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Sample records for involves atrial natriuretic

  1. Involvement of atrial natriuretic peptide in blood pressure reduction induced by estradiol in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Belo, Najara O; Silva-Barra, Juliana; Carnio, Evelin C; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Dos Reis, Adelina M

    2004-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the involvement of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in blood pressure (BP) alterations induced by estradiol treatment. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar rats (WR) were ovariectomized and, after 3 weeks, were injected daily for 4 days with estradiol benzoate (E2; 5 microg/100 g/day) or a vehicle. One day after the last injection, the animals were decapitated, blood was collected, and both right and left atrial appendages were quickly removed for determination of ANP by radioimmunoassay (RIA), or used for ANP mRNA determination. Estradiol treatment induced a significant reduction of blood pressure in SHR, but not in WR. This reduction was correlated with the increase of plasma ANP levels that were significantly increased in E2-treated, compared with vehicle-treated, SHR. E2-treated SHR showed significant increases in ANP concentration in the right and left atria compared to the vehicle-treated animals. These observations were confirmed by ANP mRNA. In summary, the present study shows that short-term estradiol treatment reduces the blood pressure of ovariectomized SHR, but not of WR. This reduction was highly correlated with increased plasma estradiol and ANP levels. These results suggest that ANP is involved in mediating the effect of estradiol on blood pressure reduction.

  2. Atrial natriuretic peptide frameshift mutation in familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Karst, Margaret L; Zingman, Leonid V; Heublein, Denise M; Darbar, Dawood; Herron, Kathleen J; Ballew, Jeffrey D; de Andrade, Mariza; Burnett, John C; Olson, Timothy M

    2008-07-10

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that is hereditary in a small subgroup of patients. In a family with 11 clinically affected members, we mapped an atrial fibrillation locus to chromosome 1p36-p35 and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the gene encoding atrial natriuretic peptide. Circulating chimeric atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was detected in high concentration in subjects with the mutation, and shortened atrial action potentials were seen in an isolated heart model, creating a possible substrate for atrial fibrillation. This report implicates perturbation of the atrial natriuretic peptide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in cardiac electrical instability. PMID:18614783

  3. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  4. Atrial natriuretic factor: is it responsible for hyponatremia and natriuresis in neurosurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Gasparotto, Ana Paula Devite Cardoso; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Kosour, Carolina; Araújo, Sebastião; Cintra, Eliane Araújo; de Oliveira, Rosmari Aparecida Rosa Almeida; Martins, Luiz Claudio; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of hyponatremia and natriuresis and their association with atrial natriuretic factor in neurosurgery patients. Methods The study included 30 patients who had been submitted to intracranial tumor resection and cerebral aneurism clipping. Both plasma and urinary sodium and plasma atrial natriuretic factor were measured during the preoperative and postoperative time periods. Results Hyponatremia was present in 63.33% of the patients, particularly on the first postoperative day. Natriuresis was present in 93.33% of the patients, particularly on the second postoperative day. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor was increased in 92.60% of the patients in at least one of the postoperative days; however, there was no statistically significant association between the atrial natriuretic factor and plasma sodium and between the atrial natriuretic factor and urinary sodium. Conclusion Hyponatremia and natriuresis were present in most patients after neurosurgery; however, the atrial natriuretic factor cannot be considered to be directly responsible for these alterations in neurosurgery patients. Other natriuretic factors are likely to be involved. PMID:27410411

  5. Atrial natriuretic factor and body water distribution.

    PubMed

    Vidal, N A; Arranz, C T; Mones Sias, M C; Herrmann, A P; Martinez Seeber, A

    1987-11-01

    In the rat, the effects of an atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) (Rat, 8-33 Peninsula Lab) on body water distribution have been evaluated. The ANF administration to nephrectomized animals produced a decrease in plasma volume and a slight increase in haematocrit and in plasma albumin concentration. No modifications were observed in total and intracellular water. The fluid efflux from the capillaries appeared to be located in the interstitial space. These results suggest that ANF could regulate plasma volume and systemic blood pressure, concurrently with its other known effects.

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide: water and electrolyte homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, C J; Jardine, A G

    1989-08-01

    In the few years since its identification, a clear role for ANP in the regulation of water and electrolyte balance has emerged (Figure 3). The peptide is released in response to blood volume expansion, both acutely and gradually during changes in dietary sodium intake. Similarly, plasma levels are elevated in pathophysiological conditions such as cardiac and renal failure. It has become apparent that ANP has natriuretic, diuretic and vasorelaxant properties. Many of the original studies employed what we now know to be pharmacological doses of the peptide. However, recent reports have confirmed that small, sustained elevations in plasma ANP within or marginally above the 'normal' physiological range produce similar effects. A number of recent studies have tried to specifically address the physiological relevance of ANP. Although undoubtedly release by atrial distension and effective when infused to similar concentrations, atrial distension also has other effects via neural pathways. Thus, the demonstration that excretion of saline is impaired by atrial appendectomy (Benjamin et al, 1988) does not imply that this is only due to the absence of an atrial hormone. Goetz et al (1986) demonstrated that in the denervated heart, although ANP is still released, the excretion of a saline load is impaired. Similarly, in man, Richards et al (1988a) needed to infuse ANP to much higher plasma levels than those achieved by a saline load in order to reproduce the natriuresis. Although these experiments can be criticized, they confirm that ANP is not the sole mechanism for excreting a volume load, or for the natriuresis following atrial distension, but that these effects are likely to reflect the balance between ANP, AVP, the renin-angiotensin and autonomic nervous systems. In rats immunized against ANP (Greenwald et al, 1988), although the ability to excrete an acute saline load was impaired, long-term sodium balance was normal, suggesting that the rats were able to compensate for

  7. Evidence for a novel natriuretic peptide receptor that prefers brain natriuretic peptide over atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Goy, M F; Oliver, P M; Purdy, K E; Knowles, J W; Fox, J E; Mohler, P J; Qian, X; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their physiological actions by binding to natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), a receptor guanylate cyclase (rGC) that synthesizes cGMP in response to both ligands. The family of rGCs is rapidly expanding, and it is plausible that there might be additional, as yet undiscovered, rGCs whose function is to provide alternative signalling pathways for one or both of these peptides, particularly given the low affinity of NPRA for BNP. We have investigated this hypothesis, using a genetically modified (knockout) mouse in which the gene encoding NPRA has been disrupted. Enzyme assays and NPRA-specific Western blots performed on tissues from wild-type mice demonstrate that ANP-activated cGMP synthesis provides a good index of NPRA protein expression, which ranges from maximal in adrenal gland, lung, kidney, and testis to minimal in heart and colon. In contrast, immunoreactive NPRA is not detectable in tissues isolated from NPRA knockout animals and ANP- and BNP-stimulatable GC activities are markedly reduced in all mutant tissues. However, testis and adrenal gland retain statistically significant, high-affinity responses to BNP. This residual response to BNP cannot be accounted for by natriuretic peptide receptor B, or any other known mammalian rGC, suggesting the presence of a novel receptor in these tissues that prefers BNP over ANP. PMID:11513736

  8. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockette, Warren; Brennaman, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). In this study, it was determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of (I-125)-albumin and (C-14)-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored, and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 microg/kg per min ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of (I-125)-albumin, but not (C-14)-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  9. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. )

    1990-12-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  10. Are endogenous cardenolides controlled by atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Brar, Kanwarjeet S; Gao, Yonglin; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous cardenolides are digoxin-like substances and ouabain-like substances that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and mood disorders in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Regulatory signals for endogenous cardenolides are still unknown. These endogenous compounds are believed to be produced by the adrenal gland in the periphery and the hypothalamus in the central nervous system, and constitute part of an hormonal axis that may regulate the catalytic activity of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. A review of literature suggests that there is great overlap in physiological environments that are associated with either elevations or reductions in the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and endogenous cardenolides. This suggests that these two factors may share a common regulatory signal or perhaps that ANP may be involved in the regulation of endogenous cardenolides. PMID:27241248

  11. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in insulin- and atrial natriuretic peptide-sensitive internalization of amyloid-β peptide in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Murata, Sho; Katsukura, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroya; Funaki, Miho; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, involves elimination across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and we previously showed that an insulin-sensitive process is involved in the case of Aβ1-40. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanism of the insulin-sensitive Aβ1-40 elimination across mouse BBB. An in vivo cerebral microinjection study demonstrated that [125I]hAβ1-40 elimination from mouse brain was inhibited by human natriuretic peptide (hANP), and [125I]hANP elimination was inhibited by hAβ1-40, suggesting that hAβ1-40 and hANP share a common elimination process. Internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (TM-BBB4) was significantly inhibited by either insulin, hANP, other natriuretic peptides or insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors, but was not inhibited by phosphoramidon or thiorphan. Although we have reported the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptor C (Npr-C) in hANP internalization, cells stably expressing Npr-C internalized [125I]hANP but not [125I]hAβ1-40, suggesting that there is no direct interaction between Npr-C and hAβ1-40. IDE was detected in plasma membrane of TM-BBB4 cells, and internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 by TM-BBB4 cells was reduced by IDE-targeted siRNAs. We conclude that elimination of hAβ1-40 from mouse brain across the BBB involves an insulin- and ANP-sensitive process, mediated by IDE expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells.

  12. Baseline and post-atrial pacing release of atrial natriuretic factor in mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Malatino, L S; Stancanelli, B; Greco, G; Polizzi, G; Leonardi, C; Russo, G; Tamburino, C; Greco, G; Giuffrida, G; Tamburino, G

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the release of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in mitral stenosis and the influence of the increase on the frequency of atrial contraction or atrial distention on ANF secretion, we studied 10 patients with symptoms of congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association classes II and III) in sinus rhythm, who were undergoing cardiac catheterization as part of an evaluation workup for mitral stenosis. Echocardiographic tracings, repeat determinations of mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure (MPAWP) and mean right atrial pressure, and blood sampling from the pulmonary artery for measurements of ANF were performed at baseline, during atrial pacing (pacing rate of 125 beats/min for 5 minutes), and 5 minutes after the pacing protocol was completed. Baseline ANF levels were closely related to right atrial pressure (r = 0.89; p less than 0.001) and increased markedly after atrial pacing from 205.6 +/- 39.8 (SEM) to 343.9 +/- 57.9 (SEM) pg/ml. A similar pacing-induced increase was shown for MPAWP and left atrial size. Our data indicate that pacing-induced increases in atrial distention and intracavitary pressure further stimulate release of ANF. However, an independent effect of frequency of atrial pacing on plasma ANF in humans could not be identified. PMID:2136967

  13. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  14. Influence of resting tension on immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Schiebinger, R.J.; Linden, J.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is a potent diuretic hormone secreted by the atria in response to volume expansion. We examined the effect of resting tension on atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro. Left atria were hooked between an electrode and force transducer and superfused with medium 199. The atria were studied at a pacing frequency of 0 or 3 Hz. Atrial natriuretic peptide content of the superfusate was measured by radioimmunoassay. In nonpaced and paced atria, increasing resting tension three- to five-fold caused immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion to increase by 35 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM, n = 6, p less than 0.01) and 30 +/- 3% (n = 4, p less than 0.01), respectively. Lowering resting tension by 50% in nonpaced and paced atria lowered immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by 30 +/- 3% (n = 7, p less than 0.01) and 24 +/- 3% (n = 6, p less than 0.01), respectively. To exclude the possibility that release of norepinephrine or acetylcholine from endogenous nerve endings was mediating this effect, the atria were superfused with the combination of propranolol 0.1 microM, phentolamine 1.0 microM, and atropine 10 microM. These concentrations of the antagonists were 125-fold or higher than their Kd for binding to their respective receptors. The antagonists did not block the rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion; neither did they inhibit an established rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion induced by increasing the resting tension.

  15. Atrial natriuretic factor inhibits mitogen-induced growth in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Baldini, P M; De Vito, P; Fraziano, M; Mattioli, P; Luly, P; Di Nardo, P

    2002-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a polypeptide able to affect cardiovascular homeostasis exhibiting diuretic, natriuretic, and vasorelaxant activities. ANF shows antimitogenic effects in different cell types acting through R(2) receptor. Excessive proliferation of smooth muscle cells is a common phenomenon in diseases such as atherosclerosis, but the role of growth factors in the mechanism which modulate this process has yet to be clarified. The potential antimitogenic role of ANF on the cell growth induced by growth factors appears very intriguing. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of ANF on rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells proliferation induced by known mitogens and the mechanism involved. Our data show that ANF, at physiological concentration range, inhibits RASM cell proliferation induced by known mitogens such as PDGF and insulin, and the effect seems to be elicited through the modulation of phosphatidic acid (PA) production and MAP kinases involvement.

  16. Atrial natriuretic factor during hypoxia and mild exercise.

    PubMed

    Story, D A; Miller, B R; Shield, C M; Bowes, G

    1991-04-01

    The effect of hypoxia on plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), plasma renin activity (PRA), and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) was evaluated during 2 h of treadmill exercise at 2 km/h, 0 grade at sea level. Six male subjects exercised on 2 separate days during normoxia (21% O2) and hypoxia (13.3 +/- 0.3% O2). No significant changes in ANF or PRA occurred during either normoxic or hypoxic exercise. However, PAC fell significantly during normoxic exercise (17.5 +/- 3.6 vs. 12.7 +/- 2.6 ng/dl, p less than 0.05) but not during hypoxic exercise. Serum potassium concentration fell during hypoxic exercise (5.0 +/- 0.1 vs. 4.4 +/- 0.1 mmol/l, p less than 0.05) along with bicarbonate (27.8 +/- 0.7 vs. 25.8 +/- 0.6 mmol/l, p less than 0.01). Between normoxic and hypoxic studies there was a significantly higher heart rate during hypoxic exercise (78 +/- 5 vs. 90 +/- 6 b/min, p less than 0.01). The major conclusion of this study is that hypoxia resulting in arterial oxygen saturations of 81 +/- 0.7% does not affect plasma atrial natriuretic factor levels during mild exercise in normal male subjects.

  17. Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and serum collagen markers after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Magga, Jarkko; Puhakka, Mikko; Hietakorpi, Seppo; Punnonen, Kari; Uusimaa, Paavo; Risteli, Juha; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Peuhkurinen, Keijo

    2004-04-01

    Experimental data suggest that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) act locally as antifibrotic factors in heart. We investigated the interrelationships of natriuretic peptides and collagen markers in 93 patients receiving thrombolytic treatment for their first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Collagen formation following AMI, evaluated as serum levels of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen, correlated with NH(2)-terminal proANP (r = 0.45, P < 0.001), BNP (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.50, P < 0.01) on day 4 after thrombolysis. Levels of intact amino terminal propeptide of type I procollagen decreased by 34% (P < 0.001), and levels of carboxy terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) increased by 65% (P < 0.001). ICTP levels correlated with NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.25, P < 0.05) and BNP (r = 0.28, P < 0.05) on day 4. Our results suggest that ANP and BNP may act as regulators of collagen scar formation and left ventricular remodeling after AMI in humans. Furthermore, degradation of type I collagen is increased after AMI and may be regulated by BNP. PMID:14607848

  18. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Renal Dopaminergic System: A Positive Friendly Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Marcelo Roberto; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia Lucía; Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás Martín; Kravetz, María Cecilia; Fernández, Belisario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Sodium metabolism by the kidney is accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Renal dopamine plays a central role in this interactive network. The natriuretic hormones, such as the atrial natriuretic peptide, mediate some of their effects by affecting the renal dopaminergic system. Renal dopaminergic tonus can be modulated at different steps of dopamine metabolism (synthesis, uptake, release, catabolism, and receptor sensitization) which can be regulated by the atrial natriuretic peptide. At tubular level, dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide act together in a concerted manner to promote sodium excretion, especially through the overinhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase activity. In this way, different pathological scenarios where renal sodium excretion is dysregulated, as in nephrotic syndrome or hypertension, are associated with impaired action of renal dopamine and/or atrial natriuretic peptide, or as a result of impaired interaction between these two natriuretic systems. The aim of this review is to update and comment on the most recent evidences demonstrating how the renal dopaminergic system interacts with atrial natriuretic peptide to control renal physiology and blood pressure through different regulatory pathways. PMID:25013796

  19. Relationship in humans between atrial natriuretic peptide and arginine vasopressin during dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.C. Jr.; Wilson, D.M.; Kao, P.C.; Schwab, T.R.; Heublein, D.M.; Heser, D.W.

    1986-03-01

    The present study was designed to define in normal humans (n=6) the relationship between atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) during thirty-six hours of dehydration. Atrial natriuretic peptide was measured from extracted plasma by radioimmunoassay to alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide; arginine vasopressin was measured from platelet free plasma by specific radioimmunoassay to AVP. Determinations were obtained of ANP, AVP and plasma osmolality (Posm) prior to and following fluid deprivation for thirty-six hours. The present study demonstrates that dehydration in humans increases plasma osmolality and arginine vasopressin but does not increase atrial natriuretic peptide. These investigations importantly dissociate these two peptide hormonal systems during the physiologic adaptation to fluid deprivation.

  20. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Cardiovascular Biology and Disease (NPPA)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Wang, Hao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a cardiac hormone that regulates salt-water balance and blood pressure by promoting renal sodium and water excretion and stimulating vasodilation. ANP also has an anti-hypertrophic function in the heart, which is independent of its systemic blood pressure-lowering effect. In mice, ANP deficiency causes salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Recent studies have shown that ANP plays an important role in regulating vascular remodeling and energy metabolism. Variants in the human NPPA gene, encoding the ANP precursor, are associated with hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF) and obesity. ANP and related peptides are used as biomarkers for heart disease. Recombinant proteins and small molecules that enhance the ANP pathway have been developed to treat patients with HF. In this review, we discuss the role of ANP in cardiovascular biology and disease. PMID:26074089

  1. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide in the guinea pig spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmar, A.M.; Friedrich, A.; Schulz, R. )

    1989-01-01

    The presence of immunoreative ANP precursor-like material in the guinea pig spleen is suggested. This is based on the following experimental evidence: An acidic extract of guinea pig spleen analyzed by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration contained 4.6 pmol/g wet tissue immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (IR-ANP), IR-ANP coeluting with 15 kDa synthetic ANP (2-126). Gel filtrated IR-ANP material was further submitted to reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and monitored by radioimmunoassay employing two antisera. One antiserum recognizes the C-terminal of ANP (1-126), the second is directed against the N-terminal sequence. Both antisera revealed material eluting with synthetic ANP (2-126). Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis suggests this ANP-like material to be localized mainly at the periphery of the white pulp of the spleen. These findings link ANP with the immune system.

  2. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethysmography of supine healthy male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n = 6) and during placebo infusion (n = 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 +/- 4 to 2,568 +/- 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion: mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3%, respectively, relative to preinfusion baseline values (p less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however, was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20% with ANP infusion, whereas blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/ arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, pharmacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchnic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  3. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethys-mography of supine health male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n equals 6) and during placebo infusion (n equals 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 plus or minus 4 to 2,568 plus or minus 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion; mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3 percent respectively, relative to pre-infusion baseline values (p is less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20 percent with ANP infusion, wheras blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, phamacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  4. Evidence for a further stimulation of atrial natriuretic factor release by atrial pacing in patients with mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Malatino, L S; Stancanelli, B; Greco, G; Polizzi, G; Leonardi, C; Russo, G; Tamburino, C; Greco, G; Giuffrida, G; Tamburino, G

    1989-12-01

    To investigate the release of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in mitral stenosis and the effect of an increased atrial contraction frequency on atrial distension and ANF secretion, we studied 14 patients [New York Heart Association (NYHA) grades II-III] in sinus rhythm, undergoing cardiac catheterization for mitral stenosis. Echocardiographic tracings, repeat determinations of mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure and blood samples from the pulmonary artery for ANF measurements were taken at baseline, during atrial pacing (125 beats/min for 5 min) and 5 min after pacing. After pacing, ANF levels rose markedly with a parallel increase in mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure and left atrial size. These data indicate that atrial pacing is capable of further stimulating ANF release, even in patients with elevated baseline ANF and left atrial pressure and an increased left atrial dimension. PMID:2534411

  5. [ATRIAL AND BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES OF CARDIAC MUSCLE CELLS IN POSTREPERFUSION PERIOD IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Bugrova, M L

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation and release of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in right atrial cardiac muscle cells has been investigated in rats after 60 minutes and 60 days after the reperfusion start. The total ischemia was simulated by the method of V. G. Korpachev. Immunocytochemical localization of peptides in cardiomyocytes was performed in ultrathin sections using polyclonal antibodies. The intensity of accumulation/excretion of ANP and BNP were analyzed by the method of counting the number of granules (A- and B-types) with immunoreactive labels in 38 x 38 mkm2 visual fields in transmission electron microscope Morgagni 268D (FEI). The results were assessed using Mann-Whitney U-test (p < 0.05). After 60 minutes and 60 days post-reperfusion period, we detected an increase in the synthesis and release of ANP and BNP. The reaction of BNP was more pronounced than ANP. This is due to the fact that ANP is the main hormone of the natriuretic peptide system involved in the regulation of blood pressure in normal conditions, while BNP is the principal regulator of pressure in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:27228659

  6. Increased transcripts for B-type natriuretic peptide in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for atrial and brain natriuretic peptide transcripts.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, L; Lavigne, J P; Nemer, M

    1992-11-01

    The cardiac natriuretic peptide family includes atrial natriuretic factor and brain or B-type natriuretic peptide, also known as iso-atrial natriuretic factor (isoANF). Although these peptides contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis, their respective roles remain unclear. To study regulation of atrial natriuretic factor and isoANF gene expression during progression of hypertension, we developed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction protocol to measure their transcript level in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) hearts. At the onset of hypertension, atrial natriuretic factor transcripts in 5-week-old SHR were 50% of those of age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, whereas the level of isoANF transcripts was similar in atria and twofold higher in ventricles. Because atria are the major sites of atrial natriuretic factor gene expression and ventricles contribute predominantly to cardiac isoANF synthesis, total atrial natriuretic factor messenger RNA (mRNA) in the hearts of 5-week-old SHR was about 50% of that in WKY rats, and total isoANF mRNA content was already higher than in control rats. In left ventricles and ventricular septa, progression of hypertension led to a maximal increase of twofold and fourfold in atrial natriuretic factor and isoANF mRNA levels, respectively, with no detectable change in right ventricles. In the atria of older SHR, atrial natriuretic factor and isoANF mRNA levels were comparable to those of age-matched controls. These data indicate that, although increased blood pressure stimulates both atrial natriuretic factor and isoANF gene expression, regulation of the two natriuretic peptide genes is not temporally coordinated in all cardiac compartments. Furthermore, isoANF mRNA is already induced in the ventricles at the onset of the hypertensive stage, and in older SHR, the isoANF gene is hyperresponsive to progression of hypertension compared with atrial natriuretic factor. Thus, isoANF might represent a very sensitive marker of cardiac

  7. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  9. Atrial natriuretic factor in maternal and fetal sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.Y.; Gibbs, D.M.; Brace, R.A.

    1987-02-01

    To determine atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) concentrations in the circulation and body fluids of adult pregnant sheep and their fetuses, pregnant ewes were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, and the fetuses were exteriorized for sampling. ANF concentration, as measured by radioimmunoassay, was 47 +/- 6 (SE) pg/ml in maternal plasma, which was significantly higher than the 15 +/- 3 pg/ml in maternal urine. In the fetus, plasma ANF concentration was 265 +/- 49 pg/ml, 5.6 times that in maternal plasma. No umbilical arterial and venous difference in ANF concentration was observed. Fetal urine ANF concentration was significantly lower than that in fetal plasma, and was similar to that measured in amniotic and allantoic fluid. In chronically catheterized maternal and fetal sheep, fetal plasma ANF was again 5.1 times that in maternal plasma, and these levels were not different from those measured in acutely anesthetized animals. These results demonstrate that immunoreactive ANF is present in the fetal circulation at levels higher than those found in the mother. The low concentration of ANF in fetal urine suggests that ANF is probably metabolized and/or reabsorbed by the fetal kidney.

  10. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Thibault, G.; Wrobel-Konrad, E.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1989-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor ((Ser99, Tyr126)ANF) binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF (des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2) (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease.

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.

  12. Binding sites of atrial natriuretic peptide in tree shrew adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, E.; Shigematsu, K.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Adrenal gland binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126) (ANP) were quantitated in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) by incubation of adrenal sections with (3-(/sup 125/I)-iodotyrosyl28) atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126), followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry. In the adrenal glands, there are three types of ANP binding sites. One is located in the zona glomerulosa (BMax 84 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein; Kd 122 +/- 9 pM); the second in the zona fasciculata and reticularis (BMax 29 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein; Kd 153 +/- 6 pM) and the third in the adrenal medulla (BMax 179 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein; Kd 70 +/- 2 pM). Besides the influence of ANP on the regulation of adrenocortical mineralcorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion our findings raise the possibility for a local site of action of atrial natriuretic peptide in the regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamines in the tree shrew, primates and man.

  13. Radioimmunoassay and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide in human plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yandle, T.G.; Espiner, E.A.; Nicholls, M.G.; Duff, H.

    1986-07-01

    A RIA for alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha hANP) in plasma was developed and used to study the immunoreactive components secreted by the heart and circulating in peripheral venous plasma. The assay used (125I)diiodotyrosyl-alpha hANP, purified by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and a C-terminal-specific antiserum purchased from Peninsula Laboratories. Serial dilution curves of coronary sinus plasma samples were parallel with the standard curve, but significant nonparallelism was found in peripheral plasma samples of low immunoreactivity. When plasma was extracted using C-18 Sep-Pak cartridges, serial dilution curves from both coronary sinus and peripheral plasma samples were parallel to the standard curve. Although values for plasma samples assayed before and after extraction agreed closely (r = 0.99; n = 76), immunoreactive ANP in unextracted plasma was consistently greater (70-79 pmol/liter) than in extracts of plasma, suggesting non-specific interference by a component in plasma when assayed without extraction. Mean plasma immunoreactive ANP in 19 normal subjects consuming a normal salt intake was 14 +/- 1 (+/- SE) pmol/liter. In 5 normal men, increasing dietary sodium intake from 10 to 200 mmol sodium/day was associated with a 2-fold increment in ANP levels, and similar changes accompanied acute sodium loading using iv saline. Elevated values were found in patients with congestive heart failure (mean, 58 pmol/liter; range, 0-200; n = 9), chronic renal failure (mean, 118 pmol/liter; range, 30-290; n = 8), and primary aldosteronism (range, 32-90 pmol/liter; n = 3). HPLC and gel chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material found in coronary sinus plasma extracts showed that a large amount of the material eluted in the position of alpha hANP.

  14. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  15. Natriuretic Peptides as Predictors of Atrial Fibrillation Recurrences Following Electrical Cardioversion.

    PubMed

    Zografos, Theodoros A; Katritsis, Demosthenes G

    2013-11-01

    Electrical cardioversion (ECV) can be effective in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in the majority of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Several factors that predispose to AF recurrences, such as age, AF duration and left atrial size have been used to guide a decision for cardioversion, but increasing evidence suggests that they may be rather poor markers of left atrial structural remodeling that determines the long-term success of a rhythm control strategy. In this context, the use of easily obtainable biomarkers, such as the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), to predict AF recurrences may be preferable. Since ANP production is associated with the extent of functional atrial myocardium, and both ANP and BNP reflect atrial pressure and mechanical stretching, these peptides are good candidate biomarkers to assess predisposition to AF recurrences. In this review we focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms and the available clinical evidence regarding the prediction of AF recurrences following successful ECV from pre-procedural ANP and BNP levels.

  16. Natriuretic Peptides as Predictors of Atrial Fibrillation Recurrences Following Electrical Cardioversion

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, Theodoros A; Katritsis, Demosthenes G

    2013-01-01

    Electrical cardioversion (ECV) can be effective in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in the majority of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Several factors that predispose to AF recurrences, such as age, AF duration and left atrial size have been used to guide a decision for cardioversion, but increasing evidence suggests that they may be rather poor markers of left atrial structural remodeling that determines the long-term success of a rhythm control strategy. In this context, the use of easily obtainable biomarkers, such as the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), to predict AF recurrences may be preferable. Since ANP production is associated with the extent of functional atrial myocardium, and both ANP and BNP reflect atrial pressure and mechanical stretching, these peptides are good candidate biomarkers to assess predisposition to AF recurrences. In this review we focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms and the available clinical evidence regarding the prediction of AF recurrences following successful ECV from pre-procedural ANP and BNP levels. PMID:26835050

  17. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide after the Fontan procedure and total cavopulmonary connexion.

    PubMed

    Burch, M; Shinebourne, E A; Rigby, M L; Carter, N; Jeffery, S; Stanley, P; Smith, A

    1990-05-01

    Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide was measured in 10 children undergoing the Fontan procedure and 3 children undergoing total cavopulmonary connexion. There was no significant difference in pre-operative plasma levels, but post-operative levels were significantly higher 48 hours after cardiopulmonary bypass in the Fontan group. There was no significant difference in plasma arginine vasopressin levels either pre- or post-operatively. Post-operative pleural effusions occurred in only 2 of the 10 patients undergoing the Fontan procedure, but were present in all 3 of those undergoing total cavopulmonary connexion. The release of atrial natriuretic peptide is an appropriate homeostatic response to volume loading and the impairment of this response in the early post-operative period may be of clinical importance.

  18. Increase in plasma concentrations of cardiodilatin (amino terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide) in cardiac failure and during recumbency.

    PubMed Central

    Meleagros, L; Gibbs, J S; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    1988-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cardiodilatin, the peptide sequence at the amino terminal of the pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, in 17 normal subjects ranged from 59 to 202 (mean 118 (SEM) (9] pmol/l. Recumbency increased the mean (SEM) concentration to 160 (13) pmol/l. The plasma concentration of cardiodilatin in 24 patients with congestive cardiac failure was much higher (964 (175) pmol/l) than in the normal subjects. It was highest in those with heart failure in New York Heart Association functional classes III and IV and the concentration correlated both with atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and left ventricular ejection fraction. Concentrations rose during induced tachycardia in three patients tested. Chromatography showed a single clean peak of plasma cardiodilatin immunoreactivity. It seems that cardiodilatin is a second circulating cardiac peptide that is jointly released with atrial natriuretic peptide by common stimuli. Other workers have reported that, like atrial natriuretic peptide, three partial cardiodilatin sequences can stimulate renal particulate guanylate cyclase and increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The simultaneous release of cardiodilatin in higher circulating concentrations than atrial natriuretic peptide may be relevant to the finding that appropriate concentrations of exogenous atrial natiuretic peptide alone do not produce the full renal effects associated with endogenous peptide release. PMID:2970269

  19. Doxycycline ameliorates aggregation of collagen and atrial natriuretic peptide in murine post-infarction heart.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongjun; Sun, Xianlin; Wang, Deguo; Hu, Nengwei; Zhang, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with the aggregation of collagen and some misfolded proteins. This study was aimed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline (Dox) in MI-induced heart failure and elucidate the potential mechanisms involved. A heart failure model of animals was established by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery of rats. The administration of Dox via drinking water (25mg/kg/day) was initiated after surgery and lasted for two weeks. After cardiac function evaluation by echocardiography, all animals were killed to assess the aggregation of type I collagen, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and the activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), autophagosomes and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3). Dox treatment significantly improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy. Histological observation revealed that Dox significantly reduced the expression of collagen and ANP in the heart. Further investigation showed that Dox significantly inhibited the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, increased autophagosomes and enhanced LC3-II in post-infarction hearts. This study revealed that Dox treatment could promote autophagy, reduce ANP aggregation in post-infarction hearts, and inhibit MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. Dox might act as a potential therapeutic drug for preventing proteotoxicity and cardiac dysfunction.

  20. Correlation between heart disorders and concentrations of directly measured atrial natriuretic peptide in plasma.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, L; Szekeres, T; Hartter, E; Schweighofer, F; Gassner, A; Laczkovic, A

    1989-03-01

    We used new commercially available direct radioimmunoassay to measure human atrial natriuretic peptide (h-ANP) in plasma from 48 individuals who were being evaluated for left and right ventricular function. For 13 healthy individuals with normal ventricular function these concentrations ranged up to 54 ng/L. Measurements of h-ANP clearly differentiated between normal subjects, patients with coronary artery disease, and patients who had undergone orthotopic heart transplantation (ANOVA P less than 0.0001, significant differences between all groups)--all showing normal ventricular function at rest. There was a strong negative correlation (r = -0.64, P less than 0.001) between left ventricular ejection fraction and h-ANP concentrations in plasma of patients with proven coronary artery disease, patients with cardiomyopathy, and healthy individuals. Results by the present method and methods involving extraction of the sample correlated well. Evidently the direct assay of h-ANP in plasma yields information that could be used to help evaluate heart disorders and other pathophysiological conditions causing increased h-ANP concentrations in plasma.

  1. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. )

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  2. Interactions between the sympathetic nervous system and atrial natriuretic factor in the control of renal functions.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, S; Protasoni, G; Assi, C; Golin, R; Stella, A; Zanchetti, A

    1990-08-01

    We studied neural influences on the renal actions of atrial peptides in anaesthetized cats by comparing the response to atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) infusion in the innervated kidney and in the contralateral surgically denervated kidney. During ANF infusion arterial pressure decreased, the heart rate did not change and blood flow to both kidneys increased slightly. Vascular conductances became slightly but significantly higher in the denervated kidneys than in the controls. In both kidneys, the glomerular filtration rate increased transiently and significantly. Inhibition of renin release was more prompt and larger in the innervated than in the denervated kidneys. ANF infusion caused a significant increase in sodium and water excretion from both the innervated and denervated kidneys. However, the diuretic and natriuretic effect in the innervated kidneys, although proportionally greater than that in the denervated kidneys, was of shorter duration and subsided after 20 min of ANF infusion. Efferent renal nerve activity did not change during the initial 10 min of ANF infusion but thereafter increased progressively and significantly. We conclude that the effects of atrial peptides on renin release and excretory functions are influenced by renal nerve activity.

  3. [Four-week simulated weightlessness increases the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the myocardium].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Huai-Zhang; Xu, Peng-Tao; Chang, Hui; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2013-04-25

    One of the major circulatory changes that occur in human during space flight and simulated weightlessness is a cerebral redistribution of body fluids, which is accompanied by an increase of blood volume in the upper body. Therefore, atrial myocardium should increase the secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), but the researches lack common conclusion until now. The present study was to investigate the expression level of ANP in simulated weightlessness rats, and to confirm the changes of ANP by observing the associated proteins of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). The tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate weightlessness. Western blots were carried out to examine the expression levels of ANP and SNARE proteins in atrial and left ventricular myocardium. The results showed that ANP expression in atrial myocardium showed an increase in 4-week tail-suspended rats (SUS) compared with that in the synchronous control rats (CON). We only detected a trace amount of ANP in the left ventricular myocardium of the CON, but found an enhanced expression of ANP in left ventricular myocardium of the SUS. Expression of VAMP-1/2 (vesicle associated SNARE) increased significantly in both atrial and left ventricular myocardium in the SUS compared with that in the CON. There was no difference of the expression of syntaxin-4 (target compartment associated SNARE) between the CON and SUS, but the expression of SNAP-23 showed an increase in atrial myocardium of the SUS compared with that in the CON. Synip and Munc-18c as regulators of SNAREs did not show significant difference between the CON and SUS. These results suggest that the expression of ANP shows an increase in atrial and left ventricular myocardium of 4-week tail-suspended rats. Enhanced expression of VAMP-1/2 associated with ANP vesicles confirms the increased expression of ANP in atrial and left ventricular myocardium.

  4. Atrial natriuretic factor mRNA and binding sites in the adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, D J; Davenport, A P; Brown, M J

    1990-01-01

    The factor inhibiting aldosterone secretion produced by the adrenal medulla may be atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), since the latter abolishes aldosterone release in response to a number of secretagogues, including angiotensin II and K+. In this study we have shown that cells in the adrenal medulla contain ANF mRNA and therefore have the potential to synthesize this peptide. The presence of binding sites for ANF predominantly in the adrenal zona glomerulosa suggests that, if ANF is synthesized in the medulla and transferred to the cortex, it may affect mineralocorticoid status. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2146954

  5. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the suggestions by Chabrier et al. (1987) and Steardo and Nathanson (1987) that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain, the ANP receptors in primary cultures of bovine brain microvessel endothelian cells were quantitated and characterized. Results of partition binding studies and the effect of cGMP additions indicated the presence of at least two types of ANP receptors, with the majority of the receptors being the nonguanylate cyclase coupled receptors. The presence of at least two ANP receptor types suggests an active role for ANP in regulating brain endothelial cell function.

  6. Genetic Decreases in Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Simon W. M.; Krege, John H.; Oliver, Paula M.; Hagaman, John R.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Pang, Stephen C.; Flynn, T. Geoffrey; Smithies, Oliver

    1995-02-01

    To determine if defects in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system can cause hypertension, mice were generated with a disruption of the proANP gene. Homozygous mutants had no circulating or atrial ANP, and their blood pressures were elevated by 8 to 23 millimeters of mercury when they were fed standard (0.5 percent sodium chloride) and intermediate (2 percent sodium chloride) salt diets. On standard salt diets, heterozygotes had normal amounts of circulating ANP and normal blood pressures. However, on high (8 percent sodium chloride) salt diets they were hypertensive, with blood pressures elevated by 27 millimeters of mercury. These results demonstrate that genetically reduced production of ANP can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension.

  7. Localization of corin and atrial natriuretic peptide expression in human renal segments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Hao; Dong, Ningzheng; Zhang, Ce; Xue, Boxin; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-mediated natriuretic response is a well-established cardiac endocrine function. Corin is a transmembrane protease that activates ANP in the heart. Corin expression has been detected in non-cardiac tissues including the kidney. Here we examined corin, pro-ANP/ANP and natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) expression in human renal segments. By immunostaining and in situ hybridization, we found similar corin, pro-ANP/ANP and NPR-A protein and mRNA expression in human renal segments. The expression was most abundant in the proximal convoluted tubules and the medullary connecting ducts. In the proximal tubules, corin protein was present in the apical membrane region underneath the brush border where the ANP-degrading protease neprilysin was abundant. These results suggest that corin-mediated pro-ANP activation may occur in renal segments and that locally produced ANP may act in an autocrine manner to regulate sodium and water reabsorption in situ Our results also point to the proximal convoluted tubules as a major site for local ANP action. Such a renal corin/ANP autocrine mechanism may differ from the cardiac corin/ANP endocrine mechanism in regulating sodium homoeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27343265

  8. Effects of angiotensin, vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide on intraocular pressure in anesthetized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, D. E.; Shue, S. G.; Keil, L. C.; Balaban, C. D.; Severs, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), vasopressin (AVP) and angiotensin (ANG) on blood and intraocular pressures of pentobarbital anesthetized rats were evaluated following intravenous, intracerebroventricular or anterior chamber routes of administration. Central injections did not affect intraocular pressure. Equipressor intravenous infusions of ANG raised, whereas AVP decreased, intraocular pressure. Direct infusions of a balanced salt solution (0.175 microliter/min) raised intraocular pressure between 30 and 60 min. Adding ANG or ANP slightly reduced this solvent effect but AVP was markedly inhibitory. An AVP-V1 receptor antagonist reversed the blunting of the solvent-induced rise by the peptide, indicating receptor specificity. Acetazolamide pretreatment lowered intraocular pressure, but the solvent-induced rise in intraocular pressure and inhibition by AVP still occurred without altering the temporal pattern. Thus, these effects appear unrelated to aqueous humor synthesis rate. The data support the possibility of intraocular pressure regulation by peptides acting from the blood and aqueous humor.

  9. Highly sensitive radioimmunoassay of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in human plasma and urine

    SciTech Connect

    Marumo, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Ando, K.; Ishigami, T.; Kawakami, M.

    1986-05-29

    A highly sensitive radioimmunoassay has been established for measurement of human plasma and urine concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and requires no extraction or concentration process. An antiserum was prepared from rabbits immunized with ..cap alpha..-human ANP (..cap alpha..-hANP) coupled with bovine-thyroglobulin. The sensitivity of this method was 0.2 pg/tube of synthetic ..cap alpha..-hANP utilized as authentic standard. Recovery of ..cap alpha..-hANP spiked to plasma and urine was 97.7 +/- 15.4% and 97.1 +/- 9.5% (mean +/- SD), respectively. Plasma and urinary ANP concentrations versus assay data showed satisfactory linearity. In 124 health subjects, the plasma ANP concentration was 31.7 +/- 12.0 pg/ml. Two different molecular forms of ANP in plasma and a single form in urine were found by gel permeation chromatography.

  10. Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in brain: alterations in Brattleboro rats

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R.; Plunkett, L.M.

    1986-12-01

    Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF-28) were analyzed in discrete brain areas of Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus and Long-Evans (LE) controls by quantitative autoradiography. The maximum binding capacity (Bmax) and affinity constant (Ka) for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 were elevated significantly in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats compared to matched LE controls. In contrast, values for Bmax and Ka for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 binding in choroid plexus and area postrema were similar for rats of the two strains. These findings are consistent with a selective upregulation of ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats which exhibit a profound disturbance in body fluid homeostasis. These alterations in ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ may represent a compensatory response to the absence of vasopressin in the Brattleboro rat.

  11. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor is increased in ovine model of endotoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Lubbesmeyer, H.J.; Woodson, L.; Traber, L.D.; Flynn, J.T.; Herndon, D.N.; Traber, D.L. Thomas Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA Westfaelian Wilhelms Univ., Muenster )

    1988-04-01

    A bolus of Escherichia coli endotoxin (1.5 {mu}g/kg) was administered to chronically instrumented sheep. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor (IR-ANF) was measured in extracted plasma by radioimmunoassay. There was a thirteenfold increase in IR-ANF 2 h after endotoxin administration, and IR-ANF levels remained significantly elevated during the first 6 h. A marked diuresis and natriuresis occurred between 4 and 6 h. ANF not only affects renal function but is also associated with decreased cardiac output, increased peripheral resistance (in sheep), and decreased capillary absorption (in rats). These renal and hemodynamic changes are also characteristic of the early (first 6 h) response to endotoxin. Therefore ANF should be considered as a potential mediator of renal and hemodynamic changes induced by sepsis. It is difficult to determine if ANF elevation is an epiphenomenon or a causative factor, because no antagonist of ANF is currently available.

  12. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Type 2 Diabetes Development – Biomarker and Genotype Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Jujić, Amra; Nilsson, Peter M.; Engström, Gunnar; Hedblad, Bo; Melander, Olle; Magnusson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background We have recently shown that low plasma levels of mid-regional atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-ANP) predict development of diabetes and glucose progression over time, independently of known risk factors for diabetes development. However, since MR-ANP levels might be influenced by unknown factors causing diabetes, we cannot rule out that such relationship might be confounded. Previous studies have shown an association of a single nucleotide polymorphism rs5068 on the natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) locus gene with higher levels of circulating ANP. Since gene variants are inherited randomly and not subject to confounding, we aimed to investigate whether the variant rs5068 within the NPPA locus is associated with incident type 2 diabetes. Methods We genotyped the variant rs5068 within the NPPA locus in 27,307 individuals without known diabetes from the Malmö Diet Cancer Study. Incident diabetes was retrieved through national and regional registers (median follow-up time of 14 years, 2,823 incident diabetes cases). Results In Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and BMI, we found that the carriers of at least one copy of the G allele of rs5068 had lower likelihood of incident diabetes within 14 years (HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78–0.99, p = 0.037). Conclusion Our results indicate a role of the ANP system in the etiology of type 2 diabetes and might help provide insight in the metabolic actions of natriuretic peptides and the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:24586593

  13. Identification and characterization of atrial natriuretic factor receptors in the rat retina

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Durango, R.; Sanchez, D.; Gutkowska, J.; Carrier, F.; Fernandez-Cruz, A.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) receptors where studied in rat retinal particulate preparations. Specific /sup 125/I-ANF binding to retinal particulate preparations was greater than 90% of total binding and saturable at a density (B/sub max/) of 40 /plus minus/ 8 fmol/mg protein with an apparent dissociation constant (K/sub d/)/sup /minus// of 6.0 /plus minus/ 2.0 pM (n=3). Apparent equilibrium conditions were established within 30 min. The K/sub d/ value of /sup 125/I-ANF binding calculated by kinetic analysis was 4.0 pM. The B/sub max/ of 60 /plus minus/ 10 fmol/mg protein and the K/sub d/ of 5 /plus minus/ 2 pM, calculated by competition analysis, were in close agreement with the values obtained from Scatchard plots or kinetic analysis. The /sup 125/I-ANF binding to retinal particulate preparations was not inhibited by 1 ..mu..M concentration of somatostatin, vasopressin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, adrenocorticotropin, tyrotropin releasing hormone, or leu-enkephalin. The rank order of potency of the unlabeled atrial natriuretic peptides for competing with specific /sup 125/I-ANF (101-126) binding sites was rANF (92-126) > rANF (101-126) > rANF (99-126) > rANF (103-126) > Tyr-Atriopeptin I > hANF (105-126) > rANF (1-126). Similar results have been obtained in peripheral tissues and mammalian brain.

  14. Influence of doxazosin on biosynthesis of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Żaneta; Filipek, Anna; Majewski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension frequently results in severe complications in cardiovascular system and histopathological changes in the heart. To better understand the cellular processes and signaling pathways responsible for the proper functioning of the heart, we decided to check whether doxazosin affects the density of structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats. The aim of this study is to find differences in the density of the structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin compared to untreated animals. Fragments of heart were collected from five spontaneously hypertensive rats and five spontaneously hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin for six weeks (dose 0.1 mg per 1 kg of body weight). On the paraffin sections S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides were localized in the heart using immunohistochemistry. Positive immunohistochemical reaction for S100A6 was observed in atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and in the coronary vasculature. In the heart of hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin the S100A6 immunoreactivity was significantly lower compared to untreated animals. Immunodetection of atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of rats confirmed presence of peptide in atrial myocardium. Delicate atrial natriuretic factor-immunoreactivity was observed also in few ventricular cardiomyocytes. The atrial natriuretic factor-immunosignal was significantly weaker in hearts of hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin compared to spontaneously hypertensive rats untreated. Since we found that doxazosin reduces the levels of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats, it can be assumed that cardiovascular disorders that occur in hypertension may be associated with disturbances of cellular processes and signaling pathways.

  15. Influence of doxazosin on biosynthesis of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Żaneta; Filipek, Anna; Majewski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension frequently results in severe complications in cardiovascular system and histopathological changes in the heart. To better understand the cellular processes and signaling pathways responsible for the proper functioning of the heart, we decided to check whether doxazosin affects the density of structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats. The aim of this study is to find differences in the density of the structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin compared to untreated animals. Fragments of heart were collected from five spontaneously hypertensive rats and five spontaneously hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin for six weeks (dose 0.1 mg per 1 kg of body weight). On the paraffin sections S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides were localized in the heart using immunohistochemistry. Positive immunohistochemical reaction for S100A6 was observed in atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and in the coronary vasculature. In the heart of hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin the S100A6 immunoreactivity was significantly lower compared to untreated animals. Immunodetection of atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of rats confirmed presence of peptide in atrial myocardium. Delicate atrial natriuretic factor-immunoreactivity was observed also in few ventricular cardiomyocytes. The atrial natriuretic factor-immunosignal was significantly weaker in hearts of hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin compared to spontaneously hypertensive rats untreated. Since we found that doxazosin reduces the levels of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats, it can be assumed that cardiovascular disorders that occur in hypertension may be associated with disturbances of cellular processes and signaling pathways. PMID:26515144

  16. Localization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat tongue and hard palate.

    PubMed

    Park, B K; Cho, E S; Lee, J D; Oh, C; Lee, M S; Kim, S Z; Kim, S H; Cho, K W

    1998-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors were characterized in rat oral mucosa using quantitative in vitro autoradiography and activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase (GC) by natriuretic peptides. Competition-binding analysis performed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography demonstrated specific [125I]rANP(1-28) binding sites in the tongue and hard palate. The precise location of this binding was revealed on the basal and parabasal cells of the epithelia by microautoradiography. The dissociation constant (Kd) and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of these sites were 3.34+/-1.35 nM and 2.71+/-2.21 fmol/mm2 on the epithelium of the tongue, and 4.09+/-1.52 nM and 3.45+/-3.01 fmol/mm2 on the epithelium of the hard palate, respectively. Receptor subtypes were characterized by competition with des [Gln18, Ser19, Gly20, Leu21, Gly22] ANP(4-23) (C-ANP), a specific ligand for the clearance receptor (NPR-C). These binding sites were displaced by C-ANP with inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.96+/-3.18 nM and Bmax of 2.89+/-2.45 fmol/mm2 on the epithelium of the tongue, and Ki of 9.12+/-2.71 nM and Bmax of 3.08+/-2.94 fmol/mm2 on the epithelium of the hard palate, respectively. Production of cyclic GMP by particulate GC in the epithelial membranes of the tongue and hard palate was stimulated by rANP(1-28), porcine brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)(1-26), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)(1-22) in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ANP-binding sites in the epithelium of the tongue and hard palate are mainly clearance receptors (NPR-C) but biological receptors (NPR-A and/or NPR-B) with GC activity are also present, and suggest that ANP may have a role in the proliferation of the oral epithelial cells, especially in the tongue and hard palate.

  17. Anhedonia and altered cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide following chronic stressor and endotoxin treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wann, Boubacar Pasto; Audet, Marie-Claude; Gibb, Julie; Anisman, Hymie

    2010-02-01

    Chronic stressors and inflammatory immune activation may contribute to pathophysiological alterations associated with both major depression and cardiovascular disease. The present study, conducted in mice, assessed whether a chronic stressor of moderate severity that induced an anhedonic effect, when coupled with a bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), additively or interactively provoked circulating and heart atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic tool in cardiac diseases. As well, given the potential role of inflammatory processes in both depression and cardiovascular disease, we assessed pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in heart in response to the stressor and the LPS treatments. Male CD-1 mice that had been exposed to a chronic, variable stressor over 4 weeks displayed reduced sucrose consumption, possibly reflecting the anhedonic effects of the stressor. Treatment with LPS (10mug) provoked increased circulating corticosterone levels in both chronically stressed and non-stressed mice. Moreover, ANP concentrations in plasma and in the left ventricle were increased by both the stressor and the LPS treatments, as were left atrial and ventricular cytokine (interleukin-1beta; tumor necrosis factor-alpha) mRNA expression. Further, these treatments synergistically influenced the rise of plasma ANP. A link may exist between stressor-provoked depressive features (anhedonia) and immune activation, with elevated levels of ANP, a potential marker of cardiovascular disturbance. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic stressors and inflammatory immune activation may represent a common denominator subserving the frequent comorbidity between these illnesses.

  18. Atrial natriuretic factor: radioimmunoassay and effects on adrenal and pituitary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkowska, J.; Horky, K.; Schiffrin, E.L.; Thibault, G.; Garcia, R.; De Lean, A.; Hamet, P.; Tremblay, J.; Anand-Srivastava, M.B.; Januszewicz, P.

    1986-06-01

    A simple and sensitive radioimmunoassay was developed for measurement of immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor (IR-ANF) in rat and human plasma and in rat atria. The two atria contain about 20 ..mu..g ANF per rat. The right atrium contained 2.5 times more ANF than did the left. Ether anesthesia and morphine markedly increased IR-ANF in rat plasma. The concentration of IR-ANF in plasma of clinically normal human subjects was 65.3 +/- 2.5 pg/ml. Paroxysmal tachycardia and rapid atrial pacing significantly increased IR-ANF in human plasma. Two- to seven-fold higher concentrations were found in coronary sinus blood than in the peripheral circulation. In the plasma of rats and humans, circulating ANF is probably a small-molecular-weight peptide. ANF acts on the adrenal and the pituitary. ANF inhibits aldosterone secretion from rat zona glomerulosa and steroid secretion by bovine adrenal zona glomerulosa and fasciculata. ANF stimulated the basal secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) in vitro and inhibited KCl-stimulated release of AVP.

  19. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides stimulate the production and secretion of C-type natriuretic peptide from bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nazario, B; Hu, R M; Pedram, A; Prins, B; Levin, E R

    1995-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a member of the natriuretic peptide family which is produced in vascular endothelial cells and may play an important paracrine role in the vasaculature. We sought to determine the regulation of CNP production by other vasoactive peptides from cultured aortic endothelial cells. The vasoconstrictors endothelin-1 and angiotensin II had little effect on the basal secretion of CNP. In contrast, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) strongly stimulated the secretion of CNP. BNP caused as much as a 400-fold enhancement above the basal accumulated secretion of CNP over 24 h at a concentration of 1 microM; this was 20 times greater than the stimulatory effect of ANP, BNP and ANP also significantly enhanced the production of new CNP protein (translation) and mRNA expressed in the BAEC. In contrast, C-ANP-4-23, a truncated form of ANP which selectively binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor, did not stimulate CNP secretion. The enhanced production and secretion of CNP, caused by either ANP or BNP, was significantly prevented by LY 83583, an inhibitor of cGMP generation, and was also attenuated by KT 5823, an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Our results indicate that ANP and BNP can stimulate CNP production through a guanylate cyclase receptor on endothelial cells. BNP is a much more potent stimulator of CNP secretion, compared to ANP. Our findings suggest that the vasodilatory, and anti-mitogenic effects of ANP and BNP in the vasculature could occur in part through CNP production and subsequent action if these interactions occur in vivo. Images PMID:7883964

  20. Effect of phorbol ester on the release of atrial natriuretic peptide from the hypertrophied rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, P.; Taskinen, T.; Järvinen, M.; Ruskoaho, H.

    1991-01-01

    1. To determine the cellular mechanisms of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release from ventricular cardiomyocytes, the secretory and the cardiac effects of a phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), known to stimulate protein kinase C activity in heart cells, were studied in isolated, perfused heart preparations from 2- and 21-month-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. TPA was added to the perfusion fluid for 30 min at a concentration of 46 nM after removal of atrial tissue. Additionally, atrial and ventricular levels of immunoreactive ANP (IR-ANP) and ANP mRNA, the distribution of ANP within ventricles as well as the relative contribution of atria and ventricles in the release of ANP were studied. 2. Ventricular hypertrophy that gradually developed in hypertensive rats resulted in remarkable augmentation of ANP gene expression, as reflected by elevated levels of immunoreactive ANP and ANP mRNA. The total amount of IR-ANP in the ventricles of the SHR rats increased 41 fold and ANP mRNA levels 12.9 fold from the age of 2 to 21 months. At the age of 21 months, levels of IR-ANP and ANP mRNA in the ventricles of SHR rats were 5.4 fold and 3.7 fold higher, respectively, than in the normotensive WKY rats. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated ANP granules within the hypertrophic ventricles of the old SHR rats, but not within normal ventricular tissue. 3. In isolated perfused heart preparations, the severely hypertrophied ventricular tissue of SHR rats after atrialectomy secreted more ANP into the perfusate than did the control hearts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:1826618

  1. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Molecularly Imprinted Polymeric Nanoparticles for Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Howell, Mark; Raulji, Payal; Davis, Yvonne; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the receptor for the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is expressed abundantly on cancer cells and disruption of ANP-NPRA signaling inhibits tumor burden and metastasis. Since antagonists of NPRA signaling have not provided reproducible results, we reasoned that a synthetic neutralizing antibody to ANP, which has high selectivity and affinity for ANP, could be used to regulate ANP levels and attenuate NPRA signaling. In this study, we prepared molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIPNPs) for ANP using a short peptide of ANP as the template and determined their binding affinity and selectivity. The MIPNPs were prepared by precipitation polymerization using NH2-SLRRSS-CONH2, which is a short peptide from ANP as template, methacrylic acid (MAA) and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) as functional monomers, bis-acrylamide (BIS) as crosslinker. The average diameter of MIPNPs and non-imprinted nanoparticles (NIPNPs) in water is 215.8 ±4.6 nm and 197.7±3.1 nm respectively. The binding isotherm analysis showed that MIPNPs have a much higher binding affinity for template peptide and ANP than NIPNPs. Scatchard analysis gave an equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd of 7.3 μM with a binding capacity 106.7 μmol/g for template peptide and Kd of 7.9 μM with a binding capacity of 36.0 μmol/g for ANP. Measurements of binding kinetics revealed that MIPNPs reach protein adsorption equilibrium in 30 min. MIPNPs found to have high specificity for ANP with little affinity for BSA or scrambled ANP peptide. MIPNPs also recognized and adsorbed ANP in cell culture media spiked with ANP and human plasma. Taken together, these results indicate that MIPNPs have high affinity and selectivity for ANP and can be used as a synthetic antibody for modulating ANP-NPRA signaling in cancers. PMID:23459692

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  4. Plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide to indicate fluid balance during cystectomy: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C; Højskov, Michael; Ruhnau, Birgitte; Salling, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Tom; Goetze, Jens P; Secher, Niels H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During surgery the volume of administered fluid is debated. Pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) is released by atrial distension, and we evaluated the relationship between changes in proANP associated with perioperative fluid balance. Design Prospective observational study. Setting One university/tertiary centre. Participants The study included patients who underwent radical cystectomy. Plasma for determination of proANP was obtained before surgery, after resection of the bladder, and at the end of surgery for 20 robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) and 20 open radical cystectomy (ORC) procedures. Results The blood loss was 1871 (95% CI 1267 to 2475) vs 589 mL (378 to 801) in the ORC and RARC groups (p=0.001), respectively, and fluid balance was positive by 1518 mL (1215 to 1821) during ORC, and by 1858 mL (1461 to 2255) during RARC (p=0.163). Yet, at the end of ORC, plasma proANP was reduced by 23% (14% to 32%, p=0.001), while plasma proANP did not change significantly during RARC. Thus, plasma proANP was associated both with the perioperative blood loss (r= −0.475 (0.632 to −0.101), p=0.002), and with fluid balance (r=0.561 (0.302 to 0.740), p=0.001), indicating that a stable plasma proANP required a fluid surplus by 2.4 L (2.0 to 2.7). Conclusions There was a correlation between intraoperative haemorrhage and a decrease in plasma proANP and, taking plasma proANP to indicate filling of the heart, about 2.5 L surplus volume of lactated Ringer's solution appears to maintain cardiac preload during cystectomy. Trial registration number EudraCT (2012-005040-20), Results. PMID:26908528

  5. Influence of atrial natriuretic factor on fluid efflux from the splenic circulation of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Y; Kaufman, S

    1996-01-01

    1. Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) causes a reduction in plasma volume that is abolished by splenectomy. Experiments were conceived to investigate whether ANF acts within the spleen to increase efflux of fluid from the intravascular to the extravascular space. 2. ANF, infused into the splenic artery of anaesthetized rats at rates of 1, 5 and 20 ng min -1, caused a dose-dependent increase in the arteriovenous difference in haematocrit as blood flowed through the spleen (basal difference, 0.18 +/- 0.10%; difference after 10 min at 20 ng min -1 ANF, 1.5 +/- 0.18%; n = 6). There was no such change in plasma protein concentration. 3. ANF (20 ng min -1) did not alter splenic arterial blood flow. However, splenic venous blood flow fell so that the arteriovenous difference increased significantly (basal difference, 0.34 +/- 0.19 ml min -1; difference at 60 min, 1.1 +/- 0.20 ml min-1, n = 7). There was no change in mean arterial pressure. 4. These data confirm our hypothesis that ANF acts within the spleen to increase fluid efflux from the intravascular to the extravascular space. Since there is no change in total splenic blood flow, we propose that the effects of ANF are mediated by dilatation of the splenic afferent arterioles and constriction of the efferent venules, thus increasing filtration pressure. PMID:9011615

  6. Genetic Analysis of the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Gene Polymorphisms among Essential Hypertensive Patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Eskandarian, Narges; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) considerably influences blood pressure regulation through water and sodium homoeostasis. Several of the studies have utilized anonymous genetic polymorphic markers and made inconsequent claims about the ANP relevant disorders. Thus, we screened Insertion/Deletion (ID) and G191A polymorphisms of ANP to discover sequence variations with potential functional significance and to specify the linkage disequilibrium pattern between polymorphisms. The relationships of detected polymorphisms with EH with or without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) status were tested subsequently. Method. ANP gene polymorphisms (I/D and A191G) were specified utilizing mutagenically separated Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 320 subjects including 163 EH case subjects and 157 controls. Result. This case-control study discovered a significant association between I/D polymorphisms of ANP gene in EH patient without T2DM. However, the study determined no association between G191A polymorphisms of ANP in EH with or without T2DM. In addition, sociodemographic factors in the case and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. As a risk factor, ANP gene polymorphisms may affect hypertension. Despite the small sample size in this study, it is the first research assessing the ANP gene polymorphisms in both EH and T2DM patients among Malaysian population. PMID:27413750

  7. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases microvascular blood flow and macromolecular escape during renin infusion in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Boric, M.P.; Albertini, R. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) on microvascular hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity were studied in the hamster cheek pouch under resting conditions and during intravenous renin infusion. Fluorescent intravital microscopy was used to observe arteriolar diameters and to detect escape of fluorescent dextran of 150 K-Daltons (FITC-Dx-150). Microvascular plasma flow was estimated by clearance of 51Cr-EDTA and net macromolecular transport by clearance of FITC-Dx-150. At rest, topical ANP (2-250 ng/ml) had no effect on arteriolar diameter, 51Cr-EDTA clearance, relative vascular conductance (RVC) or FITC-Dx-150 clearance. Infusion of renin (10 mU/Kg/Hr, iv) elevated systemic arterial pressure by 30% and reduced cheek pouch RVC by 26%. During renin infusion, topical ANP (50 ng/ml) produced transient arteriolar vasodilation, and increased 51Cr-EDTA clearance (+35%), RVC (+58%) and FITC-Dx-150 clearance (+54%), without affecting systemic pressure. ANP did not induce venular leakage sites under any condition, but changes in FITC-Dx-150 clearance were highly correlated with changes in 51Cr-EDTA clearance, suggesting that the larger macromolecular escape was due to increases in microvascular blood flow and capillary/post-capillary hydrostatic pressure.

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using {sup 125}I-ANP{sub 8-33}. Specific {sup 125}I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP.

  10. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-19

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of (/sup 125/I)-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of (/sup 3/H)-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet.

  11. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cold-induced diuresis (CID)

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, J.W.; Freund, B.J.; DuBose, D.A.; McKay, J.M.; Hashiro, G.M. Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI )

    1991-03-11

    The hormonal control of cold-induced diuresis (CID) remains unresolved. This study investigated the role of ANP, plasma vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone (ALDO) on CID. Four semi-nude men participated in a 210 min exposure to 15C and 29C air, on separate days. These subjects drank 300 mL of water and had an intravenous saline drip throughout both exposures to replace blood and insensible fluid losses. CID was observed in 15C but not in the 29C experiment, as indicated by a greater urine output. In 15C, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased after 90 min by 41% and remained elevated for 2 h relative to 29C. No differences were observed in AVP between 15C and 29C. In the 15C versus the 29C experiment, ALDO was approximately 37% lower at the pre, 15 and 90 min time periods. Mean arterial blood pressure was generally greater but only significant at 60 min during the 15C versus the 29C experiment. Urinary NA{sup +} excretion was elevated in 15C relative to 29C while no difference in K{sup +} excretion was observed. Although pressure effects may contribute, the observed natriuresis in the absence of a kaliuresis in the cold suggests a physiological role of ANP in CID.

