suh, Chang Ok; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the prognostic influence of involvement of both internal mammary nodes (IMNs) and supraclavicular nodes (SCNs) in clinical stage IIIc breast cancer patients who underwent primary systemic treatment, surgery, and radiotherapy (RT). Between 2001 and 2009, 110 breast cancer patients with IMN or SCN involvement were treated with primary systemic treatment followed by surgery and RT. The median age was 50 years. Clinical N-stage was cN3b and cN3c in 29 (26.4%) and 81 (73.6%) patients, respectively. Among the 81 patients with cN3c disease, 18 patients had both IMN and SCN involvement. Primary systemic treatment regimen was most commonly doxorubicin plus docetaxel (54.5%) or cyclophosphamide (20.0%). Mastectomy was performed in 71 (64.5%) patients. The RT dose delivered to the chest wall or whole breast was 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. IMN and SCN regions were irradiated in 77 (70.0%) and 107 (97.6%) patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 57.4 months (range, 8.6-149.9 months), 44 patients (40.0%) developed disease recurrence. Among the 18 patients with both IMN and SCN involvement, 12 patients experienced disease recurrence and 11 of them had distant metastases. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of all patients were 60.2% and 75.5%, respectively. Decreased DFS and OS were observed in the 18 patients with both IMN and SCN involvement (5-year rates, 33.3% and 50.0%; P = 0.0051 and 0.0010, respectively). Involvement of both IMNs and SCNs was associated with worse survival outcomes in patients with clinical stage IIIc breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, M. T. Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Dávila, J.

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  19. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, M. T.; Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Dávila, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2015-07-01

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e'n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction 10B(n,α)7Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (˜1.6 104 neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  20. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, M. T., E-mail: mariate9590@gmail.com; Barros, H.; Pino, F.

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). Thesemore » covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.« less

  1. Extended-field radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the uterine cervix: clinical experience with and without concomitant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sood, Brij M; Gorla, Giridhar R; Garg, Madhur; Anderson, Patrick S; Fields, Abbie L; Runowicz, Carolyn D; Goldberg, Gary L; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2003-04-01

    It has long been recognized that many patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix harbor occult paraaortic metastases. A randomized study demonstrated that elective paraaortic irradiation improved survival and reduced distant metastases. More recently, concomitant chemotherapy with pelvic irradiation has improved survival among patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix. This has led to a reexamination of the role of extended-field irradiation. An important issue is the toxicity of concomitant chemotherapy and extended-field radiotherapy. The authors report a retrospective analysis of their experience with extended-field radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy. The authors treated 54 women with biopsy-confirmed carcinoma of the cervix using extended-field radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy. The histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 49 patients (91%) and nonsquamous cell carcinoma in 5 patients (9%). The median size of the primary tumor was 7 cm (range, 3-10 cm). Each patient received 45 grays (Gy) of external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis and the paraaortic region, followed by a parametrial boost (9 Gy) in the patients with disease extension to the parametrium or the pelvic side wall(s). Each patient also underwent two applications of high-dose-rate brachytherapy, 1 week apart. The median dose delivered to Point A from each application was 9 Gy. Forty-four of the 54 patients (81%) received concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatin, 20 mg/m(2)/day for 5 days) during the first and the fourth weeks of external beam radiotherapy, and once after the second high-dose rate application. Chemotherapy was not assigned randomly. One of the 10 patients (10%) treated without chemotherapy experienced acute toxicity, whereas 41 of 44 patients (93%) who received chemotherapy suffered from acute toxicity, including hematologic toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity

  2. SU-E-J-198: Out-Of-Field Dose and Surface Dose Measurements of MRI-Guided Cobalt-60 Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure quantities of dosimetric interest in an MRI-guided cobalt radiotherapy machine that was recently introduced to clinical use. Methods: Out-of-field dose due to photon scatter and leakage was measured using an ion chamber and solid water slabs mimicking a human body. Surface dose was measured by irradiating stacks of radiochromic film and extrapolating to zero thickness. Electron out-of-field dose was characterized using solid water slabs and radiochromic film. Results: For some phantom geometries, up to 50% of Dmax was observed up to 10 cm laterally from the edge of the beam. The maximum penetration was between 1 andmore » 2 mm in solid water, indicating an electron energy not greater than approximately 0.4 MeV. Out-of-field dose from photon scatter measured at 1 cm depth in solid water was found to fall to less than 10% of Dmax at a distance of 1.2 cm from the edge of a 10.5 × 10.5 cm field, and less that 1% of Dmax at a distance of 10 cm from field edge. Surface dose was measured to be 8% of Dmax. Conclusion: Surface dose and out-of-field dose from the MRIguided cobalt radiotherapy machine was measured and found to be within acceptable limits. Electron out-of-field dose, an effect unique to MRI-guided radiotherapy and presumed to arise from low-energy electrons trapped by the Lorentz force, was quantified. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc.« less

  3. Teachers as Secondary Players: Involvement in Field Trips to Natural Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Nirit Lavie; Tal, Tali

    2017-08-01

    This study focused on field trips to natural environments where the teacher plays a secondary role alongside a professional guide. We investigated teachers' and field trip guides' views of the teacher's role, the teacher's actual function on the field trip, and the relationship between them. We observed field trips, interviewed teachers and guides, and administered questionnaires. We found different levels of teacher involvement, ranging from mainly supervising and giving technical help, to high involvement especially in the cognitive domain and sometimes in the social domain. Analysis of students' self-reported outcomes showed that the more students believe their teachers are involved, the higher the self-reported learning outcomes.

  4. Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Compared With Mediastinoscopy for Delineating Involved Lymph Nodes in Stage III Lung Cancer: Insights for Radiotherapy Planning From a Surgical Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M. Rice, Thomas W.; Murthy, Sudish; Suh, John H.; Saxton, Jerrold P.; Adelstein, David J.; Mekhail, Tarek M.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Mediastinoscopy is routinely carried out on the majority of nonmetastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in our institution. We used the results of mediastinoscopy from a Stage III NSCLC cohort to assess the reliability of positron emission tomography (PET) scans at identifying involved mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) when used during radiotherapy planning. Methods and Materials: Mediastinoscopy was the gold standard. Characteristics of PET were calculated for nodal sensitivity. To compare the impact on contouring, theoretical nodal targets (NTs) containing involved MLNs were generated using PET and mediastinoscopy. We determined whether the NT derived from PET (NT-P) was equivalent to, greater than, or less than that seen with the mediastinoscopy (NT-M). Results: Data for 122 patients with Stage III NSCLC, treated between 2000 and 2004, were analyzed. After exclusions, 87 patients with Stage III disease by mediastinoscopy were analyzed. Overall PET sensitivity was 61% and positive predictive value was 94%. Of the 87 patients, 33 (38%) had no abnormal MLN findings by PET. Of 36 Stage IIIA cancer patients, 18 (50%) had NT-P equivalent to NT-M, 10 (28%) had smaller NT-Ps, and 8 (22%) had larger NT-Ps compared with NT-Ms. Of 18 Stage IIIB cancer patients, NTs were equivalent in 6 (34%); in 1 patient (5%) NT-P was larger than the corresponding NT-M, and in 11 (61%) smaller than the corresponding NT-M. Conclusions: In this study PET had modest sensitivity to detect MLN involvement and underestimated the extent of involved nodes for target definition. The role of PET in mediastinal contouring needs to be evaluated prospectively and ideally correlated with a pathology standard.

  5. Out-of-field in vivo dosimetry using TLD in SABR for primary kidney cancer involving mixed photon fields.

    PubMed

    Lonski, P; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Pham, D; Franich, R D; Taylor, M L; Kron, T

    2017-05-01

    To assess out-of-field dose using three different variants of LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) for ten patients who underwent stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and compare with treatment planning system (TPS) dose calculations. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements were conducted at 20, 30, 40 and 50cm from isocentre on ten patients undergoing SABR for primary RCC. Three types of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLD material with different 6Li/7Li isotope ratios were used. Patient plans were calculated using Eclipse Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for clinical evaluation and recalculated using Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) algorithm for comparison. Both AAA and PBC showed diminished accuracy for photon doses at increasing distance out-of-field. At 50cm, measured photon dose was 0.3cGy normalised to a 10Gy prescription on average with only small variation across all patients. This is likely due to the leakage component of the out-of-field dose. The 6Li-enriched TLD materials showed increased signal attributable to additional neutron contribution. LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLD containing 6Li is sensitive enough to measure out-of-field dose 50cm from isocentre however will over-estimate the photon component of out-of-field dose in high energy treatments due to the presence of thermal neutrons. 7Li enriched materials which are insensitive to neutrons are therefore required for accurate photon dosimetry. Neutron signal has been shown here to increase with MUs and is higher for patients treated using certain non coplanar beam arrangements. Further work is required to convert this additional neutron signal to dose. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-Term Follow-Up of Dose-Adapted and Reduced-Field Radiotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Central Nervous System Germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Issa Laack, Nadia N.; Buckner, Jan C.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Wetmore, Cynthia J.; Brown, Paul D.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To update our institutional experience with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and minimized radiotherapy vs. radiation monotherapy for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of 59 patients with diagnosis of primary intracranial germinoma between 1977 and 2007. Treatment was irradiation alone or neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy and local irradiation (initial tumor plus margin) for patients with localized complete response and reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation for others. Results: For the chemoradiotherapy group (n = 28), median follow-up was 7 years. No patient died. The freedom from progression (FFP) rate was 88% at 5 years and 80% at 10 years. In 4 patients, disease recurred 1.1 to 6.8 years after diagnosis. All were young male patients who received 30.6 Gy to local fields after complete response to chemotherapy. The FFP rate was 88% for local irradiation vs. 100% for more extensive fields (p = .06). For the radiotherapy-alone group (n = 31), median follow-up was 15 years. Overall and disease-free survival rates were 93% and 93% at 5 years and 90% and 87% at 15 years. In 5 patients, disease recurred 1.1 to 4.9 years after diagnosis. Most patients in this group were young men 18 to 23 years of age with suprasellar primary disease treated with about 50 Gy to local fields. The FFP rate was 44% for local irradiation vs. 100% for more extensive fields (p < .01). Conclusions: The addition of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to local-field radiotherapy reduced central nervous system cancer recurrence when high-risk patients were excluded by thorough pretreatment staging. There was trend toward improved central nervous system tumor control when larger fields (whole brain, whole ventricle, or craniospinal axis) were used.

  7. Long-Term Follow-Up of Dose-Adapted and Reduced-Field Radiotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Central Nervous System Germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Issa Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.ed; Buckner, Jan C.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To update our institutional experience with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and minimized radiotherapy vs. radiation monotherapy for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of 59 patients with diagnosis of primary intracranial germinoma between 1977 and 2007. Treatment was irradiation alone or neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy and local irradiation (initial tumor plus margin) for patients with localized complete response and reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation for others. Results: For the chemoradiotherapy group (n = 28), median follow-up was 7 years. No patient died. The freedom from progression (FFP) rate was 88% at 5 years and 80% at 10 years. In 4 patients,more » disease recurred 1.1 to 6.8 years after diagnosis. All were young male patients who received 30.6 Gy to local fields after complete response to chemotherapy. The FFP rate was 88% for local irradiation vs. 100% for more extensive fields (p = .06). For the radiotherapy-alone group (n = 31), median follow-up was 15 years. Overall and disease-free survival rates were 93% and 93% at 5 years and 90% and 87% at 15 years. In 5 patients, disease recurred 1.1 to 4.9 years after diagnosis. Most patients in this group were young men 18 to 23 years of age with suprasellar primary disease treated with about 50 Gy to local fields. The FFP rate was 44% for local irradiation vs. 100% for more extensive fields (p < .01). Conclusions: The addition of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to local-field radiotherapy reduced central nervous system cancer recurrence when high-risk patients were excluded by thorough pretreatment staging. There was trend toward improved central nervous system tumor control when larger fields (whole brain, whole ventricle, or craniospinal axis) were used.« less

  8. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bing-Jie; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Chou, Yueh-Hung; Tseng, Li-Ming; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day). However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours) was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of pseudomembranous colitis following concurrent chemoradiation therapy. PMID:23359785

  9. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing-Jie; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Chou, Yueh-Hung; Tseng, Li-Ming; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day). However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours) was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of pseudomembranous colitis following concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  10. Lung stereotactic body radiotherapy with an MR-linac - Quantifying the impact of the magnetic field and real-time tumor tracking.

    PubMed

    Menten, Martin J; Fast, Martin F; Nill, Simeon; Kamerling, Cornelis P; McDonald, Fiona; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-06-01

    There are concerns that radiotherapy doses delivered in a magnetic field might be distorted due to the Lorentz force deflecting secondary electrons. This study investigates this effect on lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments, conducted either with or without multileaf collimator (MLC) tumor tracking. Lung SBRT treatments with an MR-linac were simulated for nine patients. Two different treatment techniques were compared: conventional, non-tracked deliveries and deliveries with real-time MLC tumor tracking, each conducted either with or without a 1.5T magnetic field. Slight dose distortions at air-tissue-interfaces were observed in the presence of the magnetic field. Most prominently, the dose to 2% of the skin increased by 1.4Gy on average. Regardless of the presence of the magnetic field, MLC tracking was able to spare healthy tissue, for example by decreasing the mean lung dose by 0.3Gy on average, while maintaining the target dose. Accounting for the magnetic field during treatment plan optimization allowed for design and delivery of clinically acceptable lung SBRT treatments with an MR-linac. Furthermore, the ability of MLC tumor tracking to decrease dose exposure of healthy tissue, was not inhibited by the magnetic field. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, David; Dear, Keith; Le, Thai; Barton, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Porter, David; Roos, Daniel; Pratt, Gary

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

  12. Weekly response assessment of involved lymph nodes to radiotherapy using diffusion-weighted MRI in oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neelam; Riaz, Nadeem; Hunt, Margie; Wengler, Kenneth; Hatzoglou, Vaios; Young, Robert; Mechalakos, James; Lee, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancers of oropharynx have a favorable prognosis and are an ideal candidate for adaptive therapy. A replan to improve coverage or escalate/de-escalate dose based on morphological information alone may not be adequate as the grossly involved lymph nodes (LNs) of a subset of these patients tend to become cystic and often do not regress. Functional adaptation may be a better approach when considering replanning for these patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the weekly trends in treatment related morphological and physiological changes for these LNs using diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) and evaluate its implications for adaptive replanning. Methods: Ten patients with histologically proven oropharynx HNSCC undergoing concurrent chemoradiation were analyzed in this study. MR imaging protocol included axial T1w, T2w, and DW-MRI using a 3 T Philips MR scanner. The patients were scanned weekly in radiation treatment planning position using a 16 element phased-array anterior coil and a 44 element posterior coil. A total of 65 DWI and T2w scans were analyzed. DWI was performed using an optimized single-shot echo planar imaging sequence (TR/TE = 5000/65 ms, slice thickness = 5 mm; slices = 28; b values = 0 and 800 s/mm2). Quantification of the DW-MRI images was performed by calculating the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). T2w and DWI scans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) corresponding to grossly involved LNs were contoured on each axial slice by physician experts. An attempt was made to remove any cystic or necrotic components so that the ADC analysis was of viable tumor only. A pixel-by-pixel fit of signal intensities within the GTVs was performed assuming monoexponential behavior. From each GTV histogram mean, median, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis were calculated. Absolute and percent change in weekly ADC histogram parameters and percent change in T2w GTV were also

  13. A review of the impact of photon and proton external beam radiotherapy treatment modalities on the dose distribution in field and out-of-field; implications for the long-term morbidity of cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Palm, Asa; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2007-01-01

    The use of untraditional treatment modalities for external beam radiotherapy such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy is increasing. This review focuses on the changes in the dose distribution and the impact on radiation related risks for long-term cancer survivors. We compare conventional radiotherapy, IMRT, and proton beam therapy based on published treatment planning studies as well as published measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of out-of-field dose distributions. Physical dose parameters describing the dose distribution in the target volume, the conformity index, the dose distribution in organs at risk, and the dose distribution in non-target tissue, respectively, are extracted from the treatment planning studies. Measured out-of-field dose distributions are presented as the dose equivalent as a function of distance from the treatment field. Data in the literature clearly shows that, compared with conventional radiotherapy, IMRT improves the dose distribution in the target volume, which may increase the probability of tumor control. IMRT also seems to increase the out-of-field dose distribution, as well as the irradiated non-target volume, although the data is not consistent, leading to a potentially increased risk of radiation induced secondary malignancies, while decreasing the dose to normal tissues close to the target volume, reducing the normal tissue complication probability. Protons show no or only minor advantage on the dose distribution in the target volume and the conformity index compared to IMRT. However, the data consistently shows that proton beam therapy substantially decreases the OAR average dose compared to the other two techniques. It is also clear that protons provide an improved dose distribution in non-target tissues compared to conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. IMRT and proton beam therapy may significantly improve tumor control for cancer patients and quality of life for long-term cancer

  14. Electric-field enhanced performance in catalysis and solid-state devices involving gases

    DOEpatents

    Blackburn, Bryan M.; Wachsman, Eric D.; Van Assche, IV, Frederick Martin

    2015-05-19

    Electrode configurations for electric-field enhanced performance in catalysis and solid-state devices involving gases are provided. According to an embodiment, electric-field electrodes can be incorporated in devices such as gas sensors and fuel cells to shape an electric field provided with respect to sensing electrodes for the gas sensors and surfaces of the fuel cells. The shaped electric fields can alter surface dynamics, system thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and adsorption/desorption processes. In one embodiment, ring-shaped electric-field electrodes can be provided around sensing electrodes of a planar gas sensor.

  15. Out-of-field neutron and leakage photon exposures and the associated risk of second cancers in high-energy photon radiotherapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Takam, R; Bezak, E; Marcu, L G; Yeoh, E

    2011-10-01

    Determination and understanding of out-of-field neutron and photon doses in accelerator-based radiotherapy is an important issue since linear accelerators operating at high energies (>10 MV) produce secondary radiations that irradiate parts of the patient's anatomy distal to the target region, potentially resulting in detrimental health effects. This paper provides a compilation of data (technical and clinical) reported in the literature on the measurement and Monte Carlo simulations of peripheral neutron and photon doses produced from high-energy medical linear accelerators and the reported risk and/or incidence of second primary cancer of tissues distal to the target volume. Information in the tables facilitates easier identification of (1) the various methods and measurement techniques used to determine the out-of-field neutron and photon radiations, (2) reported linac-dependent out-of-field doses, and (3) the risk/incidence of second cancers after radiotherapy due to classic and modern treatment methods. Regardless of the measurement technique and type of accelerator, the neutron dose equivalent per unit photon dose ranges from as low as 0.1 mSv/Gy to as high as 20.4 mSv/Gy. This radiation dose potentially contributes to the induction of second primary cancer in normal tissues outside the treated area.

  16. First patients treated with a 1.5 T MRI-Linac: clinical proof of concept of a high-precision, high-field MRI guided radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaymakers, B. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Bol, G. H.; Glitzner, M.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; van Asselen, B.; de Boer, J. C. J.; Bluemink, J. J.; Hackett, S. L.; Moerland, M. A.; Woodings, S. J.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; van Zijp, H. M.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Tijssen, R.; Kok, J. G. M.; de Groot-van Breugel, E. N.; Kiekebosch, I.; Meijers, L. T. C.; Nomden, C. N.; Sikkes, G. G.; Doornaert, P. A. H.; Eppinga, W. S. C.; Kasperts, N.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Tersteeg, J. H. A.; Brown, K. J.; Pais, B.; Woodhead, P.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2017-12-01

    The integration of 1.5 T MRI functionality with a radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac) has been pursued since 1999 by the UMC Utrecht in close collaboration with Elekta and Philips. The idea behind this integrated device is to offer unrivalled, online and real-time, soft-tissue visualization of the tumour and the surroundings for more precise radiation delivery. The proof of concept of this device was given in 2009 by demonstrating simultaneous irradiation and MR imaging on phantoms, since then the device has been further developed and commercialized by Elekta. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of online, high-precision, high-field MRI guidance of radiotherapy using the first clinical prototype MRI-Linac. Four patients with lumbar spine bone metastases were treated with a 3 or 5 beam step-and-shoot IMRT plan. The IMRT plan was created while the patient was on the treatment table and based on the online 1.5 T MR images; pre-treatment CT was deformably registered to the online MRI to obtain Hounsfield values. Bone metastases were chosen as the first site as these tumors can be clearly visualized on MRI and the surrounding spine bone can be detected on the integrated portal imager. This way the portal images served as an independent verification of the MRI based guidance to quantify the geometric precision of radiation delivery. Dosimetric accuracy was assessed post-treatment from phantom measurements with an ionization chamber and film. Absolute doses were found to be highly accurate, with deviations ranging from 0.0% to 1.7% in the isocenter. The geometrical, MRI based targeting as confirmed using portal images was better than 0.5 mm, ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm. In conclusion, high precision, high-field, 1.5 T MRI guided radiotherapy is clinically feasible.

  17. Optimal field-splitting algorithm in intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Evaluations using head-and-neck and female pelvic IMRT cases

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Xin; Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu; Bayouth, John E.

    2013-04-01

    To develop an optimal field-splitting algorithm of minimal complexity and verify the algorithm using head-and-neck (H and N) and female pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) cases. An optimal field-splitting algorithm was developed in which a large intensity map (IM) was split into multiple sub-IMs (≥2). The algorithm reduced the total complexity by minimizing the monitor units (MU) delivered and segment number of each sub-IM. The algorithm was verified through comparison studies with the algorithm as used in a commercial treatment planning system. Seven IMRT, H and N, and female pelvic cancer cases (54 IMs) were analyzed by MU, segment numbers, andmore » dose distributions. The optimal field-splitting algorithm was found to reduce both total MU and the total number of segments. We found on average a 7.9 ± 11.8% and 9.6 ± 18.2% reduction in MU and segment numbers for H and N IMRT cases with an 11.9 ± 17.4% and 11.1 ± 13.7% reduction for female pelvic cases. The overall percent (absolute) reduction in the numbers of MU and segments were found to be on average −9.7 ± 14.6% (−15 ± 25 MU) and −10.3 ± 16.3% (−3 ± 5), respectively. In addition, all dose distributions from the optimal field-splitting method showed improved dose distributions. The optimal field-splitting algorithm shows considerable improvements in both total MU and total segment number. The algorithm is expected to be beneficial for the radiotherapy treatment of large-field IMRT.« less

  18. Response of Fingernail Growth to Out-of-Field Low-Dose X ray in Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shichuan; Peng, Huan; He, Ling; Zhang, Xudong; Gao, Yiying; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Jiabao; Fan, Yu; Li, Jian; Wen, Hao; Wang, Jie; Fan, Jinchuan

    2017-06-01

    The entire body of a patient with cancer is exposed to low-dose levels of radiation (mGy) during radiation therapy. The safety and biological impact of such exposure to low-dose radiation on the human body are largely unknown. The fingernail is a highly proliferative tissue, and its growth can be monitored during radiation treatment to analyze early effects of low-dose radiation. The fingernails of 30 patients who received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were used in this study to investigate the change in nail growth during fractionated radiotherapy. Lead shields were applied to some fingers to create dose variance within individual patients. The absorbed dose was measured, and the relationship between the dose and change in nail growth rate was analyzed. Other factors, including serum albumin, hemoglobin level, body weight index, age, gender and chemotherapy, were also subjected to multivariate analysis. Fingernails from patients received an average of 0.96 mGy per treatment fraction. We observed a surprising decline in fingernail growth rate during radiotherapy, which was more prominent in the nonshielded fingernails with a relatively high-absorbed dose. Such growth delay could be observed as early as one week postirradiation and lasted the entire treatment course. Using fingernail growth as a novel marker for radioresponse, the current study showed that exposure to very low-dose ionizing radiation has previously unrecognized early effects on human tissue.

  19. Radiotherapy of Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, C R; Cummings, B J; Harwood, A R

    1986-11-01

    Between 1958 and 1983, 91 patients with Kaposi's sarcoma were referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital. Eight patients received no specific therapy immediately following their first assessment. Twenty-seven patients were treated by local field radiotherapy, of whom 17 entered complete remission and 6 have remained relapse-free. Fifty-six patients received extended field radiotherapy, usually a single fraction of 8 Gy megavoltage gamma-ray or photon therapy; 38 achieved completed remission, and 24 have remained relapse-free for a median duration of 3 years. The actuarial relapse-free survival for patients treated by local versus extended field radiotherapy significantly favors the extended field technique although the rates of relapse after complete remission has been achieved appear similar. Immunosuppression was present in 12 patients prior to the diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma; these patients had a similar response rate to radiation therapy to those who were not known to be immunosuppressed. A rationale for management, and radiation technique and dose are discussed. It is concluded that radiotherapy is an effective treatment for most forms of Kaposi's sarcoma.

  20. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistantmore » that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF

  1. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  2. A treatment planning study comparing volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and fixed field IMRT for cervix uteri radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Luca; Dinshaw, Ketayun Ardeshir; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Engineer, Reena; Deshpande, Deepak Dattatray; Jamema, S V; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Fogliata, Antonella

    2008-11-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of the novel volumetric modulated single arc radiotherapy on cervix uteri cancer patients. Conventional fixed field IMRT was used as benchmark. CT datasets of eight patients were included in the study. Plans were optimised with the aim to assess organs at risk and healthy tissue sparing while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. Planning objectives for PTV were: maximum significant dose lower than 52.5 Gy and minimum significant dose higher than 47.5 Gy. For organs at risk, the median and maximum doses were constrained to be lower than 30 (rectum), 35 (bladder) and 25 Gy (small bowel) and 47.5 Gy; additional objectives were set on various volume thresholds. Plans were evaluated on parameters derived from dose volume histograms and on NTCP estimates. Peripheral doses at 5, 10 and 15 cm from the PTV surface were recorded to assess the low-level dose bath. The MU and delivery time were scored to measure expected treatment efficiency. Both RapidArc and IMRT resulted in equivalent target coverage but RapidArc had an improved homogeneity (D(5%)-D(95%) = 3.5 +/- 0.6 Gy for RapidArc and 4.3 +/- 0.8 Gy for IMRT) and conformity index (CI(90%) = 1.30 +/- 0.06 for RapidArc and 1.41 +/- 0.15 for IMRT). On rectum the mean dose was reduced by about 6 Gy (10 Gy for the rectum fraction not included in the PTV). Similar trends were observed for the various dose levels with reductions ranging from approximately 3 to 14.4 Gy. For the bladder, RapidArc allowed a reduction of mean dose ranging from approximately 4 to 6Gy and a reduction from approximately 3 to 9 Gy w.r.t. IMRT. Similar trends but with smaller absolute differences were observed for the small bowel and left and right femur. NTCP calculations on bladder and rectum confirmed the DVH data with a potential relative reduction ranging from 30 to 70% from IMRT to RapidArc. The healthy tissue was significantly less irradiated in the medium to high dose

  3. [Conformal index and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Feuvret, L; Noël, G; Nauraye, C; Garcia, P; J-Mazeron, J

    2004-04-01

    Goal of radiotherapy is to treat patient with the best therapeutic ratio, i.e. the highest local control and the lowest toxicity rates. The conformal approach, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy, is based on imageries, up-dated 3-D treatment planning systems, immobilization systems, restricted quality assurance and treatment verification. The aim is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume, while reducing exposure of normal tissues. The evaluation tools used for optimizing treatment are the visual inspection of the dose distribution in various planes, and the dose-volume histograms, but they do not fully quantify the conformity of dose distributions. The conformal index is a tool for scoring a given plan or for evaluating different treatment plans for the same patient. This paper describes the onset and evolution of conformal index and his potential application field.

  4. Parental Motivational Practice, Parent Involvement, and Students' Choice of Study Field in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niu, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes data of the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 to examine the association between parental provision of task-extrinsic rewards for academic performance, parent involvement in students' learning, and students' choice of study field in college. Results show that frequent receipt of task-extrinsic rewards for good grades from…

  5. Gibberellins are involved in effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yue; Wei, Shufeng

    2017-01-01

    We previously found that flowering of Arabidopsis was suppressed by near-null magnetic field, which was related to the modification of cryptochrome. To disclose the physiological mechanism of this effect, we detected gibberellin (GA) levels and expressions of GA biosynthetic and signaling genes in wild type Arabidopsis plants and cryptochrome double mutant, cry1/cry2, grown in near-null magnetic field. We found that levels of GA4 , GA9 , GA34 , and GA51 in wild type plants in near-null magnetic field were significantly decreased compared with local geomagnetic field controls. However, GA levels in cry1/cry2 mutants in near-null magnetic field were similar to controls. Expressions of three GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) genes (GA20ox1, GA20ox2, and GA20ox3) and four GA3-oxidase (GA3ox) genes (GA3ox1, GA3ox2, GA3ox3, and GA3ox4) in wild type plants in near-null magnetic field were significantly reduced compared with controls, while expressions of GA20ox4, GA20ox5, GA2-oxidase (GA2ox) genes, and GA signaling-related genes in wild type plants in near-null magnetic field were not significantly different from controls. In contrast, expressions of all the detected GA biosynthetic and signaling genes in cry1/cry2 mutants were not affected by near-null magnetic field. Moreover, transcriptions of flowering-related genes, LFY and SOC1, in wild type plants were downregulated by near-null magnetic field, while they were not affected by near-null magnetic field in cry1/cry2 mutants. Our results suggest that the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering is GA-related, which is caused by cryptochrome-involved suppression of GA biosynthesis. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:1-10, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. RapidArc radiotherapy for whole pelvic lymph node in cervical cancer with 6 and 15 MV: a treatment planning comparison with fixed field IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, De-Yin; Yin, Yong; Gong, Guan-Zhong; Liu, Tong-Hai; Chen, Jin-Hu; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Lu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Dosimetric differences were investigated among single and dual arc RapidArc and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (f-IMRT) treatment plans for whole pelvic irradiation of lymph nodes. A total of 12 patients who had undergone radical surgery for cervical cancer and who had demonstrated multiple pelvic lymph node metastases were treated with radiotherapy. For all 12 cases, 7-field IMRT, single-arc RapidArc and dual-arc RapidArc were applied with 6 MV and 15 MV X-ray energies. The radiation dosimetric parameters for the different plans were compared with one another. All the plans met the clinical requirements. The homogeneity, conformity and external volume indices of f-IMRT and dual-arc RapidArc were better than for single-arc RapidArc (P < 0.05), while the differences between f-IMRT and dual-arc RapidArc were not significant. There were no significant differences in the radiation dose to organs at risk, except for the small bowel receiving >40 Gy (f-IMRT and dual-arc < single-arc, P < 0.05). The differences in dose distributions between the two applied X-ray energies for each of the modality plans were not significant. RapidArc plans resulted in fewer monitor units than the corresponding f-IMRT plans. Also, there were no differences between the two photon energies, except for a reduction in the number of MUs for 15 MV (P > 0.05). Compared to f-IMRT, no significant dosimetric benefits were found using RapidArc for whole pelvic lymph node irradiation. However, RapidArc has been associated with shorter treatment time and fewer monitor units, supporting the case for its safety and efficacy for pelvic irradiation. PMID:23283869

  7. Integrating a MRI scanner with a 6 MV radiotherapy accelerator: impact of the surface orientation on the entrance and exit dose due to the transverse magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; van der Meer, S; Lagendijk, J J W

    2007-02-21

    At the UMC Utrecht, in collaboration with Elekta and Philips Research Hamburg, we are developing a radiotherapy accelerator with integrated MRI functionality. The radiation dose will be delivered in the presence of a lateral 1.5 T field. Although the photon beam is not affected by the magnetic field, the actual dose deposition is done by a cascade of secondary electrons and these electrons are affected by the Lorentz force. The magnetic field causes a reduced build-up distance: because the trajectory of the electrons between collisions is curved, the entrance depth in tissue decreases. Also, at tissue-air interfaces an increased dose occurs due to the so-called electron return effect (ERE): electrons leaving tissue will describe a circular path in air and re-enter the tissue yielding a local dose increase. In this paper the impact of a 1.5 T magnetic field on both the build-up distance and the dose increase due to the ERE will be investigated as a function of the angle between the surface and the incident beam. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that in the presence of a 1.5 T magnetic field, the surface dose, the build-up distance and the exit dose depend more heavily on the surface orientation than in the case without magnetic field. This is caused by the asymmetrical pointspread kernel in the presence of 1.5 T and the directional behaviour of the re-entering electrons. Simulations on geometrical phantoms show that ERE dose increase at air cavities can be avoided using opposing beams, also when the air-tissue boundary is not perpendicular to the beam. For the more general case in patient anatomies, more problems may arise. Future work will address the possibilities and limitations of opposing beams in combination with IMRT in a magnetic field.

  8. Integrating a MRI scanner with a 6 MV radiotherapy accelerator: impact of the surface orientation on the entrance and exit dose due to the transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Raaymakers, B. W.; van der Meer, S.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2007-02-01

    At the UMC Utrecht, in collaboration with Elekta and Philips Research Hamburg, we are developing a radiotherapy accelerator with integrated MRI functionality. The radiation dose will be delivered in the presence of a lateral 1.5 T field. Although the photon beam is not affected by the magnetic field, the actual dose deposition is done by a cascade of secondary electrons and these electrons are affected by the Lorentz force. The magnetic field causes a reduced build-up distance: because the trajectory of the electrons between collisions is curved, the entrance depth in tissue decreases. Also, at tissue-air interfaces an increased dose occurs due to the so-called electron return effect (ERE): electrons leaving tissue will describe a circular path in air and re-enter the tissue yielding a local dose increase. In this paper the impact of a 1.5 T magnetic field on both the build-up distance and the dose increase due to the ERE will be investigated as a function of the angle between the surface and the incident beam. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that in the presence of a 1.5 T magnetic field, the surface dose, the build-up distance and the exit dose depend more heavily on the surface orientation than in the case without magnetic field. This is caused by the asymmetrical pointspread kernel in the presence of 1.5 T and the directional behaviour of the re-entering electrons. Simulations on geometrical phantoms show that ERE dose increase at air cavities can be avoided using opposing beams, also when the air-tissue boundary is not perpendicular to the beam. For the more general case in patient anatomies, more problems may arise. Future work will address the possibilities and limitations of opposing beams in combination with IMRT in a magnetic field.

  9. A randomized study of involved-field irradiation versus elective nodal irradiation in combination with concurrent chemotherapy for inoperable stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuanghu; Sun, Xindong; Li, Minghuan; Yu, Jinming; Ren, Ruimei; Yu, Yonghu; Li, Jianbin; Liu, Xiuqing; Wang, Renben; Li, Baosheng; Kong, Li; Yin, Yong

    2007-06-01

    Radiation dose escalation is limited by the high incidence of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, leading to calls for the omission of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and the willingness to use involved-field irradiation (IFI) in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 200 eligible patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy and randomized into either an IFI or ENI arm. A total of 4 to 6 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy were delivered, and concurrent radiotherapy was started after the second cycle of chemotherapy. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy to 68 to 74 Gy for IFI or 60 to 64 Gy for ENI. Patients in the IFI arm achieved better overall response rate (90% vs. 79%, P = 0.032) and better 5-years local control rate (51% vs.36%, P = 0.032) than those in the ENI arm. The radiation pneumonitis rate in patients with IFI was lower than in patients with ENI (17% vs. 29%, P = 0.044), and similar trends appeared in the radiation esophagitis, myelosuppression, and radiation pericarditis between 2 study arms, although not significantly. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 60.4%, 25.6%, and 18.3% for the ENI arm and 69.9%, 39.4%, and 25.1% for the IFI arm, respectively. Only the 2-year survival rates were statistically significant (P = 0.048). IFI arm achieved better overall response and local control than ENI arm, and it allowed a dose of 68 to 74 Gy to be safely administered to patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. Outcome improvement can be expected by conformal IFI combined with chemotherapy for stage III NSCLC.

  10. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-01-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25–30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  11. Risk of a Second Malignant Neoplasm After Cancer in Childhood Treated With Radiotherapy: Correlation With the Integral Dose Restricted to the Irradiated Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif; Universite Paris XI, Villejuif

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: After successful treatment of cancers in childhood, the occurrence of second malignant neoplasm (SMN) came to the fore. Few studies have considered the relationship between the radiation dose received and the risk of developing an SMN. To take into account the heterogeneity of the dose distribution so as to evaluate the overall risk of an SMN after a childhood cancer, we therefore focused on the integral dose restricted to the irradiated fields. Methods and Materials: The study was performed in a cohort of 4,401 patients who were 3-year survivors of all types of childhood cancer treated between 1947 andmore » 1986 in France and Great Britain. For each patient, the integral dose was estimated for the volume inside the beam edges. Results: We found a significant dose-response relationship between the overall risk of an SMN and the estimated integral dose. The excess relative risk for each incremental unit of the integral dose was only 0.008 in a linear model and 0.017 when a negative exponential term was considered, when adjusted for chemotherapy. The risk of SMN occurrence was 2.6 times higher in the case of irradiation. However among patients who had received radiotherapy, only those who had received the highest integral dose actually had a higher risk. Conclusions: The integral dose in our study cannot be considered as a good predictor of later risks. However other studies with the same study design are obviously needed to evaluate the use of the integral dose as a tool for decision making concerning different radiotherapy techniques.« less

  12. Pelvic recurrence after definitive surgery for locally advanced rectal cancer: a retrospective investigation of implications for precision radiotherapy field design.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhu, Yinju; Tong, Tong; Xu, Ye; Guan, Yun; Wang, Jingwen; Wang, Huankun; Zhu, Ji

    2017-11-10

    To analyze the local distribution of pelvic recurrence after total mesorectal excision, with a view to simplifying the formulation of optimal individualized radiotherapy plans. We retrospectively investigated the data of 168 patients diagnosed with recurrent pelvic cancer treated at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between January 2008 and December 2012. The following were collected depending on availability: operative report, histological report, specimen photographs, initial preoperative images, images confirming local recurrence, and clinical history. A total of 203 lesions of local recurrence were identified. The most common sites of pelvic recurrence were the mesorectum, including the anastomotic stoma in 53.0% of cases; presacral space in 27.4%, and pelvic floor and perineum in 21.4% the cases. Recurrence was most common in the lower pelvic region (i.e., below the upper border of the acetabulum), accounting for approximately 76.2% (128 cases) of cases. In patients with mid-rectal and distal rectal carcinoma. Patients with pelvic cancer may benefit by individualized treatment plans aimed at achieving a balance between tumor control and minimal risk of irradiation-induced toxicity.

  13. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  14. Exposures involving perturbations of the EM field have non-linear effects on radiation response and can alter the expression of radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Our recent data suggest there is a physical component to the bystander signal induced by radiation exposure and that alternative medicine techniques such as Reiki and acupuncture or exposures to weak EM fields alter the response of cells to direct irradiation and either altered bystander signal production or altered the response of cells receiving bystander signals. Our proposed mechanism to explain these findings is that perturbation of electromagnetic (EM) fields is central to the induction of low radiation dose responses especially non-targeted bystander effects. In this presentation we review the alternative medicine data and other data sets from our laboratory which test our hypothesis that perturbation of bio-fields will modulate radiation response in the low dose region. The other data sets include exposure to MRI, shielding using lead and or Faraday cages, the use of physical barriers to bystander signal transmission and the use of membrane channel blockers. The data taken together strongly suggest that EM field perturbation can modulate low dose response and that in fact the EM field rather than the targeted deposition of ionizing energy in the DNA may be the key determinant of dose response in a cell or organism The results also lead us to suspect that at least when chemical transmission is blocked, bystander signals can be transmitted by other means. Our recent experiments suggest light signals and volatiles are not likely. We conclude that alternative medicine and other techniques involving electromagnetic perturbations can modify the response of cells to low doses of ionizing radiation and can induce bystander effects similar to those seen in medium transfer experiments. In addition to the obvious implications for mechanistic studies of low dose effects, this could perhaps provide a novel target to exploit in space radiation protection and in optimizing therapeutic gain during radiotherapy.

  15. Postoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer. Investigations about optimal dose distribution in irradiation of the thoracic wall by tangential fields. II(in German)

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, H.P.

    1973-09-01

    Experimental investigations are reported for the study of dose distributions on the thoracic wall in irradiation via tangential standing fields. A special water-model with particularly thin walls as well as a Machlett-Alderson- Rando-Man-Phanto m were used for the measurements. The dosimetry was performed by ionometry with a micro-tube-chamber and the Duplex-dosimeter on the water- phantom, by thermoluminescence dosimetry with LiF TLD-100 dosimeters on the Alderson-phantom. The measured values were recorded on punched tapes and processed in a computer. By arithmetic superimposition of the counter-fields the isodoses of the superimposition could be demonstrated. The arithmetic variation of the irradiation parameters (anglemore » of incidence, exposure) made it possible to study various modes of irradiation. The measurements were made for kilovolt technique, the tele-cesium-apparatus, the tele-cobalt apparatus, and the 17MeV- Betatron for ultrahard x-ray radiation. The accuracy of the dose distributions found on the water-model could be tested by comparison with the results obtained on the body-equivalent model. With tele-cesium, tele-cobalt and ultrahard x-rays using tangential counter-fields, an equal perradiation of the thoracic wall was attained, with adequate to satisfactory protection of the lung tissue, whereas the conventional deep x-ray therapy did not guarantee satisfactory dose distributions. An improvement of the dose distribution by different exposure of the fields was not possible. Differences of the dose distribution on the Alderson model are caused by inhomogeneities of the tissues. With the kilovolt- technique, particularly before the superimposition of the standing fields, a marked influence caused by inhomogeneities was observed. Conclusions are drawn for practical radiotherapy and a technique of adjustment to the patient was described which permits reproducible irradiations and the use of the resulting isodoses. (GE)« less

  16. Regional Nodal Involvement and Patterns of Spread Along In-Transit Pathways in Children With Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Extremity: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group;Rhabdomyosarcoma; Regional failure; In-transit nodes; Radiotherapy; Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    La, Trang H.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Rodeberg, David A.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and prognostic factors for regional failure, with attention to the in-transit pathways of spread, in children with nonmetastatic rhabdomyosarcoma of the extremity. Methods and Materials: The Intergroup rhabdomyosarcoma studies III, IV-Pilot, and IV enrolled 226 children with rhabdomyosarcoma of the extremity. Failure at the in-transit (epitrochlear/brachial and popliteal) and proximal (axillary/infraclavicular and inguinal/femoral) lymph nodes was evaluated. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 10.4 years. Results: Of the 226 children, 55 (24%) had clinical or pathologic evidence of either in-transit and/or proximal lymph node involvement at diagnosis. The actuarial 5-year risk of regionalmore » failure was 12%. The prognostic factors for poor regional control were female gender and lymph node involvement at diagnosis. In the 116 patients with a distal extremity primary tumor, 5% had in-transit lymph node involvement at diagnosis. The estimated 5-year incidences of in-transit and proximal nodal failure was 12% and 8%, respectively. The in-transit failure rate was 0% for patients who underwent radiotherapy and/or underwent lymph node sampling of the in-transit nodal site but was 15% for those who did not (p = .07). However, the 5-year event-free survival rate did not differ between these two groups (64% vs. 55%, respectively, p = .47). Conclusion: The high incidence of regional involvement necessitates aggressive identification and treatment of regional lymph nodes in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma of the extremity. In patients with distal extremity tumors, in-transit failures were as common as failures in more proximal regional sites. Patients who underwent complete lymph node staging with appropriate radiotherapy to the in-transit nodal site, if indicated, were at a slightly lower risk of in-transit failure.« less

  17. [Conceptual and methodological issues involved in the research field of diagnostic reasoning].

    PubMed

    Di Persia, Francisco N

    2016-05-01

    The psychopathological field is crossed by dilemmas that put in question its methodological, conceptual and philosophical filiations. Since the early works of Ey and Jaspers until recent work of Berrios it has been in question the position psychopathology has in the field of medicine in general, and in the field of psychiatry in particular, especially if it should follow the principles of natural science or if it has an autonomous position between them. This debate has led to two opposing positions facing two different models of psychopathology: the biomedical model and the socio-constructionist model. In this work it is proposed to review the scope and difficulties involved in each model following two central axes: diagnostic reasoning and mental illness conceptual problem. Later, as a synthesis of the analysis proposed they are identified central concepts of each model that could allow the development of a hybrid model in psychopathology; in between them the comprehensive framework employed in symptoms recognition and the social component that characterizes it are highlighted. As a conclusion, these concepts are proposed as central aspects for conceptual and methodological clarification of the research field of diagnostic reasoning in psychopathology.

