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Sample records for involves localized translation

  1. Does translation involve structural priming?

    PubMed

    Maier, Robert M; Pickering, Martin J; Hartsuiker, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    When asked to translate utterances, people might merely make sure that their translations have the same meaning as the source, but they might also maintain aspects of sentence form across languages. We report two experiments in which English-German and German-English bilinguals (without specialist translator training) repeated German ditransitive sentences whose meaning was compatible with more than one grammatical form or translated them into English. Participants almost invariably repeated the sentences accurately, thereby retaining the grammatical structure. Importantly, Experiment 1 found that they tended to repeat grammatical form across languages. Experiment 2 included a condition with sentences that had no grammatical equivalent form in English; here participants tended to persist in the order of thematic roles. We argue that cross-linguistic structural priming plays a major role in the act of translation.

  2. Localized translation near the mitochondrial outer membrane: An update.

    PubMed

    Lesnik, Chen; Golani-Armon, Adi; Arava, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Local synthesis of proteins near their activity site has been demonstrated in many biological systems, and has diverse contributions to cellular functions. Studies in recent years have revealed that hundreds of mitochondria-destined proteins are synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes near the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that localized translation also occurs at this cellular locus. Furthermore, in the last year central factors that are involved in this process were identified in yeast, Drosophila, and human cells. Herein we review the experimental evidence for localized translation on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane; in addition, we describe the factors that are involved in this process and discuss the conservation of this mechanism among various species. We also describe the relationship between localized translation and import into the mitochondria and suggest avenues of study that look beyond cotranslational import. Finally we discuss future challenges in characterizing the mechanisms for localized translation and its physiological significance.

  3. G-quadruplexes mediate local translation in neurons.

    PubMed

    Schofield, James P R; Cowan, Joanne L; Coldwell, Mark J

    2015-06-01

    There has recently been a huge increase in interest in the formation of stable G-quadruplex structures in mRNAs and their functional significance. In neurons, local translation of mRNA is essential for normal neuronal behaviour. It has been discovered that local translation of specific mRNAs encoding some of the best known synaptic proteins is dependent on the presence of a G-quadruplex. The recognition of G-quadruplexes in mRNAs, their transport as repressed complexes and the control of their translation at their subcellular destinations involves a diversity of proteins, including those associated with disease pathologies. This is an exciting field, with rapid improvements to our knowledge and understanding. Here, we discuss some of the recent work on how G-quadruplexes mediate local translation in neurons.

  4. Remote Control of Gene Function by Local Translation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hosung; Gkogkas, Christos G.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Holt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    The subcellular position of a protein is a key determinant of its function. Mounting evidence indicates that RNA localization, where specific mRNAs are transported subcellularly and subsequently translated in response to localized signals, is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to control protein localization. On-site synthesis confers novel signaling properties to a protein and helps to maintain local proteome homeostasis. Local translation plays particularly important roles in distal neuronal compartments, and dysregulated RNA localization and translation cause defects in neuronal wiring and survival. Here, we discuss key findings in this area and possible implications of this adaptable and swift mechanism for spatial control of gene function. PMID:24679524

  5. Translationally invariant conservation laws of local Lindblad equations

    SciTech Connect

    Žnidarič, Marko; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio

    2014-02-15

    We study the conditions under which one can conserve local translationally invariant operators by local translationally invariant Lindblad equations in one-dimensional rings of spin-1/2 particles. We prove that for any 1-local operator (e.g., particle density) there exist Lindblad dissipators that conserve that operator, while on the other hand we prove that among 2-local operators (e.g., energy density) only trivial ones of the Ising type can be conserved, while all the other cannot be conserved, neither locally nor globally, by any 2- or 3-local translationally invariant Lindblad equation. Our statements hold for rings of any finite length larger than some minimal length determined by the locality of Lindblad equation. These results show in particular that conservation of energy density in interacting systems is fundamentally more difficult than conservation of 1-local quantities.

  6. The Benefits of Patient Involvement for Translational Research.

    PubMed

    van der Scheer, Lieke; Garcia, Elisa; van der Laan, Anna Laura; van der Burg, Simone; Boenink, Marianne

    2017-09-01

    The question we raise in this paper is, whether patient involvement might be a beneficial way to help determine and achieve the aims of translational (TR) research and, if so, how to proceed. TR is said to ensure a more effective movement ('translation') of basic scientific findings to relevant and useful clinical applications. In view of the fact that patients are supposed to be the primary beneficiaries of such translation and also have relevant knowledge based on their experience, listening to their voice early on in the innovation process might very well increase the effectiveness of the translation. After explaining how the concept of TR emerged and what it entails, this paper shows through a literature review which arguments have been put forward to promote patient involvement in health care research in a more general sense. We examine whether, and if so how, these arguments are relevant for the discourse on TR and we identify pitfalls and dilemmas. Ultimately, we conclude that it may be worthwhile to experiment with patient involvement in TR but that the design of such involvement requires careful consideration.

  7. Global Analysis of mRNA, Translation, and Protein Localization: Local Translation Is a Key Regulator of Cell Protrusions.

    PubMed

    Mardakheh, Faraz K; Paul, Angela; Kümper, Sandra; Sadok, Amine; Paterson, Hugh; Mccarthy, Afshan; Yuan, Yinyin; Marshall, Christopher J

    2015-11-09

    Polarization of cells into a protrusive front and a retracting cell body is the hallmark of mesenchymal-like cell migration. Many mRNAs are localized to protrusions, but it is unclear to what degree mRNA localization contributes toward protrusion formation. We performed global quantitative analysis of the distributions of mRNAs, proteins, and translation rates between protrusions and the cell body by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative proteomics. Our results reveal local translation as a key determinant of protein localization to protrusions. Accordingly, inhibition of local translation destabilizes protrusions and inhibits mesenchymal-like morphology. Interestingly, many mRNAs localized to protrusions are translationally repressed. Specific cis-regulatory elements within mRNA UTRs define whether mRNAs are locally translated or repressed. Finally, RNAi screening of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in protrusions revealed trans-regulators of localized translation that are functionally important for protrusions. We propose that by deciphering the localized mRNA UTR code, these proteins regulate protrusion stability and mesenchymal-like morphology.

  8. Parent Involvement in Local Chapter 1 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, E. Deborah; Shields, Patrick M.

    This report focuses on the involvement of parents in local projects funded under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. It researches the kind and extent of involvement, the impact of state and local factors on it, and the effect of the change from Title I to Chapter…

  9. Neuronal RNA granules: a link between RNA localization and stimulation-dependent translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krichevsky, A. M.; Kosik, K. S.

    2001-01-01

    RNA granules are a macromolecular structure observed in neurons, where they serve as motile units that translocate mRNAs. Isolated RNA granules are highly enriched in Staufen protein and ultrastructurally contain densely packed clusters of ribosomes. With depolarization, many mRNAs, including those involved in plasticity, rapidly shift from the RNA granule fraction to polysomes. Depolarization reorganizes granules and induces a less compact organization of their ribosomes. RNA granules are not translationally competent, as indicated by the failure to incorporate radioactive amino acids and the absence of eIF4E, 4G, and tRNAs. We concluded that RNA granules are a local storage compartment for mRNAs under translational arrest but are poised for release to actively translated pools. Local release of mRNAs and ribosomes from granules may serve as a macromolecular mechanism linking RNA localization to translation and synaptic plasticity.

  10. Neuronal RNA granules: a link between RNA localization and stimulation-dependent translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krichevsky, A. M.; Kosik, K. S.

    2001-01-01

    RNA granules are a macromolecular structure observed in neurons, where they serve as motile units that translocate mRNAs. Isolated RNA granules are highly enriched in Staufen protein and ultrastructurally contain densely packed clusters of ribosomes. With depolarization, many mRNAs, including those involved in plasticity, rapidly shift from the RNA granule fraction to polysomes. Depolarization reorganizes granules and induces a less compact organization of their ribosomes. RNA granules are not translationally competent, as indicated by the failure to incorporate radioactive amino acids and the absence of eIF4E, 4G, and tRNAs. We concluded that RNA granules are a local storage compartment for mRNAs under translational arrest but are poised for release to actively translated pools. Local release of mRNAs and ribosomes from granules may serve as a macromolecular mechanism linking RNA localization to translation and synaptic plasticity.

  11. Local translation of RhoA regulates growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Llewellyn J.; Macosko, Evan Z.; Jeromin, Andreas; Urquhart, Erica R.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2005-01-01

    Neuronal development requires highly coordinated regulation of the cytoskeleton within the developing axon. This dynamic regulation manifests itself in axonal branching, turning, and pathfinding, presynaptic differentiation, and growth cone collapse and extension. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a secreted guidance cue that primarily acts to repel axons from inappropriate targets, induces cytoskeletal rearrangements that results in growth cone collapse 1. These effects require intra-axonal mRNA translation. Here we show that transcripts for RhoA, a small GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton, are localized to developing axons and growth cones, and this localization is mediated by an axonal targeting element located in the RhoA 3’UTR. Sema3A induces intra-axonal translation of RhoA mRNA and this local translation of RhoA is necessary and sufficient for Sema3A-mediated growth cone collapse. These studies indicate that local RhoA translation regulates the neuronal cytoskeleton and identify a novel mechanism for the regulation of RhoA signaling. PMID:16107849

  12. mRNA transport & local translation in neurons.

    PubMed

    Glock, Caspar; Heumüller, Maximilian; Schuman, Erin M

    2017-08-01

    Neurons are amongst the most structurally complex cells and exhibit a high degree of spatial compartmentalization. Also, neurons exhibit rapid and dynamic signaling by processing information in a precise and, sometimes, spatially-restricted manner. The signaling that occurs in axons and dendrites necessitates the maintenance and modification of their local proteomes. Local translation of mRNAs into protein is one solution that neurons use to meet synaptic demand and activity. Here we review some of the key findings and recent discoveries that have shaped our understanding of local translation in neuronal function and highlight important new techniques that might pave the way for new insights. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Local Translation in Primary Afferent Fibers Regulates Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Passmore, Gayle M.; Leith, J. Lianne; Fisher, Amy S.; Berliocchi, Laura; Sivasubramaniam, Anantha K.; Sheasby, Anne; Lumb, Bridget M.; Hunt, Stephen P.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of local protein synthesis for neuronal plasticity. In particular, local mRNA translation through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been shown to play a key role in regulating dendrite excitability and modulating long-term synaptic plasticity associated with learning and memory. There is also increased evidence to suggest that intact adult mammalian axons have a functional requirement for local protein synthesis in vivo. Here we show that the translational machinery is present in some myelinated sensory fibers and that active mTOR-dependent pathways participate in maintaining the sensitivity of a subpopulation of fast-conducting nociceptors in vivo. Phosphorylated mTOR together with other downstream components of the translational machinery were localized to a subset of myelinated sensory fibers in rat cutaneous tissue. We then showed with electromyographic studies that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduced the sensitivity of a population of myelinated nociceptors known to be important for the increased mechanical sensitivity that follows injury. Behavioural studies confirmed that local treatment with rapamycin significantly attenuated persistent pain that follows tissue injury, but not acute pain. Specifically, we found that rapamycin blunted the heightened response to mechanical stimulation that develops around a site of injury and reduced the long-term mechanical hypersensitivity that follows partial peripheral nerve damage - a widely used model of chronic pain. Our results show that the sensitivity of a subset of sensory fibers is maintained by ongoing mTOR-mediated local protein synthesis and uncover a novel target for the control of long-term pain states. PMID:18398477

  14. Promoter sequences direct cytoplasmic localization and translation of mRNAs during starvation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zid, Brian M; O'Shea, Erin K

    2014-10-02

    A universal feature of the response to stress and nutrient limitation is transcriptional upregulation of genes that encode proteins important for survival. Under many such conditions, the overall protein synthesis level is reduced, thereby dampening the stress response at the level of protein expression. For example, during glucose starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), translation is rapidly repressed, yet the transcription of many stress- and glucose-repressed genes is increased. Here we show, using ribosomal profiling and microscopy, that this transcriptionally upregulated gene set consists of two classes: one class produces messenger RNAs that are translated during glucose starvation and are diffusely localized in the cytoplasm, including many heat-shock protein mRNAs; and the other class produces mRNAs that are not efficiently translated during glucose starvation and are concentrated in foci that co-localize with P bodies and stress granules, a class that is enriched for mRNAs involved in glucose metabolism. Surprisingly, the information specifying the differential localization and protein production of these two classes of mRNA is encoded in the promoter sequence: promoter responsiveness to heat-shock factor 1 (Hsf1) specifies diffuse cytoplasmic localization and higher protein production on glucose starvation. Thus, promoter sequences can influence not only the levels of mRNAs but also the subcellular localization of mRNAs and the efficiency with which they are translated, enabling cells to tailor protein production to the environmental conditions.

  15. Protein kinase KIS localizes to RNA granules and enhances local translation.

    PubMed

    Cambray, Serafí; Pedraza, Neus; Rafel, Marta; Garí, Eloi; Aldea, Martí; Gallego, Carme

    2009-02-01

    The regulation of mRNA transport is a fundamental process for cytoplasmic sorting of transcripts and spatially controlled translational derepression once properly localized. There is growing evidence that translation is locally modulated as a result of specific synaptic inputs. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate this translational process are just emerging. We show that KIS, a serine/threonine kinase functionally related to microtubule dynamics and axon development, interacts with three proteins found in RNA granules: KIF3A, NonO, and eEF1A. KIS localizes to RNA granules and colocalizes with the KIF3A kinesin and the beta-actin mRNA in cultured cortical neurons. In addition, KIS is found associated with KIF3A and 10 RNP-transported mRNAs in brain extracts. The results of knockdown experiments indicate that KIS is required for normal neurite outgrowth. More important, the kinase activity of KIS stimulates 3' untranslated region-dependent local translation in neuritic projections. We propose that KIS is a component of the molecular device that modulates translation in RNA-transporting granules as a result of local signals.

  16. Glutamate-induced RNA localization and translation in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young J.; Wu, Bin; Buxbaum, Adina R.; Das, Sulagna; Tsai, Albert; English, Brian P.; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Lavis, Luke D.

    2016-01-01

    Localization of mRNA is required for protein synthesis to occur within discrete intracellular compartments. Neurons represent an ideal system for studying the precision of mRNA trafficking because of their polarized structure and the need for synapse-specific targeting. To investigate this targeting, we derived a quantitative and analytical approach. Dendritic spines were stimulated by glutamate uncaging at a diffraction-limited spot, and the localization of single β-actin mRNAs was measured in space and time. Localization required NMDA receptor activity, a dynamic actin cytoskeleton, and the transacting RNA-binding protein, Zipcode-binding protein 1 (ZBP1). The ability of the mRNA to direct newly synthesized proteins to the site of localization was evaluated using a Halo-actin reporter so that RNA and protein were detected simultaneously. Newly synthesized Halo-actin was enriched at the site of stimulation, required NMDA receptor activity, and localized preferentially at the periphery of spines. This work demonstrates that synaptic activity can induce mRNA localization and local translation of β-actin where the new actin participates in stabilizing the expanding synapse in dendritic spines. PMID:27791158

  17. Systemic involvement in localized scleroderma/morphea.

    PubMed

    Gorkiewicz-Petkow, Anna; Kalinska-Bienias, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (LoSc), also known as morphea, is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin and underlying tissues. Sclerosis is mainly limited to the skin, but subcutaneous tissue, fascia, and underlying muscles and bone may also be involved. In some cases, systemic manifestation with visceral abnormalities may occur. Several publications have focused on significant aspects of LoSc: genetics, immunity, epidemiology, scoring systems, and unification of classifications. Clinical studies featuring large cohorts with the disease published by various international study groups have been of great value in furthering the diagnostic and therapeutic management of LoSc. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Global and Local Translation Designs of Quantum Image Based on FRQI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-Gui; Tan, Canyun; Ian, Hou

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, two kinds of quantum image translation are designed based on FRQI, including global translation and local translation. Firstly, global translation is realized by employing adder modulo N, where all pixels in the image will be moved, and the circuit of right translation is designed. Meanwhile, left translation can also be implemented by using right translation. Complexity analysis shows that the circuits of global translation in this paper have lower complexity and cost less qubits. Secondly, local translation, consisted of single-column translation, multiple-columns translation and translation in the restricted area, is designed by adopting Gray code. In local translation, any parts of pixels in the image can be translated while other pixels remain unchanged. In order to lower complexity when the number of columns needing to be translated are more than one, multiple-columns translation is proposed, which has the approximate complexity with single-column translation. To perform multiple-columns translation, three conditions must be satisfied. In addition, all translations in this paper are cyclic.

  19. Acquisition of Character Translation Rules for Supporting SNOMED CT Localizations.

    PubMed

    Miñarro-Giménez, Jose Antonio; Hellrich, Johannes; Schulz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Translating huge medical terminologies like SNOMED CT is costly and time consuming. We present a methodology that acquires substring substitution rules for single words, based on the known similarity between medical words and their translations, due to their common Latin / Greek origin. Character translation rules are automatically acquired from pairs of English words and their automated translations to German. Using a training set with single words extracted from SNOMED CT as input we obtained a list of 268 translation rules. The evaluation of these rules improved the translation of 60% of words compared to Google Translate and 55% of translated words that exactly match the right translations. On a subset of words where machine translation had failed, our method improves translation in 56% of cases, with 27% exactly matching the gold standard.

  20. Reading for Repetition and Reading for Translation: Do They Involve the Same Processes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, M. Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Theories of translation differ in the role assigned to the reformulation process. One view, the ''horizontal'' approach, considers that translation involves on-line searches for matches between linguistic entries in the two languages involved [Gerver, D. (1976). Empirical studies of simultaneous interpretation: A review and a model. In R. W.…

  1. Reading for Repetition and Reading for Translation: Do They Involve the Same Processes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, M. Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Theories of translation differ in the role assigned to the reformulation process. One view, the ''horizontal'' approach, considers that translation involves on-line searches for matches between linguistic entries in the two languages involved [Gerver, D. (1976). Empirical studies of simultaneous interpretation: A review and a model. In R. W.…

  2. Local Translation of Extranuclear Lamin B Promotes Axon Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Byung C.; Jung, Hosung; Dwivedy, Asha; O'Hare, Catherine M.; Zivraj, Krishna H.; Holt, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Local protein synthesis plays a key role in regulating stimulus-induced responses in dendrites and axons. Recent genome-wide studies have revealed that thousands of different transcripts reside in these distal neuronal compartments, but identifying those with functionally significant roles presents a challenge. We performed an unbiased screen to look for stimulus-induced, protein synthesis-dependent changes in the proteome ofXenopus retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. The intermediate filament protein lamin B2 (LB2), normally associated with the nuclear membrane, was identified as an unexpected major target. Axonal ribosome immunoprecipitation confirmed translation of lb2 mRNA in vivo. Inhibition of lb2 mRNA translation in axons in vivo does not affect guidance but causes axonal degeneration. Axonal LB2 associates with mitochondria, and LB2-deficient axons exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction and defects in axonal transport. Our results thus suggest that axonally synthesized lamin B plays a crucial role in axon maintenance by promoting mitochondrial function. PMID:22341447

  3. Involvement of imported tRNA in intramitochondrial translation. [Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Y.

    1981-01-01

    These studies show that only 10 out of 36 mitochondrial tRNAs hybridize to mtDNA. Consistent with previous observations, Arg, Ile, Lys, Val tRNAs must be imported cytoplasmic tRNAs, since these tRNAs do not hybridize to mtDNA. The evident indicates that these imported tRNAs in Tetrahymena mitochondria are not contaminating cytoplasmic tRNAs in our mitochondrial preparations. The conclusion that they function in intramitochondrial translation is based on the demonstration that all the native and imported tRNAs are associated with the functinal mitochondrial 80S monosome as well as with carefully washed 55S subunits. As expected if they function in translation, all these tRNAs on the ribosomes should become acylated when mitochondria are engaged in protein synthesis. From the codon recognition patterns determined previously, it is quite probable that Tetrahymena mitochondrial translation system differs from mammalian and fungal mitochondrial systems. The mechanisms for transporting tRNA into mitochondria is not known. However, it was proposed earlier that the corresponding tRNA synthetase may act as transport protein.