  12. Culture on Electrospun Polyurethane Scaffolds Decreases Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Expression by Cardiomyocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Danielle N.; Akins, Robert E.; Parrag, Ian; Woodhouse, Kimberly A.; Rabolt, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The function of the mammalian heart depends on the functional alignment of cardiomyocytes, and controlling cell alignment is an important consideration in biomaterial design for cardiac tissue engineering and research. The physical cues that guide functional cell alignment in vitro and the impact of substrate-imposed alignment on cell phenotype, however, are only partially understood. In this report, primary cardiac ventricular cells were grown on electrospun, biodegradable polyurethane (ES-PU) with either aligned or unaligned microfibers. ES-PU scaffolds supported high-density cultures, and cell subpopulations remained intact over two weeks in culture. ES-PU cultures contained electrically-coupled cardiomyocytes with connexin-43 localized to points of cell:cell contact. Multi-cellular organization correlated with microfiber orientation, and aligned materials yielded highly oriented cardiomyocyte groupings. Atrial natriuretic peptide, a molecular marker that has decreasing expression during ventricular cell maturation, was significantly lower in cultures grown on ES-PU scaffolds than in those grown on tissue culture polystyrene. Cells grown on aligned ES-PU had significantly lower steady state levels of ANP and constitutively released less ANP over time indicating that scaffold-imposed cell organization resulted in a shift in cell phenotype to a more mature state. We conclude that the physical organization of microfibers in ES-PU scaffolds impacts both multi-cellular architecture and cardiac cell phenotype in vitro. PMID:18823659

  13. Role of calcium in effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aldosterone production in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, L.; Schiffrin, E.L.

    1987-04-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits the stimulation of aldosterone secretion by isolated adrenal glomerulosa cells produced by angiotensin II (ANG II), ACTH, and potassium. The effect of ANP on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium on isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. In the presence of ANP the maximal response of aldosterone output stimulated by ANG II or potassium decreased and the half-maximum (EC/sub 50/) of the response to ACTH was displaced to the right. Because these effects resemble those of calcium-channel blockers, the authors investigated the effect of different concentrations of nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium. Nifedipine produced effects similar to ANP. The maximal response of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II and potassium was decreased and the dose-response curve to ACTH was displaced to the right. ANP decreased the maximal response of aldosterone to the dihydropyridine derivative BAY K8644, a calcium-channel activator, without change in its EC/sub 50/. In contrast, nifedipine displaced the dose-response curve to BAY K8644 to the right as expected of a competitive inhibitor. The effect of ANP and nifedipine on basal and stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. ANP may act on the rat adrenal glomerulosa cells at least in part by interference with calcium entry.

  14. Genetic Analysis of the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Gene Polymorphisms among Essential Hypertensive Patients in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Eskandarian, Narges; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) considerably influences blood pressure regulation through water and sodium homoeostasis. Several of the studies have utilized anonymous genetic polymorphic markers and made inconsequent claims about the ANP relevant disorders. Thus, we screened Insertion/Deletion (ID) and G191A polymorphisms of ANP to discover sequence variations with potential functional significance and to specify the linkage disequilibrium pattern between polymorphisms. The relationships of detected polymorphisms with EH with or without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) status were tested subsequently. Method. ANP gene polymorphisms (I/D and A191G) were specified utilizing mutagenically separated Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 320 subjects including 163 EH case subjects and 157 controls. Result. This case-control study discovered a significant association between I/D polymorphisms of ANP gene in EH patient without T2DM. However, the study determined no association between G191A polymorphisms of ANP in EH with or without T2DM. In addition, sociodemographic factors in the case and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. As a risk factor, ANP gene polymorphisms may affect hypertension. Despite the small sample size in this study, it is the first research assessing the ANP gene polymorphisms in both EH and T2DM patients among Malaysian population. PMID:27413750

  15. In vivo measurement of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors using nuclear imaging.

    PubMed

    Willenbrock, R; Lambert, R; Tremblay, J; Bavaria, G; Langlois, Y; Léveillé, J; Flanagan, R; Hamet, P

    1992-11-01

    We have successfully visualized atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors in vivo using nuclear imaging. 123I-Labelled ANP, injected in green vervet monkeys, was rapidly bound to ANP receptors in the kidneys and lungs. That the observed uptake was receptor mediated was demonstrated with competition studies using simultaneous injection of unlabelled ANP 99-126. It was possible to distinguish between the ANP receptor subtypes by the use of selective antagonists. Thus coinjection of ANP 102-121-des[Gln, Ser, Gly, Leu, Gly] (C-ANP), an ANP analog that selectively binds to the ANP C-receptor, decreased uptake in the kidneys by 50% but increased relative uptake in the lungs and soft tissues. This method permits for the first time, the dynamic in vivo analysis of ANP receptors and their interaction with endogenous ligand. Differences and changes in local ANP receptor concentrations and occupancy could be detected. Since ANP receptor density and affinity are influenced by various physiological and pathological conditions, clinical and diagnostic applications seem possible.

  16. Impaired sinoatrial node function and increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation in mice lacking natriuretic peptide receptor C

    PubMed Central

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Vella, Kimberly; Hua, Rui; Jansen, Hailey J; Moghtadaei, Motahareh; Polina, Iuliia; Bogachev, Oleg; Hurnik, Rhea; Mackasey, Martin; Rafferty, Sara; Ray, Gibanananda; Rose, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are critical regulators of the cardiovascular system that are currently viewed as possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of heart disease. Recent work demonstrates potent NP effects on cardiac electrophysiology, including in the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atria. NPs elicit their effects via three NP receptors (NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C). Among these receptors, NPR-C is poorly understood. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to determine the effects of NPR-C ablation on cardiac structure and arrhythmogenesis. Cardiac structure and function were assessed in wild-type (NPR-C+/+) and NPR-C knockout (NPR-C−/−) mice using echocardiography, intracardiac programmed stimulation, patch clamping, high-resolution optical mapping, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and histology. These studies demonstrate that NPR-C−/− mice display SAN dysfunction, as indicated by a prolongation (30%) of corrected SAN recovery time, as well as an increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (6% in NPR-C+/+ vs. 47% in NPR-C−/−). There were no differences in SAN or atrial action potential morphology in NPR-C−/− mice; however, increased atrial arrhythmogenesis in NPR-C−/− mice was associated with reductions in SAN (20%) and atrial (15%) conduction velocity, as well as increases in expression and deposition of collagen in the atrial myocardium. No differences were seen in ventricular arrhythmogenesis or fibrosis in NPR-C−/− mice. This study demonstrates that loss of NPR-C results in SAN dysfunction and increased susceptibility to atrial arrhythmias in association with structural remodelling and fibrosis in the atrial myocardium. These findings indicate a critical protective role for NPR-C in the heart. Key points Natriuretic peptides (NPs) elicit their effects via multiple NP receptors (including NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C, with NPR-C being relatively poorly understood). We have studied the effects of NPR-C ablation on cardiac structure

  17. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  18. Renal Overexpression of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α as Adaptive Response to a High Salt Diet

    PubMed Central

    Della Penna, Silvana Lorena; Cao, Gabriel; Carranza, Andrea; Zotta, Elsa; Gorzalczany, Susana; Cerrudo, Carolina Susana; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia Lucía; Correa, Alicia; Trida, Verónica; Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Fernández, Belisario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, a high salt intake favors oxidative stress and hypoxia and causes the development of fibrosis. Both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) exert cytoprotective effects. We tested the hypothesis that renal expression of ANP and HIF-1α is involved in a mechanism responding to the oxidative stress produced in the kidneys of rats chronically fed a high sodium diet. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a normal salt (0.4% NaCl) (NS) or a high salt (8% NaCl) (HS) diet for 3 weeks, with or without the administration of tempol (T), an inhibitor of oxidative stress, in the drinking water. We measured the mean arterial pressure (MAP), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and urinary sodium excretion (UVNa). We evaluated the expression of ANP, HIF-1α, and transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) in renal tissues by western blot and immunohistochemistry. The animals fed a high salt diet showed increased MAP and UVNa levels and enhanced renal immunostaining of ANP, HIF-1α, and TGF-β1. The administration of tempol together with the sodium overload increased the natriuresis further and prevented the elevation of blood pressure and the increased expression of ANP, TGF-β1, and HIF-1α compared to their control. These findings suggest that HIF-1α and ANP, synthesized by the kidney, are involved in an adaptive mechanism in response to a sodium overload to prevent or attenuate the deleterious effects of the oxidative stress and the hypoxia on the development of fibrosis. PMID:24689065

  19. Permeability and contractile responses of collecting lymphatic vessels elicited by atrial and brain natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J; Huxley, Virginia H

    2013-10-15

    Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively) are cardiac hormones released into the bloodstream in response to hypervolaemia or fluid shifts to the central circulation. The actions of both peptides include natriuresis and diuresis, a decrease in systemic blood pressure, and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Further, ANP and BNP elicit increases in blood microvessel permeability sufficient to cause protein and fluid extravasation into the interstitium to reduce the vascular volume. Given the importance of the lymphatic vasculature in maintaining fluid balance, we tested the hypothesis that ANP or BNP (100 nM) would likewise elevate lymphatic permeability (Ps) to serum albumin. Using a microfluorometric technique adapted to in vivo lymphatic vessels, we determined that rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic Ps to rat serum albumin increased by 2.0 ± 0.4-fold (P = 0.01, n = 7) and 2.7 ± 0.8-fold (P = 0.07, n = 7) with ANP and BNP, respectively. In addition to measuring Ps responses, we observed changes in spontaneous contraction amplitude and frequency from the albumin flux tracings in vivo. Notably, ANP abolished spontaneous contraction amplitude (P = 0.005) and frequency (P = 0.006), while BNP augmented both parameters by ∼2-fold (P < 0.01 each). These effects of ANP and BNP on contractile function were examined further by using an in vitro assay. In aggregate, these data support the theory that an increase in collecting lymphatic permeability opposes the absorptive function of the lymphatic capillaries, and aids in the retention of protein and fluid in the interstitial space to counteract volume expansion.

  20. Clearance function of type C receptors of atrial natriuretic factor in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, F.A.; Suzuki, M.; Scarborough, R.M.; Lewicki, J.A.; Maack, T.

    1989-02-01

    The overwhelming majority of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) receptors in kidney and vascular tissues do not mediate any of the known functional effects of the hormone. To test whether these receptors (C-ANF receptors) function as clearance receptors for circulating ANF-(1-28), we determined the effects of C-ANF-(4-23) (des(Gln18Ser19Gly20Leu21Gly22)rANF-(3-23)-NH2), a specific ligand of C-ANF receptors, on the pharmacokinetics and hydrolysis of 125I-labeled ANF-(1-28) in anesthetized rats. Radioactivity in plasma was characterized by trichloroacetic acid solubility and high-pressure liquid chromatography. C-ANF-(4-23) (1 and 10 micrograms.min-1.kg body wt-1) led to marked dose-dependent increases in initial plasma concentration of administered 125I-ANF-(1-28) and decreases in its volume of distribution at steady state (Vss), metabolic clearance rate (MCR), and appearance of hydrolytic products ((125I)monoiodotyrosine and free 125I) in plasma (Pm). At the highest dose, C-ANF-(4-23) decreased Vss from 97 +/- 12 to 36 +/- 2 ml/100 g body wt, MCR from 50 +/- 4 to 12 +/- 1 ml.min-1.100 g body wt-1, and Pm from 54 +/- 8 to 11 +/- 2% of initial plasma 125I-ANF-(1-28). The data demonstrate that C-ANF receptors are mainly responsible for the very large volume of distribution and fast MCR of ANF in the rat. In this manner, C-ANF receptors are likely to play an important role in the homeostasis of circulating ANF.

  1. The interaction of cadmium with atrial natriuretic factor: A study in in vivo and in vitro models

    SciTech Connect

    Giridhar, J.

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and its receptor in cadmium(Cd)-induced cardiovascular alterations and neurotoxicity is not known. This study examines the mechanisms underlying Cd-induced changes in the ANF peptide and its receptor in cardiovascular toxicity. In rats on short term Cd exposure (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.p., twice a day for 7 days and a maintenance period of 30 days), atrial ANF levels decreased significantly in the Cd 1 mg/kg group; plasma ANF levels were unchanged. Hypothalamic ANF content decreased significantly in 0.1-1.0 mg/kg Cd groups. Plasma renin activity and concentration were unchanged by Cd treatment. However, plasma aldosterone was significantly decreased in Cd 1.0 mg/kg group. Binding of [sup 125]I-ANF to its receptors in kidney, adrenals and aorta was not significantly altered. Cd treatment decreased urine volume indicating nephrotoxicity. Neuromodulation by ANF involved significant decrease in K[sup +] stimulated [[sup 3]H]NE release in rat hypothalamic slices. This action is proposed to be mediated by ANF-B receptors. 8Br-cGMP mimicked this action. In Cd treated animals (0.5 mg/kg twice a day for 7 days and maintained for 30 days), ANF neuromodulation in the hypothalmus was blocked, even though Cd content was undetectable. Cd preincubated (0.5 mM) slices showed a 49.1% block in neurotransmitter release indicating that Cd may block calcium channels leading to decreased K[sup +]-stimulated release of [[sup 3]H]NE. Hence, Cd-induced cardiovascular toxicity and neurotoxicity may be partly mediated by alteration in the release and possibly the synthesis of ANF peptide, disruption of ANF function through alterations in receptor dynamics and possibly alteration in cellular calcium homeostasis and membrane integrity. Central ANF function is sensitive to Cd and this effect may be partly resposible for the cardiovascular and neurotoxic responses to CD.

  2. Metabolism of /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic factor by vascular smooth muscle cells. Evidence for a peptidase that specifically removes the COOH-terminal tripeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Arik, L.; Foster, C.J.

    1989-07-15

    The addition of 200 pM monoiodinated human atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) (125I-hANF) to cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells at 37/degree/C resulted in a rapid clearance from the medium (t1/2 approximately 7.5 min). Within 5 min, (125I)iodotyrosine126 (125I-Y), Arg125-(125I)iodotyrosine126 (125I-RY) and Phe124-Arg-(125)iodotyrosine126 (125I-FRY) appeared in the medium. The identities of these degradation products were confirmed by (1) retention time on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) relative to standards, (2) products generated by digestion with aminopeptidase M, and (3) the absence of the Met110. Preincubation of the cells with ammonium chloride or chloroquine resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular accumulation of radiolabel, indicative of endocytosis and rapid delivery of 125I-hANF to an acidic intracellular compartment (endosome and/or lysosome). Neither ammonium chloride, chloroquine, nor excess unlabeled hANF blocked the rapid appearance in the medium of 125I-RY or 125I-FRY. Bestatin inhibited the generation of 125I-RY, with a concomitant increase in 125I-FRY, suggesting that the 125I-RY is produced by aminopeptidase action on 125I-FRY. The endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) inhibitor, SCH 39370, did not inhibit the formation of 125I-FRY. These results provide evidence of a peptidase capable of specifically removing the COOH-terminal tripeptide from 125I-hANF. The COOH-terminal tripeptide, Phe124-Arg-Tyr126, was also isolated from cell digests of hANF by HPLC and its identity confirmed by amino acid analysis. Since it is generally believed that the COOH-terminal tripeptide is critical to many of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126)'s bioactivities, this enzyme may be involved in the inactivation of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) in target tissues.

  3. Defective stretch-induced release of atrial natriuretic peptide from aging hypertensive rat heart: possible role of phosphatidylinositol pathway.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F; Mouton, R; Lochner, A; Opie, L H

    1995-01-01

    Because the phosphatidylinositol pathway may be part of the signaling system associated with stretch-induced release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), we tested the hypothesis that formation of the intermediate inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) is impaired when ANP release is decreased in response to atrial stretch in hearts from aging genetically hypertensive (GH) rats. Immunoreactive ANP release into the coronary effluent and IP3 levels were studied in cardiac tissues of isolated perfused hearts from normotensive control (WAG) or GH rats aged 4, 11, or 16 months. Left atria were repeatedly distended and released with a latex balloon. ANP was measured in coronary effluent, and IP3 was measured in cardiac tissues. In all age groups, stretch and relief of stretch evoked considerably less ANP release in spontaneously beating hearts from GH than from WAG rats. Hearts from GH rats aged 16 months released no ANP, but electrical pacing restored some stretch-induced ANP secretion. With repeated stretch and release of stretch of the left atrium for 2 min, IP3 levels increased in left atrial tissue in WAG but not in GH hearts of all age groups. IP3 levels in (unstretched) left ventricles were much lower than in left atria and were unaltered by atrial stretch. In aging GH rats, the capacity to release ANP on atrial stretch is largely lost, in association with complete suppression of stimulus-induced increase in IP3 levels. These data support a role for IP3 in stretch-mediated atrial ANP secretion and suggest a progressive uncoupling of this signaling pathway in aging hypertensive rats. PMID:7723347

  4. Cocaine-associated increase of atrial natriuretic peptides: an early predictor of cardiac complications in cocaine users?

    PubMed Central

    Casartelli, Alessandro; Dacome, Lisa; Tessari, Michela; Pascali, Jennifer; Bortolotti, Federica; Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Bosco, Oliviero; Cristofori, Patrizia; Tagliaro, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cocaine is known to produce life-threatening cardiovascular complications, and the investigation of the causes of death may be challenging in forensic medicine. The increasing knowledge of the cardiac function biomarkers and the increasing sensitivity of assays provide new tools in monitoring the cardiac life-threatening pathological conditions and in the sudden death investigation in chronic abusers. In this work, cardiac dysfunction was assessed in an animal model by measuring troponin I and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers, and considering other standard endpoints used in preclinical toxicology studies. Methods Lister Hooded rats were treated with cocaine in chronic self-administration studies. Troponin I (cTnI) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were evaluated at different time points and heart weight and histopathology were assessed at the end of the treatment period. Furthermore, cocaine and its main metabolites were measured in the rat fur to assess rats’ cocaine exposure. All the procedures and endpoints considered were designed to allow an easy and complete translation from the laboratory animals to human beings, and the same approach was also adopted with a group of 10 healthy cocaine abuse volunteers with no cardiac pathologies. Results Cardiac troponin I values were unaffected, and ANP showed an increasing trend with time in all cocaine-treated animals considered. Similarly, in the healthy volunteers, no changes were observed in troponin serum levels, whereas the N-terminal brain natriuretic pro-peptide (NT proBNP) showed variations comparable with the changes observed in rats. Conclusions In conclusion, natriuretic peptides could represent an early indicator of heart dysfunction liability in chronic cocaine abusers. PMID:27326180

  5. Plasma arginine vasopressin, atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide responses to long-term field training in the heat: effects of fluid ingestion and acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Mudambo, K S; Coutie, W; Rennie, M J

    1997-01-01

    The maintenance of blood volume during exercise, especially in a hot environment, is of major importance for continued performance. In order to investigate the relationships between exercise, type and amount of fluid intake and the degree of acclimatization to heat stress and on responses of arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), we studied 24 soldiers during and after jogging/walking exercise both before and after acclimatization to field training at [mean (SE)] 40 (0.7) degrees C and 32 (3)% relative humidity. The running exercise was carried out under three conditions, i.e., (1) without any fluid intake, (2) with intake of water or (3) with intake of a dextrose/electrolyte solution. Venous blood samples were drawn before exercise, at the end of exercise and at 15 min and 60 min afterwards. Acclimatization resulted in significant losses of body mass, total body water, plasma volume, ANP and increases in plasma osmolality, packed cell volume and AVP at rest but without any significant changes in BNP. During exercise with no fluid intake, there was a significant rise in plasma osmolality, Na+ and AVP, but no significant alterations in plasma ANP and BNP were observed. When subjects ingested water or dextrose/electrolyte solution during exercise, ANP rose by 234% and 431% respectively and BNP rose by 398% and 583% respectively without any significant increase in AVP. The results suggest that, during acclimatization, the subjects became slightly dehydrated. Alterations in response to changes in body water status appear to be greater for AVP than ANP or BNP at rest. During exercise in the heat ANP and BNP may play complementary roles. PMID:9088840

  6. Beta-adrenoceptor blockade potentiates acute exercise-induced release of atrial natriuretic peptide by increasing atrial diameter in normotensive healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Berlin, I; Lechat, P; Deray, G; Landault, C; Maistre, G; Chermat, V; Brouard, R; Ressayre, C; Puech, A J

    1993-01-01

    The role of atrial distension and/or adrenergic mechanisms in the regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion, plasma immunoreactive ANP, norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and left atrial diameter at rest, during and after graded bicycle exercise has been studies in 8 healthy male subjects after single doses of placebo, tertatolol 5 mg (a non-selective beta-adrenoceptor blocker), prazosin 1 mg (an alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist) and their combination. Systolic and diastolic left atrial diameters were measured before, during and just after exercise by bidimensional echocardiography. Exercise caused an increase in plasma ANP, which was greater after tertatolol alone, and tertatolol plus prazosin, than after placebo or prazosin alone; the mean area under the plasma ANP concentration curve was increased by 35% after tertatolol alone, by 45% after tertatolol and prazosin compared to placebo, and by 82% and 94%, respectively when compared to prazosin alone. The rise in plasma ANP was more marked during the post-exercise period: 80% after tertatolol alone, 67% after tertatolol and prazosin compared to placebo, and 133% and 115%, respectively, compared to prazosin alone. The rise in plasma ANP was accompanied by an increase in both the systolic and diastolic atrial diameter, which was also significantly greater after tertatolol alone and the combination than placebo, or after prazosin alone. beta-Adrenoceptor blockade alone did not affect the plasma catecholamine concentrations, but the exercise-induced increase in plasma norepinephrine was significantly potentiated by prazosin and by prazosin plus tertatolol, and that of plasma epinephrine by the drug combination.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Beta-adrenergic modulation of the release of atrial natriuretic factor from rat cardiac atria in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.; Imada, T.; Takayanagi, B.; Inagami, T.

    1986-03-01

    Several stimulatory factors for the release of atrial natriuretic factor, such as atrial stretch, atrial pacing and vasopressin, have been reported. We studied the effects of the adrenergic nervous system on the release of ANF using an in vitro perfusion system. Right and left atria from Sprague-Dawley rats were quartered and perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution gassed with 95% CO/sub 2//5% O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C. Perfusate factions were collected every 2 minutes. Fractions were collected 20 minutes before and for 2 hours during the administration of test agents. ANF was measured by radioimmunoassay. Within 10 minutes of exposure to 10/sup -6/M isoproterenol, ANF secretion fell to less than 50% of its baseline level. However, beta agonists showed a stimulatory effect of 4-5 fold. Carbachol, in a concentration of 10/sup -2/M was used to demonstrate the viability of the atria exposed to isoproterenol, and produced a stimulation of ANF release of 4-6 times the basal level. The adrenergic nervous system can modulate ANF release in vitro. Further studies are being performed with selective beta agonists and antagonists to elucidate these results.

  8. Increased atrial natriuretic peptide (6-33) binding sites in the subfornical organ of water deprived and Brattleboro rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.; Israel, A.; Correa, F.M.A.; Kurihara, M.

    1986-09-01

    Binding sites for rat atrial natriuretic eptide (6-33) (ANP) were quantitated in the subfornical organ of chronically dehydrated homozygous Brattleboro rats unable to synthesize vasopressin; heterozygous Brattleboro rats, their controls, Long Evans rats and Long Evans rats after 4 days of water deprivation. Brain sections were incubated in the presence of /sup 125/I-ANP and the results analyzed by autoradiography coupled to computerized microdensitometry and comparison to /sup 125/I-standards. Brattleboro rats and water deprived Long Evans rats presented a higher number of ANP binding sites than their normally hydrated controls. The results suggest a role of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ in the central regulation of fluid balance and vasopressin secretion.

  9. Alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (. cap alpha. -hANP) specific binding sites in bovine adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, K.; Nawata, H.; Kato, K.I.; Ibayashi, H.; Matsuo, H.

    1986-06-13

    The effects of synthetic ..cap alpha..-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (..cap alpha..-hANP) on steroidogenesis in bovine adrenocortical cells in primary monolayer culture were investigated. ..cap alpha..-hANP did not inhibit basal aldosterone secretion. ..cap alpha..-hANP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of basal levels of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion and also of aCTH (10/sup -8/M)-stimulated increases in aldosterone, cortisol and DHEA secretion. Visualization of (/sup 125/I) ..cap alpha..-hANP binding sites in bovine adrenal gland by an in vitro autoradiographic technique demonstrated that these sites were highly localized in the adrenal cortex, especially the zona glomerulosa. These results suggest that the adrenal cortex may be a target organ for direct receptor-mediated actions of ..cap alpha..-hANP.

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits cell cycle activity of embryonic cardiac progenitor cells via its NPRA receptor signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Adam; Feridooni, Tiam; Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; McNeil, Kathleen; Chinni, Sarita; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-04-01

    The biological effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs), which can either activate guanylyl cyclase (NPRA and NPRB) or inhibit adenylyl cyclase (NPRC) to modulate intracellular cGMP or cAMP, respectively. During cardiac development, ANP serves as an early maker of differentiating atrial and ventricular chamber myocardium. As development proceeds, expression of ANP persists in the atria but declines in the ventricles. Currently, it is not known whether ANP is secreted or the ANP-NPR signaling system plays any active role in the developing ventricles. Thus the primary aims of this study were to 1) examine biological activity of ANP signaling systems in embryonic ventricular myocardium, and 2) determine whether ANP signaling modulates proliferation/differentiation of undifferentiated cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and/or cardiomyocytes. Here, we provide evidence that ANP synthesized in embryonic day (E)11.5 ventricular myocytes is actively secreted and processed to its biologically active form. Notably, NPRA and NPRC were detected in E11.5 ventricles and exogenous ANP stimulated production of cGMP in ventricular cell cultures. Furthermore, we showed that exogenous ANP significantly decreased cell number and DNA synthesis of CPCs but not cardiomyocytes and this effect could be reversed by pretreatment with the NPRA receptor-specific inhibitor A71915. ANP treatment also led to a robust increase in nuclear p27 levels in CPCs compared with cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data provide evidence that in the developing mammalian ventricles ANP plays a local paracrine role in regulating the balance between CPC proliferation and differentiation via NPRA/cGMP-mediated signaling pathways.

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L.; Machan, Jason T.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/−), and knockout (NPR-A−/−) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A−/− mice than in NPR-A+/− or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A−/− and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A−/− mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  12. Relationship between natriuresis and changes in plasma atrial natriuretic factor, renin activity and aldosterone levels in fasting obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Donckier, J E; Kolanowski, J; Berbinschi, A; Gerard, G; Ketelslegers, J M

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether changes in atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) secretion could account for the natriuresis of the early phase of fasting. To this end, 8 AM (supine) and 10 AM (standing) plasma ANF concentrations were determined daily and compared with plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels in 8 obese subjects submitted to a 7-day total fast. Depiste constant daily sodium intake (51 mmol), urinary sodium excretion increased from 35 +/- 7 to 109 +/- 8 mmol/day after 4 days of fast (p less than 0.001) and declined thereafter. Urinary ketone excretion progressively increased over the whole period of fasting (p less than 0.001). Interestingly, fasting induced a decrease in plasma ANF concentrations (p less than 0.05). A contrast analysis revealed no significant change in ANF during the initial natriuretic phase of fasting but a decrease at the end of fasting averaging 36% (p less than 0.05) and 18% (p less than 0.05) at 8 and 10 AM respectively. In contrast, plasma aldosterone rose during fasting (p less than 0.05), the difference being significant at the end of fasting (p less than 0.01). Plasma renin activity and cortisol did not change significantly over the fasting period. Postural and/or diurnal changes of ANF, aldosterone, renin and cortisol were preserved during fasting (p less than 0.01). Postural changes of ANF were, however, attenuated at the end of fasting (p less than 0.05). These data indicate that the fasting natriuresis cannot be explained by changes in ANF levels but that the loss of sodium may contribute to a decline of basal ANF levels, with an attenuation of their physiological postural changes, and to a stimulation of the aldosterone secretion.

  13. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide in the locus coeruleus and its possible role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, H.; Sterzel, R.B. ); Bahner, U.; Heidland, A. ); Palkovits, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANP) is present in neuronal cells of the locus coeruleus and its vicinity in the pontine tegmentum and moderate amount of ANP is detectable in this area by radioimmunoassay. The ANP is known as a neuropeptide which may influence the body salt and water homeostasis and blood pressure by targeting both central and peripheral regulatory mechanisms. Whether this pontine ANP cell group is involved in any of these regulatory mechanisms, the effect of various types of hypertension and experimental alterations in the salt and water balance on ANP levels was measured by radioimmunoassay in the locus coeruleus of rats. Adrenalectomy, as well as aldosterone and dexamethasone treatments failed to alter ANP levels in the locus coeruleus. Reduced ANP levels were measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and in diabetes insipidus rats with vasopressin replacement. In contrast to these situations, elevated ANP levels were found in rats with DOCA-salt or 1-Kidney-1-clip hypertension. These data suggest a link between ANP levels in the locus coeruleus and fluid volume homeostasis. Whether this link is causal and connected with the major activity of locus coeruleus neurons needs further information.

  15. [Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide level and urinary fractional sodium excretion (FENa) in patients with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Czekalski, S

    1990-12-01

    The aim of the study was the search for the correlation between the degree of impairment renal function (measured by creatinine clearance) and plasma concentration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and urinary fractional sodium excretion (FENa) in patients with chronic renal diseases. Forty seven patients were studied: 10 with diminished renal reserve (group I), 10 with renal insufficiency (group II), 27 with renal failure (group III) and 10 chronically haemodialysed before dialysis (group IV). Control group consisted of 27 healthy persons. All patients and controls were on the diet containing 100-120 mmol sodium daily. Plasma ANP levels were significantly higher in all groups of patients (I--16.5 +/- 5.7; II--40.7 +/- 18.6; III--86.2 +/- 49.9; IV--196.1 +/- 51.3 pmol/l, respectively) than in controls (10.8 +/- 6.0 pmol/l). A significant correlation (r = 0.85; p less than 0.01) between plasma ANP concentration and FENa was found when the patients from all groups were pooled together. The results confirm the important role of ANP in the adaptation of reduced kidney mass to the excretion of sodium load.

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide down-regulates neutrophil recruitment on inflamed endothelium by reducing cell deformability and resistance to detachment force

    PubMed Central

    Morikis, Vasilios A.; Radecke, Chris; Jiang, Yanyan; Heinrich, Volkmar; Curry, Fitz-Roy; Simon, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recombinant atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is administered in patients with acute heart failure in Japan to improve renal function and hemodynamics, but its anti-inflammatory effect on activated leukocytes may also contribute to its therapeutic efficacy. OBJECTIVE Examine unconventional role of ANP in neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium. METHODS Human neutrophils were perfused over endothelial monolayers in a microfluidic lab-chip assay. Cell rheology was assessed by micropipette aspiration to assess changes in cortical tension and viscosity. Fluorescence microscopy was applied to measure adhesive contact area and β2-integrin focal bond formation. RESULTS ANP inhibited neutrophil rolling and firm adhesion without influencing the upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules on endothelium or the regulation of high affinity CD18 and shedding of L-selectin during neutrophil activation. Exposed to fluid shear, integrin mediated arrest was disrupted with ANP treatment, which elicited formation of long tethers and diminished cell spreading and contact. This correlated with a ~40% increase in neutrophil viscosity and a reduction in the adhesive footprint. CONCLUSIONS A decrease in cell deformation and neutrophil flattening with ANP results in fewer integrin bond clusters, which translates to higher tensile forces and impaired adhesion strengthening and cell detachment. PMID:26639357

  17. [Effects of xinshuaikang granule on cardiac function and atrial natriuretic polypeptide levels in rabbits with experimental congestive heart failure].

    PubMed

    Jin, X C; Sun, J Z; Wang, X

    1996-07-01

    Xinshuaikang (XSK) granule mainly consisted of Radix Ginseng, Aconifum carmichaeli, Ligustici wallichii, Semen Lepidii seu Descurainiae, etc. Thirty-five white rabbits of Japanese strain with big ears were used and five groups were divided randomly. The models of chronic heart failure (CHF) was made by injection of adriamycin through the marginal vein of rabbit's ear. Only one group without adriamycin injection was taken as blank group. After the making of models, Xinbao (XB) was used to treat one group which was regarded as control group, XSK was used to treat two model groups, one used higher dose, the other one used lower dose. Fifteen days was taken as a course of treatment. The results were: the body weight of all model groups was heavier than that without adriamycin. After a course of treatment, the body weight of the groups treated by XSK or XB decreased rapidly, the general conditions of the three groups were improved; the two drugs could reduce heart rate and enhance heart function, at the same time they reduced the level of atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP) in plasma. The best results was obtained in XSK group with higher dose, the effect of XSK group with lower dose was equivalent to that of XB group. Hence, XSK granule could enhance the CHF rabbits' heart function, improve their heart endocrine activity, this drug had a reliable effect on CHF.

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by CPA47 cells - Evidence for a divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Chen, Y. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is rapidly cleared and degraded in vivo. Nonguanylate-cyclase receptors (C-ANPR) and a metalloproteinase, neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) (NEP 24.11), are thought to be responsible for its metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms of ANP degradation by an endothelial-derived cell line, CPA47. CPA47 cells degraded 88 percent of 125I-ANP after 1 h at 37 degrees C as determined by HPLC. Medium preconditioned by these cells degraded 41 percent of the 125I-ANP, and this activity was inhibited by a divalent cation chelator, EDTA. Furthermore, a cell-surface proteolytic activity degraded 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA when receptor-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by low temperature (4 degrees C) or by hyperosmolarity at 37 degrees C. The metalloproteinase, NEP 24.11, is unlikely to be the cell-surface peptidase because 125I-ANP is degraded by CPA47 cells at 4 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM EDTA. These data indicate that CPA47 cells can degrade ANP by a novel divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity.

  19. Sensitive radioimmunoassay of. cap alpha. human atrial natriuretic polypeptide using monoclonal antibody recognizing human form ring structure

    SciTech Connect

    Naomi, S.; Umeda, T.; Iwaoka, T.; Miura, F.; Ohno, M.; Sasaki, M.; Oishi, S.; Sato, T.; Takatsu, K.

    1988-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (C351) against ..cap alpha.. human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (..cap alpha..hANP) recognizing human form ring structure was established and applied to a radioimmunoassay of plasma ..cap alpha..hANP. The minimum detectable amount in terms of 10 % radioligand displacement relative to zero dose were 0.28 fmol/tube, corresponding to 0.7 fmol/ml in plasma after extraction using Sep-Pak C18 cartridges. When the mean plasma levels at recumbent position in fasted morning were compared in 10 young (<30 years) and 10 elderly (greater than or equal to50 years) healthy subjects taking normal sodium diet, it was slightly higher in the latter. After i.v. infusion of hypertonic saline at a rate of 0.24 ml/kg/min for 20 min in 6 normal subjects (26 to 35 years), it was increased from 4.1 +/- 0.4 to 5.9 +/- 0.7 fmol/ml (p<0.01). In 6 patients with essential hypertension (34 to 57 years), it was elevated with high salt intake. From these results, the radioimmunoassay of plasma IR-..cap alpha..hANP using MAb C351 seems to be quite suitable to detect rather small changes at low plasma concentrations and to investigate a physiological importance of ..cap alpha..hANP in man.

  20. An analogue of atrial natriuretic peptide (C-ANP4-23) modulates glucose metabolism in human differentiated adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco Javier; Aguilera, Concepción María; Rupérez, Azahara Iris; Gil, Ángel; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina

    2016-08-15

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of C-atrial natriuretic peptide (C-ANP4-23) in human adipose-derived stem cells differentiated into adipocytes over 10 days (1 μM for 4 h). The intracellular cAMP, cGMP and protein kinase A levels were determined by ELISA and gene and protein expression were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively, in the presence or absence of C-ANP4-23. The levels of lipolysis and glucose uptake were also determined. C-ANP4-23 treatment significantly increased the intracellular cAMP levels and the gene expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and protein kinase, AMP-activated, alpha 1 catalytic subunit (AMPK). Western blot showed a significant increase in GLUT4 and phosphor-AMPKα levels. Importantly, the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished these effects. Additionally, C-ANP4-23 increased glucose uptake by 2-fold. Our results show that C-ANP4-23 enhances glucose metabolism and might contribute to the development of new peptide-based therapies for metabolic diseases. PMID:27181211

  1. Receptors for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and regulation of thyroglobulin secretion by ANP in human thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sellitti, D.F.; Tseng, Y.C.L.; Wartofsky, L. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC )

    1989-01-01

    Specific binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were identified and characterized in primary cultures of human thyroid cells. Saturation analysis using ({sup 125}I) {alpha} rat (1-28) ANP as the ligand showed a single class of high affinity binding which was inhibited by atriopeptin I and the {alpha} -human form of ANP, but not by a C-terminal fragment (13-28) of the peptide. The number of ANP binding sites in these cultures was not altered by the thyroid hormone concentration of the medium. In a dose-response experiment, thyroglobulin secretion was significantly reduced in the presence of 0.01 nM ANP and was maximally reduced with 10 nM ANP. Cyclic GMP production was increased threefold in the presence of 100 nM ANP, but was unchanged with lower doses of the peptides. The finding of receptors in thyroid follicular cells suggests a hitherto unrecognized role of ANP in the thyroid gland.

  2. Role of atrial natriuretic peptide in systemic responses to acute isotonic volume expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Buckey, Jay C.; Lane, Lynda D.; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed that a temporal relationship exists between increases in cardiac filling pressure and plasma artrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentration and also between ANP elevation and vasodilation, fluid movement from plasma to interstitium, and increased urine volume (UV). To test the hypothesis, 30 ml/kg isotonic saline were infused in supine male subjects over 24 min and responses were monitored for 3 h postinfusion. Results show that at end infusion, mean arterial pressure (RAP), heart rate and plasma volume exhibited peak increases of 146, 23, and 27 percent, respectively. Mean plasma ANP and UV peaked (45 and 390 percent, respectively) at 30 min postinfusion. Most cardiovascular variables had returned toward control levels by 1 h postinfusion, and net reabsorption of extravascular fluid ensued. It is concluded that since ANP was not significantly increased until 30 min postinfusion, factors other than ANP initiate responses to intravascular fluid loading. These factors include increased vascular pressures, baroreceptor-mediated vasolidation, and hemodilution of plasma proteins. ANP is suggested to mediate, in part, the renal response to saline infusion.

  3. Relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide pathways participate in the anti-fibrotic effect of a melon concentrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Carillon, Julie; Gauthier, Audrey; Barial, Sandy; Tournier, Michel; Gayrard, Nathalie; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Jover, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Background In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a model of human essential hypertension, oxidative stress is involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis associated with hypertension. Dietary supplementation with agents exhibiting antioxidant properties could have a beneficial effect in remodeling of the heart. We previously demonstrated a potent anti-hypertrophic effect of a specific melon (Cucumis melo L.) concentrate with antioxidant properties in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were reported to reduce collagen deposition and fibrosis progression in various experimental models. Objective The aim of the present investigation was to test the hypothesis that, beside reduction in oxidative stress, the melon concentrate may act through relaxin, its receptor (relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1, RXFP1), and ANP in SHR. Design and results The melon concentrate, given orally during 4 days, reduced cardiomyocyte size (by 25%) and totally reversed cardiac collagen content (Sirius red staining) in SHR but not in their normotensive controls. Treatment with the melon concentrate lowered cardiac nitrotyrosine-stained area (by 45%) and increased by 17–19% the cardiac expression (Western blot) of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, plasma relaxin concentration was normalized while cardiac relaxin (Western blot) was lowered in treated SHR. Cardiac relaxin receptor level determined by immunohistochemical analysis increased only in treated SHR. Similarly, the melon concentrate reversed the reduction of plasma ANP concentration and lowered its cardiac expression. Conclusions The present results demonstrate that reversal of cardiac fibrosis by the melon concentrate involves antioxidant defenses, as well as relaxin and ANP pathways restoration. It is suggested that dietary SOD supplementation could be a useful additional strategy against cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis

  4. Effect of short-term endurance training on exercise capacity, haemodynamics and atrial natriuretic peptide secretion in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Geny, B; Saini, J; Mettauer, B; Lampert, E; Piquard, F; Follenius, M; Epailly, E; Schnedecker, B; Eisenmann, B; Haberey, P; Lonsdorfer, J

    1996-01-01

    Exercise tolerance of heart transplant patients is often limited. Central and peripheral factors have been proposed to explain such exercise limitation but, to date, the leading factors remain to be determined. We examined how a short-term endurance exercise training programme may improve exercise capacity after heart transplantation, and whether atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release may contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise training by minimizing ischaemia and/or cardiac and circulatory congestion through its vasodilatation and haemoconcentration properties. Seven heart transplant recipients performed a square-wave endurance exercise test before and after 6 weeks of supervised training, while monitoring haemodynamic parameters, ANP and catecholamine concentrations. After training, the maximal tolerated power and the total mechanical work load increased from 130.4 (SEM 6.5) to 150.0 (SEM 6.0) W (P < 0.05) and from 2.05 (SEM 0.1) to 3.58 (SEM 0.14) kJ.kg-1 (P < 0.001). Resting heart rate decreased from 100.0 (SEM 3.4) to 92.4 (SEM 3.5) beats.min-1 (P < 0.05) but resting and exercise induced increases in cardiac output, stroke volume, right atrial, pulmonary capillary wedge, systemic and pulmonary artery pressures were not significantly changed by training. Exercise-induced decrease of systemic vascular resistance was similar before and after training. After training arterio-venous differences in oxygen content were similar but maximal lactate concentrations decreased from 6.20 (SEM 0.55) to 4.88 (SEM 0.6) mmol.l-1 (P < 0.05) during exercise. Similarly, maximal exercise noradrenaline concentration tended to decrease from 2060 (SEM 327) to 1168 (SEM 227) pg.ml-1. A significant correlation was observed between lactate and catecholamines concentrations. The ANP concentration at rest and the exercise-induced ANP concentration did not change throughout the experiment [104.8 (SEM 13.1) pg.ml-1 vs 116.0 (SEM 13.5) pg.ml-1 and 200.0 (SEM 23.0) pg.ml-1 vs 206

  5. Effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on potassium-stimulated aldosterone secretion: potential relevance to hypoaldosteronism in man.

    PubMed

    Clark, B A; Brown, R S; Epstein, F H

    1992-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to suppress aldosterone secretion under certain circumstances, although the physiological significance of this is uncertain. We wondered if ANP would suppress potassium-stimulated aldosterone secretion in man and, if so, whether we might find high circulating levels of ANP in patients with the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism. We studied seven healthy young subjects under two conditions: 1) infusion of KCl (0.5 mmol/kg) over 45 min, and 2) KCl infused with ANP (0.01 microgram/kg.min) for 60 min. We also evaluated ANP levels in eight elderly subjects with the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism, as defined by hyperkalemia (mean serum K+, 5.3 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) associated with inappropriately low aldosterone levels (216 +/- 50 pmol/L). In the normal subjects, ANP almost completely suppressed the aldosterone response to KCl infusion (P less than 0.001, by analysis of variance) despite a similar rise in the serum potassium level with KCl alone (0.70 +/- 0.07 mmol/L) and KCl plus ANP (0.75 +/- 0.09 mmol/L). PRA fell slightly during KCl plus ANP treatment, but did not change during the infusion of KCl alone. ANP levels were approximately 800 pmol/L during the ANP infusion studies. Endogenous ANP levels in the hyperkalemic patients with hypoaldosteronism were markedly elevated at 1186 +/- 340 pmol/L (compared to 93 +/- 10 pmol/L in healthy elderly controls), a level that would be capable of suppressing the potassium-mediated aldosterone response. Exogenous infusion of ANP suppressed the aldosterone response to hyperkalemia, and ANP levels were found to be markedly elevated in a group of patients with hyperkalemia and hypoaldosteronism. We suggest that ANP may contribute to clinically significant hypoaldosteronism and hyperkalemia in the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism.

  6. B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein in the prediction of atrial fibrillation risk: the CHARGE-AF Consortium of community-based cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Moritz F.; Stepas, Katherine A.; Moser, Carlee B.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Aspelund, Thor; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Fontes, João D.; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; Kronmal, Richard A.; Magnani, Jared W.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Chamberlain, Alanna M.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Agarwal, Sunil K.; McManus, David D.; Franco, Oscar H.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G.; Burke, Gregory L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Hofman, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S.; Kääb, Stefan; Couper, David; Harris, Tamara B.; Astor, Brad C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Arai, Andrew E.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Stricker, Bruno H.C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Heckbert, Susan R.; Pencina, Michael J.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Aims B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) predict atrial fibrillation (AF) risk. However, their risk stratification abilities in the broad community remain uncertain. We sought to improve risk stratification for AF using biomarker information. Methods and results We ascertained AF incidence in 18 556 Whites and African Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC, n=10 675), Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS, n = 5043), and Framingham Heart Study (FHS, n = 2838), followed for 5 years (prediction horizon). We added BNP (ARIC/CHS: N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide; FHS: BNP), CRP, or both to a previously reported AF risk score, and assessed model calibration and predictive ability [C-statistic, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), and net reclassification improvement (NRI)]. We replicated models in two independent European cohorts: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study (AGES), n = 4467; Rotterdam Study (RS), n = 3203. B-type natriuretic peptide and CRP were significantly associated with AF incidence (n = 1186): hazard ratio per 1-SD ln-transformed biomarker 1.66 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.56–1.76], P < 0.0001 and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.11–1.25), P < 0.0001, respectively. Model calibration was sufficient (BNP, χ2 = 17.0; CRP, χ2 = 10.5; BNP and CRP, χ2 = 13.1). B-type natriuretic peptide improved the C-statistic from 0.765 to 0.790, yielded an IDI of 0.027 (95% CI, 0.022–0.032), a relative IDI of 41.5%, and a continuous NRI of 0.389 (95% CI, 0.322–0.455). The predictive ability of CRP was limited (C-statistic increment 0.003). B-type natriuretic peptide consistently improved prediction in AGES and RS. Conclusion B-type natriuretic peptide, not CRP, substantially improved AF risk prediction beyond clinical factors in an independently replicated, heterogeneous population. B-type natriuretic peptide may serve as a benchmark to evaluate novel putative AF risk biomarkers. PMID:25037055

  7. Blockade of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins Aggravates Acute Pancreatitis and Blunts Atrial Natriuretic Factor’s Beneficial Effect in Rats: Role of MRP4 (ABCC4)

    PubMed Central

    Ventimiglia, María Silvia; Najenson, Ana Clara; Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Carozzo, Alejandro; Vatta, Marcelo S; Davio, Carlos A; Bianciotti, Liliana G

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) stimulates secretin-evoked cAMP efflux through multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) in the exocrine pancreas. Here we sought to establish in vivo whether this mechanism was involved in acute pancreatitis onset in the rat. Rats pretreated with or without probenecid (MRPs general inhibitor) were infused with secretin alone or with ANF. A set of these animals were given repetitive cerulein injections to induce acute pancreatitis. Plasma amylase and intrapancreatic trypsin activities were measured and histological examination of the pancreas performed. Secretin alone activated trypsinogen but induced no pancreatic histological changes. Blockade by probenecid in secretin-treated rats increased trypsin and also induced vacuolization, a hallmark of acute pancreatitis. ANF prevented the secretin response but in the absence of probenecid. In rats with acute pancreatitis, pretreatment with secretin aggravated the disease, but ANF prevented secretin-induced changes. Blockade of MRPs in rats with acute pancreatitis induced trypsinogen activation and larger cytoplasmic vacuoles as well as larger areas of necrosis and edema that were aggravated by secretin but not prevented by ANF. The temporal resolution of intracellular cAMP levels seems critical in the onset of acute pancreatitis, since secretin-evoked cAMP in a context of MRP inhibition makes the pancreas prone to injury in normal rats and aggravates the onset of acute pancreatitis. Present findings support a protective role for ANF mediated by cAMP extrusion through MRP4 and further suggest that the regulation of MRP4 by ANF would be relevant to maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis. PMID:25569802

  8. Blockade of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins Aggravates Acute Pancreatitis and Blunts Atrial Natriuretic Factor's Beneficial Effect in Rats: Role of MRP4 (ABCC4).

    PubMed

    Ventimiglia, María Silvia; Najenson, Ana Clara; Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Carozzo, Alejandro; Vatta, Marcelo S; Davio, Carlos A; Bianciotti, Liliana G

    2015-01-06

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) stimulates secretin-evoked cAMP efflux through multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) in the exocrine pancreas. Here we sought to establish in vivo whether this mechanism was involved in acute pancreatitis onset in the rat. Rats pretreated with or without probenecid (MRPs general inhibitor) were infused with secretin alone or with ANF. A set of these animals were given repetitive cerulein injections to induce acute pancreatitis. Plasma amylase and intrapancreatic trypsin activities were measured and histological examination of the pancreas performed. Secretin alone activated trypsinogen but induced no pancreatic histological changes. Blockade by probenecid in secretin-treated rats increased trypsin and also induced vacuolization, a hallmark of acute pancreatitis. ANF prevented the secretin response but in the absence of probenecid. In rats with acute pancreatitis, pretreatment with secretin aggravated the disease, but ANF prevented secretin-induced changes. Blockade of MRPs in rats with acute pancreatitis induced trypsinogen activation and larger cytoplasmic vacuoles as well as larger areas of necrosis and edema that were aggravated by secretin but not prevented by ANF. The temporal resolution of intracellular cAMP levels seems critical in the onset of acute pancreatitis, since secretin-evoked cAMP in a context of MRP inhibition makes the pancreas prone to injury in normal rats and aggravates the onset of acute pancreatitis. Present findings support a protective role for ANF mediated by cAMP extrusion through MRP4 and further suggest that the regulation of MRP4 by ANF would be relevant to maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis.

  9. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide and dopamine beta-hydroxylase in myocytes and chromaffin cells of the heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T H; Helle, K B; Saetersdal, T

    1994-07-01

    The heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus, was examined for immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) as markers for hormone secreting myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively. Specific antibodies raised against rat alpha-ANP and rat D beta H were used for immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. D beta H-immunoreactive cells were restricted to subendocardial areas of the atrium whereas ANP immunoreactivity occurred throughout both the atrial and the ventricular myocardium, showing particularly strong staining intensity in the atrial myocytes. The granular ANP immunostaining in the atrial myocytes was frequently accumulated in the sarcoplasm. In the ventricular myocytes ANP immunoreactivity occurred as scattered granular staining throughout the sarcoplasm. ANP and D beta H immunofluorescence staining coincided with the presence of immunoreactive specific granules and secretory vesicles in the cardiac myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively, as revealed by electron microscopy. The number of ANP-containing specific granules was generally high in the atrial myocytes, and they were frequently observed in clusters in subsarcolemmal areas. Granular frequency was considerably lower and the mean granular diameter was smaller (0.142 +/- 0.045 micron versus 0.213 +/- 0.049 micron) in the ventricular than in the atrial myocytes. The present results indicate that ANP and D beta H are phylogenetically highly conserved proteins from the dipnoi to the rat. The large amounts of ANP and of specific granules are consistent with an endocrine myocardium in the Protopterus heart. The presence of D beta H and secretory vesicles in the subendocardial chromaffin cells of the atrium suggests a local production of catecholamines from dopamine in the heart of this dipnoan. PMID:7926645

  10. The diagnostic performance of mid-regional portion of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide for the detection of left ventricular hypertrophy in Caucasian hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, S S; Davies, J E; Struck, J; Ng, L L

    2012-12-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is predictive of cardiovascular disease. The vasodilator, natriuretic and diuretic actions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) support a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension. Measuring the redundant precursor fragment mid-regional portion of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MRproANP) overcomes the technical difficulties of quantifying the bioactive ANP. This study sought to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic utility of MRproANP in a hypertensive Caucasian patient population. A total of 194 hypertensive patients (39 patients with LVH, 69±7.82 years of age, 74% female vs 155 patients without LVH, 68±6.51 years of age, 71% female) were derived from a screening study. Plasma MRproANP concentrations were quantified using immunoluminometric assays. Hypertensive patients with LVH had higher MRproANP concentrations than those without LVH (103.04 (50.58) vs 84.11 pmol l(-1) (44.82); P=0.014). Independent predictors of left ventricular mass index were LogMRproANP (P=0.022), male gender (P<0.001), body mass index (P=0.001) and history of angina or myocardial infarction (P=0.009). The receiver operating curve for MRproANP for the detection of LVH was limited, yielding an area under the curve of only 0.628 (confidence interval 0.523-0.733; P=0.014). Therefore, the role of MRproANP may not lie in the diagnosis of LVH but in monitoring the response to therapy. A nonsignificant trend towards greater mortality in patients with above-median MRproANP levels compared with below-median levels (P=0.167) was observed. Larger studies are required to assess its prognostic utility further. PMID:22113442

  11. Food intake and body positional change alter the circadian rhythm of atrial natriuretic peptides excretion into human urine.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Giordano, A T

    1991-01-01

    The 98 amino acid (a.a.) N-terminus of the 126 a.a. atrial natriuretic factor prohormone contains two natriuretic and vasodilatory peptides consisting of a.a. 1-30 (proANF 1-30) and a.a. 31-67 (proANF 31-67). The N-terminus and C-terminus (a.a. 99-126, i.e., ANF--also a vasodilatory peptide) circulate normally in humans with a circadian peak at 04:00 h in plasma. To determine if the N-terminus and C-terminus of the ANF prohormone are present in urine and possibly have a circadian variation in urine, six healthy volunteers had urine samples hourly while awake and every 3 h during sleep for five consecutive days obtained for radioimmunoassay. The sleep-awake pattern was varied so that after 2 days of normal sleep (supine)-awake (upright) positions, these volunteers were supine from 15:00 h on the third day until 10:00 h of the fourth day. They were then upright until 19:00 h that day when they became supine again until 02:30 h, and then were upright until 10:00 h of day 5. Three radioimmunoassays that immunologically recognize (a) the whole N-terminus (i.e., amino acids 1-98), (b) the midportion of the N-terminus (amino acids 31-67), and (c) the C-terminus of the ANF prohormone were utilized. ProANF 1-98, proANF 31-67, and the ANF radioimmunoassays each detected their respective peptides in urine. A circadian peak for each of these peptides was detected at 04:00 to 05:00 h whether the person was supine or upright during the night, which were significantly (p less than 0.001) higher than their concentrations in the afternoon of the previous days. Assuming a supine position during the day caused a significant (p less than 0.01) two- to threefold increase in these peptides in the urine. Food intake also increased the concentrations of proANF 1-98, proANF 31-67, and ANF in urine (p less than 0.001). Fluid intake when abstaining from food throughout the day lowered the concentration of these peptides in the urine. It was concluded that there is a circadian rhythm in both

  12. Treatment of hypertension with perindopril reduces plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels, left ventricular mass, and improves echocardiographic parameters of diastolic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalcin, F.; Aksoy, F. G.; Muderrisoglu, H.; Sabah, I.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for cardiac deaths, and diastolic dysfunction is a usual finding during the course of this disease. HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic therapy with perindopril on left ventricular (LV) mass, left atrial size, diastolic function, and plasma level of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in patients with hypertension. METHODS: Twenty four patients who had not been previously taking any antihypertensive medication and without prior history of angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, dysrhythmias, valvular heart disease, or systemic illnesses received 4-8 mg/day of perindopril orally. Echocardiographic studies were acquired at baseline and 6 months after the initiation of therapy. RESULTS: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased from 174 +/- 19.7 and 107.5 +/- 7.8 mmHg to 134 +/- 10.6 and 82 +/- 6.7 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.001). Left ventricular mass decreased from 252.4 +/- 8.3 to 205.7 +/- 7.08 g and left atrial volume from 20.4 +/- 5.1 to 17.6 +/- 5.2 ml, respectively (p < 0.001). Transmitral Doppler early and atrial filling velocity ratio (E/A) increased from 0.69 +/- 0.06 to 0.92 +/- 0.05 m/s and plasma ANP level decreased from 71.9 +/- 11.7 to 35.3 +/- 7.8 pg/ml (p < 0.001). Reduction of LV mass correlated positively with a reduction in ANP levels (r = 0.66, p < 0.0005). CONCLUSIONS: Perindopril caused a significant reduction of LV mass, left atrial volume, and plasma ANP levels, as well as improvement in Doppler parameters of LV filling in this group of patients with hypertension.

  13. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits the expression of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 induced by angiotensin II in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, M; Tsuji, H; Nishimura, H; Kasahara, T; Sugano, T; Masuda, H; Nakagawa, K; Nakahara, Y; Kitamura, H; Yamada, K; Yoneda, M; Sawada, S; Nakagawa, M

    1998-03-01

    The pharmacological characteristics of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), such as natriuresis, vasodilation, or suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation, are well investigated. However, this is the first study to report its role on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis mediated by vascular endothelial cells. In this study, the effects of ANP on the enhanced expression of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by angiotensin II (Ang II) in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs) were examined. The expressions of TF and PAI-1 mRNA were detected by northern blotting methods. The activities of TF on the surface of RAECs and PAI-1 in the culture media were measured by chromogenic assay. ANP suppressed mRNA expressions of TF and PAI-1 induced by Ang II in a concentration-dependent manner. This suppression was accompanied by the decreased activities of TF and PAI-1.

  14. Association of restriction fragment length polymorphism at the atrial natriuretic peptide gene locus with aldosterone responsiveness to angiotensin in aldosterone-producing adenoma.

    PubMed

    Tunny, T J; Jonsson, J R; Klemm, S A; Ballantine, D M; Stowasser, M; Gordon, R D

    1994-11-15

    Primary aldosteronism is an important, potentially curable, form of hypertension. We examined the possible association between restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene and responsiveness of aldosterone to angiotensin II in 59 patients with primary aldosteronism due to aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). Significant differences in the allelic frequencies of the BglI, TaqI and XhoI polymorphic sites at the ANP gene locus (chromosome 1; 1p36) between angiotensin II-unresponsive and angiotensin II-responsive tumors were observed. Variation in the ANP gene between the two groups may result in altered expression of ANP within the adrenal gland, and may contribute to the biochemical regulation of aldosterone production of these two subgroups of patients with APA.

  15. Immunoreactive prohormone atrial natriuretic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 - Existence of a single circulating amino-terminal peptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yu-Ming; Whitson, Peggy A.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    Sep-Pak C18 extraction of human plasma and radioimmunoassay using antibodies which recognize atrial natriuretic peptide (99-128) and the prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 resulted in mean values from 20 normal subjects of 26.2 (+/- 9.2), 362 (+/- 173) and 368 (+/- 160) pg/ml, respectively. A high correlation coefficient between values obtained using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 was observed (R = 0.84). Extracted plasma immunoreactivity of 1-30 and 31-67 both eluted at 46 percent acetonitrile. In contrast, chromatographic elution of synthetic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 was observed at 48 and 39 percent acetonitrile, respectively. Data suggest that the radioimmunoassay of plasma using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 may represent the measurement of a unique larger amino-terminal peptide fragment containing antigenic sites recognized by both antisera.

  16. Correlation between the compact regions predicted by the average distance map (ADM) and the biologically active sites in atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, T

    1992-10-01

    The prediction of the short-range compact regions of human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha-hANP), one of the biologically active peptides, has been made by means of the Average Distance Map(ADM). We found out that the location of the predicted short-range compact regions is consistent with the structural units determined by the NMR analysis (Kobayashi et al., 1988). Furthermore, the short-range compact regions correspond well to the biologically active areas of atriopeptin (103-125)-amide (which is homologous peptide to alpha-hANP), detected by the glycine substitution technique (Konishi et al., 1987). The results suggest that a predicted short-range compact region can be regarded as a possible active site in a biologically active peptide.

  17. A case of marked diuresis by combined dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide administration without renal injury in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Masataka; Sato, Naoki; Akiya, Mai; Okazaki, Hirotake; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2013-01-01

    Renal injury is an important factor for worsening outcome in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). An 81-year-old woman was admitted due to ADHF with dyspnea and mild peripheral edema. The patient was managed with intravenous administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) at a dose of 0.0125 μg/kg/minute, which did not control volume overload even at an increased dose of 0.025 μg/kg/minute. After a low dose of dopamine (DA) of 1.0 μg/kg/ minute was added, urine output increased markedly to 120 from 30 mL/hour. Furthermore, her heart rate decreased to 80-100 from 120 bpm and the congestion improved with a reduced brain natriuretic peptide level. Interestingly, the combination of ANP and DA therapy reduced serum creatinine as well as the levels of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein, a novel reno-tubular stress marker, by 98.9%, and an oxidative stress marker, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, by 88.2% from baseline levels. Thus, this ADHF patient, a nonresponder to ANP alone, improved without renal injury when administered combination therapy consisting of low doses of ANP and DA, suggesting that this combined therapy might be useful for better management of ADHF in patients without diuretic responses with ANP alone. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits DMBA/croton oil induced skin tumor growth by modulating NF-κB, MMPs, and infiltrating mast cells in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Vimala; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and its receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) are implicated as a vital regulator of cancer cell growth and tumor progression. However, the underlying mechanism by which ANP opposes the cancer growth in in-vivo remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of ANP on 7, 12-dimethyl benzanthracence (DMBA)/Croton oil- induced two-step skin carcinogenic mouse model. Skin tumor incidence and tumor volume were recorded during the experimental period of 16 weeks. ANP (1 μg/kg body weight/alternate days for 4 weeks) was injected subcutaneously from the 13th week of DMBA/Croton oil induction. ANP treatment markedly inhibited the skin tumor growth (P<0.001). A significant reduction in the level of NF-κB activation (P<0.001), infiltrating mast cell count (P<0.01) and MMP-2/-9 (P<0.001, respectively) were noticed in the ANP treated mice skin tissue. Further, ANP treatment revert back the altered levels of serum LDH-4, C-reactive protein (CRP), and enzymatic antioxidants (SOD and CAT activities) to near normal level. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that ANP opposes the skin carcinogenesis by suppressing the inflammatory response and MMPs.