  18. Para-aortic and pelvic extended-field radiotherapy for advanced-stage uterine cancer: dosimetric and toxicity comparison between the four-field box and intensity-modulated techniques.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, A; Bernard, L; Ramanakumar, A V; Stroian, G; Gotlieb, W H; Lau, S; Bahoric, B

    2015-12-01

    In patients with advanced-stage endometrial carcinoma (eca), extended-field radiotherapy (efrt) is traditionally delivered by the 3-dimensional conformal (3d-crt) 4-field box technique. In recent years, the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) in gynecologic cancers has increased. We compared the delivery of efrt by the 3d-crt and contemporary imrt techniques. After surgical staging and adjuvant chemotherapy in 38 eca patients, efrt was delivered by either imrt or 3d-crt. Doses to the organs at risk, side effects, and outcomes were compared between the techniques. Of the 38 eca patients, 33 were stage iiic, and 5 were stage ivb. In the imrt group, maximal doses to rectum, small intestine, and bladder were significantly higher, and mean dose to bladder was lower (p < 0.0001). Most acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematologic side effects were grade i or ii and were comparable between the groups. In long-term follow-up, only grade 1 cystitis at 3 months was statistically higher in the imrt patients. No grade iii or iv gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were observed. No statistically significant differences in overall and disease-free survival or recurrence rates were observed between the techniques. In advanced eca patients, imrt is a safe and effective technique for delivering efrt to the pelvis and para-aortic region, and it is comparable to the 3d-crt 4-field box technique in both side effects and efficacy. For centres in which imrt is not readily available, 3d-crt is a valid alternative.

  19. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation following systemic chemotherapy, prophylactic intrathecal methotrexate, and radiotherapy prevents relapse and improves the outcome of advanced stage primary testicular lymphoma even with cardiac involvement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Keiichi; Imamura, Shin; Kamiya, Kenichi

    2017-10-12

    Primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) is a rare but aggressive disease. Although most patients present in the early stage, their prognosis is poor. Similar with PTL, cardiac lymphoma is also an uncommon disease characterized by its aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis. We herein report an extremely rare case of advanced stage PTL with cardiac involvement, treated by high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT-ASCT) followed by systemic chemotherapy, prophylactic intrathecal methotrexate (IT-MTX), and radiotherapy. A 48-year-old man presented with painless left scrotal swelling. He was diagnosed with PTL after orchiectomy, and the histological type was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. For staging of lymphoma, positron emission tomography was performed, which revealed uptake in the right atrium and early cardiac metastasis within just 2 months after orchiectomy. He underwent 6 cycles of systemic chemotherapy that consisted of rituximab, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP). He also received central nervous system prophylaxis 4 times with weekly IT-MTX during the first 2 cycles of R-CHOP. He achieved complete response after 6 cycles of R-CHOP, and underwent HDT-ASCT and radiotherapy as consolidation therapy without irreversible adverse effects. He is currently doing well, with a progression-free survival of 31 months. The above treatment strategy including HDT-ASCT may be one of the treatment options for advanced stage PTL with cardiac metastasis in patients younger than 65 years old.

  20. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dose volume histogram analysis of normal structures associated with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered by high dose rate brachytherapy and comparison with whole breast external beam radiotherapy fields.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Alexandra J; O'Farrell, Desmond A; Cormack, Robert A; Hansen, Jorgen L; Khan, Atif J; Mutyala, Subhakar; Devlin, Phillip M

    2008-11-19

    To assess the radiation dose delivered to the heart and ipsilateral lung during accelerated partial breast brachytherapy using a MammoSite applicator and compare to those produced by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT). Dosimetric analysis was conducted on patients receiving MammoSite breast brachytherapy following conservative surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma. Cardiac dose was evaluated for patients with left breast tumors with a CT scan encompassing the entire heart. Lung dose was evaluated for patients in whom the entire lung was scanned. The prescription dose of 3400 cGy was 1 cm from the balloon surface. MammoSite dosimetry was compared to simulated WBRT fields with and without radiobiological correction for the effects of dose and fractionation. Dose parameters such as the volume of the structure receiving 10 Gy or more (V10) and the dose received by 20 cc of the structure (D20), were calculated as well as the maximum and mean doses received. Fifteen patients were studied, five had complete lung data and six had left-sided tumors with complete cardiac data. Ipsilateral lung volumes ranged from 925-1380 cc. Cardiac volumes ranged from 337-551 cc. MammoSite resulted in a significantly lower percentage lung V30 and lung and cardiac V20 than the WBRT fields, with and without radiobiological correction. This study gives low values for incidental radiation received by the heart and ipsilateral lung using the MammoSite applicator. The volume of heart and lung irradiated to clinically significant levels was significantly lower with the MammoSite applicator than using simulated WBRT fields of the same CT data sets.

  2. Circumferential resection margin positivity after preoperative chemoradiotherapy based on magnetic resonance imaging for locally advanced rectal cancer: implication of boost radiotherapy to the involved mesorectal fascia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Min Jung; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Ho Geun; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-04-01

    To identify patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Between October 2008 and November 2012, 165 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT4 or cT3 with <2 mm distance from tumour to mesorectal fascia) who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy were analysed. The morphologic patterns on post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging were categorized into five patterns from Pattern A (most-likely negative pathologic circumferential resection margin) to Pattern E (most-likely positive pathologic circumferential resection margin). In addition, the location of mesorectal fascia involvement was classified as lateral, posterior and anterior. The diagnostic accuracy of the morphologic criteria was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was identified in 17 patients (10.3%). The diagnostic accuracy of predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 0.73 using the five-scale magnetic resonance imaging pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement were 76.5, 65.5, 20.3 and 96.0%, respectively, when cut-off was set between Patterns C and D. On multivariate logistic regression, the magnetic resonance imaging patterns D and E (P= 0.005) and posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement (P= 0.017) were independently associated with increased probability of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement. The rate of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 30.0% when the patient had Pattern D or E with posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement. Patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement can be identified using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging although

  3. Circumferential resection margin positivity after preoperative chemoradiotherapy based on magnetic resonance imaging for locally advanced rectal cancer: implication of boost radiotherapy to the involved mesorectal fascia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Min Jung; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Ho Geun; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Between October 2008 and November 2012, 165 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT4 or cT3 with <2 mm distance from tumour to mesorectal fascia) who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy were analysed. The morphologic patterns on post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging were categorized into five patterns from Pattern A (most-likely negative pathologic circumferential resection margin) to Pattern E (most-likely positive pathologic circumferential resection margin). In addition, the location of mesorectal fascia involvement was classified as lateral, posterior and anterior. The diagnostic accuracy of the morphologic criteria was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results Pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was identified in 17 patients (10.3%). The diagnostic accuracy of predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 0.73 using the five-scale magnetic resonance imaging pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement were 76.5, 65.5, 20.3 and 96.0%, respectively, when cut-off was set between Patterns C and D. On multivariate logistic regression, the magnetic resonance imaging patterns D and E (P= 0.005) and posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement (P= 0.017) were independently associated with increased probability of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement. The rate of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 30.0% when the patient had Pattern D or E with posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement. Conclusions Patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement can be identified using preoperative

  4. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 2: Calculating the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum from scattered radiation using Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Skrobala, A; Adamczyk, S; Kruszyna-Mochalska, M; Skórska, M; Konefał, A; Suchorska, W; Zaleska, K; Kowalik, A; Jackowiak, W; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    During radiotherapy, leakage from the machine head and collimator expose patients to out-of-field irradiation doses, which may cause secondary cancers. To quantify the risks of secondary cancers due to out-of-field doses, it is first necessary to measure these doses. Since most dosimeters are energy-dependent, it is essential to first determine the type of photon energy spectrum in the out-of-field area. The aim of this study was to determine the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum for a 6 MV photon beam using the GEANT 4-Monte Carlo method. A specially-designed large water phantom was simulated with a static field at gantry 0°. The source-to-surface distance was 92cm for an open field size of 10×10cm2. The photon energy spectra were calculated at five unique positions (at depths of 0.5, 1.6, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) along the central beam axis and at six different off-axis distances. Monte Carlo simulations showed that mean radiation energy levels drop rapidly beyond the edge of the 6 MV photon beam field: at a distance of 10cm, the mean energy level is close to 0.3MeV versus 1.5MeV at the central beam axis. In some cases, the energy level actually increased even as the distance from the field edge increased: at a depth of 1.6cm and 15cm off-axis, the mean energy level was 0.205MeV versus 0.252MeV at 20cm off-axis. The out-of-field energy spectra and dose distribution data obtained in this study with Monte Carlo methods can be used to calibrate dosimeters to measure out-of-field radiation from 6MV photons. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Involvement of NMDA receptor in low-frequency magnetic field-induced anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Balwant P; Umathe, Sudhir N; Chavan, Jagatpalsingh G

    2014-12-01

    It had been reported that exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic field (ELFMF) induces anxiety in human and rodents. Anxiety mediates via the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, whereas activation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor attenuates the same. Hence, the present study was carried out to understand the contribution of NMDA and/or GABA receptors modulation in ELFMF-induced anxiety for which Swiss albino mice were exposed to ELFMF (50 Hz, 10 G) by subjecting them to Helmholtz coils. The exposure was for 8 h/day for 7, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days. Anxiety level was assessed in elevated plus maze, open field test and social interaction test, on 7th, 30th, 60th, 90th and 120th exposure day, respectively. Moreover, the role of GABA and glutamate in ELFMF-induced anxiety was assessed by treating mice with muscimol [0.25 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)], bicuculline (1.0 mg/kg i.p.), NMDA (15 mg/kg i.p.) and MK-801 (0.03 mg/kg i.p.), as a GABAA and NMDA receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively. Glutamate receptor agonist exacerbated while inhibitor attenuated the ELFMF-induced anxiety. In addition, levels of GABA and glutamate were determined in regions of the brain viz, cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus. Experiments demonstrated significant elevation of GABA and glutamate levels in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. However, GABA receptor modulators did not produce significant effect on ELFMF-induced anxiety and elevated levels of GABA at tested dose. Together, these findings suggest that ELFMF significantly induced anxiety behavior, and indicated the involvement of NMDA receptor in its effect.

  6. Technical Note: Dose effects of 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on tissue interfaces in MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinfeng; Prior, Phil; Chen, Guang-Pei; Schultz, Christopher J; Li, X Allen

    2016-08-01

    The integration of MRI with a linear accelerator (MR-linac) offers great potential for high-precision delivery of radiation therapy (RT). However, the electron deflection resulting from the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF) can affect the dose distribution, particularly the electron return effect (ERE) at tissue interfaces. The purpose of the study is to investigate the dose effects of ERE at air-tissue and lung-tissue interfaces during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for representative pancreas, lung, breast, and head and neck (HN) cases were generated following commonly used clinical dose volume (DV) criteria. In each case, three types of plans were generated: (1) the original plan generated without a TMF; (2) the reconstructed plan generated by recalculating the original plan with the presence of a TMF of 1.5 T (no optimization); and (3) the optimized plan generated by a full optimization with TMF = 1.5 T. These plans were compared using a variety of DV parameters, including V100%, D95%, DHI [dose heterogeneity index: (D20%-D80%)/Dprescription], Dmax, and D1cc in OARs (organs at risk) and tissue interface. All the optimizations and calculations in this work were performed on static data. The dose recalculation under TMF showed the presence of the 1.5 T TMF can slightly reduce V100% and D95% for PTV, with the differences being less than 4% for all but one lung case studied. The TMF results in considerable increases in Dmax and D1cc on the skin in all cases, mostly between 10% and 35%. The changes in Dmax and D1cc on air cavity walls are dependent upon site, geometry, and size, with changes ranging up to 15%. The VMAT plans lead to much smaller dose effects from ERE compared to fixed-beam IMRT in pancreas case. When the TMF is considered in the plan optimization, the dose effects of the TMF at tissue interfaces (e.g., air-cavity wall, lung-tissue interfaces, skin) are

  7. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria; Verona, Chiara; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Chiara, Anna; Perna, Lucia; Villa, Eugenio; Reni, Michele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapse were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses {>=}40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose {>=}40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.

  8. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria, E-mail: andres.ferreri@hsr.i; Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan; Verona, Chiara

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapsemore » were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses {>=}40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose {>=}40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.« less

  9. Prospective Study of Alternating Chemoradiotherapy Consisting of Extended-Field Dynamic Conformational Radiotherapy and Systemic Chemotherapy Using 5-FU and Nedaplatin for Patients in High-Risk Group With Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaira, Takeshi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Nakanishi, Toru

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of alternating chemoradiotherapy combined with extended-field conformal radiotherapy for patients with high-risk cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated cervical cancer, with Stage III/IVA disease, or Stage IB/II with high-risk factor (primary tumor diameter {>=}50 mm or positive lymph node) were entered into this study. Three cycles of chemotherapy with 3,500 mg/m{sup 2} of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and nedaplatin (NDP) were accompanied with pelvic irradiation of 45.6-51.3 Gy in 24-27 fractions over 6 weeks. Prophylactic (36 Gy/20 fractions) or definitive (45-56 Gy) irradiation for para-aortic region was followed by pelvic irradiation. Results: Between 1998more » and 2004, 40 patients were recruited for this protocol study. Eighteen patients from Phase I setting were registered. Twenty-two patients were treated with NDP of 140 mg/m{sup 2} (the recommended dose) in the Phase II segment. Twenty-five patients had T3 disease, and 25 patients had nodal disease including para-aortic involvement (n = 5). Overall/progression-free survival rates at 5 years were 78.8 and 66.5%, respectively. The median follow-up time was 61.8 months (25.5-106.7). Hematologic and gastrointestinal Grade 3 or more toxicities were relatively high rate (27.5-45%); however, they were well manageable. Two for bladder toxicity of Grade 3 were noted. Comparing the data from historical control group evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging, alternating chemoradiotherapy revealed a significant favorable factor for survival and disease recurrence in multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Acquired results from our unique protocol for cervical cancer with high-risk factor were thought to be promising, considering that the majority of our cohort consisted of high-risk population.« less

  10. Adding intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the pelvis does not worsen the adverse effect profiles compared to limited field radiotherapy in men with prostate cancer at 12-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Stensvold, Andreas; Dahl, Alv A

    2014-10-01

    To compare adverse effects and toxicity in men with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer when adding intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique to the pelvis. In this prospective follow-up study 180 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy (RAD) to the prostate and vesiculae seminales (boost volumes; PV) and long-term androgen deprivation therapy (LADT), were compared to 90 patients managed by LADT, RAD to the PV and additionally pelvic IMRT. Adverse effects were self-reported at baseline, at 3- and 12-month follow-up. At each time point, the patients rated a questionnaire covering urinary, bowel, and sexual function and bother, quality of life, fatigue, and mental distress. At 3-month follow-up urinary and bowel functions were significantly decreased among IMRT compared to RAD. At 12-month follow-up both groups showed the same reductions within the urinary, bowel and sexual domains. RAD patients had more mental distress than IMRT patients. The scores on quality of life, fatigue and mental distress hardly influenced function or bother within the urinary, bowel or sexual domains. Men treated for high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer with a combination of LADT, RAD and IMRT including PV and pelvic structures had considerably more acute side effects at 3 months than men treated with LADT and RAD to the PV only. However, at 12-month follow-up, the observed genitourinary and gastrointestinal function and bother were similar in both groups.

  11. Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, David, E-mail: david.christie@premion.com.au; Dear, Keith; Le, Thai

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking fieldmore » technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.« less

  12. [Radiotherapy and the flow of data and documentation].

    PubMed

    Tobiás, P; Slampa, P R; Zychácek, M

    2011-01-01

    Working approaches to radiotherapy are constantly in contact with new techniques that simultaneously require more advanced information flow and integration of all required information. These procedures are multi-dimensional and comprise a broad spectrum of documentation (patient demography, radiotherapy data, information required for diagnosis and treatment specification, illustrative records, etc.). These data are indispensable to the patient treatment process and it is crucial that they be integrated into patient health documentation. They are also necessary to enable long-term and speedy access to the data fields required by staff involved in treatment. In view of the various requirements placed on systems and their range of usage, it is essential that communication standards (DICOM, DICOM RT, PACS, HL7) are employed in such a way as to ensure compatibility and common systems communication.

  13. Post-Operative Radiotherapy (PORT) is Associated with Better Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Involved N2 Lymph Nodes: Results of an Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Mikell, John L.; Gillespie, Theresa W.; Hall, William A.; Nickleach, Dana C.; Liu, Yuan; Lipscomb, Joseph; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Rajpara, Raj S.; Force, Seth D.; Fernandez, Felix G.; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Pillai, Rathi N.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Curran, Walter J.; Higgins, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Use of post-operative radiotherapy (PORT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. Limited data indicate that PORT may benefit patients with involved N2 nodes. This study evaluates this hypothesis in a large retrospective cohort treated with chemotherapy and contemporary radiation techniques. Methods The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for patients diagnosed 2004–2006 with resected NSCLC and pathologically involved N2 (pN2) nodes also treated with chemotherapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess factors associated with overall survival (OS). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) using the propensity score was used to reduce selection bias. OS was compared between patients treated with vs. without PORT using the adjusted Kaplan-Meier estimator and weighted log-rank test based on IPTW. Results 2115 patients were eligible for analysis. 918 (43.4%) received PORT, 1197 (56.6%) did not. PORT was associated with better OS (median survival time (MST) 42 months with PORT vs. 38 months without, p=.048). This effect was significant in multivariable and IPTW Cox models (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.78–0.98, p=.026, and HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.79–1.00, p=.046, respectively). No interaction was seen between the effects of PORT and number of involved lymph nodes (p=.615). Conclusions PORT was associated with better survival for patients with pN2 nodes also treated with chemotherapy. No interaction was seen between benefit of PORT and number of involved nodes. These findings reinforce the benefit of PORT for N2 disease in modern practice using the largest, most recent cohort of chemotherapy-treated pN2 patients to date. PMID:25384064

  14. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  15. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a whole-ventricular irradiation: A planning comparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Sato, Sayaka; Ogura, Kengo; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the dosimetric difference between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (cIMRT) in whole-ventricular irradiation. Computed tomography simulation data for 13 patients were acquired to create plans for VMAT and cIMRT. In both plans, the same median dose (100% = 24 Gy) was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV), which comprised a tumor bed and whole ventricles. During optimization, doses to the normal brain and body were reduced, provided that the dose constraints of the target coverage were satisfied. The dose-volume indices of the PTV, normal brain, and body as well as monitor units were compared between the 2 techniques by using paired t-tests. The results showed no significant difference in the homogeneity index (0.064 vs 0.065; p = 0.824) of the PTV and conformation number (0.78 vs 0.77; p = 0.065) between the 2 techniques. In the normal brain and body, the dose-volume indices showed no significant difference between the 2 techniques, except for an increase in the volume receiving a low dose in VMAT; the absolute volume of the normal brain and body receiving 1 Gy of radiation significantly increased in VMAT by 1.6% and 8.3%, respectively, compared with that in cIMRT (1044 vs 1028 mL for the normal brain and 3079.2 vs 2823.3 mL for the body; p<0.001). The number of monitor units to deliver a 2.0-Gy fraction was significantly reduced in VMAT compared with that in cIMRT (354 vs 873, respectively; p<0.001). In conclusion, VMAT delivers IMRT to complex target volumes such as whole ventricles with fewer monitor units, while maintaining target coverage and conformal isodose distribution comparable to cIMRT; however, in addition to those characteristics, the fact that the volume of the normal brain and body receiving a low dose would increase in VMAT should be considered.

  16. Whole brain radiotherapy combined with stereotactic radiotherapy versus stereotactic radiotherapy alone for brain metastases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lei; Zeng, Rong; Yang, Ke-Hu; Tian, Jin-Hui; Wu, Xiao-Lu; Dai, Qiang; Niu, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Di-Wa

    2014-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of whole brain radiation (WBRT) combined with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRS) versus stereotactic radiotherapy alone for patients with brain metastases using a meta- analysis. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library from their inception up to October 2013. Randomized controlled trials involving whole brain radiation combined with stereotactic radiotherapy versus stereotactic radiotherapy alone for brain metastases were included. Statistical analyses were performed using RevMan5.2 software. Four randomized controlled trials including 903 patients were included. The meta-analysis showed statistically significant lowering of the local recurrence rate (OR=0.29, 95%CI: 0.17~0.49), new brain metastasis rate (OR=0.45, 95%CI: 0.28~0.71) and symptomatic late neurologic radiation toxicity rate (OR=3.92, 95%CI: 1.37~11.20) in the combined group. No statistically significant difference existed in the 1-year survival rate (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.60~1.03). The results indicate that whole brain radiotherapy combined with stereotactic radiotherapy has advantages in local recurrence and new brain metastasis rates, but stereotactic radiotherapy alone is associated with better neurological function. However, as the samples included were not large, more high-quality, large-sample size studies are necessary for confirmation.

  17. Molecular Predictors of Radiotherapy Response in Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carlos H F; Wong, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcoma is one of the few clinical cancer models in which pre-operative radiotherapy is commonly utilized and in which tumor response to radiotherapy could be assessed. However, clinical and histopathological features of soft-tissue sarcomas are not useful in predicting tumor radiotherapy response. Exploration of predictive markers of sarcoma response to radiotherapy is further confounded by discordance between radiological tumor size reduction, pathological changes, and clinical local recurrence rates. The diversity of disease histology and anatomical origin further influences which type of radiotherapy response (volumetric vs. cytotoxic) would best relate to patient outcome. Advances in molecular biology and understanding of sarcoma biology have recently resulted in the identification of several molecular and imaging predictive markers of radiotherapy response. As the underlying mechanism of radiation-induced cell killing involves the production of DNA damage through the production of oxygen radicals, the most promising biomarkers and imaging markers are related to DNA damage repair genes, hypoxia, and tumor vasculature. As bone and cartilaginous sarcomas are less often treated with radiotherapy, biomarkers of response in these diseases are less examined.

  18. Stage IVB endometrial cancer confined to the abdomen: is chemotherapy superior to radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Cirik, D Akdag; Karalok, A; Ureyen, I; Tasci, T; Koc, S; Turan, T; Tulunay, G

    2016-01-01

    To determine the impact of clinical variables and adjuvant therapy on survival in patients with Stage IVB endometrial cancer (EC) confined to abdomen. A total of 65 patients were included. Curative chemotherapy was defined as using only chemotherapy (platin based) or sandwich therapy. Patients receiving only radiotherapy had standard pelvic radiotherapy and extended-field radiotherapy when necessary. The optimal cytoreduction was achieved in 89.3% of patients. With a median follow-up of 18 months, two-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated as 33.4% and 42.2%, respectively. Optimal cytoreduction provided more longer PFS and OS compared to suboptimal cytoreduction. In univariate analysis, curative chemotherapy instead of radiotherapy improved the two-year PFS and two-year OS. Type of adjuvant therapy, tumor grade, and peritoneal cytology were found as the independent prognostic factors for PFS. Peritoneal cytology, adnexal involvement, and adjuvant therapy were independent prognostic factor for OS. Curative chemotherapy significantly improved both two-year PFS and OS in patients with Stage IVB endometrial disease confined to abdomen over only radiotherapy.

  19. Medical Applications: Proton Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2009-05-01

    Proton therapy is a highly advanced and precise form of radiation treatment for cancer. Due to the characteristic Bragg peak associated with ion energy deposition, proton therapy provides the radiation oncologist with an improved method of treatment localization within a patient, as compared with conventional radiation therapy using X-rays or electrons. Controlling disease and minimizing side effects are the twin aims of radiation treatment. Proton beams enhance the opportunity for both by facilitating maximal dose to tumor and minimal dose to surrounding tissue. In the United States, five proton radiotherapy centers currently treat cancer patients, with more in the construction phase. New facilities and enabling technologies abound. An overview of the treatment modality generally, as well as of the capabilities and research planned for the field and for the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute in particular, will be presented.

  20. Social Influence In a High-Ego-Involvement Situation: A Field Study of Petition Signing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keasey, Charles Blake; Keasey, Carol T.

    This study used the national crisis following President Nixon's decision to send troops into Cambodia as an opportunity to investigate the effectiveness of social influence variables (sex and clothing attire) under conditions of high ego-involvement. Four hundred and forty-six adult passersby were presented an antiwar petition by the authors (one…

  1. A devolved model for public involvement in the field of mental health research: case study learning.

    PubMed

    Moule, Pam; Davies, Rosie

    2016-12-01

    Patient and public involvement in all aspects of research is espoused and there is a continued interest in understanding its wider impact. Existing investigations have identified both beneficial outcomes and remaining issues. This paper presents the impact of public involvement in one case study led by a mental health charity conducted as part of a larger research project. The case study used a devolved model of working, contracting with service user-led organizations to maximize the benefits of local knowledge on the implementation of personalized budgets, support recruitment and local user-led organizations. To understand the processes and impact of public involvement in a devolved model of working with user-led organizations. Multiple data collection methods were employed throughout 2012. These included interviews with the researchers (n = 10) and research partners (n = 5), observation of two case study meetings and the review of key case study documentation. Analysis was conducted in NVivo10 using a coding framework developed following a literature review. Five key themes emerged from the data; Devolved model, Nature of involvement, Enabling factors, Implementation challenges and Impact. While there were some challenges of implementing the devolved model it is clear that our findings add to the growing understanding of the positive benefits research partners can bring to complex research. A devolved model can support the involvement of user-led organizations in research if there is a clear understanding of the underpinning philosophy and support mechanisms are in place. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Impact of Field Trips and Family Involvement on Mental Models of the Desert Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judson, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the mental models of the desert environment held by fourth- and seventh-grade students in the USA and whether those mental models could be affected by: (1) classroom field trips to a desert riparian preserve, and (2) interaction with family members at the same preserve. Results generally indicated that students in this study…

  3. The Impact of Field Trips and Family Involvement on Mental Models of the Desert Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judson, Eugene

    2011-07-01

    This study examined the mental models of the desert environment held by fourth- and seventh-grade students in the USA and whether those mental models could be affected by: (1) classroom field trips to a desert riparian preserve, and (2) interaction with family members at the same preserve. Results generally indicated that students in this study were resolute in their models and that field trips did not impact the types of models students adhered to. Twenty-three seventh-grade students who self-selected to participate in a Family Science Club with their parents did demonstrate a shift in their mental models and developed significantly more sophisticated models over time. A critical implication of the study is that unless transformation of mental models of the environment is an explicit goal of instruction, simple exposure to the environment (even within the context of life science instruction) will not transform understandings of how organisms within an environment act and interact interdependently.

  4. Ergonomics-related risk identification and pain analysis for farmers involved in rice field preparation.

    PubMed

    Swangnetr, Manida; Kaber, David B; Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Gross, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    A previous ergonomic screening of rice field preparation revealed farmer exposure to high risks of musculoskeletal disorders at the shoulders, hands, wrists and back. The screening method was not applied to muddy soil farming in which analysts could not observe farmer legs and feet. This study analyzed farmer pain in all stages of field preparation. To examine the relationship of farmer experience and demographics to perceptions of pain and to identify body areas exposed to ergonomics risks, unknown to farmers. Results were expected to support interventions and guidelines for famers on physical behaviors towards minimizing risk of injury as well as validation of the screening approach. Comparison of analyst screening results and farmer pain ratings using self-ratings and interviews. Farmer experience and age were significantly correlated with occurrence of pain and cramping. Less experienced farmers reported less pain in high-risk body parts (e.g., neck and lower back). More experienced farmers reported more pain in the legs, as compared with analyst risk ratings. Results demonstrated less experienced farmers to be unaware of critical areas of exposure to ergonomics risks. Correlation of farmer ratings of pain with analyst risk assessments support validity of the screening method for hazard identification and control.

  5. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, onemore » patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.« less

  6. Field detection capability of immunochemical assays during criminal investigations involving the use of TNT.

    PubMed

    Romolo, Francesco Saverio; Ferri, Elida; Mirasoli, Mara; D'Elia, Marcello; Ripani, Luigi; Peluso, Giuseppe; Risoluti, Roberta; Maiolini, Elisabetta; Girotti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The capability to collect timely information about the substances employed on-site at a crime scene is of fundamental importance during scientific investigations in crimes involving the use of explosives. TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) is one of the most employed explosives in the 20th century. Despite the growing use of improvised explosives, criminal use and access to TNT is not expected to decrease. Immunoassays are simple and selective analytical tests able to detect molecules and their immunoreactions can occur in portable formats for use on-site. This work demonstrates the application of three immunochemical assays capable of detecting TNT to typical forensic samples from experimental tests: an indirect competitive ELISA with chemiluminescent detection (CL-ELISA), a colorimetric lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on colloidal gold nanoparticles label, and a chemiluminescent-LFIA (CL-LFIA). Under optimised working conditions, the LOD of the colorimetric LFIA and CL-LFIA were 1 μg mL(-1) and 0.05 μg mL(-1), respectively. The total analysis time for LFIAs was 15 min. ELISA proved to be a very effective laboratory approach, showing very good sensitivity (LOD of 0.4 ng mL(-1)) and good reproducibility (CV value about 7%). Samples tested included various materials involved in controlled explosions of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), as well as hand swabs collected after TNT handling tests. In the first group of tests, targets covered with six different materials (metal, plastic, cardboard, carpet fabric, wood and adhesive tape) were fixed on top of wooden poles (180 cm high). Samples of soil from the explosion area and different materials covering the targets were collected after each explosion and analysed. In the second group of tests, hand swabs were collected with and without hand washing after volunteers simulated the manipulation of small charges of TNT. The small amount of solution required for each assay allows for several analyses. Results of

  7. Conformity Index and Homogeneity Index of the Postoperative Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Deva; Smickovska, Snezana; Lazarevska, Emilija

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of breast cancer involves a multidisciplinary approach in which radiotherapy plays a key role. AIM: The conformity index and the homogeneity index are two analysis tools of a treatment plan using conformal radiotherapy. The purpose of this article is an analysis of these two parameters in the assessment of the treatment plans in 58 patients undergoing postoperative radiotherapy of the whole breast. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All 58 patients participating in the study had a conservatively treated early-stage breast cancer. The treatment was performed using a standard regimen of fractionation in 25 fractions up to a total dose of 50 Gy. Dose-volume histograms were generated for both plans with and without segmental fields. RESULTS: Pair samples t-test was used. The technique with segmental fields allowed us more homogeneity distribution when compared to standard two tangential field techniques. The HI values were 1.08 ± 0.01 and 1.09 ± 0.01 for segment and technique with two tangential fields (p < 0.001). The DHI values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.901 ± 0.01 for segment and technique with two tangential fields (p < 0.001). The CI values were 1.38 ± 0.02 and 1.43 ± 0.3 for segment and technique with two tangential fields (p = 0.0018). CONCLUSION: The results showed that the conformity and the homogeneity index are important tools in the analysis of the treatment plans during radiation therapy in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Adding segment fields in the administration of radiotherapy in patients with conservatively treated breast cancer can lead to improved dosage homogeneity and conformity. PMID:29123573

  8. Conformity Index and Homogeneity Index of the Postoperative Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Deva; Smickovska, Snezana; Lazarevska, Emilija

    2017-10-15

    The treatment of breast cancer involves a multidisciplinary approach in which radiotherapy plays a key role. The conformity index and the homogeneity index are two analysis tools of a treatment plan using conformal radiotherapy. The purpose of this article is an analysis of these two parameters in the assessment of the treatment plans in 58 patients undergoing postoperative radiotherapy of the whole breast. All 58 patients participating in the study had a conservatively treated early-stage breast cancer. The treatment was performed using a standard regimen of fractionation in 25 fractions up to a total dose of 50 Gy. Dose-volume histograms were generated for both plans with and without segmental fields. Pair samples t-test was used. The technique with segmental fields allowed us more homogeneity distribution when compared to standard two tangential field techniques. The HI values were 1.08 ± 0.01 and 1.09 ± 0.01 for segment and technique with two tangential fields (p < 0.001). The DHI values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.901 ± 0.01 for segment and technique with two tangential fields (p < 0.001). The CI values were 1.38 ± 0.02 and 1.43 ± 0.3 for segment and technique with two tangential fields (p = 0.0018). The results showed that the conformity and the homogeneity index are important tools in the analysis of the treatment plans during radiation therapy in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Adding segment fields in the administration of radiotherapy in patients with conservatively treated breast cancer can lead to improved dosage homogeneity and conformity.

  9. Planning National Radiotherapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Countries, states, and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centers are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries, the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment. This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centers, equipment, staff, education programs, quality assurance, and sustainability aspects. Realistic budgetary and cost considerations must also be part of the project proposal or business plan. PMID:25505730

  10. Care staff attributions for violent incidents involving male and female patients: a field study.

    PubMed

    Leggett, Janice; Silvester, Joanne

    2003-11-01

    This article presents a study of naturally occurring attributions recorded by care staff following incidents of restraint in a psychiatric secure unit. The relationship between control for patient, control for staff and behavioural outcomes including use of medication, seclusion and duration of restraint were explored for male and female patients. In all, 557 forms documenting incidents of control and restraint, and completed over a four-year period by nurses in a UK psychiatric hospital, were content analysed using the Leeds Attributional Coding System (LACS; Munton, Silvester, & Hanks, 1999). Additional information concerning duration of restraint, severity of injuries sustained by patient and care staff, use of medication and seclusion, and patient was also gathered. It was hypothesized that perceived patient control over causes of the restraint incident would be associated with duration of restraint, use of seclusion and medication. It was also predicted that male patients would be perceived as having more control over incidents, and thus be more likely to be secluded and less likely to be prescribed medication, than female patients. Seclusion was associated with controllable attributions for patient and uncontrollable attributions for care staff. Use of medication was associated with uncontrollable attributions for patient, but only for male patients. Contrary to prediction, female patients were more likely to be secluded than males and less likely to receive medication. Staff were also more likely to state that they had 'no explanation' for restraint incidents involving female patients. The investigation of naturally occurring attributions raises important questions regarding the relationship between patient gender and attributional models of helping behaviour. The results are discussed in terms of their potential implications for future research and health care practice.

  11. SU-F-T-111: Investigation of the Attila Deterministic Solver as a Supplement to Monte Carlo for Calculating Out-Of-Field Radiotherapy Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Mille, M; Lee, C; Failla, G

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To use the Attila deterministic solver as a supplement to Monte Carlo for calculating out-of-field organ dose in support of epidemiological studies looking at the risks of second cancers. Supplemental dosimetry tools are needed to speed up dose calculations for studies involving large-scale patient cohorts. Methods: Attila is a multi-group discrete ordinates code which can solve the 3D photon-electron coupled linear Boltzmann radiation transport equation on a finite-element mesh. Dose is computed by multiplying the calculated particle flux in each mesh element by a medium-specific energy deposition cross-section. The out-of-field dosimetry capability of Attila is investigated by comparing averagemore » organ dose to that which is calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. The test scenario consists of a 6 MV external beam treatment of a female patient with a tumor in the left breast. The patient is simulated by a whole-body adult reference female computational phantom. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP6 and XVMC. Attila can export a tetrahedral mesh for MCNP6, allowing for a direct comparison between the two codes. The Attila and Monte Carlo methods were also compared in terms of calculation speed and complexity of simulation setup. A key perquisite for this work was the modeling of a Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator. Results: The solid mesh of the torso part of the adult female phantom for the Attila calculation was prepared using the CAD software SpaceClaim. Preliminary calculations suggest that Attila is a user-friendly software which shows great promise for our intended application. Computational performance is related to the number of tetrahedral elements included in the Attila calculation. Conclusion: Attila is being explored as a supplement to the conventional Monte Carlo radiation transport approach for performing retrospective patient dosimetry. The goal is for the dosimetry to be sufficiently accurate for use in retrospective

  12. SU-F-T-111: Investigation of the Attila Deterministic Solver as a Supplement to Monte Carlo for Calculating Out-Of-Field Radiotherapy Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Mille, M; Lee, C; Failla, G

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To use the Attila deterministic solver as a supplement to Monte Carlo for calculating out-of-field organ dose in support of epidemiological studies looking at the risks of second cancers. Supplemental dosimetry tools are needed to speed up dose calculations for studies involving large-scale patient cohorts. Methods: Attila is a multi-group discrete ordinates code which can solve the 3D photon-electron coupled linear Boltzmann radiation transport equation on a finite-element mesh. Dose is computed by multiplying the calculated particle flux in each mesh element by a medium-specific energy deposition cross-section. The out-of-field dosimetry capability of Attila is investigated by comparing average organ dose to that which is calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. The test scenario consists of a 6 MV external beam treatment of a female patient with a tumor in the left breast. The patient is simulated by a whole-body adult reference female computational phantom. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP6 and XVMC. Attila can export a tetrahedral mesh for MCNP6, allowing for a direct comparison between the two codes. The Attila and Monte Carlo methods were also compared in terms of calculation speed and complexity of simulation setup. A key perquisite for this work was the modeling of a Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator. Results: The solid mesh of the torso part of the adult female phantom for the Attila calculation was prepared using the CAD software SpaceClaim. Preliminary calculations suggest that Attila is a user-friendly software which shows great promise for our intended application. Computational performance is related to the number of tetrahedral elements included in the Attila calculation. Conclusion: Attila is being explored as a supplement to the conventional Monte Carlo radiation transport approach for performing retrospective patient dosimetry. The goal is for the dosimetry to be sufficiently accurate for use in retrospective

  13. Efficiency improvement of the investment and innovation activities in the transport facility construction field with public-private partnership involvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibayeva, Marina; Serebryakova, Yelena; Shalnev, Oleg

    2017-10-01

    Growing demand to increase the investment volume in modernization and development projects for transport infrastructure define the urgency of the current study. The amount of private sector investments in the field is insufficient to implement the projects for road construction due to their significant capital intensity and long payoff period. The implementation of social significant infrastructure projects on the principles of public-private partnership is one of the key strategic directions of growth for transport facilities. The authors come up with a concept and methodology for modeling the investment and innovation activity in the transport facility construction. Furthermore, there is developed a model to find the balance between public and private sector investments in implementing construction projects for transport infrastructure with involvement of PPP (further – public-private partnership). The suggested concepts aim to improve the efficiency rate of the investment and innovation activity in the field of transport facility construction on the basis of public and private sectors collaboration.

  14. Differential pro-inflammatory responses of astrocytes and microglia involve STAT3 activation in response to 1800 MHz radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yonghui; He, Mindi; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; He, Yue; Chen, Chunhai; Liu, Chuan; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Microglia and astrocytes play important role in maintaining the homeostasis of central nervous system (CNS). Several CNS impacts have been postulated to be associated with radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields exposure. Given the important role of inflammation in neural physiopathologic processes, we investigated the pro-inflammatory responses of microglia and astrocytes and the involved mechanism in response to RF fields. Microglial N9 and astroglial C8-D1A cells were exposed to 1800 MHz RF for different time with or without pretreatment with STAT3 inhibitor. Microglia and astrocytes were activated by RF exposure indicated by up-regulated CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, RF exposure induced differential pro-inflammatory responses in astrocytes and microglia, characterized by different expression and release profiles of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, PGE2, nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). Moreover, the RF exposure activated STAT3 in microglia but not in astrocytes. Furthermore, the STAT3 inhibitor Stattic ameliorated the RF-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in microglia but not in astrocytes. Our results demonstrated that RF exposure differentially induced pro-inflammatory responses in microglia and astrocytes, which involved differential activation of STAT3 in microglia and astrocytes. Our data provide novel insights into the potential mechanisms of the reported CNS impacts associated with mobile phone use and present STAT3 as a promising target to protect humans against increasing RF exposure.

  15. Differential Pro-Inflammatory Responses of Astrocytes and Microglia Involve STAT3 Activation in Response to 1800 MHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonghui; He, Mindi; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; He, Yue; Chen, Chunhai; Liu, Chuan; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Microglia and astrocytes play important role in maintaining the homeostasis of central nervous system (CNS). Several CNS impacts have been postulated to be associated with radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields exposure. Given the important role of inflammation in neural physiopathologic processes, we investigated the pro-inflammatory responses of microglia and astrocytes and the involved mechanism in response to RF fields. Microglial N9 and astroglial C8-D1A cells were exposed to 1800 MHz RF for different time with or without pretreatment with STAT3 inhibitor. Microglia and astrocytes were activated by RF exposure indicated by up-regulated CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, RF exposure induced differential pro-inflammatory responses in astrocytes and microglia, characterized by different expression and release profiles of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, PGE2, nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). Moreover, the RF exposure activated STAT3 in microglia but not in astrocytes. Furthermore, the STAT3 inhibitor Stattic ameliorated the RF-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in microglia but not in astrocytes. Our results demonstrated that RF exposure differentially induced pro-inflammatory responses in microglia and astrocytes, which involved differential activation of STAT3 in microglia and astrocytes. Our data provide novel insights into the potential mechanisms of the reported CNS impacts associated with mobile phone use and present STAT3 as a promising target to protect humans against increasing RF exposure. PMID:25275372

  16. [Involved-field three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment for stage III non-small-cell lung].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Ming; Sun, Xin-Dong; Li, Ming-Huan; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Yao, Chun-Ping; Liu, Sen; Zhang, Zhen

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of involved-field irradiation (IFI ) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From September 1997 to November 2001, 200 stage-III NSCLC patients were randomly divided into two groups-- IFI and ENI (elective node irradiation). The IFI group was irradiated by 3DCR to a dose of 68-74 Gy/34-37f/7-9 w including the primary tumor and the lymph nodes of > or = 10 mm in short axis. The ENI group was irradiated to a dose of 60-64 Gy/30-32f/6-7.5 w including the primary tumor, ipsilateral hilum, subcarinal and mediastinal lymph nodes, even the supraclavicular area when the lymph nodes of superior mediastinum were involved. The overall response (CR + PR) rates were 90.0% in IFI group and 79.0% in ENI group. Radiation pneumonitis developed in 29.0% of the patients in ENI group and 17.0% in IFI group (P = 0.04). The 1-year primary tumor failure rate in IFI group (13.0%) was lower than that (23.0%) in ENI group. The 1-year involved nodal failure rate was 20.0% in ENI group and 10.0% in IFI group (P = 0.048). The 1-year elective node failure rate was 16.0% in ENI group versus 21.0% in IFI group (P = 0.39). The 1-, 2-and 3-year overall survival rate was 67.2% , 38.7% , 27.3% , respectively, in IFI group; versus 59.7% , 25.6% , 19.2% in ENI group, with a difference significant in the 2-year overall survival rate between IFI and ENI group (P = 0.048). Involved-field 3D-CRT for stage-III non-small cell lung cancer is well tolerated. It does not increase the rate of lymph node failure in the elective node irradiation field, and may improve the survival due to dose escalation.

  17. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapymore » based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).« less

  18. Low-Dose Palliative Radiotherapy for Cutaneous B- and T-Cell Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Neelis, Karen J. Schimmel, Erik C.; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Senff, Nancy J.; Willemze, Rein; Noordijk, Evert M.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of low-dose palliative radiotherapy for both low-grade malignant cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCLs) and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (mycosis fungoides). Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients with low-grade CBCL (10 primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell and 8 primary cutaneous follicle center lymphomas) with 44 symptomatic plaques and tumors underwent low-dose (4 Gy in two fractions) local radiotherapy. A total of 31 patients with mycosis fungoides were treated at 82 symptomatic sites, initially with 4 Gy and later with 8 Gy in two fractions. Results: The complete response rate for CBCL lesions was 72%. Of the 44 B-cell lymphoma lesions, 13 were re-treated to the same site after a median of 6.3 months because of persistent (n = 8) or recurrent (n = 5) symptomatic disease. Of the mycosis fungoides patients treated with 4 Gy in two fractions (17 lesions), 70% failed to respond. Increasing the dose to 8 Gy in two fractions yielded a complete response rate of 92% (60 of 65 lesions). The patients in whom low-dose radiotherapy failed were retreated with 20 Gy in eight fractions. Conclusion: Our results have demonstrated that low-dose involved-field radiotherapy induces a high response rate in both CBCL and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma lesions without any toxicity. Therefore, this treatment is now our standard palliative treatment. At progression, it is safe and feasible to apply greater radiation doses.