  4. A role for mRNA trafficking and localized translation in peroxisome biogenesis and function?

    PubMed

    Haimovich, Gal; Cohen-Zontag, Osnat; Gerst, Jeffrey E

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are distinct membrane-enclosed organelles involved in the β-oxidation of fatty acids and synthesis of ether phospholipids (e.g. plasmalogens), as well as cholesterol and its derivatives (e.g. bile acids). Peroxisomes comprise a distinct and highly segregated subset of cellular proteins, including those of the peroxisome membrane and the interior matrix, and while the mechanisms of protein import into peroxisomes have been extensively studied, they are not fully understood. Here we will examine the potential role of RNA trafficking and localized translation on protein import into peroxisomes and its role in peroxisome biogenesis and function. Given that RNAs encoding peroxisome biogenesis (PEX) and matrix proteins have been found in association with the endoplasmic reticulum and peroxisomes, it suggests that localized translation may play a significant role in the import pathways of these different peroxisomal constituents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. PARP12, an interferon-stimulated gene involved in the control of protein translation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Welsby, Iain; Hutin, David; Gueydan, Cyril; Kruys, Veronique; Rongvaux, Anthony; Leo, Oberdan

    2014-09-19

    Transcriptome analyses have recently identified PARP12, a member of a large family of ADP-ribosyl transferases, as an interferon-induced gene (ISG), whose function remains incompletely characterized. We demonstrate herein that PARP12 is a genuine ISG, whose expressed protein displays at least two distinct subcellular locations and related functions. Upon ectopic expression or exposure to oxidative stress, PARP12 is recruited to stress-granules (SGs), known sites of mRNA translational arrest. Accordingly, PARP12 was found to block mRNA translation, possibly upon association to the translational machinery. Both the N-terminal domain (containing an RNA-binding domain characterized by the presence of five CCCH-type Zn-fingers) and integrity of the catalytic domain are required for this suppressive function. In contrast, stimulation with LPS leads to the localization of PARP12 to p62/SQSTM1 (an adaptor protein involved in innate signaling and autophagy) containing structures, unrelated to SGs. Deletion of the N-terminal domain promotes the association of the protein to p62/SQSTM1, suggesting that the RNA-binding domain is responsible for the subcellular localization of PARP12. Association to p62/SQSTM1 was found to correlate with increased NF-κB signaling, suggesting a role for PARP12 in inflammation. Collectively, these observations suggest that PARP12 can alternate between two distinct subcellular compartments associated to two distinct cellular functions. The present work therefore identifies PARP12 as an ISG with a potential role in cellular defenses against viral infections.

  6. Localized Pemphigus Vegetans without Mucosal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vk; Jindal, N; Imchen, S

    2014-03-01

    Pemphigus vegetans is a rare variant of pemphigus vulgaris. A 62-year-old woman presented with erythematous moist vegetative plaque on the left breast and left groin. There was no mucosal involvement. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence findings were suggestive of pemphigus vegetans. She showed excellent response to oral steroids. Literature is scarcely available on the limited involvement with pemphigus vegetans without mucosal involvement.

  7. Community Representatives’ Involvement in Clinical and Translational Science Awardee Activities

    PubMed Central

    Spofford, Mark; Williams, Neely; McKeever, Corliss; Allen, Shauntice; Brown, Jen; Opp, Jennifer; Richmond, Alan; Strelnick, A. Hal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To understand the formal roles of community representatives (CRs) in Clinical and Translational Science Awardee (CTSA) activities, to evaluate the extent of integration into the organizational and governance structures and to identify barriers to effective integration. Methods The inventory tool was distributed to each of the 60 CTSAs using a secure web application. Results Forty‐seven (78%) completed the inventory. The mean number of CRs per CTSA is 21.4 (SD: 14.8). Most CTSAs had community advisory boards (89%) and 94% included CRs in Community Engagement (CE) cores. Only 11% reported a CR being a member of the CTSA leadership team and 19% reported that CRs advise core programs beyond CE. CRs are compensated by 79% of CTSAs. Mean annual compensation is $753 (median: $400). Compensation directly correlated with the number of hours that CRs worked in CTSA activities (r = 0.64; P = 0.001). Conclusions This inventory allows CTSAs to better understand how CRs have engaged in activities and brings attention to the limited representation among cores and in leadership roles. CTSAs should, with substantive input from CRs, develop strategies to provide the resources and compensation necessary to better integrate the community in CTSA activities and fully realize the goals of the CTSA vision. PMID:23919364

  8. Localized pemphigus foliaceus with unilateral facial involvement.

    PubMed

    Maderal, A D; Miner, A; Nousari, C; Alonso-Llamazares, J

    2014-05-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus is a superficial vesiculobullous disease that typically presents with widespread lesions. Localized presentations are less frequent, and they typically occur in middle-aged patients, following exposure to topical medications, and later on, become more disseminated. We present a case of a 19-year-old female with a localized presentation of pemphigus foliaceus unrelated to previous topical medications, that was a diagnostic and therapeutically challenging case. We also discuss the literature on localized cases, differences in presentations and responses to various treatment modalities.

  9. Face aftereffects involve local repulsion, not renormalization.

    PubMed

    Storrs, Katherine R; Arnold, Derek H

    2015-01-01

    After looking at a photograph of someone for a protracted period (adaptation), a previously neutral-looking face can take on an opposite appearance in terms of gender, identity, and other attributes-but what happens to the appearance of other faces? Face aftereffects have repeatedly been ascribed to perceptual renormalization. Renormalization predicts that the adapting face and more extreme versions of it should appear more neutral after adaptation (e.g., if the adaptor was male, it and hyper-masculine faces should look more feminine). Other aftereffects, such as tilt and spatial frequency, are locally repulsive, exaggerating differences between adapting and test stimuli. This predicts that the adapting face should be little changed in appearance after adaptation, while more extreme versions of it should look even more extreme (e.g., if the adaptor was male, it should look unchanged, while hyper-masculine faces should look even more masculine). Existing reports do not provide clear evidence for either pattern. We overcame this by using a spatial comparison task to measure the appearance of stimuli presented in differently adapted retinal locations. In behaviorally matched experiments we compared aftereffect patterns after adapting to tilt, facial identity, and facial gender. In all three experiments data matched the predictions of a locally repulsive, but not a renormalizing, aftereffect. These data are consistent with the existence of similar encoding strategies for tilt, facial identity, and facial gender.

  10. Global and local depletion of ternary complex limits translational elongation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Fedyunin, Ivan; Miekley, Oskar; Valleriani, Angelo; Moura, Alessandro; Ignatova, Zoya

    2010-08-01

    The translation of genetic information according to the sequence of the mRNA template occurs with high accuracy and fidelity. Critical events in each single step of translation are selection of transfer RNA (tRNA), codon reading and tRNA-regeneration for a new cycle. We developed a model that accurately describes the dynamics of single elongation steps, thus providing a systematic insight into the sensitivity of the mRNA translation rate to dynamic environmental conditions. Alterations in the concentration of the aminoacylated tRNA can transiently stall the ribosomes during translation which results, as suggested by the model, in two outcomes: either stress-induced change in the tRNA availability triggers the premature termination of the translation and ribosomal dissociation, or extensive demand for one tRNA species results in a competition between frameshift to an aberrant open-reading frame and ribosomal drop-off. Using the bacterial Escherichia coli system, we experimentally draw parallels between these two possible mechanisms.

  11. Global and local depletion of ternary complex limits translational elongation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gong; Fedyunin, Ivan; Miekley, Oskar; Valleriani, Angelo; Moura, Alessandro; Ignatova, Zoya

    2010-01-01

    The translation of genetic information according to the sequence of the mRNA template occurs with high accuracy and fidelity. Critical events in each single step of translation are selection of transfer RNA (tRNA), codon reading and tRNA-regeneration for a new cycle. We developed a model that accurately describes the dynamics of single elongation steps, thus providing a systematic insight into the sensitivity of the mRNA translation rate to dynamic environmental conditions. Alterations in the concentration of the aminoacylated tRNA can transiently stall the ribosomes during translation which results, as suggested by the model, in two outcomes: either stress-induced change in the tRNA availability triggers the premature termination of the translation and ribosomal dissociation, or extensive demand for one tRNA species results in a competition between frameshift to an aberrant open-reading frame and ribosomal drop-off. Using the bacterial Escherichia coli system, we experimentally draw parallels between these two possible mechanisms. PMID:20360046

  12. Imaging Single-mRNA Localization and Translation in Live Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Hun; Bae, Seong-Woo; Shim, Jaeyoun Jay; Park, Sung Young; Park, Hye Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Local protein synthesis mediates precise spatio-temporal regulation of gene expression for neuronal functions such as long-term plasticity, axon guidance and regeneration. To reveal the underlying mechanisms of local translation, it is crucial to understand mRNA transport, localization and translation in live neurons. Among various techniques for mRNA analysis, fluorescence microscopy has been widely used as the most direct method to study localization of mRNA. Live-cell imaging of single RNA molecules is particularly advantageous to dissect the highly heterogeneous and dynamic nature of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes in neurons. Here, we review recent advances in the study of mRNA localization and translation in live neurons using novel techniques for single-RNA imaging. PMID:28030897

  13. mTOR and MAPK: from localized translation control to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pernice, Helena F; Schieweck, Rico; Kiebler, Michael A; Popper, Bastian

    2016-11-17

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases characterized by excessive hyperexcitability of neurons. Molecular mechanisms of epilepsy are diverse and not really understood. All in common is the misregulation of proteins that determine excitability such as potassium and sodium channels as well as GABA receptors; which are all known as biomarkers for epilepsy. Two recently identified key pathways involve the kinases mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Interestingly, mRNAs coding for those biomarkers are found to be localized at or near synapses indicating a local misregulation of synthesis and activity. Research in the last decade indicates that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) responsible for mRNA localization, stability and translation mediate local expression control. Among others, they are affected by mTOR and MAPK to guide expression of epileptic factors. These results suggest that mTOR/MAPK act on RBPs to regulate the fate of mRNAs, indicating a misregulation of protein expression at synapses in epilepsy. We propose that mTOR and MAPK regulate RBPs, thereby guiding the local expression of their target-mRNAs encoding for markers of epilepsy. Thus, misregulated mTOR/MAPK-RBP interplay may result in excessive local synthesis of ion channels and receptors thereby leading to hyperexcitability. Continuous stimulation of synapses further activates mTOR/MAPK pathway reinforcing their effect on RBP-mediated expression control establishing the basis for epilepsy. Here, we highlight findings showing the tight interplay between mTOR as well as MAPK with RBPs to control expression for epileptic biomarkers.

  14. Localized mRNA translation and protein association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2014-08-01

    Recent direct observations of localization of mRNAs and proteins both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells can be related to slowdown of diffusion of these species due to macromolecular crowding and their ability to aggregate and form immobile or slowly mobile complexes. Here, a generic kinetic model describing both these factors is presented and comprehensively analyzed. Although the model is non-linear, an accurate self-consistent analytical solution of the corresponding reaction-diffusion equation has been constructed, the types of localized protein distributions have been explicitly shown, and the predicted kinetic regimes of gene expression have been classified.

  15. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association.

  16. Translation of CGA codon repeats in yeast involves quality control components and ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed

    Letzring, Daniel P; Wolf, Andrew S; Brule, Christina E; Grayhack, Elizabeth J

    2013-09-01

    Translation of CGA codon repeats in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is inefficient, resulting in dose-dependent reduction in expression and in production of an mRNA cleavage product, indicative of a stalled ribosome. Here, we use genetics and translation inhibitors to understand how ribosomes respond to CGA repeats. We find that CGA codon repeats result in a truncated polypeptide that is targeted for degradation by Ltn1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in nonstop decay, although deletion of LTN1 does not improve expression downstream from CGA repeats. Expression downstream from CGA codons at residue 318, but not at residue 4, is improved by deletion of either ASC1 or HEL2, previously implicated in inhibition of translation by polybasic sequences. Thus, translation of CGA repeats likely causes ribosomes to stall and exploits known quality control systems. Expression downstream from CGA repeats at amino acid 4 is improved by paromomycin, an aminoglycoside that relaxes decoding specificity. Paromomycin has no effect if native tRNA(Arg(ICG)) is highly expressed, consistent with the idea that failure to efficiently decode CGA codons might occur in part due to rejection of the cognate tRNA(Arg(ICG)). Furthermore, expression downstream from CGA repeats is improved by inactivation of RPL1B, one of two genes encoding the universally conserved ribosomal protein L1. The effects of rpl1b-Δ and of either paromomycin or tRNA(Arg(ICG)) on CGA decoding are additive, suggesting that the rpl1b-Δ mutant suppresses CGA inhibition by means other than increased acceptance of tRNA(Arg(ICG)). Thus, inefficient decoding of CGA likely involves at least two independent defects in translation.

  17. Found in translation: Decoding local understandings of genetics and heredity in a Yup'ik Eskimo community.

    PubMed

    West, Kathleen M; Hopkins, Scarlett E; Hopper, Kim J; Mohatt, Gerald V; Boyer, Bert B

    2013-01-01

    The Center for Alaska Native Health Research is a community-based participatory research center that conducts studies involving genetic research with Yup'ik Eskimo community members in Southwest Alaska, where Yup'ik remains the first language for most residents. Cultural equivalents are needed to communicate results of these studies among all partners and members of the participating communities, since many scientific terms have no direct translation in Yup'ik. To inform that effort, we examined local understandings of genetics and heredity in one community. Here, we report results from back-translated Yup'ik interviews, and identify working genetic concepts shared by participants from interviews and focus groups. We suggest issues involved in, and some potential steps toward, developing a concise, scientifically accurate and culturally relevant term for "genetics" and other health concepts.

  18. Found in translation: decoding local understandings of genetics and heredity in a Yup'ik Eskimo community

    PubMed Central

    West, Kathleen M.; Hopkins, Scarlett E.; Hopper, Kim J.; Mohatt, Gerald V.; Boyer, Bert B.

    2011-01-01

    The Center for Alaska Native Health Research is a community-based participatory research center that conducts studies involving genetic research with Yup'ik Eskimo community members in Southwest Alaska, where Yup'ik remains the first language for most residents. Cultural equivalents are needed to communicate results of these studies among all partners and members of the participating communities, since many scientific terms have no direct translation in Yup'ik. To inform that effort, we examined local understandings of genetics and heredity in one community. Here, we report results from back-translated Yup'ik interviews, and identify working genetic concepts shared by participants from interviews and focus groups. We suggest issues involved in, and some potential steps toward, developing a concise, scientifically accurate and culturally relevant term for “genetics” and other health concepts. PMID:23832886

  19. Exocyst Sec10 is Involved in Basolateral Protein Translation and Translocation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Young; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Lingappa, Vishwanath R.; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein translation and translocation at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) are the first steps in the secretory pathway. The translocon through which newly-made proteins are translocated into or across the RER membrane, consists of three main subunits, Sec61α, β, and γ. Sec61β facilitates translocation, and we and others showed that the highly-conserved eight protein exocyst complex interacts with Sec61β. We also showed that the exocyst was involved in basolateral, and not apical, protein synthesis and delivery. Recently, however, exocyst involvement in apical protein delivery was reported. Furthermore, we showed that the exocyst was necessary for formation of primary cilia, organelles found on the apical surface. Methods GST pulldown was performed on lysate of renal tubule cells to investigate biochemical interactions. Cell-free assays consisting of cell-free extracts from rabbit reticulocytes, pancreatic ER microsomal membranes, transcripts of cDNA from apical and basolateral proteins, ATP/GTP, amino acids, and 35S-methionine for protein detection, were used to investigate the role of the exocyst in synthesis of polarized proteins. P32-orthophosphate and immunoprecipitation with antibody against Sec61β was used to investigate the Sec61β phosphorylation in exocyst Sec10-overexpressing cells. Results Sec10 biochemically interacts with Sec61β using GST pulldown. Using cell-free assays, there is enhanced recruitment to ER membranes following exocyst depletion and basolateral VSVG protein translation, compared to apical HA protein translation. Finally, Sec10 overexpression increases Sec61β phosphorylation. Conclusion These data confirm that the exocyst is preferentially involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation, and may well act through the phosphorylation of Sec61β. PMID:23037926

  20. Exocyst Sec10 is involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo Young; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2012-01-01

    Protein translation and translocation at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) are the first steps in the secretory pathway. The translocon through which newly made proteins are translocated into or across the RER membrane consists of three main subunits: Sec61α, -β, and -γ. Sec61β facilitates translocation, and we and others have shown that the highly conserved eight-protein exocyst complex interacts with Sec61β. We have also shown that the exocyst is involved in basolateral, not apical, protein synthesis and delivery. Recently, however, exocyst involvement in apical protein delivery has been reported. Furthermore, we have shown that the exocyst is necessary for formation of primary cilia, organelles found on the apical surface. GST pulldown was performed on lysate of renal tubule cells to investigate biochemical interactions. Cell-free assays consisting of cell-free extracts from rabbit reticulocytes, pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) microsomal membranes, transcripts of cDNA from apical and basolateral proteins, ATP/GTP, amino acids, and (35)S-methionine for protein detection were used to investigate the role of the exocyst in synthesis of polarized proteins. P(32)-orthophosphate and immunoprecipitation with antibody against Sec61β was used to investigate Sec61β phosphorylation in exocyst Sec10-overexpressing cells. Sec10 biochemically interacts with Sec61β using GST pulldown. Using cell-free assays, there is enhanced exocyst recruitment to endoplasmic reticulum membranes following exocyst depletion and basolateral G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus protein translation, compared to apical hemagglutinin of influenza virus protein translation. Finally, Sec10 overexpression increases Sec61β phosphorylation. These data confirm that the exocyst is preferentially involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation, and may well act through the phosphorylation of Sec61β. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Intra-axonal synthesis of eukaryotic translation initiation factors regulates local protein synthesis and axon growth in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kar, Amar N; MacGibeny, Margaret A; Gervasi, Noreen M; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2013-04-24

    Axonal protein synthesis is a complex process involving selective mRNA localization and translational regulation. In this study, using in situ hybridization and metabolic labeling, we show that the mRNAs encoding eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 are present in the axons of rat sympathetic neurons and are locally translated. We also report that a noncoding microRNA, miR16, modulates the axonal expression of eIF2B2 and eIF4G2. Transfection of axons with precursor miR16 and anti-miR16 showed that local miR16 levels modulated axonal eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 mRNA and protein levels, as well as axon outgrowth. siRNA-mediated knock-down of axonal eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 mRNA also resulted in a significant decrease in axonal eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 protein. Moreover, results of metabolic labeling studies showed that downregulation of axonal eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 expression also inhibited local protein synthesis and axon growth. Together, these data provide evidence that miR16 mediates axonal growth, at least in part, by regulating the local protein synthesis of eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 in the axon.

  2. The Central Dogma Decentralized: New Perspectives on RNA Function and Local Translation in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Christine E.; Schuman, Erin M.