  19. Mechanism of vasodilation induced by alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide in rabbit and guinea-pig renal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Ishimatsu, T; Kuriyama, H

    1986-01-01

    Effects of alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha-HANP) on electrical and mechanical properties of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries and of the guinea-pig mesenteric artery were investigated. alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) modified neither the membrane potential nor resistance of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries. In the guinea-pig mesenteric and renal arteries, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the amplitude and facilitation (mesenteric artery) or depression (renal artery) of excitatory junction potentials nor on action potentials. In the guinea-pig renal artery, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the depolarization induced by noradrenaline (NA) (up to 10 microM) but markedly inhibited NA-induced contraction. alpha-HANP (10 nM) slightly inhibited the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, alpha-HANP (10 nM) inhibited the NA-induced contraction and to a lesser extent the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, the effects of alpha-HANP on the release of Ca from the cellular storage by two applications of NA, and its re-storage, were investigated in Ca-free solution containing 2 mM-EGTA. When 5 nM-alpha-HANP was applied before and during the first application of 0.5 microM-NA, the contraction was markedly inhibited but the contraction to a second application of 10 microM-NA was potentiated. If the first dose of NA was 10 microM the effect was very small. Under the same experimental procedures, nitroglycerine (10 microM) showed almost the same effects as alpha-HANP on the NA-induced contractions. When both the first (3 mM) and second (10 mM) contractions were evoked by caffeine in Ca-free solution, alpha-HANP (5 nM) and nitroglycerine (10 microM) inhibited both contractions to the same extent. In the rabbit renal artery, applications of alpha-HANP or nitroglycerine increased the amount of guanosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic GMP) in a dose-dependent manner. However, a

  20. An activator of protein kinase C (phorbol dibutyrate) attenuates atrial-natriuretic-factor-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation in smooth-muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nambi, P; Whitman, M; Aiyar, N; Stassen, F; Crooke, S T

    1987-01-01

    Rat thoracic aortic smooth-muscle cells (A-10; A.T.C.C. CRL 1476) displays a high density of vasopressin and atrial-natriuretic-factor (ANF) receptors and a low density of beta-adrenergic receptors. ANF stimulates cGMP (cyclic GMP) accumulation in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Pretreatment of these cells with phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), a known activator of protein kinase C, attenuated ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation without affecting basal cGMP concentrations. This effect was concentration-dependent and was observed as early as 2 min after treatment. 4 alpha-Phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (alpha PDD), which does not activate protein kinase C, did not inhibit the cGMP accumulation. PDBu pretreatment did not affect the density and affinity of ANF receptors. These data suggest that PDBu, presumably via activation of protein kinase C, might stimulate phosphorylation of a key regulatory protein in the ANF/cGMP pathway. PMID:2822009

  1. Measurement of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration in rabbit aorta using the photoprotein, aequorin. Effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on agonist-induced Ca2+ signal generation.

    PubMed Central

    Takuwa, Y; Rasmussen, H

    1987-01-01

    Addition of norepinephrine, angiotensin II, or histamine leads to a transient rise in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), as measured with aequorin, in rabbit aortic strips. Each induces a [Ca2+]i transient which peaks in 2 min and then falls either back to baseline (angiotensin II) or to a plateau (norepinephrine and histamine). The [Ca2+]i transient is due to the mobilization of Ca2+ from a caffeine-sensitive, intracellular pool. An elevation of [K+] to 35 mM leads to a monotonic sustained rise in [Ca2+]i which depends entirely on extracellular Ca2+, but an increase to 100 mM leads to a [Ca2+]i transient from the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Atrial natriuretic peptide does not alter basal [Ca2+]i nor inhibit the [Ca2+]i transient induced by either histamine or angiotensin II, but blocks that induced by norepinephrine, and blocks the plateau phase induced by either histamine or norepinephrine. The peptide inhibits the contractile response to all three agonists and to K+. PMID:2439545

  2. Change in plasma immunoreactive N-terminus, C-terminus, and 4,000-dalton midportion of atrial natriuretic factor prohormone with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Winters, C J; Vesely, D L

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of the immunoreactive N-terminus, C-terminus and 4,000-dalton midportion of the N-terminus of the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) prohormone were measured before and after hemodialysis in 13 patients with end-stage renal disease. There was a significant (p less than 0.001) fall in the mean plasma concentration of the C-terminus (i.e. ANF, amino acids 99-126 of the prohormone) from 123 +/- 25 to 80 +/- 22 fmol/ml (mean +/- SEM) with dialysis. The whole N-terminus, on the other hand, increased from 9,336 +/- 2,011 to 11,021 +/- 2,134 fmol/ml after dialysis (p less than 0.002). Pro ANF 31-67 (i.e. amino acids 31-67 of the prohormone) increased postdialysis from 27,775 +/- 4,300 to 31,040 +/- 4,840 fmol/ml (p less than 0.003). Only 1.5% of pro ANF 1-98 and pro ANF 31-67 were cleared by the dialyzer membrane while 15% of ANF crossed the membrane. Thus, with hemodialysis the C-terminus decreases while the N-terminus and pro ANF 31-67 from the midportion of the N-terminus of the ANF prohormone increase in plasma which is partially explained by their respective abilities to cross the dialyzer membrane.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Expresses a Functional Human Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Ortholog: Involvement in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rosay, Thibaut; Bazire, Alexis; Diaz, Suraya; Clamens, Thomas; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Mijouin, Lily; Hoffmann, Brice; Sergent, Jacques-Aurélien; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Boireau, Wilfrid; Vieillard, Julien; Hulen, Christian; Dufour, Alain; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Considerable evidence exists that bacteria detect eukaryotic communication molecules and modify their virulence accordingly. In previous studies, it has been demonstrated that the increasingly antibiotic-resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can detect the human hormones brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) at micromolar concentrations. In response, the bacterium modifies its behavior to adapt to the host physiology, increasing its overall virulence. The possibility of identifying the bacterial sensor for these hormones and interfering with this sensing mechanism offers an exciting opportunity to directly affect the infection process. Here, we show that BNP and CNP strongly decrease P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Isatin, an antagonist of human natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR), prevents this effect. Furthermore, the human NPR-C receptor agonist cANF4-23 mimics the effects of natriuretic peptides on P. aeruginosa, while sANP, the NPR-A receptor agonist, appears to be weakly active. We show in silico that NPR-C, a preferential CNP receptor, and the P. aeruginosa protein AmiC have similar three-dimensional (3D) structures and that both CNP and isatin bind to AmiC. We demonstrate that CNP acts as an AmiC agonist, enhancing the expression of the ami operon in P. aeruginosa. Binding of CNP and NPR-C agonists to AmiC was confirmed by microscale thermophoresis. Finally, using an amiC mutant strain, we demonstrated that AmiC is essential for CNP effects on biofilm formation. In conclusion, the AmiC bacterial sensor possesses structural and pharmacological profiles similar to those of the human NPR-C receptor and appears to be a bacterial receptor for human hormones that enables P. aeruginosa to modulate biofilm expression. PMID:26307165

  4. Syndecan-4 shedding is involved in the oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in left atrial tissue with valvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Zhou, Qing; Xie, Jun; Li, Guan-Nan; Chen, Qin-Hua; Kang, Li-Na; Xu, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play critical roles in the development and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). In addition, syndecan-4 (Synd4) shedding induced by oxidative stress or inflammation plays a role in the migration of inflammatory cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that Synd4 shedding was also involved in the inflammatory response in atrial fibrillation patients with valvular heart disease. To confirm this suppose, left atrial appendages and clinical data were obtained from 65 patients with valvular disease undergoing valve surgery. Ten left atrial appendages obtained from healthy heart donors were used as controls. Analyses including histopathology, western blotting, and enzyme kinetics were performed to assess the oxidative injury, inflammation responses, and Synd4 shedding. The results showed that the inflammatory response and oxidative injury were increased significantly, whereas as levels of the Synd4 ectodomain was decreased significantly in AF patients. Furthermore, Synd4 ectodomain levels were correlated with atrial oxidative and inflammatory markers. The results showed that Synd4 shedding is a molecular pathological alteration in the development and maintenance of inflammation-associated AF. PMID:26261514

  5. Kinetic analysis of internalization, recycling and redistribution of atrial natriuretic factor-receptor complex in cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells. Ligand-dependent receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, K N

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of internalization, sequestration and metabolic degradation of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-receptor complex were studied in rat thoracic aortic smooth-muscle (RTASM) cells. These parameters were directly determined by measuring 125I-ANF binding to total, intracellular and cell-surface receptors. Pretreatment of cells with the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine and the energy depleter dinitrophenol led to an increase in the intracellular 125I-ANF radioactivity. After 60 min incubation at 37 degrees C, cell-associated 125I-ANF radioactivity fell rapidly in chloroquine-treated cells (> 85%) compared with the controls (< 45%). 125I-ANF radioactivity increased to a peak of 65% of the initial level within 15 min in chloroquine-treated cells compared with only 22% in the control cells. During the initial incubation period at 37 degrees C, chloroquine inhibited the release of both intact and degraded 125I-ANF in a time-dependent manner. However, at later incubation times, the effect of chloroquine was diminished and release of both degraded and intact ligand was resumed. Extracellular unlabelled ANF did not affect the release of degraded 125I-ANF but it accelerated the release of intact ANF by a retroendocytotic mechanism. After the endocytosis, about 30-40% of ANF receptors were restored to the cell surface from the internalized pool of receptors. The restoration was blocked by chloroquine or dinitrophenol but not by cycloheximide. Exposure of RTASM cells to unlabelled ANF resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent loss of ANF receptors. Unlabelled ANF (10 nM) induced a loss of more than 52% of 125I-ANF binding, and a complete loss occurred at micromolar concentrations. It is inferred that ANF-induced down-regulation of its receptor resulted primarily from an increased rate in internalization and metabolic degradation of ligand-receptor complex by receptor-mediated endocytotic mechanisms. PMID:1445281

  6. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains.

    PubMed

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart.

  7. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains

    PubMed Central

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart. PMID:27508036

  8. Recombinant Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Prevents Aberrant Ca2+ Leakage through the Ryanodine Receptor by Suppressing Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Induced by Isoproterenol in Failing Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Susa, Takehisa; Nanno, Takuma; Ishiguchi, Hironori; Myoren, Takeki; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Kato, Takayoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Oda, Tetsuro; Okuda, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yano, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Catecholamines induce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus enhancing diastolic Ca2+ leakage through the ryanodine receptor during heart failure (HF). However, little is known regarding the effect of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on ROS generation and Ca2+ handling in failing cardiomyocytes. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which an exogenous ANP exerts cardioprotective effects during HF. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricles of a canine tachycardia-induced HF model and sham-operated vehicle controls. The degree of mitochondrial oxidized DNA was evaluated by double immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using an anti-VDAC antibody for the mitochondria and an anti-8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine antibody for oxidized DNA. The effect of ANP on ROS was investigated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, diastolic Ca2+ sparks assessed by confocal microscopy using Fluo 4-AM, and the survival rate of myocytes after 48 h. The double IHC study revealed that isoproterenol (ISO) markedly increased oxidized DNA in the mitochondria in HF and that the ISO-induced DNA damage was markedly inhibited by the co-presence of ANP. ROS production and Ca2+ spark frequency (CaSF) were increased in HF compared to normal controls, and were further increased in the presence of ISO. Notably, ANP significantly suppressed both ISO-induced ROS and CaSF without changing sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in HF (p<0.01, respectively). The survival rate after 48 h in HF was significantly decreased in the presence of ISO compared with baseline (p<0.01), whereas it was significantly improved by the co-presence of ANP (p<0.01). Together, our results suggest that ANP strongly suppresses ISO-induced mitochondrial ROS generation, which might correct aberrant diastolic Ca2+ sparks, eventually contributing to the improvement of cardiomyocyte survival in HF. PMID:27657534

  9. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains.

    PubMed

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart. PMID:27508036

  10. The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide and glucagon on proximal glomerulo-tubular balance in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Harris, P J; Skinner, S L; Zhuo, J

    1988-08-01

    1. The renal actions of ANP (average dose 30 ng kg-1 min-1 and glucagon (50 ng kg-1 min-1) were compared using fractional lithium reabsorption as the index of proximal reabsorption in groups of seven rats. Doses were chosen to cause similar increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Time controls were included. 2. Glucagon raised GFR 32% and absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) 26% producing 81% effective proximal glomerulo-tubular balance (GTB) which was not significantly different from the 100% expected for perfect GTB. ANP raised GFR 33% and APR 10% indicating only 30% effective GTB (P less than 0.01). This was a significantly different effect from glucagon (P less than 0.005). 3. Sodium output increased 10-fold with ANP and 3-fold with glucagon. Filtration fraction increased 33% (P less than 0.04) above the pre-treatment value with ANP but was unchanged with glucagon. Plasma renin concentration was suppressed similarly by each hormone (46 and 36%, P less than 0.05, compared with pre-treatment values). 4. Despite a change in peritubular physical factors favouring reabsorption, there was almost complete attenuation of the increase expected in APR with the ANP-induced increase in GFR. In contrast, a similar change in GFR with glucagon resulted in an almost parallel increase in APR demonstrating maintenance of proximal GTB. 5. It is concluded that in the anaesthetized rat, ANP but not glucagon profoundly inhibits the increase in proximal reabsorption that normally follows an increase in filtered load. Such an action would contribute to the more potent natriuretic activity of ANP compared with glucagon.

  11. Evidence that atrial natriuretic peptide tissue extraction is not changed by large increases in its plasma levels induced by pacing in humans.

    PubMed

    Iervasi, G; Clerico, A; Pilo, A; Vitek, F; Berti, S; Palmieri, C; Ravani, M; Sabatino, L; Manfredi, C; Del Chicca, M G; Biagini, A; Donato, L

    1997-03-01

    throughout the study period (50.4 +/- 10.6% and 49.6 +/- 10% during atrial and ventricular pacing, respectively). Our findings demonstrate that degradative mechanisms involved in ANP clearance are not saturable at least for acute elevations of ANP plasma levels up to 3-5 times the basal level. PMID:9062501

  12. Solubilization and molecular characterization of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor in human platelets: Comparison with ANP receptors in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffrin, E.L.; Carrier, F.; Thibault, G.; Deslongchamps, M. )

    1991-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated the presence of binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in human platelets. These sites have pharmacological characteristics similar to those of rat vascular smooth muscle. They are subject to regulation by circulating levels of ANP in plasma, varying inversely with the latter after high sodium intake, in arterial hypertension and congestive heart failure. We have now solubilized these platelet receptors with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 (0.6%). The preparations were incubated with (125I)ANP in the presence of increasing concentrations of ANP-(99-126), ANP-(101-126), ANP-(103-126), and ANP-(103-123). The order of potency of these peptides to displace (125I)ANP was similar for the solubilized and particulate receptor. Bound (125I)ANP was covalently cross-linked to the receptor with 5 mM disuccinimidyl suberate. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel showed that (125I)ANP specifically interacts with a 125-kDa membrane component, some of which may be reduced by 2% mercaptoethanol or 10 mmol/L dithiothreitol to a 70-kDa species. A small proportion of a 70-kDa peptide is also found under nonreducing conditions. The concentration of ANP-(99-126) that inhibits binding of (125I)ANP by 50% to both the 125-kDa and the 70-kDa species was 0.1 nM, while that for ANP-(103-123) was 3 nM. The internally ring-deleted analog Des(Gln116,Ser117,Gly118,Leu119,Gly120)ANP -(102-121) or C-ANP displaced with equal potency ANP binding to the high and low mol wt (Mr) bands, as also found in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells, but not in the mesemteric arteries these cells are derived from. In the latter, C-ANP displaced only binding from the lower Mr band. These results show that the ANP receptor in human platelets is heterogeneous.

  13. Right Ventricular and Right Atrial Involvement Can Predict Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Doesch, Christina; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Rudic, Boris; Tueluemen, Erol; Budjan, Johannes; Haubenreisser, Holger; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Borggrefe, Martin; Papavassiliu, Theano

    2016-01-01

    Objectives and Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with clinical deterioration, stroke and disability in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluated cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived determinants for the occurrence of AF in patients with HCM. Methods: 98 Patients with HCM and 30 healthy controls underwent CMR and were followed-up for 6±3 years. Results: 19 (19.4%) patients presented with AF at initial diagnosis, 19 (19.4%) developed AF during follow-up and 60 (61.2%) remained in sinus rhythm (SR). Compared to healthy controls, patients with HCM who remained in SR presented with significantly increased left ventricular mass, an elevated left ventricular remodeling index, enlarged left atrial volumes and reduced septal mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) compared to healthy controls. Whereas HCM patients who presented with AF at initial diagnosis and those who developed AF during follow-up additionally presented with reduced tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and right atrial (RA) dilatation. Receiver-operator curve analysis indicated good predictive performance of TAPSE, RA diameter and septal MAPSE (AUC 0.73, 0.69 and 0.71, respectively) to detect patients at risk of developing AF. Conclusion: Reduced MAPSE measurements and enlarged LA volumes seems to be a common feature in patients with HCM, whereas reduced TAPSE and RA dilatation only seem to be altered in patients with history of AF and those developing AF. Therefore, they could serve as easy determinable markers of AF in patients with HCM. PMID:26812947

  14. Plasma cardiac natriuretic peptide determination as a screening test for the detection of patients with mild left ventricular impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Omland, T.; Aakvaag, A.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of measuring the cardiac natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and brain natriuretic peptide, as screening tests for identifying patients with mild left ventricular impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the cardiac natriuretic peptides. SETTING: Cardiac catheterisation unit, Norwegian central hospital. PATIENTS: A consecutive series of 254 patients undergoing diagnostic left-sided cardiac catheterisation. One hundred and twenty eight of these patients had a history of previous myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of normal and impaired left ventricular function, as evaluated by logistic regression analysis and estimation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (an index of overall diagnostic accuracy). Ventricular function was assessed by the measurement of left ventricular end diastolic pressure and angiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that plasma brain natriuretic peptide was the best predictor of increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure (> or = 15 mm Hg) (P < 0.001), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (< or = 45%) (P < 0.001), and the combination of left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 45% and left ventricular end diastolic pressure > or = 15 mm Hg (P < 0.001). The areas under the ROC function for the detection of left ventricular dysfunction were 0.789 for brain natriuretic peptide, 0.665 for atrial natriuretic factor, and 0.610 for N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma brain natriuretic peptide seemed to be a better indicator of left ventricular function than plasma atrial natriuretic factor or N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of circulating atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and

  15. Vascular Relaxation Induced by C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Involves the Ca2+/NO-Synthase/NO Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Fernanda A.; Restini, Carolina B. A.; Grando, Marcella D.; Ramalho, Leandra N. Z.; Bendhack, Lusiane M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and nitric oxide (NO) are endothelium-derived factors that play important roles in the regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. We hypothesized that NO produced by the endothelial NO-synthase (NOS-3) contributes to the relaxation induced by CNP in isolated rat aorta via activation of endothelial NPR-C receptor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the putative contribution of NO through NPR-C activation in the CNP induced relaxation in isolated conductance artery. Main Methods Concentration-effect curves for CNP were constructed in aortic rings isolated from rats. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cytosolic calcium mobilization induced by CNP. The phosphorylation of the residue Ser1177 of NOS was analyzed by Western blot and the expression and localization of NPR-C receptors was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Key Findings CNP was less potent in inducing relaxation in denuded endothelium aortic rings than in intact ones. L-NAME attenuated the potency of CNP and similar results were obtained in the presence of hydroxocobalamin, an intracellular NO0 scavenger. CNP did not change the phosphorylation of Ser1177, the activation site of NOS-3, when compared with control. The addition of CNP produced an increase in [Ca2+]c in endothelial cells and a decrease in [Ca2+]c in vascular smooth muscle cells. The NPR-C-receptors are expressed in endothelial and adventitial rat aortas. Significance These results suggest that CNP-induced relaxation in intact aorta isolated from rats involves NO production due to [Ca2+]c increase in endothelial cells possibly through NPR-C activation expressed in these cells. The present study provides a breakthrough in the understanding of the close relationship between the vascular actions of nitric oxide and CNP. PMID:24787693

  16. Signaling Pathways Involved in Renal Oxidative Injury: Role of the Vasoactive Peptides and the Renal Dopaminergic System

    PubMed Central

    Rukavina Mikusic, N. L.; Kravetz, M. C.; Kouyoumdzian, N. M.; Della Penna, S. L.; Rosón, M. I.; Fernández, B. E.; Choi, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological hydroelectrolytic balance and the redox steady state in the kidney are accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Angiotensin II, atrial natriuretic peptide and intrarenal dopamine play a pivotal role in this interactive network. The balance between endogenous antioxidant agents like the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide, by one side, and the prooxidant effect of the renin angiotensin system, by the other side, contributes to ensuring the normal function of the kidney. Different pathological scenarios, as nephrotic syndrome and hypertension, where renal sodium excretion is altered, are associated with an impaired interaction between two natriuretic systems as the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide that may be involved in the pathogenesis of renal diseases. The aim of this review is to update and comment the most recent evidences about the intracellular pathways involved in the relationship between endogenous antioxidant agents like the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide and the prooxidant effect of the renin angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of renal inflammation. PMID:25436148

  17. Cardiac Involvement in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, an Incidental Large Atrial Mass: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Emadi Torghabeh, Ali; Homaee Shandiz, Fateme; Memar, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac involvement as an initial presentation of malignant lymphoma has been a rare occurrence. Case Presentation: We have reported a 78 year old man with complaint of abdominal pain and vomiting. In patients preoperative evaluation for surgical management of an intra-abdominal mass, a large intracardiac mass has found incidentally during the echocardiography. Pathologic biopsy of right atrial mass that has removed by open heart surgery shown: non Hodgkin-B cell lymphoma. Bone marrow biopsy was taken and was positive for lymphomatous involvement. Conclusions: The patient has treated by CHOP chemotherapy regiment successfully and after completion of treatment, there was complete response. PMID:26634111

  18. Inhibition of goby posterior intestinal NaCl absorption by natriuretic peptides and by cardiac extracts.

    PubMed

    Loretz, C A

    1996-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides abolish active Na+ and Cl- absorption across the posterior intestine of the euryhaline goby Gillichthys mirabilis. Inhibition by eel and human natriuretic peptides is dose-dependent with the following sequence of potencies based on experimentally determined ID50 values for inhibition of short-circuit current: eel ventricular natriuretic peptide (78 nmol.l-1), eel atrial natriuretic peptide (156 nmol.l-1), human brain natriuretic peptide (326 nmol.l-1), human alpha atrial natriuretic peptide (1.05 mumol.l-1), and eel C-type natriuretic peptide (75 mumol.l-1). Natriuretic peptides also significantly increase transcellular conductance. The observed sequence of natriuretic peptide potencies is suggestive of cellular mediation by GC-A-type NP-R1 receptors in this tissue; as expected for guanylyl-cyclase-coupled NP-R1 receptors, cyclic GMP mimics the action of natriuretic peptides on the goby intestine. Crude aqueous extracts of goby atrium and ventricle inhibited short circuit current and increased tissue conductance in a dose-dependent manner. Ventricular extract was more potent than atrial extract on both a per organ and per milligram basis.

  19. Effect of atrial natriuretic factor and 8-bromo cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate on ( sup 3 H)acetylcholine outflow from myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle of the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Matusak, O.; Kuchel, O.; Hamet, P. )

    1991-04-01

    We report that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) inhibits electrically induced cholinergic twitches of longitudinal muscle in whole intestinal segments and myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle (MPLM) strips from the guinea pig ileum. To elucidate the possible presynaptic mechanism of ANF's action, we studied spontaneous and stimulation-evoked radiolabeled acetylcholine (ACh) outflow from MPLM after incubation with ({sup 3}H)choline. We developed a method of mounting and treating MPLM preparations, which allowed us, at the same time, to record isometric contractions and to determine ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow upon electrical stimulation by a train of three pulses. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8}M), norepinephrine (2 x 10{sup {minus} 7}) M and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (10{sup {minus} 3} M) in nearly equieffective concentrations caused a similar inhibition of cholinergic twitches. However, ANF had no effect on ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow, whereas norepinephrine was found to suppress ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cGMP to enhanced ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8} M) caused a 7.0-fold increase of cGMP over control values, predominantly in muscle layers, whereas Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin (12.5 U/ml) elicited a 35-fold increment of cGMP in the extramuscular layer. Thus, ANF is able to elevate cGMP in intestinal smooth muscle and to inhibit cholinergic contractions of MPLM. This inhibition is mimicked by exogenous cGMP and by endogenously generated cyclic nucleotides. We suggest that the depressive action of ANF on cholinergic contractions of MPLM is mediated via its postsynaptic impact implicating elevation of cGMP in smooth muscle.

  20. Nitric oxide induces gene expression of Jumonji and retinoblastoma 2 protein while reducing expression of atrial natriuretic peptide precursor type B in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Klassen, S S; Rabkin, S W

    2008-01-01

    Jumonji (JMJ, Jarid2), a prototypical member of the jumonji domain-containing protein family, plays a major role in embryonic cardiac development, but its role in the developed heart is unclear. Cardiomyocytes from neonatal mouse heart were treated in culture with NO donor SIN-1, 500 microM, for 2, 4, and 20 h. SIN-1 treatment was associated with a significant and 6.9 +/- 2.5 fold increase in jmj gene expression over all time points. The expression of jmj increased markedly and significantly 4.2 +/- 1.1 fold, 16.6 +/- 4.1 fold, and 2.7 +/- 0.3 fold, respectively, at time points 2 h, 4 h, and 20 h after treatment. The ability of the increase in gene expression to translate into an increase in cellular protein expression was ascertained by Western blotting, which showed an increase in the JMJ protein in whole-cell lysates. Because of the relationship of JMJ to Rb and ANP in the heart, gene expression of these proteins was also examined. SIN-1 produced a small but significant increase in Rb2, but not Rb1 or Rb-binding proteins 4, 6, or 7. In contrast, SIN-1 produced a marked and significant reduction in natriuretic peptide precursor type B but not type C to 0.24 +/- 0.09 fold of the control. These data suggest that JMJ may be a critical, previously unrecognized factor that mediates some of the cellular effects of NO, that NO may be able to increase JMJ in diseases associated with reduced JMJ expression.

  1. Utility of point-of-care testing of natriuretic peptides (brain natriuretic peptide and n-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide) in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Nayer, Jamshed; Aggarwal, Praveen; Galwankar, Sagar

    2014-07-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of a patient with an acute disease is a challenge for emergency physicians. Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important tools for diagnosis, risk stratification and therapeutic decision making for some categories of emergency patients. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a member of a four natriuretic peptides family that shares a common 17-peptide ring structure. Atrial natriuretic peptide, C-natriuretic peptide (CNP), and D-type natriuretic peptide are the other natriuretic peptide, which share the same common 17-peptide ring structure. The N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) consists of 76 amino acids, which is biologically inert, while the active component BNP contains 32 amino acids. BNP and NT-proBNP are secreted in the plasma in equimolar quantities and are frequently used in the diagnosis of congestive heart failure, and distinguishing between patients with dyspnea of cardiac or pulmonary origin. Both natriuretic peptides have also been evaluated for use in the assessment and management of several other conditions including sepsis, cirrhosis of liver and renal failure. However, one should remember that the values of natriuretic peptides are affected by age and weight of the patients, and presence of several comorbidities such as chronic renal failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, anemia, pulmonary embolism, and acute coronary syndrome. Values of these peptides also vary depending on the type of test used. The performance characteristics of these natriuretic peptides vary depending on the patients on whom they are used. Therefore determination of reference values for these peptides represents a challenge.

  2. Cardiac melanocytes influence atrial reactive oxygen species involved with electrical and structural remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hayoung; Liu, Fang; Petrenko, Nataliya B; Huang, Jianhe; Schillinger, Kurt J; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac melanocyte-like cells (CMLCs) contribute to atrial arrhythmias when missing the melanin synthesis enzyme dopachrome tautomerase (Dct). While scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Dct-null mice partially suppressed atrial arrhythmias, it remains unclear if CMLCs influence atrial ROS and structure or if the electrical response of CMLCs to ROS differs from that of atrial myocytes. This study is designed to determine if CMLCs contribute to overall atrial oxidative stress or structural remodeling, and if ROS affects the electrophysiology of CMLCs differently than atrial myocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis showed higher expression of the oxidative marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in Dct-null atria versus Dct-heterozygous (Dct-het) atria. Exposing isolated CMLCs from Dct-het and Dct-null mice to hydrogen peroxide increased superoxide anion more in Dct-null CMLCs. Trichrome staining showed increased fibrosis in Dct-null atria, and treating Dct-null mice with the ROS scavenger Tempol reduced atrial fibrosis. Action potential recordings from atrial myocytes and isolated Dct-het and Dct-null CMLCs in response to hydrogen peroxide showed that the EC50 for action potential duration (APD) prolongation of Dct-null CMLCs was 8.2 ± 1.7 μmol/L versus 16.8 ± 2.0 μmol/L for Dct-het CMLCs, 19.9 ± 2.1 μmol/L for Dct-null atrial myocytes, and 20.5 ± 1.9 μmol/L for Dct-het atrial myocytes. However, APD90 was longer in CMLCs versus atrial myocytes in response to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide also induced more afterdepolarizations in CMLCs compared to atrial myocytes. These studies suggest that Dct within CMLCs contributes to atrial ROS balance and remodeling. ROS prolongs APD to a greater extent and induces afterdepolarizations more frequently in CMLCs than in atrial myocytes.

  3. Difference in molecular pathology of natriuretic peptides in the myocardium between acute asphyxial and cardiac deaths.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-07-01

    In investigating death due to mechanical asphyxiation and drowning, a cardiac attack is important for discriminating between possible causes of death and as a contributory factor in death processes; however, general pathologies involving visceral congestion are often similar. The present study compared terminal cardiac dysfunction in these fatalities using the molecular pathology of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in the myocardium as markers of cardiac strain. Both mechanical asphyxiation (n=27) and drowning (n=23) showed significantly lower ANP and BNP mRNA expressions in bilateral ventricular walls than sudden cardiac deaths (n=36). In addition, right atrial wall BNP mRNA expression was lower in asphyxiation; however, immunostaining did not demonstrate any difference among these fatalities. Differences among the subtypes of asphyxiation or between fresh- and saltwater drowning were insignificant. These observations suggest a difference between primary heart failure in sudden cardiac death and terminal cardiac dysfunction secondary to fatal asphyxiation or drowning.

  4. Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome in Cardiac Illness Involves Elevated Concentrations of 3,5-Diiodothyronine and Correlates with Atrial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Müller, Patrick; Schiedat, Fabian; Schlömicher, Markus; Strauch, Justus; Chatzitomaris, Apostolos; Klein, Harald H.; Mügge, Andreas; Köhrle, Josef; Rijntjes, Eddy; Lehmphul, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Background Although hyperthyroidism predisposes to atrial fibrillation, previous trials have suggested decreased triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations to be associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF). Therapy with thyroid hormones (TH), however, did not reduce the risk of POAF. This study reevaluates the relation between thyroid hormone status, atrial electromechanical function and POAF. Methods Thirty-nine patients with sinus rhythm and no history of atrial fibrillation or thyroid disease undergoing cardiac surgery were prospectively enrolled. Serum concentrations of thyrotropin, free (F) and total (T) thyroxine (T4) and T3, reverse (r)T3, 3-iodothyronamine (3-T1AM) and 3,5-diiodothyronine (3,5-T2) were measured preoperatively, complemented by evaluation of echocardiographic and electrophysiological parameters of cardiac function. Holter-ECG and telemetry were used to screen for POAF for 10 days following cardiac surgery. Results Seven of 17 patients who developed POAF demonstrated nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS; defined as low T3 and/or low T4 syndrome), compared to 2 of 22 (p < 0.05) patients who maintained sinus rhythm. In patients with POAF, serum FT3 concentrations were significantly decreased, but still within their reference ranges. 3,5-T2 concentrations directly correlated with rT3 concentrations and inversely correlated with FT3 concentrations. Furthermore, 3,5-T2 concentrations were significantly elevated in patients with NTIS and in subjects who eventually developed POAF. In multivariable logistic regression FT3, 3,5-T2, total atrial conduction time, left atrial volume index and Fas ligand were independent predictors of POAF. Conclusion This study confirms reduced FT3 concentrations in patients with POAF and is the first to report on elevated 3,5-T2 concentrations in cardiac NTIS. The pathogenesis of NTIS therefore seems to involve more differentiated allostatic mechanisms. PMID:26279999

  5. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-15

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C-Gi-phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  6. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C–Gi–phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:18006579

  7. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mashael F.; Smith, Craig M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004–0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002–0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003–0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187–1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4–1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2–54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3–20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios

  8. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Mashael F; Smith, Craig M; Weiss, Scott L; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004-0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002-0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003-0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187-1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4-1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2-54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3-20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios were

  9. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Mashael F; Smith, Craig M; Weiss, Scott L; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004-0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002-0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003-0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187-1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4-1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2-54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3-20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios were

  10. Localization of the human B-type natriuretic peptide precursor (NPPB) gene to chromosome 1p36

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, K.C.; Viars, C.S.; Weiss, S.

    1995-03-20

    Cardiac myocytes synthesize and secrete a family of peptide hormones with potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory properties. These peptides are derived from precursor molecules that are encoded by two different genes, the atrial natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) and the B-type natriuretic peptide or natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB). A human genomic clone for the NPPB gene was used to determine the chromosomal location of the NPPB gene. Analysis of Southern blot hybridization to DNAs from various somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization allowed assignment of the NPPB locus to human chromosome 1p36. This location coincided with that of the NPPA locus; pulsed-field gel electrophoresis placed NPPA and NPPB within 50 kb of each other. This close chromosomal linkage, together with the conserved primary sequences and structural organization of the two natriuretic peptide precursor genes, suggests that the natriuretic peptide loci may have evolved from a common ancestor gene. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Differential gene expression of the three natriuretic peptides and natriuretic peptide receptor subtypes in human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, A M; Paumgartner, G; Gerbes, A L

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the liver have been observed. However, there is limited information about the types of receptors for natriuretic peptides expressed by the human liver. AIM: To investigate gene expression of the three NP receptor types (NPR) as well as of the NP in human liver. METHODS: Presence of mRNA coding for all three NPR and for ANP, brain and C-type natriuretic peptide (BNP, CNP) was investigated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Human liver tissues and hepatocellular carcinoma tissues were examined. RESULTS: Specific PCR products for all three NPR, namely NPR-A, B, and C, could be detected. Moreover, ANP and CNP, but not BNP mRNA was detectable. The concentration of ANP transcripts was up to fivefold higher in hepatocellular carcinoma compared with non-tumorous liver tissue of the same subjects. No difference in the expression of NP receptors relative to GAPDH mRNA of tumorous and non-tumorous tissue was observed except of slightly increased NPR-A transcripts. CONCLUSION: These data show that NPR transcripts are coexpressed with ANP and CNP mRNA in the human liver. This provides evidence for a local NP system in the human liver. Images PMID:9155593

  12. Natriuretic peptides induce weak VASP phosphorylation at Serine 239 in platelets.

    PubMed

    Borgognone, Alessandra; Lowe, Kate L; Watson, Stephen P; Madhani, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophoshate (cGMP) is the common second messenger for the cardiovascular effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides (NP; e.g. atrial NP [ANP]), which activate soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases, respectively. The role of NO in regulating cGMP and platelet function is well documented, whereas there is little evidence supporting a role for NPs in regulating platelet reactivity. By studying platelet aggregation and secretion in response to a PAR-1 peptide, collagen and ADP, and phosphorylation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) substrate vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) at serine 239, we evaluated the effects of NPs in the absence or presence of the non-selective cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Our results show that NPs, possibly through the clearance receptor (natriuretic peptide receptor-C) expressed on platelet membranes, increase VASP phosphorylation but only following PDE inhibition, indicating a small, localised cGMP synthesis. As platelet aggregation and secretion measured under the same conditions were not affected, we conclude that the magnitude of PKG activation achieved by NPs in platelets per se is not sufficient to exert functional inhibition of platelet involvement in haemostasis. PMID:23469931

  13. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-02-25

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we examined the diurnal changes of the mRNAs encoding ANP, BNP, and their common receptor NPR-A in atrial and ventricular myocardium. Forty eight mice were killed at the following ZT times: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24, where ZT designates Zeitgeber; ZT 0 corresponds to lights ON and ZT 12 corresponds to lights OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP, and their common receptor (NPR-A) were determined using RT-PCR. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents oscillated in antiphase in both atrial and ventricular regions, where Bmal1 mRNA peaked 12h out of phase relative to Per1 mRNA. ANP and NPR-A atrial mRNA contents revealed borderline significant diurnal changes, whereas ventricular BNP mRNA contents exhibited pronounced oscillation during constant darkness with nadir at CT 12 (P<0.0001). In conclusion, we report a chamber-dependent circadian profile of cardiac BNP mRNA contents, which is not paralleled by the related ANP gene. Our findings suggest that the BNP mRNA pattern could be associated with increased cardiac susceptibility and response to disease.

  14. Biochemistry and physiology of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Johanne; Desjardins, Richard; Hum, David; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Hamet, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclases (GC) exist as soluble and particulate, membrane-associated enzymes which catalyse the conversion of GTP to cGMP, an intracellular signalling molecule. Several membrane forms of the enzyme have been identified up to now. Some of them serve as receptors for the natriuretic peptides, a family of peptides which includes atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), three peptides known to play important roles in renal and cardiovascular physiology. These are transmembrane proteins composed of a single transmembrane domain, a variable extracellular natriuretic peptide-binding domain, and a more conserved intracellular kinase homology domain (KHD) and catalytic domain. GC-A, the receptor for ANP and BNP, also named natriuretic peptide receptor-A or -1 (NPR-A or NPR- 1), has been studied widely. Its mode of activation by peptide ligands and mechanisms of regulation serve as prototypes for understanding the function of other particulate GC. Activation of this enzyme by its ligand is a complex process requiring oligomerization, ligand binding, KHD phosphorylation and ATP binding. Gene knockout and genetic segregation studies have provided strong evidence for the importance of GC-A in the regulation of blood pressure and heart and renal functions. GC-B is the main receptor for CNP, the latter having a more paracrine role at the vascular and venous levels. The structure and regulation of GC-B is similar to that of GC-A. This chapter reviews the structure and roles of GC-A and GC-B in blood pressure regulation and cardiac and renal pathophysiology. PMID:11952095

  15. Possible involvement of central C-type natriuretic polypeptide receptor on water intake in spontaneously hypertensive rats, but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, K; Makino, I; Goto, E; Katsuragi, T; Furukawa, T

    1999-12-01

    The present study was designed to examine the possible role of brain C-type natriuretic polypeptide receptor (GC-B) in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). The level of GC-B mRNA in various regions of the brain in both SHR and WKY was examined in the present study. The GC-B mRNA was unevenly distributed in rat brain, the transcript being expressed predominantly in the hypothalamus and cerebellum but comparatively at low level in the striatum and septum. However, the level in the septum was 3-fold higher in SHR than than in age-matched WKY, while no differences were observed in other regions of the brain. Intracerebroventricular administration of antisense oligonucleotide to GC-B mRNA inhibits the night-time water intake in SHR, but not in WKY. However, the daily food intake was not significantly altered by the injection of antisense oligonucleotide in both strains. These results demonstrate that the brain GC-B mRNA, particularly in septum, is increased in SHR and this increase may be closely related to the regulation of water-drinking behaviour in SHR.

  16. Inhibition of dehydration-induced water intake by glucocorticoids is associated with activation of hypothalamic natriuretic peptide receptor-A in rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Guan, Jing; Kang, Yunxiao; Xiu, Heming; Chen, Ying; Deng, Bao; Liu, Kunshen

    2010-12-20

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) provides a potent defense mechanism against volume overload in mammals. Its primary receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), is localized mostly in the kidney, but also is found in hypothalamic areas involved in body fluid volume regulation. Acute glucocorticoid administration produces potent diuresis and natriuresis, possibly by acting in the renal natriuretic peptide system. However, chronic glucocorticoid administration attenuates renal water and sodium excretion. The precise mechanism underlying this paradoxical phenomenon is unclear. We assume that chronic glucocorticoid administration may activate natriuretic peptide system in hypothalamus, and cause volume depletion by inhibiting dehydration-induced water intake. Volume depletion, in turn, compromises renal water excretion. To test this postulation, we determined the effect of dexamethasone on dehydration-induced water intake and assessed the expression of NPR-A in the hypothalamus. The rats were deprived of water for 24 hours to have dehydrated status. Prior to free access to water, the water-deprived rats were pretreated with dexamethasone or vehicle. Urinary volume and water intake were monitored. We found that dexamethasone pretreatment not only produced potent diuresis, but dramatically inhibited the dehydration-induced water intake. Western blotting analysis showed the expression of NPR-A in the hypothalamus was dramatically upregulated by dexamethasone. Consequently, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (the second messenger for the ANP) content in the hypothalamus was remarkably increased. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on water intake presented in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which emerged at least after 18-hour dexamethasone pretreatment. This effect was glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediated and was abolished by GR antagonist RU486. These results indicated a possible physiologic role for glucocorticoids in the hypothalamic control of water intake

  17. [Natriuretic peptides. History of discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of action and the removal routes. Basis of diagnostic and therapeutic use].

    PubMed

    Stryjewski, Piotr J; Nessler, Bohdan; Cubera, Katarzyna; Nessler, Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) are the group of proteins synthesized and secreted by the mammalian heart. All the NP are synthesized from prohormones and have 17-amino acid cyclic structures containing two cysteine residues linked by internal disulphide bond. They are characterized by a wide range of actions, mainly through their membrane receptors. The NP regulate the water and electrolyte balance, blood pressure through their diuretic, natriuretic, and relaxating the vascular smooth muscles effects. They also affect the endocrine system and the nervous system. The neurohormonal regulation of blood circulation results are mainly based on antagonism with renin--angiotensin--aldosterone system. The NP representatives are: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), urodilatine and (DNP) Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide, not found in the human body. According to the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology determination of NT-proBNP level have found a use in the diagnosis of acute and chronic heart failure, risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes and pulmonary embolism. There are reports found in the literature, that demonstrate the usefulness of NT-proBNP determination in valvular, atrial fibrillation, and syncopes. Recombinant human ANP--Carperitid and BNP--Nesiritid, have already found a use in the adjunctive therapy of dyspnea in acute heart failure. PMID:24167949

  18. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A signaling antagonizes phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ release, and activation of protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, three related natriuretic peptides (NPs) and three distinct sub-types of cognate NP receptors have been identified and characterized based on the specific ligand binding affinities, guanylyl cyclase activity, and generation of intracellular cGMP. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) specifically bind and activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) shows specificity to activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-B (GC-B/NPRB). All three NPs bind to natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC), which is also known as clearance or silent receptor. The NPRA is considered the principal biologically active receptor of NP family; however, the molecular signaling mechanisms of NP receptors are not well understood. The activation of NPRA and NPRB produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP, which serves as the major signaling molecule of all three NPs. The activation of NPRB in response to CNP also produces the intracellular cGMP; however, at lower magnitude than that of NPRA, which is activated by ANP and BNP. In addition to enhanced accumulation of intracellular cGMP in response to all three NPs, the levels of cAMP, Ca2+ and inositol triphosphate (IP3) have also been reported to be altered in different cells and tissue types. Interestingly, ANP has been found to lower the concentrations of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3; however, NPRC has been proposed to increase the levels of these metabolic signaling molecules. The mechanistic studies of decreased and/or increased levels of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in response to NPs and their receptors have not yet been clearly established. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of ANP/NPRA and their biological effects involving an increased level of intracellular accumulation of cGMP and a decreased level of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in different cells and tissue systems. PMID:25202235

  19. The natriuretic peptide/guanylyl cyclase--a system functions as a stress-responsive regulator of angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela; Völker, Katharina; Schwarz, Kristine; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Stypmann, Jörg; van Eickels, Martin; Gambaryan, Stepan; Hartmann, Michael; Werner, Matthias; Wieland, Thomas; Schrader, Jürgen; Baba, Hideo A

    2009-07-01

    Cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) modulate blood pressure and volume by activation of the receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) and subsequent intracellular cGMP formation. Here we report what we believe to be a novel function of these peptides as paracrine regulators of vascular regeneration. In mice with systemic deletion of the GC-A gene, vascular regeneration in response to critical hind limb ischemia was severely impaired. Similar attenuation of ischemic angiogenesis was observed in mice with conditional, endothelial cell-restricted GC-A deletion (here termed EC GC-A KO mice). In contrast, smooth muscle cell-restricted GC-A ablation did not affect ischemic neovascularization. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR revealed BNP expression in activated satellite cells within the ischemic muscle, suggesting that local BNP elicits protective endothelial effects. Since within the heart, BNP is mainly induced in cardiomyocytes by mechanical load, we investigated whether the natriuretic peptide/GC-A system also regulates angiogenesis accompanying load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. EC GC-A KO hearts showed diminished angiogenesis, mild fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction. In vitro BNP/GC-A stimulated proliferation and migration of cultured microvascular endothelia by activating cGMP-dependent protein kinase I and phosphorylating vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and p38 MAPK. We therefore conclude that BNP, produced by activated satellite cells within ischemic skeletal muscle or by cardiomyocytes in response to pressure load, regulates the regeneration of neighboring endothelia via GC-A. This paracrine communication might be critically involved in coordinating muscle regeneration/hypertrophy and angiogenesis. PMID:19487812

  20. The natriuretic peptide/guanylyl cyclase--a system functions as a stress-responsive regulator of angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela; Völker, Katharina; Schwarz, Kristine; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Stypmann, Jörg; van Eickels, Martin; Gambaryan, Stepan; Hartmann, Michael; Werner, Matthias; Wieland, Thomas; Schrader, Jürgen; Baba, Hideo A

    2009-07-01

    Cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) modulate blood pressure and volume by activation of the receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) and subsequent intracellular cGMP formation. Here we report what we believe to be a novel function of these peptides as paracrine regulators of vascular regeneration. In mice with systemic deletion of the GC-A gene, vascular regeneration in response to critical hind limb ischemia was severely impaired. Similar attenuation of ischemic angiogenesis was observed in mice with conditional, endothelial cell-restricted GC-A deletion (here termed EC GC-A KO mice). In contrast, smooth muscle cell-restricted GC-A ablation did not affect ischemic neovascularization. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR revealed BNP expression in activated satellite cells within the ischemic muscle, suggesting that local BNP elicits protective endothelial effects. Since within the heart, BNP is mainly induced in cardiomyocytes by mechanical load, we investigated whether the natriuretic peptide/GC-A system also regulates angiogenesis accompanying load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. EC GC-A KO hearts showed diminished angiogenesis, mild fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction. In vitro BNP/GC-A stimulated proliferation and migration of cultured microvascular endothelia by activating cGMP-dependent protein kinase I and phosphorylating vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and p38 MAPK. We therefore conclude that BNP, produced by activated satellite cells within ischemic skeletal muscle or by cardiomyocytes in response to pressure load, regulates the regeneration of neighboring endothelia via GC-A. This paracrine communication might be critically involved in coordinating muscle regeneration/hypertrophy and angiogenesis.

  1. Cardiac content of brain natriuretic peptide in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Naoto; Aburaya, Masahito; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Kato, Johji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kida, Osamu; Eto, Tanenao; Kangawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Kenjiro ); Minamino, Naoto; Matsuo, Hisayuki )

    1991-01-01

    The cardiac content of immunoreactive rat brain natriuretic peptide (ir-rBNP) in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The atrial content of ir-rBNP was significantly lower in the DOCA-salt group than in the control group. However, the ventricular content of ir-rBNP was markedly increased in the DOCA-salt group as compared to the other groups. Ir-rBNP level in the atria was negatively correlated with blood pressure, while that in the ventricle was positively correlated with blood pressure. A significant correlation was observed between tissue levels of ir-rBNP and ir-rat atrial natriuretic peptide (rANP) both in atrium and ventricle. These results raise the possibility that rBNP as well as rANP functions as a cardiac hormone, the production of which probably changes in response to increased of body fluid and blood pressure.

  2. SP 04-1 THE ROLE OF NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Kobalava, Zhanna

    2016-09-01

    The burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in general and heart failure (HF) in particular continues to increase worldwide. CVD are major contributors to death and morbidity and recognized as important drivers of healthcare expenditure. Chronic overactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a key role in human hypertension and HF pathophysiology. RAAS is fundamental in the overall regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis through the actions of hormones, which regulate vascular tone, and specifically blood pressure through vasoconstriction and renal sodium and water retention. Drugs inhibiting key components of the RAAS have become a cornerstone of contemporary cardiovascular drug therapy. Nowadays there is a high priority for the development of innovative therapeutic agents that better control blood pressure, have a therapeutic potential in HF and enhance current therapies for CVD. The enhancement of the biological activities of the natriuretic peptides (NP) via inhibition of their degradation is one of the novel strategies.Natriuretic peptide system includes primarily three well-characterized peptides with structural similarity: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). These three peptides are involved in the maintenance of cardio-renal homeostasis and all have cardio-renal protective properties. Atrial natriuretic peptide and BNP are synthetized mainly by the cardiomyocytes in response to cardiac stretch, whereas CNP is mainly produced by endothelial cells in response to cytokines and endothelium-dependent agonists. B-type natriuretic peptide is also produced by cardiofibroblasts where it elicits its antifibrotic actions in the heart. All NP function via the second messenger cGMP. All three peptides are cleared by the clearance receptor (NPR-C), not linked to a guanylate cyclase. The NP are also cleared from the circulation via enzymatic degradation by neutral endopeptidase

  3. Thirty years of the heart as an endocrine organ: physiological role and clinical utility of cardiac natriuretic hormones.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Aldo; Giannoni, Alberto; Vittorini, Simona; Passino, Claudio

    2011-07-01

    Thirty years ago, De Bold et al. (20) reported that atrial extracts contain some biologically active peptides, which promote a rapid and massive diuresis and natriuresis when injected in rats. It is now clear that the heart also exerts an endocrine function and in this way plays a key role in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal systems. The aim of this review is to discuss some recent insights and still-debated findings regarding the cardiac natriuretic hormones (CNHs) produced and secreted by cardiomyocytes (i.e., atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide). The functional status of the CNH system depends not only on the production/secretion of CNHs by cardiomyocytes but also on both the peripheral activation of circulating inactive precursor of natriuretic hormones and the transduction of the hormone signal by specific receptors. In this review, we will discuss the data supporting the hypothesis that the production and secretion of CNHs is the result of a complex integration among mechanical, chemical, hemodynamic, humoral, ischemic, and inflammatory inputs. The cross talk among endocrine function, adipose tissue, and sex steroid hormones will be discussed more in detail, considering the clinically relevant relationships linking together cardiovascular risk, sex, and body fat development and distribution. Finally, we will review the pathophysiological role and the clinical relevance of both peripheral maturation of the precursor of B-type natriuretic peptides and hormone signal transduction.

  4. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  5. Vascular effects and electrolyte homeostasis of the natriuretic peptide isolated from Crotalus oreganus abyssus (North American Grand Canyon rattlesnake) venom.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, S L; Dias-Junior, C A; Baldasso, P A; Damico, D C S; Carvalho, B M A; Garanto, A; Acosta, G; Oliveira, E; Albericio, F; Soares, A M; Marangoni, S; Resende, R R

    2012-08-01

    Crotalus oreganus abyssus is a rattlesnake that is usually found in the Grand Canyon, United States of America. Knowledge regarding the composition of C. o. abyssus venom is scarce. New natriuretic peptides (NPs) have been isolated and characterized from the venoms of members of the Crotalinae family. The NP family comprises three members, ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), BNP (b-type natriuretic peptide) and CNP (c-type natriuretic peptide), and has an important role in blood pressure regulation and electrolyte homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to characterize a novel natriuretic-like peptide (Coa_NP2), isolated from C. o. abyssus venom. The Coa_NP2 presents an average molecular mass of 3419.88Da (theoretical average molecular mass 3418.94Da, monoisotopic molecular mass 3416.66Da and theoretical PI 7.78) and its amino acid sequence presents the loop region that is characteristic of natriuretic peptides. The peptide has 32 amino acids and its complete sequence is SYGISSGCFGLKLDRIGTMSGLGCWRLLQDSP. Coa_NP2 is a natriuretic peptide of the ANP/BNP-like family, since the carboxyterminal region of CNP has its own NP domain. We demonstrate, herein, that Coa_NP2 produces a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure in rats, followed by significant increases in concentrations of markers of nitric oxide formation measured in the plasma and vasorelaxation in a thoracic aortic ring bath. The structural and biological aspects confirm Coa_NP2 as a new natriuretic peptide, isolated from snake venom.

  6. Vascular effects and electrolyte homeostasis of the natriuretic peptide isolated from Crotalus oreganus abyssus (North American Grand Canyon rattlesnake) venom.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, S L; Dias-Junior, C A; Baldasso, P A; Damico, D C S; Carvalho, B M A; Garanto, A; Acosta, G; Oliveira, E; Albericio, F; Soares, A M; Marangoni, S; Resende, R R

    2012-08-01

    Crotalus oreganus abyssus is a rattlesnake that is usually found in the Grand Canyon, United States of America. Knowledge regarding the composition of C. o. abyssus venom is scarce. New natriuretic peptides (NPs) have been isolated and characterized from the venoms of members of the Crotalinae family. The NP family comprises three members, ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), BNP (b-type natriuretic peptide) and CNP (c-type natriuretic peptide), and has an important role in blood pressure regulation and electrolyte homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to characterize a novel natriuretic-like peptide (Coa_NP2), isolated from C. o. abyssus venom. The Coa_NP2 presents an average molecular mass of 3419.88Da (theoretical average molecular mass 3418.94Da, monoisotopic molecular mass 3416.66Da and theoretical PI 7.78) and its amino acid sequence presents the loop region that is characteristic of natriuretic peptides. The peptide has 32 amino acids and its complete sequence is SYGISSGCFGLKLDRIGTMSGLGCWRLLQDSP. Coa_NP2 is a natriuretic peptide of the ANP/BNP-like family, since the carboxyterminal region of CNP has its own NP domain. We demonstrate, herein, that Coa_NP2 produces a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure in rats, followed by significant increases in concentrations of markers of nitric oxide formation measured in the plasma and vasorelaxation in a thoracic aortic ring bath. The structural and biological aspects confirm Coa_NP2 as a new natriuretic peptide, isolated from snake venom. PMID:22617223

  7. Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia. The ... the heart's electrical system. Often, people who have AF may not even feel symptoms. But you may ...

  8. Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Goralnick, Eric; Bontempo, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a supraventricular tachyarrhythmia that results from the chaotic depolarization of atrial tissue. AF is the most common sustained cardiac dysrhythmia and the most common dysrhythmia diagnosed in US emergency departments. All patients with AF must have their cardioembolic risk assessed, even if sinus rhythm is restored. Novel oral anticoagulants may be considered instead of vitamin K antagonists for anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular AF. PMID:26226868

  9. Atrial BNP endocrine function during chronic unloading of the normal canine heart.

    PubMed

    Lisy, Ondrej; Redfield, Margaret M; Schirger, John A; Burnett, John C

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the study was to define the effect of chronic unloading of the normal heart on atrial endocrine function with a focus on brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), specifically addressing the role of load and neurohumoral stimulation. Although produced primarily by atrial myocardium in the normal heart, controversy persists with regard to load-dependent vs. neurohumoral mechanisms controlling atrial BNP synthesis and storage. We used a unique canine model of chronic unloading of the heart produced by thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC), which also resulted in activation of plasma endothelin (ET-1), ANG II, and norepinephrine (NE), known activators of BNP synthesis, compared with sham. TIVCC was produced by banding of the inferior vena cava for 10 days (n = 6), whereas in control (n = 5) the band was not constricted (sham). In a third group (n = 7), the band was released on day 11, thus acutely reloading the heart. Chronic TIVCC decreased cardiac output and right atrial pressure with a decrease in atrial mass index consistent with atrial atrophy. Atrial BNP mRNA decreased compared with sham. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed an increase in BNP in atrial granules consistent with increased storage. Acute reloading increased cardiac filling pressures and resulted in an increase in plasma BNP. We conclude that chronic unloading of the normal heart results in atrial atrophic remodeling and in suppression of atrial BNP mRNA despite intense stimulation by ET, ANG II, and NE, underscoring the primacy of load in the control of atrial endocrine function and structure.

  10. Changes of adrenomedullin and natriuretic peptides in patients with adrenal medullary hyperplasia prior to and following pharmacological therapy and adrenalectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pang-Hu; Shi, Lei; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathophysiological functions of adrenomedullin (ADM), atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in patients with adrenal medullary hyperplasia (AMH). Plasma ADM, ANP and BNP concentrations were measured in 20 patients with AMH, 35 patients with essential hypertension (EH), and 40 healthy control subjects. Following effective antihypertensive therapy, the values in AMH and EH patients were measured again and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed for AMH patients. At 2 weeks after surgery, the three peptides were measured again. The AMH patients had higher plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP compared with the EH and control subjects. There were significant differences in the values of ADM, ANP and BNP between adrenal vein and inferior vena cava and between AMH and contralateral adrenal vein. Plasma ADM concentration was correlated with serum epinephrine and norepinephrine and urine vanillylmandelic acid, in addition to systolic and diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and ANP and BNP values in the AMH group. Following antihypertensive treatment, ADM, ANP and BNP were significantly decreased in EH patients, but remained unchanged in AMH subjects. However, these concentrations significantly decreased following surgery. Therefore, the present results suggest that ADM, ANP and BNP may be involved in regulating adrenal medulla functions. PMID:27446289

  11. Atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Essential facts Atrial fibrillation (AF) causes an abnormal, sometimes fast pulse, and is the most common heart rhythm disturbance. It occurs when electrical impulses controlling the heart's natural rhythm lose co-ordination. People with AF have a four or five times higher risk of stroke because it increases the risk of a blood clot forming in the chambers of the heart. The condition is responsible for 22,500 strokes a year in the UK, according to the British Heart Foundation (BHF). PMID:24593083

  12. Atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Thomas M.; Wu, Li-Qun; Shen, Win K.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia affecting patients today. Disease prevalence is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, and is associated with often catastrophic and costly consequences, including heart failure, syncope, dementia, and stroke. Therapies including anticoagulants, anti-arrhythmic medications, devices, and non-pharmacologic procedures in the last 30 years have improved patients' functionality with the disease. Nonetheless, it remains imperative that further research into AF epidemiology, genetics, detection, and treatments continues to push forward rapidly as the worldwide population ages dramatically over the next 20 years. PMID:24474959

  13. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  14. Influence of natriuretic peptide receptor-1 on survival and cardiac hypertrophy during development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nicola J.A.; Ellmers, Leigh. J.; Lainchbury, John G.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Smithies, Oliver; Richards, A. Mark; Cameron, Vicky A.

    2010-01-01

    The heart adapts to an increased workload through the activation of a hypertrophic response within the cardiac ventricles. This response is characterized by both an increase in the size of the individual cardiomyocytes and an induction of a panel of genes normally expressed in the embryonic and neonatal ventricle, such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their biological actions through activation of the natriuretic peptide receptor-1 (Npr1). The current study examined mice lacking Npr1 (Npr1−/−) activity and investigated the effects of the absence of Npr1 signaling during cardiac development on embryo viability, cardiac structure and gene and protein expression. Npr1−/−embryos were collected at embryonic day (ED) 12.5, 15.5 and neonatal day 1 (ND 1). Npr1−/−embryos occurred at the expected Mendelian frequency at ED 12.5, but knockout numbers were significantly decreased at ED 15.5 and ND 1. There was no indication of cardiac structural abnormalities in surviving embryos. However, Npr1−/−embryos exhibited cardiac enlargement (without fibrosis) from ED 15.5 as well as significantly increased ANP mRNA and protein expression compared to wild-type (WT) mice, but no concomitant increase in expression of the hypertrophy-related transcription factors, Mef2A, Mef2C, GATA-4, GATA-6 or serum response factor (SRF). However, there was a significant decrease in Connexin-43 (Cx43) gene and protein expression at mid-gestation in Npr1−/−embryos. Our findings suggest that the mechanism by which natriuretic peptide signaling influences cardiac development in Npr1−/− mice is distinct from that seen during the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The decreased viability of Npr1−/−embryos may result from a combination of cardiomegaly and dysregulated Cx43 protein affecting cardiac contractility. PMID:19782130

  15. Molecular Basis of Gene-Gene Interaction: Cyclic Cross-Regulation of Gene Expression and Post-GWAS Gene-Gene Interaction Involved in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chengqi; Zhang, Hongfu; Lu, Qiulun; Chang, Le; Wang, Fan; Wang, Pengxia; Zhang, Rongfeng; Hu, Zhenkun; Song, Qixue; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Cong; Li, Sisi; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yang, Qin; Yin, Dan; Wang, Xiaojing; Si, Wenxia; Li, Xiuchun; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Dan; Huang, Yuan; Luo, Chunyan; Li, Jia; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Wang, Longfei; Wang, Li; Han, Meng; Ye, Jian; Chen, Feifei; Liu, Jingqiu; Liu, Ying; Wu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yuhua; Wu, Yanxia; Ke, Tie; Chen, Qiuyun; Tu, Xin; Elston, Robert; Rao, Shaoqi; Yang, Yanzong; Xia, Yunlong; Wang, Qing K.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia at the clinic. Recent GWAS identified several variants associated with AF, but they account for <10% of heritability. Gene-gene interaction is assumed to account for a significant portion of missing heritability. Among GWAS loci for AF, only three were replicated in the Chinese Han population, including SNP rs2106261 (G/A substitution) in ZFHX3, rs2200733 (C/T substitution) near PITX2c, and rs3807989 (A/G substitution) in CAV1. Thus, we analyzed the interaction among these three AF loci. We demonstrated significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 in three independent populations and combined population with 2,020 cases/5,315 controls. Compared to non-risk genotype GGCC, two-locus risk genotype AATT showed the highest odds ratio in three independent populations and the combined population (OR=5.36 (95% CI 3.87-7.43), P=8.00×10-24). The OR of 5.36 for AATT was significantly higher than the combined OR of 3.31 for both GGTT and AACC, suggesting a synergistic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) analysis also revealed significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 when exposed two copies of risk alleles (RERI=2.87, P<1.00×10-4) or exposed to one additional copy of risk allele (RERI=1.29, P<1.00×10-4). The INTERSNP program identified significant genotypic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 under an additive by additive model (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.74-0.97, P=0.02). Mechanistically, PITX2c negatively regulates expression of miR-1, which negatively regulates expression of ZFHX3, resulting in a positive regulation of ZFHX3 by PITX2c; ZFHX3 positively regulates expression of PITX2C, resulting in a cyclic loop of cross-regulation between ZFHX3 and PITX2c. Both ZFHX3 and PITX2c regulate expression of NPPA, TBX5 and NKX2.5. These results suggest that cyclic cross-regulation of gene expression is a molecular basis for gene

  16. Pathophysiology of sudden cardiac death as demonstrated by molecular pathology of natriuretic peptides in the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-11-30

    Various heart diseases present with sudden death; however, it is difficult to interpret the severity of or difference in respective preexisting and terminal cardiac dysfunction based on conventional morphology. The present study investigated the cardiac pathophysiology employing quantitative mRNA measurement of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in the myocardium as markers of cardiac strain, using autopsy materials consisting of acute ischemic heart disease (AIHD, n=40) with/without the pathology of apparent myocardial necrosis (n=19/21), recurrent myocardial infarction (RMI, n=19), chronic congestive heart disease (CHD, n=11) and right ventricular cardiomyopathy (RVC, n=5), as well as hemopericardium (HP, n=11) due to myocardial infarction (n=5) and aortic rupture (n=6), and acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE, n=5). Cardiac death groups showed higher ANP and/or BNP mRNA expressions in the left ventricle than acute fatal bleeding (sharp instrumental injury; n=15) and/or mechanical asphyxiation (strangulation; n=10). AIHD and RMI cases had similar ANP and BNP mRNA expressions in bilateral ventricular walls, but their bilateral atrial levels were lower in RMI. RVC showed higher mRNA expressions of posterior left ventricular BNP, and right ventricular and bilateral atrial ANP and BNP. HP cases had lower BNP mRNA expression in the right ventricular wall, but PTE showed lower ANP and BNP mRNA expressions in the left ventricular wall; however, these mRNA expressions at other sites were similar to those of AIHD. CHD presented findings similar to those of AIHD, but the pericardial BNP level was significantly increased. These observations indicate characteristic molecular biological responses of myocardial natriuretic peptides in individual heart diseases and suggest the possible application of molecular pathology to demonstrate cardiac dysfunction even after death.