  19. A meta-analysis of perceptual and cognitive functions involved in useful-field-of-view test performance.

    PubMed

    Woutersen, Karlijn; Guadron, Leslie; van den Berg, Albert V; Boonstra, F Nienke; Theelen, Thomas; Goossens, Jeroen

    2017-12-01

    The useful-field-of-view (UFOV) test measures the amount of information someone can extract from a visual scene in one glance. Its scores show relatively strong relationships with everyday activities. The UFOV test consists of three computer tests, suggested to measure processing speed and central vision, divided attention, and selective attention. However, other functions seem to be involved as well. In order to investigate the contribution of these suggested and other perceptual and cognitive functions, we performed a meta-analysis of 116 Pearson's correlation coefficients between UFOV scores and other test scores reported in 18 peer-reviewed articles. We divided these correlations into nine domains: attention, executive functioning, general cognition, memory, spatial ability, visual closure, contrast sensitivity, visual processing speed, and visual acuity. A multivariate mixed-effects model analysis revealed that each domain correlated significantly with each of the UFOV subtest scores. These correlations were stronger for Subtests 2 and 3 than for Subtest 1. Furthermore, some domains were more strongly correlated to the UFOV than others across subtests. We did not find interaction effects between subtest and domain, indicating that none of the UFOV subtests is more selectively sensitive to a particular domain than the others. Thus, none of the three UFOV subtests seem to measure one clear construct. Instead, a range of visual and cognitive functions is involved. Perhaps this is the reason for the UFOV's high ecological validity, as it involves many functions at once, making it harder to compensate if one of them fails.

  20. Planning a Radiotherapy Department.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, D

    2017-02-01

    The master planning of new radiotherapy facilities requires the input and engagement of a range of highly specialised professionals, both in the construction and health sector. Although radiation protection and safety aspects of radiotherapy services are universal, low and middle income countries are often presented with unique challenges that also need to be considered, e.g. competing needs within the health sector, lack of financial and human resources, environmental factors like poor provision of transport or electrical power, inadequate regulatory infrastructure, etc. Efforts to establish, upgrade or expand radiotherapy services should therefore not only focus on the technology that is appropriate and sustainable, but also be mindful of the need for quality, safety and optimal utilisation of technology. The workflow in a radiotherapy department can be facilitated by strategic placement of the main functional areas into the concept design. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Imaging in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.

    1987-01-01

    The text contains details of recording media, image quality, sensitometry, processing and equipment used in radiotherapy for imaging. It reflects part of the syllabus for the College of Radiographers.

  2. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  3. Radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis: Organ equivalent dose to partially in-field structures and second cancer risk estimates on the basis of a mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau model

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis Damilakis, John; Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of the current study was to (a) calculate the organ equivalent dose (OED) and (b) estimate the associated second cancer risk to partially in-field critical structures from adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis on the basis of three different nonlinear risk models. Methods: Three-dimensional plans were created for twelve patients who underwent a treatment planning computed tomography of the abdomen. The plans for irradiation of seminoma consisted of para-aortic anteroposterior and posteroanterior fields giving 20 Gy to the target site with 6 MV photons. The OED of stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidneys, that were partially included in the treatment volume, was calculated using differential dose–volume histograms. The mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau models were employed for these calculations provided that organ-specific parameters were available for the subsequent assessment of the excess absolute risk (EAR) for second cancer development. The estimated organ-specific lifetime risks were compared with the respective nominal intrinsic probabilities for cancer induction. Results: The mean OED, which was calculated from the patients’ treatment plans, varied from 0.54 to 6.61 Gy by the partially in-field organ of interest and the model used for dosimetric calculations. The difference between the OED of liver derived from the mechanistic model with those from the bell-shaped and plateau models was less than 1.8%. An even smaller deviation of 1.0% was observed for colon. For the rest organs of interest, the differences between the OED values obtained by the examined models varied from 8.6% to 50.0%. The EAR for stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney cancer induction at an age of 70 yr because of treatment of a typical 39-yr-old individual was up to 4.24, 11.39, 0.91, 3.04, and 0.14 per 10 000 persons-yr, respectively. Patient’s irradiation was found to elevate the lifetime intrinsic risks by 8.3%–63.0% depending

  4. Radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis: Organ equivalent dose to partially in-field structures and second cancer risk estimates on the basis of a mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau model

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Charalambos

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of the current study was to (a) calculate the organ equivalent dose (OED) and (b) estimate the associated second cancer risk to partially in-field critical structures from adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I seminoma of the testis on the basis of three different nonlinear risk models. Methods: Three-dimensional plans were created for twelve patients who underwent a treatment planning computed tomography of the abdomen. The plans for irradiation of seminoma consisted of para-aortic anteroposterior and posteroanterior fields giving 20 Gy to the target site with 6 MV photons. The OED of stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidneys, thatmore » were partially included in the treatment volume, was calculated using differential dose–volume histograms. The mechanistic, bell-shaped, and plateau models were employed for these calculations provided that organ-specific parameters were available for the subsequent assessment of the excess absolute risk (EAR) for second cancer development. The estimated organ-specific lifetime risks were compared with the respective nominal intrinsic probabilities for cancer induction. Results: The mean OED, which was calculated from the patients’ treatment plans, varied from 0.54 to 6.61 Gy by the partially in-field organ of interest and the model used for dosimetric calculations. The difference between the OED of liver derived from the mechanistic model with those from the bell-shaped and plateau models was less than 1.8%. An even smaller deviation of 1.0% was observed for colon. For the rest organs of interest, the differences between the OED values obtained by the examined models varied from 8.6% to 50.0%. The EAR for stomach, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney cancer induction at an age of 70 yr because of treatment of a typical 39-yr-old individual was up to 4.24, 11.39, 0.91, 3.04, and 0.14 per 10 000 persons-yr, respectively. Patient’s irradiation was found to elevate the lifetime intrinsic risks by 8.3%–63

  5. Gadolinium-doped iron oxide nanoparticles induced magnetic field hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy increases tumour response by vascular disruption and improved oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Tsai, Hsin-Yu; Drake, Philip; Wang, Fu-Nien; Chiang, Chi-Shiun

    2017-11-01

    The gadolinium-doped iron oxide nanoparticles (GdIONP) with greater specific power adsorption rate (SAR) than Fe3O4 was developed and its potential application in tumour therapy and particle tracking were demonstrated in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate C1 (TRAMP-C1) tumours. The GdIONPs accumulated in tumour region during the treatment could be clearly tracked and quantified by T2-weighted MR imaging. The therapeutic effects of GdIONP-mediated hyperthermia alone or in combination with radiotherapy (RT) were also evaluated. A significant increase in the tumour growth time was observed following the treatment of thermotherapy (TT) only group (2.5 days), radiation therapy only group (4.5 days), and the combined radio-thermotherapy group (10 days). Immunohistochemical staining revealed a reduced hypoxia region with vascular disruption and extensive tumour necrosis following the combined radio-thermotherapy. These results indicate that GdIONP-mediated hyperthermia can improve the efficacy of RT by its dual functions in high temperature (temperature greater than 45 °C)-mediated thermal ablation and mild-temperature hyperthermia (MTH) (temperature between 39 and 42 °C)-mediated reoxygenation.

  6. Towards using a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for in vivo beam monitoring of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, R. F.; Abbott, N. L.; Davies, J.; Dyke, E. L.; Randles, H. J.; Velthuis, J. J.; Fletcher, S.; Gregory, S. D.; Hall, C.; John, A.; Lawrence, H.; Stevens, P. H.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Tunbridge, V.

    2013-12-01

    The use of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for cancer treatments is entering wider use. These treatments involve using a complex configuration of field modifying components, known as Multileaf Collimators (MLC), to dynamically shape the beam. A treatment consists of a sequence of irregular shaped fields, which means real time monitoring and verification is essential. In the current framework the treatment plans are verified before the patient is treated, but not during. The aim of our collaboration is to monitor the treatment being given to the patient. This is achieved by placing a camera system using an ultra-thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) upstream of the patient.

  7. Radiotherapy basics for family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Rajiv; Gooi, Adrian Chuen Chiang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the use of radiotherapy in cancer care, especially the role of radiation in palliative care. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to January 2004. Relevant articles evaluating indications for radiotherapy were reviewed. This paper describes use of radiotherapy based on well established current radiotherapy practices and level I and II evidence. MAIN MESSAGE A substantial number of patients seeing family physicians develop cancer or die of it. Despite its effectiveness, radiotherapy remains underused in management of cancer patients. Broad uses of radiotherapy in cancer care include curative treatment, palliative symptom control, and management of oncologic emergencies. Radiotherapy can be especially effective for treating common complications of cancer, including painful bone and soft tissue metastases, hemoptysis, dyspnea, dysphagia, brain metastases, and spinal cord compression. CONCLUSION Radiotherapy is a vital aspect of both curative and palliative cancer treatment. Understanding the basics of radiotherapy can assist family physicians in providing complete care for their cancer patients. PMID:16353832

  8. Use of a Conventional Low Neck Field (LNF) and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT): No Clinical Detriment of IMRT to an Anterior LNF During the Treatment of Head-and Neck-Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Turaka, Aruna; Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine differences in clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or a standard low neck field (LNF) to treat low neck. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective, single-institution study. Ninety-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with curative intent. According to physician preference, some patients were treated with LNF (Planning Target Volume 3) field using a single anterior photon field matched to the IMRT field. Field junctions were not feathered. The endpoints were time to failure and use of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube (as a surrogate of laryngeal edema causingmore » aspiration), and analysis was done with {chi}{sup 2} and log-rank tests. Results: Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-89 months). Median age was 60 years. Thirty-seven patients (41%) were treated with LNF, 84% were Stage III or IV. A PEG tube was required in 30%, as opposed to 33% without the use of LNF. Node 2 or 3 neck disease was treated more commonly without LNF (38% vs. 24%, p = 0.009). Failures occurred in 12 patients (13%). Only 1 patient treated with LNF failed regionally, 4.5 cm above the match line. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 87% and 79% with LNF and without LNF, respectively (p = 0.2), and the 3-year LR failure rate was 4% and 21%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Using LNF to treat the low neck did not increase the risk of regional failure 'in early T and early N diseases' or decrease PEG tube requirements.« less

  9. Use of a Conventional Low Neck Field (LNF) and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT): No Clinical Detriment of IMRT to an Anterior LNF During the Treatment of Head-and Neck-Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Turaka, Aruna; Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Lango, Miriam N.; Burtness, Barbara; Horwitz, Eric M.; Ridge, John A.; Feigenberg, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine differences in clinical outcomes using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or a standard low neck field (LNF) to treat low neck. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective, single-institution study. Ninety-one patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with curative intent. According to physician preference, some patients were treated with LNF (Planning Target Volume 3) field using a single anterior photon field matched to the IMRT field. Field junctions were not feathered. The endpoints were time to failure and use of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube (as a surrogate of laryngeal edema causing aspiration), and analysis was done with {chi}{sup 2} and log-rank tests. Results: Median follow-up was 21 months (range, 2-89 months). Median age was 60 years. Thirty-seven patients (41%) were treated with LNF, 84% were Stage III or IV. A PEG tube was required in 30%, as opposed to 33% without the use of LNF. Node 2 or 3 neck disease was treated more commonly without LNF (38% vs. 24%, p = 0.009). Failures occurred in 12 patients (13%). Only 1 patient treated with LNF failed regionally, 4.5 cm above the match line. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 87% and 79% with LNF and without LNF, respectively (p = 0.2), and the 3-year LR failure rate was 4% and 21%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Using LNF to treat the low neck did not increase the risk of regional failure 'in early T and early N diseases' or decrease PEG tube requirements.

  10. A pulsing electric field (PEF) increases human chondrocyte proliferation through a transduction pathway involving nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Robert J; Gordon, Stephen L; Kronberg, James; Ganey, Timothy; Pilla, Arthur A

    2008-06-01

    A potential treatment modality for joint pain due to cartilage degradation is electromagnetic fields (EMF) that can be delivered, noninvasively, to chondrocytes buried within cartilage. A pulsed EMF in clinical use for recalcitrant bone fracture healing has been modified to be delivered as a pulsed electric field (PEF) through capacitive coupling. It was the objective of this study to determine whether the PEF signal could have a direct effect on chondrocytes in vitro. This study shows that a 30-min PEF treatment can increase DNA content of chondrocyte monolayer by approximately 150% at 72 h poststimulus. Studies intended to explore the biological mechanism showed this PEF signal increased nitric oxide measured in culture medium and cGMP measured in cell extract within the 30-min exposure period. Increasing calcium in the culture media or adding the calcium ionophore A23187, without PEF treatment, also significantly increased short-term nitric oxide production. The inhibitor W7, which blocks calcium/calmodulin, prevented the PEF-stimulated increase in both nitric oxide and cGMP. The inhibitor L-NAME, which blocks nitric oxide synthase, prevented the PEF-stimulated increase in nitric oxide, cGMP, and DNA content. An inhibitor of guanylate cyclase (LY83583) blocked the PEF-stimulated increase in cGMP and DNA content. A nitric oxide donor, when present for only 30 min, increased DNA content 72 h later. Taken together, these results suggest the transduction pathway for PEF-stimulated chondrocyte proliferation involves nitric oxide and the production of nitric oxide may be the result of a cascade that involves calcium, calmodulin, and cGMP production. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. SU-E-T-340: Dosimetry of a Small Field Electron Beam for Innovative Radiotherapy of Small Surface Or Internal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reft, C; Lu, Z; Noonan, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: An innovative small high intensity electron beams with energies from 6 to 12 MeV is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to deliver an absorbed dose via a catheter to small malignant and nonmalignant lesions. This study reports on the initial dosimetric characteristics of this electron beam. These include output calibration, percent depth dose, beam profiles and leakage through the catheter. Methods: To simulate the narrow electron beam, the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is used to produce high energy electron beams. The electron beam from the accelerator is monitored by measuring the current through a transmission coil while the beammore » shape is observed with a fluorescent screen. The dosimetry properties of the electron beam transmitting through bone and tissue-like materials are measured with nanodot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters and EDR radiographic film. The 6 MV photon beam from a Varian True beam linac is used to calibrate both the OSLDs and the film. Results: The beam characteristics of the 12 MeV beam were measured. The properties of the small diameter, 5 mm, beam differs from that of broad clinical electron beams from radiotherapy linacs. Due to the lack of scatter from the narrow beam, the maximum dose is at the surface and the depth of the 50% depth dose is 35 mm compared to 51 mm for a clinical 12 MeV. The widths of the 90% isodose measured at the surface and depths of 2, 6, 12, and 16 mm varied from 6.6 to 8.8 mm while the widths of the FWHM isodose varied from 7.8 to 25.5 mm. Conclusion: Initial beam measurements show favorable dosimetric properties for its use in treating either small surface or internal lesions, particularly to deliver radiation at the time of surgery to maximize the dose to the lesion and spare normal tissue.« less

  12. Open field exposure facilitates recovery from an aversive emotional event: Involvement of adrenergic and cholinergic transmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Psyrdellis, Mariana; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Justel, Nadia

    2016-10-28

    Successive negative contrast (SNC) is an incentive relativity procedure that has been widely used to model emotional reactivity in rodents. The reward downshift experienced during SNC is thought to result in frustration. The exploration of a novel open field (OF), a complex situation involving stress induction and novelty detection, can enhance or block the acquisition of associative and non-associative memories. Previous experiments found a modulatory effect of OF, applied before downshift trials, on SNC. This schedule, however, can affect retention performance by influencing attentional, motivational, motor or sensory-perceptual mechanisms at training or retention testing. The use of post-training OF exposure avoids these confounds. This work assessed the effect of OF exposure after the acquisition of the downshifted memory, with the goal of targeting the consolidation of this mnemonic trace. We also investigated the involvement of the cholinergic and adrenergic systems in this phenomenon. The results indicated that OF facilitates recovery from reward loss and that both transmitter systems, cholinergic and adrenergic, play a role in this effect of OF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High Dose Involved Field Radiation Therapy as Salvage for Loco-Regional Recurrence of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Nam, Heerim; Park, Hee Chul; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Jhingook; Kim, Kwhanmien; Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effectiveness of salvage radiation therapy (RT) in patients with loco-regional recurrences (LRR) following initial complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and assess prognostic factors affecting survivals. Materials and Methods Between 1994 and 2007, 64 patients with LRR after surgery of NSCLC were treated with high dose RT alone (78.1%) or concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT, 21.9%) at Samsung Medical Center. Twenty-nine patients (45.3%) had local recurrence, 26 patients (40.6%) had regional recurrence and 9 patients (14.1%) had recurrence of both components. The median RT dose was 54 Gy (range, 44-66 Gy). The radiation target volume included the recurrent lesions only. Results The median follow-up time from the start of RT in survivors was 32.0 months. The rates of in-field failure free survival, intra-thoracic failure free survival and extra-thoracic failure free survival at 2 years were 52.3%, 33.9% and 59.4%, respectively. The median survival after RT was 18.5 months, and 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 47.9%. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, the interval from surgery till recurrence and CCRT were significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusion The current study demonstrates that involved field salvage RT is effective for LRR of NSCLC following surgery. PMID:23074111

  14. A Monte-Carlo study to assess the effect of 1.5 T magnetic fields on the overall robustness of pencil-beam scanning proton radiotherapy plans for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christopher; Landry, Guillaume; Resch, Andreas F.; Dedes, George; Kamp, Florian; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Parodi, Katia

    2017-11-01

    Combining magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) and proton therapy (PT) using pencil-beam scanning (PBS) may improve image-guided radiotherapy. We aimed at assessing the impact of a magnetic field on PBS-PT plan quality and robustness. Specifically, the robustness against anatomical changes and positioning errors in an MRI-guided scenario with a 30 cm radius 1.5 T magnetic field was studied for prostate PT. Five prostate cancer patients with three consecutive CT images (CT1-3) were considered. Single-field uniform dose PBS-PT plans were generated on the segmented CT1 with Monte-Carlo-based treatment planning software for inverse optimization. Plans were optimized at 90° gantry angle without B-field (no B), with  ±1.5 T B-field (B and minus B), as well as at 81° gantry angle and  +1.5 T (B G81). Plans were re-calculated on aligned CT2 and CT3 to study the impact of anatomical changes. Dose distributions were compared in terms of changes in DVH parameters, proton range and gamma-index pass-rates. To assess the impact of positioning errors, DVH parameters were compared for  ±5 mm CT1 patient shifts in anterior–posterior (AP) and left–right (LR) direction. Proton beam deflection considerably reduced robustness against inter-fractional changes for the B scenario. Range agreement, gamma-index pass-rates and PTV V95% were significantly lower compared to no B. Improved robustness was obtained for minus B and B G81, the latter showing only minor differences to no B. The magnetic field introduced slight dosimetric changes under LR shifts. The impact of AP shifts was considerably larger, and equivalent for scenarios with and without B-field. Results suggest that robustness equivalent to PT without magnetic field can be achieved by adaptation of the treatment parameters, such as B-field orientation (minus B) with respect to the patient and/or gantry angle (B G81). MRI-guided PT for prostate cancer might thus be implemented without compromising robustness

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy for trigeminal schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Champ, Colin E; Mishra, Mark V; Shi, Wenyin; Siglin, Joshua; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Andrews, David W; Evans, James J

    2012-08-01

    Data on radiotherapy for trigeminal schwannomas (TSs) and comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) are limited. We present a large retrospective review of our institutional experience treating TSs with SRS and FSRT. We also describe a flare phenomenon experienced by some patients. The records of 23 consecutive TSs patients treated with radiotherapy between 1996 and 2011 were reviewed. We investigated radiographic response, tumor control, and toxicity. Ten patients underwent SRS and 13 underwent FSRT, with median clinical follow-up of 32 months (range, 3-120 months). Tumor control at 5 and 10 years was 94% overall. Symptom control at 5 years was achieved in 48% of all patients, with nonsignificant improvement in more patients in the FSRT group than those in the SRS group (56% vs 40%, P = .37). Acute toxicity was higher in the FSRT group (38.5 vs 0%, P < .01), although lesions treated with FSRT were larger (mean, 9.5 mL vs 4.8 mL, P < .01). A symptomatic flare phenomenon occurred in 2 patients (8.7% overall) during FSRT, involving transient cystic formation and dramatic size increase. One lesion regressed in size and 1 remained stable on follow-up. Tumor control rates for TSs are excellent with SRS and FSRT with minimal toxicity. This represents the first documented report of a flare phenomenon after FSRT for TS treatment. Flare risk after FSRT in previously resected large lesions should be discussed with patients before treatment, and prophylactic oral steroids may be considered.

  16. Radiogenomics and radiotherapy response modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Kerns, Sarah L.; Coates, James; Luo, Yi; Speers, Corey; West, Catharine M. L.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in patient-specific information and biotechnology have contributed to a new era of computational medicine. Radiogenomics has emerged as a new field that investigates the role of genetics in treatment response to radiation therapy. Radiation oncology is currently attempting to embrace these recent advances and add to its rich history by maintaining its prominent role as a quantitative leader in oncologic response modeling. Here, we provide an overview of radiogenomics starting with genotyping, data aggregation, and application of different modeling approaches based on modifying traditional radiobiological methods or application of advanced machine learning techniques. We highlight the current status and potential for this new field to reshape the landscape of outcome modeling in radiotherapy and drive future advances in computational oncology.

  17. Results of patient specific quality assurance for patients undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Clements, Natalie; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Cramb, Jim; Siva, Shankar; Wanigaratne, Derrick M; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    Hypofractionated image guided radiotherapy of extracranial targets has become increasingly popular as a treatment modality for inoperable patients with one or more small lesions, often referred to as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). This report details the results of the physical quality assurance (QA) program used for the first 33 lung cancer SABR radiotherapy 3D conformal treatment plans in our centre. SABR involves one or few fractions of high radiation dose delivered in many small fields or arcs with tight margins to mobile targets often delivered through heterogeneous media with non-coplanar beams. We have conducted patient-specific QA similar to the more common intensity modulated radiotherapy QA with particular reference to motion management. Individual patient QA was performed in a Perspex phantom using point dose verification with an ionisation chamber and radiochromic film for verification of the dose distribution both with static and moving detectors to verify motion management strategies. While individual beams could vary by up to 7%, the total dose in the target was found to be within ±2% of the prescribed dose for all 33 plans. Film measurements showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between planned and measured isodose line shapes and dimensions. The QA process highlighted the need to account for couch transmission and demonstrated that the ITV construction was appropriate for the treatment technique used. QA is essential for complex radiotherapy deliveries such as SABR. We found individual patient QA helpful in setting up the technique and understanding potential weaknesses in SABR workflow, thus providing confidence in SABR delivery.

  18. Reconstruction of organ dose for external radiotherapy patients in retrospective epidemiologic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonik; Jung, Jae Won; Pelletier, Christopher; Pyakuryal, Anil; Lamart, Stephanie; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-01

    Organ dose estimation for retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients involves two challenges: radiological images to represent patient anatomy are not usually available for patient cohorts who were treated years ago, and efficient dose reconstruction methods for large-scale patient cohorts are not well established. In the current study, we developed methods to reconstruct organ doses for radiotherapy patients by using a series of computational human phantoms coupled with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a radiotherapy-dedicated Monte Carlo transport code, and performed illustrative dose calculations. First, we developed methods to convert the anatomy and organ contours of the pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantom series to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-image and DICOM-structure files, respectively. The resulting DICOM files were imported to a commercial TPS for simulating radiotherapy and dose calculation for in-field organs. The conversion process was validated by comparing electron densities relative to water and organ volumes between the hybrid phantoms and the DICOM files imported in TPS, which showed agreements within 0.1 and 2%, respectively. Second, we developed a procedure to transfer DICOM-RT files generated from the TPS directly to a Monte Carlo transport code, x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) for more accurate dose calculations. Third, to illustrate the performance of the established methods, we simulated a whole brain treatment for the 10 year-old male phantom and a prostate treatment for the adult male phantom. Radiation doses to selected organs were calculated using the TPS and XVMC, and compared to each other. Organ average doses from the two methods matched within 7%, whereas maximum and minimum point doses differed up to 45%. The dosimetry methods and procedures established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support

  19. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Damania, Dhwanil; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Cruz, Mart Dela; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA) targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  1. Post-operative radiotherapy of the mammary carcinoma. Investigations of optimum dose distributions for irradiation of the thoracic wall by means of tangential standing fields. Part 1(in German)

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, H.P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental investigations are described that were carried out on a special water phantom with particularly thin walls as well as on a Machlett- Alderson-Rando-Man phantom in which the usual bore holes have been replaced by a point lattice of microbores with a lattice pitch of 1.5 cm. Dosimetric measurements were made ionometrically on the water phantom and for the Alderson phantom, TLD-100 dosemeters were used. The measured values were standandized by a computer program and printed out as isodoses. The superimposed isodoses were obtained by computational superposition of opposing fields and the mathematical variation of irradiation parameters (angle of incidence,more » etc.) allowed the examination of various irradiation procedures. Measurements were carried out using the kilovolt technique, with the tele-cesium device, the tele-cobalt device, and the 17-MeV betatron with ultrahand x-ray irradiation. Uniform irradiation of the thoracic wall with good or satisfactory protection of the lung can be obtained with the tele-cesium device and even better with the tele-cobalt device using ultrahand x rays, whereas in the conventional deep x ray therapy, the dose distribution is not satisfactory as the dose applied to the region between the two fields is not sufficient. For tele-cesium ard tele-cobalt irradiation, differences in dose distribution due to tissue inhomogeneities, measured in the Alderson phantom and compared with those obtained in the water phantom, could be detected but were too slight. Using the kilovolt irradiatior however, considerable effects of inhomogeneities could be clearly detected prior to the superimposition of the standing fields. The conclusions to be drawn from these results with regard to practical radiotherapy are discussed and irradiation techniques are described that will allow reproducible irradiations to be made using the given isodoses. (GE)« less

  2. The shortage of radiotherapy physicists.

    PubMed

    Thomadsen, Bruce

    2004-04-01

    The difficulties many radiotherapy facilities have in hiring new medical physicists indicate a shortage in the production and supply of these specialists. It appears that about 130 out of 350 new positions go unfilled each year. This projection matches well with the estimate that around 217 new medical physicists graduate per year. The problem is likely to become worse as a large cohort of practitioners reach retirement age in a couple of years. The radiotherapy physicists in the field tend to be working longer and harder, potentially leading to burnout or increases in errors. Addressing the difficulty in finding trained medical physicists, some facilities may start hiring untrained physicists or assigning technological personnel to perform the functions of a medical physicist, both of which could pose dangerous situations. While more physics undergraduates are showing interest in medical physics as a career, and medical physics graduate programs have increased enrollment by more than 30% over the last two years, further significant increases seem unlikely soon because of limited resources. Increasing resources (mostly faculty at the teaching universities) will require more research funding from governmental agencies--a situation unlikely in the near future. New mechanisms of funding medical post-graduate education are needed.

  3. Effects of 2.45 GHz microwave fields on liposomes entrapping glycoenzyme ascorbate oxidase: evidence for oligosaccharide side chain involvement.

    PubMed

    Ramundo-Orlando, Alfonsina; Liberti, Micaela; Mossa, Giuseppe; D'Inzeo, Guglielmo

    2004-07-01

    Previous observations reported by our group indicate that 2.45 GHz microwave fields at specific absorption rate (SAR) of 5.6 W/kg reduce the enzyme activity rate of ascorbate oxidase (AO) trapped in liposomes. In this study, we report dose-response studies on these AO containing liposomes irradiated at different SAR values (1.4, 2.8, 4.2, and 5.6 W/kg). No response was observed for SAR below 5.6 W/kg. Liposomes entrapping functional AO in its deglycated form (AO-D) were also used. In this case, no MW related enzyme activity changes were observed, demonstrating a direct involvement of oligosaccharide chains of AO. Furthermore, the catalytic properties of both AO and AO-D were not impaired by MW irradiation, neither in homogeneous solution nor loaded in liposomes, excluding possible changes in the conformation of enzyme as a mechanism. Our results suggest that the oligosaccharide chains of AO are critical to elicit the microwave observed effects on lipid membrane. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. K-12 educator involvement in the Mars Pathfinder field trips in the Channeled Scabland of Washington and Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2000-03-01

    In September 1995, thirteen K-12 educators were completely immersed in an activity in which they worked with engineers and scientists as they assessed potential hazards and previewed the possible geology of the site that had been selected for the July 1997 landing of Mars Pathfinder. This site, located in the Ares Vallis outflow channel on Mars, was expected to be quite similar to the terrain of the Channeled Scabland of Washington and Idaho. The 13 educators were tasked with bringing their first-hand experience back to their hometowns and sharing what they had learned with local students, colleagues, and families. In addition, the educators helped conduct public outreach and teacher-training activities in the towns encountered during the field trips. For a wider outreach, the trip activities were also documented for television and print media. For many of the 13 educators, their connection to the Mars mission continued for more than two years, and some remain involved with this type of activity today. For some, these events changed the course and/or outlook of their careers. These activities and events can serve as a model for others considering ways to connect educators, children, and communities to high-visibility geoscience research projects.

  5. Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the angiogenesis pathway may play a critical role for this aggressiveness. The significance of angiogenesis in...studies have assessed the role of genes involved in angiogenesis in recurrence of prostate cancer after radiotherapy. On the basis of strong...genetic and epigenetic individual variation in angiogenesis genes is associated with recurrence of prostate cancer after radiotherapy. We will test this

  6. Two-argument total scatter factor for small fields simultaneously collimated by MLC and jaws: application to stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhaohui; Friesen, Scott; Hacker, Fred; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Direct use of the total scatter factor (S tot) for independent monitor unit (MU) calculations can be a good alternative approach to the traditional separate treatment of head/collimator scatter (S c) and phantom scatter (S p), especially for stereotactic small fields under the simultaneous collimation of secondary jaws and tertiary multileaf collimators (MLC). We have carried out the measurement of S tot in water for field sizes down to 0.5  ×  0.5 cm2 on a Varian TrueBeam STx medical linear accelerator (linac) equipped with high definition MLCs. Both the jaw field size (c) and MLC field size (s) significantly impact the linac output factors, especially when c \\gg s and s is small (e.g. s  <  5 cm). The combined influence of MLC and jaws gives rise to a two-argument dependence of the total scatter factor, S tot(c,s), which is difficult to functionally decouple. The (c,s) dependence can be conceived as a set of s-dependent functions (‘branches’) defined on domain [s min, s max  =  c] for a given jaw size of c. We have also developed a heuristic model of S tot to assist the clinical implementation of the measured S tot data for small field dosimetry. The model has two components: (i) empirical fit formula for the s-dependent branches and (ii) interpolation scheme between the branches. The interpolation scheme preserves the characteristic shape of the measured branches and effectively transforms the measured trapezoidal domain in (c,s) plane to a rectangular domain to facilitate easier two-dimensional interpolation to determine S tot for arbitrary (c,s) combinations. Both the empirical fit and interpolation showed good agreement with experimental validation data.

  7. Assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation in the build-up region of the tangential field of the breast for a radiotherapy treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Farhood, Bagher; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Mortezazadeh, Tohid

    2017-01-01

    Our objective was to quantify the accuracy of dose calculation in the build-up region of the tangential field of the breast for a TiGRT treatment planning system (TPS). Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were arranged in a RANDO phantom for the dose measurement. TiGRT TPS was also used for the dose calculation. Finally, confidence limit values were obtained to quantify the accuracy of the dose calculation of the TPS at the build-up region. In the open field, for gantry angles of 15°, 30°, and 60°, the confidence limit values were 17.68, 19.97, and 34.62 at a depth of 5 mm, and 24.01, 19.07, and 15.74 at a depth of 15 mm, respectively. In the wedge field, for gantry angles of 15°, 30°, and 60°, the confidence limit values were 21.64, 26.80, and 34.87 at a depth of 5 mm, and 27.92, 22.04, and 20.03 at a depth of 15 mm, respectively. Additionally, the findings showed that at a depth of 5 mm, the confidence limit values increased with increasing gantry angle while at a depth of 15 mm, the confidence limit values decreased with increasing gantry angle. Overall, TiGRT TPS overestimated doses compared to TLD measurements, and the confidence limit values were greater for the wedge field than for the open fields. Our findings suggest that the assessment of dose distributions in large-dose gradient regions (i.e. build-up region) should not entirely rely on TPS calculations.

  8. ANDRILL: INVOLVING TEACHERS IN FIELD RESEARCH ENHANCES THE TRANSFER OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE TO CLASSROOMS AND TO OTHER EDUCATORS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattadori, M.; Huffman, L. T.; Trummel, B.

    2009-12-01

    For most educators, the end of a field research experience is truly the beginning. From the knowledge gained and the excitement of living and working in a harsh environment like Antarctica, ARISE (ANDRILL Research Immersion for Science Educators) participants create enhanced learning experiences and resources for their students and for the professional development of other teachers. ANDRILL (Antarctic geological DRILLing) is an multi-national and interdisciplinary research project involving Italy, Germany , New Zealand, and USA. The core concept of its Education and Public Outreach Program is to embed educators as integral members on the science research teams, allowing them to participate in every phase of the mission. Their primary goal is to develop effective and innovative educational approaches for the communication of the scientific and technical aspects of the drilling program. ANDRILL has developed an exemplary teacher research experience model that differs from most by supporting a collaborative team of international educators rather than just one teacher. During the first two years of drilling projects, 2006 and 2007, ANDRILL took 16 educators from 4 countries to Antarctica. From those experiences, a growing collaborative network of polar science educators is nurtured, many valuable resources and examples of professional development have been created, and lessons have been learned and evaluated for future teacher research immersion experiences. An Italian ARISE participant and ANDRILL’s Education and Outreach Coordinator will present how ARISE has been at the core of developing transformational programs and resources in both countries including: [1] Flexhibit, a digital series of climate change materials designed for informal and formal learning environments that have been translated into Italian, German, French, Arabic, Spanish, and New Zealand English, (2) C2S2: Climate Change Student Summits, which provide professional development and resources for

  9. Strategic Application of Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo Hee; Seong, Jinsil

    2018-02-14

    With increasing clinical use, radiotherapy (RT) has been considered reliable and effective method for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment, depending on extent of disease and patient characteristics. RT for HCC can improve therapeutic outcomes through excellent local control, downstaging, conversion from unresectable to resectable status, and treatments of unresectable HCCs with vessel invasion or multiple intrahepatic metastases. In addition, further development of modern RT technologies, including image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy, has expanded the indication of RT. An essential feature of IGRT is that it allows image guidance therapy through in-room images obtained during radiation delivery. Compared with 3D-conformal RT, distinctions of IMRT are inverse treatment planning process and use of a large number of treatment fields or subfields, which provide high precision and exquisitely conformal dose distribution. These modern RT techniques allow more precise treatment by reducing inter- and intra-fractional errors resulting from daily changes and irradiated dose at surrounding normal tissues. More recently, particle therapy has been actively investigated to improve effectiveness of RT. This review discusses modern RT strategies for HCC, as well as optimal selection of RT in multimodal approach for HCC.

  10. The role of radiotherapy in the management of POEMS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Young-Suk; Suh, Chang-Ok; Kim, Yu Ri; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-11-28

    POEMS syndrome is a paraneoplastic syndrome caused by an underlying plasma cell proliferative disease. In this study, we examined the treatment outcomes and role of radiotherapy in the management of POEMS syndrome. In total, 33 patients diagnosed with POEMS syndrome were analyzed. These patients presented with osteosclerotic myeloma (OSM, n = 13), Castleman's disease (CD, n = 4), OSM with CD (n = 10), and vascular endothelial growth factor elevation without gross lesions (VEGFe, n = 6), respectively. The patients were treated by radiotherapy alone (n = 4), chemotherapy alone (n = 16), or a combination thereof (n = 9). The clinical response rates of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy plus chemotherapy were 75%, 69%, and 89%, respectively. In addition, the hematologic response rates were 50%, 69%, and 71%, respectively. Among the six patients with limited multiple lesions who underwent radiotherapy, the clinical symptoms were improved in five patients after radiotherapy. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 51 months, and the median overall survival (OS) was 65 months. In univariate analysis, the administration of chemotherapy was significantly associated with better PFS (p = 0.007) and OS (p = 0.020). In contrast, underlying VEGFe was a significant factor worsening PFS (p = 0.035) and OS (p = 0.008). Radiotherapy produces a reliable clinical response and is effective in improving POEMS-associated symptoms that are refractory to chemotherapy in selected patients with clustered or limited multiple lesions that can be covered by single radiation field.

  11. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RADIOTHERAPY VS NO RADIOTHERAPY BASED ON EARLY RESPONSE TO VAMP CHEMOTHERAPY AND SURVIVAL AMONG CHILDREN WITH FAVORABLE RISK HODGKIN LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Monika L.; Weinstein, Howard J.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Billett, Amy L.; Larsen, Eric C.; Friedmann, Alison; Howard, Scott C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Kun, Larry E.; Marcus, Karen J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy; Billups, Catherine A.; Wu, Jianrong; Link, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Context Maintaining excellent cure rates in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma while minimizing toxicity. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of 4 cycles of vinblastine, Adriamycin, methotrexate, and prednisone (VAMP) in patients with favorable risk Hodgkin lymphoma who achieve a complete response after 2 cycles and do not receive radiotherapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Multi-institutional, unblinded, non-randomized single group phase II clinical trial to assess the need for radiotherapy based on early response to chemotherapy. Eighty-eight eligible patients with Hodgkin lymphoma stage I and II (< 3 nodal sites, no B symptoms, mediastinal bulk, or extranodal extension) enrolled between March 3, 2000 through December 9, 2008. Data frozen March 12, 2012. Interventions Patients who achieved a complete response (n=47) after 2 cycles received no radiotherapy, and those with less than complete response (n=41) were given 25.5 Gy involved field radiotherapy. Main Outcome Measures 2-year event-free survival was the primary outcome measure. A 2-year event-free survival of greater than 90% was desired, and 80% was considered to be unacceptably low. Results Two-year event-free survival was 90.8% (95% CI, 84.7% – 96.9%); for patients who did not require radiotherapy it was 89.4% (95% CI, 80.8% – 98%), compared with 92.5% (95% CI, 84.5% – 100%) for those who did (P=0.61). Most common acute side effects were neuropathic pain (2% of patients), nausea/vomiting (3% of patients), neutropenia (32% of cycles), and febrile neutropenia (2% of patients). Nine patients (10%) were hospitalized 11 times (3% of cycles) for febrile neutropenia or non-neutropenic infection. Long term side effects after radiotherapy were asymptomatic compensated hypothyroidism in 9 patients (10%), osteonecrosis and moderate osteopenia in 2 patients each, subclinical pulmonary dysfunction in 12 patients (26%) and asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction in 4 patients (5%). No second malignant neoplasms were

  12. [Particle radiotherapy for malignant gliomas].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Particle radiations using protons or carbons, and boron neutron capture therapy are emerging as a therapeutic modality for malignant gliomas. Some non-randomized prospective studies found favorable results; however, the advantageous method of advantage of conformal radiation using protons or carbon ions and tumor cell-selective radiation using boron neutron capture therapy have not been confirmed. In a recent clinical trial involving 20 newly diagnosed glioblastomas at the Proton Medical Research Center at Tsukuba, the median overall survival time and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 21.6 months, 71.1% and 45.3%, respectively. In the clinical trial of boron neutron capture therapy of 15 newly diagnosed glioblastomas at Tsukuba, the median overall survival time and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 25.7 month, 80.0% and 53.3%, respectively. The rationale, history, and clinical results of particle radiotherapy for glioblastoma were also discussed.

  13. Inorganic chemistry in nuclear imaging and radiotherapy: current and future directions.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Valerie; Demoin, Dustin W; Hoffman, Timothy J; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2012-08-01

    Radiometals play an important role in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. This field of radiochemistry is multidisciplinary, involving radiometal production, separation of the radiometal from its target, chelate design for complexing the radiometal in a biologically stable environment, specific targeting of the radiometal to its in vivo site, and nuclear imaging and/or radiotherapy applications of the resultant radiopharmaceutical. The critical importance of inorganic chemistry in the design and application of radiometal-containing imaging and therapy agents is described from a historical perspective to future directions.

  14. Inorganic chemistry in nuclear imaging and radiotherapy: current and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Valerie; Demoin, Dustin W.; Hoffman, Timothy J; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2013-01-01

    Summary Radiometals play an important role in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. This field of radiochemistry is multidisciplinary, involving radiometal production, separation of the radiometal from its target, chelate design for complexing the radiometal in a biologically stable environment, specific targeting of the radiometal to its in vivo site, and nuclear imaging and/or radiotherapy applications of the resultant radiopharmaceutical. The critical importance of inorganic chemistry in the design and application of radiometal-containing imaging and therapy agents is described from a historical perspective to future directions. PMID:25382874

  15. SU-E-T-399: Evaluation of Selection Criteria for Computational Human Phantoms for Use in Out-Of-Field Organ Dosimetry for Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Lee, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric uncertainty due to organ position errors when using height and weight as phantom selection criteria in the UF/NCI Hybrid Phantom Library for the purpose of out-of-field organ dose reconstruction. Methods: Four diagnostic patient CT images were used to create 7-field IMRT plans. For each patient, dose to the liver, right lung, and left lung were calculated using the XVMC Monte Carlo code. These doses were taken to be the ground truth. For each patient, the phantom with the most closely matching height and weight was selected from the body size dependent phantom library. The patientmore » plans were then transferred to the computational phantoms and organ doses were recalculated. Each plan was also run on 4 additional phantoms with reference heights and or weights. Maximum and mean doses for the three organs were computed, and the DVHs were extracted and compared. One sample t-tests were performed to compare the accuracy of the height and weight matched phantoms against the additional phantoms in regards to both maximum and mean dose. Results: For one of the patients, the height and weight matched phantom yielded the most accurate results across all three organs for both maximum and mean doses. For two additional patients, the matched phantom yielded the best match for one organ only. In 13 of the 24 cases, the matched phantom yielded better results than the average of the other four phantoms, though the results were only statistically significant at the .05 level for three cases. Conclusion: Using height and weight matched phantoms does yield better results in regards to out-of-field dosimetry than using average phantoms. Height and weight appear to be moderately good selection criteria, though this selection criteria failed to yield any better results for one patient.« less

  16. [Soft tissue sarcoma as a result of uterine cervix cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Karczmarek-Borowska, Bozenna; Korobowicz, Elzbieta; Furmanik, Franciszek; Sieracki, Andrzej; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Sawicki, Marek

    2004-01-01

    The secondary neoplasms due to previous radiotherapy occur rarely. They develop within the radiation field or on its border. In this paper we present the case of soft tissue sarcoma that evolved 11 years after uterine cervix cancer radiotherapy. The long-term survival of patients subjected to radiotherapy is linked with the risk of secondary neoplasms appearance. That is why the repeated regular observation after radical treatment is recommended.

  17. Calcium signaling in lymphocytes and ELF fields. Evidence for an electric field metric and a site of interaction involving the calcium ion channel.

    PubMed

    Liburdy, R P

    1992-04-13

    Calcium influx increased during mitogen-activated signal transduction in thymic lymphocytes exposed to a 22 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field (E induced = 1.7 mV/cm, 37 degrees C, 60 min). To distinguish between an electric or a magnetic field dependence a special multi-ring annular cell culture plate based on Faraday's Law of Induction was employed. Studies show a dependence on the strength of the induced electric field at constant magnetic flux density. Moreover, exposure to a pure 60 Hz electric field or to a magnetically-induced electric field of identical strength resulted in similar changes in calcium transport. The first real-time monitoring of [Ca2+]i during application of a 60 Hz electric field revealed an increase in [Ca2+]i observed 100 s after mitogen stimulation; this suggests that the plateau phase rather than the early phase of calcium signaling was influenced. The hypothesis was tested by separating, in time, the early release of calcium from intracellular stores from the influx of extracellular calcium. In calcium-free buffer, 60 Hz field exerted little influence on the early release of calcium from intracellular stores. In contrast, addition of extracellular calcium during exposure enhanced calcium influx through the plasma membrane. Alteration of the plateau phase of calcium signaling implicates the calcium channel as a site of field interaction. In addition, an electric field exposure metric is mechanistically consistent with a cell-surface interaction site.