    2013-01-01

    The elaborate morphology of neurons together with the information processing that occurs in remote dendritic and axonal compartments makes the use of decentralized cell biological machines necessary. Recent years have witnessed a revolution in our understanding of signaling in neuronal compartments and the manifold functions of a variety of RNA molecules that regulate protein translation and other cellular functions. Here we discuss the view that mRNA localization and RNA-regulated and localized translation underlie many fundamental neuronal processes and highlight key issues for future experiments. PMID:24183017

  3. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  4. Close to the bench as well as at the bedside: involving service users in all phases of translational research

    PubMed Central

    Callard, Felicity; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aim  The paper aims to develop a model of translational research in which service user and other stakeholder involvement are central to each phase. Background  ‘Translational’ is the current medical buzzword: translational research has been termed ‘bench to bedside’ research and promises to fast‐track biomedical advances in the service of patient benefit. Models usually conceive of translational research as a ‘pipeline’ that is divided into phases: the early phase is characterized as the province of basic scientists and laboratory‐based clinical researchers; the later phases focus on the implementation, dissemination and diffusion of health applications. If service user involvement is mentioned, it is usually restricted to these later phases. Methods  The paper critically reviews existing literature on translational research and medicine. The authors develop a theoretical argument that addresses why a reconceptualization of translational research is required on scientific, ethical and pragmatic grounds. Results  The authors reconceptualize the model of translational research as an interlocking loop rather than as a pipeline, one in which service user and other stakeholder involvement feed into each of its elements. The authors demonstrate that for the ‘interlocking loop’ model of translational research to be materialized in practice will require changes in how health research is structured and organized. Conclusion  The authors demonstrate the scientific, ethical and pragmatic benefits of involving service users in every phase of translational research. The authors’ reconceptualized model of translational research contributes to theoretical and policy debates regarding both translational research and service user involvement. PMID:21615638

  5. Does remote sensing help translating local SGD investigation to large spatial scales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosdorf, N.; Mallast, U.; Hennig, H.; Schubert, M.; Knoeller, K.; Neehaul, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Within the last 20 years, studies on submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) have revealed numerous processes, temporal behavior and quantitative estimations as well as best-practice and localization methods. This plethora on information is valuable regarding the understanding of magnitude and effects of SGD for the respective location. Yet, since given local conditions vary, the translation of local understanding, magnitudes and effects to a regional or global scale is not trivial. In contrast, modeling approaches (e.g. 228Ra budget) tackling SGD on a global scale do provide quantitative global estimates but have not been related to local investigations. This gap between the two approaches, local and global, and the combination and/or translation of either one to the other represents one of the mayor challenges the SGD community currently faces. But what if remote sensing can provide certain information that may be used as translation between the two, similar to transfer functions in many other disciplines allowing an extrapolation from in-situ investigated and quantified SGD (discrete information) to regional scales or beyond? Admittedly, the sketched future is ambitious and we will certainly not be able to present a solution to the raised question. Nonetheless, we will show a remote sensing based approach that is already able to identify potential SGD sites independent on location or hydrogeological conditions. Based on multi-temporal thermal information of the water surface as core of the approach, SGD influenced sites display a smaller thermal variation (thermal anomalies) than surrounding uninfluenced areas. Despite the apparent simplicity, the automatized approach has helped to localize several sites that could be validated with proven in-situ methods. At the same time it embodies the risk to identify false positives that can only be avoided if we can `calibrate' the so obtained thermal anomalies to in-situ data. We will present all pros and cons of our

  6. Drosophila melanogaster LRPPRC2 is involved in coordination of mitochondrial translation

    PubMed Central

    Baggio, Francesca; Bratic, Ana; Mourier, Arnaud; Kauppila, Timo E.S.; Tain, Luke S.; Kukat, Christian; Habermann, Bianca; Partridge, Linda; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Members of the pentatricopeptide repeat domain (PPR) protein family bind RNA and are important for post-transcriptional control of organelle gene expression in unicellular eukaryotes, metazoans and plants. They also have a role in human pathology, as mutations in the leucine-rich PPR-containing (LRPPRC) gene cause severe neurodegeneration. We have previously shown that the mammalian LRPPRC protein and its Drosophila melanogaster homolog DmLRPPRC1 (also known as bicoid stability factor) are necessary for mitochondrial translation by controlling stability and polyadenylation of mRNAs. We here report characterization of DmLRPPRC2, a second fruit fly homolog of LRPPRC, and show that it has a predominant mitochondrial localization and interacts with a stem-loop interacting RNA binding protein (DmSLIRP2). Ubiquitous downregulation of DmLrpprc2 expression causes respiratory chain dysfunction, developmental delay and shortened lifespan. Unexpectedly, decreased DmLRPPRC2 expression does not globally affect steady-state levels or polyadenylation of mitochondrial transcripts. However, some mitochondrial transcripts abnormally associate with the mitochondrial ribosomes and some products are dramatically overproduced and other ones decreased, which, in turn, results in severe deficiency of respiratory chain complexes. The function of DmLRPPRC2 thus seems to be to ensure that mitochondrial transcripts are presented to the mitochondrial ribosomes in an orderly fashion to avoid poorly coordinated translation. PMID:25428350

  7. Developing a civic intelligence: local involvement in HIA

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Eva; Williams, Gareth

    2004-02-01

    Public involvement and participation in policy development and implementation is becoming an increasingly prominent feature of social life. However, as politics and policy become ever more concerned with 'evidence,' the relationship between 'expert evidence' and political judgements and decisions becomes ever more complicated. For this reason, public participation increasingly has to mean inclusion in arguments about information, evidence and knowledge as much as it means straightforward involvement in decision making. Such involvement can involve critical questioning of a kind that can challenge and sometimes debunk experts' claims to privileged understanding. One practical arena in which knowledge-based policy and politics is being expressed is in health impact assessment (HIA). This paper describes a health impact assessment of housing options in a former mining village in South Wales in order to illustrate the contributions that local people can make to both evidence and decision making. This case study exemplifies an emerging civic intelligence that challenges a traditional demarcation between different forms of expertise and creates public spaces that provide the basis for new opportunities of democratic renewal.

  8. Esophageal involvement in juvenile localized scleroderma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Guariso, G; Conte, S; Galeazzi, F; Vettorato, M G; Martini, G; Zulian, F

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the esophageal involvement in patients with juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS). A cohort of patients with JLS underwent esophageal stationary manometry to evaluate esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function, distal esophagus 24-hour pH-monitoring to detect gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy to evaluate the presence of esophagitis. Fourteen patients (10 female, mean age 13.3 yrs, mean disease duration 4.7 yrs), took part in the study. Ten had linear scleroderma, three deep morphea, and one generalized morphea. Esophageal abnormalities were found in 8/14 patients (57%): pathological acid exposure on 24-hour pH-monitoring was found in 7; non-specific esophageal motor abnormalities in 5 and endoscopy-proved esophagitis in 5 symptomatic patients. Interestingly, 5 out of 8 patients with esophageal abnormalities were found to be ANA positive, and 2 were also RF positive. Esophageal involvement is not unusual in patients with juvenile localized scleroderma, even in the absence of specific symptoms. These preliminary findings, if confirmed in a larger cohort of patients, may support the indication for an extensive GI evaluation especially in presence of positive autoantibodies or specific GI symptoms.

  9. Translation-rotation decoupling of tracers of locally favorable structures in glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoonjae; Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2017-09-28

    Particles in glass-forming liquids may form domains of locally favorable structures (LFSs) upon supercooling. Whether and how the LFS domains would relate to the slow relaxation of the glass-forming liquids have been issues of interest. In this study, we employ tracers of which structures resemble the LFS domains in Wahnström and Kob-Andersen (KA) glass-forming liquids and investigate the translation-rotation decoupling of the tracers. We find that the tracer structure affects how the translation and the rotation of tracers decouple and that information on the local mobility around the LFS domains may be gleaned from the tracer dynamics. According to the Stokes-Einstein relation and the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation, the ratio of the translational (DT) and rotational (DR) diffusion coefficients is expected to be a constant over a range of T/η, where η and T denote the medium viscosity and temperature, respectively. In supercooled liquids and glasses, however, DT and DR decouple due to dynamic heterogeneity, thus DT/DR not being constant any more. In Wahnström glass-forming liquids, icosahedron LFS domains are the most long-lived ones and the mobility of neighbor particles around the icosahedron LFS domain is suppressed. We find from our simulations that the icosahedron tracers, similar in size and shape to the icosahedron LFS domains, experience drastic translation-rotation decoupling upon cooling. The local mobility of liquid particles around the icosahedron tracers is also suppressed significantly. On the other hand, tracers of FCC and HCP structures do not show translation-rotation decoupling in the Wahnström liquid. In KA glass-forming liquids, bicapped square antiprism LFS domains are the most long-lived LFS domains but are not correlated significantly with the local mobility. We find from our simulations that DT and DR of bicapped square antiprism tracers, also similar in size and shape to the bicapped square antiprism LFS domains, do not decouple

  10. Online Localization of "Zooniverse" Citizen Science Projects--On the Use of Translation Platforms as Tools for Translator Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at describing the way in which online translation platforms can facilitate the process of training translators. "Zooniverse," a website hosting a variety of citizen science projects in which everyone can take part, was used as an example of such a concept. The first section of this paper is focused on the history, idea…

  11. Nonrigid motion correction in 3D using autofocusing with localized linear translations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph Y; Alley, Marcus T; Cunningham, Charles H; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael

    2012-12-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from nonrigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric--more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multichannel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called "Butterfly" navigators, which are modifications of the spin-warp sequence that provides intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, nonrigid motion was observed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Non-rigid Motion Correction in 3D Using Autofocusing with Localized Linear Translations

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Joseph Y.; Alley, Marcus T.; Cunningham, Charles H.; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from non-rigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well-approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric – more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multi-channel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called “Butterfly” navigators which are modifications to the spin-warp sequence that provide intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, non-rigid motion was observed. PMID:22307933

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of translationally controlled tumor protein in the mouse digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Sheverdin, Vadim; Jung, Jiwon; Lee, Kyunglim

    2013-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a housekeeping protein, highly conserved among various species. It plays a major role in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation, apoptosis and carcinogenesis. Studies reported so far on TCTP expression in different digestive organs have not led to any understanding of the role of TCTP in digestion, so we localized TCTP in organs of the mouse digestive system employing immunohistochemical techniques. Translationally controlled tumor protein was found expressed in all organs studied: tongue, salivary glands, esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, liver and pancreas. The expression of TCTP was found to be predominant in epithelia and neurons of myenteric nerve ganglia; high in serous glands (parotid, submandibular, gastric, intestinal crypts, pancreatic acini) and in neurons of myenteric nerve ganglia, and moderate to low in epithelia. In epithelia, expression of TCTP varied depending on its type and location. In enteric neurons, TCTP was predominantly expressed in the processes. Translationally controlled tumor protein expression in the liver followed porto-central gradient with higher expression in pericentral hepatocytes. In the pancreas, TCTP was expressed in both acini and islet cells. Our finding of nearly universal localization and expression of TCTP in mouse digestive organs points to the hitherto unrecognized functional importance of TCTP in the digestive system and suggests the need for further studies of the possible role of TCTP in the proliferation, secretion, absorption and neural regulation of the digestive process and its importance in the physiology and pathology of digestive process. PMID:23834399

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of translationally controlled tumor protein in the mouse digestive system.

    PubMed

    Sheverdin, Vadim; Jung, Jiwon; Lee, Kyunglim

    2013-09-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a housekeeping protein, highly conserved among various species. It plays a major role in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation, apoptosis and carcinogenesis. Studies reported so far on TCTP expression in different digestive organs have not led to any understanding of the role of TCTP in digestion, so we localized TCTP in organs of the mouse digestive system employing immunohistochemical techniques. Translationally controlled tumor protein was found expressed in all organs studied: tongue, salivary glands, esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, liver and pancreas. The expression of TCTP was found to be predominant in epithelia and neurons of myenteric nerve ganglia; high in serous glands (parotid, submandibular, gastric, intestinal crypts, pancreatic acini) and in neurons of myenteric nerve ganglia, and moderate to low in epithelia. In epithelia, expression of TCTP varied depending on its type and location. In enteric neurons, TCTP was predominantly expressed in the processes. Translationally controlled tumor protein expression in the liver followed porto-central gradient with higher expression in pericentral hepatocytes. In the pancreas, TCTP was expressed in both acini and islet cells. Our finding of nearly universal localization and expression of TCTP in mouse digestive organs points to the hitherto unrecognized functional importance of TCTP in the digestive system and suggests the need for further studies of the possible role of TCTP in the proliferation, secretion, absorption and neural regulation of the digestive process and its importance in the physiology and pathology of digestive process. © 2013 Anatomical Society.

  15. Involvement of Arabidopsis RACK1 in Protein Translation and Its Regulation by Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Wang, Shucai; Valerius, Oliver; Hall, Hardy; Zeng, Qingning; Li, Jian-Feng; Weston, David; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that RACK1 functions as a negative regulator of ABA responses in Arabidopsis, but the molecular mechanism of the action of RACK1 in these processes remains elusive. Global gene expression profiling revealed that approximately 40% of the genes affected by ABA treatment were affected in a similar manner by the rack1 mutation, supporting the view that RACK1 is an important regulator of ABA responses. On the other hand, co-expression analysis revealed that >80% of the genes co-expressed with RACK1 encode ribosome proteins, implying a close relationship between RACK1 s function and the ribosome complex. These results implied that the regulatory role for RACK1 in ABA responses may be partially due to its putative function in protein translation, which is one of the major cellular processes that mammalian and yeast RACK1 is involved in. Consistently, all three Arabidopsis RACK1 homologous genes, namely RACK1A, RACK1B and RACK1C, complemented the growth defects of the S. cerevisiae cpc2/rack1 mutant. In addition, RACK1 physically interacts with Arabidopsis Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6), whose mammalian homologue is a key regulator of 80S ribosome assembly. Moreover, rack1 mutants displayed hypersensitivity to anisomycin, an inhibitor of protein translation, and displayed characteristics of impaired 80S functional ribosome assembly and 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis in a ribosome profiling assay. Gene expression analysis revealed that ABA inhibits the expression of both RACK1 and eIF6. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1 may be required for normal production of 60S and 80S ribosomes and that its action in these processes may be regulated by ABA.

  16. Regulation of mRNA transport, localization and translation in the nervous system of mammals (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DI LIEGRO, CARLO MARIA; SCHIERA, GABRIELLA; DI LIEGRO, ITALIA

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control of mRNA trafficking and metabolism plays a critical role in the actualization and fine tuning of the genetic program of cells, both in development and in differentiated tissues. Cis-acting signals, responsible for post-transcriptional regulation, reside in the RNA message itself, usually in untranslated regions, 5′ or 3′ to the coding sequence, and are recognized by trans-acting factors: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and/or non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). ncRNAs bind short mRNA sequences usually present in the 3′-untranslated (3′-UTR) region of their target messages. RBPs recognize specific nucleotide sequences and/or secondary/tertiary structures. Most RBPs assemble on mRNA at the moment of transcription and shepherd it to its destination, somehow determining its final fate. Regulation of mRNA localization and metabolism has a particularly important role in the nervous system where local translation of pre-localized mRNAs has been implicated in developing axon and dendrite pathfinding, and in synapse formation. Moreover, activity-dependent mRNA trafficking and local translation may underlie long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy, responsible for learning and memory. This review focuses on the role of RBPs in neuronal development and plasticity, as well as possible connections between ncRNAs and RBPs. PMID:24452120

  17. Neuron-wide RNA transport combines with netrin-mediated local translation to spatially regulate the synaptic proteome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmok; Martin, Kelsey C

    2015-01-08

    The persistence of experience-dependent changes in brain connectivity requires RNA localization and protein synthesis. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for local translation in altering the structure and function of synapses during synapse formation and experience-dependent synaptic plasticity. In this study, we ask whether in addition to promoting local translation, local stimulation also triggers directed trafficking of RNAs from nucleus to stimulated synapses. Imaging of RNA localization and translation in cultured Aplysia sensory-motor neurons revealed that RNAs were delivered throughout the arbor of the sensory neuron, but that translation was enriched only at sites of synaptic contact and/or synaptic stimulation. Investigation of the mechanisms that trigger local translation revealed a role for calcium-dependent retrograde netrin-1/DCC receptor signaling. Spatially restricting gene expression by regulating local translation rather than by directing the delivery of mRNAs from nucleus to stimulated synapses maximizes the readiness of the entire neuronal arbor to respond to local cues.

  18. RNA Docking and Local Translation Regulate Site-Specific Axon Remodeling In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hovy Ho-Wai; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Ströhl, Florian; Roque, Cláudio Gouveia; Cioni, Jean-Michel; Cagnetta, Roberta; Turner-Bridger, Benita; Laine, Romain F; Harris, William A; Kaminski, Clemens F; Holt, Christine E

    2017-08-16

    Nascent proteins can be positioned rapidly at precise subcellular locations by local protein synthesis (LPS) to facilitate localized growth responses. Axon arbor architecture, a major determinant of synaptic connectivity, is shaped by localized growth responses, but it is unknown whether LPS influences these responses in vivo. Using high-resolution live imaging, we examined the spatiotemporal dynamics of RNA and LPS in retinal axons during arborization in vivo. Endogenous RNA tracking reveals that RNA granules dock at sites of branch emergence and invade stabilized branches. Live translation reporter analysis reveals that de novo β-actin hotspots colocalize with docked RNA granules at the bases and tips of new branches. Inhibition of axonal β-actin mRNA translation disrupts arbor dynamics primarily by reducing new branch emergence and leads to impoverished terminal arbors. The results demonstrate a requirement for LPS in building arbor complexity and suggest a key role for pre-synaptic LPS in assembling neural circuits. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sonic Hedgehog Guides Axons via Zipcode Binding Protein 1-Mediated Local Translation.

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, Léa; Langlois, Sébastien D; Kent, Christopher B; Welshhans, Kristy; Morin, Steves; Bassell, Gary J; Yam, Patricia T; Charron, Frédéric

    2017-02-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) attracts spinal cord commissural axons toward the floorplate. How Shh elicits changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that drive growth cone turning is unknown. We find that the turning of rat commissural axons up a Shh gradient requires protein synthesis. In particular, Shh stimulation increases β-actin protein at the growth cone even when the cell bodies have been removed. Therefore, Shh induces the local translation of β-actin at the growth cone. We hypothesized that this requires zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1), an mRNA-binding protein that transports β-actin mRNA and releases it for local translation upon phosphorylation. We found that Shh stimulation increases phospho-ZBP1 levels in the growth cone. Disruption of ZBP1 phosphorylation in vitro abolished the turning of commissural axons toward a Shh gradient. Disruption of ZBP1 function in vivo in mouse and chick resulted in commissural axon guidance errors. Therefore, ZBP1 is required for Shh to guide commissural axons. This identifies ZBP1 as a new mediator of noncanonical Shh signaling in axon guidance.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sonic hedgehog (Shh) guides axons via a noncanonical signaling pathway that is distinct from the canonical Hedgehog signaling pathway that specifies cell fate and morphogenesis. Axon guidance is driven by changes in the growth cone in response to gradients of guidance molecules. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of how Shh orchestrates changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that are required for growth cone turning. Here, we show that the guidance of axons by Shh requires protein synthesis. Zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates the local translation of proteins, including actin, in the growth cone. We demonstrate that ZBP1 is required for Shh-mediated axon guidance, identifying a new member of the noncanonical Shh signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/371685-11$15.00/0.

  20. Localization and local translation of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA at synapses: some observations and paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Steward, Oswald; Farris, Shannon; Pirbhoy, Patricia S; Darnell, Jennifer; Driesche, Sarah J Van

    2014-01-01

    Arc is a unique immediate early gene whose expression is induced as synapses are being modified during learning. The uniqueness comes from the fact that newly synthesized Arc mRNA is rapidly transported throughout dendrites where it localizes near synapses that were recently activated. Here, we summarize aspects of Arc mRNA translation in dendrites in vivo, focusing especially on features of its expression that are paradoxical or that donot fit in with current models of how Arc protein operates. Findings from in vivo studies that donot quite fit include: (1) Following induction of LTP in vivo, Arc mRNA and protein localize near active synapses, but are also distributed throughout dendrites. In contrast, Arc mRNA localizes selectively near active synapses when stimulation is continued as Arc mRNA is transported into dendrites; (2) Strong induction of Arc expression as a result of a seizure does not lead to a rundown of synaptic efficacy in vivo as would be predicted by the hypothesis that high levels of Arc cause glutamate receptor endocytosis and LTD. (3) Arc protein is synthesized in the perinuclear cytoplasm rapidly after transcriptional activation, indicating that at least a pool of Arc mRNA is not translationally repressed to allow for dendritic delivery; (4) Increases in Arc mRNA in dendrites are not paralleled by increases in levels of exon junction complex (EJC) proteins. These results of studies of mRNA trafficking in neurons in vivo provide a new perspective on the possible roles of Arc in activity-dependent synaptic modifications.