  17. Increased synthesis and release of atrial peptide during DOCA escape in conscious dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, C.H.; Gardner, D.G.; Keil, L.C.; Baxter, J.D.; Ramsay, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The escape from the sodium-retaining effects of prolonged mineralocorticoid treatment in animals and humans was first noted over 40 yr ago, but despite intense study the mechanisms responsible for the escape phenomenon have not been identified. Putative natriuretic hormones have been proposed to account for the escape phenomenon. To determine whether atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) could participate in the escape phenomenon, the mineralocorticoid deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) was administered to conscious dogs for 14 days. Escape was accompanied by a doubling of plasma ANP concentration, determined by radioimmunoassay, and four- to sevenfold increases in caridac ANP messenger RNA. There were also significant increases in mean arterial blood pressure during the last 8 days of DOCA treatment. Thus increases in the synthesis and secretion of ANP and increases in atrial pressure may represent mechanisms that contribute to the escape from mineralocorticoid-induced sodium retention.

  18. Functional Role and Mechanism of microRNA-28b in Atrial Myocyte in a Persistent Atrial Fibrillation Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongbin; Kang, Weiqiang; Wang, Xu; Chen, Meina; Qin, Qiaoji; Guo, Minglei; Ge, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent atrial fibrillation has been indicated to be related with microRNA-28b. However, the exact role of microRNA-28b in persistent atrial fibrillation needs to be further elucidated. Therefore, this study aimed to establish a rat model of persistent atrial fibrillation to investigate the level of microRNA-28b in atrial myocytes and to explore the molecular mechanism involved. Material/Methods A persistent atrial fibrillation model was established in rats by using chronic rapid atrial pacing induction. The size of the heart was measured by ultrasonic method. The expression of microRNA-28b in left atrial myocytes was quantified by RT-PCR. Cardiomyocytes were isolated and cultured to detect cell proliferation and apoptosis by MTT and flow cytometry, respectively. The specific inhibitor of ERK signaling pathway, PD98059, was used to further illustrate the role of ERK signaling pathway in the modulation of cardiomyocytes in persistent atrial fibrillation. Results MicroRNA-28b was up-regulated in the experimental rat model with persistent atrial fibrillation. The proliferation of cardiomyocytes was significantly inhibited with potentiated apoptosis. Blockage of the ERK pathway suppressed the microRNA-28b expression and inhibited cell apoptosis. Conclusions microRNA-28b-induced growth inhibition and cell apoptosis of atrial myocytes was observed in the rat model with persistent atrial fibrillation, via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27574952

  19. Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atrial Fibrosis in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation.

    PubMed

    Spragg, David D; Khurram, Irfan; Nazarian, Saman

    2013-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) likely involves a complex interplay between triggering activity, usually from pulmonary vein foci, and maintenance of the arrhythmia by an arrhythmogenic substrate. Both components of AF, triggers and substrate have been linked to atrial fibrosis and attendant changes in atrial electrophysiology. Recently, there has been a growing use of imaging modalities, particularly cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), to quantify the burden of atrial fibrosis and scar in patients either undergoing AF ablation, or who have recently had the procedure. How to use the CMR derived data is still an open area of investigation. The aim of this article is to summarise what is known as atrial fibrosis, as assessed by traditional catheter-based techniques and newer imaging approaches, and to report on novel efforts from our group to advance the use of CMR in AF ablation patients.

  20. Responses of cardiac natriuretic peptides after paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia: ANP surges faster than BNP and CNP.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Wang, An-Mei; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Chen, Chun-Yen; Shih, Bing-Fu; Yeh, Hung-I

    2016-03-15

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion increases after 30 min of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). Whether this phenomenon also applies to brain or C-type natriuretic peptides (BNP or CNP) remains unknown. Blood samples of 18 patients (41 ± 11 yr old; 4 men) with symptomatic PSVT and normal left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction 65 ± 6%) were collected from the coronary sinus (CS) and the femoral artery (FA) before and 30 min after the induction, and 30 min after the termination of PSVT. The results showed that the ANP levels rose steeply after the PSVT and then reduced at 30 min after the termination (baseline vs. post-PSVT vs. posttermination: CS: 34.0 ± 29.6 vs. 74.1 ± 42.3 vs. 46.1 ± 32.9; FA: 5.9 ± 3.24 vs. 28.2 ± 20.7 vs. 10.0 ± 4.6 pg/ml; all P < 0.05). In contrast, compared with ANP, the increases of BNP and CNP in CS after the PSVT were less sharp, but continued to rise after the termination of tachycardia (BNP, 10.2 ± 6.4 vs. 11.3 ± 7.1 vs. 11.8 ± 7.9; CNP, 4.5 ± 1.2 vs. 4.9 ± 1.4 vs. 5.0 ± 1.4 pg/ml; all P < 0.05). The rise of BNP and CNP in FA was similarly less sharp after the PSVT and remained stationary after the termination. PSVT exerted differential effects on cardiac natriuretic peptide levels. ANP increased greater after a 30-min induced PSVT, but dropped faster after termination of PSVT, compared with BNP and CNP.

  1. ED 05-4 NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND HYPERTENSION: AN INTEGRATED VIEW.

    PubMed

    Sarzani, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) are the cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP), true "cardiometabolic" hormones well known for their renal, endocrine and cardiovascular activities leading to reduced sodium reabsorption and arterial blood pressure. These effects are mainly mediated by the second messenger cGMP that also stimulates lipolysis, mitochondriogenesis and a thermogenic program with potency similar to catecholamines. Two distinct NP receptors modulate the final response to cardiac NP: the cGMP-signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. The cellular and systemic effects of NP largely depend upon the ratio of the clearance receptor NPRC to the signaling receptor NPRA, both abundantly expressed in human adipose tissue and adipocytes. Indeed, most of the available data indicate that the total NPRC expression in the body is the main negative modulator of the circulating NP levels and, at cellular level, NPRC is a main silencer of their biological effects. NP are not only 'cleared' from circulation by NPRC, but they are also degraded very quickly by neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and both are increased in obesity. Starving sharply decreases NPRC expression in white and brown adipose tissue and a low-calorie diet in obese hypertensive patients strongly potentiates the clinical and biological effects of infused ANP. Hypocaloric diet also enhances ANP-induced lipolysis in humans, whereas obesity is associated with lower circulating levels of NP. Many studies have linked the genes of NP and their receprtros to hypertension and many population studies have also linked reduced NP levels to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Insulin/glucose are the main factors in adipocytes hypertrophy in many conditions characterized by insulin resistance such as metabolic syndrome. Insulin attenuate lipolysis in adipocytes by inducing NPRC expression, linking the eating pattern to reduced NP activities both on adipose tissue and likely in the

  2. Physiological levels of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide shed the endothelial glycocalyx and enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Matthias; Saller, Thomas; Chappell, Daniel; Rehm, Markus; Welsch, Ulrich; Becker, Bernhard F

    2013-05-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a peptide hormone released from the cardiac atria during hypervolemia. Though named for its well-known renal effect, ANP has been demonstrated to acutely increase vascular permeability in vivo. Experimentally, this phenomenon was associated with a marked shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, at least for supraphysiological intravascular concentrations. This study investigates the impact and mechanism of action of physiological doses of ANP and related peptides on the vascular barrier. In isolated guinea pig hearts, prepared and perfused in a modified Langendorff mode with and without the intravascular presence of the colloid hydroxyethyl starch (HES), we measured functional changes in vascular permeability and glycocalyx shedding related to intracoronary infusion of physiological concentrations of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide (ANP, BNP and CNP). Significant coronary venous washout of glycocalyx constituents (syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate) was observed. As tested for ANP, this effect was positively related to the intracoronary concentration. Intravascular shedding of the glycocalyx was morphologically confirmed by electron microscopy. Also, functional vascular barrier competence decreased, as indicated by significant increases in transudate formation and HES extravasation. Ortho-phenanthroline, a non-specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteases, was able to reduce ANP-induced glycocalyx shedding. These findings suggest participation of natriuretic peptides in pathophysiological processes like heart failure, inflammation or sepsis. Inhibition of metalloproteases might serve as a basis for future therapeutical options.

  3. Atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bang, Casper N

    2013-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication after myocardial infarction (MI) and new-onset AF has been demonstrated to be associated with adverse outcome and a large excess risk of death in both MI and aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Prevention of new-onset AF is therefore a potential therapeutic target in AS and MI patients. Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent AF. Accordingly, statins are recommended as a class IIa recommendation for prevention of new-onset AF after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, this preventive effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with AS or a large scale first-time MI patient sample and data in patients not undergoing invasive cardiac interventions are limited. This PhD thesis was conducted at the Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, with the aim to investigate the three aforementioned questions and to add to the existing evidence of AF prevention with statins. This was done using three different settings: 1) a randomized patients sample of 1,873 from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 2) a register patient sample of 97,499 with first-time MI, and 3) all published studies until beginning of June 2011 examining statin treatment on new-onset and recurrent AF in patients not undergoing cardiac surgery. This thesis revealed that statins did not lower the incidence or the time to new-onset AF in patients with asymptomatic AS. However, statin treatment showed an independently preventive effect on new-onset AF, including type-dependent effect and a trend to dosage-dependent effect. In addition, this thesis showed that good compliance to statin treatment was important to prevent new-onset AF. Finally, the meta-analysis in this PhD thesis showed a preventive effect in the observational studies although this effect was absent in the randomized controlled trials. Based on this PhD thesis

  4. Atrial Septal Defect (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Atrial Septal Defect KidsHealth > For Teens > Atrial Septal Defect Print A ... Care of Yourself What Is an Atrial Septal Defect? Having a doctor listen to your heart is ...

  5. Determinants of Left Atrial Volume in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hochgruber, Thomas; Krisai, Philipp; Zimmermann, Andreas J.; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Pumpol, Katrin; Kessel-Schaefer, Arnheid; Stephan, Frank-Peter; Handschin, Nadja; Sticherling, Christian; Osswald, Stefan; Kaufmann, Beat A.; Paré, Guillaume; Kühne, Michael; Conen, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Left atrial (LA) enlargement is an important risk factor for incident stroke and a key determinant for the success of rhythm control strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, factors associated with LA volume in AF patients remain poorly understood. Methods Patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF were enrolled in this study. Real time 3-D echocardiography was performed in all participants and analyzed offline in a standardized manner. We performed stepwise backward linear regression analyses using a broad set of clinical parameters to determine independent correlates for 3-D LA volume. Results We included 210 patients (70.9% male, mean age 61±11years). Paroxysmal and persistent AF were present in 95 (45%) and 115 (55%) patients, respectively. Overall, 115 (55%) had hypertension, 11 (5%) had diabetes, and 18 (9%) had ischemic heart disease. Mean indexed LA volume was 36±12ml/m2. In multivariable models, significant associations were found for female sex (β coefficient -10.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) -17.85;-3.16), p = 0.0053), undergoing cardioversion (β 11.95 (CI 5.15; 18.74), p = 0.0006), diabetes (β 14.23 (CI 2.36; 26.10), p = 0.019), body surface area (BSA) (β 34.21 (CI 19.30; 49.12), p<0.0001), glomerular filtration rate (β -0.21 (CI -0.36; -0.06), p = 0.0064) and plasma levels of NT-pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) (β 6.79 (CI 4.05; 9.52), p<0.0001), but not age (p = 0.59) or hypertension (p = 0.42). Our final model explained 52% of the LA volume variability. Conclusions In patients with AF, the most important correlates with LA volume are sex, BSA, diabetes, renal function and NT-proBNP, but not age or hypertension. These results may help to refine rhythm control strategies in AF patients. PMID:27701468

  6. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  7. Diuretic and natriuretic effects of sorbinil, an aldose reductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Springate, J E; Feld, L G; Van Liew, J B; Fildes, R D; Acara, M A

    1991-04-01

    The renal effects of sorbinil, an aldose reductase inhibitor that interferes with the conversion of glucose to sorbitol, were studied in rats and rabbits before and after fluid deprivation. The intracellular osmolar solute, sorbitol, is found in increasing concentrations from cortex to medulla in the kidney and may be involved in the urinary concentrating mechanism. Oral administration of sorbinil in the rabbit resulted in significant increases in urine flow rate and sodium excretion with a tendency toward decreased urine osmolality and increased potassium excretion both before and after water deprivation. When fluid intake was controlled in the rat study, significant increases in urine flow rate and sodium and potassium excretion and a significant decrease in urine osmolality occurred only in response to fluid deprivation. Thus, sorbinil has diuretic and natriuretic properties and may prevent the normal concentration of urine in the antidiuretic animal.

  8. Left ventricular dysfunction, natriuretic peptides, and mortality in an urban population

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, T; Cunningham, A; Morrison, C; McMurray, J; Ford, I; Morton, J; Dargie, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To report the mortality of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVD), assessed objectively by echocardiography, and its association with natriuretic peptide hormones in a random sample of 1640 men and women aged 25-74 years from a geographical, urban population.
METHODS—Left ventricular function was measured by echocardiography in 1640 attendees studied in 1992-3. LVD was defined as a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ⩽ 30%. Plasma concentrations of N-terminal atrial natriuretic peptide (N-ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured by standard radioimmunoassays. Mortality was documented at four years.
RESULTS—The four year all cause mortality rate in the whole cohort was 4.9% (80 deaths). It was 21% (nine deaths) in those with an LVEF ⩽ 30% and 4% in those whose LVEF was > 30% (p < 0.001). The median (interquartile range) BNP concentration in those who died was 16.9 pg/ml (8.8-27) and 7.8 pg/ml (3.4-13) in survivors (p < 0.0001). Similarly, N-ANP had a median concentration of 2.35 ng/ml (1.32-3.36) in those with a fatal outcome and 1.27 ng/ml (0.9-2.0) in those alive at four years (p < 0.0001). Subjects with an LVEF ⩽ 40% also had a significant mortality rate of 17% if they also had a BNP concentration ⩾ 17.9 pg/ml compared with 6.8% if their BNP was below this concentration (p = 0.013). Multivariate analysis revealed the independent predictors of four year all cause mortality to be increasing age (p < 0.001), a BNP concentration ⩾ 17.9 pg/ml (p = 0.006), the presence of ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.03), and male sex (p = 0.04).
CONCLUSIONS—LVD is associated with a considerable mortality rate in this population. BNP also independently predicts outcome. In addition to its role as a diagnostic aid in chronic heart failure and LVD, it provides prognostic information and clarifies the meaning of a given degree of LVD.


Keywords: epidemiology; left ventricular dysfunction

  9. Total plasma proANP increases with atrial dilatation in horses.

    PubMed

    Van Der Vekens, N; Hunter, I; Timm, A; Decloedt, A; De Clercq, D; Deprez, P; Goetze, J P; van Loon, G

    2015-12-19

    Equine atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) plasma concentrations are correlated with left atrial size. However, species-specific assays are lacking and the results from human assays are poorly reproducible. A new methodology called processing independent analysis (PIA) that measures the total proANP product in plasma has proven to be successful in human medicine, but has never been used in horses. The aims were to establish an equine proANP reference interval by measurement of the total proANP product using PIA and to examine the proANP concentrations in horses with atrial dilatation. Sample stability was studied by comparison of storage at -80°C and -20°C. Plasma samples were obtained from 23 healthy horses, 12 horses with moderate or severe valvular regurgitation without atrial dilatation and 42 horses with valvular regurgitation and atrial dilatation. The proANP concentration was significantly (P<0.001) higher in horses with atrial dilatation (761.4 (442.1-1859.1) pmol/l) than in healthy horses (491.6 (429.5-765.9) pmol/l; P<0.001) or horses with cardiac disease but without atrial dilatation (544.4 (457.0-677.6) pmol/l). A cut-off value (573.8 pmol/l) for detection of atrial dilatation was calculated. Sample storage at -80°C did not differ from sample storage at -20°C. The measurement of total proANP in plasma detects atrial dilatation in horses and may be useful for clinical evaluation in equine medicine.

  10. Atrial mass: a myxoma?

    PubMed

    Chatzis, Andrew C; Kostopanagiotou, Kostas; Kousi, Theofili; Mitropoulos, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    A middle-aged woman with a history of resected colorectal cancer and receiving chemotherapy presented with a right atrial mass and the provisional diagnosis of myxoma supported by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Successful surgical removal revealed organized thrombus instead. Atrial thrombus may be mistaken for myxoma and long-term intracardiac indwelling catheters can be thrombogenic. PMID:27525099

  11. Electrophysiological Mechanisms of Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching- Tai; Chen, Shin-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Atrial flutter (AFL) is a common arrhythmia in clinical practice. Several experimental models such as tricuspid regurgitation model, tricuspid ring model, sterile pericarditis model and atrial crush injury model have provided important information about reentrant circuit and can test the effect of antiarrhythmic drugs. Human atrial flutter has typical and atypical forms. Typical atrial flutter rotates around tricuspid annulus and uses the crista terminalis and sometimes sinus venosa as the boundary. The IVC-tricuspid isthmus is a slow conduction zone and the target of radiofrequency ablation. Atypical atrial flutter may arise from the right or left atrium. Right atrial flutter includes upper loop reentry, free wall reentry and figure of eight reentry. Left atrial flutter includes mitral annular atrial flutter, pulmonary vein-related atrial flutter and left septal atrial flutter. Radiofrequency ablation of the isthmus between the boundaries can eliminate these arrhythmias. PMID:16943903

  12. Multiple Biomarkers and Atrial Fibrillation in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Renate B.; Wild, Philipp S.; Wilde, Sandra; Ojeda, Francisco M.; Schulz, Andreas; Zeller, Tanja; Sinning, Christoph R.; Kunde, Jan; Lackner, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Different biological pathways have been related to atrial fibrillation (AF). Novel biomarkers capturing inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurohumoral activation have not been investigated comprehensively in AF. Methods and Results In the population-based Gutenberg Health Study (n = 5000), mean age 56±11 years, 51% males, we measured ten biomarkers representing inflammation (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen), cardiac and vascular function (midregional pro adrenomedullin [MR-proADM], midregional pro atrial natriuretic peptide [MR-proANP], N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide [Nt-proBNP], sensitive troponin I ultra [TnI ultra], copeptin, and C-terminal pro endothelin-1), and oxidative stress (glutathioneperoxidase-1, myeloperoxidase) in relation to manifest AF (n = 161 cases). Individuals with AF were older, mean age 64.9±8.3, and more often males, 71.4%. In Bonferroni-adjusted multivariable regression analyses strongest associations per standard deviation increase in biomarker concentrations were observed for the natriuretic peptides Nt-proBNP (odds ratio [OR] 2.89, 99.5% confidence interval [CI] 2.14–3.90; P<0.0001), MR-proANP (OR 2.45, 99.5% CI 1.91–3.14; P<0.0001), the vascular function marker MR-proADM (OR 1.54, 99.5% CI 1.20–1.99; P<0.0001), TnI ultra (OR 1.50, 99.5% CI 1.19–1.90; P<0.0001) and. fibrinogen (OR 1.44, 99.5% CI 1.19–1.75; P<0.0001). Based on a model comprising known clinical risk factors for AF, all biomarkers combined resulted in a net reclassification improvement of 0.665 (99.3% CI 0.441–0.888) and an integrated discrimination improvement of >13%. Conclusions In conclusion, in our large, population-based study, we identified novel biomarkers reflecting vascular function, MR-proADM, inflammation, and myocardial damage, TnI ultra, as related to AF; the strong association of natriuretic peptides was confirmed. Prospective studies need to examine whether risk prediction of AF can be enhanced beyond clinical risk

  13. Lifestyle and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Anna Vittoria

    2011-07-01

    Lifestyle factors, in particular dietary intake, have been recognized as important, modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Consuming a heart-healthy diet lowers the individual's risk for cardiovascular disease. Data on the relationship between lifestyle and atrial fibrillation are controversial; however, the strong association between obesity, atrial/ventricular dysfunction and a nonhealthy lifestyle and atrial fibrillation, suggests that a correction of nutritional habits could prevent the development of arrhythmias through a reduction of underlying cardiac diseases. Today, the Mediterranean diet is considered one of the most effective in terms of its prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Atrial Septal Defects and Cardioembolic Strokes.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Michelle; Poisson, Sharon N; Carroll, John D

    2016-05-01

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) can be complicated by cardioembolic strokes, but the exact incidence is unknown. Patients with large and small shunts may present with a cardioembolic stroke. Patients with cryptogenic strokes should have cardiac ultrasound to see if an ASD is present. Cardioembolic strokes associated with ASD principally occur with 2 mechanisms. The first is paradoxic embolism involving a venous-based source of thrombus, which may subsequently pass through the ASD by right-to-left shunting, causing a cardioembolic stroke. The second is atrial fibrillation that can complicate the course of patients with ASDs, especially as they age. PMID:27150170

  15. Atrial fibrillation from the pathologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Electrophysiologically, it is characterized by a high rate of asynchronous atrial cell depolarization causing a loss of atrial contractile function and irregular ventricular rates. For a long time, AF was considered as a pure functional disorder without any structural background. Only in recent years, have new mapping and imaging techniques identified atrial locations, which are very often involved in the initiation and maintenance of this supraventricular arrhythmia (i.e. the distal portion of the pulmonary veins and the surrounding atrial myocardium). Morphological analysis of these myocardial sites has demonstrated significant structural remodeling as well as paved the way for further knowledge of AF natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment. This architectural myocardial disarrangement is induced by the arrhythmia itself and the very frequently associated cardiovascular disorders. At the same time, the structural remodeling is also capable of sustaining AF, thereby creating a sort of pathogenetic vicious circle. This review focuses on current understanding about the structural and genetic bases of AF with reference to their classification, pathogenesis, and clinical implications. PMID:24462196

  16. Atrial Fibrillation Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... think you are pregnant If you notice red, dark brown or black urine or stools If you ... Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • Understand your Risk for AFib Children • Symptoms of ...

  17. Atrial fibrillation or flutter

    MedlinePlus

    ... the mitral valve) Hypertension Medicines Overactive thyroid gland ( hyperthyroidism ) Pericarditis Sick sinus syndrome Symptoms You may not ... procedures Heart attack Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Hyperthyroidism Pericarditis Pulse Stable angina Stroke Patient Instructions Atrial ...

  18. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... regular beat. Certain cells in your heart make electric signals that cause the heart to contract and ... read your ECG to find out if the electric signals are normal. In atrial fibrillation (AFib), the ...

  19. Clinical utility of natriuretic peptides and troponins in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Devin W; Buttan, Anshu; Siegel, Robert J; Rader, Florian

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is based on clinical, echocardiographic and in some cases genetic findings. However, prognostication remains limited except in the subset of patients with high-risk indicators for sudden cardiac death. Additional methods are needed for risk stratification and to guide clinical management in HCM. We reviewed the available data regarding natriuretic peptides and troponins in HCM. Plasma levels of natriuretic peptides, and to a lesser extent serum levels of troponins, correlate with established disease markers, including left ventricular thickness, symptom status, and left ventricular hemodynamics by Doppler measurements. As a reflection of left ventricular filling pressure, natriuretic peptides may provide an objective measure of the efficacy of a specific therapy. Both natriuretic peptides and troponins predict clinical risk in HCM independently of established risk factors, and their prognostic power is additive. Routine measurement of biomarker levels therefore may be useful in the clinical evaluation and management of patients with HCM.

  20. Amino-terminal fragment of C-type natriuretic peptide precursor and C-type natriuretic peptide do not correlate in patients with Chagas disease: role for neutral endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Moreira, Maria da Consolação V; Heringer-Walther, Silvia; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Wessel, Niels; Walther, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP), but not C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), have been identified to be diagnostic and prognostic markers in Chagas disease (CD). Although ANP and BNP excessively rise in patients with CD, increase in CNP is just minor. Our study aimed to investigate the mechanisms leading to CNP insensitivity to heart failure (HF) stimuli. Amino-terminal fragment of CNP precursor (NT-proCNP) and activity of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) were quantified to monitor CNP generation and degradation, respectively. Blood samples were collected from patients with CD and control healthy subjects. NT-proCNP concentrations were significantly lower in patients with CD without systolic dysfunction compared with healthy subjects. Despite a trend toward increase with rising heart failure clinical severity, it was significantly correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction and other echocardiographic parameters. As shown for CNP before, NT-proCNP could not predict mortality and heart transplant. Importantly, it had no statistical correlation with CNP. Additionally, NEP activity was significantly increased in New York Heart Association III and IV patients with HF but was positively correlated with CNP concentration. Our data demonstrates that generation of CNP is not enhanced under HF condition like CD. Thus, CNP rise by severe HF is caused by its less degradation that is independent of NEP activity.

  1. Invasive and noninvasive correlations of B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure due to Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Fábio; Feitosa, Gilson Soares; Soares, Milena B P; Pinho-Filho, Joel Alves; Nascimento, Thais; Barojas, Marcos M; Andrade, Marcus V S; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ricardo; Bocchi, Edimar

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure due to Chagas cardiomyopathy (HFCC) differs from failure with other etiologies because of the occurrence of intense inflammatory infiltrate and right ventricle compromise. This article investigates correlations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels with parameters of severity in HFCC. Twenty-eight patients and 8 normal controls underwent heart catheterization and clinical and laboratory analyses. BNP levels were higher in patients with HFCC (P<.0001) and correlated with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class; right atrial pressure; wedge pressure; cardiac output; levels of serum sodium, hemoglobin, urea, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha; and ejection fraction. Interferon-gamma and transforming growth factor-beta did not correlate with BNP level. The authors conclude that BNP levels are elevated in patients experiencing HFCC, irrespective of NYHA class, and that the occurrence of HFCC correlates with severity of disease.

  2. Inverse association of long-acting natriuretic peptide with metabolic syndrome in congestive heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aims Long-acting natriuretic peptide (LANP) is one of the peptide hormones in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) pro-hormone. Low levels of natriuretic peptide may lead to reduced lipolysis and excessive weight gain in obese patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fasting serum LANP level and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) among congestive heart failure (CHF) patients. Methods Fasting blood samples were obtained from 186 patients with normal renal function in cardiac clinic outpatients. CHF defined by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association 2005 Guidelines. MetS and its components were defined using diagnostic criteria from the International Diabetes Federation. Results Ninety-eight patients (52.7%) had CHF. There was a tendency of increased fasting LANP levels as the NYHA CHF functional classes increased (p = 0.002). Forty-six of the CHF patients (46.9%) had MetS. Fasting LANP level negatively correlated with MetS among CHF patients (p < 0.001). Univariate linear regression analysis showed that BUN (p = 0.026) positively correlated with fasting serum LANP levels, while body weight (p = 0.009), BMI (p = 0.004), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; p = 0.024) and HOMA-β (p = 0.001) negatively correlated with fasting serum LANP levels among the CHF patients. Multivariate forward stepwise linear regression analysis of the significant variables showed that the HOMA-β (R2 change = 0.292, p < 0.001) and HOMA-IR (R2 change = 0.081, p = 0.019) were independent predictors of fasting serum LANP levels in CHF patients. Conclusions LANP level is significantly reduced in CHF patients affected by MetS. HOMA-β and HOMA-IR were independent predictors of serum LANP levels in CHF patients. PMID:23566312

  3. Exercise-induced changes in atrial peptides in relation to neuroendocrine responses and fluid balance in the horse.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, U M; Pösö, A R; Hyyppä, S; Huttunen, P; Leppäluoto, J

    2002-04-01

    Previous data show that, in horses, plasma atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP and NT-ANP) remain elevated for a long time after exercise. To study whether exercise-induced changes in hormonal and fluid balance explain this, we measured plasma concentrations of COOH- and NH2-terminal atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP(99-129) and NT-ANP(1-98) together with arginine vasopressin (AVP), adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH), beta-endorphin, cortisol, catecholamines, and indicators of fluid balance in six Finnhorses after a graded submaximal exercise test on a treadmill. After exercise, AVP and catecholamines diminished rapidly; atrial peptides, ACTH, beta-endorphin, and cortisol remained elevated longer. ANP reached its peak value at 5 min and NT-ANP at 30 min post-exercise. At 60 min, ANP was still significantly increased and NT-ANP even above its level at the end of exercise. The different temporal patterns of ANP and NT-ANP are most probably explained by differences in their plasma half-lives. The post-exercise increase in NT-ANP indicates that the release of atrial peptides is stimulated during recovery after exercise. The rapid decrease in AVP and catecholamines suggests that these hormones do not explain the long-lasting increase in atrial peptides. Cortisol remained elevated longer and it may have contributed to some extent. After exercise, the packed cell volume (PCV) decreased more slowly than plasma total protein and electrolytes, which refers to a slow post-exercise return in blood volume. Taken together, the present results show that the long-lasting post-exercise increase in plasma atrial peptides in horses is most probably explained by elevated central blood volume and that the role of vasoactive hormones is small. PMID:12019955

  4. Comparison of treatment effects of bevantolol and metoprolol on cardiac function and natriuretic peptides in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuji; Hamada, Mareomi; Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Saeki, Hideyuki; Matsunaka, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Jun; Shigematsu, Yuji

    2002-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of bevantolol, a beta(1)-selective blocker with alpha-blockade and vasodilating activity, with that of metoprolol, a beta(1)-selective receptor blocker, for the treatment of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Forty-one patients with DCM were enrolled to receive either bevantolol or metoprolol in addition to the standard therapy for DCM. They were classified into two groups: 16 patients were treated with bevantolol and 25 were treated with metoprolol. Echocardiographic parameters and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP) were measured before treatment and after 6 months of treatment. Left ventricular dimension at end-diastole and end-systole was significantly lower and fractional shortening was significantly higher after treatment than before treatment in both groups. The plasma ANP and BNP levels were significantly decreased in both groups. Changes in all variables, except for systolic blood pressure, showed no significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, bevantolol showed parallel beneficial effects to those of metoprolol on cardiac function and natriuretic peptides in patients with DCM.

  5. Prediction of sinus rhythm maintenance following DC-cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation – the role of atrial cycle length

    PubMed Central

    Meurling, Carl J; Roijer, Anders; Waktare, Johan EP; Holmqvist, Fredrik; Lindholm, Carl J; Ingemansson, Max P; Carlson, Jonas; Stridh, Martin; Sörnmo, Leif; Olsson, S Bertil

    2006-01-01

    Background Atrial electrical remodeling has been shown to influence the outcome the outcome following cardioversion of atrial fibrillation (AF) in experimental studies. The aim of the present study was to find out whether a non-invasively measured atrial fibrillatory cycle length, alone or in combination with other non-invasive parameters, could predict sinus rhythm maintenance after cardioversion of AF. Methods Dominant atrial cycle length (DACL), a previously validated non-invasive index of atrial refractoriness, was measured from lead V1 and a unipolar oesophageal lead prior to cardioversion in 37 patients with persistent AF undergoing their first cardioversion. Results 32 patients were successfully cardioverted to sinus rhythm. The mean DACL in the 22 patients who suffered recurrence of AF within 6 weeks was 152 ± 15 ms (V1) and 147 ± 14 ms (oesophagus) compared to 155 ± 17 ms (V1) and 151 ± 18 ms (oesophagus) in those maintaining sinus rhythm (NS). Left atrial diameter was 48 ± 4 mm and 44 ± 7 mm respectively (NS). The optimal parameter predicting maintenance of sinus rhythm after 6 weeks appeared to be the ratio of the lowest dominant atrial cycle length (oesophageal lead or V1) to left atrial diameter. This ratio was significantly higher in patients remaining in sinus rhythm (3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 3.1 ± 0.4 ms/mm respectively, p = 0.04). Conclusion In this study neither an index of atrial refractory period nor left atrial diameter alone were predictors of AF recurrence within the 6 weeks of follow-up. The ratio of the two (combining electrophysiological and anatomical measurements) only slightly improve the identification of patients at high risk of recurrence of persistent AF. Consequently, other ways to asses electrical remodeling and / or other variables besides electrical remodeling are involved in determining the outcome following cardioversion. PMID:16533393

  6. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  7. Nonpharmacologic approaches to the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Baker, B M; Smith, J M; Cain, M E

    1995-10-01

    The high prevalence of atrial fibrillation, the associated morbidity and mortality, the absence of safe and effective drug therapy, and an increased understanding of the pathophysiologic basis of atrial fibrillation and flutter have collectively led to the development of novel nonpharmacologic treatments for the management of these arrhythmias, including the CORRIDOR and MAZE surgical procedures, catheter-based ablation and modification of AV conduction, catheter-based ablation of atrial flutter and fibrillation, and internal atrial defibrillation. These surgical and catheter-based techniques offer potentially curative therapy while sparing the long-term risk of antiarrhythmic drug therapy. For patients with typical atrial flutter, catheter ablation affords to cure rate in excess of 70%. As technological innovations further facilitate identification and ablation of the critical isthmus in the floor of the right atrium, success rates should improve substantially. For patients with atrial fibrillation, AV junction ablation with implantation of a rate-responsive ventricular pacemaker should be considered palliative therapy, as should modification of AV junction conduction. The MAZE procedure offers very high cure rates, but because it currently involves open heart surgery, patient selection is critical. Catheter-based procedures emulating aspects of the MAZE procedure may one day offer cure rates comparable to those of the surgery itself, but additional research and technological development are necessary to further define and refine the minimal effective procedure, and then to facilitate the placement of contiguous, full-thickness lesions in precise three-dimensional configurations. In the interim, the implantable automatic atrial defibrillator may offer a means for rapidly restoring sinus rhythm without the risks of long-term antiarrhythmic drug therapy.

  8. The Mechanism of and Preventive Therapy for Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Roh, Seung-Young

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a major cardiac cause of stroke, and a pathogenesis involving thrombus formation in patients with atrial fibrillation is well established. A strategy for rhythm control that involves catheter ablation and anticoagulation therapy is evolving. A strategy for rhythm control that restores and maintains sinus rhythm should reduce the risk of ischemic stroke that is associated with atrial fibrillation; however, this is yet to be proven in large-scale randomized controlled trials. This paper reviews the emerging role of rhythm control therapy for atrial fibrillation to prevent stroke. PMID:27283277

  9. Diuretic and natriuretic activity of two mistletoe species in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Namita; Patil, C. R.; Chaudhari, K. B.; Wagh, J. P.; Surana, S. J.; Jadhav, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    In different cultural groups, the hemiparasitic plants of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae (mistletoes) are frequently used in the treatment of hypertension and/or as diuretic agents. However, it remains unclear as to what commonality makes them diuretic agents or a remedy for hypertension. In this article, the diuretic activity of methanol extracts of Viscum articulatum (VA) Burm. f. and Helicanthus elastica (HE) (Ders.) Dans. in rats is reported. The extracts were administered orally at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg to rats that had been fasted and deprived of water for 18 hours. Investigations were carried out for diuretic, saluretic and natriuretic effects. The polyphenolic and triterpenoid contents were determined quantitatively using chemical assays and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, respectively. The extracts of VA and HE demonstrated significant and dose-dependent diuretic activity in rats. It was found that while VA mimics the furosemide pattern, HE demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in diuresis, along with an increase in potassium-sparing effects. Phytochemical analysis revealed that polyphenolics and triterpenoids, such as oleanolic acid and lupeol, are the major phytochemicals involved. It was also found that in different combinations, these phytochemicals differed in the way they influenced the electrolyte excretion. A higher content of polyphenolics in association with lower triterpenoid content was found to favor potassium-sparing effects. PMID:21808540

  10. Association of Atrial Fibrillation with Morphological and Electrophysiological Changes of the Atrial Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Matějková, Adéla; Šteiner, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. For long time it was considered as pure functional disorder, but in recent years, there were identified atrial locations, which are involved in the initiation and maintenance of this arrhythmia. These structural changes, so called remodelation, start at electric level and later they affect contractility and morphology. In this study we attempted to find a possible relation between morphological (scarring, amyloidosis, left atrial (LA) enlargement) and electrophysiological (ECG features) changes in patients with AF. We examined grossly and histologically 100 hearts of necropsy patients - 54 with a history of AF and 46 without AF. Premortem ECGs were evaluated. The patients with AF had significantly heavier heart, larger LA, more severely scarred myocardium of the LA and atrial septum, and more severe amyloidosis in both atria. Severity of amyloidosis was higher in LAs vs. right atria (RAs). Distribution of both fibrosis and amyloidosis was irregular. The most affected area was in the LA anterior wall. Patients with a history of AF and with most severe amyloidosis have more often abnormally long P waves. Finding of long P wave may contribute to diagnosis of a hitherto undisclosed atrial fibrillation. PMID:27526304

  11. [Effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aortic baroreceptor activity in rats].

    PubMed

    Ma, X Y; Zhang, W Y; Ho, S Y

    1994-10-01

    Effects of atriopeptin III (AP III) on the aortic baroreceptor activity in rats were studied in the isolated aorta arch-aortic nerve preparation in situ. By perfusing the isolated aortic arch with AP III (2.0 micrograms/ml) in rats, at constant intra-aortic pressure (IAP) of 13.3 kPa, the integral of aortic nerve activity (IANA) was increased by 64 +/- 27% (P < 0.001), the stepwise increases and decreases of IAP were correspondingly accompanied by increase and decrease in IANA, while the saturation pressure (SP) and the operating range (OR) of aortic baroreceptor activity were decreased from 22.5 +/- 0.5 to 21.3 +/- 0.5 kPa (P < 0.05) and 12.1 +/- 0.4 to 10.6 +/- 0.4 (P < 0.05), respectively, and the threshold pressure (TP) did not show any changes. The function curve of aortic baroreceptor was shifted to left and upward, and the peak integral value (PIV) and the peak slope (PS) of the curve were increased from 508 +/- 66 to 730 +/- 52% (P < 0.05), 55.6 +/- 7.5 to 93.2 +/- 6.8%.kPa-1 (P < 0.05), respectively. After washing out of AP III, the IANA returned to the control level. By perfusing the aortic arch with sodium nitroprusside (NP, 1.0 microgram/ml), at constant intra-aortic pressure (IAP) of 13.3 kPa, although the IANA was decreased as compared with the control, there was no statistical significance (P > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Chronic treatment with trimetazidine reduces the upregulation of atrial natriuretic peptide in heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trimetazidine (TMZ) is effective for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy; however, little is known about the effect of TMZ in established injury-induced heart failure. When rats with established infarct-induced heart failure were treated for 12 weeks with TMZ there was no effect on left ventric...

  13. Exploiting periodicity to extract the atrial activity in atrial arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinares, Raul; Igual, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation disorders are one of the main arrhythmias of the elderly. The atrial and ventricular activities are decoupled during an atrial fibrillation episode, and very rapid and irregular waves replace the usual atrial P-wave in a normal sinus rhythm electrocardiogram (ECG). The estimation of these wavelets is a must for clinical analysis. We propose a new approach to this problem focused on the quasiperiodicity of these wavelets. Atrial activity is characterized by a main atrial rhythm in the interval 3-12 Hz. It enables us to establish the problem as the separation of the original sources from the instantaneous linear combination of them recorded in the ECG or the extraction of only the atrial component exploiting the quasiperiodic feature of the atrial signal. This methodology implies the previous estimation of such main atrial period. We present two algorithms that separate and extract the atrial rhythm starting from a prior estimation of the main atrial frequency. The first one is an algebraic method based on the maximization of a cost function that measures the periodicity. The other one is an adaptive algorithm that exploits the decorrelation of the atrial and other signals diagonalizing the correlation matrices at multiple lags of the period of atrial activity. The algorithms are applied successfully to synthetic and real data. In simulated ECGs, the average correlation index obtained was 0.811 and 0.847, respectively. In real ECGs, the accuracy of the results was validated using spectral and temporal parameters. The average peak frequency and spectral concentration obtained were 5.550 and 5.554 Hz and 56.3 and 54.4%, respectively, and the kurtosis was 0.266 and 0.695. For validation purposes, we compared the proposed algorithms with established methods, obtaining better results for simulated and real registers.

  14. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L. Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  15. Obesity and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Abed, H S; Wittert, G A

    2013-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasing public health problem, often described as the epidemic of the new millennium. The rising health economic impact of AF, its association with poor quality of life and independent probability of increased mortality, has recently been highlighted. Although population ageing is regarded as an important contributor to this epidemic, obesity and its associated cardiometabolic comorbidities may represent the principal driving factor behind the current and projected AF epidemic. Obesity-related risk factors, such as hypertension, vascular disease, obstructive sleep apnea and pericardial fat, are thought to result in atrial electro-structural dysfunction. In addition, insulin resistance, its associated abnormalities in nutrient utilization and intermediary metabolic by-products are associated with structural and functional abnormalities, ultimately promoting AF. Recent elucidation of molecular pathways, including those responsible for atrial fibrosis, have provided mechanistic insights and the potential for targeted pharmacotherapy. In this article, we review the evidence for an obesity-related atrial electromechanical dysfunction, the mechanisms behind this and its impact on AF therapeutic outcomes. In light of the recently described mechanisms, we illustrate proposed management approaches and avenues for further investigations.

  16. B-type natriuretic peptide to predict ductus intervention in infants <28 weeks.

    PubMed

    Czernik, Christoph; Lemmer, Julia; Metze, Boris; Koehne, Petra S; Mueller, Christian; Obladen, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is frequent in neonates with gestational age of less than 28 wk. Clinical and echocardiographic signs define hemodynamic significance of PDA, but do not reveal the need for PDA intervention in the first days of life. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been proposed as a screening tool for PDA in preterm infants. To determine whether BNP can predict the need for PDA intervention, plasma BNP was measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay in 67 preterm infants <28 wk (median 26) on the second day of life in a prospective blinded study. PDA intervention was based on specified clinical and echocardiographic findings. Twenty-four patients (intervention group) received treatment for PDA and 43 patients (controls) remained without intervention. BNP concentrations were higher in the intervention (median 1069 pg/mL) than in the control group (247 pg/mL, p < 0.001). BNP correlated positively with ductal size (R = 0.46, p < 0.001) and atrial/aortic root ratio (R = 0.54, p < 0.001). In conclusion, plasma BNP proved to be a good predictor for ductus intervention (area under the curve: 0.86) with the best cutoff at 550 pg/mL on the second day of life in ventilated infants less than 28 wk gestation (sensitivity: 83%; specificity: 86%).

  17. Molecular pathology of natriuretic peptides in the myocardium with special regard to fatal intoxication, hypothermia, and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-09-01

    The present study investigated the molecular pathology of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in the myocardium to evaluate terminal cardiac function in routine forensic casework with particular regard to fatal drug intoxication (n = 18; sedative-hypnotics, n = 10; methamphetamine, n = 8), hypothermia (cold exposure, n = 13), and hyperthermia (heatstroke, n = 10), compared with that in acute ischemic heart disease (AIHD, n = 35) and congestive heart disease (CHD, n = 11) as controls (total n = 87; within 48 h postmortem). Quantitative analyses of myocardial ANP and BNP messenger RNA demonstrated that their expressions in bilateral atrial and ventricular walls were high in methamphetamine intoxication and hypothermia, comparable to those in AIHD and CHD, but were low in sedative-hypnotic intoxication and hyperthermia. In pericardial fluid, both ANP and BNP levels were increased in hypothermia, while CHD cases had an elevated BNP level, and ANP level showed a tendency to increase in hyperthermia; however, immunohistochemistry showed no evident differences in myocardial ANP and BNP among the causes of death. These findings suggest terminal high cardiac strain in methamphetamine intoxication, decreased cardiac strain in sedative-hypnotic intoxication and hyperthermia (heatstroke), and persistent congestion in hypothermia (cold exposure).

  18. Emergency management of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, A; O'Neill, J

    2003-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia managed by emergency and acute general physicians. There is increasing evidence that selected patients with acute atrial fibrillation can be safely managed in the emergency department without the need for hospital admission. Meanwhile, there is significant variation in the current emergency management of acute atrial fibrillation. This review discusses evidence based emergency management of atrial fibrillation. The principles of emergency management of acute atrial fibrillation and the subset of patients who may not need hospital admission are reviewed. Finally, the need for evidence based guidelines before emergency department based clinical pathways for the management of acute atrial fibrillation becomes routine clinical practice is highlighted. PMID:12840118

  19. A new atrial septostomy technique.

    PubMed

    Park, S C; Zuberbuhler, J R; Neches, W H; Lenox, C C; Zoltun, R A

    1975-01-01

    Balloon atrial septostomy is usually ineffective if the atrial septum is thickened. A technique for incising the atrial septum is described. A no. 6 French catheter was modified to enclose a tiny surgical blade. The distal end of the blade was pivoted to the catheter tip, and the proximal end was attached to a guide wire in the catheter lumen. Advancing the guide wire protruded the blade through a slit in the long axis of the tip of the catheter. Atrial septostomy was performed in five newborn lambs in vivo and in adult dog hearts and human hearts in vitro by advancing the catheter tip across the atrial septum with the blade retracted and withdrawing it to the right atrium with the blade extended. Eight to 12 mm lacerations of the atrial septum were produced and could be extended by subsequent balloon septostomy. The technique may be useful when balloon septostomy has been ineffective.

  20. Clinical implications of atrial isomerism.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, I S; How, S W; Wang, J K; Wu, M H; Chu, S H; Lue, H C; Hung, C R

    1988-01-01

    Right atrial isomerism or left atrial isomerism is frequently diagnosed as situs ambiguous without further discrimination of the specific morbid anatomy. Thirty six cases of right atrial isomerism and seven cases of left atrial isomerism were collected from the records and pathological museum at the National Taiwan University Hospital. There was a necropsy report for 18 cases. In all patients one or more of the following conditions was met: (a) isomeric bronchial anatomy, (b) echocardiographic and angiocardiographic evidence of isomerism, and (c) surgical or necropsy evidence of abnormal atrial anatomy. An anomalous pulmonary venous connection was present in 55% of patients with right atrial isomerism; in left atrial isomerism one case (14%) had a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Forty per cent of cases of anomalous pulmonary venous connection with right atrial isomerism had obstruction. Six (86%) of seven cases with left atrial isomerism had an ambiguous biventricular atrioventricular connection. In contrast, univentricular atrioventricular connection (26 of 36, 72%) was significantly more common in right atrial isomerism. A common atrioventricular valve was the most frequent mode of connection in both forms. Two discrete atrioventricular valves were significantly more common in left atrial isomerism. Atrioventricular valve regurgitation was detected in 14 cases. Double outlet right ventricle was the most common type of ventriculoarterial connection. The most commonly cited causes of death after either palliative or definitive operation were undetected anomalous pulmonary venous connection, pulmonary venous stricture, and uncorrected atrioventricular valve or aortic regurgitation complicated by abnormal coagulation. Although the prognosis is poor, successful operation depends on knowledge of the precise anatomical arrangement associated with atrial isomerism. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3408620

  1. Hyperuricemia and Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Maharani, Nani; Kuwabara, Masanari; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-07-27

    The importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) as a cause of mortality and morbidity has prompted research on its pathogenesis and treatment. Recognition of AF risk factors is essential to prevent it and reduce the risk of death. Hyperuricemia has been widely accepted to be associated with the incidence of paroxysmal or persistent AF, as well as to the risk of AF in post cardiovascular surgery patients. The possible explanations for this association have been based on their relation with either oxidative stress or inflammation. To investigate the link between hyperuricemia and AF, it is necessary to refer to hyperuricemia-induced atrial remodeling. So far, both ionic channel and structural remodeling caused by hyperuricemia might be plausible explanations for the occurrence of AF. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, or the use of antioxidants, along with serum uric acid (SUA) level reduction to prevent inflammation, might be useful. Uric acid transporters (UATs) play a key role in the regulation of intracellular uric acid concentration. Intracellular rather than serum uric acid level is considered more important for the pathogenesis of AF. Identification of UATs expressed in cells is thus important, and targeting UATs might become a potential strategy to reduce the risk of hyperuricemia-induced atrial fibrillation. PMID:27396561

  2. Expression and differential regulation of natriuretic peptides in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, A M; Schulz, R

    1995-01-01

    The coexpression of the natriuretic peptides ANP, BNP and CNP as well as their differential regulation in mouse macrophages was demonstrated by quantitative PCR, HPLC analysis, and specific radioimmunoassays. Exposure of peritoneal- and bone marrow-derived macrophages to various immunomodulators revealed that bacterial LPS strikingly increases (up to 300-fold) the mRNA coding for CNP as does zymosan (up to 15-fold). In this respect, neither the phorbol ester PMA nor the glucocorticoid dexamethasone had any effect. Examination of macrophages for ANP mRNA showed a similar response to LPS and zymosan, though only a three- to sixfold increase, confirming previous data. In contrast, the concentration of mRNA coding for brain natriuretic peptide in these cells was reduced by dexamethasone (up to twofold) as well as LPS (two- to fivefold). No change was observed upon challenge with zymosan or PMA. The findings at the mRNA level are complemented by their corresponding peptide products. Incubation of macrophages with LPS resulted in a two- and fivefold elevation of intracellular ANP and CNP immunoreactivity, respectively. The amount of peptides released from cells under these conditions was found increased for ANP (threefold) and CNP (10-fold). No changes were observed for both intra- and extracellular brain natriuretic peptide. The coexpression of natriuretic peptides in macrophages as well as their different regulations by immunomodulators suggest discrete functions of these peptides within the immune system. Images PMID:7769089

  3. [Diagnostic Ability of Natriuretic Peptides for Heart Failure According to eGFR Level: Comparison between Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Amino-Terminal Probrain Natriuretic Peptide].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Kimika; Ando, Yukichi; Matsunaga, Sachiko; Nishiura, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Although the influence of reduced kidney function on natriuretic peptides (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and amino terminal probrain natriuretic peptide [NT]) is clear, effect of kidney function on the difference of diagnostic ability for heart failure by these peptides is not obvious. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between natriuretic peptide concentrations and echocardiographic findings according to eGFR level of the patients. In addition, we compared diagnostic ability of BNP with that of NT according to eGFR level. The eGFR levels were classified by based on CKD stage (≥ 60, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, < 15 and on maintenance HD). Patients who underwent the measurements of BNP, NT and serum creatinine concentrations, as well as echocardiography between March and October in 2011 were enrolled (n = 1,297). The left ventricular mass index was greater in patients with eGFR < 60 than in those with eGFR ≥ 60, but EF (%) was not different among eGFR level (except eGFR30-44). The percentage of patients with heart failure in those with eGFR < 60 (16.0%) was more than eGFR ≥ 60 (5.8%). Median BNP and NT concentrations were elevated in association with decreasing eGFR level. Using receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, the area under the ROC curve for BNP and NT that stratified subjects with or without heart failure was not different among eGFR level. In conclusion, BNP and NT levels are elevated depend on decreasing eGFR level, BNP and NT are comparable in the accuracy for diagnosing heart failure at every eGFR level. The cut-off value of BNP and NT should be established according to the eGFR level. PMID:27363216

  4. TRIF promotes angiotensin II-induced cross-talk between fibroblasts and macrophages in atrial fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Guo, Meng; Zhan, Yang-Yang; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Li; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Quan-Xing; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-14

    Aims: Atrial fibroblasts and macrophages have long been thought to participate in atrial fibrillation (AF). However, which specific mediator may regulate the interaction between them remains unclear. Methods and results: We provided the evidence for the involvement of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF), an important inflammation-related molecule, in the pathophysiology of AF. Patients with AF showed higher levels of angiotensin II (AngII) and TRIF expression and larger number of macrophages infiltration in left atria appendage than individuals with sinus rhythm (SR). In the cell study, AngII induced chemokines expressions in mouse atrial fibroblasts and AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts induced the chemotaxis of macrophages, which were reduced by losartan and TRIF siRNA. Meanwhile, AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts proliferation was enhanced by macrophages. Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that TRIF may be a crucial factor promoting the interaction between atrial fibroblasts and macrophages, leading to atrial fibrosis. - Highlights: • Compared with SR, AF showed higher TRIF expression in left atrial appendage. • TRIF siRNA reversed macrophage chemotaxis induced by AngII-treated fibroblast. • TRIF siRNA reversed chemokines expressions induced by AngII in fibroblast. • AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblast proliferation was enhanced by macrophage.

  5. Sinus Node and Atrial Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    John, Roy M; Kumar, Saurabh

    2016-05-10

    Although sinus node dysfunction (SND) and atrial arrhythmias frequently coexist and interact, the putative mechanism linking the 2 remain unclear. Although SND is accompanied by atrial myocardial structural changes in the right atrium, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disease of variable interactions between left atrial triggers and substrate most commonly of left atrial origin. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic and pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the development and progression of SND and AF. Although some patients manifest SND as a result of electric remodeling induced by periods of AF, others develop progressive atrial structural remodeling that gives rise to both conditions together. The treatment strategy will thus vary according to the predominant disease phenotype. Although catheter ablation will benefit patients with predominantly AF and secondary SND, cardiac pacing may be the mainstay of therapy for patients with predominant fibrotic atrial cardiomyopathy. This contemporary review summarizes current knowledge on sinus node pathophysiology with the broader goal of yielding insights into the complex relationship between sinus node disease and atrial arrhythmias.

  6. Atrial Cardiopathy: A Broadened Concept of Left Atrial Thromboembolism Beyond Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Hooman; Okin, Peter M.; Longstreth, W. T.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has long been associated with a heightened risk of ischemic stroke and systemic thromboembolism, but recent data require a re-evaluation of our understanding of the nature of this relationship. New findings about the temporal connection between AF and stroke, alongside evidence linking markers of left atrial abnormalities with stroke in the absence of apparent AF, suggest that left atrial thromboembolism may occur even without AF. These observations undermine the hypothesis that the dysrhythmia that defines AF is necessary and sufficient to cause thromboembolism. In this commentary, we instead suggest that the substrate for thromboembolism may often be the anatomic and physiological atrial derangements associated with AF. Therefore, our understanding of cardioembolic stroke may be more complete if we shift our representation of its origin from AF to the concept of atrial cardiopathy. PMID:26021638

  7. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Rahul S.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. METHODS Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or <-1.5. RESULTS Eleven patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Six of these also developed neurocognitive decline. Of the 12 patients with sinus rhythm, only 2 developed neurocognitive decline. POAF+NCD patients had unique regulation of 17 named genes preoperatively, 60 named genes six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (P<0.05) compared with normal patients. Pathway analysis demonstrated that these genes are involved in cell death, inflammation, cardiac remodeling and nervous system function. CONCLUSION Patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline after cardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the

  8. Perioperative application of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the research was to find out the factors which influence plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, then to assess whether preoperative plasma NT-proBNP levels could predict postoperative outcomes of cardiac surgery. Methods Between November 2008 and February 2010,225 patients who underwent cardiac surgery in our department were included in the study. The mean age was 61.25 ± 12.54 years, and 156 (69.3%) patients were male. NT-proBNP, CK-MB, cTnT and creatinine levels were measured preoperatively and 24 hours after operation. Postoperatively outcomes including ventilation time, length of stay in ICU and hospital, and mortality were closely monitored. The endpoints includes: 1) use of inotropic agents or intra-aortic balloon pump ≥24 h; 2) creatinine level elevated to hemodialysis; 3) cardiac events; 4) ICU stay ≥5d; 5) ventilation dependence ≥ 72 h; 6) deaths within 30 days of surgery. Results NT-proBNP concentrations (median [interquartile range]) increased from 728.4 pg/ml (IQR 213.5 to 2551 pg/ml) preoperatively to 1940.5 pg/ml (IQR 995.9 to 3892 pg/ml) postoperatively (P = 0.015). Preoperative atrial fibrillation, NYHA class III/IV, ejection fraction, pulmonary arterial pressure, left ventricle end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), preoperative plasma creatinine and cTnT levels were significantly associated with preoperative NT-proBNP levels in univariate analysis. The preoperative NT-proBNP was closely related to ventilation time (P = 0.009), length of stay in ICU (P = 0.004) and length of stay in hospital (P = 0.019). Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated a cut-off value above 2773.5 pg/ml was the best cutoff (sensitivity of 63.6% and specificity of 80.8%) to predict the mortality within 30d of surgery. Conclusions Preoperative plasma NT-proBNP level presents a high individual variability in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. NYHA classification, ejection

  9. Left atrial appendage occlusion.

    PubMed

    Alli, Oluseun; Holmes, David

    2015-06-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion for stroke and thromboembolism prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a significant advancement in the field of cardiovascular disease. Prevention and avoidance of the devastating consequences of thromboembolic complications from AF continues to be central in the management of these patients. The role of LAA as a nidus for thrombus formation is well documented. Multiple approaches to exclude the LAA from the circulation either percutaneously or surgically have been described and are undergoing testing. Although pharmacological therapy for stroke prevention remains the cornerstone of treatment, device and surgical exclusion of the LAA have proven to be viable alternatives in carefully selected patients. Even though current evidence show that LAA occlusion is safe and effective, approval and adoption of this strategy has been quite difficult due to paucity of randomised clinical trial data on the risk and benefit ratio, cost effectiveness and the issues of procedural risk as well as longer-term outcome. This review aims to provide an update on the current status of LAA occlusion, specifically looking at interpretation of current clinical data, available techniques and devices, issues with current devices and future direction. PMID:25518846

  10. [Perioperative management of atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Arguis, M J; Navarro, R; Regueiro, A; Arbelo, E; Sierra, P; Sabaté, S; Galán, J; Ruiz, A; Matute, P; Roux, C; Gomar, C; Rovira, I; Mont, L; Fita, G

    2014-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a frequent complication in the perioperative period. When it appears there is an increased risk of perioperative morbidity due to stroke, thromboembolism, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, anticoagulation haemorrhage, and hospital readmissions. The current article focuses on the recommendations for the management of perioperative atrial fibrillation based on the latest Clinical Practice Guidelines on atrial fibrillation by the European Society of Cardiology and the Spanish Society of Cardiology. This article pays special attention to the preoperative management, as well as to the acute perioperative episode. For this reason, the latest recommendations for the control of cardiac frequency, antiarrhythmic treatment and anticoagulation are included.

  11. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease as a Predictor of Atrial Fibrillation in Middle-Aged Population (OPERA Study).

    PubMed

    Käräjämäki, Aki J; Pätsi, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Markku; Kesäniemi, Y Antero; Huikuri, Heikki; Ukkola, Olavi

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and atrial fibrillation (AF) are widespread diseases and have multiple common risk factors and comorbidities. No studies of association between ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD and AF exist in other than diabetic population. The goal of this prospective study was to study the value of NAFLD as a predictor of atrial fibrillation. This study had 958 subjects from the OPERA (Oulu Project Elucidating Risk of Atherosclerosis) cohort, and the mean follow-up time was 16.3 years. NAFLD was diagnosed if the subject had fatty liver in ultrasonography and no excess alcohol intake. AF was followed in the National Registers. In this study 249 subjects (26.0%) had NAFLD and 37 (14.9%) of these had AF whereas only 56 (7.9%) of those without NAFLD experienced AF during the follow-up time (p = 0.001). In the multiple Cox regression analysis including potential confounders (age, sex, study group, diabetes, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, alcohol consumption, smoking, serum alanine aminotransferase concentration (ALT), systolic blood pressure, quick index, left ventricular mass index, left atrial diameter, coronary artery disease (CAD), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP)), NAFLD remained as an independent predictor of AF (Adjusted OR, 1.88 (95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.03-3.45)). In conclusion, our data shows that NAFLD is independently associated with the risk of AF.

  12. Atrial myxomas and coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Isma; Parthasarthy, H; Clark, C Grahame

    2010-07-01

    Coronary angiography is not an only important component of preoperative evaluation of the patient with underlying coronary artery disease but also diagnostic tool for delineating cardiac myxomas. This also serve as an important surgical anatomical marker. We present two cases which presented with repeated episode of chest pain, were found to have atrial blushing on coronary angiography subsequent confirmation of diagnosis of atrial myxoma on echocardiography. PMID:20578102

  13. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques. PMID:27560278

  14. Rate control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Rienstra, Michiel; Crijns, Harry J G M; Olshansky, Brian

    2016-08-20

    Control of the heart rate (rate control) is central to atrial fibrillation management, even for patients who ultimately require control of the rhythm. We review heart rate control in patients with atrial fibrillation, including the rationale for the intervention, patient selection, and the treatments available. The choice of rate control depends on the symptoms and clinical characteristics of the patient, but for all patients with atrial fibrillation, rate control is part of the management. Choice of drugs is patient-dependent. β blockers, alone or in combination with digoxin, or non-dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (not in heart failure) effectively lower the heart rate. Digoxin is least effective, but a reasonable choice for physically inactive patients aged 80 years or older, in whom other treatments are ineffective or are contraindicated, and as an additional drug to other rate-controlling drugs, especially in heart failure when instituted cautiously. Atrioventricular node ablation with pacemaker insertion for rate control should be used as an approach of last resort but is also an option early in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation treated with cardiac resynchronisation therapy. However, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation should be considered before atrioventricular node ablation. Although rate control is a top priority and one of the first management issues for all patients with atrial fibrillation, many issues remain. PMID:27560277

  15. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques.

  16. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Ben; Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-08-20

    Atrial fibrillation is found in a third of all ischaemic strokes, even more after post-stroke atrial fibrillation monitoring. Data from stroke registries show that both unknown and untreated or under treated atrial fibrillation is responsible for most of these strokes, which are often fatal or debilitating. Most could be prevented if efforts were directed towards detection of atrial fibrillation before stroke occurs, through screening or case finding, and treatment of all patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk of stroke with well-controlled vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants. The default strategy should be to offer anticoagulant thromboprophylaxis to all patients with atrial fibrillation unless defined as truly low risk by simple validated risk scores, such as CHA2DS2-VASc. Assessment of bleeding risk using the HAS-BLED score should focus attention on reversible bleeding risk factors. Finally, patients need support from physicians and various other sources to start anticoagulant treatment and to ensure adherence to and persistence with treatment in the long term. PMID:27560276

  17. 77 FR 4043 - Scientific Information Request on the Use of Natriuretic Peptide Measurement in the Management of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Natriuretic Peptide Measurement in the Management of Heart Failure AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and... manufacturers of natriuretic peptide measurement assays. Scientific information is being solicited to inform our Comparative Effectiveness Review of Use of Natriuretic Peptide Measurement in the Management of Heart...

  18. Reactive γ-ketoaldehydes promote protein misfolding and preamyloid oligomer formation in rapidly-activated atrial cells.