  18. Involved Field Radiation After Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in the Rituximab Era

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tithi; Dhakal, Sughosh; Chen Rui

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: For patients with recurrent or refractory large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is the treatment of choice. We evaluated the role of involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) post-ASCT for patients initially induced with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) or, more recently, rituximab-CHOP (R-CHOP). Materials and Methods: Between May 1992 and April 2005, 176 patients underwent ASCT for recurrent or refractory large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; 164 patients were evaluable for endpoint analysis. Fifty percent of the CHOP group (n = 131), and 39% of the R-CHOP group (n = 33), received IFRT. Follow-upmore » from the time of transplant was a median/mean of 1.7/3 years (range, 0.03-13 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) improved with IFRT in both the R-CHOP (p = 0.006 and 0.02, respectively) and CHOP (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively) groups. IFRT was associated with a 10% (p = 0.17) reduction in local failure, alone or with a distant site. On univariate analysis, IFRT was associated with superior OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.50 [95% CI 0.32, 0.78]; p = 0.002) and DSS (HR = 0.53 [95% CI 0.33, 0.86]; p = 0.009). Presence of B symptoms was adverse (p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, only IFRT was associated with significant improvement in OS (HR = 0.35 [0.18, 0.68]; p = 0.002) and DSS (HR = 0.39 [95% CI 0.18, 0.84]; p = 0.01). Conclusions: Recognizing that positive and negative patient selection bias exists for the use of IFRT post-ASCT, patients initially treated with CHOP or R-CHOP and who undergo ASCT for recurrent or refractory disease may benefit from subsequent IFRT presumably due to enhanced local control that can translate into a survival advantage.« less

  19. [Intraoperative radiotherapy. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P; Fraisse, J; Brun, O; Salas, S; Naudy, S; Bernard, A; Goudet, P; Chalencon, J L; Minello, C; Pillet, M

    1995-01-01

    We report a series of 40 patients treated by intraoperative radiotherapy between 1988 and 1992 (18 primary tumors, 13 local recurrences and 9 nodal extensions). The doses delivered were 15 Gy to 25 Gy, completed by external radiotherapy (15 to 45 Gy) in 13 cases. The local tumor control rate was 61% for initial therapy in primary tumors (70% for adenocarcinoma of the stomach) and 80.9% after complete en bloc surgery. The local control rate after palliative surgery for local recurrences is 38% and 33% for nodal extension. Two patients died (5%) during the postoperative period. We observed 2 hemorrhages and 3 cases of stone-free cholecystitis. The value of this approach must be confirmed in rigorous indications in comparison with surgery alone in controlled and randomised clinical trials.

  20. Radiotherapy DICOM packet sniffing.

    PubMed

    Ackerly, T; Gesoand, M; Smith, R

    2008-09-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is meant to allow communication of medical images between equipment provided by different vendors, but when two applications do not interact correctly in a multi-vendor environment it is often first necessary to demonstrate non-compliance of either the sender or the receiver before a resolution to the problem can be progressed. Sometimes the only way to do this is to monitor the network communication between the two applications to find out which one is not complying with the DICOM standard. Packet sniffing is a technique of network traffic analysis by passive observation of all information transiting a point on the network, regardless of the specified sender or receiver. DICOM packet sniffing traps and interprets the network communication between two DICOM applications to determine which is non compliant. This is illustrated with reference to three examples, a radiotherapy planning system unable to receive CT data from a particular CT scanner, a radiotherapy simulator unable to print correctly on a DICOM printer, and a PACS unable to respond when queried about what images it has in its archive by a radiotherapy treatment planning system. Additionally in this work it has been proven that it is feasible to extract DICOM images from the intercepted network data. This process can be applied to determine the cause of a DICOM image being rendered differently by the sender and the receiver.

  1. Developments in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Hans; Möller, Torgil R

    2003-01-01

    A systematic assessment of radiotherapy for cancer was conducted by The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) in 2001. The assessment included a review of future developments in radiotherapy and an estimate of the potential benefits of improved radiotherapy in Sweden. The conclusions reached from this review can be summarized as: Successively better knowledge is available on dose-response relationships for tumours and normal tissues at different fractionation schedules and treated volumes. Optimization of dose levels and fractionation schedules should improve the treatment outcome. Improved treatment results may be expected with even more optimized fractionation schedules. The radiosensitivity of the tumour is dependent on the availability of free oxygen in the cells. The oxygen effect has been studied for a long time and new knowledge has emerged, but there is still no consensus on the best way to minimize its negative effect in the treatment of hypoxic tumours. Development in imaging techniques is rapid, improving accuracy in outlining targets and organs at risk. This is a prerequisite for advanced treatment planning. More accurate treatment can be obtained using all the computer techniques that are successively made available for calculating dose distributions, controlling the accelerator and multileaf collimator (MLC) and checking patient set-up. Optimized treatment plans can be achieved using inverse dose planning and intensity modulation radiation therapy (IMRT). Optimization algorithms based on biological data from clinical trials could be a part of future dose planning. New genetic markers might be developed that give a measure of the radiation responsiveness of tumours and normal tissue. This could lead to more individualized treatments. New types of radiation sources may be expected: protons, light ions, and improved beams (and compounds) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Proton accelerators with scanned-beam systems and

  2. Risk-adaptive radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yusung

    Currently, there is great interest in integrating biological information into intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning with the aim of boosting high-risk tumor subvolumes. Selective boosting of tumor subvolumes can be accomplished without violating normal tissue complication constraints using information from functional imaging. In this work we have developed a risk-adaptive optimization-framework that utilizes a nonlinear biological objective function. Employing risk-adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer, it is possible to increase the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) by up to 35.4 Gy in tumor subvolumes having the highest risk classification without increasing normal tissue complications. Subsequently, we have studied the impact of functional imaging accuracy, and found on the one hand that loss in sensitivity had a large impact on expected local tumor control, which was maximal when a low-risk classification for the remaining low risk PTV was chosen. While on the other hand loss in specificity appeared to have a minimal impact on normal tissue sparing. Therefore, it appears that in order to improve the therapeutic ratio a functional imaging technique with a high sensitivity, rather than specificity, is needed. Last but not least a comparison study between selective boosting IMRT strategies and uniform-boosting IMRT strategies yielding the same EUD to the overall PTV was carried out, and found that selective boosting IMRT considerably improves expected TCP compared to uniform-boosting IMRT, especially when lack of control of the high-risk tumor subvolumes is the cause of expected therapy failure. Furthermore, while selective boosting IMRT, using physical dose-volume objectives, did yield similar rectal and bladder sparing when compared its equivalent uniform-boosting IMRT plan, risk-adaptive radiotherapy, utilizing biological objective functions, did yield a 5.3% reduction in NTCP for the rectum. Hence, in risk-adaptive radiotherapy the

  3. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.

    1997-03-01

    The study of second cancer risk after radiotherapy provides a unique opportunity to study carcinogenesis since large groups of humans are deliberately exposed to substantial doses of radiation in order to cure disease. Detailed radiotherapy records for cancer patients allow precise quantification of organ dose, and population-based cancer registries are frequently available to provide access to large groups of patients who are closely followed for long periods. Moreover, cancer patients treated with surgery alone (no radiation) are frequently available to serve as a non-irradiated comparison group. New information can be provided on relatively insensitive organs, and low dose exposures in the range of scientific interest are received by organs outside the radiation treatment fields. This paper will review several recently completed studies that characterize the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Emphasis will be given to studies providing new information on the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced leukemia, breast cancer and lung cancer.

  4. Radiosurgery and radiotherapy for sacral tumors.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Iris C; Chang, Steven D

    2003-08-15

    Sacral tumors represent a small subset of spinal lesions and typically include chordomas, metastases, other primary bone tumors, and benign schwannomas. Resection is the standard treatment for many sacral tumors, but many types of sacral lesions have the potential for recurrence after excision. In these cases, adjuvant radiotherapy is often beneficial. Although conventional radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of spinal lesions, the radiation doses required for adequate local control of many sacral lesions generally exceed the tolerance doses of normal tissues, thus limiting its definitive role in the management of sacral tumors. Recent advances in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery have allowed precise targeting of the sacrum. In this report the authors review the use of these two forms of radiation treatment and their role in managing sacral tumors.

  5. Sublethal irradiation induces vascular endothelial growth factor and promotes growth of hepatoma cells: implications for radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Jian, James Jer-Min; Cheng, Skye Hongiun; Tsai, Stella Y C; Chuang, Vincent P; Soong, Thomas; Lin, Yu-Mong; Horng, Cheng-Fang

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the clinical benefit of additional radiotherapy to patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) and the molecular effects of radiation on gene expression in hepatoma cells. Between August 1996 and August 2003, 276 and 64 patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage T3N0M0 hepatocellular carcinoma receiving TACE alone and TACE followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, respectively, at our institution were studied. Clinical outcome and pattern of failure were analyzed for the association of survival benefit with radiotherapy. The molecular effects of radiotherapy were studied in vitro and in vivo using human hepatoma cells with different p53 mutation and hepatitis B virus infection status. Median follow-up and survival time in the TACE alone and TACE + radiotherapy groups were 39 and 19 months, and 51 and 17 months, respectively. Additional radiotherapy to TACE did not improve overall survival (P = 0.65). However, different failure patterns were noted after TACE and after radiotherapy. Although all irradiated tumors regressed substantially, radiotherapy rapidly enhanced both intrahepatic and extrahepatic tumor progression outside the radiotherapy treatment field in a significant portion of patients, which offset the benefit of radiotherapy on overall survival. In molecular analysis of the radiation effects on human hepatoma cells, radiotherapy rapidly induced p53-independent transcriptional up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased VEGF secretion in a dose-, time-, and cell type-dependent manner, and promoted hepatoma cell growth in vivo with enhanced intratumor angiogenesis, which correlated well with elevated levels of serum VEGF. Radiotherapy to eradicate a primary hepatocellular carcinoma might result in the outgrowth of previously dormant microtumors not included in the radiotherapy treatment field. Radiotherapy-induced VEGF could

  6. Synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Turner, S L; Tiver, K W

    1993-09-30

    Because of the high rates of local tumor control obtained by combining moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy and synchronous 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin C chemotherapy in the treatment of squamous and basiloid cancers of the anal canal, we chose to investigate this regimen for nasopharyngeal cancer which shows significant local and distant failure rates after treatment with radiotherapy alone. Between 1983 and 1990, 43 patients with previously untreated squamous cell and undifferentiated nasopharyngeal cancer, without evidence of distant metastases at diagnosis were treated with radical radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy using mitomycin C (10 mg/m2 i.v. day 1 of radiotherapy) and 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg/m2 continuous i.v. infusion days 1-4 of radiotherapy and repeated at least 28 days later). Ninety-one percent of cases had Stage IV tumors and 93% had clinically involved regional lymph nodes. Actuarial rates of survival, local control, regional nodal control and distant metastases at 5 years were 37%, 71%, 94%, and 53%. Grade 3 or 4 skin and mucosal reactions occurred in 30% and 34% of patients, respectively. Only one patient developed greater than Grade 2 myelosuppression and he died of overwhelming sepsis. A second patient died of malnutrition 4 months after treatment giving a 5% incidence of treatment-related mortality. Nine percent of patients developed significant late complications of treatment. Despite the morbidity observed, the treatment outcome is not obviously superior to that reported for radiotherapy as a single modality of treatment.

  7. Implementation of an intraoperative electron radiotherapy in vivo dosimetry program.

    PubMed

    López-Tarjuelo, Juan; Morillo-Macías, Virginia; Bouché-Babiloni, Ana; Boldó-Roda, Enrique; Lozoya-Albacar, Rafael; Ferrer-Albiach, Carlos

    2016-03-15

    Intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) is a highly selective radiotherapy technique which aims to treat restricted anatomic volumes during oncological surgery and is now the subject of intense re-evaluation. In vivo dosimetry has been recommended for IOERT and has been identified as a risk-reduction intervention in the context of an IOERT risk analysis. Despite reports of fruitful experiences, information about in vivo dosimetry in intraoperative radiotherapy is somewhat scarce. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to report our experience in developing a program of in vivo dosimetry for IOERT, from both multidisciplinary and practical approaches, in a consistent patient series. We also report several current weaknesses. Reinforced TN-502RDM-H mobile metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) and Gafchromic MD-55-2 films were used as a redundant in vivo treatment verification system with an Elekta Precise fixed linear accelerator for calibrations and treatments. In vivo dosimetry was performed in 45 patients in cases involving primary tumors or relapses. The most frequent primary tumors were breast (37 %) and colorectal (29 %), and local recurrences among relapses was 83 %. We made 50 attempts to measure with MOSFETs and 48 attempts to measure with films in the treatment zones. The surgical team placed both detectors with supervision from the radiation oncologist and following their instructions. The program was considered an overall success by the different professionals involved. The absorbed doses measured with MOSFETs and films were 93.8 ± 6.7 % and 97.9 ± 9.0 % (mean ± SD) respectively using a scale in which 90 % is the prescribed dose and 100 % is the maximum absorbed dose delivered by the beam. However, in 10 % of cases we experienced dosimetric problems due to detector misalignment, a situation which might be avoided with additional checks. The useful MOSFET lifetime length and the film sterilization procedure should also be

  8. Radiotherapy in the Management of Orbital Lymphoma: A Single Institution's Experience Over 4 Decades.

    PubMed

    Kharod, Shivam M; Herman, Michael P; Morris, Christopher G; Lightsey, Judith; Mendenhall, William M; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2018-01-01

    To report our institution's treatment techniques, disease outcomes, and complication rates after radiotherapy for the management of lymphoma involving the orbits. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 44 patients curatively treated with radiotherapy for stage IAE (75%) or stage IIAE (25%) orbital lymphoma between 1969 and 2013. Median follow-up was 4.9 years. Thirty-eight patients (86%) had low-grade lymphoma and 6 (14%) had high-grade lymphoma. Radiation was delivered with either a wedge-pair (61%), single-anterior (34%), or anterior with bilateral wedges (5%) technique. The median radiation dose was 25.5 Gy (range, 15 to 47.5 Gy). Lens shielding was performed when possible. Cause-specific survival and freedom from distant relapse were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The 5-year local control rate was 98%. Control of disease in the orbit was achieved in all but 1 patient who developed an out-of-field recurrence after irradiation of a lacrimal tumor. The 5-year regional control rate was 91% (3 patients failed in the contralateral orbit and 1 patient failed in the ipsilateral parotid). Freedom from disease, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 70% and 55%, 89% and 89%, and 76% and 61%, respectively. Acute toxicity was minimal. Ten patients (23%) reported worsened vision following radiotherapy, and cataracts developed in 17 patients. Cataracts developed in 13 of 28 patients treated without lens shielding (46%) and 4 of 16 patients (25%) treated with lens shielding. Radiotherapy is a safe and effective local treatment in the management of orbital lymphoma.

  9. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eldebawy, Eman; Parker, William; Abdel Rahman, Wamied; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  10. [New radiotherapy techniques for non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Giraud, P; Massiani, M-A; Parent, L; Lavole, A; Helfre, S; Saliou, M; Livartowski, A; Cosset, J-M

    2004-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most difficult challenges for radiotherapy. Problems include ballistic targeting compromised by respiratory movements, poor tolerance of neighboring healthy tissues and difficult dosimetry due to the heterogeneous nature of the thoracic tIssues. New perspectives are offered by recent developments allowing a more comprehensive approach to thoracic radiotherapy integrating new advances in imaging techniques, contention, dosimetry, and treatment devices. Two techniques are particularly promising: conformal radiotherapy and respiration-gated radiotherapy. Conformal radiotherapy, a three-dimensional conformal mode of irradiation with or without intensity modulation, is designed to achieve high-precision dose delivery by integrating advanced imaging techniques into the irradiation protocol. These tools are used to optimize irradiation of target Volumes and avoid recurrence while sparing as much as possible healthy tissues. If healthy tissue can be correctly protected, increased doses can be delivered to the target tumor. Respiration-gated techniques offer promising prospects for the treatment of tumors which are displaced by respiratory movements. These techniques allow better adaptation of the irradiation fields to the target tumor and better protection of healthy tissues (lung, heart...). These new approaches are now routine practices in many centers. Early results have been very promising. We describe here the currently available techniques for thoracic radiotherapy.

  11. Light effects on the multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote 'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis' are cancelled by radiofrequency fields: the involvement of radical pair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Roger Duarte; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis' is the most studied multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote. It presents a light-dependent photokinesis: green light decreases the translation velocity whereas red light increases it, in comparison to blue and white light. The present article shows that radio-frequency electromagnetic fields cancel the light effect on photokinesis. The frequency to cancel the light effect corresponds to the Zeeman resonance frequency (DC magnetic field of 4 Oe and radio-frequency of 11.5 MHz), indicating the involvement of a radical pair mechanism. An analysis of the orientation angle relative to the magnetic field direction shows that radio-frequency electromagnetic fields disturb the swimming orientation when the microorganisms are illuminated with red light. The analysis also shows that at low magnetic fields (1.6 Oe) the swimming orientation angles are well scattered around the magnetic field direction, showing that magnetotaxis is not efficiently in the swimming orientation to the geomagnetic field. The results do not support cryptochrome as being the responsible chromophore for the radical pair mechanism and perhaps two different chromophores are necessary to explain the radio-frequency effects.

  12. Using sediment transport and river restoration to link research and education, and promote K-12 female involvement in STEM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, E. M.; Bradley-Eitel, K.

    2011-12-01

    The focus of this CAREER award is to better understand and predict the mechanics of sediment transport, to link research and education through courses and shared field sites, and to increase female interest in STEM fields. To accomplish the education component of this proposal we have focused on the following three activities: 1) a Keystone course on the scientific method, 2) a Women Outside with Science (WOWS) camp and 3) a permanent field site for research and education on river processes. In the Keystone Course, students investigated the impact of roughness addition, in sediment-starved river reaches (e.g. downstream of dams), on the retention of gravel used for spawning. They developed research questions and hypotheses, designed and conducted a set of scaled laboratory flume experiments, analyzed their data and wrote a draft manuscript of their results. Student feedback was overwhelmingly positive on the merits of this course, which included hands-on learning of the following: basic sediment transport and fluvial geomorphology, applied statistics, laboratory methods, and scientific writing skills. Students sometimes struggled when flume experiments did not progress as planned, and in the analysis and interpretation of complex data. Some of the students in the course have reanalyzed data, conducted additional experiments and are currently rewriting the manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. Such a course fundamentally links research and teaching, and provides an introduction to research for advanced undergraduates or beginning graduate students. We have also run one summer WOWS camp, which was a ten day camping and inquiry based research experience for 20 female junior-high and high-school students. The girls studied climate change and water related issues, worked on a restoration project on the Little Salmon River, met with a fish biologist and did fish habitat surveys and studied water quality along the North Fork of the Payette River while on a

  13. Imaging in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrino, R.; Del Maschio, A.; Cattaneo, G. M.; Castiglioni, I.

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  14. Graduate student involvement with designing inquiry-based Earth science field projects for the secondary-level classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Scherf, L.; Ward, S.; Cady, P.; Bromley, J.; Varner, R. K.; Froburg, E.

    2008-12-01

    In a secondary-level Earth System Science (ESS) curriculum, the most authentic learning is achieved through the inquiry-based application of real-world research methods in the context of modern understanding of the interconnected components of the Earth System (e.g. lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere). Following the intensive ESST-1 summer institute at UNH, during which teachers enhance their ESS content knowledge via interactions with UNH faculty, staff, and graduate students, each participating teacher is paired with one graduate student fellow for the duration of the school year. This graduate fellow provides a continuing link between the secondary-level school teaching environment and university resources, facilitating the implementation of new content knowledge and current scientific research methodology into the classroom setting. According to the National Science Education Standards (1), scientific inquiry is the central strategy for teaching science. "In successful science classrooms, teachers and students collaborate in the pursuit of ideas... Students formulate questions and devise ways to answer them, they collect data and decide how to represent it, they organize data to generate knowledge, and they test the reliability of the knowledge they have generated. As they proceed, students explain and justify their work to themselves and to one another, learn to cope with problems such as the limitations of equipment, and react to challenges posed by the teacher and by classmates." To speak to these goals, an ongoing local wetland field study has been conceptualized and implemented in three example classrooms (seventh grade general science, ninth grade physical science and tenth grade biology) in two school systems (Oyster River Middle School in Durham, NH and Berlin High School in Berlin, NH). These field studies were conducted using authentic scientific equipment to collect data, including a Li-Cor 840 infrared CO2 analyzer and handmade

  15. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sunitha Susan; Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for malignant PT. Metastatic malignant PT has a poor outcome.

  16. [Task sharing with radiotherapy technicians in image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Diaz, O; Lorchel, F; Revault, C; Mornex, F

    2013-10-01

    The development of accelerators with on-board imaging systems now allows better target volumes reset at the time of irradiation (image-guided radiotherapy [IGRT]). However, these technological advances in the control of repositioning led to a multiplication of tasks for each actor in radiotherapy and increase the time available for the treatment, whether for radiotherapy technicians or radiation oncologists. As there is currently no explicit regulatory framework governing the use of IGRT, some institutional experiments show that a transfer is possible between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians for on-line verification of image positioning. Initial training for every technical and drafting procedures within institutions will improve audit quality by reducing interindividual variability. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  17. Coupled Analysis Technique Involving Magnetic-Field-Control/Circuit Simulation and Loss Estimation for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Katsuyuki; Yamada, Takashi; Sakashita, Yoshiyuki; Akatsu, Kan

    The high-flux permanent magnet and flux-barrier structure of permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM) has strong magnetic saturation and harmonics components. When control algorithms for such machines are examined by performing control simulation, the use of the conventional motor model based on the voltage equation can cause problems. To avoid these problems, we introduce the technique of coupled analysis of the magnetic-field-control/circuit simulation. Further, iron losses generated in PMSM can be estimated by the coupled analysis system. The iron losses at various driving conditions are calculated by the coupled analysis system and are compared with measured losses. The comparison results show that the coupled analysis system is suitable for accurately estimating the iron losses of PMSM.

  18. New quality assurance program integrating "modern radiotherapy" within the German Hodgkin Study Group.

    PubMed

    Kriz, J; Baues, C; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Haverkamp, U; Herfarth, K; Lukas, P; Schmidberger, H; Marnitz-Schulze, S; Fuchs, M; Engert, A; Eich, H T

    2017-02-01

    Field design changed substantially from extended-field RT (EF-RT) to involved-field RT (IF-RT) and now to involved-node RT (IN-RT) and involved-site RT (IS-RT) as well as treatment techniques in radiotherapy (RT) of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the establishment of a quality assurance program (QAP) including modern RT techniques and field designs within the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). In the era of modern conformal RT, this QAP had to be fundamentally adapted and a new evaluation process has been intensively discussed by the radiotherapeutic expert panel of the GHSG. The expert panel developed guidelines and criteria to analyse "modern" field designs and treatment techniques. This work is based on a dataset of 11 patients treated within the sixth study generation (HD16-17). To develop a QAP of "modern RT", the expert panel defined criteria for analysing current RT procedures. The consensus of a modified QAP in ongoing and future trials is presented. With this schedule, the QAP of the GHSG could serve as a model for other study groups.

  19. Ichthyosiform scaling secondary to megavoltage radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, E.V.

    1991-07-01

    Acquired ichthyosis is a rare dermatosis associated with a number of malignancies. Side effects seen on the skin secondary to megavoltage radiotherapy are uncommon but may include fine dry desquamation and tanning. The authors present a case of ichthyosiform scaling limited to the radiation fields in a patient treated for brain metastases of a primary small cell lung carcinoma. The reader is reminded that side effects of megavoltage treatment do occur on the skin. A brief review of these effects is included. 5 references.

  20. Parotid glands in whole-brain radiotherapy: 2D versus 3D technique for no sparing or sparing.

    PubMed

    Trignani, Marianna; Genovesi, Domenico; Vinciguerra, Annamaria; Di Pilla, Angelo; Augurio, Antonietta; Di Tommaso, Monica; Cèfaro, Giampiero Ausili; Di Nicola, Marta

    2015-03-01

    Whole-brain radiotherapy is performed as standard therapy in patients with multiple brain metastases and in patients with more favourable prognosis such as lymphoma and small-cell lung carcinoma in the prophylactic setting. Because of the prognosis and the total prescribed dose, the parotid glands are not usually regarded as an organ at risk in whole-brain radiotherapy. Long-term survival can be expected in some of these patients and late toxicity can be observed, becoming essential to evaluate organs at risk, particularly the parotid glands even in metastatic patients. We compared the 2D with 3D technique to evaluate parotid glands involvement and received dose, and coverage of the clinical target volume. Seven patients were considered. The prescribed dose was 30 Gy in ten fractions. On the same day and with the same set-up, all the treatment planning were performed using a 2D and 3D technique. A treatment plan was performed following same technical characteristics as the 2D technique. The parotid glands and whole brain were delineated. Dose-volume statistics were analysed. Dose-volume histograms of the parotid glands showed that 2/7 patients (28 %) received a mean dose >20 Gy. We found a lack of coverage of the clinical target volume in 6/7 patients. Planning whole-brain radiotherapy with only the 2D technique involves a risk of including parotid glands in the field and not covering the clinical target volume. The 3D technique should be systematically performed and the parotid glands should be regarded as an organ at risk in whole-brain radiotherapy.

  1. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  2. [Radiotherapy during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Barillot, I; Mornex, F; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostic of cancer during pregnancy is a rare and delicate situation. As the developments of the embryo and the human fetus are extremely sensitive to ionizing radiations, the treatment of these tumors should be discussed. The studies - preclinical and clinical - based mostly on exposure accidents show that subdiaphragmatic treatments are possible during pregnancy. When radiotherapy is used, phantom estimations of the dose to the fetus, confirmed by in vivo measurements are required. Irradiation and imaging techniques should be arranged to decrease as much as possible the dose delivered to the fetus and hold below the threshold of 0.1Gy. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiotherapy Planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maria A; Payne, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimised, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT. PMID:26509844

  4. Genetics and genomics of radiotherapy toxicity: towards prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy is involved in many curative treatments of cancer; millions of survivors live with the consequences of treatment, and toxicity in a minority limits the radiation doses that can be safely prescribed to the majority. Radiogenomics is the whole genome application of radiogenetics, which studies the influence of genetic variation on radiation response. Work in the area focuses on uncovering the underlying genetic causes of individual variation in sensitivity to radiation, which is important for effective, safe treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in radiotherapy and discuss results from four genome-wide studies of radiotoxicity. PMID:21861849

  5. Emergency Radiotherapy for Spinal Cord Compression due to Bone Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Taima, Kageaki; Tanaka, Hisashi; Itoga, Masamichi; Ishioka, Yoshiko; Shiratori, Toshihiro; Tsuchiya, Junichiro; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Takanashi, Shingo; Tasaka, Sadatomo

    2018-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory granulomatous disease that is systemic, but bone involvement is uncommon. A 68-year-old man was referred to our hospital complaining of right shoulder pain with numbness. Computed tomography revealed systemic lymphadenopathy and multiple bone lesions. Because malignant lymphoma with a mass lesion protruding into the vertebral canal was considered, he underwent urgent radiotherapy. Thereafter, a needle biopsy of the left parasternal node was performed and showed epithelioid granulomas, confirming a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Since his neurologic symptoms improved, the patient was not given systemic corticosteroids. Radiotherapy may be useful for local control of bone sarcoidosis.

  6. Factors involved in sustained use of point-of-use water disinfection methods: a field study from Flores Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Roma, E; Bond, T; Jeffrey, P

    2014-09-01

    Many scientific studies have suggested that point-of-use water treatment can improve water quality and reduce the risk of infectious diseases. Despite the ease of use and relatively low cost of such methods, experience shows the potential benefits derived from provision of such systems depend on recipients' acceptance of the technology and its sustained use. To date, few contributions have addressed the problem of user experience in the post-implementation phase. This can diagnose challenges, which undermine system longevity and its sustained use. A qualitative evaluation of two household water treatment systems, solar disinfection (SODIS) and chlorine tablets (Aquatabs), in three villages was conducted by using a diagnostic tool focusing on technology performance and experience. Cross-sectional surveys and in-depth interviews were used to investigate perceptions of involved stakeholders (users, implementers and local government). Results prove that economic and functional factors were significant in using SODIS, whilst perceptions of economic, taste and odour components were important in Aquatabs use. Conclusions relate to closing the gap between factors that technology implementers and users perceive as key to the sustained deployment of point-of-use disinfection technologies.

  7. Target volume delineation for radical radiotherapy of early oesophageal carcinoma in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Su, J; Zhu, S; Liu, Z; Zhao, Y; Song, C

    2017-02-01

    To compare the prognosis of elderly patients with early oesophageal carcinoma between radical elective nodal prophylactic irradiation and involved-field irradiation and to estimate the failure modes and adverse effects, then to provide the patients the safe and individual therapeutic regimens. The charts of 96 patients aged 65 and over with early stage oesophageal carcinoma receiving radical radiotherapy in our department were retrospectively analysed. Of all the patients, 49 received elective nodal prophylactic irradiation and the other 47 received involved-field irradiation. After completion of the whole treatment, we analysed short-term effects, tumour local control, overall survival of the patients, failure modes and adverse effects. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year local control rate in elective nodal irradiation and involved-field irradiation groups were 80.6%, 57.4%, 54.0% and 65.4%, 46.5%, 30.5% respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (χ 2 =4.478, P=0.03). The differences of overall survival and progression-free survival were not significant (P>0.05). The difference of 1-, 3-, and 5-years local regional failure rate was statistically significant between elective nodal prophylactic irradiation and involved-field irradiation groups, except for the overall failure and distant metastasis rates. The overall incidence of radiation-induced oesophagitis after elective nodal irradiation or involved-field irradiation was 79.6% and 59.6%, and the difference was statistically significant (χ 2 =4.559, P=0.03). The difference of radiation pneumonitis between elective nodal prophylactic irradiation and involved-field irradiation was not significant (12.2% vs 14.9%; χ 2 =0.144, P=0.7). For elderly patients with early stage oesophageal carcinoma receiving radical radiotherapy, although elective nodal prophylactic irradiation could increase the incidence of radiation-induced oesophagitis, patients could tolerate the treatment and benefit from local

  8. Comparison of Toxicity Between Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ling, Diane C; Hess, Clayton B; Chen, Allen M; Daly, Megan E

    2016-01-01

    The role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in reducing treatment-related toxicity for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains incompletely defined. We compared acute toxicity and oncologic outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with IMRT or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT), with or without elective nodal irradiation (ENI). A single-institution retrospective review was performed evaluating 145 consecutive patients with histologically confirmed stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Sixty-five (44.8%) were treated with 3-DCRT using ENI, 43 (30.0%) with 3-DCRT using involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT), and 37 (25.5%) with IMRT using IFRT. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Comparison of acute toxicities by treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3-DCRT) and extent of nodal irradiation (3-DCRT-IFRT vs. 3-DCRT-ENI) was performed for grade 2 or higher esophagitis or pneumonitis, number of acute hospitalizations, incidence of opioid requirement, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy utilization, and percentage weight loss during treatment. Local control and overall survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. We identified no significant differences in any measures of acute toxicity by treatment technique or extent of nodal irradiation. There was a trend toward lower rates of grade 2 or higher pneumonitis among IMRT patients compared to 3-DCRT patients (5.4% vs. 23.0%; P = .065). Local control and overall survival were similar between cohorts. Acute and subacute toxicities were similar for patients treated with IMRT and with 3-DCRT with or without ENI, with a nonsignificant trend toward a reduction in pneumonitis with IMRT. Larger studies are needed to better define which patients will benefit from IMRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Combined radiotherapy of uveal melanoma].

    PubMed

    Brovkina, A F; Kesheleva, V V; Fridman, F E; Fishkin, I G

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen patients with uveal melanoma were exposed to combined radiotherapy: transscleral exposure of melanoma using a ruthenium ophthalmoapplicator and intracorporeal administration of 59Fe. Radiation reaction of the tumor was potentiated by combined exposure.

  10. Radiotherapy for intraarticular venous malformations of the knee.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2014-11-01

    Intraarticular venous malformation (IAVM) of the knee is a rare vascular disease that manifests with pain, swelling, and hemarthrosis. A young man with left knee pain and swelling was admitted to our institution for the treatment of the IAVM of the left knee which was diagnosed by a local orthopedic doctor via arthroscopy. A total dose of 40 Gy of radiotherapy was delivered with a daily dose of 2.0 Gy using 6 MV X-ray beams and a linear accelerator through anteroposterior portals. Fifteen months after radiotherapy, follow-up examination using radiologic imaging showed distinct shrinkage of the venous malformations. Swelling and pain of the left knee had decreased, and range of motion of the left knee was maintained. This report describes a case involving a 38-year-old man with IAVM of the left knee in whom favorable outcomes were obtained in response to radiotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An electromechanical, patient positioning system for head and neck radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostyn, Mark; Dwyer, Thomas; Miller, Matthew; King, Paden; Sacks, Rachel; Cruikshank, Ross; Rosario, Melvin; Martinez, Daniel; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In cancer treatment with radiation, accurate patient setup is critical for proper dose delivery. Improper arrangement can lead to disease recurrence, permanent organ damage, or lack of disease control. While current immobilization equipment often helps for patient positioning, manual adjustment is required, involving iterative, time-consuming steps. Here, we present an electromechanical robotic system for improving patient setup in radiotherapy, specifically targeting head and neck cancer. This positioning system offers six degrees of freedom for a variety of applications in radiation oncology. An analytical calculation of inverse kinematics serves as fundamental criteria to design the system. Computational mechanical modeling and experimental study of radiotherapy compatibility and x-ray-based imaging demonstrates the device feasibility and reliability to be used in radiotherapy. An absolute positioning accuracy test in a clinical treatment room supports the clinical feasibility of the system.

  12. Melatonin protects rats from radiotherapy-induced small intestine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Moneim, Ahmed E Abdel; Ortiz, Francisco; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Molina-Navarro, María M; García-Verdugo, José M; Sayed, Ramy K A; Florido, Javier; Luna, Juan D; López, Luis Carlos; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity is among the most prevalent dose-limiting toxicities following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation enteropathy requires protection of the small intestine. However, despite the prevalence and burden of this pathology, there are currently no effective treatments for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity, and this pathology remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the changes induced in the rat small intestine after external irradiation of the tongue, and to explore the potential radio-protective effects of melatonin gel. Male Wistar rats were subjected to irradiation of their tongues with an X-Ray YXLON Y.Tu 320-D03 irradiator, receiving a dose of 7.5 Gy/day for 5 days. For 21 days post-irradiation, rats were treated with 45 mg/day melatonin gel or vehicle, by local application into their mouths. Our results showed that mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetic impairment, and subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation were involved in the development of radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity. Oral treatment with melatonin gel had a protective effect in the small intestine, which was associated with mitochondrial protection and, consequently, with a reduced inflammatory response, blunting the NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling activation. Thus, rats treated with melatonin gel showed reduced intestinal apoptosis, relieving mucosal dysfunction and facilitating intestinal mucosa recovery. Our findings suggest that oral treatment with melatonin gel may be a potential preventive therapy for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity in cancer patients.

  13. Definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva and technical issues: a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gokula; Norhafizah, I.; Shazril, I.; Nursyatina, AR; Aziz, MZ Abdul; Zin, Hafiz M.; Zakir, MK; Norjayadi; Norliza, AS; Ismail, A.; Khairun, N.

    2017-05-01

    This case report describes a complex radical 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy treatment planning, dosimetric issues and outcome of definitive treatment of un-resectable carcinoma of the vulvar in a 42-year old lady. The patient presented with large fungating mass of the vulva which was biopsy confirmed as Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Further staging investigation revealed locally advanced disease (T4), with bilateral inguinal lymph nodes involvement. There is no systemic metastasis or intra-pelvic nodes. The patient was seen by Gynae-Oncology team and the disease was deemed un-resectable without significant morbidity. She was treated to a total dose of 64.8Gy in 36 fractions over 7 weeks with concurrent weekly Cisplatinum in 2 phases. 3D-Conformal radiotherapy technique using the modified segmental boost technique (MSBT, large PA and small AP photon fields with inguinal electron matching) was used. TLD chips were used for in-vivo dose verification in phase 1 and 2 of the treatment. At completion of planned radiotherapy, patient had a complete clinical response, grade 2-3 skin toxicity, grade 2 rectal toxicity, and grade 2 dysuria Vulval Squamous Cell Carcinomas are very radiosensitive tumours and the skills of the treating Radiation Oncologist, Dosimetrists, Physicist, Radiation Therapist and also nurses is of foremost importance is ensuring good clinical outcomes.

  14. Laparoscopic pelvic sling placement facilitates optimum therapeutic radiotherapy delivery in the management of pelvic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Joyce, M; Thirion, P; Kiernan, F; Byrnes, C; Kelly, P; Keane, F; Neary, P

    2009-04-01

    Radiotherapy has a significant role in the management of pelvic malignancies. However, the small intestine represents the main dose limiting organ. Invasive and non-invasive mechanical methods have been described to displace bowel out of the radiation field. We herein report a case series of laparoscopic placement of an absorbable pelvic sling in patients requiring pelvic radiotherapy. Six patients were referred to our minimally invasive unit. Four patients required radical radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer, one was scheduled for salvage localised radiotherapy for post-prostatectomy PSA progression and one patient required adjuvant radiotherapy post-cystoprostatectomy for bladder carcinoma. All patients had excessive small intestine within the radiation fields despite the use of non-invasive displacement methods. All patients underwent laparoscopic mesh placement, allowing for an elevation of small bowel from the pelvis. The presence of an ileal conduit or previous surgery did not prevent mesh placement. Post-operative planning radiotherapy CT scans confirmed displacement of the small intestine allowing all patients to receive safely the planned radiotherapy in terms of both volume and radiation schedule. Laparoscopic mesh placement represents a safe and efficient procedure in patients requiring high-dose pelvic radiation, presenting with unacceptable small intestine volume in the radiation field. This procedure is also feasible in those that have undergone previous major abdominal surgery.

  15. Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy D. Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Kirsch, David G.; Suit, Herman D.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Yoon, Sam S.; Gebhardt, Marc C.; Mankin, Henry J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

  16. Performance of different radiotherapy workload models.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Lisa; Jackson, Lynda D; Schulze, Karleen; Groome, Patti A; Foroudi, Farshad; Delaney, Geoff P; Mackillop, William J

    2003-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of different radiotherapy workload models using a prospectively collected dataset of patient and treatment information from a single center. Information about all individual radiotherapy treatments was collected for 2 weeks from the three linear accelerators (linacs) in our department. This information included diagnosis code, treatment site, treatment unit, treatment time, fields per fraction, technique, beam type, blocks, wedges, junctions, port films, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of the original and revised basic treatment equivalent (BTE) model, the simple and complex Addenbrooke models, the equivalent simple treatment visit (ESTV) model, fields per hour, and two local standards of workload measurement. Data were collected for 2 weeks in June 2001. During this time, 151 patients were treated with 857 fractions. The revised BTE model performed better than the other models with a mean [observed -predicted] of 2.62 (2.44-2.80). It estimated 88.0% of treatment times within 5 min, which is similar to the previously reported accuracy of the model. The revised BTE model had similar accuracy and precision for data collected in our center as it did for the original dataset and performed the best of the models assessed. This model would have uses for patient scheduling, and describing workloads and case complexity.

  17. Dosimetry in steep dose-rate gradient radiation fields: A challenge in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massillon-JL, G.

    2010-12-01

    The fundamental goal of radiotherapy is to reduce the damage to normal tissue and optimize the dose to the tumor with an associated high probability of cure. Because of this, an accurate and precise knowledge of the radiation dose distribution delivered around the tumor volume during radiotherapy treatments such as stereotactic radiosurgery, intensity modulated radiotherapy or brachytherapy with low-energy X-ray and beta particle sources is of great importance. However, in each of these radiation fields, there exists a steep dose-rate gradient which makes it very difficult to perform accurate dose measurements. In this work, the physics phenomena involved in the energy absorption for each of these situations are discussed, and a brief revision of what the Medical Physics community is doing is presented.

  18. Radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leonard, K; Stryker, J A

    1986-09-01

    The charts of 96 patients who received radiotherapy at The M. S. Hershey Medical Center for their prostatic carcinoma were reviewed. The 4-year NED (no evidence of disease) survival rates for patients receiving between 6,500 and 7,000 rad of external beam radiation (EBR) were 92, 78, 56, and 50% for stages A, B, C, and D1, respectively. The 4-year NED survival rate for stage B patients was 90% for those receiving approximately 6,500 rad of EBR, 75% for those receiving approximately 7,000 rad of EBR, and 71% for those receiving interstitial implants. Bowel or urinary complications occurred in 27% (21% grade I, 3% grade II, and 3% grade III) of those receiving approximately 6,500 rad of EBR, 40% (25% grade I, 10% grade II, and 5% grade III) of those receiving 7,000 rad of EBR, and 0% of those receiving interstitial implants. The effects of stage, grade, and treatment type on NED survival and complications are discussed.

  19. The future of heavy ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P; Debus, Jürgen

    2008-12-01

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in heavy ion radiotherapy (RT) and a number of new facilities are being installed in Europe and Japan. This development is accompanied by intensive technical, physical, and clinical research. The authors identify six research fields where progress is likely and propose a thesis on the expected achievements for each of the fields: (1) Synchrotrons with active energy variation and three-dimensional beam scanning will be the standard in ion beam RT. (2) Common standards for precise measurement, prescription, and reporting of dose will be available. (3) Intensity-modulated particle therapy will be state-of-the-art. (4) Time-adaptive treatments of moving targets will be feasible. (5) Therapeutic effectiveness of heavy ions will be known for the most important indications while cost effectiveness will remain to be shown. (6) The potential of high-linear energy transfer radiation will be known. The rationale for each of these theses is described.

  20. Treating locally advanced lung cancer with a 1.5T MR-Linac - Effects of the magnetic field and irradiation geometry on conventionally fractionated and isotoxic dose-escalated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Hannah E; Menten, Martin J; Fast, Martin F; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; McDonald, Fiona

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates the feasibility and potential benefits of radiotherapy with a 1.5T MR-Linac for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) patients. Ten patients with LA NSCLC were retrospectively re-planned six times: three treatment plans were created according to a protocol for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and three treatment plans following guidelines for isotoxic target dose escalation. In each case, two plans were designed for the MR-Linac, either with standard (∼7mm) or reduced (∼3mm) planning target volume (PTV) margins, while one conventional linac plan was created with standard margins. Treatment plan quality was evaluated using dose-volume metrics or by quantifying dose escalation potential. All generated treatment plans fulfilled their respective planning constraints. For conventionally fractionated treatments, MR-Linac plans with standard margins had slightly increased skin dose when compared to conventional linac plans. Using reduced margins alleviated this issue and decreased exposure of several other organs-at-risk (OAR). Reduced margins also enabled increased isotoxic target dose escalation. It is feasible to generate treatment plans for LA NSCLC patients on a 1.5T MR-Linac. Margin reduction, facilitated by an envisioned MRI-guided workflow, enables increased OAR sparing and isotoxic target dose escalation for the respective treatment approaches. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lesions of the Spine and Paraspinal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, John W.; Yoo, David S.; Sampson, John H.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Larrier, Nicole A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Yin Fangfang; Wu, Q. Jackie; Wang Zhiheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience and clinical strategy for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of spinal lesions. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two patients with 33 spinal lesions underwent computed tomography-based simulation while free breathing. Gross/clinical target volumes included involved portions of the vertebral body and paravertebral/epidural tumor. Planning target volume (PTV) expansion was 6 mm axially and 3 mm radially; the cord was excluded from the PTV. Biologic equivalent dose was calculated using the linear quadratic model with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. Treatment was linear accelerator based with on-board imaging; dose was adjusted to maintain cord dose within tolerance. Survival, local control, pain, and neurologic status were monitored. Results: Twenty-one patients are alive at 1 year (median survival, 14 months). Median follow-up is 6 months for all patients (7 months for survivors). Mean previous radiotherapy dose to 22 patients was 35 Gy, and median interval was 17 months. Renal (31%), breast, and lung (19% each) were the most common histologic sites. Three SBRT fractions (range, one to four fractions) of 7 Gy (range, 5-16 Gy) were delivered. Median cord and target biologic equivalent doses were 70 Gy{sub 3} and 34.3 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. Thirteen patients reported complete and 17 patients reported partial pain relief at 1 month. There were four failures (mean, 5.8 months) with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of in-field progression. No dosimetric parameters predictive of failure were identified. No treatment-related toxicity was seen. Conclusions: Spinal SBRT is effective in the palliative/re-treatment setting. Volume expansion must ensure optimal PTV coverage while avoiding spinal cord toxicity. The long-term safety of spinal SBRT and the applicability of the linear-quadratic model in this setting remain to be determined, particularly the time-adjusted impact of prior radiotherapy.

  2. Synchronous bilateral squamous cell carcinoma of the lung successfully treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Loo, S W; Smith, S; Promnitz, D A; Van Tornout, F

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of synchronous bilateral inoperable lung cancer which required treatment with external beam radiotherapy to a radical dose. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was used. More conformal dose distribution within the planning target volume was obtained using IMRT than the conventional technique. Dose-volume constraints defined for the lungs were met. Treatment was subsequently delivered using a seven-field IMRT plan. The patient remains alive and disease-free 48 months after the completion of radiotherapy. IMRT can be considered an effective treatment for synchronous bilateral lung cancer.