  1. novPTMenzy: a database for enzymes involved in novel post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2015-01-01

    With the recent discoveries of novel post-translational modifications (PTMs) which play important roles in signaling and biosynthetic pathways, identification of such PTM catalyzing enzymes by genome mining has been an area of major interest. Unlike well-known PTMs like phosphorylation, glycosylation, SUMOylation, no bioinformatics resources are available for enzymes associated with novel and unusual PTMs. Therefore, we have developed the novPTMenzy database which catalogs information on the sequence, structure, active site and genomic neighborhood of experimentally characterized enzymes involved in five novel PTMs, namely AMPylation, Eliminylation, Sulfation, Hydroxylation and Deamidation. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the sequence and structural features of these known PTM catalyzing enzymes, we have created Hidden Markov Model profiles for the identification of similar PTM catalyzing enzymatic domains in genomic sequences. We have also created predictive rules for grouping them into functional subfamilies and deciphering their mechanistic details by structure-based analysis of their active site pockets. These analytical modules have been made available as user friendly search interfaces of novPTMenzy database. It also has a specialized analysis interface for some PTMs like AMPylation and Eliminylation. The novPTMenzy database is a unique resource that can aid in discovery of unusual PTM catalyzing enzymes in newly sequenced genomes. Database URL: http://www.nii.ac.in/novptmenzy.html PMID:25931459

  2. novPTMenzy: a database for enzymes involved in novel post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2015-01-01

    With the recent discoveries of novel post-translational modifications (PTMs) which play important roles in signaling and biosynthetic pathways, identification of such PTM catalyzing enzymes by genome mining has been an area of major interest. Unlike well-known PTMs like phosphorylation, glycosylation, SUMOylation, no bioinformatics resources are available for enzymes associated with novel and unusual PTMs. Therefore, we have developed the novPTMenzy database which catalogs information on the sequence, structure, active site and genomic neighborhood of experimentally characterized enzymes involved in five novel PTMs, namely AMPylation, Eliminylation, Sulfation, Hydroxylation and Deamidation. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the sequence and structural features of these known PTM catalyzing enzymes, we have created Hidden Markov Model profiles for the identification of similar PTM catalyzing enzymatic domains in genomic sequences. We have also created predictive rules for grouping them into functional subfamilies and deciphering their mechanistic details by structure-based analysis of their active site pockets. These analytical modules have been made available as user friendly search interfaces of novPTMenzy database. It also has a specialized analysis interface for some PTMs like AMPylation and Eliminylation. The novPTMenzy database is a unique resource that can aid in discovery of unusual PTM catalyzing enzymes in newly sequenced genomes. Database URL: http://www.nii.ac.in/novptmenzy.html © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Many-body self-localization in a translation-invariant Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondaini, Rubem; Cai, Zi

    2017-07-01

    We study the statistical and dynamical aspects of a translation-invariant Hamiltonian, without quench disorder, as an example of the manifestation of the phenomenon of many-body localization. This is characterized by the breakdown of thermalization and by information preservation of initial preparations at long times. To realize this, we use quasiperiodic long-range interactions, which are now achievable in high-finesse cavity experiments, to find evidence suggestive of a divergent time-scale in which charge inhomogeneities in the initial state survive asymptotically. This is reminiscent of a glassy behavior, which appears in the ground state of this system, being also present at infinite temperatures.

  4. Screening the Molecular Framework Underlying Local Dendritic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Sanjeev V.; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, bioinformatic analyses of high-throughput proteomics and transcriptomics data have enabled researchers to gain insight into the molecular networks that may underlie lasting changes in synaptic efficacy. Development and utilization of these techniques have advanced the field of learning and memory significantly. It is now possible to move from the study of activity-dependent changes of a single protein to modeling entire network changes that require local protein synthesis. This data revolution has necessitated the development of alternative computational and statistical techniques to analyze and understand the patterns contained within. Thus, the focus of this review is to provide a synopsis of the journey and evolution toward big data techniques to address still unanswered questions regarding how synapses are modified to strengthen neuronal circuits. We first review the seminal studies that demonstrated the pivotal role played by local mRNA translation as the mechanism underlying the enhancement of enduring synaptic activity. In the interest of those who are new to the field, we provide a brief overview of molecular biology and biochemical techniques utilized for sample preparation to identify locally translated proteins using RNA sequencing and proteomics, as well as the computational approaches used to analyze these data. While many mRNAs have been identified, few have been shown to be locally synthesized. To this end, we review techniques currently being utilized to visualize new protein synthesis, a task that has proven to be the most difficult aspect of the field. Finally, we provide examples of future applications to test the physiological relevance of locally synthesized proteins identified by big data approaches. PMID:28286470

  5. Local health department involvement in Rocky Mountain Arsenal Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Butts, T.J.; Collins, D.E.; Caldwell, W.J.; Whitcomb, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) is located adjacent to land zoned for residential, commercial and rural agricultural uses. A large number of private wells are located downgradient of the On-post contamination in what is known as the Off-post Study Area. The groundwater wells are used for municipal drinking water, private residences, and large produce farms and non-food crop irrigation. As a result of the existence of Arsenal, related contamination in the alluvial (unconfined) aquifer there are significant concerns about the safety of these water supplies. Due to Tri-County Health Department`s involvement with various RMA related issues (investigation of complaints since the 1950`s) the Department was identified as a community resource that local residents could trust. In this liaison capacity TCHD continues to work with area residents and the Army, Shell, EPA, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment. Since 1988, TCHD has been involved in providing real time data about the offpost (residents, wells uses, and water quality) to interested parties and Arsenal cleanup information to the residents. The survey stage of this program identified all landowners, residents and wells that existed in the Off-post Study Area. Next, high risk wells, for example those allowing interaquifer communication, were identified and prioritized and are monitored frequently. Ground water chemistry and contaminant (DIMP) trends are tracked over time. The survey information has been put in a computer database and this was integrated into a GIS computer mapping system to increase usefulness for data searches and risk assessment.

  6. Dynamics of many-body localization in a translation-invariant quantum glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Horssen, Merlijn; Levi, Emanuele; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2015-09-01

    We study the real-time dynamics of a translationally invariant quantum spin chain, based on the East kinetically constrained glass model, in search for evidence of many-body localization in the absence of disorder. Numerical simulations indicate a change, controlled by a coupling parameter, from a regime of fast relaxation-corresponding to thermalization-to a regime of very slow relaxation. This slowly relaxing regime is characterized by dynamical features usually associated with nonergodicity and many-body localization (MBL): memory of initial conditions, logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy, and nonexponential decay of time correlators. We show that slow relaxation is a consequence of sensitivity to spatial fluctuations in the initial state. While numerical results and physical considerations indicate that relaxation time scales grow markedly with size, our finite size results are consistent both with an MBL transition, expected to only occur in disordered systems, and with a pronounced quasi-MBL crossover.

  7. Local slowdown of translation by nonoptimal codons promotes nascent-chain recognition by SRP in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Chartron, Justin W; Frydman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The genetic code allows most amino acids a choice of optimal and nonoptimal codons. We report that synonymous codon choice is tuned to promote interaction of nascent polypeptides with the signal recognition particle (SRP), which assists in protein translocation across membranes. Cotranslational recognition by the SRP in vivo is enhanced when mRNAs contain nonoptimal codon clusters 35–40 codons downstream of the SRP-binding site, the distance that spans the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel. A local translation slowdown upon ribosomal exit of SRP-binding elements in mRNAs containing these nonoptimal codon clusters is supported experimentally by ribosome profiling analyses in yeast. Modulation of local elongation rates through codon choice appears to kinetically enhance recognition by ribosome-associated factors. We propose that cotranslational regulation of nascent-chain fate may be a general constraint shaping codon usage in the genome. PMID:25420103

  8. Measuring both Rotational and Translational Ground-Motions from Explosions and Local Earthquakes in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.; Lee, W.; Lin, C.; Liu, C.; Shin, T.; Teng, T.; Wu, C.

    2008-12-01

    Since rotational motions can "contaminate" translational ground-motion measurements due to the induced perturbation of the Earth's gravitational field, we started a program to measure rotational ground motions near Hualien (Taiwan) in December, 2000. However, no useful data were obtained after 3 years, until a rotational sensor of much higher sensitivity was deployed at the HGSD station in eastern Taiwan in December, 2004. Rotational and translational seismograms were obtained from several hundred local earthquakes. As noted by several authors before, we found a linear relationship between peak rotational rate (PRR in mrad/s) and peak ground acceleration (PGA in m/s2) from local earthquakes in Taiwan: PRR = 0.002 + 1.301 PGA, with a correlation coefficient of 0.988. Taking advantage of two large explosions of the TAIGER Active Seismic Experiment, we deployed 13 accelerometers and 8 rotational sensors within 600 m from the N3 shot points and obtained some interesting results, which will be presented by Langston et al. in this Session. In December, 2007, we began an instrument array deployment along the Meishan fault in southwestern Taiwan, where a major earthquake occurred in 1906 with surface rupture of more than 12 km long. The deployed instruments are: (1) a 32-element seismic array in free-field, (2) a 32-element accelerometer array in a building, (3) a six-channel unit with a low-gain broadband seismometer and an accelerometer, and (4) two six-channel units with an accelerometer and an external rotational senor. We have 8 rotational sensors now deployed in Taiwan and seven new rotational sensors are scheduled for deployment soon in a program to assess the effect of ground rotation on traditional measurements of translational strong ground motions.

  9. Strategies for assessing mental health in Haiti: local instrument development and transcultural translation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Bonnie N; Kohrt, Brandon A; Keys, Hunter M; Khoury, Nayla M; Brewster, Aimée-Rika T

    2013-08-01

    The lack of culturally appropriate mental health assessment instruments is a major barrier to screening and evaluating efficacy of interventions. Simple translation of questionnaires produces misleading and inaccurate conclusions. Multiple alternate approaches have been proposed, and this study compared two approaches tested in rural Haiti. First, an established transcultural translation process was used to develop Haitian Kreyòl versions of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). This entailed focus group discussions evaluating comprehensibility, acceptability, relevance, and completeness. Second, qualitative data collection was employed to develop new instruments: the Kreyòl Distress Idioms (KDI) and Kreyòl Function Assessment (KFA) scales. For the BDI and BAI, some items were found to be nonequivalent due to lack of specificity, interpersonal interpretation, or conceptual nonequivalence. For all screening tools, items were adjusted if they were difficult to endorse or severely stigmatizing, represented somatic experiences of physical illness, or were difficult to understand. After the qualitative development phases, the BDI and BAI were piloted with 31 and 27 adults, respectively, and achieved good reliability. Without these efforts to develop appropriate tools, attempts at screening would have captured a combination of atypical suffering, everyday phenomena, and potential psychotic symptoms. Ultimately, a combination of transculturally adapted and locally developed instruments appropriately identified those in need of care through accounting for locally salient symptoms of distress and their negative sequelae.

  10. Software issues involved in code translation of C to Ada programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooi, Robert; Giarratano, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    It is often thought that translation of one programming language to another is a simple solution that can be used to extend the software life span or in rehosting software to another environment. The possible problems are examined as are the advantages and disadvantages of direct machine or human code translation versus that of redesign and rewrite of the software. The translation of the expert system language called C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) which is written in C, to Ada, will be used as a case study of the problems that are encountered.

  11. Spastin subcellular localization is regulated through usage of different translation start sites and active export from the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Claudiani, Pamela; Riano, Elena; Errico, Alessia; Andolfi, Gennaro; Rugarli, Elena I. . E-mail: rugarli@tigem.it

    2005-10-01

    Most cases of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia are linked to mutations in SPG4 encoding spastin, a protein involved in microtubule dynamics and membrane trafficking. In pyramidal neurons of the motor cortex and in immortalized motor neurons, spastin is localized to the synaptic terminals and growth cones. However, in other neurons and in proliferating cells spastin is prevalently nuclear. The mechanisms that determine targeting of spastin to the nucleus or the cytoplasm are unknown. We show here that the SPG4 mRNA is able to direct synthesis of two spastin isoforms, 68 and 60 kDa, respectively, through usage of two different translational start sites. Both isoforms are imported into the nucleus, but the 68-kDa isoform contains two nuclear export signals that efficiently drive export to the cytoplasm. Nuclear export is leptomycin-B sensitive. The cytoplasmic 68-kDa spastin isoform is more abundant in the brain and the spinal cord than in other tissues. Our data indicate that spastin function is modulated through usage of alternative translational start sites and active nuclear import and export, and open new perspectives for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  12. Biochemical characterization of USP7 reveals post-translational modification sites and structural requirements for substrate processing and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalván, Amaury; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Joberty, Gerard; Mader, Robert; Mahnke, Marion; Pierrat, Benoit; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc; Worpenberg, Susanne; Gerhartz, Bernd

    2007-08-01

    Ubiquitin specific protease 7 (USP7) belongs to the family of deubiquitinating enzymes. Among other functions, USP7 is involved in the regulation of stress response pathways, epigenetic silencing and the progress of infections by DNA viruses. USP7 is a 130-kDa protein with a cysteine peptidase core, N- and C-terminal domains required for protein-protein interactions. In the present study, recombinant USP7 full length, along with several variants corresponding to domain deletions, were expressed in different hosts in order to analyze post-translational modifications, oligomerization state, enzymatic properties and subcellular localization patterns of the enzyme. USP7 is phosphorylated at S18 and S963, and ubiquitinated at K869 in mammalian cells. In in vitro activity assays, N- and C-terminal truncations affected the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme different. Both the protease core alone and in combination with the N-terminal domain are over 100-fold less active than the full length enzyme, whereas a construct including the C-terminal region displays a rather small decrease in catalytic efficiency. Limited proteolysis experiments revealed that USP7 variants containing the C-terminal domain interact more tightly with ubiquitin. Besides playing an important role in substrate recognition and processing, this region might be involved in enzyme dimerization. USP7 constructs lacking the N-terminal domain failed to localize in the cell nucleus, but no nuclear localization signal could be mapped within the enzyme's first 70 amino acids. Instead, the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-like region (amino acids 70-205) was sufficient to achieve the nuclear localization of the enzyme, suggesting that interaction partners might be required for USP7 nuclear import.

  13. A novel 4E-interacting protein in Leishmania is involved in stage-specific translation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zinoviev, Alexandra; Léger, Mélissa; Wagner, Gerhard; Shapira, Michal

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, exposure to stress conditions causes a shift from cap-dependent to cap-independent translation. In trypanosomatids, environmental switches are the driving force of a developmental program of gene expression, but it is yet unclear how their translation machinery copes with their constantly changing environment. Trypanosomatids have a unique cap structure (cap-4) and encode four highly diverged paralogs of the cap-binding protein, eIF4E; none were found to genetically complement a yeast mutant failing to express eIF4E. Here we show that in promastigotes, a typical cap-binding complex is anchored through LeishIF4E-4, which associates with components of the cap-binding pre-initiation complex. In axenic amastigotes, expression of LeishIF4E-4 decreases and the protein does not bind the cap, whereas LeishIF4E-1 maintains its expression level and associates with the cap structure and with translation initiation factors. However, LeishIF4E-1 does not interact with eIF4G-like proteins in both life stages, excluding its involvement in cap-dependent translation. Using pull-down assays and mass-spectrometry, we identified a novel, non-conserved 4E-Interacting Protein (Leish4E-IP), which binds to LeishIF4E-1 in promastigotes, but not in amastigotes. Yeast two-hybrid and NMR spectroscopy confirmed the specificity of this interaction. We propose that Leish4E-IP is a translation regulator that is involved in switching between cap-dependent and alternative translation pathways. PMID:21764780

  14. A novel 4E-interacting protein in Leishmania is involved in stage-specific translation pathways.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, Alexandra; Léger, Mélissa; Wagner, Gerhard; Shapira, Michal

    2011-10-01

    In eukaryotes, exposure to stress conditions causes a shift from cap-dependent to cap-independent translation. In trypanosomatids, environmental switches are the driving force of a developmental program of gene expression, but it is yet unclear how their translation machinery copes with their constantly changing environment. Trypanosomatids have a unique cap structure (cap-4) and encode four highly diverged paralogs of the cap-binding protein, eIF4E; none were found to genetically complement a yeast mutant failing to express eIF4E. Here we show that in promastigotes, a typical cap-binding complex is anchored through LeishIF4E-4, which associates with components of the cap-binding pre-initiation complex. In axenic amastigotes, expression of LeishIF4E-4 decreases and the protein does not bind the cap, whereas LeishIF4E-1 maintains its expression level and associates with the cap structure and with translation initiation factors. However, LeishIF4E-1 does not interact with eIF4G-like proteins in both life stages, excluding its involvement in cap-dependent translation. Using pull-down assays and mass-spectrometry, we identified a novel, non-conserved 4E-Interacting Protein (Leish4E-IP), which binds to LeishIF4E-1 in promastigotes, but not in amastigotes. Yeast two-hybrid and NMR spectroscopy confirmed the specificity of this interaction. We propose that Leish4E-IP is a translation regulator that is involved in switching between cap-dependent and alternative translation pathways.

  15. Trusted Translation Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, Yacine; Serhani, Mohamed Adel; Campbell, Piers; Mathew, Sujith Samuel

    Administering multilingual Web sites and applications reliably, involves interconnected and multipart tasks, where trust in the involved parties and content translation sources is paramount. Published Web sites may reflect content from databases, content management systems and other repositories to manage related Web content. But a Web site mirrored wholly or selectively onto a target language version requires streamlined trusted processes. Traditionally, files are translated and transferred via FTP, e-mail, or other communication means. Similarly, translation instructions are communicated between involved parties through verbal instruction, e-mail, and instruction files lead to a variety of inconsistencies and lack of trust in the translation process. This paper proposes a Web service approach to streamline the translation processes and an integration of trust properties in the proposed translation Web services. Web Services have been instrumental in handling problems inherent to systems integration, allowing web-based systems to converse and communicate data automatically. The OASIS Translation Web Services Technical Committee has released a standard way for Web Services to serve the translation and localization business. This article proposes a framework to centralize translation services at a reputable source providing a workflow and a mechanism to quantify service trust. An implementation of the framework is also described in the context of a localization case study.

  16. SMN regulates axonal local translation via miR-183/mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Min Jeong; Niederst, Emily D.; Wertz, Mary H.; Gonçalves, Inês do Carmo G.; Akten, Bikem; Dover, Katarzyna Z.; Peters, Miriam; Riessland, Markus; Neveu, Pierre; Wirth, Brunhilde; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Sardi, S. Pablo; Monani, Umrao R.; Passini, Marco A.; Sahin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Reduced expression of SMN protein causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disorder leading to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. However, the molecular mechanisms by which SMN regulates neuronal dysfunction are not fully understood. Here, we report that reduced SMN protein level alters miRNA expression and distribution in neurons. In particular, miR-183 levels are increased in neurites of SMN-deficient neurons. We demonstrate that miR-183 regulates translation of mTor via direct binding to its 3′ UTR. Interestingly, local axonal translation of mTor is reduced in SMN-deficient neurons, and this can be recovered by miR-183 inhibition. Finally, inhibition of miR-183 expression in the spinal cord of an SMA mouse model prolongs survival and improves motor function of Smn-mutant mice. Together, these observations suggest that axonal miRNAs and the mTOR pathway are previously unidentified molecular mechanisms contributing to SMA pathology. PMID:25055867

  17. Electronic transitions in polymethine dyes involving local and delocalized levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viniychuk, O. O.; Levchenko, S. M.; Przhonska, O. V.; Kachkovsky, O. D.; Bricks, Yu. L.; Kudinova, M. O.; Kovtun, Yu. P.; Poronik, Ye. M.; Shandura, M. P.; Tolmachev, O. I.