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Tatiana N; Yermalitskaya, Liudmila V; Mace, Lisa C; Wells, K Sam; Boutaud, Olivier; Prinsen, Joseph K; Davies, Sean S; Roberts, L Jackson; Dikalov, Sergey I; Glabe, Charles G; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Barnett, Joey V; Murray, Katherine T

    2015-02-01

    Rapid activation causes remodeling of atrial myocytes resembling that which occurs in experimental and human atrial fibrillation (AF). Using this cellular model, we previously observed transcriptional upregulation of proteins implicated in protein misfolding and amyloidosis. For organ-specific amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, preamyloid oligomers (PAOs) are now recognized to be the primary cytotoxic species. In the setting of oxidative stress, highly-reactive lipid-derived mediators known as γ-ketoaldehydes (γ-KAs) have been identified that rapidly adduct proteins and cause PAO formation for amyloid β1-42 implicated in Alzheimer's. We hypothesized that rapid activation of atrial cells triggers oxidative stress with lipid peroxidation and formation of γ-KAs, which then rapidly crosslink proteins to generate PAOs. To investigate this hypothesis, rapidly-paced and control, spontaneously-beating atrial HL-1 cells were probed with a conformation-specific antibody recognizing PAOs. Rapid stimulation of atrial cells caused the generation of cytosolic PAOs along with a myocyte stress response (e.g., transcriptional upregulation of Nppa and Hspa1a), both of which were absent in control, unpaced cells. Rapid activation also caused the formation of superoxide and γ-KA adducts in atriomyocytes, while direct exposure of cells to γ-KAs resulted in PAO production. Increased cytosolic atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and the generation of ANP oligomers with exposure to γ-KAs and rapid atrial HL-1 cell stimulation, strongly suggest a role for ANP in PAO formation. Salicylamine (SA) is a small molecule scavenger of γ-KAs that can protect proteins from modification by these reactive compounds. PAO formation and transcriptional remodeling were inhibited when cells were stimulated in the presence of SA, but not with the antioxidant curcumin, which is incapable of scavenging γ-KAs. These results demonstrate that γ-KAs promote protein misfolding and PAO formation as a

  19. New elements in the C-type natriuretic peptide signaling pathway inhibiting swine in vitro oocyte meiotic resumption.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Papillon-Dion, Emilie; Djender, Nadjib; Guillemette, Christine; Richard, François J

    2014-07-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its cognate receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) B, have been shown to promote cGMP production in granulosa/cumulus cells. Once transferred to the oocyte through the gap junctions, the cGMP inhibits oocyte meiotic resumption. CNP has been shown to bind another natriuretic receptor, NPR-C. NPR-C is known to interact with and degrade bound CNP, and has been reported to possess signaling functions. Therefore, NPR-C could participate in the control of oocyte maturation during swine in vitro maturation (IVM). Here, we examine the effect of CNP signaling on meiotic resumption, the amount of cGMP and gap junctional communication (GJC) regulation during swine IVM. The results show an inhibitory effect of CNP in inhibiting oocyte meiotic resumption in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated IVM. We also found that an NPR-C-specific agonist (cANP([4-23])) is likely to play a role in maintaining meiotic arrest during porcine IVM when in the presence of a suboptimal dose of CNP. Moreover, we show that, even if CNP can increase intracellular concentration of cGMP in cumulus-oocyte complexes, cANP((4-23)) had no impact on cGMP concentration, suggesting a potential cGMP-independent signaling pathway related to NPR-C activation. These data support a potential involvement of cANP((4-23)) through NPR-C in inhibiting oocyte meiotic resumption while in the presence of a suboptimal dose of CNP. The regulation of GJC was not altered by CNP, cANP((4-23)), or the combination of CNP and cANP((4-23)), supporting their potential contribution in sending signals to the oocytes. These findings offer promising insights in to new elements of the signaling pathways that may be involved in inhibiting resumption of meiosis during FSH-stimulated swine IVM.

  20. Catecholamines and estrogen are involved in the pathogenesis of emotional stress-induced acute heart attack.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Takashi; Kasamatsu, Ken; Hano, Takuzo; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Ishikura, Fuminobu

    2008-12-01

    Emotional stress triggers takotsubo cardiomyopathy in postmenopausal women. Clinical analysis of autonomic nervous function has revealed a transient increase of sympathetic nervous activity and decrease of vagal nervous activity. Immobilization (IMO) stress of rats can reproduce the electrocardiographic and left ventriculographic changes that occur in takotsubo cardiomyopathy, both of which are prevented by combined blockade of alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors. Estrogen supplementation partially attenuated these cardiac changes. It also attenuated the IMO-induced increase of c-Fos immunoreactivity, or c-fos mRNA expression in the lateral septum, medial amygdaloid nucleus, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, and locus ceruleus; these regions contain central sympathetic neurons and neurons with immunoreactive estrogen receptors. It also downregulated c-fos mRNA expression in the adrenal gland and the heart, suggesting an increase of estrogen attenuated the stress-induced hypothalamo-sympathoadrenal outflow from the central nervous system to the target organs. Estrogen treatment also upregulated the levels of cardioprotective substances, such as atrial natriuretic peptide and heat shock protein 70, in the heart. These data suggest that reduction of estrogen levels following menopause might be involved in the primary cause of takotsubo cardiomyopathy both by indirect action on the nervous system and by direct action on the heart.

  1. Correlation of B-type natriuretic peptide levels and echocardiographic parameters in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Ah; Shin, Jeonghee; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Eun Hee; Son, Chang Sung; Lee, Joo Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the correlation, according to postnatal age, between plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and echocardiographic parameters for the assessment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants with respiratory distress. Methods We enrolled 42 preterm infants with respiratory distress who underwent serial echocardiographic evaluation with simultaneous plasma BNP measurements until ductal closure. The correlations between BNP levels and the following 4 representative echocardiographic parameters were studied: diameter of the ductus arteriosus (DA), ratio of the left atrial diameter to the aortic diameter (LA/Ao), ratio of the PDA diameter to the infant's left pulmonary artery diameter (PDA/LPA), and the antegrade diastolic flow of LPA (DFLPA). Results BNP levels were significantly correlated to the magnitude of the ductal shunt, comprising the DA diameter, PDA/LPA ratio, LA/Ao ratio, and antegrade DFLPA for the overall study period. The earliest significant correlation, starting from postnatal day 2, was observed between the LA/Ao ratio and BNP levels. The PDA/LPA ratio and the antegrade DFLPA showed significant correlations with BNP levels postnatal day 3 onward, and with the DA diameter, postnatal day 5 onward. Conclusion BNP levels and echocardiographic parameters showed a positive correlation, but the significance of the correlations differed according to the postnatal age, especially during the first few days of life. PMID:27186229

  2. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibrillation also increases the risk of stroke and sudden death. Complications of familial atrial fibrillation can occur at ... beats , increasing the risk of syncope, stroke, and sudden death. Most cases of atrial fibrillation are not caused ...

  3. Left atrial myxoma masquerading as viral flu

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Kiernan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is a rare cardiac tumor that may be diagnosed incidentally on cardiac imaging or may present with life-threatening cardiac symptoms. We present a case of giant left atrial myxoma that presented as a flulike illness.

  4. Repeated radiofrequency ablation of atrial tachycardia in restrictive cardiomyopathy secondary to myofibrillar myopathy.

    PubMed

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Gatterer, Edmund; Finsterer, Josef; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Tilz, Roland Richard

    2014-08-01

    Myofibrillar myopathy is characterized by nonhyaline and hyaline lesions due to mutations in nuclear genes encoding for extra-myofibrillar or myofibrillar proteins. Cardiac involvement in myofibrillar myopathy may be phenotypically expressed as dilated, hypertrophic, or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation and flutter has so far not been reported in myofibrillar myopathy. We report the case of a young female with myofibrillar myopathy and deteriorating heart failure due to restrictive cardiomyopathy and recurrent atrial fibrillation and atrial tachycardias intolerant to pharmacotherapy. Cardiac arrhythmias were successfully treated with repeat radiofrequency ablations and resulted in regression of heart failure, thus postponing the necessity for cardiac transplantation.

  5. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Christoffersen, Christina; Goetze, Jens P

    2015-12-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs - NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism were quantified at 4-h intervals: in the diurnal study, mice were exposed to a period of 12 h light followed by 12 h darkness (n=52). In the circadian study, mice were kept in darkness for 24 h (n=47). Concomitant serum concentrations of free fatty acids, glycerol, triglycerides (TGs), and insulin were measured. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents showed reciprocal circadian profiles (P<0.0001). NPR-A mRNA contents followed a temporal pattern (P=0.01), peaking in the dark (active) period. In contrast, NPR-C mRNA was expressed in an antiphase manner with nadir in the active period (P=0.007). TG concentrations in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner.

  6. Cloning of an unusual natriuretic peptide from the South American coral snake Micrurus corallinus.

    PubMed

    Ho, P L; Soares, M B; Maack, T; Gimenez, I; Puorto, G; Furtado, M F; Raw, I

    1997-11-15

    In the course of cloning abundant cDNAs from the South American coral snake Micrurus corallinus venom gland, we characterized a cDNA coding for a putative natriuretic peptide. All the natural natriuretic peptides described so far, possess a ring structure composed of 17 amino acids formed through an S-S bridge which is extended at the N-terminus by few to several amino acids and may be extended at the C-terminus, usually 4-7 amino acids. In contrast, the M. corallinus natriuretic peptide presents several distinct features: (a) the proform of the deduced natriuretic peptide displays an unusual C-terminus extension. This implies that the mature peptide has a long C-terminal tail or it is further extensively processed to result in the mature natriuretic peptide with the expected 4-7 amino-acid extension. (b) the deduced natriuretic peptide presents an unusual internal Cys within the ring structure. This raises the possibility of natriuretic peptides with a smaller ring structure. (c) the putative natriuretic peptide is flanked by two homologous peptides of unknown function. In addition, an analogous peptide was synthesized and assayed on perfused rat kidney, showing a dose-dependent response in urinary volume and sodium excretion. Moreover, northern-blot studies showed that M. corallinus natriuretic peptide transcripts were highly expressed in venom glands, but they were not detectable in other tissues like heart and brain, suggesting a main role for this M. corallinus natriuretic peptide in the venom gland or in the envenomation by this coral snake's bite.

  7. Evaluation of left atrial mechanical function and atrial conduction abnormalities in Maras powder (smokeless tobacco) users and smokers

    PubMed Central

    Akcay, Ahmet; Naci Aydin, M; Acar, Gurkan; Akgungor, Mehmet; Cabioglu, Eren; Ardic, İdris; Mese, Bulent; Bozoglan, Orhan; Çetin, Mustafa; Çakıcı, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective In Turkey, a type of smokeless tobacco called Maras powder (MP) is widely used in the south-eastern region. Smokeless tobacco is found in preparations for chewing and for absorption by the nasal and oral mucosae. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether MP damages intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay and left atrial (LA) mechanical function as much as cigarette smoking. Method A total of 150 chronic MP users (50 males, 32.5 ± 5.4 years), smokers (50 males, 32.1 ± 6.0 years) and controls (50 males, 30.1 ± 5.8 years) were included in the study. LA volumes were measured echocardiographically according to the biplane area–length method. Atrial electromechanical coupling was measured with tissue Doppler imaging and LA mechanical function parameters were calculated. Results The LA passive emptying fraction was significantly decreased and LA active emptying volume (LAAEV) was significantly increased in the MP group (p = 0.012 and p = 0.024, respectively), and the LA active emptying fraction (LAAEF) was significantly increased in the smokers (p = 0.003). There was a positive correlation between the amount of MP used and smoking (pack years) with LAAEV and LAAEF (r = 0.26, p = 0.009 and r = 0.25, p = 0.013, respectively). Lateral atrial electromechanical intervals (PA) were significantly higher in MP users, and the septal mitral PA was statistically higher in the smokers (p = 0.05 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion We suggest that atrial electromechanical coupling intervals were prolonged and LA mechanical function was impaired in MP users and smokers, but there was no significant difference between the MP users and smokers. These findings may be markers of subclinical cardiac involvement and tendency for atrial fibrillation. PMID:26592906

  8. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  9. Diabetes-induced loss of gastric ICC accompanied by up-regulation of natriuretic peptide signaling pathways in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Huang, Xu; Liu, Dong-Hai; Meng, Xiang-Min; Guo, Xin; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2013-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that natriuretic peptides (NPs) play an inhibitory role in regulation of gastric smooth muscle motility. However, it is not clear whether NPs are involved in diabetics-induced loss of gastric interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC). The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between diabetics-induced loss of gastric ICC and natriuretic peptide signaling pathway in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results showed that the protein expression levels of c-Kit and membrane-bound stem cell factor (mSCF) in gastric smooth muscle layers were decreased in STZ-induced diabetic mice. However, both mRNA and protein expression levels of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A, B and C were increased in the same place of the diabetic mice. The amplitude of spontaneous contraction in gastric antral smooth muscles was inhibited by C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) dose-dependently and the inhibitory effect was potentiated in diabetic mice. Pretreatment of the cultured gastric smooth muscle cells (GSMCs) with different concentration of CNP can significantly decrease the mSCF expression level. 8-Bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclomo-nophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), a membrane permeable cGMP analog, mimicked the effect of CNP but not cANF (a specific NPR-C agonist). Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that high concentration of cANF (10(-6) mol/L) inhibited cell proliferation in cultured GSMCs. These findings suggest that up-regulation of NPs/NPR-A, B/cGMP and NPs/NPR-C signaling pathways may be involved in diabetes-induced loss of gastric ICC.

  10. [Panic disorder and atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Olazabal Eizaguirre, N; Chavez, R; González-Torres, M A; Gaviria, M

    2013-10-01

    This paper studies the relationship between atrial fibrillation and panic disorder. There are often doubts on the differential diagnosis in emergency services and general medical settings. Panic disorder prevalence rates have been found to be high in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. Various studies have observed that patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders frequently have higher cardiovascular disease rates compared to the general population. Usually, patients suffering from panic disorder exhibit somatic complaints suggesting coronary disease, such as chest pain or palpitations. The aim is to make the correct diagnosis and treatment for these different illnesses, and to decrease the costs due to misdiagnosis.

  11. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  12. [Atrial fibrillation and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Apor, Péter

    2013-03-31

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia. Its "lone" form (when underlying pathology is not discovered) can be detected in a small percentage of endurance sports participants, and in growing numbers among veterans, probably as a result of some cardiac or other irregularities. Enhanced vagal tone and sudden sympathetic impulse, repetitive oxidative stress, inflammatory processes, enlarged atria, electric instabilization can explain the higher occurrence. Treatment of atrial fibrillation enables the affected persons to participate in regular medium-intensity exercise, 3-5 hours a week, which offers a protective role against cardiovascular, metabolic and mental illnesses. PMID:23524234

  13. Genetics of Atrial Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Cascos, Andrés Sánchez

    1972-01-01

    Of 109 cases of atrial septal defect, cases with an isolated defect (92 cases) showed a female preponderance (sex ratio 0·64), but there was a higher risk to the sibs of the male patients, suggesting a multifactorial mechanism. Dermatoglyphs showed a large number of whorls on the fingers. In 17 cases there were multiple malformations, such as Holt-Oram syndrome (hypoplastic and triphalangic thumb, with ostium secundum atrial septal defect), polydactyly plus ostium primum defect, and tracheo-oesophageal fistula. ImagesFIG. 1.FIG. 2.FIG. 3. PMID:4261647

  14. Laser Atrial Septostomy: An Engineering Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shachar, Giora; Cohen, Mark H.; Riemenschneider, Thomas A.; Beder, Stanley D.

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reproducible method for atrial septostomy in live animals, which would be independent of both atrial septal thickness and left atrial size. Seven mongrel dogs monitored electrocardiographically were anesthetized and instrumented with systemic and pulmonary arterial lines. A modified Mullin's transseptal sheath was advanced under fluoroscopic control to interrogate the left atrium and atrial septum. A 400 micron regular quartz or a laser heated metallic tip fiber was passed through the sheath up to the atrial septum. Lasing of the atrial septum was done with an Argon laser at power output of 5 watts. In three dogs, an atrial septosomy catheter was passed to the left atrium through the laser atrial septostomy and balloon atrial septostomy was performed. The laser atrial septostomy measured 3 x 5 mm in diameter. This interatrial communication could be enlarged with a balloon septostomy to over one cm in diameter. Hemodynamic and electrocardiographic monitoring were stable during the procedure. Engineering problems included: 1) radioluscency of the laser fibers thus preventing fluoroscopic localization of the fiber course; and 2) the inability to increase lateral vaporization of the atrial septum. It is concluded that further changes in the lasing fibers need to be made before the method can be considered for clinical use.

  15. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Amie J; Khambata, Rayomand S; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J; Baliga, Reshma S; Lumsden, Natalie G; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J; Simone, Michela I; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J; MacAllister, Raymond J; Selwood, David L; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders.

  16. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Amie J.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Lumsden, Natalie G.; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J.; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J.; Simone, Michela I.; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F.; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J.; MacAllister, Raymond J.; Selwood, David L.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor–C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25105365

  17. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Modulate the Transcriptional Regulation of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription. PMID:24451378

  18. NPR-B natriuretic peptide receptors in human corneal epithelium: mRNA, immunohistochemistochemical, protein, and biochemical pharmacology studies

    PubMed Central

    Katoli, Parvaneh; Sule, Anupam; Dimitrijevich, Slobodan D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the presence of natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) in primary human corneal epithelial cells (p-CEPI), SV40-immortalized CEPI cells (CEPI-17-CL4) and in human corneal epithelium, and to define the pharmacology of natriuretic peptide (NP)-induced cGMP accumulation. Methods NPR presence was shown by RT–PCR, western blot analysis, and indirect immunofluoresence. cGMP accumulation was determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Results p-CEPI and CEPI-17-CL4 cells expressed mRNAs for NPR-A and NPR-B. Proteins for both NPRs were present in these cells and in human corneal epithelium. C-type NP (CNP), atrial NP (ANP) and brain NP (BNP) stimulated the accumulation of cGMP in a concentration-dependent manner in p-CEPI cells (potency; EC50s): CNP (1–53 amino acids) EC50=24±5 nM; CNP fragment (32–53 amino acids) EC50=51±8 nM; ANP (1–28 amino acids) EC50=>10 µM; BNP (32 amino acids) EC50>10 µM (all n=3–4). While the NPs were generally more potent in the CEPI-17-CL4 cells than in p-CEPI cells (n=4–9; p<0.01), the rank order of potency of the peptides was essentially the same in both cell types. Effects of CNP fragment in p-CEPI and CEPI-17-CL4 cells were potently blocked by HS-142–1, an NPR-B receptor subtype-selective antagonist (Ki=0.25±0.05 µM in CEPI-CL4–17; Ki=0.44±0.09 µM in p-CEPIs; n=6–7) but less so by an NPR-A receptor antagonist, isatin (Ki=5.3–7.8 µM, n=3–7). Conclusions Our studies showed the presence of NPR-A and NPR-B (mRNAs and protein) in p-CEPI and CEPI-17-CL4 cells and in human corneal epithelial tissue. However, detailed pharmacological studies revealed NPR-B to be the predominant functionally active receptor in both cell-types whose activation leads to the generation of cGMP. While the physiologic role(s) of the NP system in corneal function remains to be delineated, our multidisciplinary findings pave the way for such future investigations. PMID:20664698

  19. Evaluation of cardiac functions of cirrhotic children using serum brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fattouh, Aya M; El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Mahmoud, Enas H; Ahmed, Wafaa O

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is described as the presence of cardiac dysfunction in cirrhotic patients. In children with chronic liver disease, CCM has been very rarely investigated. The Aim of the Study: Is to evaluate the cardiac function of cirrhotic children to identify those with CCM. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two cirrhotic patients and 53 age and sex matched controls were assessed using serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), conventional echocardiography, and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Patients’ mean ages were 7.66 ± 4.16 years (vs. 6.88 ± 3.04 years for the controls). The study included 27 males and 25 females (28 and 25 respectively for the controls). Patients had larger left atrium and right ventricle (RV) (P value 0.05) and increased LV posterior wall thickness than controls (P value 0.04). They had higher late atrial diastolic filling velocity (A) of tricuspid valve (TV) inflow (0.59 ± 0.17 vs. 0.5 ± 0.1 m/s, P < 0.001) and lower ratios between the early diastolic filling velocity (E) and A wave velocity (E/A) of both mitral valve and TV inflow (1.7 ± 0.35 vs. 1.87 ± 0.34 and 1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.5 ± 0.3, P < 0.005 and 0.0008, respectively). Patients had significantly longer isovolumic relaxation time of LV (45.5 ± 11.1 vs. 40.5 ± 7.7 ms P 0.008), higher late diastolic peak myocardial velocity (A’) (11.8 ± 3.6 vs. 9.5 ± 2.7 ms, P 0.0003) and systolic velocity (S’) of the RV (14.5 ± 2.7 vs. 13.2 ± 2.9, P 0.01) and significantly higher myocardial performance index of both LV and RV (P 0.001 and 0.01). BNP levels were significantly higher in cases than controls (5.25 ng/l vs. 3.75 ng/l, P < 0.04) and was correlated with the E wave velocity of the TV (r 0.004) and the E/E’ ratio of the RV (r 0.001). None of the clinical or laboratory data were correlated with the BNP level. Conclusion Cirrhotic children have cardiac dysfunction mainly in the form of diastolic dysfunction. There is a need that CCM be more accurately

  20. Lebetin 2, a Snake Venom-Derived Natriuretic Peptide, Attenuates Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury through the Modulation of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore at the Time of Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tourki, Bochra; Matéo, Philippe; Morand, Jessica; Elayeb, Mohamed; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Marrakchi, Naziha; Belaidi, Elise; Messadi, Erij

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is now well established that natriuretic peptides can attenuate the development of irreversible ischemic injury during myocardial infarction. Lebetin 2 (L2) is a new discovered peptide isolated from Macrovipera lebetina venom with structural similarity to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Our objectives were to define the acute cardioprotective actions of L2 in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts after regional or global ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We studied infarct size, left ventricular contractile recovery, survival protein kinases and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in injured myocardium. L2 dosage was determined by preliminary experiments at its ability to induce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) release without changing hemodynamic effects in normoxic hearts. L2 was found to be as effective as BNP in reducing infarct size after the induction of either regional or global IR. Both peptides equally improved contractile recovery after regional IR, but only L2 increased coronary flow and reduced severe contractile dysfunction after global ischemia. Cardioprotection afforded by L2 was abolished after isatin or 5-hydroxydecanote pretreatment suggesting the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptors and mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channels in the L2-induced effects. L2 also increased survival protein expression in the reperfused myocardium as evidenced by phosphorylation of signaling pathways PKCε/ERK/GSK3β and PI3K/Akt/eNOS. IR induced mitochondrial pore opening, but this effect was markedly prevented by L2 treatment. These data show that L2 has strong cardioprotective effect in acute ischemia through stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptors. These beneficial effects are mediated, at least in part, by mitoKATP channel opening and downstream activated survival kinases, thus delaying mPTP opening and improving IR-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID

  1. Lebetin 2, a Snake Venom-Derived Natriuretic Peptide, Attenuates Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury through the Modulation of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore at the Time of Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Tourki, Bochra; Matéo, Philippe; Morand, Jessica; Elayeb, Mohamed; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Marrakchi, Naziha; Belaidi, Elise; Messadi, Erij

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is now well established that natriuretic peptides can attenuate the development of irreversible ischemic injury during myocardial infarction. Lebetin 2 (L2) is a new discovered peptide isolated from Macrovipera lebetina venom with structural similarity to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Our objectives were to define the acute cardioprotective actions of L2 in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts after regional or global ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We studied infarct size, left ventricular contractile recovery, survival protein kinases and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in injured myocardium. L2 dosage was determined by preliminary experiments at its ability to induce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) release without changing hemodynamic effects in normoxic hearts. L2 was found to be as effective as BNP in reducing infarct size after the induction of either regional or global IR. Both peptides equally improved contractile recovery after regional IR, but only L2 increased coronary flow and reduced severe contractile dysfunction after global ischemia. Cardioprotection afforded by L2 was abolished after isatin or 5-hydroxydecanote pretreatment suggesting the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptors and mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channels in the L2-induced effects. L2 also increased survival protein expression in the reperfused myocardium as evidenced by phosphorylation of signaling pathways PKCε/ERK/GSK3β and PI3K/Akt/eNOS. IR induced mitochondrial pore opening, but this effect was markedly prevented by L2 treatment. These data show that L2 has strong cardioprotective effect in acute ischemia through stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptors. These beneficial effects are mediated, at least in part, by mitoKATP channel opening and downstream activated survival kinases, thus delaying mPTP opening and improving IR-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID

  2. Chemical-induced atrial thrombosis in NTP rodent studies.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kissling, Grace E; Johnson, Jo Anne; Clayton, Natasha P; Flagler, Norris D; Nyska, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac thrombosis, one of the causes of sudden death throughout the world, plays a principal role in several cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. Data from studies of induction of chemical thrombosis in rodents help to identify substances in our environment that may contribute to cardiac thrombosis. Results for more than 500 chemicals tested in rodents in 2-year bioassays have been published as Technical Reports of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov/index. We evaluated atrial thrombosis induced by these chemical exposures and compared it to similarly induced lesions reported in the literature. Spontaneous rates of cardiac thrombosis were determined for control Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice: 0% in rats and mice in 90-day studies and, in 2-year studies, 0.7% in both genders of mice, 4% in male rats, and 1% in female rats. Incidences of atrial thrombosis were increased in high-dosed groups involving 13 compounds (incidence rate: 20-100%): 2-butoxyethanol, C.I. Direct Blue 15, bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane, diazoaminobenzene, diethanolamine, 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine dihydrochloride, hexachloroethane, isobutene, methyleugenol, oxazepam, C.I. Pigment Red 23, C.I. Acid Red 114, and 4,4'-thiobis(6-t-butyl-m-cresol). The main localization of spontaneously occurring and chemically induced thromboses occurred in the left atrium. The literature survey suggested that chemical-induced atrial thrombosis might be closely related to myocardial injury, endothelial injury, circulatory stasis, hypercoagulability, and impaired atrial mechanical activity, such as atrial fibrillation, which could cause stasis of blood within the left atrial appendage, contributing to left atrial thrombosis. Supplementary data referenced in this paper are not printed in this issue of Toxicologic Pathology. They are available as downloadable files at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0192-6233. To

  3. Role of FQQI motif in the internalization, trafficking, and signaling of guanylyl-cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A in cultured murine mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Pandey, Kailash N

    2016-01-01

    Binding of the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to transmembrane guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP in target cells. To delineate the critical role of an endocytic signal in intracellular sorting of the receptor, we have identified a FQQI (Phe(790), Gln(791), Gln(792), and Ile(793)) motif in the carboxyl-terminal region of NPRA. Mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were transiently transfected with the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-tagged wild-type (WT) and mutant constructs of eGFP-NPRA. The mutation FQQI/AAAA, in the eGFP-NPRA cDNA sequence, markedly attenuated the internalization of mutant receptors by almost 49% compared with the WT receptor. Interestingly, we show that the μ1B subunit of adaptor protein-1 binds directly to a phenylalanine-based FQQI motif in the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor. However, subcellular trafficking indicated that immunofluorescence colocalization of the mutated receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and Rab 11 marker was decreased by 57% in early endosomes, 48% in lysosomes, and 42% in recycling endosomes, respectively, compared with the WT receptor in MMCs. The receptor containing the mutated motif (FQQI/AAAA) also produced a significantly decreased level of intracellular cGMP during subcellular trafficking than the WT receptor. The coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed a decreased level of colocalization of the mutant receptor with subcellular compartments during endocytic processes. The results suggest that the FQQI motif is essential for the internalization and subcellular trafficking of NPRA during the hormone signaling process in intact MMCs.

  4. Consensus document and recommendations on the use of natriuretic peptides in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Figal, D A; Casademont, J; Lobos, J M; Piñera, P; Bayés-Genis, A; Ordóñez-Llanos, J; González-Juanatey, J R

    2016-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are a useful laboratory tool for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients with heart failure. Natriuretic peptides are used in various healthcare settings (consultations, emergency department, hospitalization, laboratory) and by various primary care and specialised professionals. However, their use in clinical practice is still scare and uneven. Properly using and interpreting natriuretic peptides in clinical practice requires a minimum of prelaboratory (pathophysiology), laboratory (methods) and postlaboratory (interpretation and integration of clinical data) expertise. The objective of this consensus document, developed by several scientific societies, is to update the necessary concepts and expertise on natriuretic peptides that enable its application in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of heart failure, in various healthcare environments.

  5. Natriuretic Peptides in Kawasaki Disease: the Myocardial Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dahdah, Nagib; Fournier, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Making a diagnosis of Kawasaki disease with certainty may be challenging, especially since the recognition of cases with incomplete diagnostic criteria and its consequences. In order to build the diagnostic case in daily practice, clinicians rely on clinical criteria established over four decades ago, aided by non specific laboratory tests, and above all inspired by experience. We have recently studied the diagnostic value of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide to improve the diagnostic certainty of cases with complete or incomplete clinical criteria. Our working hypothesis was based on the fact that myocarditis is present in nearly all Kawasaki disease patients supported by histology data. In this paper, we review these facts and the myocardial perspective from the diagnostic and the mechanistic standpoints. PMID:26835665

  6. Natriuretic peptides: diagnostic tools and predictors of heart failure outcome.

    PubMed

    Isakson, Susan R; Gardetto, Nancy J; Maisel, Alan S

    2006-11-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a progressive disease whose outcome largely depends on early, accurate and prompt diagnosis, accompanied by evidence-based treatment. The explosion of uptake of natriuretic peptides (NPs) in clinical practice belies an understanding of how peptides are used. The signal for NP release is the same signal that causes symptoms of CHF, such as increased wall stress. Thus, NPs can reliably add to the information a physician brings to the table as they attempt to diagnose the acutely dyspneic patient with CHF. Additionally, NPs have strong prognostic utility in the emergency room and the hospital. Monitoring of NPs during treatment for acute CHF may help manage the patient. In the future, it is possible that NPs will play a more prominent role in early detection of left ventricular dysfunction as well as guiding chronic CHF treatment. PMID:19804259

  7. Can Natriuretic Peptides be Used to Guide Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lupón, Josep; Jaffe, Allan S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the hypothesis that intensified treatment directed at reducing natriuretic peptide (NP) concentrations may improve the outcomes of patients with heart failure (HF) has been scrutinized in several prospective clinical trials, with conflicting results. Collectively, however, the data suggest that NP concentrations may be useful in guiding HF management and improving HF-related morbidity and mortality. In this review, we summarize the existing data investigating the use of NPs as targets for outpatient HF therapy. We focus on the information gathered in randomized clinical trials and comprehensive meta-analyses, and also on the recommendations of international guidelines (primarily guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association). Although the results for this approach are promising overall, additional well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials (e.g., the GUIDE-IT trial) are necessary to confirm or refute the utility of NP-guided outpatient HF management.

  8. Neprilysin and Natriuretic Peptide Regulation in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Morant-Talamante, Nuria; Lupón, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Neprilysin is acknowledged as a key player in neurohormonal regulation, a cornerstone of modern drug therapy in chronic heart failure. In the cardiovascular system, neprilysin cleaves numerous vasoactive peptides, some with mainly vasodilating effects (natriuretic peptides, adrenomedullin, bradykinin) and other with mainly vasoconstrictor effects (angiotensin I and II, endothelin-1). For decades, neprilysin has been an important biotarget. Academia and industry have combined active efforts to search for neprilysin inhibitors (NEPIs) that might be useful in clinical practice. NEPI monotherapy was initially tested with little success due to efficacy issues. Next, combination of NEPI and ACE-inhibiting activity agents were abandoned due to safety concerns. Recently, the combination of NEPI and ARB, also known as ARNI, has shown better than expected results in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, and multitude of ongoing studies are set to prove its value across the heart failure spectrum. PMID:27260315

  9. Identification of Putative Natriuretic Hormones Isolated from Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Herbert J

    2015-01-01

    This brief review describes some representative methodological approaches to the isolation of putative endogenous inhibitors of epithelial sodium transport - i.e., as ouabain-like factors (OLF) that inhibit the sodium transport enzyme Na-K-ATPase or inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Gel chromatography and reverse-phase (RP)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of lyophilized and reconstituted 24 h-urine from salt-loaded healthy humans led to two active fractions, a hydrophilic OLF-1 and a lipophilic OLF-2, whose mass (Ms)-spectroscopic data indicate a Mr of 391 (1, 2). Further identification was attempted by Ms-, infrared (IR)-, ultraviolet (UV)-, and (1)H-NMR-spectroscopy. OLF-1 and OLF-2 may be closely related if not identical to (di)ascorbic acid or its salts such as vanadium (V)-V(v)-diascorbate with Mr 403 (3) and V(IV)-diascorbate. OLF-1 and V(v)-diascorbate are about 10-fold stronger inhibitors of Na-K-ATPase than OLF-2 and V(IV)-diascorbate, respectively. In conscious rats, i.v. infusion of OLF-1 and OLF-2 resulted in a strong natriuresis. In a similar study, Cain et al. (4) isolated a sodium transport inhibitor from the urine of uremic patients by gel chromatography and RP-HPLC. In uremic rats, a natriuretic response to the injection of the active material was found. Xanthurenic acid 8-O-β-d-glucoside (Mr 368) and xanthurenic acid 8-O-sulfate (Mr 284) were identified as endogenous inhibitors of sodium transport acting, e.g., by ENaC blockade. No definite relation to blood pressure, body fluid volume, or sodium balance has been reported for any of these above factors, and further studies to identify the natriuretic and/or ouabain-like compound(s) or hormone(s) will be needed. PMID:26052310

  10. Brain natriuretic peptide: Much more than a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Calzetta, Luigino; Orlandi, Augusto; Page, Clive; Rogliani, Paola; Rinaldi, Barbara; Rosano, Giuseppe; Cazzola, Mario; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2016-10-15

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) modulates several biological processes by activating the natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A). Atria and ventricles secrete BNP. BNP increases natriuresis, diuresis and vasodilatation, thus resulting in a decreased cardiac workload. BNP and NT-proBNP, which is the biologically inactive N-terminal portion of its pro-hormone, are fast and sensitive biomarkers for diagnosing heart failure. The plasma concentrations of both BNP and NT-proBNP also correlate with left ventricular function in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD, even without history of heart failure. Several studies have been conducted in vitro and in vivo, both in animals and in humans, in order to assess the potential role of the NPR-A activation as a novel therapeutic approach for treating obstructive pulmonary disorders. Unfortunately, these studies have yielded conflicting results. Nevertheless, further recent specific studies, performed in ex vivo models of asthma and COPD, have confirmed the bronchorelaxant effect of BNP and its protective role against bronchial hyperresponsiveness in human airways. These studies have also clarified the intimate mechanism of action of BNP, represented by an autocrine loop elicited by the activation of NPR-A, localized on bronchial epithelium, and the relaxant response of the surrounding ASM, which does not expresses NPR-A. This review explores the teleological activities and paradoxical effects of BNP with regard to chronic obstructive respiratory disorders, and provides an excursus on the main scientific findings that explain why BNP should be considered much more than a biomarker. PMID:27447810

  11. [Prophylaxis of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation: new oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure].

    PubMed

    Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Bode, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Thrombo-embolic prophylaxis is a key element within the therapy of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter. Besides new oral anticoagulants the concept of left atrial appendage occlusion has approved to be a good alternative option, especially in patients with increased risk of bleeding. PMID:26261929

  12. Is there a relationship between atrial septal aneurysm and atrial tachycardia?

    PubMed

    Muser, Daniele; De Biasio, Marzia; Rebellato, Luca; Proclemer, Alessandro

    2011-09-01

    We describe the case of a 37-year-old woman with atrial tachycardia associated to atrial septal aneurysm. We consider a localized reentry mechanism as the pathogenetic mechanism of the arrhythmia as demostrated by means of electrophisiological evaluation and electroanatomical mapping. The treatment by radiofrequency appears as an effective and well tolerated treatment of this unusual left atrial tachycardia.

  13. Successful cryoablation of an incessant atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage

    PubMed Central

    Roshan, John; Gizurarson, Sigfus; Das, Moloy; Chauhan, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    The right atrial appendage can be the origin of focal atrial tachycardias. Their ablation can be challenging owing to the complexity of the appendage anatomy. To our knowledge, we describe the first successful solid tip cryoablation of a focal tachycardia within the right atrial appendage in a patient presenting with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26937112

  14. Evaluating the Atrial Myopathy Underlying Atrial Fibrillation: Identifying the Arrhythmogenic and Thrombogenic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J; Arora, Rishi; Green, David; Greenland, Philip; Lee, Daniel C; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Markl, Michael; Ng, Jason; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2015-07-28

    Atrial disease or myopathy forms the substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) and underlies the potential for atrial thrombus formation and subsequent stroke. Current diagnostic approaches in patients with AF focus on identifying clinical predictors with the evaluation of left atrial size by echocardiography serving as the sole measure specifically evaluating the atrium. Although the atrial substrate underlying AF is likely developing for years before the onset of AF, there is no current evaluation to identify the preclinical atrial myopathy. Atrial fibrosis is 1 component of the atrial substrate that has garnered recent attention based on newer MRI techniques that have been applied to visualize atrial fibrosis in humans with prognostic implications regarding the success of treatment. Advanced ECG signal processing, echocardiographic techniques, and MRI imaging of fibrosis and flow provide up-to-date approaches to evaluate the atrial myopathy underlying AF. Although thromboembolic risk is currently defined by clinical scores, their predictive value is mediocre. Evaluation of stasis via imaging and biomarkers associated with thrombogenesis may provide enhanced approaches to assess risk for stroke in patients with AF. Better delineation of the atrial myopathy that serves as the substrate for AF and thromboembolic complications might improve treatment outcomes. Furthermore, better delineation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the atrial substrate for AF, particularly in its earlier stages, could help identify blood and imaging biomarkers that could be useful to assess risk for developing new-onset AF and suggest specific pathways that could be targeted for prevention.

  15. Evaluating the Atrial Myopathy Underlying Atrial Fibrillation: Identifying the Arrhythmogenic and Thrombogenic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J; Arora, Rishi; Green, David; Greenland, Philip; Lee, Daniel C; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Markl, Michael; Ng, Jason; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2015-07-28

    Atrial disease or myopathy forms the substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) and underlies the potential for atrial thrombus formation and subsequent stroke. Current diagnostic approaches in patients with AF focus on identifying clinical predictors with the evaluation of left atrial size by echocardiography serving as the sole measure specifically evaluating the atrium. Although the atrial substrate underlying AF is likely developing for years before the onset of AF, there is no current evaluation to identify the preclinical atrial myopathy. Atrial fibrosis is 1 component of the atrial substrate that has garnered recent attention based on newer MRI techniques that have been applied to visualize atrial fibrosis in humans with prognostic implications regarding the success of treatment. Advanced ECG signal processing, echocardiographic techniques, and MRI imaging of fibrosis and flow provide up-to-date approaches to evaluate the atrial myopathy underlying AF. Although thromboembolic risk is currently defined by clinical scores, their predictive value is mediocre. Evaluation of stasis via imaging and biomarkers associated with thrombogenesis may provide enhanced approaches to assess risk for stroke in patients with AF. Better delineation of the atrial myopathy that serves as the substrate for AF and thromboembolic complications might improve treatment outcomes. Furthermore, better delineation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the atrial substrate for AF, particularly in its earlier stages, could help identify blood and imaging biomarkers that could be useful to assess risk for developing new-onset AF and suggest specific pathways that could be targeted for prevention. PMID:26216085

  16. Evaluating the Atrial Myopathy Underlying Atrial Fibrillation: Identifying the Arrhythmogenic and Thrombogenic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Jeffrey J.; Arora, Rishi; Green, David; Greenland, Philip; Lee, Daniel C.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Markl, Michael; Ng, Jason; Shah, Sanjiv J.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial disease or myopathy forms the substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) and underlies the potential for atrial thrombus formation and subsequent stroke. Current diagnostic approaches in patients with AF focus on identifying clinical predictors with evaluation of left atrial size by echocardiography serving as the sole measure specifically evaluating the atrium. Although the atrial substrate underlying AF is likely developing for years prior to the onset of AF, there is no current evaluation to identify the pre-clinical atrial myopathy. Atrial fibrosis is one component of the atrial substrate that has garnered recent attention based on newer MRI techniques that have been applied to visualize atrial fibrosis in humans with prognostic implications regarding success of treatment. Advanced ECG signal processing, echocardiographic techniques, and MRI imaging of fibrosis and flow provide up-to-date approaches to evaluate the atrial myopathy underlying AF. While thromboembolic risk is currently defined by clinical scores, their predictive value is mediocre. Evaluation of stasis via imaging and biomarkers associated with thrombogenesis may provide enhanced approaches to assess risk for stroke in patients with AF. Better delineation of the atrial myopathy that serves as the substrate for AF and thromboembolic complications might improve treatment outcomes. Furthermore, better delineation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the atrial substrate for AF, particularly in its earlier stages, could help identify blood and imaging biomarkers that could be useful to assess risk for developing new onset AF and suggest specific pathways that could be targeted for prevention. PMID:26216085

  17. Atrial Fibrillation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atrial Fibrillation (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Atrial Fibrillation 心房纤维颤动 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Atrial Fibrillation 心房纖維顫動 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - ...

  18. Almanac 2015: atrial fibrillation research in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Jawad-Ul-Qamar, Muhammad; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to attract interest in the cardiovascular community and in Heart. Over 60 original research and review papers published in Heart in 2014–2015 cover various aspects of atrial fibrillation, from associated conditions and precipitating factors to new approaches to management. Here, we provide an overview of articles on atrial fibrillation published in Heart in 2014–2015, highlighting new developments, emerging concepts and novel approaches to treatment. PMID:26791994

  19. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  20. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  1. Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159459.html Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation Blood thinners -- not aspirin -- dramatically cut the risk of stroke, researchers say ...

  2. Effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on ischemia-reperfusion injury in a porcine total hepatic vascular exclusion model

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Oshima, Kiyohiro; Muraoka, Masato; Akao, Takahiko; Totsuka, Osamu; Shimizu, Hisashi; Sato, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Kazumi; Konno, Kenjiro; Matsumoto, Koshi; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of ANP on warm I/R injury in a porcine THVE model. METHODS: Miniature pigs (mini-pigs) weighing 16-24 kg were observed for 120 min after reperfusion following 120 min of THVE. The animals were divided into two groups. ANP (0.1 μg/kg per min) was administered to the ANP group (n = 7), and vehicle was administered to the control group (n = 7). Either vehicle or ANP was intravenously administered from 30 min before the THVE to the end of the experiment. Arterial blood was collected to measure AST, LDH, and TNF-α. Hepatic tissue blood flow (HTBF) was also measured. Liver specimens were harvested for p38 MAPK analysis and histological study. Those results were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: The AST and LDH levels were lower in the ANP group than in the control group; the AST levels were significantly different between the two groups (60 min: 568.7 ± 113.3 vs 321.6 ± 60.1, P = 0.038 < 0.05, 120 min: 673.6 ± 148.2 vs 281.1 ± 44.8, P = 0.004 < 0.01). No significant difference was observed in the TNF-α levels between the two groups. HTBF was higher in the ANP group, but the difference was not significant. A significantly higher level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK was observed in the ANP group compared to the control group (0 min: 2.92 ± 1.1 vs 6.38 ± 1.1, P = 0.011 < 0.05). Histological tissue damage was milder in the ANP group than in the control group. CONCLUSION: Our results show that ANP has a protective role in I/R injury with p38 MAPK activation in a porcine THVE model. PMID:17659696

  3. Human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 contains a natriuretic peptide receptor system that responds preferentially to ANP among various natriuretic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Katafuchi, T.; Hagiwara, H.; Ito, T.; Kangawa, K.; Matsuo, H.; Hirose, S. )

    1990-12-31

    A new type of ANP receptor system which clearly distinguishes natriuretic peptides A and B (ANP and BNP) has been identified in the human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 and characterized. SW-13 cells responded to nanomolar concentrations of ANP with large increases in cGMP levels but in the case of BNP, much higher concentrations were required to produce the same extent of response. This property is unique since the 140-kDa ANP receptors so far characterized do not discriminate between ANP and BNP. For comparison, various natriuretic peptide receptors were also re-characterized using the recently identified CNP.

  4. Left Atrial Appendage Closure Devices

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Perez, Irving E; Krumerman, Andrew; Garcia, Mario J; Lucariello, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk for thromboembolic stroke five-fold. The left atrial appendage (LAA) has been shown to be the main source of thrombus formation in the majority of strokes associated with AF. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin and novel anticoagulants remains the standard of care; however, it has several limitations, including bleeding and poor compliance. Occlusion of the LAA has been shown to be an alternative therapeutic approach to drug therapy. The purpose of this article is to review the different techniques and devices that have emerged for the purpose of occluding this structure, with a particular emphasis on the efficacy and safety studies published to date in the medical literature. PMID:24963274

  5. Mathematical Approaches to Understanding and Imaging Atrial Fibrillation: Significance for Mechanisms and Management

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in humans. The mechanisms that govern AF initiation and persistence are highly complex, of dynamic nature, and involve interactions across multiple temporal and spatial scales in the atria. This articles aims to review the mathematical modeling and computer simulation approaches to understanding AF mechanisms and aiding in its management. Various atrial modeling approaches are presented, with descriptions of the methodological basis and advancements in both lower-dimensional and realistic geometry models. A review of the most significant mechanistic insights made by atrial simulations is provided. The article showcases the contributions that atrial modeling and simulation have made not only to our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial arrhythmias, but also to the development of AF management approaches. A summary of the future developments envisioned for the field of atrial simulation and modeling is also presented. The review contends that computational models of the atria assembled with data from clinical imaging modalities that incorporate electrophysiological and structural remodeling could become a first line of screening for new AF therapies and approaches, new diagnostic developments, and new methods for arrhythmia prevention. PMID:24763468

  6. Role of atrial receptors in the control of sodium excretion. [pressure breathing and antinatiuretic effects in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, J. R.; Henry, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Responses of an innervated and a contralateral chronically denervated kidney to mild positive pressure breathing are compared for saline volume expansions in chloralose anesthetized dogs. It is shown that mild pressure breathing significantly reduces sodium excretion, urine flow, free water clearance, and PAH clearance. After 20 minutes of positive pressure breathing, both kidney responses are identical suggesting the release of natriuretic hormone which reduces renal function in addition to the demonstrated change in renal nerve activity. Increase of the left atrial pressure through balloon obstruction of the mitral orifice increases urine flow, sodium excretion and PAH clearance; inflation of the balloon and positive pressure breathing again depresses renal function. Preliminary evidence indicates that receptors in the right atrium are more severely affected by pressure breathing than those in the left atrium.

  7. Cardiac natriuretic peptides act via p38 MAPK to induce the brown fat thermogenic program in mouse and human adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bordicchia, Marica; Liu, Dianxin; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ailhaud, Gerard; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Zhang, Chaoying; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Sarzani, Riccardo; Collins, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    The ability of mammals to resist body fat accumulation is linked to their ability to expand the number and activity of “brown adipocytes” within white fat depots. Activation of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) can induce a functional “brown-like” adipocyte phenotype. As cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) and β-AR agonists are similarly potent at stimulating lipolysis in human adipocytes, we investigated whether NPs could induce human and mouse adipocytes to acquire brown adipocyte features, including a capacity for thermogenic energy expenditure mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). In human adipocytes, atrial NP (ANP) and ventricular NP (BNP) activated PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and UCP1 expression, induced mitochondriogenesis, and increased uncoupled and total respiration. At low concentrations, ANP and β-AR agonists additively enhanced expression of brown fat and mitochondrial markers in a p38 MAPK–dependent manner. Mice exposed to cold temperatures had increased levels of circulating NPs as well as higher expression of NP signaling receptor and lower expression of the NP clearance receptor (Nprc) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT). NPR-C–/– mice had markedly smaller WAT and BAT depots but higher expression of thermogenic genes such as Ucp1. Infusion of BNP into mice robustly increased Ucp1 and Pgc-1α expression in WAT and BAT, with corresponding elevation of respiration and energy expenditure. These results suggest that NPs promote “browning” of white adipocytes to increase energy expenditure, defining the heart as a central regulator of adipose tissue biology. PMID:22307324

  8. Onset and Regression of Pregnancy-Induced Cardiac Alterations in Gestationally Hypertensive Mice: The Role of the Natriuretic Peptide System.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Nicole M; Li, Terry Y; Tse, M Yat; Andrew, R David; Tayade, Chandrakant; Jin, Albert Y; Pang, Stephen C

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy induces cardiovascular adaptations in response to increased volume overload. Aside from the hemodynamic changes that occur during pregnancy, the maternal heart also undergoes structural changes. However, cardiac modulation in pregnancies complicated by gestational hypertension is incompletely understood. The objectives of the current investigation were to determine the role of the natriuretic peptide (NP) system in pregnancy and to assess alterations in pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy between gestationally hypertensive and normotensive dams. Previously we have shown that mice lacking the expression of atrial NP (ANP; ANP(-/-)) exhibit a gestational hypertensive phenotype. In the current study, female ANP(+/+) and ANP(-/-) mice were mated with ANP(+/+) males. Changes in cardiac size and weight were evaluated across pregnancy at Gestational Days 15.5 and 17.5 and Postnatal Days 7, 14, and 28. Nonpregnant mice were used as controls. Physical measurement recordings and histological analyses demonstrated peak cardiac hypertrophy occurring at 14 days postpartum in both ANP(+/+) and ANP(-/-) dams with little to no change during pregnancy. Additionally, left ventricular expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and NP system was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Up-regulation of Agt and AT(1a) genes was observed late in pregnancy, while Nppa and Nppb genes were significantly up-regulated postpartum. Our data suggest that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy may be influenced by the RAS throughout gestation and by the NP system postpartum. Further investigations are required to gain a complete understanding of the mechanistic aspects of pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  9. Practical management of anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Richard J; Flaker, Greg C; Saxonhouse, Sherry J; Doherty, John U; Birtcher, Kim K; Cuker, Adam; Davidson, Bruce L; Giugliano, Robert P; Granger, Christopher B; Jaffer, Amir K; Mehta, Bella H; Nutescu, Edith; Williams, Kim A

    2015-04-01

    Anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation has become more complex due to the introduction of new anticoagulant agents, the number and kinds of patients requiring therapy, and the interactions of those patients in the matrix of care. The management of anticoagulation has become a "team sport" involving multiple specialties in multiple sites of care. The American College of Cardiology, through the College's Anticoagulation Initiative, convened a roundtable of experts from multiple specialties to discuss topics important to the management of patients requiring anticoagulation and to make expert recommendations on issues such as the initiation and interruption of anticoagulation, quality of anticoagulation care, management of major and minor bleeding, and treatment of special populations. The attendees continued to work toward consensus on these topics, and present the key findings of this roundtable in a state-of- the-art review focusing on the practical aspects of anticoagulation care for the patient with atrial fibrillation. PMID:25835447

  10. Practical management of anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Richard J; Flaker, Greg C; Saxonhouse, Sherry J; Doherty, John U; Birtcher, Kim K; Cuker, Adam; Davidson, Bruce L; Giugliano, Robert P; Granger, Christopher B; Jaffer, Amir K; Mehta, Bella H; Nutescu, Edith; Williams, Kim A

    2015-04-01

    Anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation has become more complex due to the introduction of new anticoagulant agents, the number and kinds of patients requiring therapy, and the interactions of those patients in the matrix of care. The management of anticoagulation has become a "team sport" involving multiple specialties in multiple sites of care. The American College of Cardiology, through the College's Anticoagulation Initiative, convened a roundtable of experts from multiple specialties to discuss topics important to the management of patients requiring anticoagulation and to make expert recommendations on issues such as the initiation and interruption of anticoagulation, quality of anticoagulation care, management of major and minor bleeding, and treatment of special populations. The attendees continued to work toward consensus on these topics, and present the key findings of this roundtable in a state-of- the-art review focusing on the practical aspects of anticoagulation care for the patient with atrial fibrillation.

  11. Robotic-assisted left atrial ligation for stroke reduction in chronic atrial fibrillation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kiaii, Bob; McClure, R Scott; Skanes, Alan C; Ross, Ian G; Spouge, Alison R; Swinamer, Stuart; Rayman, Reiza; Bainbridge, Daniel T; Iglesias, Ivan; Novick, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation are at significant risk for sustaining a thromboembolic stroke. More than 90% of thromboemboli form in the left atrial appendage. Ligation of the left atrial appendage to reduce the risk of stroke is often performed in connection with other cardiac surgical procedures. As a stand-alone procedure, however, left atrial ligation has generally been deemed too invasive and has gained little support as an alternative therapeutic option. We report a case of port-access robotic-assisted left atrial ligation as a stand-alone procedure in a patient with chronic atrial fibrillation in whom anticoagulation was a contraindication. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of stand-alone robotic-assisted left atrial ligation in the literature. PMID:16387671

  12. Defining nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A quest for clarification.

    PubMed

    Martins, Raphaël P; Galand, Vincent; Colette, Edouard; Behar, Nathalie; Pavin, Dominique; Leclercq, Christophe; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Mabo, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are currently recommended for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation since the publication of the 4 major pivotal trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of factor IIa and factor Xa inhibitors. The definition of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation is unclear, varying from one trial to another and even between North American and European guidelines, which is a source of uncertainties in clinical practice. However, many patients with atrial fibrillation present signs of valvular involvement, and clarification of this term is needed to not deny NOACs to patients based on the wrong perception that they may have valvular atrial fibrillation. The currently unique contraindications to NOACs are patients with mechanical heart valves and those with moderate-to-severe mitral stenosis, as stated by the recent 2015 position paper of the European Heart Rhythm Association. Patients with native heart valve involvement, regardless of their severity, are suitable for NOAC therapy. Patients with bioprosthetic heart valves and mitral valve repair may be suitable for NOACs except for the first 3 and the first 3-6 months postoperatively, respectively. Patients with transaortic valve implantation or percutaneous transluminal aortic valvuloplasty are also considered as being eligible for NOACs, although the bleeding risk has to be carefully considered in this population often requiring a combination with antiplatelet therapy. Future studies are warranted to increase the level of evidence of use of NOACs, particularly in patients with transaortic valve implantation and valvular surgery, and to determine whether they could be used in the future in the only 2 remaining contraindications. PMID:27502864

  13. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females

    PubMed Central

    Holditch, Sara J.; Schreiber, Claire A.; Burnett, John C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb−/−) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb−/− females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb−/− female. This study highlights BNP’s vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  14. Left atrial myxoma masquerading as viral flu

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Kiernan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is a rare cardiac tumor that may be diagnosed incidentally on cardiac imaging or may present with life-threatening cardiac symptoms. We present a case of giant left atrial myxoma that presented as a flulike illness. PMID:27695187

  15. A novel and simple atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Kofidis, Theo; Lee, Chuen Neng

    2011-05-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac operations require specialized equipment. Atrial retractors are a frequently used tool to expose heart valves for minimally invasive and open procedures. The models currently available in the market are efficient; however, they may be complex, bulky, or expensive. We introduce a novel, very simple atrial retractor we designed using ubiquitously available materials.

  16. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  17. Familial atrial fibrillation with fetal onset

    PubMed Central

    Tikanoja, T; Kirkinen, P; Nikolajev, K; Eresmaa, L; Haring, P

    1998-01-01

    A woman presented during two pregnancies (at 25 and 23 weeks' gestation, respectively) because the fetuses had rapid, irregular tachycardia and hydrops. After maternal drug treatment and achievement of slower fetal heart rates, the hydrops gradually resolved. Both babies were born full term with continuing atrial fibrillation. In the first, an ectopic atrial rhythm was temporarily achieved during high dose flecainide treatment but, in the younger sibling, all medications and repeated cardioversions failed even temporarily to convert the atrial fibrillation with an almost isoelectric baseline in ECG to sinus rhythm. Good rate control has been achieved with digoxin in both patients. No infective, immunological, or structural cause was found in either case, and thus an inherited aetiology is probable.

 Keywords: atrial fibrillation;  arrhythmias;  fetal atrial fibrillation;  familial arrhythmias PMID:9538316

  18. Minimally Invasive Surgical Therapies for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Kiaii, Bob; Chu, Michael W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with significant risks of thromboembolism, stroke, congestive heart failure, and death. There have been major advances in the management of atrial fibrillation including pharmacologic therapies, antithrombotic therapies, and ablation techniques. Surgery for atrial fibrillation, including both concomitant and stand-alone interventions, is an effective therapy to restore sinus rhythm. Minimally invasive surgical ablation is an emerging field that aims for the superior results of the traditional Cox-Maze procedure through a less invasive operation with lower morbidity, quicker recovery, and improved patient satisfaction. These novel techniques utilize endoscopic or minithoracotomy approaches with various energy sources to achieve electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins in addition to other ablation lines. We review advancements in minimally invasive techniques for atrial fibrillation surgery, including management of the left atrial appendage. PMID:22666609

  19. Noninvasive electrocardiographic mapping for prediction of tachycardia mechanism and origin of atrial tachycardia following bilateral pulmonary transplantation.

    PubMed

    Roten, Laurent; Pedersen, Michala; Pascale, Patrizio; Shah, Ashok; Eliautou, Sandra; Scherr, Daniel; Sacher, Frederic; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2012-05-01

    This is a case of atrial tachycardia 2 years after pulmonary transplantation. After excluding right atrial involvement, tachycardia origin was located in a scar region medial to the anastomosis of the left inferior pulmonary donor vein. Tachycardia mechanism was microreentry. Noninvasive electrocardiographic mapping performed before the ablation procedure matched with results of invasive Carto mapping and predicted both tachycardia mechanism and origin. We discuss arrhythmia mechanism found after pulmonary transplantation and benefit of noninvasive electrocardiographic mapping for procedure planning.

  20. Analytical Issues with Natriuretic Peptides - has this been Overly Simplified?

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander G; Katrukha, Alexey G

    2016-08-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) were first described as cardiac biomarkers more than two decades ago. Since that time, numerous studies have confirmed NPs' diagnostic and prognostic utilities as biomarkers of myocardial function. However, we must now admit that despite the NPs' relatively long period of use in clinical practice, our understanding of the biochemistry and the variety of circulating forms of NPs, as well as of their potential as biomarkers, remains far from being complete and comprehensive. The highly complex nature and wide diversity of circulating forms of NPs make their accurate measurements in plasma far more complex than initially believed. A highly simplistic view of the NPs' use is that elevated values of NPs indicate the severity of heart failure and thus reflect the prognosis. However, as shown by a variety of studies, deep understanding of how the NP system works will be required for correct interpretation of test results in routine practice of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding of the complexity of the NP system and discuss related analytical issues, which open new horizons, as well as challenges for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27683533

  1. Comparative study of atrial fibrillation and AV conduction in mammals.

    PubMed

    Meijler, F L; van der Tweel, I

    1987-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common cardiac arrhythmias in humans. It also occurs quite frequently in dogs and horses. Comparative study of this arrhythmia may contribute to better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved. In this study, we present a quantitative analysis of atrial fibrillation in humans, dogs, horses, and in a kangaroo, making use of histograms and serial autocorrelograms of the ventricular rhythm with and without digitalis medication. Increase in the size of the animal and thus in the size of the heart is accompanied by a decrease in ventricular rate. The ventricular rhythm was random in the dog, kangaroo, and man, but periodicity was present in the horse. Digitalis decreased the ventricular rate in all species studied and enforced the periodicity in the horse. The differences in the atrial excitation process, atrioventricular (AV) conduction, and ventricular behavior between the four species studied are small when compared with the differences in their heart size. We conclude that in evolution, as far as the heart is concerned, cell size and morphology probably prevail over cell-function.