  3. Synchronous bilateral squamous cell carcinoma of the lung successfully treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Loo, S W; Smith, S; Promnitz, D A; Van Tornout, F

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of synchronous bilateral inoperable lung cancer which required treatment with external beam radiotherapy to a radical dose. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was used. More conformal dose distribution within the planning target volume was obtained using IMRT than the conventional technique. Dose–volume constraints defined for the lungs were met. Treatment was subsequently delivered using a seven-field IMRT plan. The patient remains alive and disease-free 48 months after the completion of radiotherapy. IMRT can be considered an effective treatment for synchronous bilateral lung cancer. PMID:21937610

  4. [Hypofractionated radiotherapy, a standard in breast cancer?].

    PubMed

    Bourgier, C; Lemanski, C; Riou, O; Charissoux, M; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2013-11-01

    In the era of high-tech radiotherapy, hypofractionated schema is more and more widely used regardless of tumour sites. In this article, we expose the role, techniques and indications of hypofractionated radiotherapy in adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using charged particle or photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Demizu, Yusuke; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Ogita, Mikio; Himei, Kengo; Nakamura, Satoaki; Suzuki, Gen; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Oh, Ryoongjin

    2017-07-01

    To examine the outcomes of reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using different modalities. This retrospective study included 26 patients who received charged particle radiotherapy (CP) and 150 who received photon radiotherapy (117 CyberKnife radiotherapy [CK] and 36 intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) involving propensity scores was used to reduce background selection bias. Higher prescribed doses were used in CP than photon radiotherapy. The 1‑year overall survival (OS) rates were 67.9% for CP and 54.1% for photon radiotherapy (p = 0.15; 55% for CK and 51% for IMRT). In multivariate Cox regression, the significant prognostic factors for better survival were nasopharyngeal cancer, higher prescribed dose, and lower tumor volume. IPTW showed a statistically significant difference between CP and photon radiotherapy (p = 0.04). The local control rates for patients treated with CP and photon radiotherapy at 1 year were 66.9% (range 46.3-87.5%) and 67.1% (range 58.3-75.9%), respectively. A total of 48 patients (27%) experienced toxicity grade ≥3 (24% in the photon radiotherapy group and 46% in the CP group), including 17 patients with grade 5 toxicity. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age and a larger planning target volume (PTV) were significant risk factors for grade 3 or worse toxicity. CP provided superior survival outcome compared to photon radiotherapy. Tumor volume, primary site (nasopharyngeal), and prescribed dose were identified as survival factors. Younger patients with a larger PTV experienced toxicity grade ≥3.

  6. The interrelationship of research in the laboratory and the field to assess hydration status and determine mechanisms involved in water regulation during physical activity.

    PubMed

    Stachenfeld, Nina S

    2014-05-01

    Changes in skin blood and sweating are the primary mechanisms for heat loss in humans. A hot, humid environment concomitant with dehydration limits the ability to increase skin blood flow for the purpose of transferring heat from the body core to skin surface and evaporate sweat to maintain core temperature within safe limits during exercise. Adequate hydration improves thermoregulation by maintaining blood volume to support skin blood flow and sweating. Humans rely on fluid intake to maintain total body water and blood volume, and have developed complex mechanisms to sense changes in the amount and composition of fluid in the body. This paper addresses the interrelationship of research in the laboratory and the field to assess hydration status involved in body water and temperature regulation during exercise. In the controlled setting of a research laboratory, investigators are able to investigate the contributions of volume and tonicity of fluid in the plasma to body water and temperature regulation during exercise and recovery. For example, laboratory studies have shown that tonicity in a rehydration beverage maintains the thirst mechanism (and stimulates drinking), and contributes to the ongoing stimulation of renal fluid retention hormones, ultimately leading to a more complete rehydration. Research in the field cannot control the environment precisely, but these studies provide a natural, 'real-life' setting to study fluid and temperature regulation during exercise. The conditions encountered in the field are closest to the environment during competition, and data collected in the field can have an immediate impact on performance and safety during exercise. There is an important synergy between these two methods of collecting data that support performance and protect athletes from harm during training and improve performance during competition.

  7. Radiogenomics: using genetics to identify cancer patients at risk for development of adverse effects following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Sarah L; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S

    2014-02-01

    Normal-tissue adverse effects following radiotherapy are common and significantly affect quality of life. These effects cannot be accounted for by dosimetric, treatment, or demographic factors alone, and evidence suggests that common genetic variants are associated with radiotherapy adverse effects. The field of radiogenomics has evolved to identify such genetic risk factors. Radiogenomics has two goals: (i) to develop an assay to predict which patients with cancer are most likely to develop radiation injuries resulting from radiotherapy, and (ii) to obtain information about the molecular pathways responsible for radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicities. This review summarizes the history of the field and current research. A single-nucleotide polymorphism–based predictive assay could be used, along with clinical and treatment factors, to estimate the risk that a patient with cancer will develop adverse effects from radiotherapy. Such an assay could be used to personalize therapy and improve quality of life for patients with cancer. 2014 AACR

  8. Evaluation of different in vitro assays of inherent sensitivity as predictors of radiotherapy response

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. Chicago Univ., IL . Medical Center); Beckett, M.A.; Mustafi, R.; Weichselbaum, R.R. . Medical Center); Vaughan, A.T.M. . Stritch School of Medicine)

    1991-01-01

    The inherent sensitivity of cells within a tumor plays an important role in the response of the tumor to radiotherapy. Clonogenic assays show that cells established from in-field radiotherapy failures are significantly more resistant to radiation than cell lines established from pre-treatment samples. Clonogenic assays fail to predict tumor response to radiotherapy, however. The failure might be due to the small sample size in this study, or the complicating factors of staging, surgery, and chemotherapy, and/or in vivo selection by radiotherapy for resistant tumor cells. In vitro selection for resistant cell lines does not appear to be a complicating factor. Nonclonogenic assays such as those that measure DNA strand break rejoining rates (filter elution, pulse-field gel electrophoresis) or chromosome structure (flow cytometric analysis) show promise as alternative rapid assays of radiation sensitivity and possibly tumor response. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Second Malignant Neoplasms Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath

    2012-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy as a part of their treatment. With the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, there is a growing concern about the risk of radiation induced second malignant neoplasm [SMN]. This risk appears to be highest for survivors of childhood cancers. The exact mechanism and dose-response relationship for radiation induced malignancy is not well understood, however, there have been growing efforts to develop strategies for the prevention and mitigation of radiation induced cancers. This review article focuses on the incidence, etiology, and risk factors for SMN in various organs after radiotherapy. PMID:23249860

  10. Improving oncoplastic breast tumor bed localization for radiotherapy planning using image registration algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodzinski, Marek; Skalski, Andrzej; Ciepiela, Izabela; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about tumor bed localization and its shape analysis is a crucial factor for preventing irradiation of healthy tissues during supportive radiotherapy and as a result, cancer recurrence. The localization process is especially hard for tumors placed nearby soft tissues, which undergo complex, nonrigid deformations. Among them, breast cancer can be considered as the most representative example. A natural approach to improving tumor bed localization is the use of image registration algorithms. However, this involves two unusual aspects which are not common in typical medical image registration: the real deformation field is discontinuous, and there is no direct correspondence between the cancer and its bed in the source and the target 3D images respectively. The tumor no longer exists during radiotherapy planning. Therefore, a traditional evaluation approach based on known, smooth deformations and target registration error are not directly applicable. In this work, we propose alternative artificial deformations which model the tumor bed creation process. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the most commonly used deformable registration algorithms: B-Splines free form deformations (B-Splines FFD), different variants of the Demons and TV-L1 optical flow. The evaluation procedure includes quantitative assessment of the dedicated artificial deformations, target registration error calculation, 3D contour propagation and medical experts visual judgment. The results demonstrate that the currently, practically applied image registration (rigid registration and B-Splines FFD) are not able to correctly reconstruct discontinuous deformation fields. We show that the symmetric Demons provide the most accurate soft tissues alignment in terms of the ability to reconstruct the deformation field, target registration error and relative tumor volume change, while B-Splines FFD and TV-L1 optical flow are not an appropriate choice for the breast tumor bed localization problem

  11. Radiomics and radiogenomics for precision radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Tha, Khin Khin; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2018-01-27

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer, as well as in radiation treatment planning and evaluation of therapeutic response. Recently, there has been significant interest in extracting quantitative information from clinical standard-of-care images, i.e. radiomics, in order to provide a more comprehensive characterization of image phenotypes of the tumor. A number of studies have demonstrated that a deeper radiomic analysis can reveal novel image features that could provide useful diagnostic, prognostic or predictive information, improving upon currently used imaging metrics such as tumor size and volume. Furthermore, these imaging-derived phenotypes can be linked with genomic data, i.e. radiogenomics, in order to understand their biological underpinnings or further improve the prediction accuracy of clinical outcomes. In this article, we will provide an overview of radiomics and radiogenomics, including their rationale, technical and clinical aspects. We will also present some examples of the current results and some emerging paradigms in radiomics and radiogenomics for clinical oncology, with a focus on potential applications in radiotherapy. Finally, we will highlight the challenges in the field and suggest possible future directions in radiomics to maximize its potential impact on precision radiotherapy. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  12. [Anatomic foundation of the lateral portal for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC)].

    PubMed

    Wei, B Q; Feng, P B; Li, J Z

    1987-05-01

    Basing on 31 normal skulls, the lateral projections of some points relative to the bony structure near the nasopharynx were located under the simulator, followed by drawing it on a sheet of paper with the aid of geometry and trigonometry. Thus, the relation between external and internal structures is shown on the drawn projection, which can serve as the anatomic basis for designing the routine field and improving radiotherapy technique. In the light of data informed by this study and clinical experiences of the authors and others, it was found logical, in radiotherapy of NPC, that large opposing lateral pre-auriculo-cervical portals with their posterior margin extending beyond the external auditory meatus posteriorly be used in order to avoid geographic miss of the uppermost deep cervical lymph nodes usually involved beneath the jugular foramen and posterior portion of the nasopharynx. In addition, the upper margin of the lateral portal must be parallel but superior to the cantho-auditory line, on which the foramen ovale is projected. Actual locating the upper margin should depend on the extent of the intracranial invasion of the tumor as shown by the CT scan.

  13. Radiotherapy for gastric lymphoma: a planning study of 3D conformal radiotherapy, the half-beam method, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Koji; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Wakita, Akihisa; Nakamura, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Murakami, Naoya; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-11-01

    During radiotherapy for gastric lymphoma, it is difficult to protect the liver and kidneys in cases where there is considerable overlap between these organs and the target volume. This study was conducted to compare the three radiotherapy planning techniques of four-fields 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), half-field radiotherapy (the half-beam method) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) used to treat primary gastric lymphoma in which the planning target volume (PTV) had a large overlap with the left kidney. A total of 17 patients with gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) were included. In DLBCL, immunochemotherapy (Rituximab + CHOP) was followed by radiotherapy of 40 Gy to the whole stomach and peri-gastric lymph nodes. 3DCRT, the half-field method, and IMRT were compared with respect to the dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) to the kidneys, liver and PTV. The mean dose and gEUD for 3DCRT was higher than for IMRT and the half-beam method in the left kidney and both kidneys. The mean dose and gEUD of the left kidney was 2117 cGy and 2224 cGy for 3DCRT, 1520 cGy and 1637 cGy for IMRT, and 1100 cGy and 1357 cGy for the half-beam method, respectively. The mean dose and gEUD of both kidneys was 1335 cGy and 1559 cGy for 3DCRT, 1184 cGy and 1311 cGy for IMRT, and 700 cGy and 937 cGy for the half-beam method, respectively. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the liver revealed a larger volume was irradiated in the dose range <25 Gy with 3DCRT, while the half-beam method irradiated a larger volume of liver with the higher dose range (>25 Gy). IMRT and the half-beam method had the advantages of dose reduction for the kidneys and liver. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  14. Stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Selch, Michael T; Pedroso, Alessandro; Lee, Steve P; Solberg, Timothy D; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Cabatan-Awang, Cynthia; DeSalles, Antonio A F

    2004-11-01

    radiotherapy. New facial palsy occurred in one patient (2.1 %) with normal seventh cranial nerve function prior to treatment. No patient's pretreatment dysfunction of the fifth or seventh cranial nerve worsened after stereotactic radiotherapy. Tinnitus improved in six patients and worsened in two. Stereotactic radiotherapy using field shaping for the treatment of acoustic neuromas achieves high rates of tumor control and preservation of useful hearing. The technique produces low rates of damage to the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. Long-term follow-up studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  15. Can involved-field irradiation replace elective nodal irradiation in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Miao, Chuanwang; Chen, Zhen; Li, Wanhu; Yuan, Shuanghu; Yu, Jinming; Hu, Xudong

    2017-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the most common treatment for inoperable esophageal cancer. However, there is no consensus on the delineation of the clinical target volume. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) is recommended for inoperable esophageal cancer. A few studies have reported a decrease in the incidence of radiation-related toxicity of involved-field irradiation (IFI) for esophageal cancer. A systematic review and pooled analysis were performed to determine whether IFI in definitive chemoradiotherapy was more beneficial than ENI for esophageal cancer. The results showed no significant differences in the overall survival and local control rates between the IFI and ENI arms. Meanwhile, the incidences of esophageal and lung toxicities were significantly decreased in the IFI arm. These results suggest that IFI is a feasible treatment option for locally advanced esophageal cancer, especially to minimize irradiation-related toxicity. PMID:28442917

  16. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke K; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-03-15

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5(+/) (-), Osr1(+/-), Osr1(-/-) and Tbx5(+/-)/Osr1(+/-) mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene-gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Dynamic 3D measurement of modulated radiotherapy: a scintillator-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Louis; Rilling, Madison; Roy-Pomerleau, Xavier; Thibault, Simon

    2017-05-01

    With the rise of high-conformity dynamic radiotherapy, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy and robotic radiosurgery, the temporal dimension of dose measurement is becoming increasingly important. It must be possible to tell both ‘where’ and ‘when’ a discrepancy occurs between the plan and its delivery. A 3D scintillation-based dosimetry system could be ideal for such a thorough, end-to-end verification; however, the challenge lies in retrieving the volumetric information of the light-emitting volume. This paper discusses the motivation, from an optics point of view, of using the images acquired with a plenoptic camera, or light field imager, of an irradiated plastic scintillator volume to reconstruct the delivered 3D dose distribution. Current work focuses on the optimization of the optical design as well as the data processing that is involved in the ongoing development of a clinically viable, second generation dosimetry system.

  18. Endorectal MRI assessment of local relapse after surgery for prostate cancer: A model to define treatment field guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy in patients at high risk for local failure

    SciTech Connect

    Miralbell, Raymond . E-mail: Raymond.Miralbell@hcuge.ch; Vees, Hansjoerg; Lozano, Joan; Khan, Haleem; Molla, Meritxell; Hidalgo, Alberto; Linero, Dolors; Rouzaud, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining local relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer to help to reassess the clinical target volume (CTV) for adjuvant postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients undergoing an endorectal MRI before salvage radiotherapy were selected. Spatial coordinates of the relapses were assessed using two reference points: the inferior border of the pubic symphysis (point 1) and the urethro-vesical anastomosis (point 2). Every lesion on MRI was delineated on the planning computed tomography and center of mass coordinates were plotted in two separate diagrams (along the x, y, and z axes) with the urethro-vesical anastomosis as the coordinate origin. An 'ideal' CTV was constructed, centered at a point defined by the mathematical means of each of the three coordinates with dimensions defined as twice 2 standard deviations in each of the three axes. The dosimetric impact of the new CTV definition was evaluated in six adjuvantly treated patients. Results: The ideal CTV center of mass was located at coordinates 0 (x), -5 (y), and -3 (z) mm with SDs of 6 (x), 6 (y), and 9 (z) mm, respectively. The CTV size was 24 (x) x 24 (y) x 36 (z) mm. Significant rectal sparing was observed with the new CTV. Conclusions: A CTV with an approximately cylindrical shape ({approx}4 x 3 cm) centered 5 mm posterior and 3 mm inferior to the urethro-vesical anastomosis was defined. Such CTV may reduce the irradiation of normal nontarget tissue in the pelvis potentially improving treatment tolerance.

  19. Enhancing radiotherapy for lung cancer using immunoadjuvants delivered in situ from new design radiotherapy biomaterials: a preclinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yao; Yasmin-Karim, Sayeda; Moreau, Michele; Sinha, Neeharika; Sajo, Erno; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2016-12-01

    Studies show that radiotherapy of a primary tumor in combination with immunoadjuvants (IA) can result in increased survival or immune-mediated regression of metastasis outside the radiation field, a phenomenon known as abscopal effect. However, toxicities due to repeated systematic administration of IA have been shown to be a major obstacle in clinical trials. To minimize the toxicities and prime a more potent immune response, Ngwa et al have proposed that inert radiotherapy biomaterials such as fiducials could be upgraded to multifunctional ones loaded with IA for in situ delivery directly into the tumor sub-volume at no additional inconvenience to patients. In this preliminary study, the potential of such an approach is investigated for lung cancer using anti-CD40 antibody. First the benefit of using the anti-CD40 delivered in situ to enhance radiotherapy was tested in mice with subcutaneous tumors generated with the Lewis Lung cancer cell line LL/2 (LLC-1). The tumors were implanted on both flanks of the mice to simulate metastasis. Tumors on one flank were treated with and without anti-CD40 and the survival benefits compared. An experimentally determined in vivo diffusion coefficient for nanoparticles was then employed to estimate the time for achieving intratumoral distribution of the needed minimal concentrations of anti-CD40 nanoparticles if released from a multifuntional radiotherapy biomaterials. The studies show that the use of anti-CD40 significantly enhanced radiotherapy effect, slowing the growth of the treated and untreated tumors, and increasing survival. Meanwhile our calculations indicate that for a 2-4 cm tumor and 7 mg g-1 IA concentrations, it would take 4.4-17.4 d, respectively, following burst release, for the required concentration of IA nanoparticles to accumulate throughout the tumor during image-guided radiotherapy. The distribution of IA could be customized as a function of loading concentrations or nanoparticle size to fit current

  20. Monte Carlo dose calculations in advanced radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Karl Kenneth

    The remarkable accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithms has led to the widely accepted view that these methods should and will play a central role in the radiotherapy treatment verification and planning of the future. The advantages of using MC clinically are particularly evident for radiation fields passing through inhomogeneities, such as lung and air cavities, and for small fields, including those used in today's advanced intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Many investigators have reported significant dosimetric differences between MC and conventional dose calculations in such complex situations, and have demonstrated experimentally the unmatched ability of MC calculations in modeling charged particle disequilibrium. The advantages of using MC dose calculations do come at a cost. The nature of MC dose calculations require a highly detailed, in-depth representation of the physical system (accelerator head geometry/composition, anatomical patient geometry/composition and particle interaction physics) to allow accurate modeling of external beam radiation therapy treatments. To perform such simulations is computationally demanding and has only recently become feasible within mainstream radiotherapy practices. In addition, the output of the accelerator head simulation can be highly sensitive to inaccuracies within a model that may not be known with sufficient detail. The goal of this dissertation is to both improve and advance the implementation of MC dose calculations in modern external beam radiotherapy. To begin, a novel method is proposed to fine-tune the output of an accelerator model to better represent the measured output. In this method an intensity distribution of the electron beam incident on the model is inferred by employing a simulated annealing algorithm. The method allows an investigation of arbitrary electron beam intensity distributions and is not restricted to the commonly assumed Gaussian intensity. In a second component of

  1. Studies of the cranial base in 23 patients with cri-du-chat syndrome suggest a cranial developmental field involved in the condition.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, I; Niebuhr, E

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cranial base on profile radiographs of patients with cri-du-chat syndrome and to relate the findings to current knowledge of brain malformation in an attempt to localize the developmental field affected in cri-du-chat syndrome. The material of profile radiographs of 23 patients was collected in Denmark in the 1970s. Twenty-two patients had terminal deletions of chromosome 5 (5p13.3, 5p14.1, 5p14.2, and 5p14.3), and one patient had an interstitial deletion. The cranial base angle (n-s-ba) was in most cases reduced and in no cases increased compared to age-related standards for normal individuals. Malformations in the bony contours of the sella turcica and the clivus occurred in cri-du-chat patients with terminal deletions. This specific cranial base region develops around the notochord at the location from where the rhombencephalic-derived brainstem, pons, and cerebellum have developed dorsally, and from where the neurons to the larynx have migrated ventrally. As the cranial base, the cerebellum and the larynx are involved in cri-du-chat syndrome, and attention is drawn to a new developmental field which comprises the dorsum sellae, clivus, cerebellum, and larynx. This field seemingly originates from the same notochordal location. The study has demonstrated a cranial base malformation in cri-du-chat patients, which ought to be elucidated in future research and combined with neurological and chromosomal investigations.

  2. Increased stomach cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, M; Fossa, S D; Stovall, M; van Leeuwen, F E; Johannesen, T B; Rajaraman, P; Gilbert, E S; Smith, S A; Weathers, R E; Aleman, B M P; Andersson, M; Curtis, R E; Dores, G M; Fraumeni, J F; Hall, P; Holowaty, E J; Joensuu, H; Kaijser, M; Kleinerman, R A; Langmark, F; Lynch, C F; Pukkala, E; Storm, H H; Vaalavirta, L; van den Belt-Dusebout, A W; Travis, L B; Morton, L M

    2015-01-06

    Abdominal radiotherapy for testicular cancer (TC) increases risk for second stomach cancer, although data on the radiation dose-response relationship are sparse. In a cohort of 22,269 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1959-1987, doses to stomach subsites were estimated for 92 patients who developed stomach cancer and 180 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression. Cumulative incidence of second primary stomach cancer was 1.45% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. The TC survivors who received radiotherapy (87 (95%) cases, 151 (84%) controls) had a 5.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-20.7) increased risk of stomach cancer. Risk increased with increasing stomach dose (P-trend<0.001), with an OR of 20.5 (3.7-114.3) for ⩾50.0 Gy compared with <10 Gy. Radiation-related risks remained elevated ⩾20 years after exposure (P<0.001). Risk after any chemotherapy was not elevated (OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.5-2.5; 14 cases and 23 controls). Radiotherapy for TC involving parts of the stomach increased gastric cancer risk for several decades, with the highest risks after stomach doses of ⩾30 Gy. Clinicians should be aware of these excesses when previously irradiated TC survivors present with gastrointestinal symptoms and when any radiotherapy is considered in newly diagnosed TC patients.

  3. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for early breast cancer: Review of phase III studies

    PubMed Central

    Kacprowska, Agata; Jassem, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery including whole breast irradiation has long been a recommended procedure for early breast cancer. However, conventionally fractionated radiotherapy requires a lengthy hospitalisation or prolonged commuting to a hospital for radiotherapy. In recent years, hypofractionated radiotherapy has increasingly been used. This method involves higher fraction doses (above 2 Gy) as compared to conventional radiotherapy, so the total dose can be delivered in fewer fractions and in a shorter overall treatment time. This review aims at presenting most important outcomes of four randomised studies comparing conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy schemes including a total of 7000 patients. These studies have not shown apparent differences in treatment efficacy, incidence of late post-radiotherapy complications or cosmetic effects during a 5–10 year follow-up, but longer observation is warranted to fully evaluate the safety of this method. Currently, major societies consider modestly hypofractionated radiotherapy schemes as a routine management in selected groups of patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery. However, this method should be used cautiously in patients with lymph node metastases, big breasts, receiving chemotherapy or trastuzumab, or those under 50 years of age. PMID:24377002

  4. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for early breast cancer: Review of phase III studies.

    PubMed

    Kacprowska, Agata; Jassem, Jacek

    2012-02-01

    Breast-conserving surgery including whole breast irradiation has long been a recommended procedure for early breast cancer. However, conventionally fractionated radiotherapy requires a lengthy hospitalisation or prolonged commuting to a hospital for radiotherapy. In recent years, hypofractionated radiotherapy has increasingly been used. This method involves higher fraction doses (above 2 Gy) as compared to conventional radiotherapy, so the total dose can be delivered in fewer fractions and in a shorter overall treatment time. This review aims at presenting most important outcomes of four randomised studies comparing conventional and hypofractionated radiotherapy schemes including a total of 7000 patients. These studies have not shown apparent differences in treatment efficacy, incidence of late post-radiotherapy complications or cosmetic effects during a 5-10 year follow-up, but longer observation is warranted to fully evaluate the safety of this method. Currently, major societies consider modestly hypofractionated radiotherapy schemes as a routine management in selected groups of patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery. However, this method should be used cautiously in patients with lymph node metastases, big breasts, receiving chemotherapy or trastuzumab, or those under 50 years of age.

  5. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Santam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Oinam, Arun Singh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm{sup 3}), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  6. [Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: dose prescription].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, M; Lartigau, E; Nataf, F; Mornex, F; Latorzeff, I; Lisbona, A; Mahé, M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planification method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planification/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO

  7. Measuring dose from radiotherapy treatments in the vicinity of a cardiac pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Peet, Samuel C; Wilks, Rachael; Kairn, Tanya; Crowe, Scott B

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the dose absorbed by tissues surrounding artificial cardiac pacemakers during external beam radiotherapy procedures. The usefulness of out-of-field reference data, treatment planning systems, and skin dose measurements to estimate the dose in the vicinity of a pacemaker was also examined. Measurements were performed by installing a pacemaker onto an anthropomorphic phantom, and using radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters to measure the dose in the vicinity of the device during the delivery of square fields and clinical treatment plans. It was found that the dose delivered in the vicinity of the cardiac device was unevenly distributed both laterally and anteroposteriorly. As the device was moved distally from the square field, the dose dropped exponentially, in line with out-of-field reference data in the literature. Treatment planning systems were found to substantially underestimate the dose for volumetric modulated arc therapy, helical tomotherapy, and 3D conformal treatments. The skin dose was observed to be either greater or lesser than the dose received at the depth of the device, depending on the treatment site, and so care should be if skin dose measurements are to be used to estimate the dose to a pacemaker. Square field reference data may be used as an upper estimate of absorbed dose per monitor unit in the vicinity of a cardiac device for complex treatments involving multiple gantry angles. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Big data, generalities and integration in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Poty, L; Noël, G

    2018-02-01

    The many advances in data collection computing systems (data collection, database, storage), diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities are responsible for an increase and a diversification of available data. Big data offers the capacities, in the field of health, to accelerate the discoveries and to optimize the management of patients by combining a large volume of data and the creation of therapeutic models. In radiotherapy, the development of big data is attractive because data are very numerous et heterogeneous (demographics, radiomics, genomics, radiogenomics, etc.). The expectation would be to predict the effectiveness and tolerance of radiation therapy. With these new concepts, still at the preliminary stage, it is possible to create a personalized medicine which is always more secure and reliable. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Monte Carlo verification of gel dosimetry measurements for stereotactic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Crowe, S. B.; Dunn, L.; Franich, R. D.; Kenny, J.; Knight, R. T.; Trapp, J. V.

    2012-06-01

    The quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments requires the use of small-field dose measurements that can be experimentally challenging. This study used Monte Carlo simulations to establish that PAGAT dosimetry gel can be used to provide accurate, high-resolution, three-dimensional dose measurements of stereotactic radiotherapy fields. A small cylindrical container (4 cm height, 4.2 cm diameter) was filled with PAGAT gel, placed in the parietal region inside a CIRS head phantom and irradiated with a 12-field stereotactic radiotherapy plan. The resulting three-dimensional dose measurement was read out using an optical CT scanner and compared with the treatment planning prediction of the dose delivered to the gel during the treatment. A BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc simulation of this treatment was completed, to provide a standard against which the accuracy of the gel measurement could be gauged. The three-dimensional dose distributions obtained from Monte Carlo and from the gel measurement were found to be in better agreement with each other than with the dose distribution provided by the treatment planning system's pencil beam calculation. Both sets of data showed close agreement with the treatment planning system's dose distribution through the centre of the irradiated volume and substantial disagreement with the treatment planning system at the penumbrae. The Monte Carlo calculations and gel measurements both indicated that the treated volume was up to 3 mm narrower, with steeper penumbrae and more variable out-of-field dose, than predicted by the treatment planning system. The Monte Carlo simulations allowed the accuracy of the PAGAT gel dosimeter to be verified in this case, allowing PAGAT gel to be utilized in the measurement of dose from stereotactic and other radiotherapy treatments, with greater confidence in the future. Experimental aspects of this work were originally presented at the Engineering and Physical Sciences in Medicine

  10. Radiotherapy and chemoradiation after surgery for early cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda; Siu, Shing Shun N; Luesley, David; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2009. There is an ongoing debate about the indications for, and value of, adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery in women with early cervical cancer. Certain combinations of pathological risk factors are thought to represent sufficient risk for recurrence, that they justify the use of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy, though this has never been shown to improve overall survival, and use of more than one type of treatment (surgery and radiotherapy) increases the risks of side effects and complications. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, chemoradiation) after radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer (FIGO stages IB1, IB2 or IIA). Search methods For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 4, 2008. The Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1950 to November 2008), EMBASE (1950 to November 2008). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. For this update, we extended the database searches to September 2011 and searched the MetaRegister for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, or chemoradiation) with no radiotherapy or chemoradiation, in women with a confirmed histological diagnosis of early cervical cancer who had undergone radical hysterectomy and dissection of the pelvic lymph nodes. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Information on grade 3 and 4 adverse events was collected from the trials. Results were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Main results Two RCTs

  11. Long-Term Outcomes of Radiotherapy for Pituitary Adenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Felicia E.; Amdur, Robert J. M.D.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term local control and toxicity for pituitary adenomas treated with fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The records of 100 patients with pituitary adenomas treated between 1983 and 2003 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-one patients had hormone-secreting tumors; 69 patients were treated with surgery and postoperative RT. Median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.6-20.2 years) for all patients and 6.2 years (range, 2-20.2 years) for living patients. The mean dose delivered was 45 Gy (range, 43-50.4 Gy). Results: The 10-year actuarial local control rates for nonsecreting and secreting adenomas were 98% and 73%, respectively (p 0.0015). Actuarial 10-yearmore » cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 95% and 88%, and overall survival rates were 66% and 79% for nonsecreting and secreting adenomas, respectively. Involvement of the sphenoid sinus was found to be significantly associated with decreased 10-year CSS (p = 0.0453). When compared with the two- or three-field techniques, stereotactic RT was associated with improved CSS (p = 0.0775). CSS was not significantly associated with hormone excretion, extent of surgery, or whether RT was administrated postoperatively or for salvage after a postsurgical recurrence. New cases of hypopituitarism occurred in 35 patients. One patient experienced vision loss, and one patient developed a post-treatment glioma. Conclusions: This is one of the most mature series in the literature that documents excellent results with fractionated RT for pituitary adenoma. We recommend 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction using stereotactic noncoplanar fields.« less

  12. Rectal Radiotherapy--Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Delivery, Delineation and Doses.

    PubMed

    Teoh, S; Muirhead, R

    2016-02-01

    The use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in rectal cancer is attractive in that it may reduce acute and late toxicities and potentially facilitate dose escalation. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy probably has a role in selected patients, but further investigation is required to identify the parameters for selection. Delineation of specific nodal groups allows maximal sparing of bladder and small bowel. In locally advanced tumours a simultaneous integrated boost allows dose escalation incorporating hypofractionation and a shorter overall treatment time. However, due to a sparsity of data on late toxicity in doses ≥ 60 Gy, doses at this level should be used with caution, ideally within prospective trials. Future studies investigating dose escalation must ascertain late toxicity as well as local control, as both can significantly affect quality of life and without both, the risk-benefit ratio cannot be calculated. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Frontal eye field, where art thou? Anatomy, function, and non-invasive manipulation of frontal regions involved in eye movements and associated cognitive operations

    PubMed Central

    Vernet, Marine; Quentin, Romain; Chanes, Lorena; Mitsumasu, Andres; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    The planning, control and execution of eye movements in 3D space relies on a distributed system of cortical and subcortical brain regions. Within this network, the Eye Fields have been described in animals as cortical regions in which electrical stimulation is able to trigger eye movements and influence their latency or accuracy. This review focuses on the Frontal Eye Field (FEF) a “hub” region located in Humans in the vicinity of the pre-central sulcus and the dorsal-most portion of the superior frontal sulcus. The straightforward localization of the FEF through electrical stimulation in animals is difficult to translate to the healthy human brain, particularly with non-invasive neuroimaging techniques. Hence, in the first part of this review, we describe attempts made to characterize the anatomical localization of this area in the human brain. The outcome of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), Magneto-encephalography (MEG) and particularly, non-invasive mapping methods such a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) are described and the variability of FEF localization across individuals and mapping techniques are discussed. In the second part of this review, we will address the role of the FEF. We explore its involvement both in the physiology of fixation, saccade, pursuit, and vergence movements and in associated cognitive processes such as attentional orienting, visual awareness and perceptual modulation. Finally in the third part, we review recent evidence suggesting the high level of malleability and plasticity of these regions and associated networks to non-invasive stimulation. The exploratory, diagnostic, and therapeutic interest of such interventions for the modulation and improvement of perception in 3D space are discussed. PMID:25202241

  14. Radiotherapy-induced thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Alterio, Daniela; Jassem, Jacek; Gibelli, Bianca; Tradati, Nicoletta; Orecchia, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    Despite their specific functional consequences, radiotherapy-induced thyroid abnormalities remain under-estimated and underreported. These sequelae may include primary or central hypothyroidism, thyroiditis, Graves' disease, euthyroid Graves' ophthalmopathy, benign adenomas, multinodular goitre and radiation-induced thyroid carcinoma. Primary hypothyroidism, the most common radiation-induced thyroid dysfunction, affects 20-30% of patients administered following curative radiotherapy to the neck region, with approximately half of the events occurring within the first 5 years after therapy. The relative risk of radiation-induced cancer (mainly well-differentiated tumours) is 15-53-fold higher than in non-irradiated population. The aetiology of radiation-induced thyroid injury includes vascular damage, parenchymal cell damage and auto-immune reactions. Total radiotherapy dose, irradiated volume of the thyroid gland, and the extent of prior thyroid resection are among the most important factors associated with the risk of hypothyroidism. The contribution of other treatment modalities (chemotherapy, endocrine therapy) as well as patient- and tumour-related factors is less clear. Reduction in radiation dose to the thyroid gland and hypothalamic/pituitary complex should be attempted whenever possible. New radiotherapy techniques, such as stereotactic radiosurgery, three-dimensional conformal irradiation, intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy allow generally better dose distribution with lower dose to the non-target organs. The diagnostic approach to thyroid radiation injury includes baseline thyroid function assays in all patients undergoing thyroid or parasellar irradiation. Recommended follow-up procedures include at least annual evaluation with a history for symptoms of thyroid dysfunction, clinical examination, and measurement of thyroid hormones and thyrotropin. Management of overt hypothyroidism is based on hormone replacement therapy. Thyroid hormone

  15. Radiotherapy capacity in European countries: an analysis of the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) database.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Izewska, Joanna; Anacak, Yavuz; Pynda, Yaroslav; Scalliet, Pierre; Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Radiotherapy is used for cure or palliation in around half of patients with cancer. We analysed data on radiotherapy equipment in 33 European countries registered in the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) database, managed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. As of July, 2012, Europe had 1286 active radiotherapy centres. The average number of teletherapy machines per radiotherapy centre ranged from 1·2 to 7·0 in different countries. Nordic countries, the UK, the Netherlands, and Slovenia all have large centres with four to ten teletherapy machines. Most western and southern European countries have several small centres with one or two machines, with few larger centres. The fragmentation in radiotherapy services that prevails in many European countries might affect the economic burden of radiotherapy and its quality. Eastern and southeastern European countries need to expand and modernise their radiotherapy equipment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CHOP-VP16 chemotherapy and involved field irradiation for high grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: a phase II multicentre study.

    PubMed Central

    Köppler, H.; Pflüger, K. H.; Eschenbach, I.; Pfab, R.; Lennert, K.; Wellens, W.; Schmidt, M.; Gassel, W. D.; Kolb, T.; Hässler, R.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty previously untreated patients with high grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas stages II-IV received cyclophosphamide 750 mg m2 i.v., doxorubicin 50 mg m2 i.v., and vincristine 2 mg i.v. on day 1, prednisolone 100 mg p.o. on days 1-5 and etoposide 100 mg m2 i.v. on days 3-5 (CHOP-VP16). After four courses an involved field irradiation with a total dose of 25 Gy was employed and followed by two additional courses of CHOP-VP16. The overall response rate was 93%, with 49 patients (82%) achieving a complete remission (CR). Seven patients had a partial response and four patients showed no response. During a median follow-up period of 55 months, 22 of the 49 patients with CR relapsed, seven of them achieving a second complete remission with the same drug regimen. A maintained complete remission of up to 68 months was seen in 55% of all patients initially achieving CR. The median survival is 43 months. Mean side-effects of this drug regimen were alopecia (89%), nausea/vomiting (76%) and leukopenia (61%). No therapy-related deaths were seen. The results of this study demonstrate that this combined modality treatment produces high complete remission rates and that more than half of these patients achieve long-term disease-free survival. PMID:2679846

  17. [Patients' coping strategies during radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Lorencetti, Ariane; Simonetti, Janete Pessuto

    2005-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that entails inquiries and a wide range of problems for persons going through this experience, inevitably leading to stress, which is part of human life. There are different ways of adapting to a situation to cope with the stress. What makes a difference in this context are the coping strategies, defined as a process used to control the demands of the relationship between individual and environment, to be elaborated by the individual. In this study, we tried to identify the forms used to cope with the disease and treatment. This is a qualitative study, using Collective Subject Discourse Analysis and the theoretical framework of coping. Sixteen radiotherapy patients were interviewed as part of a convenience sample. When faced with cancer and radiotherapy, the patients elaborated coping strategies that were based on emotion as well as on the problem.

  18. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Abouaf, Lucie; Girard, Nicolas; Claude Bernard University, Lyon

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were comparedmore » with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.« less

  19. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk estimates due to radiotherapy for benign pigmented villonodular synovitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2016-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign disease affecting synovial membranes of young and middle-aged adults. The aggressive treatment of this disorder often involves external-beam irradiation. This study was motivated by the lack of data relating to the radiation exposure of healthy tissues and radiotherapy-induced cancer risk. Monte Carlo methodology was employed to simulate a patient’s irradiation for PVNS in the knee and hip joints with a 6 MV photon beam. The average radiation dose received by twenty-two out-of-field critical organs of the human body was calculated. These calculations were combined with the appropriate organ-, age- and gender-specific risk coefficients of the BEIR-VII model to estimate the lifetime probability of cancer development. The risk for carcinogenesis to colon, which was partly included in the treatment fields used for hip irradiation, was determined with a non-linear mechanistic model and differential dose-volume histograms obtained by CT-based 3D radiotherapy planning. Risk assessments were compared with the nominal lifetime intrinsic risk (LIR) values. Knee irradiation to 36 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 0.2-24.6 mGy. The corresponding range from hip radiotherapy was 1.2-455.1 mGy whereas the organ equivalent dose for the colon was up to 654.9 mGy. The organ-specific cancer risks from knee irradiation for PVNS were found to be inconsequential since they were at least 161.5 times lower than the LIRs irrespective of the patient’s age and gender. The bladder and colon cancer risk from radiotherapy in the hip joint was up to 3.2 and 6.6 times smaller than the LIR, respectively. These cancer risks may slightly elevate the nominal incidence rates and they should not be ignored during the patient’s treatment planning and follow-up. The probabilities for developing any other solid tumor were more than 20 times lower than the LIRs and, therefore, they may be considered as small.

  20. Neurocognitive Effects of Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Gy) 64 (50.4-79.2) 54 (54) Laterality Midline 3 1 Right 0 2 Left 1 1 Location* Base of Skull 4 1 Frontal Lobe 0 2 Temporal Lobe 0 1 Parietal... Lobe 0 1 Local Control 100% 100% Overall Survival 100% 100% Table 1. Patient Characteristics.*Radiation targets involving one or more...0%) 3656.3 (0%) Left Temporal Lobe 6665.9 (50%) 3540.7 (0%) Right Temporal Lobe 6159.0 (50%) 4157.9 (0%) Brainstem 6122.1 (0

  1. Trajectory optimization in radiotherapy using sectioning (TORUS).

    PubMed

    Locke, Christopher Barry; Bush, Karl Kenneth

    2017-07-01

    A challenging problem in trajectory optimization for radiotherapy is properly handling the synchronization of the medical accelerators dynamic delivery. The initial coarse sampling of control points implemented in a Progressive Resolution Optimization type approach (VMAT) routinely results in MLC aperture forming contention issues as the sampling resolution increases. This work presents an approach to optimize continuous, beam-on radiation trajectories through exploration of the anatomical topology present in the patient and formation of a novel dual-metric graph optimization problem. This work presents a new perspective on trajectory optimization in radiotherapy using the concept of sectioning (TORUS). TORUS avoids degradation of 3D dose optimization quality by mapping the connectedness of target regions from the BEV perspective throughout the space of deliverable coordinates. This connectedness information is then incorporated into a graph optimization problem to define ideal trajectories. The unique usage of two distance functions in this graph optimization permits the TORUS algorithm to generate efficient dynamic trajectories for delivery while maximizing the angular flux through all PTV voxels. 3D dose optimization is performed for trajectories using a commercial TPS progressive resolution optimizer. The TORUS algorithm is applied to three example treatments: chest wall, scalp, and the TG-119 C-shape phantom. When static collimator coplanar trajectories are generated for the chest wall and scalp cases, the TORUS trajectories are found to outperform both 7 field IMRT and 2 arc VMAT plans in delivery time, organ at risk sparing, conformality, and homogeneity. For the TG-119 phantom, when static couch and collimator non-coplanar trajectories are optimized, TORUS trajectories have superior sparing of the central core avoidance with shorter delivery times, with similar dose conformality and homogeneity. The TORUS algorithm is able to automatically generate

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  3. Particle Accelerators for Radiotherapy:. Present Status and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciszewski, Wieslaw; Scharf, Waldemar

    2004-07-01

    The paper describes the development of the application of particle accelerators in the treatment of cancer diseases over the past fifty years. Special emphasis is put on the routine application of conventional electron accelerators delivering electron and photon beams. This is the largest group of devices for radiotherapy (over 7500 machines operating worldwide). The number of patients reaches 5 million per year. The medical electron linacs have recently undergone considerable modifications of construction, in particular the systems of radiation field shaping. Contemporary accelerators for radiotherapy are equipped with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) which, in conjunction with IMRT (Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy) technique and special system of therapy planning, assure considerably higher precision, effectiveness and quality of treatment.

  4. The potential effectiveness of nanoparticles as radio sensitizers for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Mohammad; Ganjalikhani, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Application of nanoparticles as radio sensitizer is a promising field to improve efficiency of radiotherapy. Methods: This study was conducted to review nano radio sensitizers. PubMed, Ovid Medline, Science Direct, Scopus, ISI web of knowledge, and Springer databases were searched from 2000 to May 2013 to identify relevant studies. Search was restricted to English language. Results: We included any study that evaluated nanoparticles, volunteer of radio enhancement at radiotherapy on animals or cell lines. Nanoparticles can increase radio sensitivity of tumor cells. This effect was shown in vivo and in vitro, at kilovltage or megavoltage energies, in 24 reviewed studies. Focus of studies was on gold nanoparticles. Radio sensitizing effects of nanoparticles depend on nanoparticles’ size, type, concentration, intracellular localization, used irradiation energy and tested cell line. Conclusion: Literature suggests potency of nanoparticles for increasing cell radio sensitivity. Reviewed results are promising and warrant future clinical trials. PMID:24790894

  5. Image Guided Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is currently one of the most active research fields in medical physics. The recent development of high precision dose delivery techniques with high energy photon and hadron beams can only be fully exploited if we confidently know the shape and location of radiation targets and the organs at risk at the time of the treatment. Most of the time, anatomical images of the patient were only acquired for the purpose of diagnosis and treatment planning usually days before the treatment planning process, i.e., the patient anatomy was assumed to be static in time. As a result, all time dependent variations of relevant anatomical structures, like shifts and deformations of tissues in time, for instance also caused by the radiation treatment, were not accounted for and therefore are a significant source of potential treatment errors. We briefly describe the basic concepts and technology employed in current IGRT practice.