    2014-02-01

    Several series of polymethine dyes containing terminal groups, which can generate the local levels close to the HOMO/LUMO energy gap, have been investigated by spectroscopic and quantum-chemical methods. The analysis of the obtained data has shown that the participation of the local levels in the electronic transitions leads to the appearance of the specific quasi-local transitions which differ from the transitions between delocalized molecular orbitals by their sensitivity to the length of the π-conjugated chromophore and to the chemical constitution of the terminal groups. These quasi-local transitions can be experimentally detected by measuring of the ordinary absorption spectra or by the excitation anisotropy spectra, in case when their low-intensive bands are covered by the intensive absorption band. In the unsymmetrical dyes, containing different terminal groups, the delocalized and quasi-local transitions can be mixed producing complicated absorption spectra with two comparatively intensive bands, and their shapes can be gradually transformed upon the lengthening of the π-conjugated chromophore.

  18. Thermoradiotherapy for locally recurrent breast cancer with skin involvement.

    PubMed

    Hehr, T; Lamprecht, U; Glocker, S; Classen, J; Paulsen, F; Budach, W; Bamberg, M

    2001-01-01

    This retrospective analysis investigated the effectiveness and side-effects of combined hyperthermia and radiation therapy in locally recurrent breast cancer after primary modified radical mastectomy. The aim of the thermoradiotherapy was to reduce the substantial risk of symptomatic chest wall disease. Between May 1995-August 1998, 39 extensively pre-treated women with progressive locoregional chest wall tumours were treated with local radiofrequency hyperthermia, given twice a week immediately before radiotherapy. Sixty-two per cent of the patients had received previous radiotherapy, with a median dose of 50 Gy, 64% had received chemotherapy, 36% hormonal therapy, and 13% local therapy with miltefosin, respectively. Nine patients were treated for microscopic residual disease after local tumour excision (R1-resection) and 30 patients for gross macroscopic nodular recurrences. Twenty-seven patients had two adjacent hyperthermia fields at the ipsilateral chest wall to cover the whole irradiation area. Each field received a median of seven local hyperthermia sessions (range 2-12, average 5.6 sessions) just before radiation therapy, with a median dose of 60 Gy (range 30-68 Gy). The monitored maximum(average) and average(average) epicutaneous temperatures were 42.1 degrees C and 41.0 degrees C, respectively. Maximum(average) and average(average) intratumoural temperatures of 43.0 degrees C and 41.1 degrees C, respectively, were achieved in nine chest wall recurrences with intratumoural temperature probes. Concurrent hormonal therapy was administered in 48%, and concurrent chemotherapy in 10% of patients. Median overall survival time was 28 months (Kaplan Meier), with 71% and 54% of patients living 1 and 2 years after thermoradiotherapy. The median time to local failure has not been reached, local tumour control after 2 years being 53%. Actuarial 1 and 2 year local tumour controls for microscopic residual disease were 89%, and for macroscopic nodular recurrences 71% and

  19. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent translational regulation of Id1 involves the PPM1G phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kaiming; Wang, Lanfang; Feng, Wei; Feng, Yue; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.

    2016-01-01

    Id1 is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional modulator that increases the aggressiveness of malignant glial neoplasms. Since most glioblastomas (GBMs) show increased phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K) signaling, we sought to determine whether this pathway regulates Id1 expression. Higher basal Id1 expression correlates with dysregulated PI-3K signaling in multiple established GBM cell lines. Further characterization of PI-3K-dependent Id1 regulation reveals that chemical or genetic inhibition of PI-3K signaling reduces Id1 protein but not mRNA expression. Overall, PI-3K signaling appears to enhance Id1 translation with no significant effect on its stability. PI-3K signaling is known to regulate protein translation through mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, which reduces its association with and inhibition of the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Interestingly, while inhibition of PI-3K and AKT lowers 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and expression of Id1 in all cases, inhibition of TORC1 with rapamycin does not consistently have a similar effect suggesting an alternative mechanism for PI-3K-dependent regulation of Id1 translation. We now identify a potential role for the serine-threonine phosphatase PPM1G in translational regulation of Id1 protein expression. PPM1G knockdown by siRNA increase both 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and Id1 expression and PPM1G and 4E-BP1 co-associates in GBM cells. Furthermore, PPM1G is a phosphoprotein and this phosphorylation appears to be regulated by PI-3K activity. Finally, PI-3K inhibition increases PPM1G activity when assessed by an in vitro phosphatase assay. Our findings provide the first evidence that the PI-3K/AKT signaling pathway modulates PPM1G activity resulting in a shift in the balance between hyper- and hypo-phosphorylated 4E-BP1 and translational regulation of Id1 expression. PMID:27065332

  20. Making scent of the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory axons.

    PubMed

    Dubacq, Caroline; Fouquet, Coralie; Trembleau, Alain

    2014-03-01

    Rodents contain in their genome more than 1000 functional odorant receptor genes, which are specifically expressed by the olfactory sensory neurons projecting from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb. Strong evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in the axon of olfactory sensory neurons was obtained, but no function has been assigned to these axonal mRNAs yet. The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory sensory axons, and to speculate on their possible function in the wiring of the mouse olfactory sensory projections.

  1. Central Localization of Plasticity Involved in Appetitive Conditioning in "Lymnaea"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straub, Volko A.; Styles, Benjamin J.; Ireland, Julie S.; O'Shea, Michael; Benjamin, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    Learning to associate a conditioned (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) results in changes in the processing of CS information. Here, we address directly the question whether chemical appetitive conditioning of "Lymnaea" feeding behavior involves changes in the peripheral and/or central processing of the CS by using extracellular recording…

  2. Central Localization of Plasticity Involved in Appetitive Conditioning in "Lymnaea"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straub, Volko A.; Styles, Benjamin J.; Ireland, Julie S.; O'Shea, Michael; Benjamin, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    Learning to associate a conditioned (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) results in changes in the processing of CS information. Here, we address directly the question whether chemical appetitive conditioning of "Lymnaea" feeding behavior involves changes in the peripheral and/or central processing of the CS by using extracellular recording…

  3. Exploring Local Public Health Workflow in the Context of Automated Translation Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Hannah; Turner, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing limited English proficiency (LEP) population in the US, and federal regulations requiring multilingual health information be available for LEP individuals, there is a lack of available high quality multilingual health promotion materials. The costs and personnel time associated with creating high quality translations serve as barriers to their creation, especially in resource limited public health settings. To explore the potential adoption of novel machine translation and document dissemination technologies for improving the creation and sharing of translated public health materials, we interviewed key health department personnel in Washington State. We analyzed translation workflow, elucidated key themes regarding public health translation work, and assessed attitudes towards electronic document exchange and machine translation. Public health personnel expressed the need for human quality assurance and oversight, but appreciated the potential of novel information technologies to assist in the production and dissemination of translated materials for public health practice. PMID:24551385

  4. Proper paraffin slide storage is crucial for translational research projects involving immunohistochemistry stains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of paraffin slides and tissue microarrays (TMA) is indispensable for translational research. However, storage of paraffin slides over time has a substantial detrimental effect on the quality and reliability of immunohistochemistry stains. Particularly affected by this issue may be any collaborative efforts where paraffin slides or TMAs are shipped to central laboratories and then ‘biobanked’ for some time until use. This article summarizes some of the key issues affecting loss of antigenicity on paraffin slides and some simple storage solutions to help maintain high quality immunohistochemistry results when paraffin slides must be stored for a certain time prior to use. PMID:24636624

  5. Translating for Linguistic Minorities in Northern Ireland: A Look at Translation Policy in the Judiciary, Healthcare, and Local Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Europe as a multilingual continent hosts three main types of languages: dominant languages, autochthonous minority languages, and new minority languages. From a policy standpoint, planning for speakers of these languages and their needs become a complex matter in which many actors with different interests are involved. Of the many issues which…

  6. Translating for Linguistic Minorities in Northern Ireland: A Look at Translation Policy in the Judiciary, Healthcare, and Local Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Europe as a multilingual continent hosts three main types of languages: dominant languages, autochthonous minority languages, and new minority languages. From a policy standpoint, planning for speakers of these languages and their needs become a complex matter in which many actors with different interests are involved. Of the many issues which…

  7. Mechanism of activation of methyltransferases involved in translation by the Trm112 ‘hub’ protein

    PubMed Central

    Liger, Dominique; Mora, Liliana; Lazar, Noureddine; Figaro, Sabine; Henri, Julien; Scrima, Nathalie; Buckingham, Richard H.; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Graille, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Methylation is a common modification encountered in DNA, RNA and proteins. It plays a central role in gene expression, protein function and mRNA translation. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic class I translation termination factors are methylated on the glutamine of the essential and universally conserved GGQ motif, in line with an important cellular role. In eukaryotes, this modification is performed by the Mtq2-Trm112 holoenzyme. Trm112 activates not only the Mtq2 catalytic subunit but also two other tRNA methyltransferases (Trm9 and Trm11). To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying methyltransferase activation by Trm112, we have determined the 3D structure of the Mtq2-Trm112 complex and mapped its active site. Using site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo functional experiments, we show that this structure can also serve as a model for the Trm9-Trm112 complex, supporting our hypothesis that Trm112 uses a common strategy to activate these three methyltransferases. PMID:21478168

  8. LOCAL TRANSLATION. Comment on "Principles of ER cotranslational translocation revealed by proximity-specific ribosome profiling".

    PubMed

    Reid, David W; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2015-06-12

    Jan et al. (Research Articles, 7 November 2014, p. 716) propose that ribosomes translating secretome messenger RNAs (mRNAs) traffic from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) upon emergence of the signal peptide and return to the cytosol after termination. An accounting of controls demonstrates that mRNAs initiate translation on ER-bound ribosomes and that ribosomes are retained on the ER through many cycles of translation.

  9. PINK1 and Parkin control localized translation of respiratory chain component mRNAs on mitochondria outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao; Klinkenberg, Michael; Sun, Yaping; Auburger, Georg; Guo, Su; Lu, Bingwei

    2015-01-06

    Mitochondria play essential roles in many aspects of biology, and their dysfunction has been linked to diverse diseases. Central to mitochondrial function is oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), accomplished by respiratory chain complexes (RCCs) encoded by nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. How RCC biogenesis is regulated in metazoans is poorly understood. Here we show that Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated genes PINK1 and Parkin direct localized translation of certain nuclear-encoded RCC (nRCC) mRNAs. Translationally repressed nRCC mRNAs are localized in a PINK1/Tom20-dependent manner to mitochondrial outer membrane, where they are derepressed and activated by PINK1/Parkin through displacement of translation repressors, including Pumilio and Glorund/hnRNP-F, a Parkin substrate, and enhanced binding of activators such as eIF4G. Inhibiting the translation repressors rescued nRCC mRNA translation and neuromuscular-degeneration phenotypes of PINK1 mutant, whereas inhibiting eIF4G had opposite effects. Our results reveal previously unknown functions of PINK1/Parkin in RNA metabolism and suggest new approaches to mitochondrial restoration and disease intervention.

  10. The DLK-1 kinase promotes mRNA stability and local translation in C. elegans synapses and axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dong; Wu, Zilu; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Jin, Yishi

    2009-01-01

    Growth cone guidance and synaptic plasticity involve dynamic local changes in proteins at axons and dendrites. The Dual Leucine zipper MAPKKK (DLK) has been previously implicated in synaptogenesis and axon outgrowth in C. elegans and other animals. Here we show that in C. elegans DLK-1 regulates not only proper synapse formation and axon morphology, but also axon regeneration, by influencing mRNA stability. DLK-1 kinase signals via a MAPKAP kinase, MAK-2, to stabilize the mRNA encoding CEBP-1, a bZip protein related to CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins, via its 3′ UTR. Inappropriate upregulation of cebp-1 in adult neurons disrupts synapses and axon morphology. CEBP-1 and the DLK-1 pathway are essential for axon regeneration after laser axotomy in adult neurons, and that axotomy induces translation of CEBP-1 in axons. Our findings identify the DLK-1 pathway as a regulator of mRNA stability in synapse formation and maintenance and also in adult axon regeneration. PMID:19737525

  11. Flutter of wings involving a locally distributed flexible control surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari-Jovin, S.; Firouz-Abadi, R. D.; Roshanian, J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper undertakes to facilitate appraisal of aeroelastic interaction of a locally distributed, flap-type control surface with aircraft wings operating in a subsonic potential flow field. The extended Hamilton's principle serves as a framework to ascertain the Euler-Lagrange equations for coupled bending-torsional-flap vibration. An analytical solution to this boundary-value problem is then accomplished by assumed modes and the extended Galerkin's method. The developed aeroelastic model considers both the inherent flexibility of the control surface displaced on the wing and the inertial coupling between these two flexible bodies. The structural deformations also obey the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, along with the Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic constitutive law. Meanwhile, the unsteady thin-airfoil and strip theories are the tools of producing the three-dimensional airloads. The origin of aerodynamic instability undergoes analysis in light of the oscillatory loads as well as the loads owing to arbitrary motions. After successful verification of the model, a systematic flutter survey was conducted on the theoretical effects of various control surface parameters. The results obtained demonstrate that the flapping modes and parameters of the control surface can significantly impact the flutter characteristics of the wings, which leads to a series of pertinent conclusions.

  12. Student Involvement in Wellness Policies: A Study of Pennsylvania Local Education Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jomaa, Lamis H.; McDonnell, Elaine; Weirich, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl; Jensen, Leif; Probart, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Explore student-involvement goals in local wellness policies (LWPs) of local education agencies (LEAs) in Pennsylvania (PA) and investigate associations with LEA characteristics. Design: An observational study that helped examine student-involvement goals. Setting: Public PA LEAs. Participants: LWPs submitted by 539 PA public LEAs. Main…

  13. Student Involvement in Wellness Policies: A Study of Pennsylvania Local Education Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jomaa, Lamis H.; McDonnell, Elaine; Weirich, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl; Jensen, Leif; Probart, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Explore student-involvement goals in local wellness policies (LWPs) of local education agencies (LEAs) in Pennsylvania (PA) and investigate associations with LEA characteristics. Design: An observational study that helped examine student-involvement goals. Setting: Public PA LEAs. Participants: LWPs submitted by 539 PA public LEAs. Main…

  14. Familiarization effects for bilingual letter detection involving translation or exact text repetition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Holly Krech; Healy, Alice F; Greenberg, Seth N

    2007-12-01

    In two experiments, English-Spanish bilinguals read passages, performing letter detection on some passages by circling target letters as they read. Detection passages were sometimes familiarized (primed) by prior reading of the same passage or a translation of it. Participants detected letters in English passages in Experiment 1 and in Spanish passages in Experiment 2. For both experiments, a missing letter effect occurred (depressed detection accuracy on frequent function words relative to less frequent content words). Familiarization promoted overall improvements in letter detection only for English passages, suggesting that reprocessing benefits depend on high language fluency. For Spanish passages, cognates engendered greater error rates than noncognates; the visual similarity of Spanish and English cognates apparently enabled faster identification of Spanish cognates in a way unaffected by familiarization of the whole text passage. Priming by familiarized text was significantly higher when the passages were in the same language than when they were in different languages, suggesting that the reprocessing benefits are at the word level instead of the semantic level. These results are consistent with the GO model of reading (Greenberg, Healy, Koriat, & Kreiner, 2004) but require an expanded consideration of attention redistribution processes in that model.

  15. Adopting, manipulating, transforming: tactics used by gender practitioners in South African NGOs to translate international gender policies into local practice.

    PubMed

    Mannell, Jenevieve

    2014-11-01

    This paper looks at what is lost and gained through the process of translating international policy from a global to a local space. It does this by sharing results from a multisite ethnographic study of gender practices in foreign-funded South African health organisations. This study identifies a number of tactics used by practitioners to deal with the funding constraints and unique knowledge systems that characterise local spaces, including: using policy to appeal to donors; merging gender with better resourced programmes; and redirecting funding allocations. These tactics point to how practitioners are adopting, manipulating and transforming international policies in order to suit their everyday working realities.

  16. C7orf30 specifically associates with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and is involved in translation.

    PubMed

    Wanschers, Bas F J; Szklarczyk, Radek; Pajak, Aleksandra; van den Brand, Mariël A M; Gloerich, Jolein; Rodenburg, Richard J T; Lightowlers, Robert N; Nijtmans, Leo G; Huynen, Martijn A

    2012-05-01

    In a comparative genomics study for mitochondrial ribosome-associated proteins, we identified C7orf30, the human homolog of the plant protein iojap. Gene order conservation among bacteria and the observation that iojap orthologs cannot be transferred between bacterial species predict this protein to be associated with the mitochondrial ribosome. Here, we show colocalization of C7orf30 with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome using isokinetic sucrose gradient and 2D Blue Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) analysis. We co-purified C7orf30 with proteins of the large subunit, and not with proteins of the small subunit, supporting interaction that is specific to the large mitoribosomal complex. Consistent with this physical association, a mitochondrial translation assay reveals negative effects of C7orf30 siRNA knock-down on mitochondrial gene expression. Based on our data we propose that C7orf30 is involved in ribosomal large subunit function. Sequencing the gene in 35 patients with impaired mitochondrial translation did not reveal disease-causing mutations in C7orf30.

  17. Interactions with RNA/DNA of proteins involved in the regulation of transcription, translation and telomere elongation.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Takako; Furukawa, Ayako; Miyoshi, Tatsuya; Takada, Yuusuke; Ohgara, Shouta; Hiratsuka, Kazuyuki; Imai, Takao; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2007-01-01

    Interactions with DNA and RNA of three different proteins involved in the regulation of (1) transcription, (2) translation, and (3) telomere elongation were examined by NMR. In the first case, the combination of structural determination, dynamical analysis on the basis of relaxation data and identification of interactive surface for wild and phosphorylation-mimicking mutant proteins has given the insight on the increase of DNA-binding affinity through phosphorylation of the protein. In the second case, the arrangement of two tandem domains interacting with RNA has been determined with residual dipolar couplings and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, which has given the idea on how the two tandem domains recognize the target RNA. In the third case, simultaneous binding of the other two tandem domains to both DNA and RNA has been analyzed with chemical shift perturbation analysis. The result has suggested that the protein composed of two tandem domains can recruit telomerase to telomere DNA.

  18. Protein-protein interactions involving voltage-gated sodium channels: Post-translational regulation, intracellular trafficking and functional expression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongmin; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2009-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), classically known to play a central role in excitability and signalling in nerves and muscles, have also been found to be expressed in a range of 'non-excitable' cells, including lymphocytes, fibroblasts and endothelia. VGSC abnormalities are associated with various diseases including epilepsy, long-QT syndrome 3, Brugada syndrome, sudden infant death syndrome and, more recently, various human cancers. Given their pivotal role in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, regulation of functional VGSC expression has been the subject of intense study. An emerging theme is post-translational regulation and macro-molecular complexing by protein-protein interactions and intracellular trafficking, leading to changes in functional VGSC expression in plasma membrane. This partially involves endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several proteins have been shown to associate with VGSCs. Here, we review the interactions involving VGSCs and the following proteins: p11, ankyrin, syntrophin, beta-subunit of VGSC, papin, ERM and Nedd4 proteins. Protein kinases A and C, as well as Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase II that have also been shown to regulate intracellular trafficking of VGSCs by changing the balance of externalization vs. internalization, and an effort is made to separate these effects from the short-term phosphorylation of mature proteins in plasma membrane. Two further modulatory mechanisms are reciprocal interactions with the cytoskeleton and, late-stage, activity-dependent regulation. Thus, the review gives an updated account of the range of post-translational molecular mechanisms regulating functional VGSC expression. However, many details of VGSC subtype-specific regulation and pathophysiological aspects remain unknown and these are highlighted throughout for completeness.

  19. The Arabidopsis thaliana MHX gene includes an intronic element that boosts translation when localized in a 5' UTR intron.