  2. An Emerging Role of Natriuretic Peptides: Igniting the Fat Furnace to Fuel and Warm the Heart.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2015-12-01

    Natriuretic peptides are produced in the heart and have been well characterized for their actions in the cardiovascular system to promote diuresis and natriuresis, thereby contributing to maintenance of extracellular fluid volume and vascular tone. For this review, we scanned the literature using PubMed and MEDLINE using the following search terms: beiging, adipose tissue, natriuretic peptides, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Articles were selected for inclusion if they represented primary data or review articles published from 1980 to 2015 from high-impact journals. With the advent of the newly approved class of drugs that inhibit the breakdown of natriuretic peptides, thereby increasing their circulation, we highlight additional functions for natriuretic peptides that have recently become appreciated, including their ability to drive lipolysis, facilitate beiging of adipose tissues, and promote lipid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle. We provide evidence for new roles for natriuretic peptides, emphasizing their ability to participate in body weight regulation and energy homeostasis and discuss how they may lead to novel strategies to treat obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Age-related atrial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gramley, Felix; Lorenzen, Johann; Knackstedt, Christian; Rana, Obaida R; Saygili, Erol; Frechen, Dirk; Stanzel, Sven; Pezzella, Francesco; Koellensperger, Eva; Weiss, Christian; Münzel, Thomas; Schauerte, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    Many age-related diseases are associated with, and may be promoted by, cardiac fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, hypoxia-induced factor (HIF), and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) system have been implicated in fibrogenesis. Thus, we investigated whether age is related to these systems and to atrial fibrosis. Right atrial appendages (RAA) obtained during heart surgery (n = 115) were grouped according to patients' age (<50 years, 51-60 years, 61-70 years, or >70 years). Echocardiographic ejection fractions (EF) and fibrosis using Sirius-red-stained histological sections were determined. TGF-beta was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and hypoxia-related factors [HIF1 alpha, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-receptor, CD34 (a surrogate marker for microvessel density), the factor inhibiting HIF (FIH), and prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD 3)] were detected by immunostaining. MMP-2 and -9 activity were determined zymographically, and mRNA levels of their common tissue inhibitor TIMP-1 were determined by RT-PCR. Younger patients (<50 years) had significantly less fibrosis (10.1% +/- 4.4% vs 16.6% +/- 8.3%) than older individuals (>70 years). While HIF1 alpha, FIH, the VEGF-receptor, and CD34 were significantly elevated in the young, TGF-beta and PHD3 were suppressed in these patients. MMP-2 and -9 activity was found to be higher while TIMP-1 levels were lower in older patients. Statistical analysis proved age to be the only factor influencing fibrogenesis. With increasing age, RAAs develop significantly more fibrosis. An increase of fibrotic and decrease of hypoxic signalling and microvessel density, coupled with differential expression of MMPs and TIMP-1 favouring fibrosis may have helped promote atrial fibrogenesis. PMID:19234766

  4. Atrial fibrillation and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bosomworth, N. John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence on the effects of various levels of physical activity (PA) on the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in both the general population and in endurance athletes. Data sources A PubMed search was done initially using the MeSH headings or text words (with the search-field descriptor TIAB [title and abstract]) atrial fibrillation and exercise or physical activity or athlet* or sport*, without additional filters. Conclusions regarding quality and strength of evidence were based on the GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation) system. Study selection No interventional studies were available. Observational studies were therefore considered acceptable, and, although larger long-term prospective cohort studies were preferred, case-control or cross-sectional trials were also included in this review. Synthesis Available evidence suggests a dose-response association linking increased exercise levels with reduced incident AF in women. The same is true in men at low and moderate levels of exertional activity. In men only, high levels of PA are associated with increased risk of AF in most, but not all, studies. This risk is moderate, with a hazard ratio of 1.29 in one of the better studies. The risk of AF for most people who exercise regularly is lower than that of a matched sedentary population. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation is probably less common as PA increases, with a demonstrable dose-response relationship. Exercise at any level should be promoted for its effect on physical well-being and mortality reduction. In men exercising at high levels, beneficial effects on AF might be lost and risk might exceed that of the sedentary population; however, the evidence is neither robust nor consistent. These men should be made aware of this modest increase in risk should they choose to continue to engage in high levels of PA. PMID:26668285

  5. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  6. Dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Maund, E; McKenna, C; Sarowar, M; Fox, D; Stevenson, M; Pepper, C; Palmer, S; Woolacott, N

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report on the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal process. The population considered in the submission were adult clinically stable patients with a recent history of or current non-permanent AF. Comparators were the current available anti-arrhythmic drugs: class 1c agents (flecainide and propafenone), sotalol and amiodarone. Outcomes were AF recurrence, all-cause mortality, stroke, treatment discontinuations (due to any cause or due to adverse events) and serious adverse events. The main evidence came from four phase III randomised controlled trials, direct and indirect meta-analyses from a systematic review, and a synthesis of the direct and indirect evidence using a mixed-treatment comparison. Overall, the results from the different synthesis approaches showed that the odds of AF recurrence appeared statistically significantly lower with dronedarone and other anti-arrhythmic drugs than with non-active control, and that the odds of AF recurrence are statistically significantly higher for dronedarone than for amiodarone. However, the results for outcomes of all-cause mortality, stroke and treatment discontinuations and serious adverse events were all uncertain. A discrete event simulation model was used to evaluate dronedarone versus antiarrhythmic drugs and standard therapy alone. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of dronedarone was relatively robust and less than 20,000 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year. Exploratory work undertaken by the ERG identified that the main drivers of cost-effectiveness were the benefits assigned to dronedarone for all-cause mortality and stroke. Dronedarone is not cost-effective relative to its comparators when

  7. Stroke risk assessment in atrial fibrillation: risk factors and markers of atrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Brandon W; Fuster, Valentin; Halperin, Jonathan L; Granger, Christopher B

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex phenomenon associated with electrical, mechanical, and structural abnormalities of the atria. Ischaemic stroke in AF is only partially understood, but the mechanisms are known to be related to the atrial substrate as well as the atrial rhythm. The temporal dissociation between timing of AF and occurrence of stroke has led to the hypothesis that fibrotic, prothrombotic atrial tissue is an important cause of thrombus formation in patients with AF, independent of the atrial rhythm. Current stroke risk scores are practical, but limited in their capacity to predict stroke risk accurately in individual patients. Stroke prediction might be improved by the addition of emerging risk factors, many of which are expressions of atrial fibrosis. The use of novel parameters, including clinical criteria, biomarkers, and imaging data, might improve stroke risk prediction and inform on optimal treatment for patients with AF and perhaps individuals only at risk of AF. PMID:27383079

  8. Serum Galectin-3 Levels Predict Recurrences after Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Clementy, Nicolas; Benhenda, Nazih; Piver, Eric; Pierre, Bertrand; Bernard, Anne; Fauchier, Laurent; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Babuty, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a biomarker of fibrosis and atrial remodeling, involved in the mechanisms of initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). We sought to study the accuracy of galectin-3 level in predicting recurrences of AF after ablation. Serum concentrations of galectin-3 were determined in a consecutive series of patients addressed for AF ablation in our center. After a 3-month blanking period, recurrences of atrial arrhythmias were collected during the first year in all patients, using Holter monitoring at 3, 6 months and 12 months. A total of 160 patients were included, with a mean galectin-3 rate was 14.4 ± 5.6 ng/mL. At 12-month, 55 patients (34%) had reexperienced sustained atrial arrhythmia. Only higher galectin-3 level (HR = 1.07 [1.01–1.12], p = 0.02) and larger left atrial diameter (HR = 1.07 [1.03–1.12], p = 0.001) independently predicted recurrence. Patients with both galectin-3 level <15 ng/mL and left atrial diameter <40 millimeters had a 1-year arrhythmia-free survival rate − after a single procedure without anti-arrhythmic drug − of 91%, as compared with 41% in patients with galectin-3 ≥ 15 and left trial diameter ≥40 (p < 0.0001), whether AF was paroxysmal or persistent. Galectin-3 and left atrial diameters, rather than clinical presentation of AF, predict recurrences after ablation. PMID:27677964

  9. [Clinical significance of natriuretic peptides in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea].

    PubMed

    Špác, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Acute dyspnea is one of the most common emergency department symptoms. But early diagnosis and treatment could be e challenging because of multiple potential causes. The gold standard biomarkers in cardiac dyspnea are B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type (natriuretic peptide NT-pro BNP), which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. The purpose of this review is to analyze diagnostic potential of BNP and NT-pro BNP biomarkers use in patients with acute dyspnea. BNP and NT-proBNP are markers of cardiac stress but are not cardiac-specific. They have comparable clinical utility, and both help in excluding acute cardiac dyspnea but they cannot reliably discriminate systolic from diastolic HF.Key word: acute dyspnea - natriuretic peptide - heart failure. PMID:27627091

  10. A new algorithm to diagnose atrial ectopic origin from multi lead ECG systems--insights from 3D virtual human atria and torso.

    PubMed

    Alday, Erick A Perez; Colman, Michael A; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J; Hancox, Jules C; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms. PMID

  11. A new algorithm to diagnose atrial ectopic origin from multi lead ECG systems--insights from 3D virtual human atria and torso.

    PubMed

    Alday, Erick A Perez; Colman, Michael A; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J; Hancox, Jules C; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms.

  12. A New Algorithm to Diagnose Atrial Ectopic Origin from Multi Lead ECG Systems - Insights from 3D Virtual Human Atria and Torso

    PubMed Central

    Alday, Erick A. Perez; Colman, Michael A.; Langley, Philip; Butters, Timothy D.; Higham, Jonathan; Workman, Antony J.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Rapid atrial arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) predispose to ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Identifying the origin of atrial ectopic activity from the electrocardiogram (ECG) can help to diagnose the early onset of AF in a cost-effective manner. The complex and rapid atrial electrical activity during AF makes it difficult to obtain detailed information on atrial activation using the standard 12-lead ECG alone. Compared to conventional 12-lead ECG, more detailed ECG lead configurations may provide further information about spatio-temporal dynamics of the body surface potential (BSP) during atrial excitation. We apply a recently developed 3D human atrial model to simulate electrical activity during normal sinus rhythm and ectopic pacing. The atrial model is placed into a newly developed torso model which considers the presence of the lungs, liver and spinal cord. A boundary element method is used to compute the BSP resulting from atrial excitation. Elements of the torso mesh corresponding to the locations of the placement of the electrodes in the standard 12-lead and a more detailed 64-lead ECG configuration were selected. The ectopic focal activity was simulated at various origins across all the different regions of the atria. Simulated BSP maps during normal atrial excitation (i.e. sinoatrial node excitation) were compared to those observed experimentally (obtained from the 64-lead ECG system), showing a strong agreement between the evolution in time of the simulated and experimental data in the P-wave morphology of the ECG and dipole evolution. An algorithm to obtain the location of the stimulus from a 64-lead ECG system was developed. The algorithm presented had a success rate of 93%, meaning that it correctly identified the origin of atrial focus in 75/80 simulations, and involved a general approach relevant to any multi-lead ECG system. This represents a significant improvement over previously developed algorithms. PMID

  13. [Secondary pulmonary embolism to right atrial myxoma].

    PubMed

    Vico Besó, L; Zúñiga Cedó, E

    2013-10-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to atrial myxoma right. The myxoma is a primary cardiac tumor, namely, has his origin in the cardiac tissue. Primary cardiac tumors are rare, including myxomas, the most common type. Have a predilection for females and the most useful tool for diagnosis is echocardiography. About 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart and rest are in the right atrium. Right atrial myxomas in some sometimes associated with tricuspid stenosis and atrial fibrillation. The most common clinical manifestations include symptoms of this neoplasm constitutional, and embolic phenomena resulting from the obstruction to the flow intracavitary. The treatment of this condition is surgical.

  14. Detection of atrial-flutter and atrial-fibrillation waveforms by fetal magnetocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Kandori, A; Hosono, T; Kanagawa, T; Miyashita, S; Chiba, Y; Murakami, M; Miyashita, T; Tsukada, K

    2002-03-01

    Two cases of fetal tachycardia are reported: atrial flutter and fibrillation. The waveforms from each case were detected by fetal magnetocardiograms (FMCGs) using a 64-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system. Because the magnitude of supraventricular arrhythmia signals is very weak, two subtraction methods were used to detect the fetal MCG waveforms: subtraction of the maternal MCG signal, and subtraction of the fetal ORS complex signal. It was found that atrial-flutter waveforms showed a cyclic pattern and that atrial-fibrillation waveforms showed f-waves with a random atrial rhythm. Fast Fourier transform analysis determined the main frequency of the atrial flutter to be about 7Hz, and the frequency distribution of atrial fibrillation consisted of small, broad peaks. To visualise the current pattern, current-arrow maps, which simplify the observation of pseudo-current patterns in fetal hearts, of the averaged atrial flutter and fibrillation waveforms were produced. The map of the atrial flutter had a circular pattern, indicating a re-entry circuit, and the map of the atrial fibrillation indicated one wavelet, which was produced by a micro-re-entry circuit. It is thus concluded that an FMCG can detect supraventricular arrhythmia, which can be characterised by re-entry circuits, in fetuses. PMID:12043803

  15. Control of left ventricular mass by moxonidine involves reduced DNA synthesis and enhanced DNA fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, P-A; Duguay, D; Ayoubi, R El-; Menaouar, A; Danalache, B; Gutkowska, J; DeBlois, D; Mukaddam-Daher, S

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a maladaptive process associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Regression of LVH is associated with reduced complications of hypertension. Moxonidine is an antihypertensive imidazoline compound that reduces blood pressure primarily by central inhibition of sympathetic outflow and by direct actions on the heart to release atrial natriuretic peptide, a vasodilator and an antihypertrophic cardiac hormone. This study investigated the effect of moxonidine on LVH and the mechanisms involved in this effect. Experimental approach: Spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with several doses of moxonidine (s.c.) over 4 weeks. Blood pressure and heart rate were continuously monitored by telemetry. Body weight and water and food intake were measured weekly. Measurements also included left ventricular mass, DNA content, synthesis, fragmentation, and apoptotic/anti-apoptotic pathway proteins. Key results: The decrease in mean arterial pressure stabilized at ∼ −10 mm Hg after 1 week of treatment and thereafter. Compared to vehicle-treated rats (100%), left ventricular mass was dose- and time-dependently reduced by treatment. This reduction remained significantly lower after normalizing to body weight. Moxonidine reduced left ventricular DNA content and inhibited DNA synthesis. DNA fragmentation transiently, but significantly increased at 1 week of moxonidine treatment and was paralleled by elevated active caspase-3 protein. The highest dose significantly decreased the apoptotic protein Bax and all doses stimulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 after 4 weeks of treatment. Conclusions and implications: These studies implicate the modulation of cardiac DNA dynamics in the control of left ventricular mass by moxonidine in a rat model of hypertension. PMID:18059325

  16. Managing atrial fibrillation in the very elderly patient: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Karamichalakis, Nikolaos; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Georgopoulos, Stamatis; Bakalakos, Athanasios; Efremidis, Michael; Sideris, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia affecting elderly patients. Management and treatment of AF in this rapidly growing population of older patients involve a comprehensive assessment that includes comorbidities, functional, and social status. The cornerstone in therapy of AF is thromboembolic protection. Anticoagulation therapy has evolved, using conventional or newer medications. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure is a new invasive procedure evolving as an alternative to systematic anticoagulation therapy. Rate or rhythm control leads to relief in symptoms, fewer hospitalizations, and an improvement in quality of life. Invasive methods, such as catheter ablation, are the new frontier of treatment in maintaining an even sinus rhythm in this particular population. PMID:26604772

  17. Atrial development in the human heart: an immunohistochemical study with emphasis on the role of mesenchymal tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessels, A.; Anderson, R. H.; Markwald, R. R.; Webb, S.; Brown, N. A.; Viragh, S.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    The development of the atrial chambers in the human heart was investigated immunohistochemically using a set of previously described antibodies. This set included the monoclonal antibody 249-9G9, which enabled us to discriminate the endocardial cushion-derived mesenchymal tissues from those derived from extracardiac splanchnic mesoderm, and a monoclonal antibody recognizing the B isoform of creatine kinase, which allowed us to distinguish the right atrial myocardium from the left. The expression patterns obtained with these antibodies, combined with additional histological information derived from the serial sections, permitted us to describe in detail the morphogenetic events involved in the development of the primary atrial septum (septum primum) and the pulmonary vein in human embryos from Carnegie stage 14 onward. The level of expression of creatine kinase B (CK-B) was found to be consistently higher in the left atrial myocardium than in the right, with a sharp boundary between high and low expression located between the primary septum and the left venous valve indicating that the primary septum is part of the left atrial gene-expression domain. This expression pattern of CK-B is reminiscent of that of the homeobox gene Pitx2, which has recently been shown to be important for atrial septation in the mouse. This study also demonstrates a poorly appreciated role of the dorsal mesocardium in cardiac development. From the earliest stage investigated onward, the mesenchyme of the dorsal mesocardium protrudes into the dorsal wall of the primary atrial segment. This dorsal mesenchymal protrusion is continuous with a mesenchymal cap on the leading edge of the primary atrial septum. Neither the mesenchymal tissues of the dorsal protrusion nor the mesenchymal cap on the edge of the primary septum expressed the endocardial tissue antigen recognized by 249-9G9 at any of the stages investigated. The developing pulmonary vein uses the dorsal mesocardium as a conduit to reach

  18. Atrial Myxoma Presenting as Myocardial Infarction Diagnosed by Echocardiography, Managed Endoscopically with Robot-Assisted Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Simmons, Charles; Ellison, Douglas; Hemp, James; Chung, Kiyon

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxomatous embolization into the coronary arteries is a rare event. Management of large myxomas is usually via surgical resection involving a median sternotomy. Echocardiography is not a routine part of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) management. Here, we present the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian man with a history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia who presented to the emergency department with an NSTEMI. Transthoracic echocardiogram and transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a large and highly mobile atrial mass, traversing through the mitral valve orifice during diastole. Coronary angiography revealed a focal 60% lesion in the right coronary artery and no other significant obstructive coronary artery disease, suggesting that the cause of his presentation was tumor embolization into the coronary circulation. The patient underwent robot-assisted endoscopic resection of his atrial mass and was discharged in stable condition on postoperative day 2. Pathology revealed atrial myxoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atrial myxoma presenting with an NSTEMI and managed with a robot-assisted endoscopic approach. This case also highlights the importance of routine early echocardiography in patients presenting with NSTEMI. PMID:27014518

  19. Left atrial appendage occlusion in atrial fibrillation after intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Solveig; Zugck, Christian; Krumsdorf, Ulrike; Rizos, Timolaos; Rauch, Geraldine; Geis, Nicolas; Hardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: In an explorative, prospective, single-center, observational study, LAAO was performed in patients with previous ICH and AF using the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug device. Risks of ischemic strokes and hemorrhagic complications were estimated using the CHA2DS2Vasc score and the HAS-BLED score. Before and 1, 6, 12, and 24 months after the procedure, clinical status and complications were recorded. Major complications were predefined as periprocedural stroke, death, pericardial effusion, and device embolism. Results: LAAO was performed in 20 patients. Based on CHA2DS2Vasc score (mean 4.5 ± 1.4) and HAS-BLED score (mean 4.7 ± 1.0), annual risks of stroke and hemorrhagic complications were 4.0%–6.7% and 8.7%–12.5%, respectively. No patient had a procedure-related complication. Minor postprocedural complications were observed in 4/20 patients (2 inguinal hematoma, 1 self-limiting asystole, and 1 thrombus formation on device). No ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke occurred during a mean follow-up of 13.6 ± 8.2 months. Conclusions: In this first study of LAAO in patients with previous ICH, LAAO appears feasible and safe. A larger, controlled trial is needed to assess the efficacy and safety of the procedure compared to other preventive measures. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that in patients with a history of previous ICH and AF, percutaneous LAAO is safe and feasible. PMID:24319042

  20. Left atrial electrophysiologic feature specific for the genesis of complex fractionated atrial electrogram during atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hoshiyama, Tadashi; Yamabe, Hiroshige; Koyama, Junjiroh; Kanazawa, Hisanori; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-05-01

    Complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) has been suggested to contribute to the maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, electrophysiologic characteristics of the left atrial myocardium responsible for genesis of CFAE have not been clarified. Non-contact mapping of the left atrium was performed at 37 AF onset episodes in 24 AF patients. Electrogram amplitude, width, and conduction velocity were measured during sinus rhythm, premature atrial contraction (PAC) with long- (L-PAC), short- (S-PAC) and very short-coupling intervals (VS-PAC). These parameters were compared between CFAE and non-CFAE regions. Unipolar electrogram amplitude was higher in CFAE than non-CFAE during sinus rhythm, L-, S- and VS-PAC (1.82 ± 0.73 vs. 1.13 ± 0.38, p < 0.001; 1.44 ± 0.54 vs. 0.92 ± 0.35, p < 0.001; 1.09 ± 0.40 vs. 0.70 ± 0.27, p < 0.001; 0.76 ± 0.30 vs. 0.53 ± 0.25 mV, p < 0.001). Laplacian bipolar electrogram amplitude was also higher in CFAE than non-CFAE during sinus rhythm, L-, S- and VS-PAC. Unipolar electrogram width was similar in CFAE and non-CFAE. Laplacian bipolar electrogram width was wider in CFAE than non-CFAE during L-, S- and VS-PAC (85.5 ± 6.8 vs. 79.6 ± 4.5, p < 0.001; 96.1 ± 9.7 vs. 84.5 ± 5.9, p < 0.001; 122.4 ± 16.0 vs. 99.6 ± 9.6 ms, p < 0.001), but not during sinus rhythm. The conduction velocity was slower in CFAE during sinus rhythm, L-, S- and VS-PAC than non-CFAE (1.7 ± 0.3 vs. 2.4 ± 0.4, p < 0.001; 1.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.0 ± 0.5, p < 0.001; 1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 1.7 ± 0.5, p < 0.001; and 0.9 ± 0.3 vs. 1.4 ± 0.4 m/s, p < 0.001). CFAE was generated in the high amplitude atrial myocardium with slow and non-uniform conduction properties which were pronounced associated with premature activation, suggesting that heterogeneous conduction produced in high amplitude region contributes to the genesis of CFAE.

  1. Sick sinus syndrome and atrial fibrillation in older persons - A view from the sinoatrial nodal myocyte.

    PubMed

    Monfredi, O; Boyett, M R

    2015-06-01

    Sick sinus syndrome remains a highly relevant clinical entity, being responsible for the implantation of the majority of electronic pacemakers worldwide. It is an infinitely more complex disease than it was believed when first described in the mid part of the 20th century. It not only involves the innate leading pacemaker region of the heart, the sinoatrial node, but also the atrial myocardium, predisposing to atrial tachydysrhythmias. It remains controversial as to whether the dysfunction of the sinoatrial node directly causes the dysfunction of the atrial myocardium, or vice versa, or indeed whether these two aspects of the condition arise through some related underlying pathological mechanism, such as extracellular matrix remodeling, i.e., fibrosis. This review aims to shed new light on the myriad possible contributing factors in the development of sick sinus syndrome, with a particular focus on the sinoatrial nodal myocyte. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled CV Aging.

  2. Increased atrial arrhythmia susceptibility induced by intense endurance exercise in mice requires TNFα

    PubMed Central

    Aschar-Sobbi, Roozbeh; Izaddoustdar, Farzad; Korogyi, Adam S.; Wang, Qiongling; Farman, Gerrie P.; Yang, FengHua; Yang, Wallace; Dorian, David; Simpson, Jeremy A.; Tuomi, Jari M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Cox, Brian; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Dorian, Paul; Backx, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia that, for unknown reasons, is linked to intense endurance exercise. Our studies reveal that 6 weeks of swimming or treadmill exercise improves heart pump function and reduces heart-rates. Exercise also increases vulnerability to AF in association with inflammation, fibrosis, increased vagal tone, slowed conduction velocity, prolonged cardiomyocyte action potentials and RyR2 phosphorylation (CamKII-dependent S2814) in the atria, without corresponding alterations in the ventricles. Microarray results suggest the involvement of the inflammatory cytokine, TNFα, in exercised-induced atrial remodelling. Accordingly, exercise induces TNFα-dependent activation of both NFκB and p38MAPK, while TNFα inhibition (with etanercept), TNFα gene ablation, or p38 inhibition, prevents atrial structural remodelling and AF vulnerability in response to exercise, without affecting the beneficial physiological changes. Our results identify TNFα as a key factor in the pathology of intense exercise-induced AF. PMID:25598495

  3. Triggers and Anatomical Substrates in the Genesis and Perpetuation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; López-Mínguez, José Ramón; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Murillo, Margarita; Cabrera, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The definition of atrial fibrillation (AF) as a functional electrical disorder does not reflect the significant underlying structural abnormalities. Atrial and Pulmonary Vein (PV) muscle sleeve microstructural remodeling is present, and establishes a vulnerable substrate for AF maintenance. In spite of an incomplete understanding of the anatomo-functional basis for AF, current evidence demonstrates that this arrhythmia usually requires a trigger for initiation and a vulnerable electrophysiological and/or anatomical substrate for maintenance. It is still unclear whether the trigger mechanisms include focal enhanced automaticity, triggered activity and/or micro re-entry from myocardial tissue. Initiation of AF can be favored by both parasympathetic and sympathetic stimulation, which also seem to play a role in maintaining AF. Finally, evolving clinical evidence demonstrates that inflammation is associated with new-onset and recurrent AF through a mechanism that possibly involves cellular degeneration, apoptosis, and subsequent atrial fibrosis. PMID:22920484

  4. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiac impedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50-300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz - 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  5. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF) power transmitter (ex vivo) and a passive (battery free) implantable power receiver (in vivo) that enables measurement of the intracardiacimpedance (ICI) during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter) and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform). An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense) mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock) mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR) or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR) chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms) amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude) shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current) power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50–300 V). Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ) = 1.62 Ω), p < 0.01) while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA) within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3)[1 Hz − 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ) = 10.77 Ω-Hz), p < 0.01); both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert. Efficient

  6. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsett, Mark; Hamilton, Douglas; Lemery, Jay; Polk, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a possible scenario of an astronaut having Atrial Fibrillation during a Mars Mission. In the case review the presentation asks several questions about the alternatives for treatment, medications and the ramifications of the decisions.

  7. [New antiarrhythmic drugs for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Drici, M-D

    2009-12-01

    The development of new antiarrhythmic drugs is mainly aimed to treat atrial fibrillation, because of its prevalence and major consequences in terms cerebral vascular thrombosis. Specific blockade of I(Na) et I(K), even if efficacious, have previously shown to be proarrhythmogenic, with a global impairment of the cardiac patient's outcome. This lead to the development of new drugs, selectively targeting atrial currents such as I(Kur) ou I(KAch). The efficacy of amiodarone in treatment of atrial fibrillation has also yielded a whole array of new antiarrhythmic drugs targeting both these atrial currents but also sharing amiodarone pharmacodynamics properties. This renders the Vaughan-Williams classification ill-adapted for such drugs.

  8. [Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Schlitt, Axel; Kamke, Wolfram; Guha, Manju; Haberecht, Olaf; Völler, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The course of cardiac rehabilitation is often altered due to episodes of paroxysmal, predominantly postoperative atrial fibrillation. In symptomatic patients, a TEE-guided cardioversion - preferential DC shock - is indicated. In patients with persistent / permanent atrial fibrillation, a heart rate up to 110 / min and 170 / min at rest and during physical activity should, respectively, be tolerated. Therefore, training should not be quitted by heart rate but rather by load. The antithrombotic management is in addition a great task in treating patients with atrial fibrillation. With the exception of patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc-Score < 1, oral anticoagulation is indicated. Atrial fibrillation has little impact on social aspects, whereas the underlying heart disease and drug treatment (oral anticoagulation) has an important impact.

  9. Determinants and importance of atrial pressure morphology in atrial septal defect.

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, D N; Fisher, J; Moses, J W; Goldberg, H L; Levin, A R; Engle, M A; Borer, J S

    1984-01-01

    A prominent "v" wave relative to the "a" wave in the jugular vein and right atrial pressure tracing is considered to be a common haemodynamic sign of atrial septal defect. Since the prevalence, age relation, and haemodynamic determinants of the "v" greater than or equal to "a" wave configuration have not been studied the pressure recordings from 15 adults and 80 children with an isolated secundum atrial septal defect in sinus rhythm and from 40 adults and 55 children in sinus rhythm without structural cardiac abnormalities or with coronary and valvular heart disease were studied to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the "v" greater than or equal to "a" wave configuration in atrial septal defect. Only 20% of adults with an atrial septal defect had prominent right atrial "v" waves compared with 63% of children, although the specificity was quite high for each group. In adults "left atrialisation " of the right atrium ("v" greater than or equal to "a" wave) occurred in younger patients with higher right atrial and right ventricular end diastolic pressures. In contrast, in children no age related or haemodynamic determinants for the "v" greater than or equal to "a" pattern were found. In addition, most adults but few children with an atrial septal defect had "right atrialisation " of the left atrial wave configuration ("a" greater than "v"). This was found in older adults with lower right atrial and right ventricular end diastolic pressures and in older children with larger left to right shunts. Thus in contrast to children adults with an atrial septal defect rarely show a prominent "v" wave in the right atrium. The presence of a prominent right atrial "v" wave in adults with an atrial septal defect is associated with relatively higher left atrial and right heart pressures than is the absence of this sign and may be related to relatively higher systolic transatrial flow in these patients. The relative paucity of prominent right atrial "v" waves in older adults

  10. Atrial conduction delay predicts atrial fibrillation in paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia patients after radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen-Xing; Zhong, Jing-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Xin; Rong, Bing; Zhu, Qing; Zheng, Zhaotong; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess whether intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could predict atrial fibrillation (AF) for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) patients after successful treatment by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Echocardiography examination was performed on 524 consecutive PSVT patients (15 patients were excluded). Left atrial dimension, right atrial diameter and intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were measured before ablation. Patients were divided into group A (n = 32): occurrence of AF after the ablation and group B (n = 477): remained in sinus rhythm during follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to estimate the predictive value of intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay. Both intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay were higher in group A than in group B (4.79 ± 0.30 msec vs. 4.56 ± 0.32 msec; 21.98 ± 1.32 msec vs. 20.01 ± 1.33; p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that intra- and inter-atrial conduction were significant influential factors for the occurrence of AF (odds ratio [OR] = 13.577, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.469-48.914; OR = 2.569, 95% CI, 1.909-3.459, p < 0.05). The ROC cure analysis revealed that intra-atrial conduction delay ≥ 4.45 msec and inter-atrial conduction delay ≥ 20.65 were the most optimal cut-off value for predicting AF in PSVT patients after RFCA. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the intra- and inter-atrial conduction delay could effectively predict AF in post-ablation PSVT patients.

  11. Serum Soluble Semaphorin 4D is Associated with Left Atrial Diameter in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Li; You, Tao; Chen, Jianchang; Xu, Weiting; Jiao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum soluble semaphorin 4D (sSema4D) in patients with atrial fibrillation and to investigate the relationship of serum sSema4D with left atrial diameter (LAD). Material/Methods We studied a total of 113 patients who were subdivided into paroxysmal and non-paroxysmal (included persistent and permanent) atrial fibrillation groups, respectively. Another 55 subjects without atrial fibrillation were enrolled as the healthy control group. Serum levels of soluble semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) were measured in all subjects using the enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay method. We also evaluated the coagulation parameters and left atrial diameters. Results Patients with paroxysmal and non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation had significantly higher sSema4D level compared with controls (8.50±2.19 ng/mL and 9.30±2.28 ng/mL vs. 6.56±1.27 ng/ml, P<0.05). Serum sSema4D concentrations were elevated in patients with non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation compared to those with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P<0.001). The level of sSema4D was positively correlated with LAD (r=0.606, P<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that serum sSema4D, LAD, male sex, heart rate, hypertension, and coronary artery disease were associated with atrial fibrillation (P<0.05). Conclusions Serum sSema4D levels are increased in patients with atrial fibrillation and are independently associated with atrial remodeling. PMID:26417899

  12. Multifocal atrial tachycardia caused by risperidone.

    PubMed

    Oner, Taliha; Akdeniz, Celal; Adaletli, Hilal

    2016-01-15

    Risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic drug, is one of the most frequently used atypical neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of symptoms of behavioral disorders seen in autism. Although various cardiovascular side effects have been reported with risperidone, to our knowledge, it has not yet been reported that it can also result in multifocal atrial tachycardia. Based on the case reported herein, our aim is to bring awareness that risperidone may cause multifocal atrial tachycardia.

  13. Atrial fibrillation precipitated by tyramine containing foods.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, L H; Carron, D B

    1987-01-01

    Episodes of atrial fibrillation that occurred after meals developed in a 60 year old man with a history of ischaemic heart disease. The attacks were precipitated by precursors and metabolites of tyramine and tyramine containing foods and drinks, in the absence of monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The patient has remained free of atrial fibrillation for the past twelve months on a diet that does not contain tyramine. PMID:3814458

  14. Atrial fibrillation: review of current treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Joshua; Luc, Jessica G. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia in modern clinical practice, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5–2%. The prevalence of AF is expected to double in the next decades, progressing with age and increasingly becoming a global medical challenge. The first-line treatment for AF is often medical treatment with either rate control or anti-arrhythmic agents for rhythm control, in addition to anti-coagulants such as warfarin for stroke prevention in patient at risk. Catheter ablation has emerged as an alternative for AF treatment, which involves myocardial tissue lesions to disrupt the underlying triggers and substrates for AF. Surgical approaches have also been developed for treatment of AF, particularly for patients requiring concomitant cardiac surgery or those refractory to medical and catheter ablation treatments. Since the introduction of the Cox-Maze III, this procedure has evolved into several modern variations, including the use of alternative energy sources (Cox-Maze IV) such as radiofrequency, cryo-energy and microwave, as well as minimally invasive thoracoscopic epicardial approaches. Another recently introduced technique is the hybrid ablation approach, where in a single setting both epicardial thoracoscopic ablation lesions and endocardial catheter ablation lesions are performed by the cardiothoracic surgeon and cardiologist. There remains controversy surrounding the optimal approach for AF ablation, energy sources, and lesion sets employed. The goal of this article is review the history, classifications, pathophysiology and current treatment options for AF. PMID:27747025

  15. Adipose tissue natriuretic peptide receptor expression is related to insulin sensitivity in obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kovacova, Zuzana; Tharp, William G.; Liu, Dianxin; Wei, Wan; Xie, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) bind to two receptors (NPRA‐mediator of signaling; NPRC‐clearance receptor) whose ratio, NPRR (NPRA/NPRC), determines the NP bioactivity. This study investigated the relationship of NP receptor gene expression in adipose tissue and muscle with obesity and glucose intolerance. Prospectively, the study also assessed whether changes in NP receptor expression and thermogenic gene markers accompanied improvements of insulin sensitivity. Methods A cross‐sectional study of subjects with a wide range of BMI and glucose tolerance (n = 50) was conducted, as well as a randomized 12‐week trial of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pioglitazone (n = 9) or placebo (n = 10). Results NPRR mRNA was significantly lower in adipose tissue of subjects with obesity when compared with lean subjects (P ≤ 0.001). NPRR decreased with progression from normal glucose tolerance to T2DM (P < 0.01) independently of obesity. Treatment of subjects with T2DM with pioglitazone increased NPRR in adipose tissue (P ≤ 0.01) in conjunction with improvements in insulin sensitivity and increases of the thermogenic markers PPARγ coactivator‐1α and uncoupling protein 1 (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusions Decreased adipose tissue NPRR was associated with obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. This relationship was not observed for skeletal muscle NPRR. Pharmacological improvement of insulin sensitivity in subjects with T2DM was tied to improvement in NPRR and increased expression of genes involved in thermogenic processes. PMID:26887289

  16. [Radiofrequency transcatheter ablation in atrial tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rodríguez, E; Morales Hernández, J A

    2000-01-01

    Incessant atrial tachycardia is an infrequent arrhythmia. Specially difficult to treat medically. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has been used successfully to cure a variety of supraventricular tachycardias. The purpose of this work is to report our initial experience in the treatment of atrial tachycardia. Ten patients, mean age 28.7 +/- 15 year with conventional drug-resistant symptomatic atrial tachycardia were treated with selective ablation of the focus using radiofrequency energy. It was found an abnormal automaticity in 10 tachycardias and in only one patient intra-atrial reentrant was supported. Radiofrequency energy was successful in 10 of 11 tachycardias with a mean of 9.3 +/- 6.8 applications using the technique of local atrial electrogram activation time with a mean value of -54 +/- -31 milliseconds at the successful ablation sites. No complications were observed and one patient had an early clinical recurrence. All patients with successful ablation are symptom-free, in sinus rhythm and without antiarrhythmic medications after 1 to 28 months of follow-up. Our initial experience support that radiofrequency catheter ablation is a safe and effective therapeutic option for incessant atrial tachycardia. PMID:10855411

  17. Antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation: new insights.

    PubMed

    Le Heuzey, J Y

    2012-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation are quickly increasing, mainly due to the ageing of the population. Atrial fibrillation is, to date, a problem of public health. Atrial fibrillation is associated to a five-fold risk of stroke, which may be identified by score risks, such as CHADS(2) score. The classical antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation is based on vitamin K antagonists. Trials made in the 90's have clearly shown that vitamin K antagonists were able to decrease stroke risk by about 60%. New oral anticoagulants are now available on the market to treat patients with atrial fibrillation. These drugs are dabigatran which has demonstrated an interest in the RE-LY trial. Two doses may be prescribed, 110 mg bid and 150 mg bid. Anti Xa have also demonstrated an interest : rivaroxaban in the ROCKET AF trial and apixaban in the AVERROES (versus aspirin) and ARISTOTLE trials. In the future these drugs will have a major place in the armamentarium used to treat patients with atrial fibrillation. In all these trials a decrease in intra cranial haemorrhages has been demonstrated. In the everyday practice it will be necessary to be very cautious in patients with impaired renal function, as all these drugs are eliminated by kidneys. PMID:23026665

  18. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  3. The Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Solus, Joseph; Chen, Qingxia; Rho, Young Hee; Milne, Ginger; Stein, C. Michael; Darbar, Dawood

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in clinical practice. There is increasing evidence that inflammation and oxidative stress contribute to the pathogenesis of AF, but their role remains poorly defined. Furthermore, it is unclear if inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with particular types of AF. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to define the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in AF. METHODS Using a case-control study design, 305 patients with AF were compared to 150 control patients. AF was categorized into lone and typical AF, and further sub-categorized as paroxysmal, persistent or permanent AF. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTpBNP) and urinary F2-isoprostanes, a measure of oxidative stress, were measured. RESULTS IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, MCP1, VEGF and NTpBNP concentrations were independently associated with AF (all P values <0.05), but F2-isoprostane excretion was not elevated (P=0.50). There was a graded increase in TNF-α (median [interquartile range (IQR)]: 6.8 [3.4–11.3], 8.0 [5.6–10.9], 10.1 [5.7–12.4] pg/ml, P<0.05) and NTpBNP (170.6 [67.3–481.9], 681.39 [310.3–1439.0], 1179.9 [653.1–2096.0] pg/ml, P<0.001) among the subgroups of paroxysmal, persistent and permanent AF, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This study shows that inflammatory biomarkers were significantly increased in patients with AF, supporting a strong association between inflammation and the arrhythmia. Surprisingly, urinary F2-isoprostanes, a sensitive index of systemic oxidative stress in vivo, were not increased in AF overall, or in different subtypes of AF. PMID:20153266

  4. Identification of a Possible Role for Atrial Natiuretic Peptide in MDMA-induced hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Hrometz, Sandra L; Thatcher, Karen E; Ebert, Jeremy A; Mills, Edward M; Sprague, Jon E

    2011-01-01

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) induces thermogenesis in a mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3-dependent manner. There is evidence that this hyperthermia is mediated in part by the lipolytic release of free fatty acids, that subsequently activate uncoupling protein 3 in skeletal muscle mitochondria. We hypothesize that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a strong lipolytic mediator, may contribute to the induction and maintenance of MDMA-induced thermogenesis. The specific aims of this study were to 1) determine if ANP is released following MDMA administration, and 2) use the ANP receptor antagonist, Anantin, to ascertain the role of ANP in MDMA-induced hyperthermia. ANP levels were measured in plasma at baseline, 10, 20, 30 and 60 min following MDMA (40 mg/kg, sc) administration in 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats. A robust increase in ANP was seen within ten min of MDMA administration. ANP levels returned to baseline at 20 min and then gradually rose over the 60 min monitoring period. The administration of Anantin (40 mg, ip), 15 min before and after MDMA, significantly attenuated the MDMA-induced hyperthermia. We conclude that ANP signaling contributes to the hyperthermia induced by MDMA. PMID:21827841

  5. Characterization of cardiac oxidative stress levels in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ayako; Kashima, Yuichiro; Tomita, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Aizawa, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with oxidative stress and elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. However, the exact cardiac origin of oxidative stress and its association with BNP levels in AF patients remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the chamber-specific plasma oxidative stress levels in patients with paroxysmal AF (PAF) and persistent AF (PSAF). Diacron-reactive oxygen metabolite (dROM) levels were measured in patients with PAF (n = 50) and PSAF (n = 35) at different cardiac sites before ablation and in peripheral vein 3 months after ablation. For all sites, dROM levels were higher in PSAF patients than in PAF patients; the levels were the highest in the coronary sinus at 429.0 (interquartile range: 392.0-449.0) vs. 374.0 (357.0-397.8) Carratelli units (P < 0.05). dROM levels in the coronary sinus were related to the BNP levels (r = 0.436, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the reduction in the peripheral dROM levels was related to that in the peripheral BNP levels in patients with symptomatic improvement (r = 0.473, P < 0.001). Cardiac oxidative stress may either be a cause or consequence of prolonged AF, and cardiac oxidative stress levels correlated with BNP levels, though a possible source of oxidative stress in AF patients may be systemic circulation.

  6. Applying non-linear dynamics to atrial appendage flow data to understand and characterize atrial arrhythmia

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Grimm, R.A.; Katz, R.; Thomas, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand and characterize left atrial appendage flow in atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation and flutter are the most common cardiac arrhythmias affecting 15% of the older population. The pulsed Doppler velocity profile data was recorded from the left atrial appendage of patients using transesophageal echocardiography. The data was analyzed using Fourier analysis and nonlinear dynamical tools. Fourier analysis showed that appendage mechanical frequency ({ital f{sub f}}) for patients in sinus rhythm was always lower (around1 Hz) than that in atrial fibrillation (5-8 Hz). Among patients with atrial fibrillation spectral power below {ital f{sub f}} was significantly different suggesting variability within this group of patients. Results that suggested the presence of nonlinear dynamics were: a) the existence of two arbitrary peak frequencies {ital f{sub 1}, f{sub 2}}, and other peak frequencies as linear combinations thereof ({ital mf{sub 1}{+-}nf{sub 2}}), and b) the similarity between the spectrum of patient data and that obtained using the Lorenz equation. Nonlinear analysis tools, including Phase plots and differential radial plots, were also generated from the velocity data using a delay of 10. In the phase plots, some patients displayed a torus-like structure, while others had a more random-like pattern. In the differential radial plots, the first set of patients (with torus-like phase plots) showed fewer values crossing an arbitrary threshold of 10 than did the second set (8 vs. 27 in one typical example). The outcome of cardioversion was different for these two set of patients. Fourier analysis helped to: differentiate between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation, understand the characteristics of the wide range of atrial fibrillation patients, and provide hints that atrial fibrillation could be a nonlinear process. Nonlinear dynamical tools helped to further characterize and sub-classify atrial fibrillation.

  7. Outcomes after ablation for typical atrial flutter (from the Loire Valley Atrial Fibrillation Project).

    PubMed

    Clementy, Nicolas; Desprets, Laurent; Pierre, Bertrand; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Simeon, Edouard; Brunet-Bernard, Anne; Babuty, Dominique; Fauchier, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Similar predisposing factors are found in most types of atrial arrhythmias. The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) among patients with atrial flutter is high, suggesting similar outcomes in patients with those arrhythmias. We sought to investigate the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with AF and/or atrial flutter with contemporary management using radiofrequency ablation. In an academic institution, we retrospectively examined the clinical course of 8,962 consecutive patients admitted to our department with a diagnosis of AF and/or atrial flutter. After a median follow-up of 934 ± 1,134 days, 1,155 deaths and 715 stroke and/thromboembolic (TE) events were recorded. Patients with atrial flutter undergoing cavotricuspid isthmus ablation (n = 875, 37% with a history of AF) had a better survival rate than other patients (hazard ratio [HR] 0.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25 to 0.49, p <0.0001). Using Cox proportional hazards model and propensity score model, after adjustment for main other confounders, ablation for atrial flutter was significantly associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.84, p = 0.006) and stroke and/or TE events (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.92, p = 0.02). After ablation, there was no significant difference in the risk of TE between patients with a history of AF and those with atrial flutter alone (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.41 to 1.67, p = 0.59). In conclusion, in patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias, those with atrial flutter with contemporary management who undergo cavotricuspid isthmus radiofrequency ablation independently have a lower risk of stroke and/or TE events and death of any cause, whether a history of AF is present or not.

  8. Atrial Ectopy as a Predictor of Incident Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Dewland, Thomas A.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Mandyam, Mala C.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Siscovick, David S.; Stein, Phyllis K.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Gottdiener, John S.; Marcus, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) prediction models have unclear clinical utility given the absence of AF prevention therapies and the immutability of many risk factors. Premature atrial contractions (PACs) play a critical role in AF pathogenesis and may be modifiable. Objective To investigate whether PAC count improves model performance for AF risk. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 4 U.S. communities. Patients A random subset of 1260 adults without prevalent AF enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study between 1989 and 1990. Measurements The PAC count was quantified by 24-hour electrocardiography. Participants were followed for the diagnosis of incident AF or death. The Framingham AF risk algorithm was used as the comparator prediction model. Results In adjusted analyses, doubling the hourly PAC count was associated with a significant increase in AF risk (hazard ratio, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.13 to 1.22]; P < 0.001) and overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.06 [CI, 1.03 to 1.09]; P < 0.001). Compared with the Framingham model, PAC count alone resulted in similar AF risk discrimination at 5 and 10 years of follow-up and superior risk discrimination at 15 years. The addition of PAC count to the Framingham model resulted in significant 10-year AF risk discrimination improvement (c-statistic, 0.65 vs. 0.72; P < 0.001), net reclassification improvement (23.2% [CI, 12.8% to 33.6%]; P < 0.001), and integrated discrimination improvement (5.6% [CI, 4.2% to 7.0%]; P < 0.001). The specificity for predicting AF at 15 years exceeded 90% for PAC counts more than 32 beats/h. Limitation This study does not establish a causal link between PACs and AF. Conclusion The addition of PAC count to a validated AF risk algorithm provides superior AF risk discrimination and significantly improves risk reclassification. Further study is needed to determine whether PAC modification can prospectively reduce AF risk. Primary Funding Source American Heart Association, Joseph Drown Foundation

  9. Racial Differences in Circulating Natriuretic Peptide Levels: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepak K; Claggett, Brian; Wells, Quinn; Cheng, Susan; Li, Man; Maruthur, Nisa; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef; Konety, Suma; Butler, Kenneth R; Mosley, Thomas; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hoogeveen, Ron; Ballantyne, Christie M; Solomon, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Background Natriuretic peptides promote natriuresis, diuresis, and vasodilation. Experimental deficiency of natriuretic peptides leads to hypertension (HTN) and cardiac hypertrophy, conditions more common among African Americans. Hospital-based studies suggest that African Americans may have reduced circulating natriuretic peptides, as compared to Caucasians, but definitive data from community-based cohorts are lacking. Methods and Results We examined plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) levels according to race in 9137 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study participants (22% African American) without prevalent cardiovascular disease at visit 4 (1996–1998). Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were performed adjusting for clinical covariates. Among African Americans, percent European ancestry was determined from genetic ancestry informative markers and then examined in relation to NTproBNP levels in multivariable linear regression analysis. NTproBNP levels were significantly lower in African Americans (median, 43 pg/mL; interquartile range [IQR], 18, 88) than Caucasians (median, 68 pg/mL; IQR, 36, 124; P<0.0001). In multivariable models, adjusted log NTproBNP levels were 40% lower (95% confidence interval [CI], −43, −36) in African Americans, compared to Caucasians, which was consistent across subgroups of age, gender, HTN, diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity. African-American race was also significantly associated with having nondetectable NTproBNP (adjusted OR, 5.74; 95% CI, 4.22, 7.80). In multivariable analyses in African Americans, a 10% increase in genetic European ancestry was associated with a 7% (95% CI, 1, 13) increase in adjusted log NTproBNP. Conclusions African Americans have lower levels of plasma NTproBNP than Caucasians, which may be partially owing to genetic variation. Low natriuretic peptide levels in African Americans may contribute to the greater risk for HTN and its sequalae in

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (AF) ... the lungs and body. This can lead to signs and symptoms, such as: Palpitations (feelings that your ...

  11. Effect of phenylephrine infusion on atrial electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, J. W.; Basta, M.; Fletcher, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of changes in autonomic tone induced by phenylephrine infusion on atrial refractoriness and conduction. DESIGN: Left and right atrial electrophysiological properties were measured before and after a constant phenylephrine infusion designed to increase sinus cycle length by 25%. SUBJECTS: 20 patients, aged 53 (SD 6) years, undergoing electrophysiological study for investigation of idiopathic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (seven patients) or for routine follow up after successful catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (13 patients). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in left and right atrial effective refractory periods, atrial activation times, and frequency of induction of atrial fibrillation. RESULTS: Phenylephrine (mean dose 69 (SD 18) mg/min) increased mean blood pressure by 22 (12) mm Hg (range 7 to 44) and lengthened sinus cycle length by 223 (94) ms (20 to 430). Left atrial effective refractory period lengthened following phenylephrine infusion from 250 (25) to 264 (21) ms (P < 0.001) but there was no significant change in right atrial effective refractory period: 200 (20) v 206 (29), P = 0.11. There was a significant relation between the effect of phenylephrine on sinus cycle length and on right atrial refractoriness (r = 0.6, P = 0.005) with shortening of right atrial refractoriness in patients with the greatest prolongation in sinus cycle length. During phenylephrine infusion, the right atrial stimulus to left atrial activation time at the basic pacing cycle length of 600 ms was unchanged, at 130 (18) v 131 (17) ms, but activation delay with a premature extrastimulus increased: 212 (28) v 227 (38) ms, P = 0.002. Atrial fibrillation was induced by two of 58 refractory period measurements at baseline and by 12 of 61 measurements during phenylephrine infusion (P < 0.01). Phenylephrine increased the difference between left and right atrial refractory periods by 22.8 (19.4) ms in the five patients with induced atrial

  12. A Case of Giant Right Atrial Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Ravindra S; Tiwari, Ashish; Suresh, P V; Raj, Vimal; Kaushik, Pradeepkumar

    2016-07-01

    Giant right atrial aneurysm is a rare entity in infants and children. It needs to be distinguished from an atrial diverticulum, which can have similar presentation. Generally, an incidental finding in children, it can present with varied symptoms. We report a case of a giant right atrial aneurysm in an asymptomatic child with a large clot in the dilated right atrium, who underwent successful resection of the atrial aneurysm. PMID:26884450

  13. Displacement of Amplatzer septal occluder in a patient with atrial septal defects and an atrial septal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Oda, Takeshi; Kato, Seiya; Suda, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects has become more common because of its high success rate and low morbidity; however, this treatment for patients with atrial septal aneurysms is still challenging. PMID:27434107

  14. Biological significance of miR-126 expression in atrial fibrillation and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wei, X.J.; Han, M.; Yang, F.Y.; Wei, G.C.; Liang, Z.G.; Yao, H.; Ji, C.W.; Xie, R.S.; Gong, C.L.; Tian, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the biological significance of microRNA-126 (miR-126) expression in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and/or heart failure (HF) to examine the possible mechanism of miR-126-dependent AF and development of HF. A total of 103 patients were divided into three groups: AF group (18 men and 17 women, mean age: 65.62±12.72 years), HF group (17 men and 15 women, mean age: 63.95±19.71 years), and HF-AF group (20 men and 16 women, mean age: 66.56±14.37 years). Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure relative miR-126 expression as calculated by the 2−ΔΔCt method. miR-126 was frequently downregulated in the 3 patient groups compared with controls. This reduction was significantly lower in permanent and persistent AF patients than in those with paroxysmal AF (P<0.05, t-test). Moreover, miR-126 expression was markedly lower in the HF-AF group compared with the AF and HF groups. The 3 patient groups had higher N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), larger left atrial diameter, and higher cardiothoracic ratio compared with controls. There were significant differences in NT-proBNP levels and LVEF among the AF, HF, and HF-AF groups. Pearson correlation analysis showed that relative miR-126 expression was positively associated with LVEF, logarithm of NT-proBNP, left atrial diameter, cardiothoracic ratio, and age in HF-AF patients. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that miR-126 expression was positively correlated with LVEF, but negatively correlated with the logarithm of NT-pro BNP and the cardiothoracic ratio (all P<0.05). Serum miR-126 levels could serve as a potential candidate biomarker for evaluating the severity of AF and HF. However, to confirm these results, future studies with a larger and diverse patient population are necessary. PMID:26313139

  15. Phosphodiesterase4D (PDE4D)--A risk factor for atrial fibrillation and stroke?

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Carina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Iversen, Helle K; Kruuse, Christina

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the gene encoding phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) enzyme are associated with ischemic stroke; however the functional implications of such mutations are not well understood. PDE4D is part of a complex protein family modulating intracellular signalling by cyclic nucleotides. The PDE4 family includes subtypes A-D, all of which show unique intracellular, cellular and tissue distribution. PDE4D is the major subtype expressed in human atrial myocytes and involved in the pathophysiology of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. The PDE4D enzyme hydrolyses cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Though diverging results are reported, several population based studies describe association of various PDE4D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with cardio-embolic stroke in particular. Functionally, a down regulation of PDE4D variants has been reported in stroke patients. The anti-inflammatory and vasodilator properties of PDE4 inhibitors make them suitable for treatment of stroke and cardiovascular disease. PDE4D has recently been suggested as factor in atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes the possible function of PDE4D in the brain, heart, and vasculature. Further, association of the described SNPs, in particular, with cardioembolic stroke, is reviewed. Current findings on the PDE4D mutations suggest functionality involves an increased cardiac risk factor as well as augmented risk of atrial fibrillation. PMID:26671126

  16. Change in P wave morphology after convergent atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Suvash; Chen, On; Greene, Mary; John, Jinu Jacob; Greenberg, Yisachar; Yang, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Convergent atrial fibrillation ablation involves extensive epicardial as well as endocardial ablation of the left atrium. We examined whether it changes the morphology of the surface P wave. We reviewed electrocardiograms of 29 patients who underwent convergent ablation for atrial fibrillation. In leads V1, II and III, we measured P wave duration, area and amplitude before ablation, and at 1, 3 and 6 months from ablation. After ablation, there were no significant changes in P wave amplitude, area, or duration in leads II and III. There was a significant reduction in the area of the terminal negative deflection of the P wave in V1 from 0.38 mm(2) to 0.13 mm(2) (p = 0.03). There is also an acute increase in the amplitude and duration of the positive component of the P wave in V1 followed by a reduction in both by 6 months. Before ablation, 62.5% of the patients had biphasic P waves in V1. In 6 months, only 39.2% of them had biphasic P waves. Hybrid ablation causes a reduction of the terminal negative deflection of the P wave in V1 as well as temporal changes in the duration and amplitude of the positive component of the P wave in V1. This likely reflects the reduced electrical contribution of the posterior left atrium after ablation as well as anatomical and autonomic remodeling. Recognition of this altered sinus P wave morphology is useful in the diagnosis of atrial arrhythmias in this patient population. PMID:27485559

  17. Dedifferentiation of atrial cardiomyocytes as a result of chronic atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed Central

    Ausma, J.; Wijffels, M.; van Eys, G.; Koide, M.; Ramaekers, F.; Allessie, M.; Borgers, M.

    1997-01-01

    Chronic atrial fibrillation was induced in goats by electrical pacing. After 9 to 23 weeks of sustained atrial fibrillation, the morphology of the atrial structures was examined. The majority of the cardiomyocytes exhibited marked changes in their cellular substructures, with the replacement of sarcomeres by glycogen as the main characteristic. Using immuno-histochemical staining procedures, we assessed the expression and organization of contractile and cytoskeletal proteins in these cases and compared them with the expression and organization of these proteins in normal atria. Part of the atrial cardiomyocytes acquired a dedifferentiated phenotype, as deduced from the re-expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, the disappearance of cardiotin, and the staining patterns of titin, which resembled those of embryonic cardiomyocytes. From these results we conclude that chronic atrial fibrillation induces myocardial dedifferentiation. This model of chronic atrial fibrillation in goats offers the possibility to study the time course of changes in cardiac structure during sustained atrial fibrillation and after cardioversion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9327732

  18. Aorta-right atrial tunnel.

    PubMed

    Sai Krishna, Cheemalapati; Baruah, Dibya Kumar; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara; Panigrahi, Nanda Kishore; Suman, Kalagara; Kumar, Palli Venkata Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aorta-right atrial tunnel is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. The tunnel is classified as anterior or posterior, depending upon its course in relation to the ascending aorta. An origin above the sinotubular ridge differentiates the tunnel from an aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, and the absence of myocardial branches differentiates it from a coronary-cameral fistula. Clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic precordial murmur to congestive heart failure. The embryologic background and pathogenesis of this lesion are attributable either to an aneurysmal dilation of the sinus nodal artery or to a congenital weakness of the aortic media. In either circumstance, progressive enlargement of the tunnel and ultimate rupture into the low-pressure right atrium could occur under the influence of the systemic pressure.The lesion is diagnosed by use of 2-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Computed tomographic angiography is an additional noninvasive diagnostic tool. The possibility of complications necessitates early therapy, even in asymptomatic patients or those with a hemodynamically insignificant shunt. Available treatments are catheter-based intervention, external ligation under controlled hypotension, or surgical closure with the patient under cardiopulmonary bypass.Herein, we discuss the cases of 2 patients who had this unusual anomaly. We highlight the outcome on follow-up imaging (patient 1) and the identification and safe reimplantation of the coronary artery (patient 2).

  19. Atrial tachycardia originating from the atrial septum in a patient with dextrocardia and complex structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ya-Lei; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Lee, Pi-Chang; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2012-10-01

    We report a case with dextrocardia, corrected transposition of the great arteries. He also had an atrial septum defect (ASD) with patch repair. Activation map showed a centrifugal activation from a focal origin on the systemic lower left atrial ASD patch. Ablation of the origin can terminate the atrial tachycardia.

  20. Increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation secondary to atrial fibrosis in transgenic goats expressing transforming growth factor - B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in people with significant morbidity and mortality. There is a strong association between atrial fibrosis and AF. Transforming growth factor B1 (TGF-B1) is an essential mediator of atrial fibrosis in animal models and human pat...

  1. Randomised trial of two approaches to screening for atrial fibrillation in UK general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stephen; Mant, David

    2002-01-01

    majority (53/65 [82%]) atrial fibrillation had been previously recorded somewhere on their medical record. If the nurse used any irregularity of the pulse as the screening criterion, the sensitivity of screening was 91% and the specificity was 74%; sensitivity fell to 54% but specificity increased to 98% if the criterion used was continuous irregularity. CONCLUSIONS: Nurse-led screening for atrial fibrillation in UK general practice is both feasible and effective and will identify a substantial number of patients who could benefit from antithrombotic therapy. Although the majority of patients detected at first screening could be identified by careful scrutiny of medical records, review of record summaries was insufficient in the practices involved in this study and screening may be a more cost-effective option. PMID:12014534

  2. Practice implications of the Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne B

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common and complex cardiac arrhythmias. Using currently available evidence, leading medical societies have established recommendations for the optimal management of atrial fibrillation. These guidelines have recently been updated by 4 consensus groups: the European Society of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and a task force of 3 societies from the United States: the American College of Cardiology Foundation, the American Heart Association, and the Heart Rhythm Society. The present review focused on the similarities and differences among these recently updated guidelines. Key revisions included updated information on newer treatments for rhythm control, treatment options to reduce atrial fibrillation complications, and updated anticoagulant management for thromboprophylaxis.

  3. Ablation therapy for left atrial autonomic modification.

    PubMed

    Malcolme-Lawes, Louisa; Sandler, Belinda C; Sikkel, Markus B; Lim, Phang Boon; Kanagaratnam, Prapa

    2016-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system is implicated in the multifactorial pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) but few studies have attempted neural targeting for therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated that short bursts of stimulation, at specific sites of left atrial ganglionated plexi (GPs), trigger fibrillation-inducing atrial ectopy and importantly continuous stimulation of these sites may not induce AV block, the 'conventional' marker used to locate GPs. We have shown that these ectopy-triggering GP (ET-GP) sites are anatomically stable and can be rendered inactive by either ablation at the site or by ablation between the site and the adjacent pulmonary vein (PV). This may have important implications for planning patient specific strategies for ablation of paroxysmal AF in the future. PMID:27595199

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Cecilia; Blanchard, Daniel G

    2016-09-15

    Atrial fibrillation is a supraventricular arrhythmia that adversely affects cardiac function and increases the risk of stroke. It is the most common arrhythmia and a major source of morbidity and mortality; its prevalence increases with age. Pulse rate is sensitive, but not specific, for diagnosis, and suspected atrial fibrillation should be confirmed with 12-lead electrocardiography. Because normal electrocardiographic findings do not rule out atrial fibrillation, home monitoring is recommended if there is clinical suspicion of arrhythmia despite normal test results. Treatment is based on decisions made regarding when to convert to normal sinus rhythm vs. when to treat with rate control, and, in either case, how to best reduce the risk of stroke. For most patients, rate control is preferred to rhythm control. Ablation therapy is used to destroy abnormal foci responsible for atrial fibrillation. Anticoagulation reduces the risk of stroke while increasing the risk of bleeding. The CHA2DS2-VASc scoring system assesses the risk of stroke, with a score of 2 or greater indicating a need for anticoagulation. The HAS-BLED score estimates the risk of bleeding. Scores of 3 or greater indicate high risk. Warfarin, dabigatran, factor Xa inhibitors (e.g., rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban), and aspirin are options for stroke prevention. Selection of therapy should be individualized based on risks and potential benefits, cost, and patient preference. Left atrial appendage obliteration is an option for reducing stroke risk. Two implantable devices used to occlude the appendage, the Watchman and the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug, appear to be as effective as warfarin in preventing stroke, but they are invasive. Another percutaneous approach to occlusion, wherein the left atrium is closed off using the Lariat, is also available, but data on its long-term effectiveness and safety are still limited. Surgical treatments for atrial fibrillation are reserved for patients who are undergoing

  5. A new dynamic 3D virtual methodology for teaching the mechanics of atrial septation as seen in the human heart

    PubMed Central

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Houyel, Lucile; Almange, Claude; Anderson, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Learning embryology remains difficult, since it requires understanding of many complex phenomena. The temporal evolution of developmental events has classically been illustrated using cartoons, which create difficulty in linking spatial and temporal aspects, such correlation being the keystone of descriptive embryology. Methods We synthesized the bibliographic data from recent studies of atrial septal development. On the basis of this synthesis, consensus on the stages of atrial septation as seen in the human heart has been reached by a group of experts in cardiac embryology and paediatric cardiology. This has permitted the preparation of three-dimensional (3-D) computer graphic objects for the anatomical components involved in the different stages of normal human atrial septation. Results We have provided a virtual guide to the process of normal atrial septation, the animation providing an appreciation of the temporal and morphologic events necessary to separate the systemic and pulmonary venous returns. Conclusion We have shown that our animations of normal human atrial septation increase significantly the teaching of the complex developmental processes involved, and provide a new dynamic for the process of learning. PMID:19363807

  6. A new dynamic 3D virtual methodology for teaching the mechanics of atrial septation as seen in the human heart.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Houyel, Lucile; Almange, Claude; Anderson, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Learning embryology remains difficult, since it requires understanding of many complex phenomena. The temporal evolution of developmental events has classically been illustrated using cartoons, which create difficulty in linking spatial and temporal aspects, such correlation being the keystone of descriptive embryology. We synthesized the bibliographic data from recent studies of atrial septal development. On the basis of this synthesis, consensus on the stages of atrial septation as seen in the human heart has been reached by a group of experts in cardiac embryology and pediatric cardiology. This has permitted the preparation of three-dimensional (3D) computer graphic objects for the anatomical components involved in the different stages of normal human atrial septation. We have provided a virtual guide to the process of normal atrial septation, the animation providing an appreciation of the temporal and morphologic events necessary to separate the systemic and pulmonary venous returns. We have shown that our animations of normal human atrial septation increase significantly the teaching of the complex developmental processes involved, and provide a new dynamic for the process of learning. PMID:19363807

  7. Bilateral Atrial Myxoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Susupaus, Attapoom; Foofuengmonkolkit, Kumpoo

    2016-02-01

    Among the rare cardiac tumors, myxoma, which is mostly located in the left atrium, is the most common type. Bilateral atrial myxoma is extremely rare, and requires urgent surgery. The authors report the case of a 34-year-old male, who presented with one month of right hemiparesis and aphasia and subsequently diagnosed with bilateral atrial myxoma based on transthoracic echocardiography. An urgent operation for intra-cardiac tumor removal was performed with the biatrial approach. Once a diagnosis of myxoma has been made, an urgent operation for tumor removal is necessary due to the risk of serious complications, including sudden death from normal blood flow obstruction. PMID:27266240

  8. Left Atrial Myxoma Mimicking Mitral Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ojji, Dike B; Mamven, Manmak H; Omonua, Odiase; Habib, Zaiyad; Osaze, Hamamatu; Sliwa, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma is a benign (non-malignant) neoplasm that represents the most common primary tumour of the heart. We present the case of a 36 year old woman with background hypertension who presented with features of left ventricular failure and seizures, and was found during transthoracic echocardiography to have left atrial myxoma protruding through the mitral valve orifice. She subsequently had excision of the atrial myxoma. The usefulness of early transthoracic echocardiography in any patient presenting with features of heart failure even when the aetiology seems obvious cannot be over-emphasised. PMID:22844201

  9. Hemoglobin and B-type natriuretic peptide preoperative values but not inflammatory markers, are associated with postoperative morbidity in cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Risk stratification in cardiac surgery significantly impacts outcome. This study seeks to define whether there is an independent association between the preoperative serum level of hemoglobin (Hb), leukocyte count (LEUCO), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), or B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and postoperative morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery. Methods Prospective, analytic cohort study, with 554 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in a tertiary cardiovascular hospital and followed up for 12 months. The cohort was distributed according to preoperative values of Hb, LEUCO, hsCRP, and BNP in independent quintiles for each of these variables. Results After adjustment for all covariates, a significant association was found between elevated preoperative BNP and the occurrence of low postoperative cardiac output (OR 3.46, 95% CI 1.53–7.80, p = 0.003) or postoperative atrial fibrillation (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.45–10.38). For the combined outcome (death/acute coronary syndrome/rehospitalization within 12 months), we observed an OR of 1.93 (95% CI 1.00–3.74). An interaction was found between BNP level and the presence or absence of diabetes mellitus. The OR for non-diabetics was 1.26 (95% CI 0.61–2.60) and for diabetics was 18.82 (95% CI 16.2–20.5). Preoperative Hb was also significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of postoperative low cardiac output (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13–0.81, p = 0.016). Both Hb and BNP were significantly associated with the lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stays and the number of transfused red blood cells (p < 0.002). Inflammatory markers, although associated with adverse outcomes, lost statistical significance when adjusted for covariates. Conclusions High preoperative BNP or low Hb shows an association of independent risk with postoperative outcomes, and their measurement could help to stratify surgical risk. The ability to predict the onset of atrial fibrillation or

  10. [Obesity as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Duraj, Iwona; Broncel, Marlena

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and obesity is a growing problem of public health both in Poland and in the whole world. AF risk factors may be summarized as elderliness, male sex, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, cardiac surgery. Once obesity is an independent, potentially modifiable risk factor for AF. The connection between obesity and atrial fibrillation is very up-to-date because of incremental prevalence, almost epidemic of obesity in the whole world. The probability of AF among obese patients increases with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea. Regardless many researches it hasn't been assessed yet how obesity itself predisposes to AF. It could be an effect of change in the atrial anatomy, the rise of atrial pressure, mechanical stretch, interstitial atrial fibrosis and disruption of atrial electric integrity. A great role is ascribed to inflammation, especially proinflammatory cytokines increased by adipocites of left atrial epicardial adiposity. PMID:26891428

  11. [Obesity as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Duraj, Iwona; Broncel, Marlena

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and obesity is a growing problem of public health both in Poland and in the whole world. AF risk factors may be summarized as elderliness, male sex, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, cardiac surgery. Once obesity is an independent, potentially modifiable risk factor for AF. The connection between obesity and atrial fibrillation is very up-to-date because of incremental prevalence, almost epidemic of obesity in the whole world. The probability of AF among obese patients increases with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea. Regardless many researches it hasn't been assessed yet how obesity itself predisposes to AF. It could be an effect of change in the atrial anatomy, the rise of atrial pressure, mechanical stretch, interstitial atrial fibrosis and disruption of atrial electric integrity. A great role is ascribed to inflammation, especially proinflammatory cytokines increased by adipocites of left atrial epicardial adiposity.