  6. Integrin β1 subunit signaling is involved in the directed migration of human retinal pigment epithelial cells following electric field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Yan, Xiao-Long; Han, Quan-Hong; Li, Yang-Jun; Du, Zhao-Jiang; Hui, Yan-Nian

    2011-01-01

    Direct current electric fields (EFs) can induce directed cell migration in a wide variety of cells, and this has been proven to be of importance in wound healing. Here we observed the effects of EFs on cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and explored the possible involvement of integrin β1 subunit signaling in the process. Cultured human RPE cells were exposed to an EF at 5 V/cm for 3 h. The rate and directionality of cell migration were quantified. The distribution of integrin β1 subunit was measured by immunohistochemistry and the expression of integrin β1 subunit and phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was determined by PCR and Western blotting. Experiments were performed in the presence or absence of anti-integrin β1 subunit antibody. During exposure to an EF at 5 V/cm for 3 h, the separated human RPE cells and wounded RPE monolayer demonstrated a cathodal-directed migration. The distribution of integrin β1 subunit in the cells was also polarized to the cathode, and the expression in mRNA and its protein level were obviously increased. Furthermore, exposure to EFs of 5 V/cm triggered the phosphorylation of FAK in human RPE cells. In contrast, blocking of integrin β1 subunit suppressed the directed migration of RPE cells and reduced the activation of FAK in EFs. These findings indicate that EF exposure results in directed migration of the separated RPE cells and RPE monolayer. These effects may partially act through the activation of integrin β1 subunit signaling. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James R.

    2002-04-30

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

  8. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

  9. A Kindler syndrome-associated squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Ademar; Trinca, William Correia; Flores, Thais Pires; Costa, Andrea Barleze; Brito, Claudio de Sá; Weigert, Karen Loureiro; Matos, Maryana Schwartzhaupt; Nicolini, Carmela; Obst, Fernando Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Kindler syndrome1, 2 is a genetic disorder mainly characterized by increased skin fragility and photosensitivity,3, 4 making the use of treatments based on radiation difficult or even prohibited. Thus, cases reporting Kindler syndrome patients treated with radiotherapy are rare. In this study, we report clinical outcomes and care provided for a rare case of a Kindler syndrome patient submitted to radiotherapy. Diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma involving the buccal mucosa, the patient was exclusively treated with radiotherapy, with 70 Gy delivered on the PTV with the Volumetric Modulated Arc technique. The patient's reaction regarding control of the lesion is relevant compared to patients not affected by the syndrome. We noticed acute reactions of the skin and buccal mucosa after few radiotherapy sessions, followed by a fast reduction in the tumor volume. The efficacy of radiotherapy along with multidisciplinary actions allowed treatment continuity, leading to a complete control of the lesion and life quality improvement and showed that the use of radiotherapy on Kindler syndrome patients is possible.

  10. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tajaldeen, A; Ramachandran, P; Geso, M

    2015-06-15

    of algorithms in lung cancer radiotherapy involving small fields. However, further investigation by Monte Carlo simulation is required to confirm our results.« less

  11. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tajaldeen, A; Ramachandran, P; Geso, M

    2015-06-15

    algorithms in lung cancer radiotherapy involving small fields. However, further investigation by Monte Carlo simulation is required to confirm our results.

  12. Development of online quality assurance automation tool "SmartQC" for radiotherapy clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaks, Daniel

    Radiotherapy has existed as a clinical medical procedure since as early as 1900, and has become an essential component of modern hospitals. It is predicted that, sometime between the years 2010 and 2020, the number of patients receiving radiation therapy during their initial treatment is expected to rise by 22% from 470,000 per year to 575,000 per year Due to the potential for harm in radiotherapy, quality assurance is an essential element at every stage of modern clinical workflow. The quality and use of time in QA procedures and checks is an important issue that has significant impact on both practice and research in the field of radiotherapy. This thesis documents the results of development and results of tools addressing that question. While the motivation for radiotherapy QA is principally about improving quality of patient care, and developing radiotherapy research tools, we also discuss the relevance of QA to radiotherapy malpractice lawsuits and related financial costs. We show that in the treatment plan check performed by the medical physicist---also known as the second check or physics check---a substantial fraction (~33%) of the average time is spent on non-physics related analysis. We also demonstrate the development and implementation of a web-based system, referred to as PlanTracker within this thesis, to track the status of the plan. This thesis concludes with further developments being considered as an outgrowth of this system.

  13. Investigating the influence of respiratory motion on the radiation induced bystander effect in modulated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Aidan J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory motion introduces complex spatio-temporal variations in the dosimetry of radiotherapy and may contribute towards uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. This study investigates the potential radiobiological implications occurring due to tumour motion in areas of geometric miss in lung cancer radiotherapy. A bespoke phantom and motor-driven platform to replicate respiratory motion and study the consequences on tumour cell survival in vitro was constructed. Human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and H1299 were irradiated in modulated radiotherapy configurations in the presence and absence of respiratory motion. Clonogenic survival was calculated for irradiated and shielded regions. Direction of motion, replication of dosimetry by multi-leaf collimator (MLC) manipulation and oscillating lead shielding were investigated to confirm differences in cell survival. Respiratory motion was shown to significantly increase survival for out-of-field regions for H460/H1299 cell lines when compared with static irradiation (p < 0.001). Significantly higher survival was found in the in-field region for the H460 cell line (p < 0.030). Oscillating lead shielding also produced these significant differences. Respiratory motion and oscillatory delivery of radiation dose to human tumour cells has a significant impact on in- and out-of-field survival in the presence of non-uniform irradiation in this in vitro set-up. This may have important radiobiological consequences for modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer.

  14. How to use PET/CT in the evaluation of response to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Decazes, Pierre; Thureau, Sébastien; Dubray, Bernard; Vera, Pierre

    2017-11-28

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality for many cancers. Tumor response after radiotherapy determines the subsequent steps of the patient's management (surveillance, adjuvant or salvage treatment and palliative care). Tumor response assessed during radiotherapy offers a promising opportunity to adapt the treatment plan to reduced / increased target volume, to specifically target sub-volumes with relevant biological characteristics (metabolism, hypoxia, proliferation ...) and to further spare the organs at risk. In addition to its role in the diagnosis and the initial staging, Positron Emission Tomography combined with a Computed Tomography (PET/CT) provides functional information and is therefore attractive to evaluate tumor response. To review the published data addressing PET/CT as an evaluation tool in irradiated tumors. Reports on PET/CT acquired at various times (during radiotherapy, after initial (chemo-)radiotherapy, after definitive radiotherapy and during posttreatment follow-up) in solid tumors (lung, head-and-neck, cervix, esophagus, prostate and rectum) were collected and reviewed. Various tracers and technical are also discussed. 18F-FDG PET/CT has a well-established role in clinical routine after definitive chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancers. 18F-choline PET/CT is indicated in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure. 18F-FDG PET/CT is optional in many others circumstances and the clinical benefits of assessing tumor response with PET/CT remain a field of very active research. The combination of PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) may prove to be valuable in irradiated rectal and cervix cancers. Tumor response can be evaluated by PET/CT with clinical consequences in multiple situations, notably in head and neck and prostate cancers, after radiotherapy. Further clinical evaluation for most cancers is still needed, possibly in association to MRI.

  15. Axillary radiotherapy in conservative surgery for early-stage breast cancer (stage I and II).

    PubMed

    García Novoa, Alejandra; Acea Nebril, Benigno; Díaz, Inma; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; Varela, Cristina; Cereijo, Carmen; Mosquera Oses, Joaquín; López Calviño, Beatriz; Seoane Pillado, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies analyze axillary treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer because of changes in the indication for axillary lymph node dissection. The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of axillary radiotherapy in disease-free and overall survival in women with early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy. Retrospective study in women with initial stages of breast carcinoma treated by lumpectomy. A comparative analysis of high-risk women with axillary lymph node involvement who received axillary radiotherapy with the group of women with low risk without radiotherapy was performed. Logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing survival and lymphedema onset. A total of 541 women were included in the study: 384 patients (71%) without axillary lymph node involvement and 157 women (29%) with 1-3 axillary lymph node involvement. Patients with axillary radiotherapy had a higher number of metastatic lymph node compared to non-irradiated (1.6±0.7 vs. 1.4±0.6, P=.02). The group of women with axillary lymph node involvement and radiotherapy showed an overall and disease-free survival at 10 years similar to that obtained in patients without irradiation (89.7% and 77.2%, respectively). 3 lymph nodes involved multiplied by more than 7 times the risk of death (HR=7.20; 95% CI: 1.36 to 38.12). The multivariate analysis showed axillary lymph node dissection as the only variable associated with the development of lymphedema. The incidence of axillary relapse on stage I and II breast cancer is rare. In these patients axillary radiotherapy does not improve overall survival, but contributes to regional control in those patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Radiotherapy promises: focus on lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Jouin, Anaïs; Durand-Labrunie, Jérôme; Leroy, Thomas; Pannier, Diane; Wagner, Antoine; Rault, Erwan; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a key cancer treatment, which greatly modified its practice in recent years thanks to medical imaging and technical improvements. The systematic use of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning, the imaging fusion/co-registration between CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT/positron emission tomography (PET) improve target identification/selection and delineation. New irradiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy or hadron therapy offer a more diverse therapeutic armamentarium to patients together with lower toxicity. Radiotherapy, as well as medical oncology, tends to offer a personalized treatment to patients thanks to the IGRT, which takes into account the inter- or intra-fraction anatomic variations. IGRT leads to adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a new planification in the treatment course in order to decrease toxicity and improve tumor control. The use of systemic therapies with radiations needs to be studied in order to improve efficiency without increasing toxicities from these multimodal approaches. Finally, radiotherapy advances were impacted by radiotherapy accidents like Epinal. They led to an increased quality control with the intensification of identity control, the emergence of in vivo dosimetry or the experience feedback committee in radiotherapy. We will illustrate through the example of lung cancer.

  17. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma following radiotherapy in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, A.; Seidman, D.S.; Trau, H.; Tsur, H. )

    1991-04-01

    A 36-year-old man was treated by radiotherapy for tinea capitis many years before discovery of microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC). Because of patient's refusal of any surgical intervention, we were able to follow the natural course of this tumor for 13 years. This case emphasizes the typical slow development of (MAC). The implication of the association of MAC and radiotherapy are discussed.

  18. Radiotherapy for Tracheal-Bronchial Cystic Adenoid Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Levy, A; Omeiri, A; Fadel, E; Le Péchoux, C

    2018-01-01

    Primary tracheal-bronchial adenoid cystic carcinoma (thoracic adenoid cystic carcinoma; TACC) is a rare and aggressive malignant tumour. Radiotherapy results have not been previously individualised in this setting. Records of 31 patients with TACC (74% tracheal and 26% bronchial) who received radiotherapy between February 1984 and September 2014 were retrospectively analysed. Surgical removal of the primary tumour was carried out for most (71%) patients, and 13/22 (59%) had R1 or R2 (1/22) margins. The mean tumour size was 4.1 cm, 10 (32%) had associated lymph node involvement and 13 (41%) had perineural invasion (PNI). Adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy were delivered for 22 (71%) and nine patients, respectively. The mean delivered dose was 62 Gy (40-70 Gy) and eight patients had a radiotherapy boost (mean 19 Gy, range 9-30 Gy, two with endobronchial brachytherapy). At a median follow-up of 5.7 years, the 5 year overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 88% and 61%, respectively. There were three local relapses and 10 metastatic relapses (mean delay 3.2 years), resulting in 5 year local and metastatic relapse rates of 10% and 26%, respectively. The prognostic factors in the univariate analysis for both decreased overall survival and PFS were: age ≥50 years (hazard ratio 6.2 and 3.8) and the presence of PNI (hazard ratio 10.3 and 4.1); and for PFS only: a radiotherapy dose ≤ 60 Gy (hazard ratio 3.1). Late toxicities were: tracheotomy due to symptomatic tracheal stenosis (n = 5), G3 dyspnoea (n = 4), hypothyroidism (n = 5) and pericarditis (n = 4). Radiotherapy dose may affect local control and the presence of PNI should be considered as an adverse prognostic factor. TACC irradiation conferred good local control rates, when comparing these results with historical series. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparative study on the risk of second primary cancers in out-of-field organs associated with radiotherapy of localized prostate carcinoma using Monte Carlo-based accelerator and patient models

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Bryan; Athar, Basit; Xu, X. George

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: A physician's decision regarding an ideal treatment approach (i.e., radiation, surgery, and/or hormonal) for prostate carcinoma is traditionally based on a variety of metrics. One of these metrics is the risk of radiation-induced second primary cancer following radiation treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of second cancer risks in out-of-field organs from 3D-CRT and IMRT treatments of prostate carcinoma compared to baseline cancer risks in these organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a detailed medical linear accelerator model and an anatomically realistic adult male whole-body phantom. A four-field box treatment, a four-fieldmore » box treatment plus a six-field boost, and a seven-field IMRT treatment were simulated. Using BEIR VII risk models, the age-dependent lifetime attributable risks to various organs outside the primary beam with a known predilection for cancer were calculated using organ-averaged equivalent doses. Results: The four-field box treatment had the lowest treatment-related second primary cancer risks to organs outside the primary beam ranging from 7.3x10{sup -9} to 2.54x10{sup -5}%/MU depending on the patients age at exposure and second primary cancer site. The risks to organs outside the primary beam from the four-field box and six-field boost and the seven-field IMRT were nearly equivalent. The risks from the four-field box and six-field boost ranged from 1.39x10{sup -8} to 1.80x10{sup -5}%/MU, and from the seven-field IMRT ranged from 1.60x10{sup -9} to 1.35x10{sup -5}%/MU. The second cancer risks in all organs considered from each plan were below the baseline risks. Conclusions: The treatment-related second cancer risks in organs outside the primary beam due to 3D-CRT and IMRT is small. New risk assessment techniques need to be investigated to address the concern of radiation-induced second cancers from prostate treatments, particularly focusing on risks to organs inside

  20. Imaging for new radiotherapy techniques

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Radiotherapy could be considerably improved by the recent development of three-dimensional intensity-modulated radiation therapy. This technique allows the concept of so-called dose painting or adaptive dose distribution to be implemented with improved aligning of the dose distribution along the complex geometric arrangements of the tumour and the surround healthy critical structures. This enables the radiation dose in the tumour to be increasingly enhanced while sparing the normal tissue. Furthermore, many subfields enable the dose distribution within the tumour to be varied considering local differences in the functional tumour characteristics. Tumour heterogeneity or even variations in tumour volume and viability during radiotherapy may be considered. However, the success of the treatment increasingly depends on the capability of oncologic imaging tools to precisely localize and delineate the tumour and to provide information about its functional heterogeneity. The challenge in oncologic imaging is to improve and further develop novel concepts for precise tumour delineation and characterization. Important achievements in biologic imaging with morphologic functional computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT have the potential to modify the delineation of target volumes and to increase the dose in selected subvolumes. For example, novel PET markers of tumour hypoxia or proliferation have been developed for functional characterization of various tumour entities. Information from several other modalities such as dual energy CT, functional MRI (dynamic contract-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, arterial spin labelling, magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), etc.) as well as from novel technological advances such as MR/PET may also be integrated in the radiotherapy plan. Data postprocessing with precise spatial coregistration of multimodal morphologic and functional imaging data as

  1. Orbital involvement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Skinnider, L F; Romanchuk, K G

    1984-04-01

    In a 68-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia diagnosed on the basis of peripheral lymphocytosis, marked bilateral exophthalmos developed owing to massive orbital involvement by the disease. At the time there was no lymphadenopathy or evidence of organ infiltration. The response to radiotherapy was excellent. Orbital involvement is rare as an early clinical feature of chronic lymphocytic leukemia but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bilateral exophthalmos in adults.

  2. [Which rules apply to hypofractionated radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Clément-Colmou, K; Paris, F; Corre, I; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy is now more widely prescribed due to improved targeting techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy). Low dose hypofractionated radiotherapy is routinely administered mostly for palliative purposes. High or very high dose hypofractionated irradiation must be delivered according to very strict procedures since every minor deviation can lead to major changes in dose delivery to the tumor volume and organs at risk. Thus, each stage of the processing must be carefully monitored starting from the limitations and the choice of the hypofractionation technique, tumour contouring and dose constraints prescription, planning and finally dose calculation and patient positioning verification. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ruella, Marco; Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab coursesmore » (375 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.« less

  4. Dosimetry audit simulation of treatment planning system in multicenters radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasmuri, S.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Treatment Planning System (TPS) is an important modality that determines radiotherapy outcome. TPS requires input data obtained through commissioning and the potentially error occurred. Error in this stage may result in the systematic error. The aim of this study to verify the TPS dosimetry to know deviation range between calculated and measurement dose. This study used CIRS phantom 002LFC representing the human thorax and simulated all external beam radiotherapy stages. The phantom was scanned using CT Scanner and planned 8 test cases that were similar to those in clinical practice situation were made, tested in four radiotherapy centers. Dose measurement using 0.6 cc ionization chamber. The results of this study showed that generally, deviation of all test cases in four centers was within agreement criteria with average deviation about -0.17±1.59 %, -1.64±1.92 %, 0.34±1.34 % and 0.13±1.81 %. The conclusion of this study was all TPS involved in this study showed good performance. The superposition algorithm showed rather poor performance than either analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and convolution algorithm with average deviation about -1.64±1.92 %, -0.17±1.59 % and -0.27±1.51 % respectively.

  5. Special radiobiological features of second cancer risk after particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2017-10-01

    order to investigate the RBE of induction of cancer from exposure to neutrons compared to photons. Since out-of-field "effective" neutron doses from proton therapy are smaller than the photon stray doses whichever reasonable RBE is chosen for comparison, and since the absolute risk of radiation-induced second cancer rates are in the order of 1% in the cohorts of adult patients who have been treated in the past with methods which caused relatively high out-of-field doses to large body volumes, it is highly unlikely that such patients treated in future with highly conformal particle therapy are at a higher radiation-induced second cancer risk than those patients treated with photons and described before. Still, the potential risks of second cancers from scattered proton radiotherapy for childhood cancers may cause concern. Yet, the overall risk of undesired consequences of radiation exposure of children which are more complex and manifold than in adult patients (including developmental, neurocognitive, hormonal and growth impairment effects) are likely to be very much reduced by the better focussing of the radiation dose in the target offered by particle radioherapy. This benefit may far outweigh the still hypothetical second cancer risk from particle radiotherapy in pediatric radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Applications of reactor physics methods to radiotherapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.

    1997-12-01

    The general optimization of a radiotherapy plan is to maximize the dose in the malignant tissue and minimize it in the healthy. This implies the formidable task of optimizing a functional of the radiation field described by the seven variables of space, energy, direction, and time. Different names are used in the medical profession to refer to the problem: two- or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, in general; tomotherapy, for a beam that moves around the patient in a spiral trajectory; stereotactic radiosurgery, for a one-time irradiation of a brain tumor; and stereotactic radiotherapy, for a fractioned irradiation of a brain tumor.more » The problem, in a restrictive sense with fewer variables, is not new. Currently, the selection of the best set of beams for a particular patient is determined by an iterative procedure that includes in each step the calculation of a three-dimensional dose for each beam configuration. Each step of the iteration generally relies on semiempirical methods that are fast but approximately correct.« less

  7. The development of accurate and high quality radiotherapy treatment delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Susan E.

    Accurate radiotherapy delivery is required for curing cancer. Historical radiotherapy accuracy studies at Leeds (1983-1991) are discussed in context of when radiographers were not involved in practice design. The seminal research was unique in being led by a radiographer practitioner, and in prospectively studying the accuracy of different techniques within one department. The viability of alignment of treatment beams with marks painted on a patient's skin varied daily, and, using film I showed that the alignment of treatment on anatomy varied. I then led 6 sequential studies with collaborating oncologists. Unique outcomes were in identifying the origins of treatment inaccuracies, implementing and evidencing changes in multi-disciplinary practice, thus improving accuracy and reproducibility generally and achieving accuracy for the pelvis to within current norms. Innovations included: discontinuation of painted skin marks and developing whole-body patient positioning using lasers, tattoos, and standardised supports; unification of set-up conditions through planning and treatment; planning normal tissue margins round target tissue to allow for inaccuracies (1985); improved manual shielding methods, changed equipment usage, its quality assurance and design; influenced the development of portal imaging and image analysis. Consequences and current implications. The research, still cited internationally, contributed to clinical management of lymphoma, and critically underpins contemporary practice. It led to my becoming the first radiographer invited into multi-disciplinary collaborative work, to advise in the first multi-centre clinical trials to consider treatment delivery accuracy, contribute to books written from within other disciplines and inform guidelines for good practice so helping to improve practices, with recent publications. I thus led my profession into research activity. Later work included development of a national staffing formula for radiotherapy

  8. Increased stomach cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hauptmann, M; Fossa, S D; Stovall, M; van Leeuwen, F E; Johannesen, T B; Rajaraman, P; Gilbert, E S; Smith, S A; Weathers, R E; Aleman, B M P; Andersson, M; Curtis, R E; Dores, G M; Fraumeni, J F; Hall, P; Holowaty, E J; Joensuu, H; Kaijser, M; Kleinerman, R A; Langmark, F; Lynch, C F; Pukkala, E; Storm, H H; Vaalavirta, L; van den Belt-Dusebout, A W; Travis, L B; Morton, L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal radiotherapy for testicular cancer (TC) increases risk for second stomach cancer, although data on the radiation dose–response relationship are sparse. Methods: In a cohort of 22 269 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1959–1987, doses to stomach subsites were estimated for 92 patients who developed stomach cancer and 180 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results: Cumulative incidence of second primary stomach cancer was 1.45% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. The TC survivors who received radiotherapy (87 (95%) cases, 151 (84%) controls) had a 5.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7–20.7) increased risk of stomach cancer. Risk increased with increasing stomach dose (P-trend<0.001), with an OR of 20.5 (3.7–114.3) for ⩾50.0 Gy compared with <10 Gy. Radiation-related risks remained elevated ⩾20 years after exposure (P<0.001). Risk after any chemotherapy was not elevated (OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.5–2.5; 14 cases and 23 controls). Conclusions: Radiotherapy for TC involving parts of the stomach increased gastric cancer risk for several decades, with the highest risks after stomach doses of ⩾30 Gy. Clinicians should be aware of these excesses when previously irradiated TC survivors present with gastrointestinal symptoms and when any radiotherapy is considered in newly diagnosed TC patients. PMID:25349972

  9. Radiotherapy dosimetry audit: three decades of improving standards and accuracy in UK clinical practice and trials

    PubMed Central

    Aird, Edwin GA; Bolton, Steve; Miles, Elizabeth A; Nisbet, Andrew; Snaith, Julia AD; Thomas, Russell AS; Venables, Karen; Thwaites, David I

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetry audit plays an important role in the development and safety of radiotherapy. National and large scale audits are able to set, maintain and improve standards, as well as having the potential to identify issues which may cause harm to patients. They can support implementation of complex techniques and can facilitate awareness and understanding of any issues which may exist by benchmarking centres with similar equipment. This review examines the development of dosimetry audit in the UK over the past 30 years, including the involvement of the UK in international audits. A summary of audit results is given, with an overview of methodologies employed and lessons learnt. Recent and forthcoming more complex audits are considered, with a focus on future needs including the arrival of proton therapy in the UK and other advanced techniques such as four-dimensional radiotherapy delivery and verification, stereotactic radiotherapy and MR linear accelerators. The work of the main quality assurance and auditing bodies is discussed, including how they are working together to streamline audit and to ensure that all radiotherapy centres are involved. Undertaking regular external audit motivates centres to modernize and develop techniques and provides assurance, not only that radiotherapy is planned and delivered accurately but also that the patient dose delivered is as prescribed. PMID:26329469

  10. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  11. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  12. Proton radiotherapy for pediatric central nervous system ependymoma: clinical outcomes for 70 patients

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Sethi, Roshan; Lavally, Beverly; Yeap, Beow Y.; Marcus, Karen J.; Caruso, Paul; Pulsifer, Margaret; Huang, Mary; Ebb, David; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ependymoma is treated with maximal surgical resection and localized radiotherapy. Minimizing unnecessary exposure to radiation is of paramount importance for young children. Proton radiotherapy (PRT) spares healthy tissues outside the target region, but reports of clinical outcomes are scarce. We report outcomes for 70 patients treated with PRT for intracranial ependymoma. Methods Seventy patients with localized ependymoma treated with involved-field PRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between October 2000 and February 2011 were included. Results Median age at diagnosis was 38 months (range, 3 mo–20 y). Nineteen (27%) patients had supratentorial ependymoma and 51(73%) had infratentorial ependymoma. Forty-six (66%) had gross total resection (GTR), and 24 (34%) had subtotal resection (STR). At a median follow-up of 46 months, 3-year local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 83%, 76%, and 95%, respectively. STR was significantly associated with worse progression-free survival (54% vs 88%, P = .001) and overall survival (90% vs 97% for GTR, P = .001). In a subset of patients (n = 14), mean intelligence was 108.5 at baseline and 111.3 after mean 2.05 years of follow-up. In a larger group of patients (n = 28), overall adaptive skills were 100.1 at baseline and 100.8 after 2.21 years of follow-up. Few patients developed evidence of growth hormone deficiency, hypothyroidism, or hearing loss. Conclusion Outcomes for children treated with PRT compare favorably with the literature. STR correlated with inferior outcome. The young age at diagnosis and the proximity of critical structures in patients with ependymoma make PRT an ideal radiation modality. PMID:24101739

  13. Proton radiotherapy for pediatric central nervous system ependymoma: clinical outcomes for 70 patients.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Shannon M; Sethi, Roshan; Lavally, Beverly; Yeap, Beow Y; Marcus, Karen J; Caruso, Paul; Pulsifer, Margaret; Huang, Mary; Ebb, David; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I

    2013-11-01

    Ependymoma is treated with maximal surgical resection and localized radiotherapy. Minimizing unnecessary exposure to radiation is of paramount importance for young children. Proton radiotherapy (PRT) spares healthy tissues outside the target region, but reports of clinical outcomes are scarce. We report outcomes for 70 patients treated with PRT for intracranial ependymoma. Seventy patients with localized ependymoma treated with involved-field PRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between October 2000 and February 2011 were included. Median age at diagnosis was 38 months (range, 3 mo-20 y). Nineteen (27%) patients had supratentorial ependymoma and 51(73%) had infratentorial ependymoma. Forty-six (66%) had gross total resection (GTR), and 24 (34%) had subtotal resection (STR). At a median follow-up of 46 months, 3-year local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 83%, 76%, and 95%, respectively. STR was significantly associated with worse progression-free survival (54% vs 88%, P = .001) and overall survival (90% vs 97% for GTR, P = .001). In a subset of patients (n = 14), mean intelligence was 108.5 at baseline and 111.3 after mean 2.05 years of follow-up. In a larger group of patients (n = 28), overall adaptive skills were 100.1 at baseline and 100.8 after 2.21 years of follow-up. Few patients developed evidence of growth hormone deficiency, hypothyroidism, or hearing loss. Outcomes for children treated with PRT compare favorably with the literature. STR correlated with inferior outcome. The young age at diagnosis and the proximity of critical structures in patients with ependymoma make PRT an ideal radiation modality.

  14. Randomized Clinical Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Radiotherapy in Primary Mediastinal Large B-Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Aviles, Agustin, E-mail: agustin.aviles@imss.gob.mx; Neri, Natividad; Fernandez, Raul

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We developed a controlled clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant-involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) in patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma that achieved complete response after the patients were treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab (R-CHOP-14). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and June 2004, 124 consecutive patients who were in complete remission after dose dense chemotherapy and rituximab administration (R-CHOP14) were randomly assigned to received IFRT (30 Gy). Sixty-three patients received IFR, and 61 patients did not (control group). Results: The study aimed to include 182 patients in each arm but was closedmore » prematurely because in a security analysis (June 2004), progression and early relapse were more frequent in patients that did not received IFRT. Patients were followed until March 2009, at which point actuarial curves at 10 years showed that progression free-survival was 72% in patients who received IFR and 20% in the control group (p < 0.001), overall survival was 72% and 31%, respectively (p < 0.001). Acute toxicity was mild and well tolerated. Discussion: Adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of bulky disease was the only difference to have an improvement in outcome in our patients; the use of rituximab during induction did not improve complete response rates and did affect overall survival; patients who received rituximab but not IFRT had a worse prognosis. Conclusions: The use of IFRT in patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma who achieved complete response remain as the best treatment available, even in patients that received rituximab during induction.« less

  15. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martínez, A; Molano, F; Lloret, M; Falcón-Vizcaino, O; García-Hernández, J A

    2003-01-01

    To compare the results obtained following treatment, from a group of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (Stage IB or higher) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in relation to a group of patients treated exclusively with radiotherapy. All patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy at the Gynaecologic Oncology Unit of the University Hospital Materno Infantil of the Canaries between 1999 and 2000, both inclusive, were included. The first group to be considered was formed by patients who received combined treatment. The second group of patients received radiotherapy exclusively, having been treated in previous years (1997-1998 period). The results were compared in relation to survival in the two following years from treatment (2000-2001) in the group of combined treatment and years 1999-2000 in the group that received only radiotherapy. To compare the survival of both groups the chi-square test and Odds Ratio were utilised. The groups compared are homogeneous when looking at the stage of the disease when diagnosed, the histological type of tumour and its degree of cellular differentiation, the CAT results and tumoral markers. Survival of more than two years was observed in the group treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in relation to the group treated exclusively with radiotherapy; chi-square 9.92, p < 0.01, OR: 0.1 (0.01-0.6).

  16. Adaptive radiotherapy for NSCLC patients: utilizing the principle of energy conservation to evaluate dose mapping operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2017-06-01

    Tumor regression during the course of fractionated radiotherapy confounds the ability to accurately estimate the total dose delivered to tumor targets. Here we present a new criterion to improve the accuracy of image intensity-based dose mapping operations for adaptive radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Six NSCLC patients were retrospectively investigated in this study. An image intensity-based B-spline registration algorithm was used for deformable image registration (DIR) of weekly CBCT images to a reference image. The resultant displacement vector fields were employed to map the doses calculated on weekly images to the reference image. The concept of energy conservation was introduced as a criterion to evaluate the accuracy of the dose mapping operations. A finite element method (FEM)-based mechanical model was implemented to improve the performance of the B-Spline-based registration algorithm in regions involving tumor regression. For the six patients, deformed tumor volumes changed by 21.2  ±  15.0% and 4.1  ±  3.7% on average for the B-Spline and the FEM-based registrations performed from fraction 1 to fraction 21, respectively. The energy deposited in the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 0.66 Joules (J) per fraction on average. The energy derived from the fractional dose reconstructed by the B-spline and FEM-based DIR algorithms in the deformed GTV’s was 0.51 J and 0.64 J, respectively. Based on landmark comparisons for the 6 patients, mean error for the FEM-based DIR algorithm was 2.5  ±  1.9 mm. The cross-correlation coefficient between the landmark-measured displacement error and the loss of radiation energy was  -0.16 for the FEM-based algorithm. To avoid uncertainties in measuring distorted landmarks, the B-Spline-based registrations were compared to the FEM registrations, and their displacement differences equal 4.2  ±  4.7 mm on average. The displacement differences were

  17. Adaptive radiotherapy for NSCLC patients: utilizing the principle of energy conservation to evaluate dose mapping operations.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J

    2017-06-07

    Tumor regression during the course of fractionated radiotherapy confounds the ability to accurately estimate the total dose delivered to tumor targets. Here we present a new criterion to improve the accuracy of image intensity-based dose mapping operations for adaptive radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Six NSCLC patients were retrospectively investigated in this study. An image intensity-based B-spline registration algorithm was used for deformable image registration (DIR) of weekly CBCT images to a reference image. The resultant displacement vector fields were employed to map the doses calculated on weekly images to the reference image. The concept of energy conservation was introduced as a criterion to evaluate the accuracy of the dose mapping operations. A finite element method (FEM)-based mechanical model was implemented to improve the performance of the B-Spline-based registration algorithm in regions involving tumor regression. For the six patients, deformed tumor volumes changed by 21.2  ±  15.0% and 4.1  ±  3.7% on average for the B-Spline and the FEM-based registrations performed from fraction 1 to fraction 21, respectively. The energy deposited in the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 0.66 Joules (J) per fraction on average. The energy derived from the fractional dose reconstructed by the B-spline and FEM-based DIR algorithms in the deformed GTV's was 0.51 J and 0.64 J, respectively. Based on landmark comparisons for the 6 patients, mean error for the FEM-based DIR algorithm was 2.5  ±  1.9 mm. The cross-correlation coefficient between the landmark-measured displacement error and the loss of radiation energy was  -0.16 for the FEM-based algorithm. To avoid uncertainties in measuring distorted landmarks, the B-Spline-based registrations were compared to the FEM registrations, and their displacement differences equal 4.2  ±  4.7 mm on average. The displacement differences were

  18. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for pancreatic malignancies: Dosimetric comparison with sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nabavizadeh, Nima, E-mail: nabaviza@ohsu.edu; Simeonova, Anna O.; Waller, Joseph G.

    2014-10-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) is an iteration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), both of which deliver highly conformal dose distributions. Studies have shown the superiority of VMAT and IMRT in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing. This is the first study examining the benefits of VMAT in pancreatic cancer for doses more than 55.8 Gy. A planning study comparing 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT was performed in 20 patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatments were planned for a 25-fraction delivery of 45 Gy to a large field followed by a reduced-volume 8-fraction externalmore » beam boost to 59.4 Gy in total. OARs and PTV doses, conformality index (CI) deviations from 1.0, monitor units (MUs) delivered, and isodose volumes were compared. IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 for the large-field and the boost plans were equivalent (large field: 0.032 and 0.046, respectively; boost: 0.042 and 0.037, respectively; p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Both IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 were statistically superior to 3D-CRT (large field: 0.217, boost: 0.177; p < 0.05 for all comparisons). VMAT showed reduction of the mean dose to the boost PTV (VMAT: 61.4 Gy, IMRT: 62.4 Gy, and 3D-CRT: 62.3 Gy; p < 0.05). The mean number of MUs per fraction was significantly lower for VMAT for both the large-field and the boost plans. VMAT delivery time was less than 3 minutes compared with 8 minutes for IMRT. Although no statistically significant dose reduction to the OARs was identified when comparing VMAT with IMRT, VMAT showed a reduction in the volumes of the 100% isodose line for the large-field plans. Dose escalation to 59.4 Gy in pancreatic cancer is dosimetrically feasible with shorter treatment times, fewer MUs delivered, and comparable CIs for VMAT when compared with IMRT.« less

  19. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for pancreatic malignancies: Dosimetric comparison with sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nabavizadeh, Nima Simeonova, Anna O.; Waller, Joseph G.; Romer, Jeanna L.; Monaco, Debra L.; Elliott, David A.; Tanyi, James A.; Fuss, Martin; Thomas, Charles R.; Holland, John M.

    2014-10-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) is an iteration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), both of which deliver highly conformal dose distributions. Studies have shown the superiority of VMAT and IMRT in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing. This is the first study examining the benefits of VMAT in pancreatic cancer for doses more than 55.8 Gy. A planning study comparing 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT was performed in 20 patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatments were planned for a 25-fraction delivery of 45 Gy to a large field followed by a reduced-volume 8-fraction external beam boost to 59.4 Gy in total. OARs and PTV doses, conformality index (CI) deviations from 1.0, monitor units (MUs) delivered, and isodose volumes were compared. IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 for the large-field and the boost plans were equivalent (large field: 0.032 and 0.046, respectively; boost: 0.042 and 0.037, respectively; p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Both IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 were statistically superior to 3D-CRT (large field: 0.217, boost: 0.177; p < 0.05 for all comparisons). VMAT showed reduction of the mean dose to the boost PTV (VMAT: 61.4 Gy, IMRT: 62.4 Gy, and 3D-CRT: 62.3 Gy; p < 0.05). The mean number of MUs per fraction was significantly lower for VMAT for both the large-field and the boost plans. VMAT delivery time was less than 3 minutes compared with 8 minutes for IMRT. Although no statistically significant dose reduction to the OARs was identified when comparing VMAT with IMRT, VMAT showed a reduction in the volumes of the 100% isodose line for the large-field plans. Dose escalation to 59.4 Gy in pancreatic cancer is dosimetrically feasible with shorter treatment times, fewer MUs delivered, and comparable CIs for VMAT when compared with IMRT.

  20. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  1. Radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bosch, A; Frias, Z

    1988-12-01

    Fifty-nine patients with multiple myeloma referred for treatment of painful bony lesions received irradiation to 95 local areas, and 16 of the 59 were irradiated using hemibody techniques. Pain relief was obtained in practically all of the irradiated regions. Most local areas were treated to doses of 3000 cGy in 10 to 15 fractions. Patients with generalized pain due to multiple site involvement were treated with single dose hemibody irradiation, to doses of 600 cGy to the upper hemibody, and of 800 cGy to the lower hemibody. This treatment was well tolerated and side effects minimal. Median survival from diagnosis was 30 months and the survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 80%, 42%, and 12% respectively. Key articles on radiation therapy of multiple myeloma are reviewed and discussed. Since all patients eventually relapse after chemotherapy, the role of radiotherapy using present techniques should be fully evaluated and considered as an alternative in the primary treatment of multiple myeloma.

  2. A cardiac contouring atlas for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Duane, Frances; Aznar, Marianne C; Bartlett, Freddie; Cutter, David J; Darby, Sarah C; Jagsi, Reshma; Lorenzen, Ebbe L; McArdle, Orla; McGale, Paul; Myerson, Saul; Rahimi, Kazem; Vivekanandan, Sindu; Warren, Samantha; Taylor, Carolyn W

    2017-03-01

    The heart is a complex anatomical organ and contouring the cardiac substructures is challenging. This study presents a reproducible method for contouring left ventricular and coronary arterial segments on radiotherapy CT-planning scans. Segments were defined from cardiology models and agreed by two cardiologists. Reference atlas contours were delineated and written guidelines prepared. Six radiation oncologists tested the atlas. Spatial variation was assessed using the DICE similarity coefficient (DSC) and the directed Hausdorff average distance (d→H,avg). The effect of spatial variation on doses was assessed using six different breast cancer regimens. The atlas enabled contouring of 15 cardiac segments. Inter-observer contour overlap (mean DSC) was 0.60-0.73 for five left ventricular segments and 0.10-0.53 for ten coronary arterial segments. Inter-observer contour separation (mean d→H,avg) was 1.5-2.2mm for left ventricular segments and 1.3-5.1mm for coronary artery segments. This spatial variation resulted in <1Gy dose variation for most regimens and segments, but 1.2-21.8Gy variation for segments close to a field edge. This cardiac atlas enables reproducible contouring of segments of the left ventricle and main coronary arteries to facilitate future studies relating cardiac radiation doses to clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  4. [Whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases: the technique of irradiation influences the dose to parotid glands].

    PubMed

    Loos, G; Paulon, R; Verrelle, P; Lapeyre, M

    2012-04-01

    In the treatment of brain metastases, whole brain radiotherapy can be carried out according two distinct methods: one using multileaf collimator for field shaping and protection of organs at risk, and a second one is to make a rotation of the field to avoid the eyes. The aim of the study was to compare for 10 patients the dose distributions at organs at risk for each method. Patients received 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Except for parotid glands, the dose received by organs at risk and the planning target volume was the same with each method. For whole brain radiotherapy, excluding the cisterna cerebellomedullaris, the mean parotid dose was 9.63 Gy using the multileaf collimator versus 12.32 Gy using the field rotation (P=0.04). For whole brain radiotherapy including the cisterna cerebellomedullaris, the mean parotid dose was 11.12 Gy using the multileaf collimator versus 20.06 Gy using field rotation (P<0.001). Using the multileaf collimator seems recommended for whole brain radiotherapy, to reduce the dose to the parotids. Copyright © 2012 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. When Does Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Really Avoid Radiotherapy? Clinical Predictors of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Papadia, Andrea; Bellati, Filippo; Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Lorusso, Domenica; Donfrancesco, Cristina; Gasparri, Maria Luisa; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify clinical variables that may predict the need for adjuvant radiotherapy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and radical surgery in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective series of cervical cancer patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages IB2-IIB treated with NACT followed by radical surgery was analyzed. Clinical predictors of persistence of intermediate- and/or high-risk factors at final pathological analysis were investigated. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and multivariate analysis and using a model based on artificial intelligence known as artificial neuronal network (ANN) analysis. Overall, 101 patients were available for the analyses. Fifty-two (51 %) patients were considered at high risk secondary to parametrial, resection margin and/or lymph node involvement. When disease was confined to the cervix, four (4 %) patients were considered at intermediate risk. At univariate analysis, FIGO grade 3, stage IIB disease at diagnosis and the presence of enlarged nodes before NACT predicted the presence of intermediate- and/or high-risk factors at final pathological analysis. At multivariate analysis, only FIGO grade 3 and tumor diameter maintained statistical significance. The specificity of ANN models in evaluating predictive variables was slightly superior to conventional multivariable models. FIGO grade, stage, tumor diameter, and histology are associated with persistence of pathological intermediate- and/or high-risk factors after NACT and radical surgery. This information is useful in counseling patients at the time of treatment planning with regard to the probability of being subjected to pelvic radiotherapy after completion of the initially planned treatment.

  6. Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Serum Testosterone and Increased FSH and LH

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Svartberg, Johan; Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromso

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: It is known that scattered radiation to the testes during pelvic radiotherapy can affect fertility, but there is little knowledge on its effects on male sex hormones. The aim of this study was to determine whether radiotherapy for rectal cancer affects testosterone production. Methods and Materials: All male patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Patients treated with surgery alone were randomly selected from the same registry as control subjects. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and sex hormone bindingmore » globulin (SHBG) were analyzed, and free testosterone was calculated (N = 290). Information about the radiotherapy treatment was collected from the patient hospital charts. Results: Serum FSH was 3 times higher in the radiotherapy group than in the control group (median, 18.8 vs. 6.3 IU/L, p <0.001), and serum LH was 1.7 times higher (median, 7.5 vs. 4.5 IU/l, p <0.001). In the radiotherapy group, 27% of patients had testosterone levels below the reference range (8-35 nmol/L), compared with 10% of the nonirradiated patients (p <0.001). Irradiated patients had lower serum testosterone (mean, 11.1 vs. 13.4 nmol/L, p <0.001) and lower calculated free testosterone (mean, 214 vs. 235 pmol/L, p <0.05) than control subjects. Total testosterone, calculated free testosterone, and gonadotropins were related to the distance from the bony pelvic structures to the caudal field edge. Conclusions: Increased serum levels of gonadotropins and subnormal serum levels of testosterone indicate that curative radiotherapy for rectal cancer can result in permanent testicular dysfunction.« less

  7. Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Serum Testosterone and Increased FSH and LH

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti Svartberg, Johan; Carlsen, Erik; Dueland, Svein; Haug, Egil; Skovlund, Eva; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Marianne G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: It is known that scattered radiation to the testes during pelvic radiotherapy can affect fertility, but there is little knowledge on its effects on male sex hormones. The aim of this study was to determine whether radiotherapy for rectal cancer affects testosterone production. Methods and Materials: All male patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Patients treated with surgery alone were randomly selected from the same registry as control subjects. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were analyzed, and free testosterone was calculated (N = 290). Information about the radiotherapy treatment was collected from the patient hospital charts. Results: Serum FSH was 3 times higher in the radiotherapy group than in the control group (median, 18.8 vs. 6.3 IU/L, p <0.001), and serum LH was 1.7 times higher (median, 7.5 vs. 4.5 IU/l, p <0.001). In the radiotherapy group, 27% of patients had testosterone levels below the reference range (8-35 nmol/L), compared with 10% of the nonirradiated patients (p <0.001). Irradiated patients had lower serum testosterone (mean, 11.1 vs. 13.4 nmol/L, p <0.001) and lower calculated free testosterone (mean, 214 vs. 235 pmol/L, p <0.05) than control subjects. Total testosterone, calculated free testosterone, and gonadotropins were related to the distance from the bony pelvic structures to the caudal field edge. Conclusions: Increased serum levels of gonadotropins and subnormal serum levels of testosterone indicate that curative radiotherapy for rectal cancer can result in permanent testicular dysfunction.

  8. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Santam, E-mail: drsantam@gmail.com; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptivemore » analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm{sup 3}), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.« less

  9. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  10. The radiotherapy reference panel--experiences and results of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG).