    PubMed

    Akua, Tsofit; Shaul, Orit

    2013-11-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the ability of some introns to increase gene expression, a phenomenon called intron-mediated enhancement (IME), are not fully understood. It is also not known why introns localized in the 5'-untranslated region (5' UTR) are considerably longer than downstream eukaryotic introns. It was hypothesized that this extra length results from the presence of some functional intronic elements. However, deletion analyses studies carried out thus far were unable to identify specific intronic regions necessary for IME. Using deletion analysis and a gain-of-function approach, an internal element that considerably increases translational efficiency, without affecting splicing, was identified in the 5' UTR intron of the Arabidopsis thaliana MHX gene. Moreover, the ability of this element to enhance translation was diminished by a minor downstream shift in the position of introns containing it from the 5' UTR into the coding sequence. These data suggest that some of the extra length of 5' UTR introns results from the presence of elements that enhance translation, and, moreover, from the ability of 5' UTR introns to provide preferable platforms for such elements over downstream introns. The impact of the identified intronic element on translational efficiency was augmented upon removal of neighbouring intronic elements. Interference between different intronic elements had not been reported thus far. This interference may support the bioinformatics-based idea that some of the extra sequence of 5' UTR introns is also necessary for separating different functional intronic elements.

  20. The N-terminal region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A signals to nuclear localization of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T.; Gomes, Marcelo D.; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2007-10-19

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a ubiquitous protein of eukaryotic and archaeal organisms which undergoes hypusination, a unique post-translational modification. We have generated a polyclonal antibody against murine eIF5A, which in immunocytochemical assays in B16-F10 cells revealed that the endogenous protein is preferentially localized to the nuclear region. We therefore analyzed possible structural features present in eIF5A proteins that could be responsible for that characteristic. Multiple sequence alignment analysis of eIF5A proteins from different eukaryotic and archaeal organisms showed that the former sequences have an extended N-terminal segment. We have then performed in silico prediction analyses and constructed different truncated forms of murine eIF5A to verify any possible role that the N-terminal extension might have in determining the subcellular localization of the eIF5A in eukaryotic organisms. Our results indicate that the N-terminal extension of the eukaryotic eIF5A contributes in signaling this protein to nuclear localization, despite of bearing no structural similarity with classical nuclear localization signals.

  1. Alternative translational initiation of ATP sulfurylase underlying dual localization of sulfate assimilation pathways in plastids and cytosol in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Anne-Sophie; Yoshimoto, Naoko; Sekiguchi, Ai; Rykulski, Nicholas; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Plants assimilate inorganic sulfate into sulfur-containing vital metabolites. ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) is the enzyme catalyzing the key entry step of the sulfate assimilation pathway in both plastids and cytosol in plants. Arabidopsis thaliana has four ATPS genes (ATPS1, -2, -3, and -4) encoding ATPS pre-proteins containing N-terminal transit peptide sequences for plastid targeting, however, the genetic identity of the cytosolic ATPS has remained unverified. Here we show that Arabidopsis ATPS2 dually encodes plastidic and cytosolic ATPS isoforms, differentiating their subcellular localizations by initiating translation at AUG(Met1) to produce plastid-targeted ATPS2 pre-proteins or at AUG(Met52) or AUG(Met58) within the transit peptide to have ATPS2 stay in cytosol. Translational initiation of ATPS2 at AUG(Met52) or AUG(Met58) was verified by expressing a tandem-fused synthetic gene, ATPS2 (5'UTR-His12) :Renilla luciferase:ATPS2 (Ile13-Val77) :firefly luciferase, under a single constitutively active CaMV 35S promoter in Arabidopsis protoplasts and examining the activities of two different luciferases translated in-frame with split N-terminal portions of ATPS2. Introducing missense mutations at AUG(Met52) and AUG(Met58) significantly reduced the firefly luciferase activity, while AUG(Met52) was a relatively preferred site for the alternative translational initiation. The activity of luciferase fusion protein starting at AUG(Met52) or AUG(Met58) was not modulated by changes in sulfate conditions. The dual localizations of ATPS2 in plastids and cytosol were further evidenced by expression of ATPS2-GFP fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts and transgenic lines, while they were also under control of tissue-specific ATPS2 promoter activity found predominantly in leaf epidermal cells, guard cells, vascular tissues and roots.

  2. The effect of types of banner ad, Web localization, and customer involvement on Internet users' attitudes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jengchung Victor; Ross, William H; Yen, David C; Akhapon, Lerdsuwankij

    2009-02-01

    In this study, three characteristics of Web sites were varied: types of banner ad, Web localization, and involvement in purchasing a product. The dependent variable was attitude toward the site. In laboratory experiments conducted in Thailand and Taiwan, participants browsed versions of a Web site containing different types of banner ads and products. As a within-participants factor, each participant browsed both a standardized English-language Web site and a localized Web site. Results showed that animated (rather than static) banner ads, localized versions (rather than a standardized version) of Web sites, and high (rather than low) product involvement led to favorable attitudes toward the site.

  3. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, a Dual Functional Protein Involved in the Immune Response of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xiaoting; Song, Liang; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-01-01

    Insect gut immunity is the first line of defense against oral infection. Although a few immune-related molecules in insect intestine has been identified by genomics or proteomics approach with comparison to well-studied tissues, such as hemolymph or fat body, our knowledge about the molecular mechanism underlying the gut immunity which would involve a variety of unidentified molecules is still limited. To uncover additional molecules that might take part in pathogen recognition, signal transduction or immune regulation in insect intestine, a T7 phage display cDNA library of the silkworm midgut is constructed. By use of different ligands for biopanning, Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) has been selected. BmTCTP is produced in intestinal epithelial cells and released into the gut lumen. The protein level of BmTCTP increases at the early time points during oral microbial infection and declines afterwards. In vitro binding assay confirms its activity as a multi-ligand binding molecule and it can further function as an opsonin that promotes the phagocytosis of microorganisms. Moreover, it can induce the production of anti-microbial peptide via a signaling pathway in which ERK is required and a dynamic tyrosine phosphorylation of certain cytoplasmic membrane protein. Taken together, our results characterize BmTCTP as a dual-functional protein involved in both the cellular and the humoral immune response of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. PMID:23894441

  4. Identifying a Network of Brain Regions Involved in Aversion-Related Processing: A Cross-Species Translational Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Dave J.; Northoff, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The ability to detect and respond appropriately to aversive stimuli is essential for all organisms, from fruit flies to humans. This suggests the existence of a core neural network which mediates aversion-related processing. Human imaging studies on aversion have highlighted the involvement of various cortical regions, such as the prefrontal cortex, while animal studies have focused largely on subcortical regions like the periaqueductal gray and hypothalamus. However, whether and how these regions form a core neural network of aversion remains unclear. To help determine this, a translational cross-species investigation in humans (i.e., meta-analysis) and other animals (i.e., systematic review of functional neuroanatomy) was performed. Our results highlighted the recruitment of the anterior cingulate cortex, the anterior insula, and the amygdala as well as other subcortical (e.g., thalamus, midbrain) and cortical (e.g., orbitofrontal) regions in both animals and humans. Importantly, involvement of these regions remained independent of sensory modality. This study provides evidence for a core neural network mediating aversion in both animals and humans. This not only contributes to our understanding of the trans-species neural correlates of aversion but may also carry important implications for psychiatric disorders where abnormal aversive behavior can often be observed. PMID:22102836

  5. Deficiency of the Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Impairs mRNA Localization and Local Translation in the Growth Cone of Motor Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fallini, Claudia; Donlin-Asp, Paul G; Rouanet, Jeremy P; Bassell, Gary J; Rossoll, Wilfried

    2016-03-30

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting spinal motor neurons. It is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays an essential role in the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins in all tissues. The etiology of the specific defects in the motor circuitry in SMA is still unclear, but SMN has also been implicated in mediating the axonal localization of mRNA-protein complexes, which may contribute to the axonal degeneration observed in SMA. Here, we report that SMN deficiency severely disrupts local protein synthesis within neuronal growth cones. We also identify the cytoskeleton-associated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) mRNA as a new target of SMN and show that motor neurons from SMA mouse models have reduced levels ofGAP43mRNA and protein in axons and growth cones. Importantly, overexpression of two mRNA-binding proteins, HuD and IMP1, restoresGAP43mRNA and protein levels in growth cones and rescues axon outgrowth defects in SMA neurons. These findings demonstrate that SMN plays an important role in the localization and local translation of mRNAs with important axonal functions and suggest that disruption of this function may contribute to the axonal defects observed in SMA. The motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays a key role in assembling RNA/protein complexes that are essential for mRNA splicing. It remains unclear whether defects in this well characterized housekeeping function cause the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons observed in SMA. Here, we describe an additional role of SMN in regulating the axonal localization and local translation of the mRNA encoding growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43). This study supports a model whereby SMN deficiency impedes transport and local translation of mRNAs important for neurite outgrowth and stabilization

  6. Deficiency of the Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Impairs mRNA Localization and Local Translation in the Growth Cone of Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fallini, Claudia; Donlin-Asp, Paul G.; Rouanet, Jeremy P.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting spinal motor neurons. It is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays an essential role in the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins in all tissues. The etiology of the specific defects in the motor circuitry in SMA is still unclear, but SMN has also been implicated in mediating the axonal localization of mRNA-protein complexes, which may contribute to the axonal degeneration observed in SMA. Here, we report that SMN deficiency severely disrupts local protein synthesis within neuronal growth cones. We also identify the cytoskeleton-associated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) mRNA as a new target of SMN and show that motor neurons from SMA mouse models have reduced levels of GAP43 mRNA and protein in axons and growth cones. Importantly, overexpression of two mRNA-binding proteins, HuD and IMP1, restores GAP43 mRNA and protein levels in growth cones and rescues axon outgrowth defects in SMA neurons. These findings demonstrate that SMN plays an important role in the localization and local translation of mRNAs with important axonal functions and suggest that disruption of this function may contribute to the axonal defects observed in SMA. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which plays a key role in assembling RNA/protein complexes that are essential for mRNA splicing. It remains unclear whether defects in this well characterized housekeeping function cause the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons observed in SMA. Here, we describe an additional role of SMN in regulating the axonal localization and local translation of the mRNA encoding growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43). This study supports a model whereby SMN deficiency impedes transport and local translation of mRNAs important for neurite

  7. Decentering Translation in the Classroom: An Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Adriana

    1994-01-01

    Argues that students in classrooms operate in an artificial situation when the teacher is the target audience. Describes a teaching experiment in which students assessed and avidly discussed the success of translations involving cultural features adapted to local audiences. (SR)

  8. Translation Initiation Factor AteIF(iso)4E Is Involved in Selective mRNA Translation in Arabidopsis Thaliana Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Silva, Ana Valeria; Aguirre-Martínez, César; Flores-Tinoco, Carlos E.; Alejandri-Ramírez, Naholi D.; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most regulated steps of translation initiation is the recruitment of mRNA by the translation machinery. In eukaryotes, this step is mediated by the 5′end cap-binding factor eIF4E bound to the bridge protein eIF4G and forming the eIF4F complex. In plants, different isoforms of eIF4E and eIF4G form the antigenically distinct eIF4F and eIF(iso)4F complexes proposed to mediate selective translation. Using a microarray analysis of polyribosome- and non-polyribosome-purified mRNAs from 15 day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type [WT] and eIF(iso)4E knockout mutant [(iso)4E-1] seedlings we found 79 transcripts shifted from polyribosomes toward non-polyribosomes, and 47 mRNAs with the opposite behavior in the knockout mutant. The translationally decreased mRNAs were overrepresented in root-preferentially expressed genes and proteins from the endomembrane system, including several transporters such as the phosphate transporter PHOSPHATE1 (PHO1), Sucrose transporter 3 (SUC3), ABC transporter-like with ATPase activity (MRP11) and five electron transporters, as well as signal transduction-, protein modification- and transcription-related proteins. Under normal growth conditions, eIF(iso)4E expression under the constitutive promoter 35 S enhanced the polyribosomal recruitment of PHO1 supporting its translational preference for eIF(iso)4E. Furthermore, under phosphate deficiency, the PHO1 protein increased in the eIF(iso)4E overexpressing plants and decreased in the knockout mutant as compared to wild type. In addition, the knockout mutant had larger root, whereas the 35 S directed expression of eIF(iso)4E caused shorter root under normal growth conditions, but not under phosphate deficiency. These results indicate that selective translation mediated by eIF(iso)4E is relevant for Arabidopsis root development under normal growth conditions. PMID:22363683

  9. A Temporal Locality-Aware Page-Mapped Flash Translation Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngjae; Gupta, Aayush; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

    2013-01-01

    The poor performance of random writes has been a cause of major concern which needs to be addressed to better utilize the potential of flash in enterprise-scale environments. We examine one of the important causes of this poor performance: the design of the flash translation layer (FTL) which performs the virtual-to-physical address translations and hides the erase-before-write characteristics of flash. We propose a complete paradigm shift in the design of the core FTL engine from the existing techniques with our Demand-Based Flash Translation Layer (DFTL) which selectively caches page- level address mappings. Our experimental evaluation using FlashSim with realistic enterprise-scale workloads endorses the utility of DFTL in enterprise-scale storage systems by demonstrating: 1) improved performance, 2) reduced garbage collection overhead and 3) better overload behavior compared with hybrid FTL schemes which are the most popular implementation methods. For example, a predominantly random-write dominant I/O trace from an OLTP application running at a large financial institution shows a 78% improvement in average response time (due to a 3-fold reduction in operations of the garbage collector), compared with the hybrid FTL scheme. Even for the well-known read-dominant TPC-H benchmark, for which DFTL introduces additional overheads, we improve system response time by 56%. Moreover, interestingly, when write-back cache on DFTL-based SSD is enabled, DFTL even outperforms the page-based FTL scheme, improving their response time by 72% in Financial trace.

  10. OCT-based approach to local relaxations discrimination from translational relaxation motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Lev A.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex; Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool for tissue state characterization. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an approach to mapping mechanical properties of tissue based on OCT. One of challenging problems in OCE is elimination of the influence of residual local tissue relaxation that complicates obtaining information on elastic properties of the tissue. Alternatively, parameters of local relaxation itself can be used as an additional informative characteristic for distinguishing the tissue in normal and pathological states over the OCT image area. Here we briefly present an OCT-based approach to evaluation of local relaxation processes in the tissue bulk after sudden unloading of its initial pre-compression. For extracting the local relaxation rate we evaluate temporal dependence of local strains that are mapped using our recently developed hybrid phase resolved/displacement-tracking (HPRDT) approach. This approach allows one to subtract the contribution of global displacements of scatterers in OCT scans and separate the temporal evolution of local strains. Using a sample excised from of a coronary arteria, we demonstrate that the observed relaxation of local strains can be reasonably fitted by an exponential law, which opens the possibility to characterize the tissue by a single relaxation time. The estimated local relaxation times are assumed to be related to local biologically-relevant processes inside the tissue, such as diffusion, leaking/draining of the fluids, local folding/unfolding of the fibers, etc. In general, studies of evolution of such features can provide new metrics for biologically-relevant changes in tissue, e.g., in the problems of treatment monitoring.

  11. The SUI-homologous translation initiation factor eIF-1 is involved in regulation of ion homeostasis in rice.

    PubMed

    Diédhiou, C J; Popova, O V; Dietz, K-J; Golldack, D

    2008-05-01

    Halophytes survive high salinity by using complex adaptive mechanisms. In a search for novel molecular mechanisms involved in salt acclimation, transcript analyses revealed increased expression of a SUI-homologous translation initiation factor eIF-1 in the salt-tolerant grass species Festuca rubra ssp. littoralis but not in rice. Upon analysis of the cell specificity of eIF-1 transcription by in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR), predominant signals were detected in rice leaf mesophyll. To further examine the role of eIF-1 in salt tolerance, transgenic rice plants were generated that over-express this factor under the control of the CaMV-35S promoter. The eIF-1 over-expressing lines showed improved growth under salt stress that was correlated with maintenance of photosynthetic activity and reduced Na(+) and Cl(-) accumulation in leaves. The transgenic rice lines also activated expression of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. In addition, an oxidoreductase that belongs to the aldo/keto reductase family was identified as a gene with modified expression in the eIF-1 over-expressing lines, compared with wild-type rice. Our data suggest that eIF-1 has a central function in salt-stress adaptation in rice by regulating ion accumulation and the intracellular redox status.

  12. Student involvement in wellness policies: a study of Pennsylvania local education agencies.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Lamis H; McDonnell, Elaine; Weirich, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl; Jensen, Leif; Probart, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Explore student-involvement goals in local wellness policies (LWPs) of local education agencies (LEAs) in Pennsylvania (PA) and investigate associations with LEA characteristics. An observational study that helped examine student-involvement goals. Public PA LEAs. LWPs submitted by 539 PA public LEAs. Six student-involvement goals analyzed as dependent variables. Correlations between demographic and policy characteristics of LEAs and student-involvement goals were measured. Policies developed by LEAs were abstracted and analyzed. Logistic regression models were developed to analyze relationships between student-involvement goals and the demographic and policy characteristics of LEAs. Majority of LEAs included policy goals that address student involvement in an array of activities related to wellness policy, food service, and role modeling. Regression models showed that LEAs with comprehensive and strong policies were most likely to include student-involvement goals regardless of LEA location, enrollment, or socioeconomic status of students. Student engagement in school nutrition policies has been shown to increase student acceptance in an array of health-related areas and is therefore promising in the area of obesity prevention. Comprehensiveness and rigor of LWPs were strongly correlated with the inclusion of student-involvement goals on LWPs. The upcoming reauthorization of the Child Nutrition programs in 2010 creates a good opportunity to address student involvement in LWPs. Copyright © 2010 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rat Humanin is encoded and translated in mitochondria and is localized to the mitochondrial compartment where it regulates ROS production.

    PubMed

    Paharkova, Vladislava; Alvarez, Griselda; Nakamura, Hiromi; Cohen, Pinchas; Lee, Kuk-Wha

    2015-09-15

    Evidence for the putative mitochondrial origin of the Humanin (HN) peptide has been lacking, although its cytoprotective activity has been demonstrated in a variety of organismal and cellular systems. We sought to establish proof-of-principle for a mitochondria-derived peptide (MDP) in a rat-derived cellular system as the rat HN sequence is predicted to lack nuclear insertions of mitochondrial origin (NUMT). We found that the rat HN (Rattin; rHN) homologue is derived from the mitochondrial genome as evidenced by decreased production in Rho-0 cells, and that peptide translation occurs in the mitochondria as it is unaffected by cycloheximide. Rat HN localizes to the mitochondria in cellular subfractionation and immunohistochemical studies. Addition of a HN analogue to isolated mitochondria from rat INS-1 beta cells reduced hydrogen peroxide production by 55%. In summary, a locally bioactive peptide is derived and translated from an open reading frame (ORF) within rat mitochondrial DNA encoding 16S rRNA.

  14. The role of agency goals and local context in Great Lakes water resources public involvement programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landre, Betsy Kiernan; Knuth, Barbara A.

    1993-03-01

    As complex social phenomena, public involvement processes are influenced by contextual factors. This study examined agency goals for public involvement and assessed the importance of local context in remedial action planning, a community-based water resources program aimed at the cleanup of the 42 most polluted locations in the Great Lakes Basin. Agency goals for public involvement in remedial action plans (RAPs) were agency-oriented and focused on public acceptance of the plan, support for implementation, and positive agency-public relations. Corresponding to these goals, citizen advisory committees were created in 75% of the RAP sites as a primary means for public input into the planning process. Factors that influenced the implementation of public involvement programs in remedial action planning included public orientation toward the remediation issue, local economic conditions, the interaction of diverse interests in the process, agency and process credibility, experience of local leadership, and jurisdictional complexity. A formative assessment of “community readiness” appeared critical to appropriate public involvement program design. Careful program design may also include citizen education and training components, thoughtful management of ongoing agency-public relations and conflict among disparate interests in the process, overcoming logistical difficulties that threaten program continuity, using local expertise and communication channels, and circumventing interjurisdictional complexities.