  12. Relationship between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and renal function: the effects on predicting early outcome after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Kwak, Young Lan; Lee, Jonghoon

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasma levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) provide useful prognostic predictors in patients after cardiac surgery. However, predictive accuracy of NT-proBNP levels has varied significantly according to renal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to assess whether preoperative NT-proBNP levels could be used as predictors of early postoperative outcomes on the basis of renal function in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB). Methods In 219 patients undergoing elective OPCAB, NT-proBNP and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were assessed preoperatively. All patients were divided into 3 groups according to tertiles of eGFR: the first (eGFR ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m2), the second (90 ml/min/1.73 m2 > eGFR ≥ 72 ml/min/1.73 m2) and the third tertile group (eGFR < 72 ml/min/1.73 m2). End point was the composite of early postoperative complications defined as myocardial infarction, new onset atrial fibrillation, ventricular dysfunction, prolonged mechanical ventilator care (> 48 hr), prolonged ICU stay (≥ 3 days), and in hospital mortality. Results There was no difference in early postoperative complications among groups. A preoperative NT-proBNP level of 228 pg/ml and 302 pg/ml (sensitivity 70%, specificity 67%, P < 0.001 and sensitivity 73%, specificity 63%, P = 0.001, respectively) were optimal cut-off values predicting complicated early postoperative course in second and third tertile group, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative NT-proBNP levels seem to be predictive of early postoperative complications in patients with eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m2 undergoing OPCAB. PMID:21860749

  13. Localized reentrant tachycardia in the aorta contiguity region mimicking perimitral atrial flutter in the context of atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Ejima, Koichiro; Shoda, Morio; Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Yashiro, Bun; Wakisaka, Osamu; Manaka, Tetsuyuki; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2013-07-01

    We describe a case with a focal atrial tachycardia (AT) masquerading as perimitral atrial flutter revealed after circumferential pulmonary vein antral isolation for atrial fibrillation. It was successfully terminated and became noninducible by a point ablation on the left atrial anterior wall (LAAW) near the mitral annulus in contact with the aortic root and on the left superior pulmonary vein-left atrial appendage ridge, without any linear ablation, using electroanatomical mapping and conventional precise mapping with a maximum amplified gain within the low-voltage area. The AT revealed in our case was an LAAW-aorta contiguity area-related AT.

  14. Antithrombotic Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    You, John J.; Singer, Daniel E.; Howard, Patricia A.; Lane, Deirdre A.; Eckman, Mark H.; Fang, Margaret C.; Hylek, Elaine M.; Schulman, Sam; Go, Alan S.; Hughes, Michael; Spencer, Frederick A.; Manning, Warren J.; Halperin, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The risk of stroke varies considerably across different groups of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Antithrombotic prophylaxis for stroke is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. We provide recommendations for antithrombotic treatment based on net clinical benefit for patients with AF at varying levels of stroke risk and in a number of common clinical scenarios. Methods: We used the methods described in the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines article of this supplement. Results: For patients with nonrheumatic AF, including those with paroxysmal AF, who are (1) at low risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 [congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 years, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack] score of 0), we suggest no therapy rather than antithrombotic therapy, and for patients choosing antithrombotic therapy, we suggest aspirin rather than oral anticoagulation or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel; (2) at intermediate risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 score of 1), we recommend oral anticoagulation rather than no therapy, and we suggest oral anticoagulation rather than aspirin or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel; and (3) at high risk of stroke (eg, CHADS2 score of ≥ 2), we recommend oral anticoagulation rather than no therapy, aspirin, or combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Where we recommend or suggest in favor of oral anticoagulation, we suggest dabigatran 150 mg bid rather than adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist therapy. Conclusions: Oral anticoagulation is the optimal choice of antithrombotic therapy for patients with AF at high risk of stroke (CHADS2 score of ≥ 2). At lower levels of stroke risk, antithrombotic treatment decisions will require a more individualized

  15. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Wheeler, Janet I; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R; Marondedze, Claudius

    2015-09-01

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article "Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress" by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386. PMID:26217812

  16. Current and emerging issues with B-type natriuretic peptide. Roundtable discussion.

    PubMed

    Silver, Marc A; Rosendorff, Clive; Berkowitz, Robert; Peacock, W Franklin

    2005-01-01

    A brief panel discussion was held on March 23, 2005, in New York City following a live symposium for primary care physicians discussing the roles of B-type natriuretic peptide in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. The participants were Dr. Marc A. Silver, Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, IL; Dr. Clive Rosendorff, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY and VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY; Dr. Robert Berkowitz, Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ; and Dr. W. Franklin Peacock IV, The Cleveland Clinic Department of Emergency Medicine, Cleveland, OH. Dr. Silver moderated the discussion. The panel gathered to review some of the questions that emerged from the symposium and the questions raised by the attendees. These are of interest and importance to all interested in heart failure and B-type natriuretic peptide.

  17. Atrial Tachycardias Arising from the Atrial Appendages and Aortic Sinus of Valsalva

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Colleen M; Samardhi, Himabindu; Haqqani, Haris M

    2015-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardias arising from the atrial appendages and the aortic sinuses of Valsalva are less frequently encountered in clinical practice. This review article describes the clinical presentation, surface P wave morphology, electrophysiologic characteristics and treatment of these arrhythmias. Catheter ablation of these focal tachycardias has a high success rate. It is however important to be aware of specific anatomic considerations in these locations for optimal treatment outcomes with low complication rates. PMID:25308812

  18. Computational models of atrial cellular electrophysiology and calcium handling, and their role in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Heijman, Jordi; Erfanian Abdoust, Pegah; Voigt, Niels; Nattel, Stanley; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2016-02-01

    The complexity of the heart makes an intuitive understanding of the relative contribution of ion channels, transporters and signalling pathways to cardiac electrophysiology challenging. Computational modelling of cardiac cellular electrophysiology has proven useful to integrate experimental findings, extrapolate results obtained in expression systems or animal models to other systems, test quantitatively ideas based on experimental data and provide novel hypotheses that are experimentally testable. While the bulk of computational modelling has traditionally been directed towards ventricular bioelectricity, increasing recognition of the clinical importance of atrial arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation, has led to widespread efforts to apply computational approaches to understanding atrial electrical function. The increasing availability of detailed, atrial-specific experimental data has stimulated the development of novel computational models of atrial-cellular electrophysiology and Ca(2+) handling. To date, more than 300 studies have employed mathematical simulations to enhance our understanding of atrial electrophysiology, arrhythmogenesis and therapeutic responses. Future modelling studies are likely to move beyond current whole-cell models by incorporating new data on subcellular architecture, macromolecular protein complexes, and localized ion-channel regulation by signalling pathways. At the same time, more integrative multicellular models that take into account regional electrophysiological and Ca(2+) handling properties, mechano-electrical feedback and/or autonomic regulation will be needed to investigate the mechanisms governing atrial arrhythmias. A combined experimental and computational approach is expected to provide the more comprehensive understanding of atrial arrhythmogenesis that is required to develop improved diagnostic and therapeutic options. Here, we review this rapidly expanding area, with a particular focus on Ca(2+) handling, and

  19. Left atrial appendage closure for thromboembolism prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: advances and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Bin; Liu, Yu; Huang, He; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of stroke. More than 90% of thrombi were found in the left atrial appendage (LAA) in non-valvular AF. Transcatheter LAA closure has been developed as a novel approach to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with AF over the last decade. In this article, we review the recent advances and propose the possible challenges regarding the LAA closure for thromboembolism prevention in patients with AF. PMID:25713737

  20. Effect of adenosine triphosphate on left atrial electrogram interval and dominant frequency in human atrial fibrillation☆

    PubMed Central

    Kogawa, Rikitake; Okumura, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ichiro; Kofune, Masayoshi; Nagashima, Koichi; Mano, Hiroaki; Sonoda, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Naoko; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Ohkubo, Kimie; Nakai, Toshiko; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAEs) and high dominant frequency (DF) are targets for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Although adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is known to promote AF by shortening the atrial refractory period, its role in the pathogenesis of CFAEs and DF during AF is not fully understood. Methods We recorded electrical activity from a 64-electrode basket catheter placed in the left atrium (LA) of patients with paroxysmal AF (PAF, n=18) or persistent AF (PerAF, n=19) before ablation. Atrial electrogram fractionation intervals (FIs) and DFs were measured from bipolar electrograms of each adjacent electrode pair. Offline mean atrial FIs and DFs were obtained before bolus injection of 30 mg ATP. Peak effect was defined as an R–R interval >3 s. Results With ATP, the mean FI decreased (from 110.4±29.1 ms to 90.5±24.7 ms, P<0.0001) and DF increased (from 6.4±0.6 Hz to 7.1±0.8 Hz, P<0.0001) in all patients. There was no difference in the FI decrease between the two groups (−20.3±20.5 ms vs. −19.6±14.5 ms, P=0.6032), but the increase in DF was significantly greater in PAF patients (1.1±0.8 Hz vs. 0.3±0.6 Hz, P=0.0051). Conclusions ATP shortens atrial FIs and increases DFs in both PAF and PerAF patients. The significant increase in DF in PAF patients suggests that pathophysiologic characteristics related to the frequency of atrial fractionation change as atrial remodeling progresses. PMID:26702319

  1. Percutaneous Left Atrial Appendage Ligation for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Valderrábano, Miguel; Price, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of thromboembolic complications in atrial fibrillation remains a tremendous clinical challenge. Knowledge that the left atrial appendage (LAA) is the most common anatomical origin of cardioembolic strokes1 has been the main motivation to develop clinical and procedural strategies to exclude the LAA from the circulation, either surgically or percutaneously. This review discusses the rationale behind these strategies, their relative merits, and future prospects for LAA exclusion strategies. PMID:26306126

  2. Reversible cardiomyopathy after radiofrequency ablation of 30-year persistent atrial tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Arai, Kotaro; Shoda, Morio

    2013-01-01

    Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is a reversible form of the left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction and is believed to be a relatively acute process. We report a TIC case with a 30-year history of long-lasting persistent atrial tachycardia involving a 44-year-old man previously diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy and a low LV ejection fraction (LVEF) of 20%. ECG revealed atrial tachycardia at 110–120 bpm. He was hospitalised with a worsening heart failure. His clinical status was New York Heart Association functional class III, and echocardiography revealed LV dilation and an LVEF of 9%. A two-dimensional speckle-tracking strain measurement revealed LV mechanical dyssynchrony. He underwent radiofrequency ablation for atrial tachycardia. After restoring sinus rhythm, his cardiac symptoms improved immediately. The LV mechanical dyssynchrony decreased a week after ablation, without changes in the LV dilation or LVEF. Thereafter, the LV dilation and systolic function gradually improved, and atrial tachycardia and heart failure remained absent. PMID:24326427

  3. Quantification of fiber orientation in the canine atrial pacemaker complex using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2012-07-01

    The atrial pacemaker complex is responsible for the initiation and early propagation of cardiac impulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality with spatial resolutions of ˜1 to 15 μm, can be used to identify unique fiber orientation patterns in this region of the heart. Functionally characterized canine sinoatrial nodes (SAN) (n=7) were imaged using OCT up to ˜1 mm below the endocardial tissue surface. OCT images were directly compared to their corresponding histological sections. Fiber orientation patterns unique to the crista terminalis (CT), SAN, and surrounding atrial myocardium were identified with dominant average fiber angles of 89±12 deg, 110±16 deg, and 95±35 deg, respectively. Both the CT and surrounding atrial myocardium displayed predominantly unidirectionally based fiber orientation patterns within each specimen, whereas the SAN displayed an increased amount of fiber disarray manifested quantitatively as a significantly greater standard deviation in fiber angle distribution within specimens [33±7 deg versus 23±5 deg, atrium (p=0.02); 18±3 deg, CT (p=0.0003)]. We also identified unique, local patterns of fiber orientation specific to the functionally characterized block zone. We demonstrate the ability of OCT in detecting components of the atrial pacemaker complex which are intimately involved in both normal and abnormal cardiac conduction.

  4. C-type natriuretic peptide plasma levels are reduced in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Del Ry, S; Cabiati, M; Bianchi, V; Storti, S; Caselli, C; Prescimone, T; Clerico, A; Saggese, G; Giannessi, D; Federico, G

    2013-12-01

    The high prevalence of obesity in children may increase the magnitude of lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease (CD). At present, explicit data for recommending biomarkers as routine pre-clinical markers of CD in children are lacking. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is assuming increasing importance in CD; in adults with heart failure, its plasma levels are related to clinical and functional disease severity. We have previously reported five different reference intervals for blood CNP as a function of age in healthy children; however, data on plasma CNP levels in obese children are still lacking. Aim of this study was to assess CNP levels in obese adolescents and verify whether they differ from healthy subjects. Plasma CNP was measured in 29 obese adolescents (age: 11.8 ± 0.4 years; BMI: 29.8 ± 0.82) by radioimmunoassay and compared with the reference values of healthy subjects. BNP was also measured. Both plasma CNP and BNP levels were significantly lower in the obese adolescents compared to the appropriate reference values (CNP: 3.4 ± 0.2 vs 13.6 ± 2.3 pg/ml, p<0.0001; BNP: 18.8 ± 2.6 vs 36.9 ± 5.5 pg/ml, p=0.003). There was no significant difference between CNP values in males and females. As reported in adults, we observed lower plasma CNP and BNP levels in obese children, suggesting a defective natriuretic peptide system in these patients. An altered regulation of production, clearance and function of natriuretic peptides, already operating in obese adolescents, may possibly contribute to the future development of CD. Thus, the availability of drugs promoting the action of natriuretic peptides may represent an attractive therapeutic option to prevent CD.

  5. [The role of B type natriuretic peptide in the assessment of post myocardial infarction prognosis].

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, A; Ibn el Hadj, Z; Chrigui, R; Kammoun, I; Lefi, A; Chine, S; Gargouri, S; Keskes, H; Kachboura, S

    2006-10-01

    Recently cardiac peptides have received close attention as cardiovascular markers. Brain (B type) natriuretic peptide is a neurohormone synthesized predominantly in ventricular myocardium. Previous studies have shown that this hormone can provide prognostic information in patients with myocardial infarction. The aim of this review is to evaluate the impact of plasma levels of BNP on prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction and remodelling and major cardiac events after myocardial infarction.

  6. Adjusted Left Atrial Emptying Fraction as a Predictor of Procedural Outcome after Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sung Il; Kim, Sun Won; Choi, Cheol Ung; Kim, Jin Won; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo; Lim, Hong Euy

    2015-01-01

    Structural remodeling of the left atrium is a risk factor for recurrent arrhythmia after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation; however, data are sparse regarding the role of functional left atrial remodeling in predicting procedural outcomes. We evaluated whether left atrial transport function could be used to predict recurrent atrial fibrillation. From July 2008 through August 2010, we enrolled 202 consecutive patients who underwent catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal=120, persistent=82). Left atrial volumes (LAVs) were measured by means of multislice computed tomography at every 10% of the R-R interval, and measurements were adjusted for body surface area to yield the LAV index (LAVI) at baseline. The left atrial emptying fraction (LAEF) was calculated according to LAV differences. During the mean follow-up period of 10 ± 4 months after a single ablation procedure, atrial fibrillation recurred in 59 patients (paroxysmal=19, persistent=40). Multivariate analysis revealed that persistent atrial fibrillation, early mitral inflow velocity, LAVImax, LAVImin, LAEF, LAVImax/LAEF, and LAVImin/LAEF were all independent predictors of atrial fibrillation, but the best predictor was LAVImin/LAEF (β=1.329, P=0.001). The cutoff value was 1.61 (mL/m2)/%, and the sensitivity and specificity were 74.6% and 62.2%, respectively (area under the curve=0.761). Our study shows that adjusted left atrial emptying fraction with use of multislice computed tomography might be a useful, noninvasive method to select patients for ablation. PMID:26175632

  7. Assessment of atrial fibrosis for the rhythm control of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Begg, Gordon A; Holden, Arun V; Lip, Gregory Y H; Plein, Sven; Tayebjee, Muzahir H

    2016-10-01

    Rhythm control of atrial fibrillation (AF) remains challenging, with modest long-term success rates. Atrial fibrosis has been associated with AF, but the clinical utility of assessment of this fibrosis has yet to be fully elucidated. In this paper we review the current state of understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrosis in AF, and its impact upon the instigation and propagation of the arrhythmia. Fibrosis causes an increase in volume of dysfunctional extracellular matrix, and is associated with cellular alterations such as hypertrophy, apoptosis and membrane dysfunction within the atrial myocardium. In turn, these cause pathological alterations to atrial conduction, such as increased anisotropy, conduction block and re-entry, which can lead to AF. We review current methods of assessing atrial fibrosis and their impact upon the prediction of success of interventional rhythm control strategies such as ablation and cardioversion. We focus particularly on circulating biomarkers of fibrosis and scar formation; their role in the fibrotic process, and their value in the prediction of rhythm control success. We also review imaging and invasive electrocardiographic mapping techniques that may identify fibrosis, and again assess their potential predictive value. In this area there exist many unanswered questions, but further work will help to refine techniques to reliably identify and treat those patients who are most likely to benefit from rhythm control treatment strategies. PMID:27389440

  8. Spontaneous atrial fibrillation in a freestyle skier.

    PubMed

    Whyte, G; Stephens, N; Sharma, S; Shave, R; Budgett, R; McKenna, W J

    2004-04-01

    A male freestyle skier was found to have atrial fibrillation during a routine physiological assessment. This was found to be associated with the consumption of an unusually large amount of alcohol. Athletes should be counselled about the potential dangers of alcohol consumption before exhaustive exercise.

  9. Right juxtaposition of the atrial appendages.

    PubMed

    Mathew, R; Replogle, R; Thilenius, O G; Arcilla, R A

    1975-04-01

    We present an infant with right-sided juxtaposition of atrial appendages who had open heart surgery for ventricular septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus. Of 12 cases thus far reported, ventricular d-loop was observed in nine, and normal position of great vessels in four. Contrary to previous views, this condition may not be accompanied by severe conotruncal anomalies.

  10. MAPK3/1 is conducive to luteinizing hormone-mediated C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in bovine granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Lei; WEI, Qiang; GE, Junbang; ZHAO, Xiaoe; MA, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) plays a role as an oocyte maturation inhibitor (OMI) in many species, including the bovine. However, the effects of luteinizing hormone (LH) on CNP expression and its potential mechanisms have not reported in the bovine. In the present study, we aimed to study the effects of LH on CNP expression and to illuminate the potential molecular mechanism in this process. Our results showed that LH induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, mitogen-activated protein kinase3/1 (MAPK3/1) activation and CNP mRNA decrease in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Further study revealed that LH suppressed CNP expression via the MAPK3/1 signaling pathway, which was activated by the EGFR pathway. In conclusion, our research suggested that MAPK3/1 is involved in LH-mediated decrease of CNP and that this process is related to the EGFR and MAPK3/1 signal pathways. PMID:26655567

  11. Demonstration of natriuretic activity in urine of neurosurgical patients with renal salt wasting

    PubMed Central

    Youmans, Steven J; Fein, Miriam R; Wirkowski, Elizabeth; Maesaka, John K

    2013-01-01

    We have utilized the persistent elevation of fractional excretion (FE) of urate, > 10%, to differentiate cerebral/renal salt wasting (RSW) from the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), in which a normalization of FEurate occurs after correction of hyponatremia.  Previous studies suggest as well  that an elevated FEurate with normonatremia, without pre-existing hyponatremia, is also consistent with RSW, including studies demonstrating induction of RSW in rats infused with plasma from normonatremic neurosurgical and Alzheimer’s disease patients.  The present studies were designed to test whether precipitates from the urine of normonatremic neurosurgical patients, with either normal or elevated FEurate, and patients with SIADH, display natriuretic activity.   Methods: Ammonium sulfate precipitates from the urine of 6 RSW and 5 non-RSW Control patients were dialyzed (10 kDa cutoff) to remove the ammonium sulfate, lyophilized, and the reconstituted precipitate was tested for its effect on transcellular transport of 22Na across LLC-PK1 cells grown to confluency in transwells. Results: Precipitates from 5 of the 6 patients with elevated FEurate and normonatremia significantly inhibited the in vitro transcellular transport of 22Na above a concentration of 3 μg protein/ml, by 10-25%, versus to vehicle alone, and by 15-40% at concentrations of 5-20 μg/ml as compared to precipitates from 4 of the 5 non-RSW patients with either normal FEurate and normonatremia (2 patients) or with SIADH (2 patients). Conclusion: These studies provide further evidence that an elevated FEurate with normonatremia is highly consistent with RSW.  Evidence in the urine of natriuretic activity suggests significant renal excretion of the natriuretic factor. The potentially large source of the natriuretic factor that this could afford, coupled with small analytical sample sizes required by the in-vitro bioassay used here, should facilitate future experimental

  12. Atrium of stone: A case of confined left atrial calcification without hemodynamic compromise.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher; Lodhi, Aadil Mubeen; Cao, Long Bao; Chagarlamudi, Arjun Kumar; Movahed, Assad

    2014-05-16

    Dystrophic cardiac calcification is often associated with conditions causing systemic inflammation and when present, is usually extensive, often encompassing multiple cardiac chambers and valves. We present an unusual case of dystrophic left atrial calcification in the setting of end stage renal disease on hemodialysis diagnosed by echocardiography and computed tomography. Significant calcium deposition is confined within the walls of the left atrium with no involvement of the mitral valve, and no hemodynamic effects. PMID:24868514

  13. Intra-atrial conduction block mimicking atrioventricular nodal block after multiple catheter ablation procedures for atrial tachycardia in a patient with cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Aman; Yokokawa, Miki; Baman, Timir; Bogun, Frank; Wu, Audrey

    2012-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman with a history of cardiomyopathy and multiple ablation procedures for atrial tachycardia developed intra-atrial conduction block that mimicked atrioventricular (AV) nodal block during radiofrequency ablation at the cavotricuspid isthmus. She was treated with atrial pacing (from the coronary sinus), which overcame intra-atrial conduction block and resulted in AV nodal conduction.

  14. [Afobasol efficacy in a model of vagotonic atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Stoliaruk, V N; Vititnova, M B; Tsorin, I B; Kryzhanovskiĭ, S A

    2010-01-01

    The new anxiolytic agent afobasol (Russia) was introduced into clinical practice by V. V. Zakusov Research Institute of Pharmacology. When administered to cats with vagotonic atrial fibrillation afobasol (7.5 mg/kg v/v) exhibited anti-arrhythmic activity at least as high as that of class 1 and III anti-arrhythmic agents (etacisin and cardiocyclide respectively) (Vaughan Williams classification). However, duration of its action was much smaller. These experimental findings were confirmed in clinical studies involving patients with severe psychosomatic pathology associated with paroxysmal flutter. It is supposed that afobasol activates cytosolic sigma-1 receptors in cardiomyocytes and may be used to manage psychoasthenic conditions accompanied by cardioneuroses and/or cardiophobias with disturbed rhythmic activity of the heart.

  15. [Social impact of stroke due to atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Santamarina, E; Alvarez Sabín, J

    2012-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent heart arrhythmia and causes a substantial proportion of ischemic strokes. AF has a marked impact on stroke severity, as well as on morbidity and mortality in these patients. The importance of AF as an etiologic factor of stroke increases in the elderly and in the last few years its detection has increased. The presence of AF leads to more severe initial neurological involvement, longer hospitalization, greater disability and a lower probability of discharge to home. In addition, AF is an independent risk factor for mortality, especially in women and the elderly. All these factors lead to a higher social and economic impact among stroke patients with AF.

  16. A prospective randomized study to assess the efficacy of rate and site of atrial pacing on long-term development of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chu-Pak; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Ngarmukos, Tachapong; Kim, You-Ho; Kong, Chi-Woon; Omar, Razali; Sriratanasathavorn, Charn; Munawar, Muhammad; Kam, Ruth; Lee, Kathy Lf; Lau, Elizabeth Oi-Yan; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2009-09-01

    The Septal Pacing for Atrial Fibrillation Suppression Evaluation (SAFE) study is a single-blinded, parallel randomized designed multicenter study in pacemaker indicated patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective is to evaluate whether the site of atrial pacing--conventional right atrial appendage versus low atrial septal--with or without atrial overdrive pacing will influence the development of persistent AF. The study will provide a definitive answer to whether a different atrial pacing site or the use of AF suppression pacing or both can give incremental antiarrhythmic benefit when one is implanting a device for a patient with a history of paroxysmal AF. PMID:19460078

  17. Increased B-type-natriuretic peptide promotes myocardial cell apoptosis via the B-type-natriuretic peptide/long non-coding RNA LSINCT5/caspase-1/interleukin 1β signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAN; SHA, MINGLEI; YAO, YUTING; DA, JIA; JING, DADAO

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is the final stage of various heart diseases, and is increasingly recognized as a major health problem in the elderly. Previous studies demonstrated that B-type-natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an established biomarker of CHF. Furthermore, BNP also regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Recent evidence has revealed that BNP affects myocardial cell apoptosis during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as novel molecular compounds involved in gene regulation, and have important roles in numerous human diseases. However, the mechanism underlying the BNP and lncRNA-induced regulation of myocardial cell apoptosis remains to be elucidated. The present study reported that lncRNA LSINCT5, upregulated by BNP, is able to regulate myocardial cell apoptosis via the activation of the caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1β signaling pathway. BNP-induced apoptosis of HCM cells was observed using flow cytometry, and involved caspase-1. In addition, expression profiling using a human lncRNA polymerase chain reaction array revealed that LSINCT5 was highly expressed in BNP-treated myocardial cells, as compared with untreated cells. The role of lncRNA LSINCT5 in HCM cell apoptosis was also investigated. The results of the present study indicated that LSINCT5 silencing by small interfering RNA inhibits caspase-1/IL-1β signaling, and suppresses apoptosis in BNP-treated HCM cells. Therefore, high expression levels of BNP promote the apoptosis of myocardial cells through the lncRNA LSINCT5 mediator, which activates the caspase-1/IL-1β signaling pathway. These findings uncovered a novel pathogenic mechanism, and provided a potential therapeutic target for CHF. PMID:26323562

  18. Aorto-left atrial tunnel: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sajiv K; Gajjar, Trushar P; Desai, Neelam B

    2013-05-01

    Aorto-left atrial tunnel (ALAT) is a vascular channel that originates from 1 of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in the left atrium. The aorto-left atrial tunnel is an extremely rare anomaly. We describe here a case of congenital aorto-left atrial tunnel in a 4-year-old child who underwent successful surgical ligation with good immediate and early results.

  19. Atrial fibrillation in inherited cardiac channelopathies: From mechanisms to management.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Andres; Antzelevitch, Charles; Bismah, Verdah; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent in cardiac channelopathies and may be the presenting feature in some patients. The pathogenesis is related to the primary ion channel dysfunction in atrial myocytes that affects atrial conduction or repolarization. The development of AF is associated with adverse outcomes, and its management is challenging in these patients. In this article we review the current information on the prevalence, risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of AF in specific cardiac channelopathies. PMID:27291509

  20. Extreme variation in the atrial septation of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    de Bakker, Desiderius M; Wilkinson, Mark; Jensen, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    Caecilians (order Gymnophiona) are elongate, limbless, snake-like amphibians that are the sister-group (closest relatives) of all other recent amphibians (frogs and salamanders). Little is known of their cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, but one nearly century old study suggests that Hypogeophis (family Indotyphlidae), commonly relied upon as a representative caecilian species, has atrial septation in the frontal plane and more than one septum. In contrast, in other vertebrates there generally is one atrial septum in the sagittal plane. We studied the adult heart of Idiocranium (also Indotyphlidae) using immunohistochemistry and confirm that the interatrial septum is close to the frontal plane. Additionally, a parallel right atrial septum divides three-fourths of the right atrial cavity of this species. Idiocranium embryos in the Hill collection reveal that atrial septation initiates in the sagittal plane as in other tetrapods. Late developmental stages, however, see a left-ward shift of visceral organs and a concordant rotation of the atria that reorients the atrial septa towards the frontal plane. The gross anatomies of species from six other caecilian families reveal that (i) the right atrial septum developed early in caecilian evolution (only absent in Rhinatrematidae) and that (ii) rotation of the atria evolved later and its degree varies between families. In most vertebrates a prominent atrial trabeculation associates with the sinuatrial valve, the so-called septum spurium, and the right atrial septum seems homologous to this trabeculation but much more developed. The right atrial septum does not appear to be a consequence of body elongation because it is absent in some caecilians and in snakes. The interatrial septum of caecilians shares multiple characters with the atrial septum of lungfishes, salamanders and the embryonic septum primum of amniotes. In conclusion, atrial septation in caecilians is based on evolutionarily conserved structures but

  1. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders.

  2. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:26118041

  3. Aorto-left atrial tunnel: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sajiv K; Gajjar, Trushar P; Desai, Neelam B

    2013-05-01

    Aorto-left atrial tunnel (ALAT) is a vascular channel that originates from 1 of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in the left atrium. The aorto-left atrial tunnel is an extremely rare anomaly. We describe here a case of congenital aorto-left atrial tunnel in a 4-year-old child who underwent successful surgical ligation with good immediate and early results. PMID:23608293

  4. Extreme variation in the atrial septation of caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    de Bakker, Desiderius M; Wilkinson, Mark; Jensen, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    Caecilians (order Gymnophiona) are elongate, limbless, snake-like amphibians that are the sister-group (closest relatives) of all other recent amphibians (frogs and salamanders). Little is known of their cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, but one nearly century old study suggests that Hypogeophis (family Indotyphlidae), commonly relied upon as a representative caecilian species, has atrial septation in the frontal plane and more than one septum. In contrast, in other vertebrates there generally is one atrial septum in the sagittal plane. We studied the adult heart of Idiocranium (also Indotyphlidae) using immunohistochemistry and confirm that the interatrial septum is close to the frontal plane. Additionally, a parallel right atrial septum divides three-fourths of the right atrial cavity of this species. Idiocranium embryos in the Hill collection reveal that atrial septation initiates in the sagittal plane as in other tetrapods. Late developmental stages, however, see a left-ward shift of visceral organs and a concordant rotation of the atria that reorients the atrial septa towards the frontal plane. The gross anatomies of species from six other caecilian families reveal that (i) the right atrial septum developed early in caecilian evolution (only absent in Rhinatrematidae) and that (ii) rotation of the atria evolved later and its degree varies between families. In most vertebrates a prominent atrial trabeculation associates with the sinuatrial valve, the so-called septum spurium, and the right atrial septum seems homologous to this trabeculation but much more developed. The right atrial septum does not appear to be a consequence of body elongation because it is absent in some caecilians and in snakes. The interatrial septum of caecilians shares multiple characters with the atrial septum of lungfishes, salamanders and the embryonic septum primum of amniotes. In conclusion, atrial septation in caecilians is based on evolutionarily conserved structures but

  5. Angiotensin Receptor Blockers and Statins Could Alleviate Atrial Fibrosis via Regulating Platelet-Derived Growth Factor/Rac1 /Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongfang; Yuan, Jia; Liu, Gan; Ling, Zhiyu; Zeng, Haiyan; Chen, Yunqing; Zhang, Yue; She, Qiang; Zhou, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether the administration of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors and statins could alleviate atrial fibrosis via platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/Rac1 /nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) axis. Methods and Results: In human left atrium, the degree of atrial fibrosis, as well as the expression levels of PDGF, Rac1 and NF-κB increased 1.5 to 2.9 folds in patients with atrial fibrillation compared to that with sinus rhythm, (P<0.0001). There were strongly positive correlations between angiotensin II (Ang II) or procollagen type III-alpha-1 (COL3A1) with PDGF, Rac1, NF-κB, and among PDGF, Rac1 and NF-κB (all P<0.05). At 3 weeks after the transverse aorta constriction (TAC) operation in rat model and with intervention of irbesartan or/and simvastatin, the collagen volume fraction (CVF) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) values respectively increased 6-folds and 3.5-folds in the TAC group compared to SHAM group (P<0.0001), but these levels decreased by 16% to 63% with following drug intervention (all P<0.0001), the combined treatment was the lowest. Accordingly, the expression levels of PDGF (3-folds), Rac1 (1.6-folds), NF-κB (7-folds) and AngII (12-folds) significantly increased in the TAC group compared to the SHAM group, and these levels were also reduced by 25% to 64% with following drug intervention. The highest reduction could be seen after treatment with irbesartan and simvastatin in combination (all P<0.001).There were strongly positive correlations between AngII or CVF with PDGF, Rac1, NF-κB, and among PDGF, Rac1 and NF-κB (all P<0.05). Conclusions: Irbesartan or/and simvastatin can improve atrial fibrosis by regulating PDGF/Rac1/NF-κB axis. PMID:23794945

  6. Hemodynamic forces regulate developmental patterning of atrial conduction.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Michael C; Louie, Jonathan D; Mikawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous action potential conduction through the atrial chambers of the heart can lead to severe cardiac arrhythmia. To date, however, little is known regarding the mechanisms that pattern proper atrial conduction during development. Here we demonstrate that atrial muscle functionally diversifies into at least two heterogeneous subtypes, thin-walled myocardium and rapidly conducting muscle bundles, during a developmental window just following cardiac looping. During this process, atrial muscle bundles become enriched for the fast conduction markers Cx40 and Nav1.5, similar to the precursors of the fast conduction Purkinje fiber network located within the trabeculae of the ventricles. In contrast to the ventricular trabeculae, however, atrial muscle bundles display an increased proliferation rate when compared to the surrounding myocardium. Interestingly, mechanical loading of the embryonic atrial muscle resulted in an induction of Cx40, Nav1.5 and the cell cycle marker Cyclin D1, while decreasing atrial pressure via in vivo ligation of the vitelline blood vessels results in decreased atrial conduction velocity. Taken together, these data establish a novel model for atrial conduction patterning, whereby hemodynamic stretch coordinately induces proliferation and fast conduction marker expression, which in turn promotes the formation of large diameter muscle bundles to serve as preferential routes of conduction.

  7. Coherex WAVECREST I Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-13

    Non-valvular Paroxysmal, Persistent, or Permanent Atrial Fibrillation; LAA Anatomy Amenable to Treatment by Percutaneous Technique; Anticoagulation Indication for Potential Thrombus Formation in the Left Atrium

  8. [Giant aneurysm of the inter-atrial septum].

    PubMed

    Akoudad, H; Cherti, M; Chaouki, S; Ztot, S; Haddour, L; el Mrabet, I; el Khadiri, A; Benmimoun, E G; Arharbi, A

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a large atrial septal aneurysm and a review of the literature. Atrial septal aneurysm is found in 1-8% of normal subjects. Its prevalence is higher among patients with ischemic stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography is an optimal tool for the diagnosis of atrial septal aneurysm. The clinical course may be complicated by arterial embolism, but mechanical complications may also occur, as in this case. Due to the lack of general agreement, treatment options should be discussed on an individual basis for patients with atrial septal aneurysm. PMID:10093663

  9. Linear left atrial lesions in minimally invasive surgical ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation: techniques for assessing conduction block across surgical lesions.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Deborah; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Peyton, Marvin D; Edgerton, James R; Scherlag, Benjamin J; Sivaram, Chittur A; Po, Sunny S; Beckman, Karen J; Abedin, Moeen; Jackman, Warren M

    2009-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) ablation, with pulmonary vein (PV) isolation and ganglionated plexi (GP) ablation, has proven highly successful for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation but has limited success in patients with persistent and long-standing persistent (P-LSP) AF. A set of linear left atrial (LA) lesions has been added to interrupt some macroreentrant components of P-LSP AF. This includes a Transverse Roof Line and Left Fibrous Trigone Line (from Roof Line to mitral annulus at the left fibrous trigone). With complete conduction block (CCB), these lesions should prevent single- or double-loop macroreentrant LA tachycardias from propagating around the PVs or mitral annulus. It is critical to identify whether CCB has been achieved and, if not, to locate the gap for further ablation, since residual gaps will support macroreentrant atrial tachycardias. Confirming CCB involves pacing close to one side of the ablation line and determining the direction of activation on the opposite side, by recording close bipolar electrograms at multiple paired sites (perpendicular and close to the ablation line) along the entire length of the line. Simpler approaches have been used, but all have limitations, especially when the conduction time across a gap is long. The extended lesion set was created after PV isolation and GP ablation in 14 patients with P-LSP AF. Mapping after the first set of radiofrequency applications for the Transverse Roof and Left Trigone Lines confirmed CCB in only 3/14 (21%) patients for each line, showing the importance of checking for CCB. During follow-up (median 8 months), 10/14 (71%) patients had no symptoms of atrial arrhythmia (7/10 off antiarrhythmic drugs). Of the remaining four patients, three have only infrequent episodes (self-terminating in 2/3). These preliminary results suggest that adding Roof and Trigone Lines may increase MIS success in patients with P-LSP AF. Accurate mapping techniques verify CCB and effectively locate gaps in

  10. Catecholamines, cardiac natriuretic peptides and chromogranin A: evolution and physiopathology of a 'whip-brake' system of the endocrine heart.

    PubMed

    Tota, Bruno; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Gattuso, Alfonsina

    2010-09-15

    In the past 50 years, extensive evidence has shown the ability of vertebrate cardiac non-neuronal cells to synthesize and release catecholamines (CA). This formed the mindset behind the search for the intrinsic endocrine heart properties, culminating in 1981 with the discovery of the natriuretic peptides (NP). CA and NP, co-existing in the endocrine secretion granules and acting as major cardiovascular regulators in health and disease, have become of great biomedical relevance for their potent diagnostic and therapeutic use. The concept of the endocrine heart was later enriched by the identification of a growing number of cardiac hormonal substances involved in organ modulation under normal and stress-induced conditions. Recently, chromogranin A (CgA), a major constituent of the secretory granules, and its derived cardio-suppressive and antiadrenergic peptides, vasostatin-1 and catestatin, were shown as new players in this framework, functioning as cardiac counter-regulators in 'zero steady-state error' homeostasis, particularly under intense excitatory stimuli, e.g. CA-induced myocardial stress. Here, we present evidence for the hypothesis that is gaining support, particularly among human cardiologists. The actions of CA, NP and CgA, we argue, may be viewed as a hallmark of the cardiac capacity to organize 'whip-brake' connection-integration processes in spatio-temporal networks. The involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS)/nitric oxide (NO) system in this configuration is discussed. The use of fish and amphibian paradigms will illustrate the ways that incipient endocrine-humoral agents have evolved as components of cardiac molecular loops and important intermediates during evolutionary transitions, or in a distinct phylogenetic lineage, or under stress challenges. This may help to grasp the old evolutionary roots of these intracardiac endocrine/paracrine networks and how they have evolved from relatively less complicated designs. The latter can also be used

  11. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization.

  12. Propofol effects on atrial fibrillation wavefront delays.

    PubMed

    Cervigón, Raquel; Moreno, Javier; Millet, José; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Castells, Francisco

    2010-08-01

    Since the cardiac activity during atrial fibrillation (AF) may be influenced by autonomic modulations, in this study, a novel method to quantify the effects of the most common anesthetic agent (propofol) in AF ablation procedures is introduced. This study has two main objectives: first, to assess whether the sedation earlier to radio frequency ablation affects the arrhythmia itself, and second, to provide new information that contributes to a better understanding of the influence of the autonomic nervous system on AF. The methodology presented is based on the measurement of synchronization and delay indexes between two atrial activations at adjacent intracavitary electrodes. These parameters aim to estimate whether two activations at different sites may be caused by the same propagating wavefront, or otherwise, are the consequence of independent wavefronts. The results showed that the mentioned indexes have a different behavior at both atria: the right atrium becomes more synchronized with propofol administration, whereas the synchronization index decreases at the left atrium.

  13. Atrial fibrillation due to licorice root syrup.

    PubMed

    Erkuş, Musluhittin Emre; Altıparmak, İbrahim Halil; Demirbağ, Recep; Günebakmaz, Özgür

    2016-04-01

    While it is known that consumption of licorice may lead to cardiac arrhythmias, there have been no reports of atrial fibrillation resulting from the consumption of licorice root syrup. A 57-year-old male with no prior history of cardiovascular disease was admitted to the emergency department with palpitation. His electrocardiogram showed atrial fibrillation with a moderate to rapid ventricular rate. In laboratory assessment, potassium was 2.0 mmol/L and plasma renin activity and aldosterone level were suppressed (<300 ng/L/hour, 42 ng/L respectively). Volumes of the heart chambers were within normal range and functions and structures of the heart valves were normal in echocardiographic assessment. The arrhythmia was resolved with propafenone infusion. PMID:27138313

  14. Minimally invasive surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Timothy S; Melby, Spencer J; Damiano, Ralph J

    2016-04-01

    The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been revolutionized over the past two decades through surgical innovation and improvements in endoscopic imaging, ablation technology, and surgical instrumentation. These advances have prompted the development of the less complex and less morbid Cox-Maze IV procedure, and have allowed its adaptation to a minimally invasive right mini-thoracotomy approach that can be used in stand-alone AF ablation and in patients undergoing concomitant mitral and tricuspid valve surgery. Other minimally invasive ablation techniques have been developed for stand-alone AF ablation, including video-assisted pulmonary vein isolation, extended left atrial lesion sets, and a hybrid approach. This review will discuss the tools, techniques, and outcomes of minimally invasive surgical procedures currently being practiced for AF ablation.

  15. Atrial-like cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells are a robust preclinical model for assessing atrial-selective pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Devalla, Harsha D; Schwach, Verena; Ford, John W; Milnes, James T; El-Haou, Said; Jackson, Claire; Gkatzis, Konstantinos; Elliott, David A; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Mummery, Christine L; Verkerk, Arie O; Passier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drugs targeting atrial-specific ion channels, Kv1.5 or Kir3.1/3.4, are being developed as new therapeutic strategies for atrial fibrillation. However, current preclinical studies carried out in non-cardiac cell lines or animal models may not accurately represent the physiology of a human cardiomyocyte (CM). In the current study, we tested whether human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived atrial CMs could predict atrial selectivity of pharmacological compounds. By modulating retinoic acid signaling during hESC differentiation, we generated atrial-like (hESC-atrial) and ventricular-like (hESC-ventricular) CMs. We found the expression of atrial-specific ion channel genes, KCNA5 (encoding Kv1.5) and KCNJ3 (encoding Kir 3.1), in hESC-atrial CMs and further demonstrated that these ion channel genes are regulated by COUP-TF transcription factors. Moreover, in response to multiple ion channel blocker, vernakalant, and Kv1.5 blocker, XEN-D0101, hESC-atrial but not hESC-ventricular CMs showed action potential (AP) prolongation due to a reduction in early repolarization. In hESC-atrial CMs, XEN-R0703, a novel Kir3.1/3.4 blocker restored the AP shortening caused by CCh. Neither CCh nor XEN-R0703 had an effect on hESC-ventricular CMs. In summary, we demonstrate that hESC-atrial CMs are a robust model for pre-clinical testing to assess atrial selectivity of novel antiarrhythmic drugs. PMID:25700171

  16. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome following burns is mediated by brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide A receptor-induced shock factor 1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang-Cheng; Luo, Cheng-Qun; Li, Xiong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in burn patients is mediated by the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)/natriuretic peptide A receptor (NPRA)-induced heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) signalling pathway. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) that were isolated from patients with burn injuries and SIRS mouse models and a RAW264.7 cell line were treated with normal serum or serum obtained from animals with burn injuries. In parallel, small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against BNP or NPRA were transfected in both cell types. Western blotting (WB) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect protein expression and inflammatory factor levels, respectively. We found that interleukin (IL)-12, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), and BNP levels were increased and IL-10 levels were decreased in the plasma and MNCs in vivo in the animal model of SIRS. Additionally, NPRA was upregulated, whereas HSF-1 was downregulated in monocytes in vivo. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with burn serum or BNP induced IL-12, TNF-α, and CRP secretion as well as HSF-1 expression. Finally, silencing BNP with shRNA interrupted the effect of burn serum on RAW264.7 cells, and silencing NPRA blocked burn serum- and BNP-mediated changes in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that the interaction of NPRA with BNP secreted from circulatory MNCs as well as mononuclear macrophages leads to inflammation via HSF-1 during SIRS development following serious burn injury.

  17. Prognostic Importance of Exercise Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Asymptomatic Chronic Organic Severe Mitral Regurgitation: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Garg, Shalini; Thakur, Ramesh; Krishna, Vinay; Singh, Karandeep; Sachan, Mohit; Goel, Amit; Razi, Mahamdula; Pandey, Umeshwar; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimal timing of surgery in patients with chronic organic severe mitral regurgitation (MR) continues to be debated, especially for those who are asymptomatic. The aim of the study was to determine independent and additive prognostic value of exercise brain natriuretic peptide (eBNP) in patients with severe asymptomatic MR and normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Methods Two hundred twenty-three consecutive patients with severe MR defined by effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area ≥ 40 mm2 and/or residual volume ≥ 60 mL, LVEF > 60%, and normal LV end-systolic diameter < 40 mm underwent symptom limited exercise treadmill test (TMT). Echocardiography was done immediately after exercise. Data were obtained within 3 minutes of peak exercise. BNP levels were assessed before echo (after 30 minutes of supine rest) and at exercise (i.e., within the 3 minutes of the end of effort). Patients were followed up every 3 months up to 15 months for major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) (cardiovascular death, need for mitral valve surgery and hospitalization for acute pulmonary edema or heart failure). Results Mean age was 31.2 ± 9 years (range: 18 - 40) with majority being male (n = 153; 68%). Etiologies were rheumatic (n = 201; 90%), mitral valve prolapse (n = 17; 7.6%) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 5; 2.4%). BNP level significantly increased from rest (65.24 ± 43.92 pg/mL; median: 43.5 pg/mL) to exercise (100.24 ± 98.24 pg/mL; median: 66.5 pg/mL; P < 0.001). Patients were divided into three tertiles according to eBNP levels (T1 = 15 - 44; T2 = 45 - 104; T3 = 105 - 400). There was trend for significantly lower exercise time in T3. During TMT, 66 (29.5%) stopped exercise due to dyspnea. They had similar resting BNP level compared with others but had significantly higher eBNP level (136 ± 109.7 pg/mL vs. 84.88 ± 90.2 pg/mL; P < 0.001). During follow-up (15 months), MACE occurred in 83 patients (37.2%): mitral valve replacement (MVR) in 59

  18. The exploitation of spatial topographies for atrial signal extraction in atrial fibrillation ECGs.

    PubMed

    Bonizzi, Pietro; Phlypo, Ronald; Zarzoso, Vicente; Meste, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    The accuracy in the extraction of the atrial activity (AA) from electrocardiogram (ECG) signals recorded during atrial fibrillation (AF) episodes plays an important role in the analysis and characterization of atrial arrhythmias. The present contribution puts forward a method for AA signal extraction based on a blind source separation (BSS) formulation. The latter exploits spatial information on the different components in the ECG related or not to AF. The source directions or spatial topographies of the components not related to AF are used to determine the nullspace of the AA, so that the topographies related to AA become more suitable to describe AF sources. The comparative performance of the method is evaluated on real data recorded from patients with noticeable AF. The AA extraction quality of the proposed technique is comparable to that of previous algorithms.

  19. Is percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage comparable to anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Uslar, Thomas; Anabalón, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    For most atrial fibrillation patients oral anticoagulation constitutes the standard treatment to prevent stroke. However, they carry a risk of bleeding, which is why alternative treatments have been put into practice, such as percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage. It is not clear whether this is as effective as the conventional treatment with anticoagulants. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including only one pertinent randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion may decrease stroke and mortality, but the certainty of the evidence is low. The effect on other outcomes is not clear because the certainty of the evidence is very low. PMID:26335602

  20. Is percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage comparable to anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed

    Uslar, Thomas; Anabalón, Jaime

    2015-08-17

    For most atrial fibrillation patients oral anticoagulation constitutes the standard treatment to prevent stroke. However, they carry a risk of bleeding, which is why alternative treatments have been put into practice, such as percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage. It is not clear whether this is as effective as the conventional treatment with anticoagulants. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including only one pertinent randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion may decrease stroke and mortality, but the certainty of the evidence is low. The effect on other outcomes is not clear because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  1. Ogilvie's Syndrome following Cardioversion for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Halawani, Moh'd; Thawabi, Mohammad; Abdeen, Yazan; Miller, Richard A.; Fedida, Andre A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute colonic pseudoobstruction, also known as Ogilvie's syndrome, is characterized by distension of the colon in the absence of a mechanical obstruction as evident by abdominal radiography. This syndrome is usually treated conservatively; however, medical or surgical therapies can be employed in refractory cases. Ogilvie's syndrome has been reported following cardiac events, such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, and cardiac bypass surgeries. We report the first case of Ogilvie's syndrome following synchronized electric cardioversion for atrial fibrillation. PMID:25214851

  2. Atrial fibrillation and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Iaccarino, Guido; De Luca, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia, especially in the elderly, and has a significant genetic component. Recently, several independent investigators have demonstrated a functional role for small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) in the pathophysiology of this cardiac arrhythmia. This report represents a systematic and updated appraisal of the main studies that established a mechanistic association between specific microRNAs and AF, focusing both on the regulation of electrical and structural remodeling of cardiac tissue. PMID:24478726

  3. Delay in diagnosis of right atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Northcote, R.J.; Sethia, B.; Ballantyne, D.

    1985-02-01

    Clinical, echocardiographic, and nuclear angiographic findings in a 51-year-old woman who presented with a history of dyspnea are discussed. Initial echocardiography revealed no abnormality. However, a subsequent radionuclide angiogram revealed a filling defect on the right side of the heart. This represented a right atrial myxoma. Radionuclide angiography can provide a useful noninvasive tool in the diagnosis of intracardiac tumors when echocardiography has not been helpful.

  4. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipset, Mark A.; Lemery, Jay; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A long-duration exploration class mission is fraught with numerous medical contingency plans. Herein, we explore the challenges of symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) occurring during an exploration class mission. The actions and resources required to ameliorate the situation, including the availability of appropriate pharmaceuticals, monitoring devices, treatment modalities, and communication protocols will be investigated. Challenges of Atrial Fibrillation during an Exploration Mission: Numerous etiologies are responsible for the initiation of AF. On Earth, we have the time and medical resources to evaluate and determine the causative situation for most cases of AF and initiate therapy accordingly. During a long-duration exploration class mission resources will be severely restricted. How is one to determine if new onset AF is due to recent myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, fluid overload, thyrotoxicosis, cardiac structural abnormalities, or CO poisoning? Which pharmaceutical therapy should be initiated and what potential side effects can be expected? Should anti-coagulation therapy be initiated? How would one monitor the therapeutic treatment of AF in microgravity? What training would medical officers require, and which communication strategies should be developed to enable the best, safest therapeutic options for treatment of AF during a long-duration exploration class mission? Summary: These questions will be investigated with expert opinion on disease elucidation, efficient pharmacology, therapeutic monitoring, telecommunication strategies, and mission cost parameters with emphasis on atrial fibrillation being just one illustration of the tremendous challenges that face a long-duration exploration mission. The limited crew training time, medical hardware, and drugs manifested to deal with such an event predicate that aggressive primary and secondary prevention strategies be developed to protect a multibillion-dollar asset like the

  5. Sequential Hybrid Procedure for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bulava, Alan; Mokracek, Ales; Hanis, Jiri; Kurfirst, Vojtech; Eisenberger, Martin; Pesl, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation yields an unsatisfactorily high number of failures. The hybrid approach has recently emerged as a technique that overcomes the limitations of both surgical and catheter procedures alone. Methods and Results We investigated the sequential (staged) hybrid method, which consists of a surgical thoracoscopic radiofrequency ablation procedure followed by radiofrequency catheter ablation 6 to 8 weeks later using the CARTO 3 mapping system. Fifty consecutive patients (mean age 62±7 years, 32 males) with long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation (41±34 months) and a dilated left atrium (>45 mm) were included and prospectively followed in an unblinded registry. During the electrophysiological part of the study, all 4 pulmonary veins were found to be isolated in 36 (72%) patients and a complete box‐lesion was confirmed in 14 (28%) patients. All gaps were successfully re‐ablated. Twelve months after the completed hybrid ablation, 47 patients (94%) were in normal sinus rhythm (4 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation required propafenone and 1 patient underwent a redo catheter procedure). The majority of arrhythmias recurred during the first 3 months. Beyond 12 months, there were no arrhythmia recurrences detected. The surgical part of the procedure was complicated by 7 (13.7%) major complications, while no serious adverse events were recorded during the radiofrequency catheter part of the procedure. Conclusions The staged hybrid epicardial–endocardial treatment of long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation seems to be extremely effective in maintenance of normal sinus rhythm compared to radiofrequency catheter or surgical ablation alone. Epicardial ablation alone cannot guarantee durable transmural lesions. Clinical Trial Registration URL: www.ablace.cz Unique identifier: cz‐060520121617 PMID:25809548

  6. [Risk of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Csanádi, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation is considered as one of the cardiovascular pandemics of our days due to its increasing prevalence and the significant burden on healthcare systems. Management, especially prevention of thromboembolism associated with the arrhythmia is still a challenge even with recently available treatment options. Herein, the author reviews the possibilities of risk stratification and stroke prevention, which are important to all medical professionals who potentially encounter patients with this arrhythmia. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(38), 1511-1515. PMID:27640617

  7. Atrial fibrillation pearls and perils of management.

    PubMed Central

    Kudenchuk, P J

    1996-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation, a common arrhythmia, is responsible for considerable cardiovascular morbidity. Its management demands more than antiarrhythmic therapy alone, but must address the causes and consequences of the arrhythmia. Although remediable causes are infrequently found, a thorough search for associated heart disease or its risk factors results in better-informed patient management. Controlling the ventricular response and protecting from thromboembolic complications are important initial goals of therapy and may include the administration of aspirin in younger, low-risk patients. Older patients and those with risk factors for systemic embolism are not adequately protected from stroke complications by aspirin therapy alone. It remains controversial whether all high-risk patients should receive warfarin and at what intensity. Whether and how sinus rhythm should be restored and maintained poses the greatest therapeutic controversy for atrial fibrillation. The mortal risk of antiarrhythmic therapy is substantially greater in patients with evidence of heart failure. In such persons, the risks and benefits of maintaining normal sinus rhythm with antiarrhythmic medications should be weighted carefully. A definitive cure for atrial fibrillation remains elusive, but promising surgical and catheter ablation therapies are being developed. PMID:8686300

  8. [Dilated cardiomyopathy induced by ectopic atrial tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rodríguez, E; Martínez Enríquez, A

    2000-01-01

    The deleterious effect of chronic or incessant supraventricular tachycardia on ventricular function is well-known and it has been demonstrated than can ultimately lead to dilated cardiomyopathy if unrecognized. Any variety of supraventricular tachycardia with chronic evolution may lead to left ventricular dysfunction, ectopic atrial tachycardia because of its persistent nature, often incessant and poorly responsive to antiarrhythmic drugs is a frequent cause of reversible congestive heart failure in patients without other demonstrable organic heart disease. Five patients (aged 14 to 52 years) were referred with symptoms of heart failure, NYHA functional class II (one patient), class III (one patient) and class IV (3 patients) associated with an incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia. Four patients underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of the ectopic focus and one patient was treated with amiodarone. All patients were successfully treated and the echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function indicated regression of the cardiomyopathy picture with recovery of systolic function, (mean left ventricular ejection fraction 39.2 +/- 6.1% before vs mean 62.4 +/- 4.8% after (p < 0.01). The clinical and echocardiographic picture of cardiomyopathy induced by incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia is reversible after successful treatment. This stresses the necessity of recognizing such arrhythmia as cause of primary heart failure. PMID:10959459

  9. Vernakalant. Too dangerous in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    2012-05-01

    The usual aim of treatment for patients with symptomatic paroxysmal or recent-onset atrial fibrillation, including after cardiac surgery, is to slow the heart rate. Electrical and drug (amiodarone) cardioversion are other options. Vernakalant, an antiarrhythmic drug, has been authorised in the European Union for rapid reduction of recent-onset atrial fibrillation. It is only available in an injectable form. Vernakalant has not been compared in clinical trials with treatments slowing the heart rate, or with electrical cardioversion. The only available comparison with another antiarrhythmic agent is a clinical pharmacology study versus amiodarone, a slow-acting drug, based on the rate of cardioversion at 90 minutes in 240 patients. As expected, given the brief observation period, the rate was significantly higher with vernakalant (51.7% versus 5.2%). During clinical evaluation, 6 deaths occurred in the vernakalant groups versus none in the other groups (placebo or amiodarone). The main adverse effects of vernakalant are cardiac arrhythmias (ventricular arrhythmia, torsades de pointes, bradycardia) and severe hypotension. Altered taste, sneezing, paraesthesia, nausea and pruritus were frequent, and respiratory and neuropsychological effects were also reported. A trial in atrial flutter was interrupted when cases of cardiogenic shock occurred. Interactions are to be expected with drugs that prolong the QT interval, and also with drugs that lower the heart rate or the blood potassium concentration. In practice, it is better to continue to use amiodarone for drug cardioversion and to avoid using vernakalant. PMID:22827000

  10. Lone atrial fibrillation: Pathologic or not?

    PubMed

    Chambers, Patrick William

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation risk has been strongly associated with increasing age and visceral obesity. These characteristics are strongly associated with diabetes, decreased heart rate variability, and chronic inflammation. Lone atrial fibrillation (LAF) on the other hand exhibits a predilection for the physically fit and the middle aged, especially males. Given these opposing features it is postulated that pathologic AF is due to cardiac fibrosis and other age related changes while LAF is due to physiologic neurohormonal changes related to autonomic tone, insulin sensitivity, and electrolyte imbalance and that pathologic AF and LAF can be reliably differentiated via an anthropometric approach using weight, height, hip, and waist measurements. An anthropometric study is undertaken from an LAF database to test this hypothesis. Such individuals in addition to being younger and predominantly male appear to be taller with less central adiposity vs. those with pathologic AF. The ramifications of these findings with respect to insulin resistance, sympathetic tone, inflammation and hypertension, often associated with pathologic atrial fibrillation, are discussed. Speculation is drawn about possible etiologic link with mitral valve prolapse, which is commonly encountered in the tall and thin and which shares multiple clinical features with LAF. PMID:17005327

  11. Focal Atrial Tachycardia Surrounding the Anterior Septum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zulu; Ouyang, Jinge; Liang, Yanchun; Jin, Zhiqing; Yang, Guitang; Liang, Ming; Li, Shibei; Yu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background— Focal atrial tachycardias (ATs) surrounding the anterior atrial septum (AAS) have been successfully ablated from the right atrial septum (RAS), the aortic cusps, and the aortic mitral junction. However, the strategy for mapping and ablation of AAS-ATs has not been well defined. Methods and Results— Of 227 consecutive patients with AT, 47 (20.7%; mean age, 56.3±11.6 years) with AAS-ATs were studied; among them, initial ablation was successful at RAS in only 5 of 14 patients and at noncoronary cusp (NCC) in 28 of 33 patients. In 45 of the 47 patients, the 46 of 48 AAS-ATs were eliminated at RAS in 8 patients, NCC in 35 patients (earliest activation time at NCC was later than that at RAS by 5–10 ms in 6 patients), and aortic mitral junction in 3 patients (all with negative P wave in lead aVL and positive P wave in the inferior leads), including 1 patient whose 2 ATs were eliminated separately from the NCC and the aortic mitral junction. Conclusions— Most of the ATs surrounding the AAS can be eliminated from within the NCC, which is usually the preferential ablation site. Ablation at the RAS and aortic mitral junction should be considered when supported by P-wave morphologies on surface ECG and results of activation mapping and ablation. PMID:25908691

  12. Atrial fibrillation: effects beyond the atrium?

    PubMed

    Wijesurendra, Rohan S; Casadei, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained clinical arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity, mostly secondary to heart failure and stroke, and an estimated two-fold increase in premature death. Efforts to increase our understanding of AF and its complications have focused on unravelling the mechanisms of electrical and structural remodelling of the atrial myocardium. Yet, it is increasingly recognized that AF is more than an atrial disease, being associated with systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and adverse effects on the structure and function of the left ventricular myocardium that may be prognostically important. Here, we review the molecular and in vivo evidence that underpins current knowledge regarding the effects of human or experimental AF on the ventricular myocardium. Potential mechanisms are explored including diffuse ventricular fibrosis, focal myocardial scarring, and impaired myocardial perfusion and perfusion reserve. The complex relationship between AF, systemic inflammation, as well as endothelial/microvascular dysfunction and the effects of AF on ventricular calcium handling and oxidative stress are also addressed. Finally, consideration is given to the clinical implications of these observations and concepts, with particular reference to rate vs. rhythm control.