    PubMed

    Eich, Hans Theodor; Müller, Rolf-Peter

    2005-07-01

    The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) including more than 500 participating centers established a central radiotherapy (RT) reference center to improve quality of treatment. The purpose of the present article is to summarize the experiences and results of the performed and ongoing quality assurance programs (QAP) of RT. A panel of expert radiation oncologists evaluated retrospectively the adequacy of treatment fields, applied radiation doses, treatment time and technical parameters. For the fourth study generation (HD10-12, 1998-2003), the RT reference center moved from Munich to Cologne. New RT QAP were initiated according to the demands of the new trials and former programs were enhanced. A strong achievement in the era of extended field RT was to show that major deviations of radiation treatment portals and radiation dose from prospective treatment prescriptions were unfavorable prognostic factors for patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The central prospective radiation oncological review of all diagnostic imaging showed that corrections of disease involvement in 49% of patients with early stages (HD10) and in 67% for patients with intermediate stages (HD11) were necessary. The introduction of electronic image transfer optimized and simplified the workflow of the QAP. Today radiation oncologists in the GHSG perform efficient QAP to improve treatment quality of study patients. For early-stage HL a central prospective review of all diagnostic imaging is performed to control the disease extension and to define the IF treatment volume. Retrospective analysis of RT portals detects faults in the applied irradiation.

  11. Palliative radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Ampil, F L; Chin, H W

    2001-08-01

    Scant information is available about the outcomes of patients with synchronous bilateral lung cancers (SBLC) treated with radiation. We report on 32 patients with SBLC who were treated for palliation by external beam irradiation during a 19-year period. The overall median survival was 7 months; 20 individuals (63%) survived at least 6 months. Among the evaluable patients, the complete/partial subjective and objective response rates were 100% and 60%, respectively. Survival was not significantly influenced by the total dose applied. Radiotherapy is effective for palliation of symptoms associated with SBLC. However, the dismal prognosis of SBLC managed by nonradical radiotherapy alone warrants investigation of treatment using curative doses of radiotherapy or chemotherapy with radiotherapy.

  12. Brain metastases: fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tony J C; Brown, Paul D

    2018-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common malignant adult intracranial tumors, occurring in approximately 10-30% of cancer patients, and generally lead to a poor prognosis. The incidence has been steadily rising, likely due to longer survival from newer systemic therapies and increased utilization of magnetic resonance imaging. Historically, whole-brain radiotherapy has been a standard of care for the management of patients with brain metastases. However, better understanding of both the acute and long-term toxicities associated with whole-brain radiotherapy has led to a more selective use of whole-brain radiotherapy. Herein we discuss the background and prognostication of brain metastases as well as the role of palliative whole-brain radiotherapy, as monotherapy and adjuvant use after resection or stereotactic radiosurgery. We also review refined whole-brain radiation techniques, potential neuroprotective drugs, and ongoing trials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A template for writing radiotherapy protocols.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Per; Ceberg, Crister; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Blomgren, Klas; Nilsson, Sten; Johansson, Mikael; Glimelius, Bengt

    2015-02-01

    Well-specified and unambiguous treatment protocols are essential both for current practice and for the future development of radiation therapy. In order to provide assistance for writing good protocols, irrespective of treatment intention and complexity, up-to-date guidelines are highly desirable. We have analysed the radiotherapy work-flow, including clinical and physical aspects, such as preparatory imaging, treatment planning, delivery and evaluation, with the aim to outline a consistent framework covering the entire radiotherapy process. Based on the analysis, a recipe-style template for specifying the description of the radiotherapy process has been designed. The template is written in a general format, which allows for modified phrasing, and should be customised for the specific clinical situation and diagnosis, as well as facility resources. The template can be used as a tool to ensure a consistent and comprehensive description of the radiotherapy section of clinical guidelines, care programmes and clinical trial protocols.

  14. Intensified autophagy compromises the efficacy of radiotherapy against prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2015-05-29

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an equivalent alternative or complement to radical prostatectomy, with high therapeutic efficacy. High risk patients, however, experience high relapse rates, so that research on radio-sensitization is the most evident route to improve curability of this common disease. Materials and methods: In the current study we investigated the autophagic activity in a series of patients with localized prostate tumors treated with radical radiotherapy, using the LC3A and the LAMP2a proteins as markers of autophagosome and lysosome cellular content, respectively. The role of autophagy on prostate cancer cell line resistance to radiation was also examined. Results: Using confocal microscopy on tissue biopsies, we showed that prostate cancer cells have, overall, high levels of LC3A and low levels of LAMP2a compared to normal prostate glands. Tumors with a ‘highLC3A/lowLAMP2a’ phenotype, suggestive of intensified lysosomal consumption, had a significantly poorer biochemical relapse free survival. The PC3 radioresistant cell line sustained remarkably its autophagic flux ability after radiation, while the DU145 radiosensitive one experiences a prolonged blockage of the autophagic process. This was assessed with aggresome accumulation detection and LC3A/LAMP2a double immunofluorescence, as well as with sequestrosome/p62 protein detection. By silencing the LC3A or LAMP2a expression, both cell lines became more sensitive to escalated doses of radiation. Conclusions: High base line autophagy activity and cell ability to sustain functional autophagy define resistance of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy. This can be reversed by blocking up-regulated components of the autophagy pathway, which may prove of importance in the field of clinical radiotherapy. - Highlights: • High LC3A and low LAMP2a levels is a frequent expression pattern of prostate carcinoma. • This pattern of intensified autophagic flux relates with high relapse rates after

  15. Intensified autophagy compromises the efficacy of radiotherapy against prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I., E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr; Kalamida, Dimitra; Mitrakas, Achilleas

    2015-05-29

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an equivalent alternative or complement to radical prostatectomy, with high therapeutic efficacy. High risk patients, however, experience high relapse rates, so that research on radio-sensitization is the most evident route to improve curability of this common disease. Materials and methods: In the current study we investigated the autophagic activity in a series of patients with localized prostate tumors treated with radical radiotherapy, using the LC3A and the LAMP2a proteins as markers of autophagosome and lysosome cellular content, respectively. The role of autophagy on prostate cancer cell line resistance to radiation was also examined. Results: Using confocal microscopymore » on tissue biopsies, we showed that prostate cancer cells have, overall, high levels of LC3A and low levels of LAMP2a compared to normal prostate glands. Tumors with a ‘highLC3A/lowLAMP2a’ phenotype, suggestive of intensified lysosomal consumption, had a significantly poorer biochemical relapse free survival. The PC3 radioresistant cell line sustained remarkably its autophagic flux ability after radiation, while the DU145 radiosensitive one experiences a prolonged blockage of the autophagic process. This was assessed with aggresome accumulation detection and LC3A/LAMP2a double immunofluorescence, as well as with sequestrosome/p62 protein detection. By silencing the LC3A or LAMP2a expression, both cell lines became more sensitive to escalated doses of radiation. Conclusions: High base line autophagy activity and cell ability to sustain functional autophagy define resistance of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy. This can be reversed by blocking up-regulated components of the autophagy pathway, which may prove of importance in the field of clinical radiotherapy. - Highlights: • High LC3A and low LAMP2a levels is a frequent expression pattern of prostate carcinoma. • This pattern of intensified autophagic flux relates with high relapse rates after

  16. The use of strontium-90 Beta radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment for conjunctival melanoma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Victoria M L; Papastefanou, Vasilios P; Liu, S; Stoker, Ian; Hungerford, John L

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims. To report the safety and efficacy of strontium (Sr(90)) beta radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment for conjunctival melanoma. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken from 1999 to 2007 of all patients who underwent Sr(90) beta radiotherapy for incompletely excised conjunctival melanoma. Failure of treatment was defined as recurrence of a conjunctival melanoma at the same location following beta radiotherapy. Results. Twenty patients underwent Sr(90) beta radiotherapy for incompletely excised conjunctival melanoma. Median follow-up interval was 59 months (8-152). All patients had conjunctival melanoma involving the bulbar conjunctiva. Underlying diagnoses included PAM with atypia in 60% (12 of 20), PAM without atypia in 15% (3 of 20), and de novo conjunctival melanoma in 25% (5 of 20). Following Sr(90) beta radiotherapy, in 90% (18 out of 20) local control was achieved and visual acuity was not affected in any patient. Three patients (15%) had dry eye symptoms, episcleritis, and descemetcoele, respectively. No cataract or secondary glaucoma was reported. Conclusions. Sr(90) treatment is a very effective adjuvant treatment after excisional biopsy and cryotherapy for conjunctival melanoma with a local success rate of 90%. The treatment is not associated with significant side effects and visual acuity is not affected.

  17. Estimation of neutron-equivalent dose in organs of patients undergoing radiotherapy by the use of a novel online digital detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Doblado, F.; Domingo, C.; Gómez, F.; Sánchez-Nieto, B.; Muñiz, J. L.; García-Fusté, M. J.; Expósito, M. R.; Barquero, R.; Hartmann, G.; Terrón, J. A.; Pena, J.; Méndez, R.; Gutiérrez, F.; Guerre, F. X.; Roselló, J.; Núñez, L.; Brualla-González, L.; Manchado, F.; Lorente, A.; Gallego, E.; Capote, R.; Planes, D.; Lagares, J. I.; González-Soto, X.; Sansaloni, F.; Colmenares, R.; Amgarou, K.; Morales, E.; Bedogni, R.; Cano, J. P.; Fernández, F.

    2012-10-01

    Neutron peripheral contamination in patients undergoing high-energy photon radiotherapy is considered as a risk factor for secondary cancer induction. Organ-specific neutron-equivalent dose estimation is therefore essential for a reasonable assessment of these associated risks. This work aimed to develop a method to estimate neutron-equivalent doses in multiple organs of radiotherapy patients. The method involved the convolution, at 16 reference points in an anthropomorphic phantom, of the normalized Monte Carlo neutron fluence energy spectra with the kerma and energy-dependent radiation weighting factor. This was then scaled with the total neutron fluence measured with passive detectors, at the same reference points, in order to obtain the equivalent doses in organs. The latter were correlated with the readings of a neutron digital detector located inside the treatment room during phantom irradiation. This digital detector, designed and developed by our group, integrates the thermal neutron fluence. The correlation model, applied to the digital detector readings during patient irradiation, enables the online estimation of neutron-equivalent doses in organs. The model takes into account the specific irradiation site, the field parameters (energy, field size, angle incidence, etc) and the installation (linac and bunker geometry). This method, which is suitable for routine clinical use, will help to systematically generate the dosimetric data essential for the improvement of current risk-estimation models.

  18. Current role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy in females. Advances in systemic therapies and radiotherapy (RT) provided long survival rates in breast cancer patients. RT has a major role in the management of breast cancer. During the past 15 years several developments took place in the field of imaging and irradiation techniques, intensity modulated RT, hypofractionation and partial-breast irradiation. Currently, improvements in the RT technology allow us a subsequent decrease in the treatment-related complications such as fibrosis and long-term cardiac toxicity while improving the loco-regional control rates and cosmetic results. Thus, it is crucial that modern radiotherapy techniques should be carried out with maximum care and efficiency. Several randomized trials provided evidence for the feasibility of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. However, the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer will continue to be defined by the mature results of randomized trials. Current review will provide an up-to-date evidence based data on the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. PMID:25114857

  19. Radiotherapy basics for family physicians. Potent tool for symptom relief.

    PubMed

    Samant, Rajiv; Gooi, Adrian Chuen Chiang

    2005-11-01

    To review the use of radiotherapy in cancer care, especially the role of radiation in palliative care. MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to January 2004. Relevant articles evaluating indications for radiotherapy were reviewed. This paper describes use of radiotherapy based on well established current radiotherapy practices and level I and II evidence. A substantial number of patients seeing family physicians develop cancer or die of it. Despite its effectiveness, radiotherapy remains underused in management of cancer patients. Broad uses of radiotherapy in cancer care include curative treatment, palliative symptom control, and management of oncologic emergencies. Radiotherapy can be especially effective for treating common complications of cancer, including painful bone and soft tissue metastases, hemoptysis, dyspnea, dysphagia, brain metastases, and spinal cord compression. Radiotherapy is a vital aspect of both curative and palliative cancer treatment. Understanding the basics of radiotherapy can assist family physicians in providing complete care for their cancer patients.

  20. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  1. Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@stanford.edu; Nelson, Geoff; Noll, John M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Small animal radiation therapy has advanced significantly in recent years. Whereas in the past dose was delivered using a single beam and a lead shield for sparing of healthy tissue, conformal doses can be now delivered using more complex dedicated small animal radiotherapy systems with image guidance. The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities. Methods: This paper presents a comparison of dose distributions generated by the three approaches—a single-field irradiator with a 200 kV beam and no image guidance, a small animal image-guided conformal system based on a modified microCTmore » scanner with a 120 kV beam developed at Stanford University, and a dedicated conformal system, SARRP, using a 220 kV beam developed at Johns Hopkins University. The authors present a comparison of treatment plans for the three modalities using two cases: a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor and a mouse with a spontaneous lung tumor. A 5 Gy target dose was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. Results: All treatment modalities generated similar dose distributions for the subcutaneous tumor case, with the highest mean dose to the ipsilateral lung and bones in the single-field plan (0.4 and 0.4 Gy) compared to the microCT (0.1 and 0.2 Gy) and SARRP (0.1 and 0.3 Gy) plans. The lung case demonstrated that due to the nine-beam arrangements in the conformal plans, the mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, spinal cord, and bones were significantly lower in the microCT plan (2.0, 0.4, and 1.9 Gy) and the SARRP plan (1.5, 0.5, and 1.8 Gy) than in single-field irradiator plan (4.5, 3.8, and 3.3 Gy). Similarly, the mean doses to the contralateral lung and the heart were lowest in the microCT plan (1.5 and 2.0 Gy), followed by the SARRP plan (1.7 and 2.2 Gy), and they were highest in the single-field plan (2.5 and 2.4 Gy). For both cases, dose uniformity was greatest in the single-field irradiator plan

  2. Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena Nelson, Geoff; Noll, John M.; Graves, Edward E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Small animal radiation therapy has advanced significantly in recent years. Whereas in the past dose was delivered using a single beam and a lead shield for sparing of healthy tissue, conformal doses can be now delivered using more complex dedicated small animal radiotherapy systems with image guidance. The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities. Methods: This paper presents a comparison of dose distributions generated by the three approaches—a single-field irradiator with a 200 kV beam and no image guidance, a small animal image-guided conformal system based on a modified microCT scanner with a 120 kV beam developed at Stanford University, and a dedicated conformal system, SARRP, using a 220 kV beam developed at Johns Hopkins University. The authors present a comparison of treatment plans for the three modalities using two cases: a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor and a mouse with a spontaneous lung tumor. A 5 Gy target dose was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. Results: All treatment modalities generated similar dose distributions for the subcutaneous tumor case, with the highest mean dose to the ipsilateral lung and bones in the single-field plan (0.4 and 0.4 Gy) compared to the microCT (0.1 and 0.2 Gy) and SARRP (0.1 and 0.3 Gy) plans. The lung case demonstrated that due to the nine-beam arrangements in the conformal plans, the mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, spinal cord, and bones were significantly lower in the microCT plan (2.0, 0.4, and 1.9 Gy) and the SARRP plan (1.5, 0.5, and 1.8 Gy) than in single-field irradiator plan (4.5, 3.8, and 3.3 Gy). Similarly, the mean doses to the contralateral lung and the heart were lowest in the microCT plan (1.5 and 2.0 Gy), followed by the SARRP plan (1.7 and 2.2 Gy), and they were highest in the single-field plan (2.5 and 2.4 Gy). For both cases, dose uniformity was greatest in the single-field irradiator plan followed by

  3. Multi-energy imagers for a radiotherapy treatment environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Liu, Langechuan; Liang, Albert K.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Koniczek, Martin; Jiang, Hao

    2015-03-01

    Over the last ~15 years, the central goal in external beam radiotherapy of maximizing dose to the tumor while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues has been greatly facilitated by the development and clinical implementation of many innovations. These include megavoltage active matrix flat-panel imagers (MV AMFPIs) designed to image the treatment beam, and separate kilovoltage (kV) AMFPIs and x-ray sources designed to provide high-contrast projection and cone-beam CT images in the treatment room. While these systems provide clinically valuable information, a variety of advantages would accrue through introduction of the capability to produce clinically useful, high quality imaging information at multiple energies (e.g., kV and MV) from a single detector along the treatment beam direction. One possible approach for achieving this goal involves substitution of the x-ray converters used in conventional MV AMFPIs with thick, segmented crystalline scintillators designed for dual-energy operation, coupled with the addition of x-ray imaging beams that contain a significant diagnostic component. A second approach involves introduction of a large area, monolithic array of photon counting pixels with multiple energy thresholds and event counters, which could provide multi-spectral views of the treatment beam with improved contrast. In this paper, the motivations behind, and the merits of each approach are described. In addition, prospects for such dual-energy imagers and photon counting array designs are discussed in the context of the radiotherapy environment.

  4. A comparison of outcomes for patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma at intermediate risk of recurrence treated by surgery alone or with post-operative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, J S; Blackburn, T K; Woolgar, J A; Lowe, D; Errington, R D; Vaughan, E D; Rogers, S N

    2007-09-01

    Controversy remains about which patients at intermediate risk of recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma would benefit from radiotherapy. A retrospective review of computerised database and medical records for 462 consecutive patients at the Regional Maxillofacial Unit in Liverpool who were treated with primary surgery with or without post-operative radiotherapy was carried out. We classified 29% (134) of patients as being at 'low' risk of disease recurrence (pT1-2, N0 with clear margins), 29% (135) at 'high' risk (involved margins or lymph node extracapsular spread) and the remaining 42% (193) at 'intermediate' risk. Of those at intermediate risk, 41% (80/193) received adjuvant radiotherapy and their 5 year survival (SE) was 54% (6%) compared to 71% (5%) for those with primary surgery alone (P=0.002). A higher proportion of patients having radiotherapy had loco-regional recurrence (19/80 24%) compared to those treated by surgery alone (17/113 15%). The improved salvage rate for recurrent disease in the surgery alone group (8/17 53%), compared to those receiving radiotherapy (2/19 13%, P=0.05), indicates an advantage in withholding radiotherapy for patients at intermediate risk of recurrence. This study indicates a potential disadvantage associated with the use of postoperative radiotherapy for patients at intermediate risk of recurrence. A randomised trial comparing a watch and wait policy to postoperative radiotherapy in patients with an intermediate risk of recurrence is required to confirm the trend indicated in this retrospective data.

  5. Survival advantage for prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hanks, G E; Hanlon, A L; Pinover, W H; Horwitz, E M; Schultheiss, T E

    1999-01-01

    The value of treating prostate cancer has been questioned, and some insist that a survival benefit is demonstrated to justify treatment. Prospective dose-escalation studies with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy technique have demonstrated improvement in biochemical freedom from disease and local control. We report the outcomes of high-dose treatment with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy compared with low-dose treatment for biochemical freedom from disease, freedom from distant metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival. The study design was retrospective, involving pairs matched on independent prognostic variables in which each patient treated with low-dose radiotherapy was matched with a patient treated with high-dose radiotherapy. Outcomes were compared for two groups of patients: Group I: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment--296 patients treated with more than 74 Gy matched on stage, grade, and prostate-specific antigen level, to 296 patients treated with less than 74 Gy. Group II: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment--357 patients treated with more than 74 Gy matched on stage and grade to 357 patients treated with less than 74 Gy. Univariate analysis showed that dose is a significant predictor of biochemical freedom from disease, freedom from distant metastasis, and cause-specific survival for group I and biochemical freedom from disease, freedom from distant metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival for group II. Multivariate analysis showed that dose is a significant independent predictor in group I for biochemical freedom from disease and freedom from distant metastasis and for biochemical freedom from disease, freedom from distant metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival in group II. These data provide strong support for the definitive treatment of prostate cancer with high-dose (> 74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. These doses can be safely delivered

  6. SU-G-JeP2-05: Dose Effects of a 1.5T Magnetic Field On Air-Tissue and Lung-Tissue Interfaces in MRI-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xinfeng; Prior, Phillip; Chen, Guangpei

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to investigate the dose effects of electron-return-effect (ERE) at air-tissue and lung-tissue interfaces under a 1.5T transverse-magnetic-field (TMF). Methods: IMRT and VMAT plans for representative pancreas, lung, breast and head & neck (H&N) cases were generated following clinical dose volume (DV) criteria. The air-cavity walls, as well as the lung wall, were delineated to examine the ERE. In each case, the original plan generated without TMF is compared with the reconstructed plan (generated by recalculating the original plan with the presence of TMF) and the optimized plan (generated by a full optimization withmore » TMF), using a variety of DV parameters, including V100%, D95% and dose heterogeneity index for PTV, Dmax, and D1cc for OARs (organs at risk) and tissue interface. Results: The dose recalculation under TMF showed the presence of the 1.5 T TMF can slightly reduce V100% and D95% for PTV, with the differences being less than 4% for all but lung case studied. The TMF results in considerable increases in Dmax and D1cc on the skin in all cases, mostly between 10-35%. The changes in Dmax and D1cc on air cavity walls are dependent upon site, geometry, and size, with changes ranging up to 15%. In general, the VMAT plans lead to much smaller dose effects from ERE compared to fixed-beam IMRT. When the TMF is considered in the plan optimization, the dose effects of the TMF at tissue interfaces are significantly reduced in most cases. Conclusion: The doses on tissue interfaces can be significantly changed by the presence of a 1.5T TMF during MR-guided RT when the TMF is not included in plan optimization. These changes can be substantially reduced or even removed during VMAT/IMRT optimization that specifically considers the TMF, without deteriorating overall plan quality.« less

  7. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Elective Nodal Irradiation and Involved-Field Radiation in the Definitive Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Dosimetric Study

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwala, Aparna H.; Ko, Christine J.; Ning, Holly; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Haglund, Karl E.; O’Meara, William P.; Simone, Charles B.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Photon involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT), the standard for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), results in favorable outcomes without increased isolated nodal failures, perhaps from scattered dose to elective nodal stations. Given the high conformality of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), proton IFRT could increase nodal failures. We investigated the feasibility of IMPT for elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in LA-NSCLC. Materials and Methods IMPT IFRT plans were generated to the same total dose of 66.6–72 Gy received by 20 LA-NSCLC patients treated with photon IFRT. IMPT ENI plans were generated to 46 CGE to elective nodal (EN) planning treatment volumes (PTV) plus 24 CGE to involved field (IF)-PTVs. Results Proton IFRT and ENI both improved D95 involved field (IF)-PTV coverage by 4% (p<0.01) compared to photon IFRT. All evaluated dosimetric parameters improved significantly with both proton plans. Lung V20 and mean lung dose decreased 18% (p<0.01) and 36% (p<0.01), respectively, with proton IFRT and 11% (p=0.03) and 26% (p<0.01) with ENI. Mean esophagus dose decreased 16% with IFRT and 12% with ENI; heart V25 decreased 63% with both (all p<0.01). Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of IMPT for LA-NSCLC ENI. Potential decreased toxicity indicates IMPT could allow ENI while maintaining a favorable therapeutic ratio compared to photon IFRT. PMID:25604729

  8. A Small Physiological Electric Field Mediated Responses of Extravillous Trophoblasts Derived from HTR8/SVneo Cells: Involvement of Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Ren, Rongmei; Luo, Xuefeng; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liang, Shanshan; Ma, Lei; Yu, Ping; Bai, Huai

    2014-01-01

    Moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into endometrium is essential for the placental development and normal pregnancy. Electric field (EF)-induced effects on cellular behaviors have been observed in many cell types. This study was to investigate the effect of physiological direct current EF (dc EF) on cellular responses such as elongation, orientation and motility of trophoblast cells. Immortalized first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells (HTR-8/SVneo) were exposed to the dc EF at physiological magnitude. Cell images were recorded and analyzed by image analyzer. Cell lysates were used to detect protein expression by Western blot. Cultured in the dc EFs the cells showed elongation, orientation and enhanced migration rate compared with non-EF stimulated cells at field strengths of 100 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. EF exposure increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and increased expression levels of MMP-2. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK impaired the EF-induced responses including motility and abrogated the elevation of MMP-2 expression. However, the expression levels of integrins like integrin α1, α5, αV and β1 were not affected by EF stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of FAK activation in migration/motility of trophobalst cells driven by EFs. In addition, it raises the feasibility of using applied EFs to promote placentation through effects on trophoblast cells. PMID:24643246

  9. A small physiological electric field mediated responses of extravillous trophoblasts derived from HTR8/SVneo cells: involvement of activation of focal adhesion kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Ren, Rongmei; Luo, Xuefeng; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liang, Shanshan; Ma, Lei; Yu, Ping; Bai, Huai

    2014-01-01

    Moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into endometrium is essential for the placental development and normal pregnancy. Electric field (EF)-induced effects on cellular behaviors have been observed in many cell types. This study was to investigate the effect of physiological direct current EF (dc EF) on cellular responses such as elongation, orientation and motility of trophoblast cells. Immortalized first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells (HTR-8/SVneo) were exposed to the dc EF at physiological magnitude. Cell images were recorded and analyzed by image analyzer. Cell lysates were used to detect protein expression by Western blot. Cultured in the dc EFs the cells showed elongation, orientation and enhanced migration rate compared with non-EF stimulated cells at field strengths of 100 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. EF exposure increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and increased expression levels of MMP-2. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK impaired the EF-induced responses including motility and abrogated the elevation of MMP-2 expression. However, the expression levels of integrins like integrin α1, α5, αV and β1 were not affected by EF stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of FAK activation in migration/motility of trophobalst cells driven by EFs. In addition, it raises the feasibility of using applied EFs to promote placentation through effects on trophoblast cells.

  10. Modelling and simulation of radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Norman F.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, models are described which have been developed to model both the way in which a population of cells respond to radiation and the way in which a population of patients respond to radiotherapy to assist the conduct of clinical trials in silico. Population balance techniques have been used to simulate the age distribution of tumour cells in the cell cycle. Sensitivity to radiation is not constant round the cell cycle and a single fraction of radiation changes the age distribution. Careful timing of further fractions of radiation can be used to maximize the damage delivered to the tumour while minimizing damage to normal tissue. However, tumour modelling does not necessarily predict patient outcome. A separate model has been established to predict the course of a brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The model considers the growth of the tumour and its effect on the normal brain. A simple representation is included of the health status of the patient and hence the type of treatment offered. It is concluded that although these and similar models have a long way yet to be developed, they are beginning to have an impact on the development of clinical practice.

  11. Involvement of protein kinase C in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and the inhibitory effects of exposure to 60-hz magnetic fields in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis

    SciTech Connect

    Kavaliers, M.; Ossenkopp, K.P. )

    1990-02-26

    One of the more consistent and dramatic effects of exposure to magnetic fields is the attenuation of morphine-induced analgesia. Results of previous studies have implicated alterations in calcium channel functioning and Ca{sup ++} flux in the mediation of these effects. It is generally accepted that Ca{sup ++}-activated-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (Protein kinase C; PKC) plays an important role in relaying trans-membrane signaling in diverse Ca{sup ++} dependent cellular processes. In experiment 1 we observed that morphine-induced analgesia in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, as measured by the latency of an avoidance behavior to a warmed surface, was reduced by the PKC activator, SC-9, and was enhanced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9. In contrast, HA-10004, a potent inhibitor of other protein kinases, but only a very weak inhibitor of PKC, had no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. In experiment 2 exposure of snails for 30 minutes to a 1.0 gauss (rms) 60-Hz magnetic field reduced morphine-induced analgesia. This inhibitory effect of the magnetic field was reduced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9, and was augmented by the PKC activator SC-9. These results suggest that: (i) PKC is involved in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and, (ii) the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields involve PKC.

  12. A phase-field-crystal alloy model for late-stage solidification studies involving the interaction of solid, liquid and gas phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Kocher, Gabriel; Provatas, Nikolas

    2018-01-01

    We present a multiphase binary alloy phase-field-crystal model. By introducing density difference between solid and liquid into a previous alloy model, this new fusion leads to a practical tool that can be used to investigate formation of defects in late-stage alloy solidification. It is shown that this model can qualitatively capture the liquid pressure drop due to solidification shrinkage in confined geometry. With an inherited gas phase from a previous multiphase model, cavitation of liquid from shrinkage-induced pressure is also included in this framework. As a unique model that has both solute concentration and pressure-induced liquid cavitation, it also captures a modified Scheil-Gulliver-type segregation behaviour due to cavitation. Simulation of inter-dendritic channel solidification using this model demonstrates a strong cooling rate dependence of the resulting microstructure. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.

  13. Effects of short term and long term Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field on depressive disorder in mice: Involvement of nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Madjid Ansari, Alireza; Farzampour, Shahrokh; Sadr, Ali; Shekarchi, Babak; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan

    2016-02-01

    Previous reports on the possible effects of Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields (ELF MF) on mood have been paradoxical in different settings while no study has yet been conducted on animal behavior. In addition, it was shown that ELF MF exposure makes an increase in brain nitric oxide level. Therefore, in the current study, we aimed to assess the possible effect(s) of ELF MF exposure on mice Forced Swimming Test (FST) and evaluate the probable role of the increased level of nitric oxide in the observed behavior. Male adult mice NMRI were recruited to investigate the short term and long term ELF MF exposure (0.5 mT and 50 Hz, single 2h and 2 weeks 2h a day). Locomotor behavior was assessed by using open-field test (OFT) followed by FST to evaluate the immobility time. Accordingly, NΩ-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester 30 mg/kg was used to exert anti-depressant like effect. According to the results, short term exposure did not alter the immobility time, whereas long term exposure significantly reduces immobility time (p<0.01). However, it was revealed that the locomotion did not differ among all experimental groups. Short term exposure reversed the anti-depressant like effect resulting from 30 mg/kg of NΩ-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (p<0.01). It has been concluded that long term exposure could alter the depressive disorder in mice, whereas short term exposure has no significant effect. Also, reversing the anti-depressant activity of L-NAME indicates a probable increase in the brain nitric oxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Combining radiotherapy and angiogenesis inhibitors: Clinical trial design

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Menard, Cynthia; Camphausen, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a vital role in the multimodality treatment of cancer. Recent advances in RT have primarily involved improvements in dose delivery. Future improvements in tumor control and disease outcomes will likely involve the combination of RT with targeted therapies. Preclinical evaluations of angiogenesis inhibitors in combination with RT have yielded promising results with increased tumor 'cure.' It remains to be seen whether these improvements in tumor control in the laboratory will translate into improved outcomes in the clinic. Multiple differences between these agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy must be taken into account when designing clinical trials evaluating their effectiveness in combination with RT. We discuss important considerations for designing clinical trials of angiogenesis inhibitors with RT.

  15. Pain and quality of life in patients undergoing radiotherapy for spinal metastatic disease treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is an important tool in the control of pain in patients with spinal metastatic disease. We aimed to evaluate pain and of quality of life of patients with spinal metastatic disease undergoing radiotherapy with supportive treatment. Methods The study enrolled 30 patients. From January 2008 to January 2010, patients selection included those treated with a 20 Gy tumour dose in five fractions. Patients completed the visual analogue scale for pain assessment and the SF-36 questionnaire for quality of life assessment. Results The most frequent primary sites were breast, multiple myeloma, prostate and lymphoma. It was found that 14 spinal metastatic disease patients (46.66%) had restricted involvement of three or fewer vertebrae, while 16 patients (53.33%) had cases involving more than three vertebrae. The data from the visual analogue scale evaluation of pain showed that the average initial score was 5.7 points, the value 30 days after the end of radiotherapy was 4.60 points and the average value 6 months after treatment was 4.25 points. Notably, this final value was 25.43% lower than the value from the initial analysis. With regard to the quality of life evaluation, only the values for the functional capability and social aspects categories of the questionnaire showed significant improvement. Conclusion Radiotherapy with supportive treatment appears to be an important tool for the treatment of pain in patients with spinal metastatic disease. PMID:23418821

  16. Navigated marker placement for motion compensation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterstein, A.; März, K.; Franz, A. M.; Hafezi, M.; Fard, N.; Sterzing, F.; Mehrabi, A.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy is frequently used to treat unoperated or partially resected tumors. Tumor movement, e.g. caused by respiration, is a major challenge in this context. Markers can be implanted around the tumor prior to radiation therapy for accurate tracking of tumor movement. However, accurate placement of these markers while keeping a secure margin around the target and while taking into account critical structures is a difficult task. Computer-assisted needle insertion has been an active field of research in the past decades. However, the challenge of navigated marker placement for motion compensated radiotherapy has not yet been addressed. This work presents a system to support marker implantation for radiotherapy under consideration of safety margins and optimal marker configuration. It is designed to allow placement of markers both percutaneously and during an open liver surgery. To this end, we adapted the previously proposed EchoTrack system which integrates ultrasound (US) imaging and electromagnetic (EM) tracking in a single mobile modality. The potential of our new marker insertion concept was evaluated in a phantom study by inserting sets of three markers around dedicated targets (n=22) simultaneously spacing the markers evenly around the target as well as placing the markers in a defined distance to the target. In all cases the markers were successfully placed in a configuration fulfilling the predefined criteria. This includes a minimum distance of 18.9 ± 2.4 mm between marker and tumor as well as a divergence of 2.1 ± 1.5 mm from the planned marker positions. We conclude that our system has high potential to facilitate the placement of markers in suitable configurations for surgeons without extensive experience in needle punctions as high quality configurations were obtained even by medical non-experts.

  17. Dosimetric Advantage of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Whole Ventricles in the Treatment of Localized Intracranial Germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi, E-mail: mizo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for whole ventricles (WV) in patients with a localized intracranial germinoma receiving induction chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 12 consecutive patients with localized intracranial germinomas who received induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy were used. Four-field coplanar three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and seven-field coplanar IMRT plans were created. In both plans, 24 Gy was prescribed in 12 fractions for the planning target volume (PTV) involving WV and tumor bed. In IMRT planning, optimization was conducted to reduce the doses to the organs at risk (OARs) as much as possible, keeping themore » minimum dose equivalent to that of 3D-CRT. The 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume statistics for target coverage and the OARs. Results: IMRT significantly increased the percentage volume of the PTV receiving 24 Gy compared with 3D-CRT (93.5% vs. 84.8%; p = 0.007), while keeping target homogeneity equivalent to 3D-CRT (p = 0.869). The absolute percentage reduction in the irradiated volume of the normal brain receiving 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of 24 Gy ranged from 0.7% to 16.0% in IMRT compared with 3D-CRT (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the volume of the normal brain receiving 10% and 5% of 24 Gy between IMRT and 3D-CRT. Conformation number was significantly improved in IMRT (p < 0.001). For other OARs, the mean dose to the cochlea was reduced significantly in IMRT by 22.3% of 24 Gy compared with 3D-CRT (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT for WV improved the target coverage and reduced the irradiated volume of the normal brain in patients with intracranial germinomas receiving induction chemotherapy. IMRT for WV with induction chemotherapy could reduce the late side effects from cranial irradiation without compromising control of the tumor.« less

  18. Dosimetric advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for whole ventricles in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the dosimetric advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for whole ventricles (WV) in patients with a localized intracranial germinoma receiving induction chemotherapy. Data from 12 consecutive patients with localized intracranial germinomas who received induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy were used. Four-field coplanar three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and seven-field coplanar IMRT plans were created. In both plans, 24 Gy was prescribed in 12 fractions for the planning target volume (PTV) involving WV and tumor bed. In IMRT planning, optimization was conducted to reduce the doses to the organs at risk (OARs) as much as possible, keeping the minimum dose equivalent to that of 3D-CRT. The 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume statistics for target coverage and the OARs. IMRT significantly increased the percentage volume of the PTV receiving 24 Gy compared with 3D-CRT (93.5% vs. 84.8%; p = 0.007), while keeping target homogeneity equivalent to 3D-CRT (p = 0.869). The absolute percentage reduction in the irradiated volume of the normal brain receiving 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of 24 Gy ranged from 0.7% to 16.0% in IMRT compared with 3D-CRT (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the volume of the normal brain receiving 10% and 5% of 24 Gy between IMRT and 3D-CRT. Conformation number was significantly improved in IMRT (p < 0.001). For other OARs, the mean dose to the cochlea was reduced significantly in IMRT by 22.3% of 24 Gy compared with 3D-CRT (p < 0.001). Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT for WV improved the target coverage and reduced the irradiated volume of the normal brain in patients with intracranial germinomas receiving induction chemotherapy. IMRT for WV with induction chemotherapy could reduce the late side effects from cranial irradiation without compromising control of the tumor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dosimetric Advantage of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Whole Ventricles in the Treatment of Localized Intracranial Germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for whole ventricles (WV) in patients with a localized intracranial germinoma receiving induction chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 12 consecutive patients with localized intracranial germinomas who received induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy were used. Four-field coplanar three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and seven-field coplanar IMRT plans were created. In both plans, 24 Gy was prescribed in 12 fractions for the planning target volume (PTV) involving WV and tumor bed. In IMRT planning, optimization was conducted to reduce the doses to the organs at risk (OARs) as much as possible, keeping the minimum dose equivalent to that of 3D-CRT. The 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume statistics for target coverage and the OARs. Results: IMRT significantly increased the percentage volume of the PTV receiving 24 Gy compared with 3D-CRT (93.5% vs. 84.8%; p = 0.007), while keeping target homogeneity equivalent to 3D-CRT (p = 0.869). The absolute percentage reduction in the irradiated volume of the normal brain receiving 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of 24 Gy ranged from 0.7% to 16.0% in IMRT compared with 3D-CRT (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the volume of the normal brain receiving 10% and 5% of 24 Gy between IMRT and 3D-CRT. Conformation number was significantly improved in IMRT (p < 0.001). For other OARs, the mean dose to the cochlea was reduced significantly in IMRT by 22.3% of 24 Gy compared with 3D-CRT (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT for WV improved the target coverage and reduced the irradiated volume of the normal brain in patients with intracranial germinomas receiving induction chemotherapy. IMRT for WV with induction chemotherapy could reduce the late side effects from cranial irradiation without compromising control of the tumor.

  20. [Image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Louvel, G; Cazoulat, G; Chajon, E; Le Maître, A; Simon, A; Henry, O; Bensadoun, R J; de Crevoisier, R

    2012-09-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account anatomical variations occurring during irradiation by visualization of anatomical structures. It may consist of a rigid registration of the tumour by moving the patient, in case of prostatic irradiation for example. IGRT associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is strongly recommended when high-dose is delivered in the prostate, where it seems to reduce rectal and bladder toxicity. In case of significant anatomical deformations, as in head and neck tumours (tumour shrinking and decrease in volume of the salivary glands), replanning appears to be necessary, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy. This should ideally be "monitored" and possibly triggered based on a calculation of cumulative dose, session after session, compared to the initial planning dose, corresponding to the concept of dose-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The creation of "planning libraries" based on predictable organ positions (as in cervical cancer) is another way of adaptive radiotherapy. All of these strategies still appear very complex and expensive and therefore require stringent validation before being routinely applied. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. Oral microbial carriage in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients at the time of diagnosis and during radiotherapy - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sonalika, Wanjari G; Amsavardani Tayaar, S; Bhat, Kishore G; Patil, B R; Muddapur, M V

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco chewing habit, presence of squamous cell carcinoma in oral cavity and radiotherapy causes alterations in healthy oral microflora. Abnormal flora developed due to radiotherapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients can exacerbate mucositis and can cause systemic infections. The role of oral microorganisms in carcinogenesis is gaining interest recently. Abnormal flora in development of second tumor in the field of first tumor is to be established. The study fundamentally tries to evaluate the shift that occurs during the radiotherapy in OSCC patients. Microbial analysis of saliva samples from OSCC patients undergoing radiotherapy, tobacco chewers and controls was undertaken. The microorganisms were grouped into categories as total aerobes, total anaerobes, candida, coliforms and gram negative anaerobic bacteria. The frequency of isolation of total aerobes, total anaerobes, coliforms and gram negative anaerobic bacteria was significantly high in OSCC patients compared to healthy controls whereas candida was isolated most frequently during radiation period. The tobacco chewers showed significant increase in colony forming units of total aerobes and coliforms. All the microbial groups were high in OSCC and radiotherapy patients. While OSCC patients showed significant increase in total anaerobes and gram negative anaerobes, candida was increased in radiotherapy patients only. Habits promote coliforms. Tumor supports efficiently anaerobes and candida. The latter is supported more by radiation. The study stresses the importance on administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy right at the time of diagnosis of the lesion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Synchronous Bilateral Testicular Seminoma: A Case Report and a Review of the Pertinent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel A.; Ester, Elizabeth C.; Leavitt, David; Cho, L. Chinsoo

    2013-01-01

    Few cases of synchronous bilateral stage I seminomas have been reported in the world literature. We present a case of bilateral synchronous testicular seminoma, the current literature on the management of stage I seminoma, and the implications for radiotherapy. A forty-year-old man presented with synchronous bilateral classical seminomas, both stage IA. After undergoing bilateral inguinal orchiectomy, he received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy, with a standard paraaortic field. After 18 months of followup, he remains well, without evidence of recurrence. Bilateral germ cell tumors (BGCTs) are reported consistently at a low rate. Bilateral radical inguinal orchiectomy is standard of care, yet some groups have proposed an organ preservation approach. Of the reported cases of bilateral stage I synchronous GCT, with concordant seminoma histology, most of them were treated with bilateral orchiectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Although morbidity associated with radiotherapy directed at the abdomen is not negligible, adjuvant paraaortic radiotherapy remains safe and well-tolerated treatment regime. Bilateral synchronous stage I seminoma of the testes is rare. Organ preservation remains investigational. Chemotherapy is probably a reasonable option. We propose that patients with bilateral stage I synchronous GCT, with concordant seminoma histology, should be managed with bilateral orchiectomy, followed by paraaortic radiotherapy. PMID:23781383

  3. Adjuvant radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral testicular seminoma: a case report and a review of the pertinent literature.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel A; Ester, Elizabeth C; Leavitt, David; Sweet, Robert; Konety, Badrinath; Jha, Gautam; Cho, L Chinsoo

    2013-01-01

    Few cases of synchronous bilateral stage I seminomas have been reported in the world literature. We present a case of bilateral synchronous testicular seminoma, the current literature on the management of stage I seminoma, and the implications for radiotherapy. A forty-year-old man presented with synchronous bilateral classical seminomas, both stage IA. After undergoing bilateral inguinal orchiectomy, he received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy, with a standard paraaortic field. After 18 months of followup, he remains well, without evidence of recurrence. Bilateral germ cell tumors (BGCTs) are reported consistently at a low rate. Bilateral radical inguinal orchiectomy is standard of care, yet some groups have proposed an organ preservation approach. Of the reported cases of bilateral stage I synchronous GCT, with concordant seminoma histology, most of them were treated with bilateral orchiectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Although morbidity associated with radiotherapy directed at the abdomen is not negligible, adjuvant paraaortic radiotherapy remains safe and well-tolerated treatment regime. Bilateral synchronous stage I seminoma of the testes is rare. Organ preservation remains investigational. Chemotherapy is probably a reasonable option. We propose that patients with bilateral stage I synchronous GCT, with concordant seminoma histology, should be managed with bilateral orchiectomy, followed by paraaortic radiotherapy.

  4. Predicted relative risk of premature ovarian failure for three radiotherapy modalities in a girl receiving craniospinal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, A; Newhauser, W D; Taddei, P J; Mahajan, A; Howell, R M

    2013-01-01

    In girls and young women, irradiation of the ovaries can reduce the number of viable ovarian primordial follicles, which may lead to premature ovarian failure and subsequently to sterility. One strategy to minimize this late effect is to reduce the radiation dose to the ovaries. A primary means of reducing dose is to choose a radiotherapy technique that avoids irradiating nearby normal tissue; however, the relative risk of premature ovarian failure (RRPOF) due to the various therapeutic options has not been assessed. This study compared the predicted RRPOF after craniospinal proton radiotherapy, conventional photon radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy. We calculated the equivalent dose delivered to the ovaries of an 11-year old girl from therapeutic and stray radiation. We then predicted the percentage of ovarian primordial follicles killed by radiation and used this as a measure of RRPOF; we also calculated the ratio of relative risk of premature ovarian failure (RRRPOF) among the three radiotherapies. Proton radiotherapy had a lower RRPOF than either of the other two types. We also tested the sensitivity of the RRRPOF between photon and proton therapies to the anatomic position of the ovaries, i.e., proximity to the treatment field (2 ≤ RRRPOF ≤ 10). We found that CRT and IMRT have higher risks of POF than PRT does, regardless of uncertainties in ovarian location. Over all PRT represents a lower RRPOF over the two other modalities. PMID:23603657

  5. Postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy in low-risk endometrial cancers: final results of a Phase I study.