  15. Different cortical involvement pattern of generalized and localized spasms: A MEG study

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Gupta, Ajay; Wang, Zhong I.; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.; Mosher, John C.; Burgess, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    We report successful magnetoencephalography (MEG) recording in a child who had generalized epileptic spasms (ES) as well as ES involving legs only during the recording. MEG source localization results demonstrated that 1) the origin of the interictal epileptiform discharges and of both types of ES were the same, i.e. right parietal region, and 2) the two types of ES involved different cortical spread patterns, i.e. epileptic involvement localized to right parietal region in spasms of legs, and rapid diffuse involvement in generalized spasms. The MEG in this case provided new insight about the mechanisms of the two types of ES, i.e. both were generated from the same focus and, in generalized ES, abnormal excitation spread to cortical areas diffusely. PMID:21944062

  16. Translation of waves along quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature two-dimensional local induction approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2015-09-15

    In a recent paper, we give a study of the purely rotational motion of general stationary states in the two-dimensional local induction approximation (2D-LIA) governing superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit [B. Svistunov, “Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit,” Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)]. Such results demonstrated that variety of stationary configurations are possible from vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion in addition to commonly discussed configurations such as helical or planar states. However, the filaments (or, more properly, waves along these filaments) can also exhibit translational motion along the axis of orientation. In contrast to the study on vortex configurations for purely rotational stationary states, the present paper considers non-stationary states which exhibit a combination of rotation and translational motions. These solutions can essentially be described as waves or disturbances which ride along straight vortex filament lines. As expected from our previous work, there are a number of types of structures that can be obtained under the 2D-LIA. We focus on non-stationary states, as stationary states exhibiting translation will essentially take the form of solutions studied in [R. A. Van Gorder, “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)], with the difference being translation along the reference axis, so that qualitative appearance of the solution geometry will be the same (even if there are quantitative differences). We discuss a wide variety of general properties of these non-stationary solutions and derive cases in which they reduce to known stationary states. We obtain various routes to Kelvin waves along vortex filaments and demonstrate that if the phase and amplitude of a disturbance both propagate with the same wave speed, then Kelvin waves will result. We also consider the self

  17. Translational and rotational localization errors in cone-beam CT based image-guided lung stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Cristina; Piperno, Gaia; Ferrari, Annamaria; Surgo, Alessia; Muto, Matteo; Ronchi, Sara; Bazani, Alessia; Pansini, Floriana; Cremonesi, Marta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Accurate localization is crucial in delivering safe and effective stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to analyse the accuracy of image-guidance using the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of the VERO system in 57 patients treated for lung SBRT and to calculate the treatment margins. The internal target volume (ITV) was obtained by contouring the tumor on maximum and mean intensity projection CT images reconstructed from a respiration correlated 4D-CT. Translational and rotational tumor localization errors were identified by comparing the manual registration of the ITV to the motion-blurred tumor on the CBCT and they were corrected by means of the robotic couch and the ring rotation. A verification CBCT was acquired after correction in order to evaluate residual errors. The mean 3D vector at initial set-up was 6.6±2.3mm, which was significantly reduced to 1.6±0.8mm after 6D automatic correction. 94% of the rotational errors were within 3°. The PTV margins used to compensate for residual tumor localization errors were 3.1, 3.5 and 3.3mm in the LR, SI and AP directions, respectively. On-line image guidance with the ITV-CBCT matching technique and automatic 6D correction of the VERO system allowed a very accurate tumor localization in lung SBRT. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Global Frameworks, Local Contingencies: Policy Translations and Education Development in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Rahul; Sriprakash, Arathi

    2011-01-01

    Policies and programmes pursuing the universalisation of elementary education (UEE) in developing nations have been influenced by a set of complex forces in international, state, and local arenas. This paper explores how a large-scale standardised assessment programme shaped by international and market-oriented discourses has been differently…

  19. Commercial Complexity and Local and Global Involvement in Programs: Effects on Viewer Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberman, Heiko; Thorson, Esther

    A study investigated the effects of local (momentary) and global (whole program) involvement in program context and the effects of message complexity on the retention of television commercials. Sixteen commercials, categorized as simple video/simple audio through complex video/complex audio were edited into two globally high- and two globally…

  20. 36 CFR 219.14 - Involvement of State and local governments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE PLANNING National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning Collaborative Planning for Sustainability § 219.14 Involvement of State and local governments. The responsible official... the planning process, including the identification of issues; and (b) Contribute to the streamlined...

  1. Local involvement in measuring and governing carbon stocks in China, Vietnam, Indonesia and Laos

    Treesearch

    Michael Køie. Poulsen

    2013-01-01

    An important element of MRV is to ensure accurate measurements of carbon stocks. Measuring trees on the ground may be needed for ground truthing of remote sensing results. It can also provide more accurate carbon stock monitoring than remote sensing alone. Local involvement in measuring trees for monitoring of carbon stocks may be advantageous in several ways....

  2. 36 CFR 219.14 - Involvement of State and local governments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE PLANNING National Forest System Land and Resource Management Planning Collaborative Planning for Sustainability § 219.14 Involvement of State and local governments. The responsible official... the planning process, including the identification of issues; and (b) Contribute to the...

  3. Transcriptomic Profiling of Egg Quality in Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Sheds Light on Genes Involved in Ubiquitination and Translation.

    PubMed

    Żarski, Daniel; Nguyen, Thaovi; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Dutto, Gilbert; Vidal, Marie Odile; Fauvel, Christian; Bobe, Julien

    2017-02-01

    Variable and low egg quality is a major limiting factor for the development of efficient aquaculture production. This stems from limited knowledge on the mechanisms underlying egg quality in cultured fish. Molecular analyses, such as transcriptomic studies, are valuable tools to identify the most important processes modulating egg quality. However, very few studies have been devoted to this aspect so far. Within this study, the microarray-based transcriptomic analysis of eggs (of different quality) of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) was performed. An Agilent oligo microarray experiment was performed on labelled mRNA extracted from 16 batches of eggs (each batch obtained from a different female) of sea bass, in which over 24,000 published probe arrays were used. We identified 39 differentially expressed genes exhibiting a differential expression between the groups of low (fertilization rate < 60 %) and high (fertilization rate > 60 %) quality. The mRNA levels of eight genes were further analyzed by quantitative PCR. Seven genes were confirmed by qPCR to be differentially expressed in eggs of low and high quality. This study confirmed the importance of some of the genes already reported to be potential molecular quality indicators (mainly rnf213 and irf7), but we also found new genes (mainly usp5, mem-prot, plec, cenpf), which had not yet been reported to be quality-dependent in fish. These results suggest the importance of genes involved in several important processes, such as protein ubiquitination, translation, DNA repair, and cell structure and architecture; these probably being the mechanisms that contribute to egg developmental competence in sea bass.

  4. Characterization of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A homolog from Tamarix androssowii involved in plant abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liuqiang; Xu, Chenxi; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yucheng

    2012-07-26

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) promotes formation of the first peptide bond at the onset of protein synthesis. However, the function of eIF5A in plants is not well understood. In this study, we characterized the function of eIF5A (TaeIF5A1) from Tamarix androssowii. The promoter of TaeIF5A1 with 1,486 bp in length was isolated, and the cis-elements in the promoter were identified. A WRKY (TaWRKY) and RAV (TaRAV) protein can specifically bind to a W-box motif in the promoter of TaeIF5A1 and activate the expression of TaeIF5A1. Furthermore, TaeIF5A1, TaWRKY and TaRAV share very similar expression pattern and are all stress-responsive gene that functions in the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway, indicating that they are components of a single regulatory pathway. Transgenic yeast and poplar expressing TaeIF5A1 showed elevated protein levels combined with improved abiotic stresses tolerance. Furthermore, TaeIF5A1-transformed plants exhibited enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, lower electrolyte leakage and higher chlorophyll content under salt stress. These results suggested that TaeIF5A1 is involved in abiotic stress tolerance, and is likely regulated by transcription factors TaWRKY and TaRAV both of which can bind to the W-box motif. In addition, TaeIF5A1 may mediate stress tolerance by increasing protein synthesis, enhancing ROS scavenging by improving SOD and POD activities, and preventing chlorophyll loss and membrane damage. Therefore, eIF5A may play an important role in plant adaptation to changing environmental conditions.

  5. Characterization of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A homolog from Tamarix androssowii involved in plant abiotic stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) promotes formation of the first peptide bond at the onset of protein synthesis. However, the function of eIF5A in plants is not well understood. Results In this study, we characterized the function of eIF5A (TaeIF5A1) from Tamarix androssowii. The promoter of TaeIF5A1 with 1,486 bp in length was isolated, and the cis-elements in the promoter were identified. A WRKY (TaWRKY) and RAV (TaRAV) protein can specifically bind to a W-box motif in the promoter of TaeIF5A1 and activate the expression of TaeIF5A1. Furthermore, TaeIF5A1, TaWRKY and TaRAV share very similar expression pattern and are all stress-responsive gene that functions in the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway, indicating that they are components of a single regulatory pathway. Transgenic yeast and poplar expressing TaeIF5A1 showed elevated protein levels combined with improved abiotic stresses tolerance. Furthermore, TaeIF5A1-transformed plants exhibited enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, lower electrolyte leakage and higher chlorophyll content under salt stress. Conclusions These results suggested that TaeIF5A1 is involved in abiotic stress tolerance, and is likely regulated by transcription factors TaWRKY and TaRAV both of which can bind to the W-box motif. In addition, TaeIF5A1 may mediate stress tolerance by increasing protein synthesis, enhancing ROS scavenging by improving SOD and POD activities, and preventing chlorophyll loss and membrane damage. Therefore, eIF5A may play an important role in plant adaptation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:22834699

  6. Converging translational evidence for the involvement of the serotonin 2A receptor gene in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Petit, Anne-Cécile; Quesseveur, Gaël; Gressier, Florence; Colle, Romain; David, Denis J; Gardier, Alain M; Ferreri, Florian; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Falissard, Bruno; Verstuyft, Céline; Guiard, Bruno P; Corruble, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-03

    An association between serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR), encoded by HTR2A gene, and major depressive disorder (MDD) has been suggested. Here, we combined preclinical and ecological clinical approaches to explore the impact of impaired 5-HT2AR-mediated transmission on MDD or anxio-depressive-like phenotype in mice. Htr2a knock-out mice (Htr2a(-/-)) and wild-type mice were compared for the ability of chronic corticosterone to elicit some anxio-depressive-like phenotype in three behavioral paradigms (elevated plus maze, tail suspension test and splash test). Accordingly, two single nucleotide polymorphisms of the HTR2A gene (rs6314 ie His452Tyr and rs6313 ie 102C/T), which specific allelic variants may decrease 5-HT2AR-mediated transmission (as in Htr2a(-/-)mice), were studied in a sample of 485 Caucasian patients with MDD. In response to chronic corticosterone exposure, Htr2a(-/-) mice displayed more pronounced anxiodepressive-like phenotype than wild-type mice, as shown by a significant higher "emotionality score" (p<0.01). In patients, the C allele of rs6313 was more frequent in depressed patients (p=0.019) and was also associated with a more severe major depressive episode (p=0.03). This translational and ecological study involving constitutive Htr2a(-/-) knock-out mice and related SNPs in depressed patients suggests that a lower neurotransmission at the 5-HT2AR may favor the susceptibility and severity of MDE. It also suggests that specific allelic variants of the rs6313 and rs6314 may reduce 5-HT2AR-mediated transmission.

  7. 'A local habitation and a name': how narrative evidence-based medicine transforms the translational research paradigm.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Rishi K; Charon, Rita; Lekas, Helen-Maria; Fullilove, Mindy T; Devlin, Michael J; Falzon, Louise; Wyer, Peter C

    2008-10-01

    We propose narrative evidence-based medicine as a necessary elaboration of the NIH translational research roadmap. The roadmap defined two complex obstacles, T1 and T2, to the progress of research from the 'bench' or basic laboratory science to the 'bedside' or clinical application, the traversal of which requires emergence of complex transformative relationships between the parties and stakeholders. It fails to encompass patient interactions, hesitancies and alliances with medical care. We suggest a third transformative or translational step, T3, that begins at the point that practitioners have themselves elected to adopt and recommend strategies and interventions based on high-level evidence and guidelines. In our model, T3 encompasses all aspects of care that converge on the practitioner-patient relationship and ultimately determine what therapies and choices patients actually make regarding their care. Learning from the biopsychosocial model, patient-centred care and shared decision making while attending to the ethical injunction of Emmanuel Levinas to know the other, we have developed a medical practice and theory that unites the local and specific concerns of narrative medicine with the generalizability and power of evidence-based medicine. We offer innovative approaches to study, teach and improve the therapeutic intimacy and integrative effectiveness of the practitioner-patient relationship.

  8. CGG Repeats in the 5’UTR of FMR1 RNA Regulate Translation of Other RNAs Localized in the Same RNA Granules

    PubMed Central

    Rovozzo, René; Korza, George; Baker, Mei W.; Li, Meng; Bhattacharyya, Anita; Barbarese, Elisa; Carson, John H.

    2016-01-01

    CGG repeats in the 5’UTR of Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) RNA mediate RNA localization and translation in granules. Large expansions of CGG repeats (> 200 repeats) in FMR1, referred to as full mutations, are associated with fragile X syndrome (FXS). Smaller expansions (55–200 repeats), referred to as premutations, are associated with fragile X tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and fragile X premature ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI). TMPyP4 is a porphyrin ring compound that destabilizes CGG repeat RNA secondary structure. Here we show that exogenous CGG repeat RNA by itself, lacking the FMRP ORF, microinjected into hippocampal neurons is localized in RNA granules and inhibits translation of ARC RNA, which is localized in the same granules. TMPyP4 rescues translation of ARC RNA in granules. We also show that in human premutation fibroblasts with endogenous CGG repeat expansions in the FMR1 gene, translation of ARC RNA is inhibited and calcium homeostasis is disrupted and both phenotypes are rescued by TMPyP4. Inhibition of granule translation by expanded CGG repeats and rescue of granule translation by TMPy4, represent potential pathogenic mechanism and therapeutic strategy, respectively, for FXTAS and FXPOI. PMID:28005950

  9. Using local culture and gender roles to improve male involvement in maternal health in southern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Omokhoa Adedayo; Aldoory, Linda; Parakoyi, Dauda Bayo

    2011-11-01

    Group health talks were conducted in Ekiadolor, Southern Nigeria, to improve male attitudes and practices regarding their involvement in prenatal care and family planning. Intervention planners highlight the importance of embedding local cultural norms along with co-opting gendered beliefs for purposes of planning and implementing the group talks. The authors facilitated 9 groups of adult males mostly from the traditional hierarchy of the community. Using gender theory as an analytical lens along with the application of local cultural beliefs and norms, a useful communication intervention was developed that increased the possibility of positive male engagement in maternal health in 1 Nigerian community.

  10. Prediction of margin involvement and local recurrence after skin-sparing and simple mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Al-Himdani, S; Timbrell, S; Tan, K T; Morris, J; Bundred, N J

    2016-07-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) facilitates immediate breast reconstruction. We investigated locoregional recurrence rates after SSM compared with simple mastectomy and the factors predicting oncological failure. Patients with early breast cancer that underwent mastectomy between 2000 and 2005 at a single institution were studied to ascertain local and systemic recurrence rates between groups. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank test were used to evaluate disease-free survival. Patients (n = 577) underwent simple mastectomy (80%) or SSM (20%). Median follow up was 80 months. Patients undergoing SSM were of younger average age, less often had involved lymph nodes (22% vs 44%, p < 0.001), more often had DCIS present (79% vs 53%, p < 0.001) and involved margins (29% vs 15%, p = 0.001). Involved surgical margins were associated with large size (p = 0.001). The 8-year local recurrence (LR) rates were 7.9% for SSM and 5% for simple mastectomy respectively (p = 0.35). Predictors of locoregional recurrence were lymph node involvement (HR 8.0, for >4 nodes, p < 0.001) and involved surgical margins (HR 3.3, p = 0.002). In node negative patients, SSM was a predictor of locoregional recurrence (HR 4.8 [1.1, 19.9], p = 0.033). Delayed reconstruction is more appropriate for node positive early breast cancer after post-mastectomy radiotherapy. Re-excision of involved margins is essential to prevent local recurrence after mastectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  11. Adolescent Peer Relations and Socioemotional Development in Latin America: Translating International Theory into Local Research.

    PubMed

    Berger, Christian; Lisboa, Carolina; Cuadros, Olga; de Tezanos-Pinto, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Peer relations constitute a main developmental context for adolescents. Peers offer an instance for identity definition and set the norms of acceptable and valued characteristics, behaviors, and attitudes, representing a societal model that allows and restrains avenues for adolescents' socioemotional development. The present article departs from these considerations to review research on adolescents' peer relations in Latin America from a socioemotional perspective. First, approaches to adolescence are discussed, with a main focus on attachment and identity theories, based on a bioecological framework. Then, a review of research in Latin America on friendships, school climate, and intergroup relations is presented. The discussion addresses the tension between theories and evidence generated in developed societies and highlights the particularities of Latin American youth, stressing the need for collecting local data. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Local therapies for inflammatory eye disease in translation: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite their side-effects and the advent of systemic immunosuppressives and biologics, the use of corticosteroids remains in the management of patients with uveitis, particularly when inflammation is associated with systemic disease or when bilateral ocular disease is present. The use of topical corticosteroids as local therapy for anterior uveitis is well-established, but periocular injections of corticosteroid can also be used to control mild or moderate intraocular inflammation. More recently, intraocular corticosteroids such as triamcinolone and steroid-loaded vitreal inserts and implants have been found to be effective, including in refractory cases. Additional benefits are noted when ocular inflammation is unilateral or asymmetric, when local therapy may preclude the need to increase the systemic medication. Implants in particular have gained prominence with evidence of efficacy including both dexamethasone and fluocinolone loaded devices. However, an appealing avenue of research lies in the development of non-corticosteroid drugs in order to avoid the side-effects that limit the appeal of injected corticosteroids. Several existing drugs are being assessed, including anti-VEGF compounds such as ranibizumab and bevacizumab, anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha antibodies such as infliximab, as well as older cytotoxic medications such as methotrexate and cyclosporine, with varying degrees of success. Intravitreal sirolimus is currently undergoing phase 3 trials in uveitis and other inflammatory pathways have also been proposed as suitable therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the advent of biotechnology is seeing advances in generation of new therapeutic molecules such as high affinity binding peptides or modified high affinity or bivalent single chain Fab fragments, offering higher specificity and possibility of topical delivery. PMID:23914773

  13. A prospective study of the practical issues of local involvement in national audit of COPD.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Lowe, D; Barnes, S; Pearson, M G

    2004-05-01

    Variation in quality of local services is of great concern to the government and public. National audit is an important means of providing data of comparative performance but is hampered at local level by poor methodology including audit design, standard setting and data collection tools. A pilot audit of the hospital care of patients admitted with acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was performed in preparation for a national audit programme and was designed and supported by experts. It was hoped to overcome these barriers. We report a prospective evaluation of the practical issues involved in local participation of hospital audit of COPD care within a national framework. Hospitals were recruited to the study by random selection and voluntary participation. A clinical audit study was completed over an 8-week period immediately followed by a survey of clinicians and audit staff to identify positive and negative issues of participation and the process required to achieve a successful outcome. Forty-one hospitals were invited to participate, 26 (63%) accepted, and four others volunteered to meet the target of 30 enrolled centres. Reasons cited for non-participation were of inadequate resources amongst either clinicians or audit departments or prior engagement in other national or local audit schemes. Following completion of the audit most (81%) participating units reported it was a useful exercise and were willing to be involved in future audits. Negative aspects of involvement included the lack of dedicated time and manpower for audit, poor information technology and inadequate systems for identifying patient diagnoses either at admission or at discharge and incomplete case note entries. Methodological issues such as study design and data collection tools were not cited as important barriers to participation. There is local willingness to be involved in national audit of hospital care of COPD and central provision of expert design of methods and tools

  14. Binding of DEAD-box helicase Dhh1 to the 5'-untranslated region of ASH1 mRNA represses localized translation of ASH1 in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianjun; Meng, Xiuhua; Li, Delin; Chen, Shaoyin; Luo, Jianmin; Zhu, Linjie; Singer, Robert H; Gu, Wei

    2017-06-09

    Local translation of specific mRNAs is regulated by dynamic changes in their subcellular localization, and these changes are due to complex mechanisms controlling cytoplasmic mRNA transport. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well suited to studying these mechanisms because many of its transcripts are transported from the mother cell to the budding daughter cell. Here, we investigated the translational control of ASH1 mRNA after transport and localization. We show that although ASH1 transcripts were translated after they reached the bud tip, some mRNAs were bound by the RNA-binding protein Puf6 and were non-polysomal. We also found that the DEAD-box helicase Dhh1 complexed with the untranslated ASH1 mRNA and Puf6. Loss of Dhh1 affected local translation of ASH1 mRNA and resulted in delocalization of ASH1 transcript in the bud. Forcibly shifting the non-polysomal ASH1 mRNA into polysomes was associated with Dhh1 dissociation. We further demonstrated that Dhh1 is not recruited to ASH1 mRNA co-transcriptionally, suggesting that it could bind to ASH1 mRNA within the cytoplasm. Of note, Dhh1 bound to the 5'-UTR of ASH1 mRNA and inhibited its translation in vitro These results suggest that after localization to the bud tip, a portion of the localized ASH1 mRNA becomes translationally inactive because of binding of Dhh1 and Puf6 to the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of ASH1 mRNA. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The highly conserved human cytomegalovirus UL136 ORF generates multiple Golgi-localizing protein isoforms through differential translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Huanan; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kondo, Rikita; Katata, Marei; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Miyado, Kenji; Inoue, Naoki; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-22

    The UL133-UL138 locus in the unique long b' (ULb') region of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome is considered to play certain roles in viral replication, dissemination and latency in a host cell type-dependent manner. Here we characterized the proteins encoded by UL136, one of the open reading frames (ORFs) in the locus. Comparative sequence analysis of UL136 among clinical isolates and laboratory strains indicates that its predicted amino-acid sequence is highly conserved. A polyclonal antibody against UL136 proteins (pUL136s) was raised against its carboxy-terminal region and this antibody specifically recognized at least five UL136-encoded protein isoforms of 29-17 kDa both in HCMV-infected cells and in cells transfected with a construct expressing pUL136. Immunofluorescence analysis with this antibody revealed localization of pUL136 in the Golgi apparatus. Analysis of several pUL136 mutants indicated that the putative transmembrane domain of pUL136 is required for its Golgi localization. Mutational analysis of multiple AUG codons in UL136 demonstrated that translation initiation from these AUG codons contributes in the generation of pUL136 isoforms.