  13. Atrial Fibrillation: The Science behind Its Defiance

    PubMed Central

    Czick, Maureen E.; Shapter, Christine L.; Silverman, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia in the world, due both to its tenacious treatment resistance, and to the tremendous number of risk factors that set the stage for the atria to fibrillate. Cardiopulmonary, behavioral, and psychological risk factors generate electrical and structural alterations of the atria that promote reentry and wavebreak. These culminate in fibrillation once atrial ectopic beats set the arrhythmia process in motion. There is growing evidence that chronic stress can physically alter the emotion centers of the limbic system, changing their input to the hypothalamic-limbic-autonomic network that regulates autonomic outflow. This leads to imbalance of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, most often in favor of sympathetic overactivation. Autonomic imbalance acts as a driving force behind the atrial ectopy and reentry that promote AF. Careful study of AF pathophysiology can illuminate the means that enable AF to elude both pharmacological control and surgical cure, by revealing ways in which antiarrhythmic drugs and surgical and ablation procedures may paradoxically promote fibrillation. Understanding AF pathophysiology can also help clarify the mechanisms by which emerging modalities aiming to correct autonomic imbalance, such as renal sympathetic denervation, may offer potential to better control this arrhythmia. Finally, growing evidence supports lifestyle modification approaches as adjuncts to improve AF control. PMID:27699086

  14. Atrial Fibrillation: The Science behind Its Defiance

    PubMed Central

    Czick, Maureen E.; Shapter, Christine L.; Silverman, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent arrhythmia in the world, due both to its tenacious treatment resistance, and to the tremendous number of risk factors that set the stage for the atria to fibrillate. Cardiopulmonary, behavioral, and psychological risk factors generate electrical and structural alterations of the atria that promote reentry and wavebreak. These culminate in fibrillation once atrial ectopic beats set the arrhythmia process in motion. There is growing evidence that chronic stress can physically alter the emotion centers of the limbic system, changing their input to the hypothalamic-limbic-autonomic network that regulates autonomic outflow. This leads to imbalance of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, most often in favor of sympathetic overactivation. Autonomic imbalance acts as a driving force behind the atrial ectopy and reentry that promote AF. Careful study of AF pathophysiology can illuminate the means that enable AF to elude both pharmacological control and surgical cure, by revealing ways in which antiarrhythmic drugs and surgical and ablation procedures may paradoxically promote fibrillation. Understanding AF pathophysiology can also help clarify the mechanisms by which emerging modalities aiming to correct autonomic imbalance, such as renal sympathetic denervation, may offer potential to better control this arrhythmia. Finally, growing evidence supports lifestyle modification approaches as adjuncts to improve AF control.

  15. Efficacy of anticoagulation in resolving left atrial and left atrial appendage thrombi: A transesophageal echocardiographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaber, W. A.; Prior, D. L.; Thamilarasan, M.; Grimm, R. A.; Thomas, J. D.; Klein, A. L.; Asher, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for evaluation of the left atrium and the left atrial appendage (LAA) for the presence of thrombi. Anticoagulation is conventionally used for patients with atrial fibrillation to prevent embolization of atrial thrombi. The mechanism of benefit and effectiveness of thrombi resolution with anticoagulation is not well defined. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a TEE database of 9058 consecutive studies performed between January 1996 and November 1998 to identify all patients with thrombi reported in the left atrium and/or LAA. One hundred seventy-four patients with thrombi in the left atrial cavity (LAC) and LAA were identified (1.9% of transesophageal studies performed). The incidence of LAA thrombi was 6.6 times higher than LAC thrombi (151 vs 23, respectively). Almost all LAC thrombi were visualized on transthoracic echocardiography (90.5%). Mitral valve pathology was associated with LAC location of thrombi (P <.0001), whereas atrial fibrillation or flutter was present in most patients with LAA location of thrombi. Anticoagulation of 47 +/- 18 days was associated with thrombus resolution in 80.1% of the patients on follow-up TEE. Further anticoagulation resulted in limited additional benefit. CONCLUSIONS: LAC thrombi are rare and are usually associated with mitral valve pathology. Transthoracic echocardiography is effective in identifying these thrombi. LAA thrombi occur predominantly in patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter. Short-term anticoagulation achieves a high rate of resolution of LAA and LAC thrombi but does not obviate the need for follow-up TEE.

  16. A novel lipid natriuretic factor in the renal medulla: sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Xia, Min; Wang, Zhengchao; Li, Pin-Lan; Li, Ningjun

    2011-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite formed by phosphorylation of sphingosine. S1P has been indicated to play a significant role in the cardiovascular system. It has been shown that the enzymes for S1P metabolism are expressed in the kidneys. The present study characterized the expression of S1P receptors in the kidneys and determined the role of S1P in the control of renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion. Real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that S1P receptors S1P1, S1P2, and S1P3 were most abundantly expressed in the renal medulla. Immunohistochemistry revealed that all three types of S1P receptors were mainly located in collecting ducts. Intramedullary infusion of FTY720, an S1P agonist, produced a dramatic increase in sodium excretion by twofold and a small but significant increase in medullary blood flow (16%). Administration of W146, an S1P1 antagonist, into the renal medulla blocked the effect of FTY720 and decreased the sodium excretion by 37% when infused alone. The antagonists of S1P2 and S1P3 had no effect. FTY720 produced additive natriuretic effects in combination with different sodium transporter inhibitors except amiloride, an epithelial sodium channel blocker. In the presence of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME, FTY720 still increased sodium excretion. These data suggest that S1P produces natriuretic effects via activation of S1P1 in the renal medulla and this natriuretic effect may be through inhibition of epithelial sodium channel, which is nitric oxide independent. It is concluded that S1P is a novel diuretic factor in the renal medulla and may be an important regulator of sodium homeostasis.

  17. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso–redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jillian N.; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso–redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF. PMID:26786158

  18. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso-redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jillian N; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso-redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF.

  19. Rotigaptide (ZP123) improves atrial conduction slowing in chronic volume overload-induced dilated atria.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Ketil; Miyamoto, Takuya; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao; Nakayama, Jun; Shimojo, Hisashi; Hirose, Masamichi

    2006-07-01

    Chronic atrial dilation is associated with atrial conduction velocity slowing and an increased risk of developing atrial tachyarrhythmias. Rotigaptide (ZP123) is a selective gap junction modifier that increases cardiac gap junctional intercellular communication. We hypothesised that rotigaptide treatment would increase atrial conduction velocity and reduce the inducibility to atrial tachyarrhythmias in a model of chronic volume overload induced chronic atrial dilatation characterized by atrial conduction velocity slowing. Chronic volume overload was created in Japanese white rabbits by arterio-venous shunt formation. Atrial conduction velocity and atrial tachyarrhythmias inducibility were examined in Langendorff-perfused chronic volume overload hearts (n=12) using high-resolution optical mapping before and after treatment with rotigaptide. Moreover, expression levels of atrial gap junction proteins (connexin40 and connexin43) were examined in chronic volume overload hearts (n=6) and compared to sham-operated controls (n=6). Rotigaptide treatment significantly increased atrial conduction velocity in chronic volume overload hearts, however, rotigaptide did not decrease susceptibility to the induction of atrial tachyarrhythmias. Protein expressions of Cx40 and Cx43 were decreased by 32% and 72% (P<0.01), respectively, in chromic volume overload atria compared to control. To conclude, rotigaptide increased atrial conduction velocity in a rabbit model of chromic volume overload induced atrial conduction velocity slowing. The demonstrated effect of rotigaptide on atrial conduction velocity did not prevent atrial tachyarrhythmias inducibility. Whether rotigaptide may possess antiarrhythmic efficacy in other models of atrial fibrillation remains to be determined.

  20. Developing and producing a patient education video on care of the permanent right atrial catheter.

    PubMed

    Akcasu, N; Bodenmiller, S

    1994-07-01

    Because of current trends in health care, nurses must find efficient, cost-effective, and innovative ways to provide quality patient education. In working with the pediatric oncology population, it is necessary to teach several family members how to care for the patient. One of the skills families must learn is care of the permanent right atrial catheter (PRAC). Although nurses and families together agreed a videotape would be extremely helpful in learning PRAC care, there was no videotape available to meet these needs. We developed and produced a patient education video on care of the permanent right atrial catheter. This article discusses identifying and organizing resources and finances, steps involved in writing and editing a script, and the producing/videotaping process. By sharing our experience, we hope to enable other nurses to create their own patient education materials.

  1. Inflammation fueling atrial fibrillation substrate: seeking ways to "cool" the heart.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Cleman, Michael W; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common chronic arrhythmia and a source of significant morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have identified numerous risk factors for the development of AF, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and heart failure, which have known pathophysiologic links with inflammatory processes. The importance of inflammation in inducing and perpetuating AF has been highlighted not only by experimental, epidemiological and cohort observational studies, but also by clinical trials providing evidence that inflammatory pathways are involved in AF pathogenesis. Local and systemic measurements of biomarkers and inflammatory mediators, as well as atrial biopsy studies have also given insight as to the purported relationship between this arrhythmia and inflammation. However, the link between inflammation and AF is still poorly defined and several issues remain unresolved. The present review offers an overview of existing evidence supporting the "inflammatory" hypothesis for AF pathophysiology and potential therapeutic means for counteracting this "foul interplay" between arrhythmia and inflammation.

  2. [C-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEP- TIDE: WHAT, WHERE AND WHAT FOR IS THIS?].

    PubMed

    Korostyshevskaya, I M; Maksimov, V F; Rudenko, N S

    2015-05-01

    The up-to-day world-wide data about the structure, distribution, and physiological effects of the most poorly known among the natriuretic peptides--the C-type (CNP)--are summarized in the review. Despite its name, this peptide does not stimulate sodium excretion but shares the prominent vasodilating and antyproliferating effects in different organs and tissues. The special emphasis is attended to CNP functions in central nervous system. The information about the peptide molecular biology, including intracellular processing, blood peptide concentration, specific receptors structure, and signaling pathways in target cells is presented.

  3. [Hormones and osteoporosis update. Effects of natriuretic peptides on endochondral bone growth].

    PubMed

    Yasoda, Akihiro; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2009-07-01

    We revealed that the C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its receptor guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B) system is a potent and physiological stimulator of endochondral bone growth by using transgenic and knockout mice. In humans, one form of skeletal dysplasias, acromesomelic dysplasia, type Maroteaux, was reported to be caused by loss of function mutations in the GC-B gene. Further studies are needed for clarifying the patho-physiological roles of the CNP/GC-B system on human skeletal dysplasias. Moreover, we will have to translate this effect of the CNP/GC-B system on endochondral bone growth into skeletal dysplasias.

  4. Prolonged and fractionated right atrial electrograms during sinus rhythm in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and sick sinus node syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, M; Fukatani, M; Konoe, A; Isomoto, S; Kadena, M; Hashiba, K

    1991-02-01

    Intraatrial catheter mapping of the right atrium was performed during sinus rhythm in 92 patients: Group I = 43 control patients without paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or sick sinus node syndrome; Group II = 31 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation but without sick sinus node syndrome; and Group III = 18 patients with both paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and sick sinus node syndrome. Atrial electrograms were recorded at 12 sites in the right atrium. The duration and number of fragmented deflections of the atrial electrograms were quantitatively measured. The mean duration and number of fragmented deflections of the 516 atrial electrograms in Group I were 74 +/- 11 ms and 3.9 +/- 1.3, respectively. The criteria for an abnormal atrial electrogram were defined as a duration of greater than or equal to 100 ms or eight or more fragmented deflections, or both. Abnormal atrial electrograms were observed in 10 patients (23.3%) in Group I, 21 patients (67.7%) in Group II and 15 patients (83.3%) in Group III (Group II versus Group I, p less than 0.001; Group III versus Group I, p less than 0.001). The mean number of abnormal electrograms per patient with an abnormal electrogram was 1.3 +/- 0.7 in Group I, 2.5 +/- 1.9 in Group II and 3.5 +/- 2.5 in Group III (Group I versus Group II, p less than 0.01; Group II versus Group III, p less than 0.05). A prolonged and fractionated atrial electrogram characteristic of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation can be closely related to the vulnerability of the atrial muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Rapid natriuretic action of aldosterone in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rad, Abolfazl K; Balment, Richard J; Ashton, Nick

    2005-02-01

    Rapid, nongenomic actions of aldosterone have been demonstrated in a number of cell types in vitro, including renal cell lines, but there remains little direct evidence that it is able to exert rapid effects on the kidney in the whole animal. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to determine whether aldosterone induces rapid changes in the renal handling of electrolytes or acid-base balance in the anesthetized rat. With the use of a servo-controlled fluid replacement system, spontaneous urine output by anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats was replaced with 2.5% dextrose. After a 3-h equilibration and a 1-h control period, rats were infused with aldosterone (42 pmol/min) or vehicle for 1 h. Aldosterone infusion induced a rapid (within 15 min) increase in sodium excretion that peaked at 0.24 +/- 0.08 compared with 0.04 +/- 0.01 micromol x min(-1) 100 x body weight(-1) (P = 0.041) in the vehicle-infused rats. This natriuresis was not associated with changes in glomerular filtration rate; urine flow rate; potassium, chloride, or bicarbonate excretion; or urine pH. The mechanisms involved are unclear, but because we have previously shown that aldosterone stimulates a rapid (4 min) increase in cAMP generation in the rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) (Sheader EA, Wargent ET, Ashton N, and Balment RJ. J Endocrinol 175: 343-347, 2002), they could involve cAMP-mediated activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel, which drives sodium secretion in the IMCD. PMID:15489254

  6. Effect of whiskey on atrial vulnerability and "holiday heart".

    PubMed

    Engel, T R; Luck, J C

    1983-03-01

    Vulnerability to atrial fibrillation and flutter was examined in 11 alcohol abusers who did not have cardiomyopathy or manifest heart failure. Atrial extrastimulation was done with rapid pacing (drive cycle length 500 ms) to facilitate induction of atrial vulnerability, seen in four alcohol abusers. The remaining seven were retested 30 minutes after drinking 60 to 120 ml of 86 proof whiskey (ethanol blood levels were 49 to 101 mg/100 ml but pulmonary capillary wedge pressure remained normal in all) and atrial fibrillation or flutter was induced in three of the drinkers. Three nondrinkers, symptomatic with sinus bradycardia but not in heart failure, were found not to be vulnerable to atrial fibrillation or flutter, but flutter was induced in two of the three after drinking whiskey. Whiskey did not alter atrial functional refractory periods (mean +/- standard error of the mean 297 +/- 14 to 290 +/- 12 ms) or widen the dispersion among three disparate right atrial sites (57 +/- 13 to 47 +/- 12 ms). Thus, whiskey enhanced vulnerability to atrial fibrillation and flutter in patients without heart failure or cardiomyopathy, substantiating the "holiday heart" syndrome.

  7. Hypertension and Atrial Fibrillation: Any Change with the New Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Taddei, Stefano; Virdis, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and atrial fibrillation are the most common cardiovascular risk factors and clinically significant arrhythmia, respectively. These conditions frequently coexist and their prevalence increases rapidly with aging. Despite several different risk factors and clinical conditions predisposing to hypertension for its high prevalence in the population is still the main risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms (such as structural changes at the level of left ventricle and or atrium, neurohormonal activation, arterial stiffness, etc.) can contribute to the onset of atrial fibrillation. Some antihypertensive treatments have been shown to contribute to reduce the risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for stroke, which is further increased in the presence of hypertension. For this reason, hypertension is included as a major risk factor in the available models for the risk stratification and the prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this article we will review the relationship between atrial fibrillation and hypertension, looking at the possible specific indications of the antithrombotic treatment with new classes of anticoagulants in the prevention of thromboembolic events in hypertensive patients with atrial fibrillation.

  8. Calcified right atrial thrombus in HIV infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Mwita, Julius Chacha; Goepamang, Monkgogi; Mkubwa, Jack Joseph; Gunness, Teeluck Kumar; Reebye, Deshmukh; Motumise, Kelebogile

    2013-01-01

    Calcified right atrial thrombi are rare cardiac masses that may be complicated by pulmonary embolism. Although they can be discovered by a transthoracic echocardiography, they may need histological examination to differentiate them from other cardiac masses. We report a case of a 44-year-old woman who presented with a calcified right atrial thrombus and progressive dyspnoea. PMID:23819008

  9. Atrial Arrhythmias and Their Implications for Space Flight - Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. D.; Barr, Y. R.; Bauer, P.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kerstman, E.; Tarver, B.

    2010-01-01

    This panel will discuss the implications of atrial arrhythmias in astronauts from a variety of perspectives; including historical data, current practices, and future challenges for exploration class missions. The panelists will present case histories, outline the evolution of current NASA medical standards for atrial arrhythmias, discuss the use of predictive tools, and consider potential challenges for current and future missions.

  10. Novel Interventional Strategies for the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Siontis, Konstantinos C; Oral, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of the invasive management of atrial fibrillation, the most common sustained arrhythmia in humans, has changed dramatically in the last decade owing to numerous advances in arrhythmia mapping and ablation technologies. The current review critically appraises novel interventional strategies for the treatment of atrial fibrillation with a focus on clinical effectiveness and safety. PMID:27403294

  11. Effects of spironolactone towards rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid pacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Fa; Gu, Lei; Huang, Meng-Xun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Li, Hua; Zhang, Bang-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the effects of spironolactone towards the rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid atrial pacing (RAP). 30 rabbits were randomly divided into control group, RAP group and spironolactone group, with 10 rabbits in each group. RAP was performed at the speed of 800 beats/min for 8 h, atrial effective refractory period (AERP) was determined before and at the 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th) and 8(th) of the pacing, the expressions of atrial muscular calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA were performed the RT-PCR detection, and ultrastructural changes of atrial myocytes were observed. AERP of RAP group shortened, with poor frequency adaptability; the expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA decreased 22% and 26%, respectively, when compared with the control group; ultrastructure of atrial myocytes changed significantly. AERP of spironotlactone group shortened less that RAP group, and the frequency adaptability was maintained, the decreased expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA significantly reduced. RAP could cause atrial remodeling, while spironolactone could inhibit RAP-induced atrial remodeling. PMID:26826809

  12. The increasing prevalence of atrial fibrillation among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Patrick, Amanda R; Liu, Jun; Brookhart, M Alan; Setoguchi, Soko

    2011-02-01

    A half million Americans have ESRD, which puts them at high risk for cardiovascular disease and poor outcomes. Little is known about the epidemiology of atrial fibrillation among patients with ESRD. We analyzed data from annual cohorts (1992 to 2006) of prevalent hemodialysis patients from the United States Renal Data System. In each cohort, we searched 1 year of medical claims for relevant diagnosis codes to determine the prevalence of atrial fibrillation. Among 2.5 million patient observations, 7.7% had atrial fibrillation, with the prevalence increasing 3-fold from 3.5% (1992) to 10.7% (2006). The number of affected patients increased from 3620 to 23,893 (6.6-fold) during this period. Older age, male gender, and several comorbid conditions were associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation. Compared with otherwise similar Caucasians, the prevalence of atrial fibrillation rates was substantially lower for blacks, Asians, and Native Americans. One-year mortality was twice as high among hemodialysis patients with atrial fibrillation compared with those without (39% versus 19%), and this increased risk was constant during the 15 years of the study. In conclusion, the prevalence of diagnosed atrial fibrillation among patients receiving hemodialysis in the United States is increasing, varies by race, and remains associated with substantially increased mortality. Identifying potentially modifiable risk factors for incident atrial fibrillation requires further investigation.

  13. Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-C is Up-Regulated in the Intima of Advanced Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Mohamed A; Harring, Scott D; Abendschein, Dana R; Vemuri, Chandu; Lu, Dongsi; Detering, Lisa; Liu, Yongjian; Woodard, Pamela K

    2016-01-01

    Objective Natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C/NPR-3) is a cell surface protein involved in vascular remodelling that is up-regulated in atherosclerosis. NPR-C expression has not been well characterized in human carotid artery occlusive lesions. We hypothesized that NPR-C expression correlates with intimal features of vulnerable atherosclerotic carotid artery plaque. Methods To test this hypothesis, we evaluated NPR-C expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens isolated from 18 patients. The grade, location, and co-localization of NPR-C in CEA specimens were evaluated using two tissue analysis techniques. Results Relative to minimally diseased CEA specimens, we observed avid NPR-C tissue staining in the intima of maximally diseased CEA specimens (65%; p=0.06). Specifically, maximally diseased CEA specimens demonstrated increased NPR-C expression in the superficial intima (61%, p=0.17), and deep intima (138% increase; p=0.05). In the superficial intima, NPR-C expression significantly co-localized with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages. The intensity of NPR-C expression was also higher in the superficial intima plaque shoulder and cap regions, and significantly correlated with atheroma and fibroatheroma vulnerable plaque regions (β=1.04, 95% CI=0.46, 1.64). Conclusion These findings demonstrate significant NPR-C expression in the intima of advanced carotid artery plaques. Furthermore, NPR-C expression was higher in vulnerable carotid plaque intimal regions, and correlate with features of advanced disease. Our findings suggest that NPR-C may serve as a potential biomarker for carotid plaque vulnerability and progression, in patients with advanced carotid artery occlusive disease. PMID:27547837

  14. Left Atrial Remodeling Assessed by Transthoracic Echocardiography Predicts Left Atrial Appendage Flow Velocity in Patients With Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atai; Suzuki, Shinya; Kano, Hiroto; Matsuno, Syunsuke; Takai, Hideaki; Kato, Yuko; Otsuka, Takayuki; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Oikawa, Yuji; Nagashima, Kazuyuki; Kirigaya, Hajime; Kunihara, Takashi; Sagara, Koichi; Yamashita, Naohide; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Yajima, Junji; Yamashita, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of stroke and other thromboembolic events. Left atrial (LA) thrombus formation is closely related to LA dysfunction, particularly to decreased LA appendage flow velocity (LAA-FV) in patients with AF. We estimated LAA-FV using parameters noninvasively obtained by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in patients with paroxysmal AF.Echocardiographic and clinical parameters were assessed in 190 patients with nonvalvular paroxysmal AF showing sinus heart rhythm during transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and TTE.LAA-FV (60 ± 22 cm/s) significantly correlated with the time interval between the initiation of the P-wave on ECG and that of the A-wave of transmitral flow on TTE (PA-TMF, correlation coefficient, -0.32; P < 0.001), LA dimension (LAD, -0.31; P < 0.001), septal a' velocity of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI, 0.35; P < 0.001), E/e' ratio (-0.28, P < 0.001), E velocity of transmitral flow (-0.20, P = 0.008), E/A ratio of transmitral flow (-0.18, P = 0.02), CHA2DS2-VASc score (-0.15, P = 0.04), and BNP plasma level (-0.32, P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis revealed that PA-TMF (standardized partial regression coefficient, -0.17; P = 0.03), a' velocity (0.24, P = 0.004), and LAD (-0.20, P = 0.01) were independent predictors of LAA-FV (multiple correlation coefficient R, 0.44; P < 0.001).Parameters of atrial remodeling, ie, decreased a' velocity, increased LAD, and PA-TMF during sinus rhythm may be useful predictors of LA blood stasis in patients with nonvalvular PAF. LAA-FV can be estimated using these TTE parameters instead of TEE.

  15. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts. Summary of a NASA Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael; Watkins, Sharmila; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the findings of a panel of heart experts brought together to study if atrial arrhythmias more prevalent in astronauts, and potential risk factors that may predispose astronauts to atrial arrhythmias. The objective of the panel was to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, identify gaps in knowledge, and propose relevant research initiatives. While Atrial Arrhythmias occur in approximately the same percents in astronauts as in the general population, they seem to occur at younger ages in astronauts. Several reasons for this predisposition were given: gender, hypertension, endurance training, and triggering events. Potential Space Flight-Related Risk factors that may play a role in precipitating lone atrial fibrillation were reviewed. There appears to be no evidence that any variable of the space flight environment increases the likelihood of developing atrial arrhythmias during space flight.

  16. Global burden of atrial fibrillation in developed and developing nations.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Sumeet S; Roth, Gregory A; Gillum, Richard F; Mensah, George A

    2014-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder in the world, with major public health impact especially due to increased risk of stroke and hospitalizations. The recently published results on epidemiology of atrial fibrillation from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study confirm the existence of a significant and progressive worldwide increase in the burden of atrial fibrillation. However, there appears to be regional variation in both the burden of atrial fibrillation and availability of epidemiological data regarding this condition. In this review, the authors identify issues that are unique to the developed versus developing regions and outline a road map for possible approaches to surveillance, management, and prevention of atrial fibrillation at the global level.

  17. The response of circulating brain natriuretic peptide to academic stress in college students.

    PubMed

    Amir, Offer; Sagiv, Moran; Eynon, Nir; Yamin, Chen; Rogowski, Ori; Gerzy, Yishay; Amir, Ruthie E

    2010-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), a cardiac peptide, has been implicated in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) responses to psychological stressors. The influence of academic stress on circulating concentration of the N-terminal fragment of BNP precursor (NT-proBNP), and in relation to the stress hormone (cortisol) response was studied in 170 college students undergoing major examinations. Just prior to the examination, we measured self-estimated stress level, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate (HR), plasma levels of cortisol, and NT-proBNP. These parameters were compared to the participants' baseline measurements, taken at the same hour of a different 'control day', without a major examination to induce stress. Hemodynamic variables (SBP, DBP, and HR) increased on the examination day compared with baseline values ( p < 0.001). Circulating cortisol concentration increased before examinations (+42%, p < 0.001). The response to stress was marked by a significant decrease in plasma NT-proBNP concentration (-40%, p < 0.001). We found in males a significant interaction between the cortisol elevation with examination stress and the NT-proBNP reduction ( p = 0.02). In response to academic stress, the plasma cortisol elevation was accompanied by a marked reduction in plasma NT-proBNP level. These data may indicate that mental stress entails an interface between the HPA axis and the peripheral natriuretic peptide system, leading to reciprocating changes in circulating levels of the corresponding hormones.

  18. B-type Natriuretic Peptide circulating forms: Analytical and bioactivity issues.

    PubMed

    Yandle, Tim G; Richards, A Mark

    2015-08-25

    B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP), A-type and C-type Natriuretic Peptides (ANP and CNP) comprise a family of peptides that retain a common ring structure and conserved amino acid sequences. All are present in the heart, but only BNP and ANP are regarded as primarily cardiac secretory products. BNP and ANP, acting through a guanylyl cyclase receptor, increase sodium and water excretion by the kidney, induce vasodilation, reduce blood pressure, counteract the bioactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems and possess anti-hypertrophic and anti-fibrotic properties. BNP is synthesised in cardiomyocytes first as the precursor peptide preproBNP. Removal of the signal peptide from preproBNP produces proBNP which is cleaved to produce the biologically active carboxy-terminal BNP peptide and the inactive N-terminal fragment, NT-proBNP. BNP, NT-proBNP, proBNP and the C-terminal portion of the BNP signal peptide have been detected in human plasma as well as multiple sub-forms including truncated forms of BNP and NT-proBNP, as well as variable glycosylation of NT-proBNP and proBNP. The origin of these circulating forms, their potential bioactivity and their detection by current analytical methods are presented in this review. PMID:26160054

  19. Biomarkers Beyond the Natriuretic Peptides for Chronic Heart Failure: Galectin-3 and Soluble ST2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and NT-proBNP are widely used plasma biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute decompensated heart failure and prognosis for future cardiac disease. The clinical performance of these tests for management of chronic heart failure is somewhat limited by the markers’ high biological variation. Biomarkers such as galectin-3 and soluble ST2 that reflect ongoing remodeling via cardiac fibrosis of the heart may provide complementary information to the natriuretic peptides in the management of chronic heart failure with regards to risk stratification for future adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, and need for heart transplantation). However, implementation of these biomarkers into routine clinical practice requires documentation that these tests will enable therapeutic decisions that can be made to improve clinical outcomes, and the availability of commercial assays. This report will discuss the need for novel heart failure biomarkers, ideal characteristics of assays, and review and compare the clinical performance of assays for galectin-3 and sST2 for chronic heart failure disease management.

  20. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards.

  1. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards. PMID:27354151

  2. Dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter: approval and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wolbrette, Deborah; Gonzalez, Mario; Samii, Soraya; Banchs, Javier; Penny-Peterson, Erica; Naccarelli, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Dronedarone, a new Class III antiarrhythmic agent, has now been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Approval came in March 2009 due to the positive results of the ATHENA trial showing significant reductions in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalization with dronedarone use. A post hoc analysis of the ATHENA data also suggested a decrease in stroke risk with this agent. However, due to safety concerns in the heart failure population in the earlier ANDROMEDA trial, dronedarone is not recommended for patients with an ejection fraction <35% and recent decompensated heart failure. Dronedarone is an amiodarone analog with multichannel blocking electrophysiologic properties similar to those of amiodarone, but several structural differences. Dronedarone’s lack of the iodine moiety reduces its potential for thyroid and pulmonary toxicity. Preliminary data from the DIONYSOS trial, and an indirect meta-analysis comparing amiodarone with dronedarone, showed amiodarone to be more effective in maintaining sinus rhythm, while dronedarone was associated with fewer adverse effects resulting in early termination of the drug. Dronedarone is the first antiarrhythmic drug for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter shown to reduce cardiovascular hospitalizations. In patients with structural heart disease who have an ejection fraction >35% and no recent decompensated heart failure, dronedarone should be considered earlier than amiodarone in the treatment algorithm. PMID:20730068

  3. Silent Atrial Fibrillation: Definition, Clarification, and Unanswered Issues.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Harold L

    2015-11-01

    Silent or subclinical asymptomatic atrial fibrillation has currently gained wide interest in the epidemiologic, neurologic and cardiovascular communities. The association of brief episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or surrogate atrial arrhythmias which predict future clinical adverse events have been established. Nevertheless there exists a confounding array of definitions to indicate its presence without discrete indication of which populations should be examined. Moreover the term "atrial fibrillation burden" (AFB) has emerged from such studies with a plethora of descriptions to prognosticate both arrhythmic and clinical adverse events. This presentation suggests clarification of diagnostic definitions associated with silent atrial fibrillation, and a more precise description of AFB. It examines the populations across the current disease and cardiovascular invasive therapeutic spectrum that lead to both silent atrial fibrillation and AFB. It describes the diagnostic methods of arrhythmia detection utilizing the surface ECG, subcutaneous ECG or intra-cardiac devices and their relationship in seeking meaningful arrhythmic markers of silent atrial fibrillation. Whereas a wide range of clinical risk factors of silent atrial fibrillation have been validated in the literature, there is an ongoing search for those arrhythmic risk factors that precisely identify and prognosticate outcome events in diverse populations at risk of atrial fibrillation and its complications. This presentation identifies this chaos, and focuses attention on the issues to be addressed to facilitate descriptive and comparative scientific studies in the future. It is a call to action specifically to the medical arrhythmic community and its specialty societies (i.e., ISHNE, HRS, EHRA) to begin a quest to unravel the arrhythmic quagmire associated with "silent atrial fibrillation."

  4. Association of brain-type natriuretic protein and cardiac troponin I with incipient cardiovascular disease in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Ely, John J; Zavaskis, Tony; Lammey, Michael L; Sleeper, Meg M; Lee, D Rick

    2011-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in chimpanzees, but its etiology and clinical presentations remain poorly understood. The disease in chimpanzees differs sufficiently from that in humans that simple extrapolation from human findings are inadequate to guide clinical diagnoses. Nevertheless, the burden of disease posed by CVD made it important to attempt to identify specific chimpanzees at risk of developing CVD to allow clinical intervention prior to clinical presentation of advanced disease. We screened 4 CVD biomarkers used in human and veterinary medicine to identify markers with prognostic value in chimpanzees. Biomarkers included complete lipid panel, C-reactive protein, brain-type natriuretic protein, and cardiac troponin I. Serum levels of brain-type natriuretic protein differed between chimpanzees with CVD and heart-healthy controls. Cardiac troponin I gave mixed results. C-reactive protein and lipid panel values were not informative for cardiovascular disease, although total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides increased significantly with decade of life. Values of braintype natriuretic protein exceeding 163 mg/mL had a specificity of 90.5% for CVD, whereas levels of cardiac troponin I above the threshold of detection (0.20 ng/mL) appeared to be clinically relevant. More extensive clinical studies are recommended to validate these specific values. We conclude that brain-type natriuretic protein and possibly cardiac troponin I are useful diagnostic biomarkers for incipient CVD processes in chimpanzees. PMID:21535928

  5. Association of Brain-Type Natriuretic Protein and Cardiac Troponin I with Incipient Cardiovascular Disease in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Ely, John J; Zavaskis, Tony; Lammey, Michael L; Sleeper, Meg M; Lee, D Rick

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in chimpanzees, but its etiology and clinical presentations remain poorly understood. The disease in chimpanzees differs sufficiently from that in humans that simple extrapolation from human findings are inadequate to guide clinical diagnoses. Nevertheless, the burden of disease posed by CVD made it important to attempt to identify specific chimpanzees at risk of developing CVD to allow clinical intervention prior to clinical presentation of advanced disease. We screened 4 CVD biomarkers used in human and veterinary medicine to identify markers with prognostic value in chimpanzees. Biomarkers included complete lipid panel, C-reactive protein, brain-type natriuretic protein, and cardiac troponin I. Serum levels of brain-type natriuretic protein differed between chimpanzees with CVD and heart-healthy controls. Cardiac troponin I gave mixed results. C-reactive protein and lipid panel values were not informative for cardiovascular disease, although total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides increased significantly with decade of life. Values of brain-type natriuretic protein exceeding 163 mg/mL had a specificity of 90.5% for CVD, whereas levels of cardiac troponin I above the threshold of detection (0.20 ng/mL) appeared to be clinically relevant. More extensive clinical studies are recommended to validate these specific values. We conclude that brain-type natriuretic protein and possibly cardiac troponin I are useful diagnostic biomarkers for incipient CVD processes in chimpanzees. PMID:21535928

  6. Disrupted calcium release as a mechanism for atrial alternans associated with human atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kelly C; Bayer, Jason D; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, but our knowledge of the arrhythmogenic substrate is incomplete. Alternans, the beat-to-beat alternation in the shape of cardiac electrical signals, typically occurs at fast heart rates and leads to arrhythmia. However, atrial alternans have been observed at slower pacing rates in AF patients than in controls, suggesting that increased vulnerability to arrhythmia in AF patients may be due to the proarrythmic influence of alternans at these slower rates. As such, alternans may present a useful therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of AF, but the mechanism underlying alternans occurrence in AF patients at heart rates near rest is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how cellular changes that occur in human AF affect the appearance of alternans at heart rates near rest. To achieve this, we developed a computational model of human atrial tissue incorporating electrophysiological remodeling associated with chronic AF (cAF) and performed parameter sensitivity analysis of ionic model parameters to determine which cellular changes led to alternans. Of the 20 parameters tested, only decreasing the ryanodine receptor (RyR) inactivation rate constant (kiCa) produced action potential duration (APD) alternans seen clinically at slower pacing rates. Using single-cell clamps of voltage, fluxes, and state variables, we determined that alternans onset was Ca2+-driven rather than voltage-driven and occurred as a result of decreased RyR inactivation which led to increased steepness of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release slope. Iterated map analysis revealed that because SR Ca2+ uptake efficiency was much higher in control atrial cells than in cAF cells, drastic reductions in kiCa were required to produce alternans at comparable pacing rates in control atrial cells. These findings suggest that RyR kinetics may play a critical role in altered Ca2+ homeostasis which drives proarrhythmic

  7. Genetic Loci Associated With Atrial Fibrillation: Relation to Left Atrial Structure in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Yin, Xiaoyan; McManus, David D.; Chuang, Michael L.; Cheng, Susan; Lubitz, Steven A.; Arora, Garima; Manning, Warren J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants associated with AF. Whether genetic variants associated with AF are also associated with atrial structure, an intermediate phenotype for AF, has had limited investigation. We sought to investigate associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and atrial structure obtained by cardiovascular imaging in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods and Results We selected 11 SNPs that have been associated with AF in GWAS. We examined the SNPs' relations to cross‐sectional left atrial (LA) dimensions (determined by transthoracic echocardiography) and LA volume (determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance [CMR]) employing linear regression. The total sample included 1555 participants with CMR LA volume (age 60±9 years, 53% women) and 6861 participants with echocardiographic LA diameter (age 48±13 years, 52% women) measured. We employed a significance threshold of P<0.0023 to account for multiple testing of the 11 SNPs and 2 LA measures. In a primary analysis, no SNPs were significantly related to the LA measures. Likewise, in secondary analyses excluding individuals with prevalent AF (n=77, CMR sample; n=105, echocardiography sample) no SNPs were related to LA volume or diameter. Conclusion In a community‐based cohort, we did not identify a statistically significant association between selected SNPs associated with AF and measures of LA anatomy. Further investigations with larger longitudinally assessed samples and a broader array of SNPs may be necessary to determine the relation between genetic loci associated with AF and atrial structure. PMID:24695651

  8. Predictors of atrial fibrillation termination and clinical success of catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Heist, E Kevin; Chalhoub, Fadi; Barrett, Conor; Danik, Stephan; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Mansour, Moussa

    2012-08-15

    The termination of persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) during catheter ablation has been associated in some, but not all, studies with reduced arrhythmia during clinical follow-up. We sought to determine the rate of persistent AF termination achievable with a stepwise ablation strategy, the predictors of AF termination, and the clinical outcomes associated with termination and nontermination. A total of 143 consecutive patients (age 62 ± 9 years, AF duration 5.7 ± 5.2 years) with persistent and longstanding persistent AF resistant to antiarrhythmic medication who presented in AF for catheter ablation were studied. Ablation was done with a stepwise approach, including pulmonary vein isolation, followed by complex fractionated atrial electrogram ablation and ablation of resultant atrial tachycardias. Clinical follow-up was then performed after a 2-month blanking period to assess arrhythmia recurrence, defined as AF or atrial tachycardia lasting ≥ 30 seconds. AF termination by ablation was achieved in 95 (66%) of the 143 patients. Multivariate predictors of AF termination included longer baseline AF cycle length (p <0.001) and smaller left atrial size (p = 0.002). AF termination by ablation was associated with both a lower incidence of arrhythmia recurrence after a single procedure without antiarrhythmic drugs (p = 0.01) and overall clinical success (single or multiple procedures, with or without antiarrhythmic drugs; p = 0.005). On multivariate analysis, the predictors of overall clinical success included AF termination by ablation (p = 0.001), a shorter ablation duration (p = 0.002), younger age (p = 0.02), male gender (p = 0.03), and the presence of hypertension (p = 0.03). In conclusion, among patients with persistent AF, termination of AF by ablation can be achieved in most patients and is associated with reduced recurrence of arrhythmia. PMID:22591670

  9. Prevalence of left atrial abnormalities in atrial fibrillation versus normal sinus patients

    PubMed Central

    Ketai, Loren H; Teague, Shawn D; Rissing, Stacy M

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) may be the cause or sequela of left atrial abnormalities and variants. Purpose To determine the prevalence of left atrial (LA) abnormalities in AF patients compared to normal sinus rhythm (NSR) patients. Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 281 cardiac CT examinations from 2010 to 2012, excluding patients with prior pulmonary vein ablation, known coronary artery disease, prior coronary stent placement, or coronary artery bypass grafts. The first group consisted of 159 AF patients undergoing cardiac CT prior to pulmonary vein ablation and the second group consisted of 122 NSR patients evaluated with coronary CT angiography. Demographic data were collected. LA abnormalities were analyzed. Left atrial diameter was measured on an axial view. Results A total of 281 patients were included. The male gender has significantly higher prevalence of AF than female gender, P value <0.001. Patients with AF were significantly older (mean age, 57.4 years; standard deviation [SD], 11.8 years) than NSR patients (mean age, 53.4 years; SD, 13.6 years), P value, 0.01. The left atrial diameter was greater in the AF patients (mean diameter, 4.3 cm; SD, 0.82 cm) versus the NSR patients (3.4 cm; SD, 0.58 cm), P value, <0.0001. LA diverticulum was the most prevalent variant, occurring in 28.4% of the entire patient population followed by LA pouch, occurring in 24%. There was no significant between group differences in the prevalence of these or the remainder of the LA variants. Conclusion AF patients differed significantly from NSR patients in LA size, gender, and mean age. There was no statistical significance between the two groups with regard to the LA morphologic abnormalities other than size. PMID:27358747

  10. Heart failure after transvenous closure of atrial septal defect associated with atrial standstill and thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Vehbi; Senocak, Filiz; Orün, Utku Arman; Ceylan, Ozben

    2013-10-01

    Despite advances in device closure for atrial septal defect, post-closure heart failure remains a clinical problem in adult patients but is seen only rarely in children. An eight-year-old boy, who had been followed by a local pediatrician with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and congenital heart disease, was consulted to us for cardiac re-evaluation. Electrocardiography demonstrated absent P waves, and echocardiography revealed enlargement of the right ventricle and both atria and secundum atrial septal defect. With the diagnosis of atrial standstill, secundum atrial septal defect and thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia, acute heart failure developed after transvenous closure of the atrial septal defect, which improved dramatically with thiamine and supportive treatment. PMID:24164997

  11. Effects of Continuous Infusion of Low-dose Human Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (hANP) on the Lungs during Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Hirotsugu; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Kuwata, Toshiyuki; Hori, Takayuki; Ogawa, Hironaga; Tsuchiya, Go

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a continuous infusion of low-dose hANP on the lungs during cardiac surgery in patients under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods: We analyzed 30 consecutive cases of cardiac surgery performed at our hospital from 2007–2008. The patients were divided into a group that received hANP (hANP group) or a group that received saline and no hANP (N-hANP group). We measured various parameters before and after surgery using a PiCCO monitor. Result: There were no differences in the preoperative characteristics between the groups, although urine volume during the operation was significantly greater in the hANP group. After surgery, there were no significant differences between the groups in cardiac output index (CI), global enddiastolic volume index (GEDVI), intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBI), pulmonary blood volume index (PBI), extravascular lung water index (ELWI) and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI), total protein, and creatine. In contrast, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and renin were significantly lower, and albumin was significantly higher in the hANP group. Conclusion: We found that low-dose hANP during open cardiac surgery inhibited the secretion and plasma activity of IL-6 and renin. Although there were no differences in lung circulatory parameters such as the amount of fluid in the pulmonary blood vessels between the two groups, we believe that the strong diuretic effect of hANP reduced third-space fluid retention caused by CPB. PMID:25740453

  12. Pro Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (1-30) and 6-keto PGF1α Activity Affects Na(+) Homeostasis in Non-modulating Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ramiro A; Gilbert, Bernardo H; Masnatta, Lucas; Giannone, Carlos; Pesiney, Carlina; Ramirez, Agustin J

    2015-01-01

    Non-modulating hypertension (NMHT) is a high renin subtype of salt sensitive hypertension, which fails to achieve renal vasodilatation and a correct Na(+) handling during sodium load. We investigate, in MHT and NMHT, the role of ANP, the renin-angiotensin system and PgI2, in the renal sodium handling mechanisms. After 10 days of low (20mmol.L) or after 72hs of high (250mmol.L) sodium intake, 13 NMHT (34±5y; 9 male) and 13 MHT (32±4y; 10male) were studied. Pro-ANP (1-30) PgI2, PRA and total exchangeable Na(+)24 (ENa(+)) were measured. Under low sodium intake, PRA (4.2±0.5ng.ml.h; p<0.05) and Pro-ANP (78.6±2pg/ml, p<0.05) were higher than in NMHT under (3.1±0.4ng.ml.h and 69.8±3 pg/ml). After 72h of high Na(+) intake, Pro-ANP (1-30) increased significantly only in MHT (82.1±3pg/ml, p<0.05). PgI2, under low sodium intake (1.83±0.2pg/24h), increased in MHT after 72h under high sodium (2.58±0.5pg/ 24h, p<0.02). Under low sodium diet, PgI2 (2.16±0.11pg/24h) was as higher in NMHT, as in MHT. After 72h under high Na+ intake, it failed to show any change (2.61±0.36 pg/24h; p=ns). A significant correlation between variations in ENa(+) and mean blood pressure (r=0.50, p<0.01), variations in Pro-ANP (1-30) values and ENa(+) in MHT (r=0.95; p<0.001) while a negative correlation between ENa(+) variations and ENa(+) (r=0.81, p<0.05) was observed in NMHT. ENa(+) variations were only significantly related to variations in FF in MHT. Thus, in NMHT, there is an unbalanced relationship between vasonstrictor and vasodilator mediators. From these, as an extrarenal homeostatic mediator, ANP seems to play an important role to compensate the altered renal sodium handling.

  13. Impact of tissue geometry on simulated cholinergic atrial fibrillation: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtois, Philippe; Nattel, Stanley

    2011-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), arising in the cardiac atria, is a common cardiac rhythm disorder that is incompletely understood. Numerous characteristics of the atrial tissue are thought to play a role in the maintenance of AF. Most traditional theoretical models of AF have considered the atrium to be a flat two-dimensional sheet. Here, we analyzed the relationship between atrial geometry, substrate size, and AF persistence, in a mathematical model involving heterogeneity. Spatially periodic properties were created by variations in times required for reactivation due to periodic acetylcholine concentration [ACh] distribution. The differences in AF maintenance between the sheet and the cylinder geometry are found for intermediate gradients of inexcitable time (intermediate [ACh]). The maximum difference in AF maintenance between geometry decreases with increasing tissue size, down to zero for a substrate of dimensions 20 × 10 cm. Generators have the tendency to be anchored to the regions of longer inexcitable period (low [ACh]). The differences in AF maintenance between geometries correlate with situations of moderate anchoring for which rotor-core drifts between low-[ACh] regions occur, favoring generator disappearance. The drift of generators increases their probability of disappearance at the tissue borders, resulting in a decreased maintenance rate in the sheet due to the higher number of no-flux boundaries. These interactions between biological variables and the role of geometry must be considered when selecting an appropriate model for AF in intact hearts.

  14. A proposal for new clinical concepts in the management of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Camm, A John; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Calkins, Hugh; Halperin, Jonathan L; Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y H; Nattel, Stanley; Ruskin, Jeremy; Banerjee, Amitava; Blendea, Dan; Guasch, Eduard; Needleman, Matthew; Savelieva, Irina; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Williams, Eric S

    2012-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a growing public health burden. It is a complex condition, involving a number of etiologic factors and arrhythmia mechanisms associated with atrial remodeling. Greater understanding of these mechanisms may improve therapy. Current AF classification schemes are limited by simplicity. A number of risk factors predict AF onset, and additional factors are being evaluated in registry studies. Doppler imaging and Holter monitoring in high-risk patients to predict the onset of AF and progression from paroxysmal to permanent AF are promising. There is a need for a novel multifactorial classification model encompassing AF duration, symptoms, markers of atrial remodeling, and a risk score for AF onset, persistence, progression, and complications to guide treatment and prognostication. Preventing AF onset with upstream therapy is of great interest, but current data are conflicting. More study is needed to optimize rhythm control with antiarrhythmic drugs and targeted ablation to specific patient populations at an earlier stage. There is little consensus on optimal rate control and no information relating to optimum rate control in specific populations. This article highlights new concepts in AF and directions for future research.

  15. Atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy: combined use for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Fletcher, J.W.; Williams, G.A.

    1987-11-01

    To evaluate the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD), atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy were performed in 36 patients with stable angina pectoris who were unable to perform an adequate exercise stress test. All patients underwent cardiac catheterization. Nine patients had previously undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. Significant CAD (one or more lesions greater than or equal to 50%) was present in 33 patients. Atrial pacing produced ischemic ST segment depression (greater than or equal to 1 mm) in 18 (55%) patients with CAD, and angina in 20 patients (61%). As the number of vessels with CAD increased, there was no significant change in the sensitivities of pacing-induced angina or ST segment depression for detecting CAD. In the 3 patients without CAD, ST segment depression occurred in 1 patient and angina in none. Thallium 201 scintigraphy demonstrated perfusion defects in 27 (82%) patients with CAD, with fixed defects seen in 13 studies (39%) and reversible defects in 15 (45%). In the 3 patients without CAD, no perfusion defects were seen. The thallium 201 scan successfully predicted the presence of CAD in patients with single-vessel disease but usually underestimated the number of vessels involved in patients with multivessel disease. Combined sensitivity of pacing-induced ST segment depression and an abnormal thallium 201 scan finding for detecting CAD was 91%. The authors conclude that combined atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy is a useful test for detecting CAD in patients unable to perform an adequate exercise stress test.

  16. Evidence that the Brain Participates in the Humoral Natriuretic Mechanism of Blood Volume Expansion in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Kaloyanides, George J.; Balabanian, Murgurdich B.; Bowman, Ralph L.; Pool, Philip

    1978-01-01

    We examined the role of the central nervous system in the activation of the humoral natriuretic mechanism elicited by blood volume expansion. Studies were performed in anesthetized dogs pretreated with deoxycorticosterone acetate (15 mg/day) and sodium chloride for 12 days. An isolated dog kidney perfused with blood from the femoral artery of the volume expanded dog served as the bioassay system for the humoral natriuretic factor. In group I volume expansion of intact dogs (n = 14) with equilibrated blood promoted an increase in fractional sodium excretion (FENa) from a control level of 2.6±0.5 to 13.6±1.6%, P <0.001. In the isolated kidney FENa increased from 3.6±0.8 to 6.8±1.1%, P <0.01. The natriuresis from the isolated kidney occurred in the absence of significant changes in renal arterial pressure, glomerular filtration rate, plasma protein concentration, or packed cell volume, whereas renal blood flow decreased slightly. In group II (n = 20) the dogs were decapitated by means of a specially designed neck vise. In 10 dogs blood pressure was supported by a constant infusion of dopamine (3.8±0.7 μg/min per kg body weight). Despite the fact that in response to the same volume stimulus, decapitated dogs manifested an increase in blood volume and cardiac output similar in magnitude to that of intact dogs whereas the rise in mean arterial pressure of decapitated dogs exceeded that of intact dogs, the natriuretic response of decapitated dogs was significantly less than that of intact dogs. FENa in decapitated dogs increased 4.7±1.1 compared to 11.1±1.4% in intact dogs (p <0.01). Furthermore, volume expansion of decapitated dogs failed to elicit a natriuretic response from the isolated kidney. FENa in the isolated kidney measured 2.6±0.4 before and 2.6±0.4% after blood volume expansion. These data indicate that decapitation inhibits activation of the humoral natriuretic mechanism elicited by blood volume expansion and are consistent with the interpretation

  17. Electrogram Morphology Recurrence Patterns during Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jason; Gordon, David; Passman, Rod S.; Knight, Bradley P.; Arora, Rishi; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional mapping of atrial fibrillation (AF) is limited by changing electrogram morphologies and variable cycle lengths. Objective We tested the hypothesis that morphology recurrence plot analysis would identify sites of stable and repeatable electrogram morphology patterns. Methods AF electrograms recorded from left atrial (LA) and right atrial (RA) sites in 19 patients (10 male, 59±10 years old) prior to AF ablation were analyzed. Morphology recurrence plots for each electrogram recording were created by cross-correlation of each automatically detected activation with every other activation in the recording. A recurrence percentage, the percentage of the most common morphology, and the mean cycle length of activations with the most common morphology (CLR) were computed. Results The morphology recurrence plots commonly showed checkerboard patterns of alternating high and low cross correlation values indicating periodic recurrences in morphologies. The mean recurrence percentage for all sites and all patients was 38±25%. The highest recurrence percentage per patient averaged 83±17%. The highest recurrence percentage was located in the RA in 5 patients and in the LA in 14 patients. Patients with sites of shortest CLR in the LA and RA had ablation failure rates of 25% and 100%, respectively (HR=4.95; p=0.05). Conclusions A new technique to characterize electrogram morphology recurrence demonstrated that there is a distribution of sites with high and low repeatability of electrogram morphologies. Sites with rapid activation of highly repetitive morphology patterns may be critical to sustaining AF. Further testing of this approach to map and ablate AF sources is warranted. PMID:25101485

  18. Atrial fibrillation: mechanisms, therapeutics, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pellman, Jason; Sheikh, Farah

    2015-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia, affecting 1% to 2% of the general population. It is characterized by rapid and disorganized atrial activation leading to impaired atrial function, which can be diagnosed on an EKG by lack of a P-wave and irregular QRS complexes. AF is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is a risk factor for embolic stroke and worsening heart failure. Current research on AF support and explore the hypothesis that initiation and maintenance of AF require pathophysiological remodeling of the atria, either specifically as in lone AF or secondary to other heart disease as in heart failure-associated AF. Remodeling in AF can be grouped into three categories that include: (i) electrical remodeling, which includes modulation of L-type Ca(2+) current, various K(+) currents and gap junction function; (ii) structural remodeling, which includes changes in tissues properties, size, and ultrastructure; and (iii) autonomic remodeling, including altered sympathovagal activity and hyperinnervation. Electrical, structural, and autonomic remodeling all contribute to creating an AF-prone substrate which is able to produce AF-associated electrical phenomena including a rapidly firing focus, complex multiple reentrant circuit or rotors. Although various remodeling events occur in AF, current AF therapies focus on ventricular rate and rhythm control strategies using pharmacotherapy and surgical interventions. Recent progress in the field has started to focus on the underlying substrate that drives and maintains AF (termed upstream therapies); however, much work is needed in this area. Here, we review current knowledge of AF mechanisms, therapies, and new areas of investigation. PMID:25880508

  19. Atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves the canine rapid atrial pacing-induced structural and electrical remodeling. Fan, ACE2 improves atrial substrate remodeling.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinqi; Zou, Lili; Cui, Kun; Woo, Kamsang; Du, Huaan; Chen, Shaojie; Ling, Zhiyu; Zhang, Quanjun; Zhang, Bo; Lan, Xianbin; Su, Li; Zrenner, Bernhard; Yin, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) by homogeneous transmural atrial gene transfer can reverse atrial remodeling and its mechanisms in a canine atrial-pacing model. Twenty-eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into four groups: Sham-operated, AF-control, gene therapy with adenovirus-enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) and gene therapy with Ad-ACE2 (Ad-ACE2) (n = 7 per subgroup). AF was induced in all dogs except the Sham-operated group by rapid atrial pacing at 450 beats/min for 2 weeks. Ad-EGFP and Ad-ACE2 group then received epicardial gene painting. Three weeks after gene transfer, all animals except the Sham group underwent rapid atrial pacing for another 3 weeks and then invasive electrophysiological, histological and molecular studies. The Ad-ACE2 group showed an increased ACE2 and Angiotensin-(1-7) expression, and decreased Angiotensin II expression in comparison with Ad-EGFP and AF-control group. ACE2 overexpression attenuated rapid atrial pacing-induced increase in activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) levels, and decrease in MAPK phosphatase 1(MKP-1) level, resulting in attenuation of atrial fibrosis collagen protein markers and transforming growth factor-β1. Additionally, ACE2 overexpression also modulated the tachypacing-induced up-regulation of connexin 40, down-regulation of connexin 43 and Kv4.2, and significantly decreased the inducibility and duration of AF. ACE2 overexpression could shift the renin-angiotensin system balance towards the protective axis, attenuate cardiac fibrosis remodeling associated with up-regulation of MKP-1 and reduction of MAPKs activities, modulate tachypacing-induced ion channels and connexin remodeling, and subsequently reduce the inducibility and duration of AF.

  20. Characterization of a novel multifunctional resveratrol derivative for the treatment of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Baczko, Istvan; Liknes, David; Yang, Wei; Hamming, Kevin C; Searle, Gavin; Jaeger, Kristian; Husti, Zoltan; Juhasz, Viktor; Klausz, Gergely; Pap, Robert; Saghy, Laszlo; Varro, Andras; Dolinsky, Vernon; Wang, Shaohua; Rauniyar, Vivek; Hall, Dennis; Dyck, Jason RB; Light, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with an increased risk for stroke, heart failure and cardiovascular-related mortality. Candidate targets for anti-AF drugs include a potassium channel Kv1.5, and the ionic currents IKACh and late INa, along with increased oxidative stress and activation of NFAT-mediated gene transcription. As pharmacological management of AF is currently suboptimal, we have designed and characterized a multifunctional small molecule, compound 1 (C1), to target these ion channels and pathways. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We made whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of recombinant ion channels, human atrial IKur, rat atrial IKACh, cellular recordings of contractility and calcium transient measurements in tsA201 cells, human atrial samples and rat myocytes. We also used a model of inducible AF in dogs. KEY RESULTS C1 inhibited human peak and late Kv1.5 currents, frequency-dependently, with IC50 of 0.36 and 0.11 μmol·L−1 respectively. C1 inhibited IKACh (IC50 of 1.9 μmol·L−1) and the Nav1.5 sodium channel current (IC50s of 3 and 1 μmol·L−1 for peak and late components respectively). C1 (1 μmol·L−1) significantly delayed contractile and calcium dysfunction in rat ventricular myocytes treated with 3 nmol·L−1 sea anemone toxin (ATX-II). C1 weakly inhibited the hERG channel and maintained antioxidant and NFAT-inhibitory properties comparable to the parent molecule, resveratrol. In a model of inducible AF in conscious dogs, C1 (1 mg·kg−1) reduced the average and total AF duration. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS C1 behaved as a promising multifunctional small molecule targeting a number of key pathways involved in AF. PMID:24102184

  1. Feasibility and safety of remote-controlled magnetic navigation for ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Katsiyiannis, William T; Melby, Daniel P; Matelski, Jayme L; Ervin, Vanessa L; Laverence, Kerri L; Gornick, Charles C

    2008-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) involves complex catheter manipulation resulting in prolonged procedure time and fluoroscopy exposure. Remote magnetic navigation (RMN) represents a novel approach toward improving the ability to perform complex ablation. Forty patients underwent ablation for AF, 20 using RMN (NIOBE II, Stereotaxis, Inc) with a 4-mm-tip magnetic catheter (Celsius, Biosense Webster) and 20 using a conventional 8-mm-tip bidirectional ablation catheter (Blazer, Boston Scientific). All patients underwent a combined wide area circumferential ablation and segmental pulmonary vein (PV) isolation using a circular mapping catheter and cavotricuspid isthmus ablation for right atrial flutter. The procedural end point was PV entrance block. There was no difference in atrial size, left ventricular systolic function, or type of AF between groups. PV entrance block was achieved in all patients. Mean procedure time was 279 +/- 60 minutes in the conventional group versus 209 +/- 56 minutes in the RMN group (p <0.001). Mean fluoroscopy time in the conventional group was 58.6 +/- 21 minutes versus 19.5 +/- 9.8 in the RMN group (p <0.001). At 1 year there were 15 patients in the conventional group and 16 in the RMN group free from clinical AF and off antiarrhythmic drugs (p = NS). There were 2 additional ablations performed for atypical atrial flutter in the conventional group and 3 in the RMN group (p = ns). Ablation catheter char formation was not observed. There were no procedural complications. In conclusion, radiofrequency ablation of AF performed with RMN is safe and feasible. Compared with conventional hand-navigated ablation, RMN ablation results in similar clinical outcomes with decreased fluoroscopy and procedure times.

  2. NASA's First Atrial Fibrillation Case - Deke Slayton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about heart dysrhythmia have been present since the earliest days of the US manned space program. While information about an astronaut's health is general kept private, one of the original seven American astronaut's health status was played out in a very public forum. Donald "Deke" Slayton was removed from the second manned space flight when it was discovered he had idiopathic atrial fibrillation. Referencing the original medical documents, details of how this was discovered and managed from the medical perspective will be reviewed. This is NASA's first heart dysrhythmia case in an astronaut and it proves quite interesting when placed in historic perspective.

  3. The polyuria of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Stein, R. M.; Discala, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Two patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and an associated polyuria were studied to delineate the mechanism of the increase in urine flow. A striking saluresis was noted in both patients. The increased sodium excretion was probably due to decreased sodium reabsorption, perhaps at proximal tubular nephron sites. This inhibition of sodium reabsorption could explain both the saluresis and some part or all of the polyuria. Re-evaluation of earlier case reports reveals patterns of concomitant salt and water excretion consistent with this mechanism. The saluresis cannot be explained by the previously favored hypothesis of antidiuretic hormone inhibition.

  4. Science Linking Pulmonary Veins and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Saagar; Sacher, Frederic; Derval, Nicolas; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Hooks, Darren; Denis, Arnaud; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanistic basis of atrial fibrillation (AF). One of the most important discoveries in this context has been that pulmonary veins (PV) play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of AF. PV isolation has since become the most widely used technique for treatment of paroxysmal AF. Multiple studies have demonstrated that the electrophysiological and anatomical characteristics of PVs create a proarrhythmogenic substrate. The following review discusses the mechanistic links between PVs and AF. PMID:26835098

  5. Minimally Invasive Atrial Fibrillation Surgery: Hybrid Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Jared P.; Downs, Emily A.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a challenging pathologic process. There continues to be a great need for the development of a reproducible, durable cure when medical management has failed. An effective, minimally invasive, sternal-sparing intervention without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass is a promising treatment approach. In this article, we describe a hybrid technique being refined at our center that combines a thoracoscopic epicardial surgical approach with an endocardial catheter-based procedure. We also discuss our results and review the literature describing this unique treatment approach. PMID:27127561

  6. Cardiometabolic risk factors and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Arthur R; Lavie, Carl J; Dinicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James; Morin, Daniel P; Khatib, Sammy; Abi-Samra, Freddy M; Messerli, Franz H; Milani, Richard V

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia worldwide; it is a significant risk factor for stroke and embolization, and has an impact on cardiac function. Despite its impact on morbidity and mortality, our understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of this disease process is still incomplete. Over the past several decades, there has been evidence to suggest that AF has a significant correlation with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Furthermore, AF appears to be more closely related to specific components of MetS compared with others. This article provides an overview of the various components of MetS and their impact on AF. PMID:24448257

  7. The Epidemiology of Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Francesca; Sacco, Simona; Tiseo, Cindy; Degan, Diana; Ornello, Raffaele; Carolei, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The burden of stroke is increasing due to aging population and unhealthy lifestyle habits. The considerable rise in atrial fibrillation (AF) is due to greater diffusion of risk factors and screening programs. The link between AF and ischemic stroke is strong. The subtype most commonly associated with AF is cardioembolic stroke, which is particularly severe and shows the highest rates of mortality and permanent disability. A trend toward a higher prevalence of cardioembolic stroke in high-income countries is probably due to the greater diffusion of AF and the control of atherosclerotic of risk factors. PMID:27150174

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the transcriptional regulation of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-a gene: interactive roles of modified histones, histone acetyltransferase, p300, AND Sp1.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-03-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription.

  9. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a novel screening algorithm for pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a major cause of mortality in systemic sclerosis. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has emerged as a candidate biomarker that may enable the early detection of systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (SSc-PAH). The objective of our study was to incorporate NT-proBNP into a screening algorithm for SSc-PAH that could potentially replace transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as a more convenient and less costly "first tier" test. Methods NT-proBNP levels were measured in patients from four clinical groups: a group with right heart catheter (RHC)-diagnosed SSc-PAH before commencement of therapy for PAH; a group at high risk of SSc-PAH based on TTE; a group with interstitial lung disease; and systemic sclerosis (SSc) controls with no cardiopulmonary complications. NT-proBNP levels were compared by using ANOVA and correlated with other clinical variables by using simple and multiple linear regression. ROC curve analyses were performed to determine the optimal cut point for NT-proBNP and other clinical variable