    PubMed

    Macchia, Gabriella; Cilla, Savino; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Padula, Gilbert D A; Deodato, Francesco; Digesù, Cinzia; Caravatta, Luciana; Picardi, Vincenzo; Corrado, Giacomo; Piermattei, Angelo; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Scambia, Giovanni; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2010-04-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy (intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique) to the upper two thirds of the vagina in endometrial cancers with low risk of local recurrence. A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had low-risk resected primary endometrial adenocarcinomas. Radiotherapy was delivered in 5 fractions over 1 week. The planning target volume was the clinical target volume plus 5 mm. The clinical target volume was defined as the upper two thirds of the vagina as evidenced at CT simulation by a vaginal radio-opaque device. The planning target volume was irradiated by a seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique, planned by the Plato Sunrise inverse planning system. A first cohort of 6 patients received 25 Gy (5-Gy fractions), and a subsequent cohort received 30 Gy (6-Gy fractions). The Common Toxicity Criteria scale, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Twelve patients with endometrial cancer were enrolled. Median age was 58 years (range, 49-74 years). Pathologic stage was IB (83.3%) and IC (16.7%). Median tumor size was 30 mm (range, 15-50 mm). All patients completed the prescribed radiotherapy. No patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity at the first level, and the radiotherapy dose was escalated from 25 to 30 Gy. No patients at the second dose level experienced dose-limiting toxicity. The most common Grade 2 toxicity was gastrointestinal, which was tolerable and manageable. The maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy was 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction. On the basis of this result, we are conducting a Phase II study with radiotherapy delivered at 30 Gy.

  6. Five-year follow-up using a prostate stent as fiducial in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carl, Jesper; Sander, Lotte

    2015-06-01

    To report results from the five-year follow-up on a previously reported study using image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) and a removable prostate stent as fiducial. Patients with local or locally advanced PC were treated using five-field 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT). The clinical target volumes (CTV) were treated to 78 Gy in 39 fractions using daily on-line image guidance (IG). Late genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities were scored using the radiotherapy oncology group (RTOG) score and the common toxicity score of adverse events (CTC) score. Urinary symptoms were also scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Median observation time was 5.4 year. Sixty-two of the 90 patients from the original study cohort were eligible for toxicity assessment. Overall survival, cancer-specific survival and biochemical freedom from failure were 85%, 96% and 80%, respectively at five years after radiotherapy. Late toxicity GU and GI RTOG scores≥2 were 5% and 0%. Comparing pre- and post-radiotherapy IPSS scores indicate that development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy may be complex. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy using a prostate stent demonstrated survival data comparable with recently published data. GU and GI toxicities at five-year follow-up were low and comparable to the lowest toxicity rates reported. These findings support that the precision of the prostate stent technique is at least as good as other techniques. IPSS revealed a complex development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy.

  7. [Image-guided radiotherapy and partial delegation to radiotherapy technicians: Clermont-Ferrand experience].

    PubMed

    Loos, G; Moreau, J; Miroir, J; Benhaïm, C; Biau, J; Caillé, C; Bellière, A; Lapeyre, M

    2013-10-01

    The various image-guided radiotherapy techniques raise the question of how to achieve the control of patient positioning before irradiation session and sharing of tasks between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians. We have put in place procedures and operating methods to make a partial delegation of tasks to radiotherapy technicians and secure the process in three situations: control by orthogonal kV imaging (kV-kV) of bony landmarks, control by kV-kV imaging of intraprostatic fiducial goldmarkers and control by cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging for prostate cancer. Significant medical overtime is required to control these three IGRT techniques. Because of their competence in imaging, these daily controls can be delegated to radiotherapy technicians. However, to secure the process, initial training and regular evaluation are essential. The analysis of the comparison of the use of kV/kV on bone structures allowed us to achieve a partial delegation of control to radiotherapy technicians. Controlling the positioning of the prostate through the use and automatic registration of fiducial goldmarkers allows better tracking of the prostate and can be easily delegated to radiotherapy technicians. The analysis of the use of daily cone beam CT for patients treated with intensity modulated irradiation is underway, and a comparison of practices between radiotherapy technicians and radiation oncologists is ongoing to know if a partial delegation of this control is possible. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  8. A dose comparison of proton radiotherapy and photon radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of photon radiotherapy and to compare the dose of treatment planning between proton radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pediatric brain tumor patients. This study was conducted in five pediatric brain tumor patients who underwent craniospinal irradiation treatment from October 2013 to April 2014 in the hospital. The study compared organs at risk (OARs) by assessing the dose distribution of normal tissue from the proton plan and 3D-CRT. Furthermore, this study assessed the treatment plans by looking at the homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). As a result, the study revealed OARs due to the small volume proton radiotherapy dose distribution in the normal tissue. Also, by comparing HI and CI between the 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy plan, the study found that the dose of proton radiotherapy plan was homogenized. When conducting 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy in a dose-volume histogram comparison, the dose of distribution turned out to be low. Consequently, proton radiotherapy is used for protecting the normal tissue, and is used in tumor tissue as a homogenized dose for effective treatment.

  9. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy.

  10. Predicting compliance and survival in palliative whole-brain radiotherapy for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Sebastià; Mur, Encarna; Müller, Katrin; Arenas, Meritxell

    2012-01-01

    Brain radiotherapy is the main treatment for patients with brain metastases but its goal is just symptom control. Our aim was to study if different performance tools, used in geriatric practice, could improve patient selection for decision-making in the palliative brain radiotherapy setting. Data from 61 consecutive patients were analysed. In addition to Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) their physical activity was assessed by means of the activity of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL) scales. A neurocognitive evaluation was performed with the Pfeiffer Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) and with the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE). Radiotherapy compliance and short survival were the endpoints of the study. High rates of cognitive impairment were found by both neurocognitive tools (Pfeiffer: 19.7% of patients; MMSE: 30%). Dependence was also highly prevalent, either measured by the ADL (50.8%) or by the IADL (43.3%). Nearly one third (27.9%) of patients died soon after radiotherapy evaluation. Longer survival was related to female, younger than 60 years, breast cancer primary tumour, steroid response, RPA class, and higher performance and neurocognitive score tools. A premature death was associated with neurocognitive tools, IADL and longer interval from brain metastatic diagnosis to radiotherapy. Twenty-three percent of patients were not able to finish the WBRT course due to clinical deterioration. The only variable related to compliance was a low MMSE score. Results suggest that the geriatric tools analysed could offer information on brain palliative radiotherapy complementary to that offered by the more usual tools. It will be interesting to study if our data could be extrapolated to the general palliative oncological field.

  11. Implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, C; Nguyen, T V F; Puyraveau, M; Bonnet, É; Lescut, N; Azélie, C; Miny, J; Mauvais, O; Maurina, T; Tochet, F; Bosset, J-F; Thariat, J; Sun, X S

    2017-02-01

    To report on patterns of relapse following implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and subsequent changes in practice in a tertiary care centre. Between 2008 and 2011, 188 consecutive patients (mean age 59 years old) received intensity-modulated radiotherapies with curative intent for squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity (17.5%), oropharynx (43%), hypopharynx (21%), larynx (14%), sinonasal cavities (6%), nasopharynx (1.5%) at the university hospital of Besançon. There were stage I and II 9%, III 24.5%, IV 66.5%. One hundred and thirty-eight underwent exclusive intensity-modulated radiotherapy, 50 underwent postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy, 174 had concurrent chemotherapy, 57 had induction chemotherapy. Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy with static fields was performed for all patients using sequential irradiation in 174 patients and simultaneous integrated boost irradiation in 14 patients. With a median follow-up was 27.5 months, there was 79% of locoregional failures occurred in the 95% isodose. Two-year overall survival, disease-free, local failure-free and locoregional failure-free survival rates were73%, 60%, 79% and 72%, respectively. Prognostic factors for disease-free survival were stage (IV vs. I-III) with a relative risk of 1.7 [1.1-2.8] (P=0.02) and T stage with 1.6 [1.04-2.5] (P=0.03). The current series showed similar patterns of failure as in other tertiary care centres. We did not identify intensity-modulated radiotherapy specific relapse risks. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of secondary neutrons induced by proton radiotherapy for cancer patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although proton radiotherapy is a promising new approach for cancer patients, functional interference is a concern for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of secondary neutrons induced by proton radiotherapy on ICDs. Methods The experimental set-up simulated proton radiotherapy for a patient with an ICD. Four new ICDs were placed 0.3 cm laterally and 3 cm distally outside the radiation field in order to evaluate the influence of secondary neutrons. The cumulative in-field radiation dose was 107 Gy over 10 sessions of irradiation with a dose rate of 2 Gy/min and a field size of 10 × 10 cm2. After each radiation fraction, interference with the ICD by the therapy was analyzed by an ICD programmer. The dose distributions of secondary neutrons were estimated by Monte-Carlo simulation. Results The frequency of the power-on reset, the most serious soft error where the programmed pacing mode changes temporarily to a safety back-up mode, was 1 per approximately 50 Gy. The total number of soft errors logged in all devices was 29, which was a rate of 1 soft error per approximately 15 Gy. No permanent device malfunctions were detected. The calculated dose of secondary neutrons per 1 Gy proton dose in the phantom was approximately 1.3-8.9 mSv/Gy. Conclusions With the present experimental settings, the probability was approximately 1 power-on reset per 50 Gy, which was below the dose level (60-80 Gy) generally used in proton radiotherapy. Further quantitative analysis in various settings is needed to establish guidelines regarding proton radiotherapy for cancer patients with ICDs. PMID:22284700

  13. Influence of secondary neutrons induced by proton radiotherapy for cancer patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Isobe, Tomonori; Hashii, Haruko; Kumada, Hiroaki; Tada, Hiroshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakae, Takeji; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2012-01-29

    Although proton radiotherapy is a promising new approach for cancer patients, functional interference is a concern for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of secondary neutrons induced by proton radiotherapy on ICDs. The experimental set-up simulated proton radiotherapy for a patient with an ICD. Four new ICDs were placed 0.3 cm laterally and 3 cm distally outside the radiation field in order to evaluate the influence of secondary neutrons. The cumulative in-field radiation dose was 107 Gy over 10 sessions of irradiation with a dose rate of 2 Gy/min and a field size of 10 × 10 cm². After each radiation fraction, interference with the ICD by the therapy was analyzed by an ICD programmer. The dose distributions of secondary neutrons were estimated by Monte-Carlo simulation. The frequency of the power-on reset, the most serious soft error where the programmed pacing mode changes temporarily to a safety back-up mode, was 1 per approximately 50 Gy. The total number of soft errors logged in all devices was 29, which was a rate of 1 soft error per approximately 15 Gy. No permanent device malfunctions were detected. The calculated dose of secondary neutrons per 1 Gy proton dose in the phantom was approximately 1.3-8.9 mSv/Gy. With the present experimental settings, the probability was approximately 1 power-on reset per 50 Gy, which was below the dose level (60-80 Gy) generally used in proton radiotherapy. Further quantitative analysis in various settings is needed to establish guidelines regarding proton radiotherapy for cancer patients with ICDs.

  14. Second primary tumors after radiotherapy for malignancies. Treatment-related parameters.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    The aim of the present analysis was to identify radiotherapy-related parameters that influence the development of second malignancies. Between 1969 and 1989, about 31,000 patients were treated in Dresden with low voltage (< or = 180 kV X-rays) or telecobalt radiotherapy or a combination of both. Of these 203 were readmitted after earlier radiotherapy, for radiotherapy of a newly developed malignancy. Based on definitive diagnosis of a secondary tumor and completeness of documentation 53 patients were selected for further analysis. This included the spatial relation between the new tumor and the primary treatment fields, and the incidence in relation to the dose at the site of origin. The material does not allow for risk estimation. Primary malignancies comprised breast and gynecological tumors in female, and tumors of prostate, head and neck and lymphomas in male patients. Second tumors developed mainly in corpus uteri, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tract. The high incidence of 9.9% second primary corpus/cervix uteri tumors in patients with primary breast cancers suggests a common etiology. The majority of second tumors was observed within the margin of the planning target volume (PTV), which was defined as the volume 2.5 cm inside to 5 cm outside the field margin proper. Inside the PTV developed < 10%, outside 11% of the second tumors. With regard to dose the majority of second tumors was observed in the region receiving < 6 Gy. A significant number of second primary tumors is found in the volume receiving < or = 6 Gy, i.e. at the margins of the PTV. This should be considered for multiple field radiotherapy and IMRT, where the relevant volumes may be substantially increased.

  15. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developedmore » GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire

  16. Abscopal Effects of Radiotherapy Are Enhanced by Combined Immunostimulatory mAbs and Are Dependent on CD8 T Cells and Crosspriming.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, María E; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Garasa, Saray; Barbes, Benigno; Solorzano, Jose Luis; Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis; Labiano, Sara; Sanmamed, Miguel F; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Bolaños, Elixabet; Sanchez-Paulete, Alfonso R; Aznar, M Angela; Rouzaut, Ana; Schalper, Kurt A; Jure-Kunkel, Maria; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-10-15

    Preclinical and clinical evidence indicate that the proimmune effects of radiotherapy can be synergistically augmented with immunostimulatory mAbs to act both on irradiated tumor lesions and on distant, nonirradiated tumor sites. The combination of radiotherapy with immunostimulatory anti-PD1 and anti-CD137 mAbs was conducive to favorable effects on distant nonirradiated tumor lesions as observed in transplanted MC38 (colorectal cancer), B16OVA (melanoma), and 4T1 (breast cancer) models. The therapeutic activity was crucially performed by CD8 T cells, as found in selective depletion experiments. Moreover, the integrities of BATF-3-dependent dendritic cells specialized in crosspresentation/crosspriming of antigens to CD8+ T cells and of the type I IFN system were absolute requirements for the antitumor effects to occur. The irradiation regimen induced immune infiltrate changes in the irradiated and nonirradiated lesions featured by reductions in the total content of effector T cells, Tregs, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, while effector T cells expressed more intracellular IFNγ in both the irradiated and contralateral tumors. Importantly, 48 hours after irradiation, CD8+ TILs showed brighter expression of CD137 and PD1, thereby displaying more target molecules for the corresponding mAbs. Likewise, PD1 and CD137 were induced on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from surgically excised human carcinomas that were irradiated ex vivo These mechanisms involving crosspriming and CD8 T cells advocate clinical development of immunotherapy combinations with anti-PD1 plus anti-CD137 mAbs that can be synergistically accompanied by radiotherapy strategies, even if the disease is left outside the field of irradiation. Cancer Res; 76(20); 5994-6005. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Role of intraoperative radiotherapy in the treatment of sacral chordoma.

    PubMed

    Jullien-Petrelli, A C; Asencio, J M; Orue-Echebarria, M I; Lozano, P; Álvarez, A; Serrano, J; Calvo, F M; Calvo-Haro, J A; Lasso, J M; García-Sabrido, J L

    2017-09-04

    Sacral chordoma is a rare entity with high local recurrence rates when complete resection is not achieved. Till date, there are not any series available in literature combining surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). To report the experience of our Centre in the management of sacral chordoma combining radical resection with both external radiotherapy and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Retrospective case series. 15 patients with sacral chordoma resected in our centre from 1998 to 2015. Overall survival (OS), Disease free survival and rates of local and distant recurrence. We retrospectively revised the records of all the patients with sacral chordoma resected in our centre from 1998 to December 2015. Overall survival (OS), Disease free survival and rates of local and distant recurrence were calculated. Results between patients treated with or without IORT were compared. A total of 15 patients were identified: 8 males and 7 females. Median age was 59 years (range 28-77). IORT was applied in 9 patients and 6 were treated with surgical resection without IORT. In 13 patients we performed the treatment of the primary tumor and in 2 patients we performed the treatment of recurrence disease. A posterior approach was used in 4 patients. Wide surgical margins (R0) were achieved in 6 patients, marginal margins (R1) in 7 patients and there were not any patient with intralesional (R2) margins. At a median follow up of 38 months (range 11-209 months), the 5 years OS in the IORT group was 100% versus 53% in the group of non-IORT (p=0.05). The median DFS in the IORT group was 85 months versus 41 months in the non-IORT group. In the group without IORT, two patients died and nobody died during the follow up in the group treated with IORT. High sacrectomy treated patients had a median survival of 41 months versus 90 months in low sacrectomy treated patients. DFS in patients without gluteal involvement was 100% at 5 years, and 40% in patients with gluteal involvement (fig

  18. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, O.; Schulz-Ertner, D.; Karger, C. P.; Heeg, P.; Debus, J.

    2005-12-01

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  19. Growth laws in cancer: implications for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Castorina, P; Deisboeck, T S; Gabriele, P; Guiot, C

    2007-09-01

    Comparing the conventional Gompertz tumor growth law (GL) with the "Universal" law (UL), which has recently been proposed and applied to cancer, we have investigated the implications of the growth laws for various radiotherapy regimens. According to the GL, the surviving tumor cell fraction could be reduced ad libitum, independent of the initial tumor mass, simply by increasing the number of treatments. In contrast, if tumor growth dynamics follows the Universal scaling law, there is a lower limit of the surviving fraction that cannot be reduced further regardless of the total number of treatments. This finding can explain the so-called tumor size effect and re-emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis because it implies that radiotherapy may be successful provided that the tumor mass at treatment onset is rather small. Taken together with our previous work, the implications of these findings include revisiting standard radiotherapy regimens and treatment protocols overall.

  20. [Good practice of image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Créhange, G; Castelli, J; Lafond, C; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account the anatomical variations occurring during the course of radiotherapy, by direct or indirect visualization of the target volume followed by a corrective action. The movements of the target, or at least the set-up errors are corrected by moving the treatment table, corresponding to the simplest and most validated IGRT modality in a standard practice. The deformations of the target volume and organs at risk are however much more common, and unfortunately much more complicated to consider, requiring multiple planning before or during the treatment, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy strategies. The planning target volume must be carefully chosen according to these anatomic variations. This article reviews the modalities of IGRT, standard or under evaluation, according to the different tumour sites. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. The effect of pulsed electric fields on the electrotactic migration of human neural progenitor cells through the involvement of intracellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Edin, Fredrik; Li, Hao; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) are required for the physiological control of the central nervous system development. Application of the direct current EFs to neural stem cells has been studied for the possibility of stem cell transplantation as one of the therapies for brain injury. EFs generated within the nervous system are often associated with action potentials and synaptic activity, apparently resulting in a pulsed current in nature. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of pulsed EF, which can reduce the cytotoxicity, on the migration of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs). We applied the mono-directional pulsed EF with a strength of 250mV/mm to hNPCs for 6h. The migration distance of the hNPCs exposed to pulsed EF was significantly greater compared with the control not exposed to the EF. Pulsed EFs, however, had less of an effect on the migration of the differentiated hNPCs. There was no significant change in the survival of hNPCs after exposure to the pulsed EF. To investigate the role of Ca 2+ signaling in electrotactic migration of hNPCs, pharmacological inhibition of Ca 2+ channels in the EF-exposed cells revealed that the electrotactic migration of hNPCs exposed to Ca 2+ channel blockers was significantly lower compared to the control group. The findings suggest that the pulsed EF induced migration of hNPCs is partly influenced by intracellular Ca 2+ signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth by Exposure to a Specific Time-Varying Electromagnetic Field Involves T-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Carly A.; Buckner, Alison L.; Koren, Stan A.; Persinger, Michael A.; Lafrenie, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca2+ influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels. Blocking Ca2+ uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca2+ influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25875081

  3. Radiotherapy in the treatment of solitary plasmacytoma.

    PubMed

    Jyothirmayi, R; Gangadharan, V P; Nair, M K; Rajan, B

    1997-05-01

    Solitary plasmacytoma of bone (SPB) and extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) are rare. High local control rates are reported with radiotherapy, although the optimal dose and extent of radiotherapy portals remains controversial. Between 1983 and 1993, 30 patients with solitary plasmacytoma were seen at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, India. 23 patients had SPB and seven EMP. The mean age was 52 years and the male to female ratio 3.2:1. Diagnosis of SPB was confirmed by biopsy in 16 patients and tumour excision in seven. 20 patients received megavoltage radiotherapy to the bone lesion with limited margins, and one received chemotherapy. Two patients who underwent complete tumour excision received no further treatment. All seven patients with EMP received megavoltage radiotherapy, four following biopsy and three after tumour excision. Local control was achieved in all patients with SPB. Nine progressed to multiple myeloma and one developed a solitary plasmacytoma in another bone. Six patients with EMP achieved local control. Three later progressed to multiple myeloma and one had local relapse. Median time to relapse was 28 months in SPB and 30 months in EMP. 5-year overall survival rates were 82% and 57% for patients with SPB and EMP, respectively. The corresponding progression free survival rates were 55% and 50%, respectively. Age, sex, site of tumour, serum M protein and haemoglobin levels did not significantly influence progression free survival. The extent of surgery, radiotherapy dose or time to relapse were not significant prognostic factors. Radiotherapy appears to be an effective modality of treatment of solitary plasmacytoma. No dose-response relationship is observed, and high local control rates are achieved with limited portals. Progression to multiple myeloma is the commonest pattern of failure, although no prognostic factors for progression are identified. The role of chemotherapy in preventing disease progression needs further evaluation.

  4. Credentialing of radiotherapy centres in Australasia for TROG 09.02 (Chisel), a Phase III clinical trial on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy of early stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kron, Tomas; Chesson, Brent; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Crain, Melissa; Clements, Natalie; Burns, Mark; Ball, David

    2018-03-06

    A randomised clinical trial comparing stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) with conventional radiotherapy for early stage lung cancer has been conducted in Australia and New Zealand under the auspices of the TransTasman Radiation Oncology Group (NCT01014130). We report on the technical credentialing program as prerequisite for centres joining the trial. Participating centres were asked to develop treatment plans for two test cases to assess their ability to create plans according to protocol. Dose delivery in the presence of inhomogeneity and motion was assessed during a site visit using a phantom with moving inserts. Site visits for the trial were conducted in 16 Australian and 3 New Zealand radiotherapy facilities. The tests with low density inhomogeneities confirmed shortcomings of the AAA algorithm for dose calculation. Dose was assessed for a typical treatment delivery including at least one non-coplanar beam in a stationary and moving phantom. This end-to-end test confirmed that all participating centres were able to deliver stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy with the required accuracy while the planning study demonstrated that they were able to produce acceptable plans for both test cases. The credentialing process documented that participating centres were able to deliver dose as required in the trial protocol. It also gave an opportunity to provide education about the trial and discuss technical issues such as four-dimensional CT, small field dosimetry and patient immobilisation with staff in participating centres. Advances in knowledge: Credentialing is an important quality assurance tool for radiotherapy trials using advanced technology. In addition to confirming technical competence, it provides an opportunity for education and discussion about the trial.

  5. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Maglieri, Robert; Licea, Angel; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors' measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. The NNS may be used to reliably measure the neutron

  6. [The role of whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal-sparing].

    PubMed

    Truc, G; Martin, É; Mirjolet, C; Chamois, J; Petitfils, A; Créhange, G

    2013-10-01

    Hippocampi plays a fundamental role in immediate or long-term memory and the spatial learning. This structure is rarely involved by metastasis and their irradiation is at the origin of some impairment of the neurocognitive function. Sparing hippocampi during whole brain radiation therapy becomes possible with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or with helical tomotherapy. The delineation of the structures should be performed after coregistration of gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR-images with the planning. The D40 to both hippocampi should not be greater than 7.3 Gy. Patients who are more likely to benefit from a hippocampal-sparing strategy must have a 6 months or longer life expectancy and a Karnosky index above 70. Hence, patients who are more likely to be deemed fit for this strategy are frequently patients with NSCLC, breast cancer, gastointestinal cancers or patients. Patients with small cell lung carcinoma who are selected for prophylactic cerebral irradiation should be also considered, as they are unfit for ablative treatments such as stereotactic radiotherapy or brain surgery. Moreover, brain metastasis located in the area surrounding the hippocampi are unlikely. To date, no randomized study is available to confirm these assumptions. Two on-going prospective trials (RTOG 0933 and a French phase II trial) are currently investigating whether breast cancer patients with a single resected metastasis could benefit from the hippocampal-sparing strategy during whole brain radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. Prevention of accidental exposure in radiotherapy: the risk matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Vilaragut, J J; Duménigo, C; Delgado, J M; Morales, J; McDonnell, J D; Ferro, R; Ortiz López, P; Ramírez, M L; Pérez Mulas, A; Papadopulos, S; Gonçalves, M; López Morones, R; Sánchez Cayuela, C; Cascajo Castresana, A; Somoano, F; Álvarez, C; Guillén, A; Rodríguez, M; Pereira, P P; Nader, A

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge and lessons from past accidental exposures in radiotherapy are very helpful in finding safety provisions to prevent recurrence. Disseminating lessons is necessary but not sufficient. There may be additional latent risks for other accidental exposures, which have not been reported or have not occurred, but are possible and may occur in the future if not identified, analyzed, and prevented by safety provisions. Proactive methods are available for anticipating and quantifying risk from potential event sequences. In this work, proactive methods, successfully used in industry, have been adapted and used in radiotherapy. Risk matrix is a tool that can be used in individual hospitals to classify event sequences in levels of risk. As with any anticipative method, the risk matrix involves a systematic search for potential risks; that is, any situation that can cause an accidental exposure. The method contributes new insights: The application of the risk matrix approach has identified that another group of less catastrophic but still severe single-patient events may have a higher probability, resulting in higher risk. The use of the risk matrix approach for safety assessment in individual hospitals would provide an opportunity for self-evaluation and managing the safety measures that are most suitable to the hospital's own conditions.

  8. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual function in women

    PubMed Central

    Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    Background During the past decade there has been considerable progress in developing new radiation methods for cancer treatment. Pelvic radiotherapy constitutes the primary or (neo) adjuvant treatment of many pelvic cancers e.g., locally advanced cervical and rectal cancer. There is an increasing focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. Methods An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. Results The literature search revealed a few RCTs with FSD evaluated as a PRO and being a secondary outcome measure in endometrial and in rectal cancer patients. Very limited information could be extracted regarding FSD in bladder, vulva, and anal cancer patients. The literature before and after 2010 confirms that pelvic radiotherapy, independent on modality, increases the risk significantly for FSD both compared to data from age-matched healthy control women and compared to data on patients treated by surgery only. There was only very limited data available on modern radiotherapy modalities. These are awaited during the next five years. Several newer studies confirm that health care professionals are still reluctant to discuss treatment induced sexual dysfunction with patients. Conclusions

  9. Identifying radiotherapy target volumes in brain cancer by image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Feng, Yang; Steel, Robin; Liao, Hanqing; McLaren, Duncan B.; Erridge, Sara C.; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    To establish the optimal radiotherapy fields for treating brain cancer patients, the tumour volume is often outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images, where the tumour is clearly visible, and mapped onto computerised tomography images used for radiotherapy planning. This process requires considerable clinical experience and is time consuming, which will continue to increase as more complex image sequences are used in this process. Here, the potential of image analysis techniques for automatically identifying the radiation target volume on MR images, and thereby assisting clinicians with this difficult task, was investigated. A gradient-based level set approach was applied on the MR images of five patients with grades II, III and IV malignant cerebral glioma. The relationship between the target volumes produced by image analysis and those produced by a radiation oncologist was also investigated. The contours produced by image analysis were compared with the contours produced by an oncologist and used for treatment. In 93% of cases, the Dice similarity coefficient was found to be between 60 and 80%. This feasibility study demonstrates that image analysis has the potential for automatic outlining in the management of brain cancer patients, however, more testing and validation on a much larger patient cohort is required. PMID:26609418

  10. Identifying radiotherapy target volumes in brain cancer by image analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Feng, Yang; Steel, Robin; Liao, Hanqing; McLaren, Duncan B; Erridge, Sara C; McLaughlin, Stephen; Nailon, William H

    2015-10-01

    To establish the optimal radiotherapy fields for treating brain cancer patients, the tumour volume is often outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images, where the tumour is clearly visible, and mapped onto computerised tomography images used for radiotherapy planning. This process requires considerable clinical experience and is time consuming, which will continue to increase as more complex image sequences are used in this process. Here, the potential of image analysis techniques for automatically identifying the radiation target volume on MR images, and thereby assisting clinicians with this difficult task, was investigated. A gradient-based level set approach was applied on the MR images of five patients with grades II, III and IV malignant cerebral glioma. The relationship between the target volumes produced by image analysis and those produced by a radiation oncologist was also investigated. The contours produced by image analysis were compared with the contours produced by an oncologist and used for treatment. In 93% of cases, the Dice similarity coefficient was found to be between 60 and 80%. This feasibility study demonstrates that image analysis has the potential for automatic outlining in the management of brain cancer patients, however, more testing and validation on a much larger patient cohort is required.

  11. [Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of cerebral meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Noël, G; Renard, A; Valéry, C; Mokhtari, K; Mazeron, J J

    2001-06-01

    Cerebral meningiomas account for 15-20% of all cerebral tumours. Although seldom malignant, they frequently recur in spite of complete surgery, which remains the cornerstone of the treatment. In order to decrease the probability of local recurrence, radiotherapy has often been recommended in atypical or malignant meningioma as well as in benign meningioma which was incompletely resected. However, this treatment never was the subject of prospective studies, randomized or not. The purpose of this review of the literature was to give a progress report on the results of different published series in the field of methodology as well as in the techniques of radiotherapy. Proposals for a therapeutic choice are made according to this analysis. For grade I or grade II-III meningiomas, limits of gross tumor volume (GTV) include the tumour in place or the residual tumour after surgery; clinical target volume (CTV) limits include gross tumour volume before surgery with a GTV-CTV distance of 1 and 2 cm respectively. Delivered doses are 55 Gy into CTV and 55-60 Gy and 70 Gy into GTV for grade I and grade II-III meningiomas respectively.

  12. Emerging Role of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy with Simultaneous Integrated Boost in Modern Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nitsche, Mirko; Dunst, Juergen; Carl, Ulrich M.; Hermann, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hypofractionated radiotherapy for breast cancer is becoming increasingly important. The scientific background of this development as well as the introduction of the simultaneous integrated boost to the primary tumor region in this context are discussed here. PMID:26688679

  13. Emerging Role of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy with Simultaneous Integrated Boost in Modern Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Mirko; Dunst, Juergen; Carl, Ulrich M; Hermann, Robert M

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy for breast cancer is becoming increasingly important. The scientific background of this development as well as the introduction of the simultaneous integrated boost to the primary tumor region in this context are discussed here.

  14. Radiosensitization by combining an aurora kinase inhibitor with radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma through cell cycle interruption.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhong-Zhe; Chou, Chia-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Liu, Wei-Lin; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason

    2014-07-15

    Radiotherapy has been integrated into the multimodal treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), especially of localized hepatic tumor(s) refractory to conventional treatment. However, tumor control remains unsatisfactory mainly because of insufficient dose, and sublethally irradiated tumor may associate with metastasis. Our aim was to assess the effect of combining a molecularly targeted Aurora kinase inhibitor, VE-465, with radiotherapy in in vitro and in vivo models of human HCC. Human HCC cell lines (Huh7 and PLC-5) were used to evaluate the in vitro synergism of combining VE-465 with irradiation. Flow cytometry analyzed the cell cycle changes, while western blot investigated the protein expressions after the combined treatment. Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice bearing ectopic and orthotopic HCC xenografts were treated with VE-465 and/or radiotherapy for the in vivo response. VE-465 significantly enhanced radiation-induced death in HCC cells by a mechanism involving the enhanced inhibition of histone H3 phosphorylation and interruption of cell cycle change. In SCID, mice bearing ectopic HCC xenografts, pretreatment with VE-465 (20 mg/kg/day × 9 days) significantly enhanced the tumor-suppressive effect of radiotherapy (5 Gy/day × 5 days) by 54.0%. A similar combinatorial effect of VE-465 and radiotherapy was observed in an orthotopic model of Huh7 tumor growth by 17.2%. In the orthotopic Huh7 xenografts, VE-465 significantly enhanced radiation-induced tumor growth suppression by a mechanism involving the increased apoptosis. VE-465 is a potent inhibitor of Aurora kinase with therapeutic value as a radiosensitizer of HCC. © 2013 UICC.

  15. [NOVEL STRATEGY IN THE RADIOTHERAPY OF METASTATIC BRAIN TUMORS: SIMULTANEOUS WHOLE BRAIN RADIOTHERAPY AND INTEGRATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY].

    PubMed

    Kalincsák, Judit; László, Zoltán; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Kovács, Péter; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Mangel László

    2015-11-30

    Treatment of central nervous system (CNS) tumors has always played an important role in development of radiotherapy techniques. Precise patient immobilisation, non-coplanar field arrangement, conformal treatment, arc therapy, radiosurgery, application of image fusion to radiation planning or re-irradiation were first introduced into clinical routine in the treatment of brain tumors. A modern multifunctional radiation instrument, Novalis TX has been installed at the University of Pécs two years ago. New methods, such as real time 3D image guided therapy, dynamic arc therapy and ultra-conformity offer further progress in treatment of CNS tumors. Whole brain irradiation and simultaneous fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery or integrated boost seem to be an optimal method in the treatment of not only soliter or oligo, but even a higher number (4-9) and not typically radiosensitive brain metastases. The new treatment strategy is illustrated by presentation of four case histories. Treatment protocol was completed in all cases. Treatment period of 1.5 to 3 weeks, and treatment time of only a few minutes were not stressful for the patients. A quite remarkable clinical improvement as to general condition of the patients was experienced in three cases. Follow-up images confirmed either remission or a stable disease. Simultaneous whole brain radiotherapy and integrated stereotactic radiosurgery is a reproducible, safe method that offers an effective irradiation with delivery of definitive dosage even in cases with radio-insensitive brain metastasis.

  16. Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy vs. stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of meningioma located predominantly in the skull base.

    PubMed

    Baumert, Brigitta G; Norton, Ian A; Davis, J Bernard

    2003-10-01

    This study evaluates a possible advantage of intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) over stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) in the treatment of lesions in the base of the skull. Ten patients (7 with a skull base meningioma) planned for routine SCRT were replanned for IMSRT. The criteria for comparison were the same for both methods: optimal dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and optimal sparing of the organs at risk (OAR). For SCRT, sparing of OAR was achieved by conformal avoidance using 5-6 fields. The IMSRT inverse planning process used optimized OAR sparing through user-defined dose constraints. Dose to the PTV and OAR were assessed by dose-volume histograms, maximum dose, 2 conformity indices, and volumes of relevant isodoses. The conformity index is consistently higher for IMSRT, the largest improvement being for the multifocal and irregular cases. Volumes of the 90% and 80% isodoses were smaller for IMSRT, whereas the volume of the 30% isodose was larger for IMSRT in 6 cases. The maximum dose was consistently higher for IMSRT (mean values 102% and 108% for SCRT and IMSRT, respectively). Sparing of OAR was better with IMSRT, especially for those OARs situated in or near a concave PTV. In terms of PTV coverage, there is an advantage in using IMSRT for all target shapes, but especially for irregular and concave targets. The dose to OAR is lower with IMSRT, although the volume of normal tissue receiving a low dose can be larger than for SCRT.

  17. [Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis: Benefit of additional whole brain radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Royer, P; Salleron, J; Vogin, G; Taillandier, L; Clément-Duchêne, C; Klein, O; Faivre, J-C; Peiffert, D; Bernier, V

    2017-12-01

    To study overall survival, risk of neurological death, local recurrence and development of new brain metastasis in patients treated for brain oligometastases with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with CyberKnife®, according to the association or not with an additional whole brain irradiation. Institutional retrospective study of 102 patients treated for one to three brain metastasis: 76 with exclusive hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and 26 with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and whole brain irradiation. Objectives were assessed and compared between these two groups according to the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox model. Median follow-up was 18.8 months. There were no difference between exclusive hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with whole brain irradiation for overall survival (respective median 21.5 and 20.1 months), risk of neurological death (respectively 9.2% and 15.4% at one year). At one year: the risk of cerebral progressive disease was greater in the group receiving exclusive hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (respectively 43.4% vs. 26.2%, P=0.043), the risk of local recurrence was 25% versus 17.6% (P=0.28) and the development of new brain metastasis was 23.7% versus 11.5% (P=0.27). After salvage treatments, crude local control was similar in the two groups, respectively 78.6% and 73.5%. Whole brain irradiation has been avoided for 72.4% of patients in the group receving exclusive hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Whole brain irradiation improves local control of brain metastatic disease in addition to hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Sparing whole brain irradiation for salvage treatments only does not affect overall survival or risk of neurological death in selected patients with favourable prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Postmastectomy locoregional radiotherapy for breast cancer: literature review].

    PubMed

    Noël, G; Mazeron, J J

    2000-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is controversial after radical mastectomy. Recent clinical trials have shown an increase in survival with this irradiation and conclusions of previous meta-analyses should be reconsidered. The results of a large number of randomized clinical trials in which women received post-mastectomy radiotherapy or not have been reviewed. These trials showed a decrease in locoregional failure with the use of postoperative radiotherapy but survival advantages have not been clearly identified. A larger number of randomized clinical trials compared postoperative radiotherapy alone, chemotherapy alone and the association of the two treatments. They showed that chemotherapy was less active locally than radiotherapy and that radiotherapy and chemotherapy significantly increased both disease-free and overall survival rates in the groups which received postoperative radiotherapy. These favourable results were, however, obtained with optimal radiotherapy techniques and a relative sparing of lung tissue and cardiac muscle. Many retrospective clinical analyses concluded that results obtained in locoregional failure rate were poor and that these failures led to an increase in future risks. Both radiotherapy and systemic treatment should be delivered after mastectomy, reserved for patients with a high risk of locoregional relapses, particularly of nodes and/or tumors with a diameter > or = 5 cm. However, radiotherapy could produce secondary effects, and techniques of radiotherapy should be optimal.

  19. Post-radiotherapy hypothyroidism in dogs treated for thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Amores-Fuster, I; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L

    2017-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common adverse event after head and neck radiotherapy in human medicine, but uncommonly reported in canine patients. Records of 21 dogs with histologically or cytologically confirmed thyroid carcinoma receiving definitive or hypofractionated radiotherapy were reviewed. Nine cases received 48 Gy in 12 fractions, 10 received 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 2 received 32 Gy in 4 fractions. Seventeen cases had radiotherapy in a post-operative setting. Ten cases developed hypothyroidism (47.6%) after radiotherapy. The development of hypothyroidism was not associated with the radiotherapy protocol used. Median time to diagnosis of hypothyroidism was 6 months (range, 1-13 months). Hypothyroidism is a common side effect following radiotherapy for thyroid carcinomas. Monitoring of thyroid function following radiotherapy is recommended. No specific risk factors have been identified. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors: State of the art].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Azria, D; Mornex, F

    2017-10-01

    Thanks to the improvement in radiotherapy physics, biology, computing and imaging, patients presenting with liver tumors can be efficiently treated by radiation. Radiotherapy has been included in liver tumors treatment guidelines at all disease stages. Liver stereotactic radiotherapy has to be preferred to standard fractionated radiotherapy whenever possible, as potentially more efficient because of higher biological equivalent dose. Liver stereotactic radiotherapy planning and delivery require extensive experience and optimal treatment quality at every step, thus limiting its availability to specialized centres. Multicentre studies are difficult to develop due to a large technical heterogeneity. Respiratory management, image guidance and immobilization are considerations as important as machine type. The use of multimodal planning imaging is compulsory to achieve expected contouring quality. Treatment efficacy is difficult to assess following liver stereotactic radiotherapy, but local control is high and toxicity unusual. As a consequence, liver stereotactic radiotherapy is part of multimodal and multidisciplinary management of liver tumors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. Breast Cancer Patients’ Experience of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical component of treatment for the majority of women with breast cancer, particularly those who receive breast conserving surgery. Although medically beneficial, radiotherapy can take a physical and psychological toll on patients. However, little is known about the specific thoughts and feelings experienced by women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Therefore, the study aim was to use qualitative research methods to develop an understanding of these thoughts and feelings based on 180 diary entries, completed during radiotherapy by 15 women with Stage 0-III breast cancer. Thematic analysis identified four primary participant concerns: (a) a preoccupation with time; (b) fantasies (both optimistic and pessimistic) about life following radiotherapy; (c) the toll their side-effect experience takes on their self-esteem; and (d) feeling mystified by radiotherapy. These themes are consistent with previous literature on illness and identity. These findings have implications for the treatment and care of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19380502

  2. Radiotherapy reduces sialorrhea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Neppelberg, E; Haugen, D F; Thorsen, L; Tysnes, O-B

    2007-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Sialorrhea is a frequent problem in ALS patients with bulbar symptoms, because of progressive weakness of oral, lingual and pharyngeal muscles. This prospective study aimed to investigate the putative effect of palliative single-dose radiotherapy on problematic sialorrhea in patients with ALS. Twenty patients with ALS and problematic drooling were included; 14 were given radiotherapy with a single fraction of 7.5 Grey (Gy). Five patients were treated with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections (20 U) into the parotid glands; two of these were later given radiotherapy. Symptom assessment, clinical examination and measurements of salivary flow (ml/min) were performed before and after treatment (1-2 weeks, 3 months). Salivary secretion was significantly reduced after radiation treatment, with a mean reduction of 60% (1 week) and 51% (2 weeks). Three months post-treatment, 21% reduction of the salivary secretion was observed compared with salivation before treatment. Mean salivary flow was not reduced after BTX-A treatment in five patients. No serious side-effects were observed with either of the two treatment modalities. Single-dose radiotherapy (7.5 Gy) significantly reduces sialorrhea and is an effective and safe palliative treatment in patients with ALS.

  3. Integer programming for improving radiotherapy treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ming; Li, Yi; Kou, Bo; Zhou, Zhili

    2017-01-01

    Patients received by radiotherapy departments are diverse and may be diagnosed with different cancers. Therefore, they need different radiotherapy treatment plans and thus have different needs for medical resources. This research aims to explore the best method of scheduling the admission of patients receiving radiotherapy so as to reduce patient loss and maximize the usage efficiency of service resources. A mix integer programming (MIP) model integrated with special features of radiotherapy is constructed. The data used here is based on the historical data collected and we propose an exact method to solve the MIP model. Compared with the traditional First Come First Served (FCFS) method, the new method has boosted patient admission as well as the usage of linear accelerators (LINAC) and beds. The integer programming model can be used to describe the complex problem of scheduling radio-receiving patients, to identify the bottleneck resources that hinder patient admission, and to obtain the optimal LINAC-bed radio under the current data conditions. Different management strategies can be implemented by adjusting the settings of the MIP model. The computational results can serve as a reference for the policy-makers in decision making.

  4. Integer programming for improving radiotherapy treatment efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Ming; Kou, Bo; Zhou, Zhili

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Patients received by radiotherapy departments are diverse and may be diagnosed with different cancers. Therefore, they need different radiotherapy treatment plans and thus have different needs for medical resources. This research aims to explore the best method of scheduling the admission of patients receiving radiotherapy so as to reduce patient loss and maximize the usage efficiency of service resources. Materials and methods A mix integer programming (MIP) model integrated with special features of radiotherapy is constructed. The data used here is based on the historical data collected and we propose an exact method to solve the MIP model. Results Compared with the traditional First Come First Served (FCFS) method, the new method has boosted patient admission as well as the usage of linear accelerators (LINAC) and beds. Conclusions The integer programming model can be used to describe the complex problem of scheduling radio-receiving patients, to identify the bottleneck resources that hinder patient admission, and to obtain the optimal LINAC-bed radio under the current data conditions. Different management strategies can be implemented by adjusting the settings of the MIP model. The computational results can serve as a reference for the policy-makers in decision making. PMID:28700726

  5. Results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus . E-mail: ramnie@uniklinikum-saarland.de; Wenzlawowicz, Knut v.; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wisser, Lothar; Derouet, Harry; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease. Patients and Methods: In the time interval 1983-2000, 154 patients in our clinic were irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Of those, 101 had at least one complete follow-up data set and are the subject of this study. In the majority of patients, penis deviation was between 30 and 50{sup o}, there were one or two indurated foci with a diameter between 5 and 15 mm. Pain was recorded in 48/92 patients. Seventy-two of the 101 patients received radiotherapy with a total dose of 30 Gy, and 25 received 36 Gy in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy. The remaining patients received the following dosage: 34 Gy (1 patient), 38-40 Gy (3 patients). Mean duration of follow-up was 5 years. Results: The best results ever at any time during follow-up were an improvement of deviation in 47%, reduction of number of foci in 32%, reduction of size of foci in 49%, and less induration in 52%. Approximately 50% reported pain relief after radiotherapy. There were 28 patients with mild acute dermatitis and only 4 patients with mild urethritis. There were no long-term side effects. Conclusion: Our results compare well with those of other studies in the literature. In our patient cohort, radiotherapy was an effective therapy option with only very rare and mild side effects.