  16. The Influence of Crustal Heterogeneity on Translational and Rotational Motions using Data from Local and Teleseismic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Korn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    In this study we use Monte Carlo (MC) solutions to the Radiative Transfer Equations (RTE) to model translational and rotational motion seismogram envelopes in random elastic media with deterministic background structure. The observation and modeling of the three additional components of rotational motions can provide independent information about wave propagation in the Earth's structure. Rotational motions around the vertical axis observed in the P-wave coda are of particular interest as they can only be excited by horizontally polarized shear waves and therefore indicate the conversion from P to SH energy by multiple scattering of the high-frequency seismic wave field at 3D heterogeneities. Radiative Transfer Theory (RTT) is used to model the propagation of seismic energy in a deterministic structure described by macroscopic medium properties with statistically distributed small scale heterogeneities. It describes the spatial and temporal distribution of seismic energy emitted from a seismic source. The central quantity of the RTT, the specific intensity I(n,r,t), is modeled by a number density of particles N(n,r,t) located at position r and moving into direction n at time t. Particles can experience scattering processes at medium heterogeneities that are described by the Born scattering coefficients. This processes include mode conversion and a change of propagation direction. When no scattering events occur particles move through the medium according to ray theory including the interaction with interfaces (reflection, transmission, mode conversions). Using projections of I(n,r,t) onto specific directions we can simulate the three rotational components of the wave-field in a random elastic medium additional to the translational components. The MC-RTT simulation results are verified by comparisons with 3D finite difference simulations. Six-component envelopes from the two approaches are compared and a reasonable agreement for translational and rotational energy

  17. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Andrew; Babikir, Osman Mahdi; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-10-29

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer.

  18. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Andrew; Mahdi Babikir, Osman; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:25355743

  19. Yeast Translation Elongation Factor-1A Binds Vacuole-localized Rho1p to Facilitate Membrane Integrity through F-actin Remodeling*

    PubMed Central

    Bodman, James A. R.; Yang, Yang; Logan, Michael R.; Eitzen, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that modulate a variety of cellular processes, most notably those involving actin dynamics. We have previously shown that yeast vacuolar membrane fusion requires re-organization of actin filaments mediated by two Rho GTPases, Rho1p and Cdc42p. Cdc42p initiates actin polymerization to facilitate membrane tethering; Rho1p has a role in the late stages of vacuolar fusion, but its mode of action is unknown. Here, we identified eEF1A as a vacuolar Rho1p-interacting protein. eEF1A (encoded by the TEF1 and TEF2 genes in yeast) is an aminoacyl-tRNA transferase needed during protein translation. eEF1A also has a second function that is independent of translation; it binds and organizes actin filaments into ordered cable structures. Here, we report that eEF1A interacts with Rho1p via a C-terminal subdomain. This interaction occurs predominantly when both proteins are in the GDP-bound state. Therefore, eEF1A is an atypical downstream effector of Rho1p. eEF1A does not promote vacuolar fusion; however, overexpression of the Rho1p-interacting subdomain affects vacuolar morphology. Vacuoles were destabilized and prone to leakage when treated with the eEF1A inhibitor narciclasine. We propose a model whereby eEF1A binds to Rho1p-GDP on the vacuolar membrane; it is released upon Rho1p activation and then bundles actin filaments to stabilize fused vacuoles. Therefore, the Rho1p-eEF1A complex acts to spatially localize a pool of eEF1A to vacuoles where it can readily organize F-actin. PMID:25561732

  20. Novel mutation involving the translation initiation codon of the growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quinteiro, Celsa; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Loidi, Lourdes; Barreiro, Jesus; de la Fuente, Maria; Dominguez, Fernando; Pombo, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) or growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (GHIS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to molecular defects in the GH receptor gene (GHR). Most of the identified mutations are located on the extracelular domain of the receptor. We studied the GHR gene in a patient with LS and found a homozygous missense mutation in exon 2. The novel mutation is an A-->T transversion (ATG -->TTG) that abolishes the translation initiation codon of the GHR gene. This mutation is expected to prevent the translation of the protein. We present clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence of Laron syndrome as the result of a mutation (ATG-->TTG) in the codon for the initial methionine of the GHR gene.

  1. [Axillary pathologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer with axillary involvement].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ballvé, A; Serrano-Palacio, A; García-Sáenz, J A; Ortega Candil, A; Salsidua-Arroyo, O; Román-Santamaría, J M; Pelayo Alarcón, A; Fuentes Ferrer, M E; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    2015-01-01

    To compare axillary involvement (N+) at initial staging in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) with axillary lymphadenectomy histologic results after neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (NeoChemo). Retrospective study between November 2011 and September 2013 of LABC cases treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on docetaxel (associated with trastuzumab in HER2 positive cases and carboplatin/adriamycin in HER2 negative cases). Those clinically or radiologically suspected cases of axillary involvement were histologically confirmed. When there was no suspicion of axillary involvement, sentinel lymph node radioguided biopsy (SLNRB) was performed using intradermal injection of (99m)Tc-nanocolloid albumin prior to neoadjuvant treatment. Axillary lymphadenectomy after NeoChemo was undertaken in all cases with positive axilla. Final pathologic response was classified as complete (pCR) when there was no evidence of tumoral disease and as non-pathologic complete response (no pCR) in the opposite case. A total of 346 patients treated with docetaxel were reviewed, identifying 105 LABC. Axillary involvement at initial staging was detected in 70 (67%) before starting NeoChemo. From these 70, 73% (n=51) were N+ (fine needle biopsy and/or biopsy) and the remaining 19 (27%) were occult N+ detected by SLNRB. Axillary lymphadenectomy detected pCR in 56% (39/70), increasing up to 84% pCR when initial N+ status was reached using SNLB. On the other hand, when N+ was detected using fine needle biopsy/lymph biopsy, pCR was only 45%. More than 50% of women affected by locally advanced breast cancer with tumoral axillary involvement at initial diagnosis present free metastatic axilla after therapeutic neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. This increases up to almost 90% in case of occult metastatic axilla detected with sentinel node biopsy prior starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. [Probable involvement of 3'-terminal segment of 18S rRNA in translation initiation of uncapped mRNAs in plants].

    PubMed

    Zhigaĭlov, A V; Babaĭlova, E S; Polimbetov, N S; Graĭfer, D M; Karpova, G G; Iskakov, B K

    2011-01-01

    A possibility of involvement of 3'-terminal 18S rRNA segment in the cap-independent initiation of translation on plant ribosomes was studied. It was shown that 3-terminal segment (nucleotides 1777-1811) of 18S rRNA including the last hairpin 45 is accessible for complementary interactions in 40S ribosomal subunits. Oligonucleotides complementary to this segment of rRNA when added to wheat germ cell-free protein synthesizing system were found to specifically inhibit translation of uncapped reporter mRNA coding for beta-glucuronidase, which bears in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) a leader sequence of potato virus Y (PVY) genomic RNA possessing fragments complementary to the region 1777-1811. It was shown that a sequence corresponding to nucleotides 291-316 of PVY, which is complementary to a major portion of the 3-terminal 18S rRNA segment 1777-1808, when placed into 5'-UTR, is able to enhance translational efficiency of the reporter mRNAs. The results obtained suggest that complementary interactions between mRNA 5'-UTR and 18S rRNA 3'-terminal segment can take place in the course of cap-independent translation initiation.

  3. Differential usage of two in-frame translational start codons regulates subcellular localization of Arabidopsis thaliana THI1.

    PubMed

    Chabregas, Sabrina M; Luche, Douglas D; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Menck, Carlos F M; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2003-01-15

    Arabidopsis thaliana THI1 is encoded by a single nuclear gene and directed simultaneously to mitochondria and chloroplasts from a single major transcript. In vitro transcription/translation experiments revealed the presence of two translational products by the differential usage of two in-frame translational start codons. The coupling site-specific mutations on the THI1 encoding sequence with green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fusions showed that translation initiation at the first AUG directs translocation of THI1 to chloroplasts. However, when translation starts from the second AUG, THI1 is addressed to mitochondria. Analysis of the translation efficiency of thi1 mRNA revealed that the best context for translation initiation is to use the first AUG. In addition, a suboptimal context in the vicinity of the second AUG initiation codon, next to a stable stem-and-loop structure that is likely to slow translation, has been noted. The fact that translation preferentially occurs in the first AUG of this protein suggests a high requirement for TH1 in chloroplasts. Although the frequency of upstream AUG translation is higher, according to the first AUG rule, initiation at the second AUG deviates significantly from Kozak's consensus. It suggests leaky ribosomal scanning, reinitiation or the internal entry of ribosomes to assure mitochondrial protein import.

  4. Local Area Disadvantage and Gambling Involvement and Disorder: Evidence for Gene-Environment Correlation and Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Slutske, Wendy S.; Deutsch, Arielle R.; Statham, Dixie B.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that local area characteristics (such as disadvantage and gambling outlet density) and genetic risk factors are associated with gambling involvement and disordered gambling. These two lines of research were brought together in the present study by examining the extent to which genetic contributions to individual differences in gambling involvement and disorder contributed to being exposed to, and were also accentuated by, local area disadvantage. Participants were members of the national community-based Australian Twin Registry who completed a telephone interview in which the past-year frequency of gambling and symptoms of disordered gambling were assessed. Indicators of local area disadvantage were based on census data matched to the participants' postal codes. Univariate biometric model-fitting revealed that exposure to area disadvantage was partially explained by genetic factors. Bivariate biometric model-fitting was conducted to examine the evidence for gene-environment interaction while accounting for gene-environment correlation. These analyses demonstrated that: (a) a small portion of the genetic propensity to gamble was explained by moving to or remaining in a disadvantaged area, and (b) the remaining genetic and unique environmental variation in the frequency of participating in electronic machine gambling (among men and women) and symptoms of disordered gambling (among women) was greater in more disadvantaged localities. As the gambling industry continues to grow, it will be important to take into account the multiple contexts in which problematic gambling behavior can emerge -- from genes to geography -- as well as the ways in which such contexts may interact with each other. PMID:26147321

  5. Localization of genes involved in the metabolic syndrome using multivariate linkage analysis

    PubMed Central

    Olswold, Curtis; Andrade, Mariza de

    2003-01-01

    There are no well accepted criteria for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome. However, the metabolic syndrome is identified clinically by the presence of three or more of these five variables: larger waist circumference, higher triglyceride levels, lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations, hypertension, and impaired fasting glucose. We use sets of two or three variables, which are available in the Framingham Heart Study data set, to localize genes responsible for this syndrome using multivariate quantitative linkage analysis. This analysis demonstrates the applicability of using multivariate linkage analysis and how its use increases the power to detect linkage when genes are involved in the same disease mechanism. PMID:14975125

  6. Agents that Stabilize Mutated von Hippel Lindau Protein Result in Differential Post-Translational Modification and Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhiyong; German, Peter; Bai, Shanshan; Feng, Zhehui; Gao, Meng; Si, Wendy; Sobieski, Mary M.; Stephan, Clifford C.; Mills, Gordon B.; Jonasch, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder that results in multiple organ systems being affected. Treatment is mainly surgical, however, effective systemic therapies are needed. We developed and tested a cell-based screening tool to identify compounds that stabilize or upregulate full-length, point mutated VHL. Methods The 786-0 cell line was infected with full-length W117A mutated VHL linked to a C-terminal Venus fluorescent protein. This VHL-W117A-Venus line was used to screen the Prestwick drug library and was tested against the known proteasome inhibitors MG132 and bortezomib. Western blot validation and evaluation of downstream functional readouts, including HIF and GLUT1 levels, were performed. Results Bortezomib, MG132, and the Prestwick compounds 8-azaguanine, thiostrepton and thioguanosine were found to reliably upregulate VHL-W117A-Venus in 786-0 cells. 8-azaguanine was found to downregulate HIF2α levels, and was augmented by the presence of VHL W117A. VHL p30 band intensities varied as a function of compound used, suggesting alternate post-translational processing. In addition, nuclear-cytoplasmic localization of pVHL varied amongst the different compounds. Conclusion 786-0 cells containing VHL-W117A-Venus can be successfully used to identify compounds that upregulate VHL levels, and that have a differential effect on pVHL intracellular localization and posttranslational processing. Further screening efforts will broaden the number of pharmacophores available to develop therapeutic agents that will upregulate and refunctionalize mutated VHL. PMID:22357874

  7. How Localized are Language Brain Areas? A Review of Brodmann Areas Involvement in Oral Language.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2016-02-01

    The interest in understanding how language is "localized" in the brain has existed for centuries. Departing from seven meta-analytic studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging activity during the performance of different language activities, it is proposed here that there are two different language networks in the brain: first, a language reception/understanding system, including a "core Wernicke's area" involved in word recognition (BA21, BA22, BA41, and BA42), and a fringe or peripheral area ("extended Wernicke's area:" BA20, BA37, BA38, BA39, and BA40) involved in language associations (associating words with other information); second, a language production system ("Broca's complex:" BA44, BA45, and also BA46, BA47, partially BA6-mainly its mesial supplementary motor area-and extending toward the basal ganglia and the thalamus). This paper additionally proposes that the insula (BA13) plays a certain coordinating role in interconnecting these two brain language systems.

  8. Lost in Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lass, Wiebke; Reusswig, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Lost in Translation? Introducing Planetary Boundaries into Social Systems. Fritz Reusswig, Wiebke Lass Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany Identifying and quantifying planetary boundaries by interdisciplinary science efforts is a challenging task—and a risky one, as the 1972 Limits to Growth publication has shown. Even if we may be assured that scientific understanding of underlying processes of the Earth system has significantly improved since then, the challenge of translating these findings into the social systems of the planet remains crucial for any kind of action, and in many respects far more challenging. We would like to conceptualize what could also be termed a problem of coupling social and natural systems as a nested set of social translation processes, well aware of the limited applicability of the language-related translation metaphor. Societies must, first, perceive these boundaries, and they have to understand their relevance. This includes, among many other things, the organization of transdisciplinary scientific cooperation. They will then have to translate this understood perception into possible actions, i.e. strategies for different local bodies, actors, and institutional settings. This implies a lot of 'internal' translation processes, e.g. from the scientific subsystem to the mass media, the political and the economic subsystem. And it implies to develop subsystem-specific schemes of evaluation for these alternatives, e.g. convincing narratives, cost-benefit analyses, or ethical legitimacy considerations. And, finally, societies do have to translate chosen action alternatives into monitoring and evaluation schemes, e.g. for agricultural production or renewable energies. This process includes the continuation of observing and re-analyzing the planetary boundary concept itself, as a re-adjustment of these boundaries in the light of new scientific insights cannot be excluded. Taken all together, societies may well

  9. Induction of Apoptosis by Double-Stranded-RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKR) Involves the α Subunit of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 2 and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Jesús; Alcamí, José; Esteban, Mariano

    1999-01-01

    The double-stranded (ds) RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is a key mediator of antiviral effects of interferon (IFN) and an active player in apoptosis induced by different stimuli. The translation initiation factor eIF-2α (α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2) and IκBα, the inhibitor of the transcription factor NF-κB, have been proposed as downstream mediators of PKR effects. To evaluate the involvement of NF-κB and eIF-2α in the induction of apoptosis by PKR, we have used vaccinia virus (VV) recombinants that inducibly express PKR concomitantly with a dominant negative mutant of eIF-2α or a repressor form of IκBα. We found that while expression of PKR by a VV vector resulted in extensive inhibition of protein synthesis and induction of apoptosis, coexpression of PKR with a dominant negative mutant of eIF-2α (Ser-51→Ala) reversed both the PKR-mediated translational block and PKR-induced apoptosis. Coexpression of PKR with a repressor form of IκBα (Ser-32,36-Ala) also leads to the inhibition of apoptosis by abolishing NF-κB induction, while translation remains blocked. Treating cells with two different proteasome inhibitors which block IκBα degradation, prevented PKR-induced apoptosis, supporting results from coexpression studies. Biochemical analysis and transient assays revealed that PKR expression by a VV vector induced NF-κB binding and transactivation. In addition, upregulation of Fas mRNA transcription occurred during PKR activation. Our findings provide direct evidence for the involvement of eIF-2α and NF-κB in the induction of apoptosis by PKR. PMID:10373514

  10. Translation during cold adaptation does not involve mRNA-rRNA base pairing through the downstream box.

    PubMed Central

    La Teana, A; Brandi, A; O'Connor, M; Freddi, S; Pon, C L

    2000-01-01

    The downstream box (DB) has been proposed to enhance translation of several mRNAs and to be a key element controlling the expression of cold-shocked mRNAs. However, the proposal that the DB exerts its effects through a base pairing interaction with the complementary anti-downstream box (antiDB) sequence (nt 1469-1483) located in the penultimate stem (helix 44) of 16S rRNA remains controversial. The existence of this interaction during initiation of protein synthesis under cold-shock conditions has been investigated in the present work using an Escherichia coli strain whose ribosomes lack the potential to base pair with mRNA because of a 12 bp inversion of the antiDB sequence in helix 44. Our results show that this strain is capable of cold acclimation, withstands cold shock, and its ribosomes translate mRNAs that contain or lack DB sequences with similar efficiency, comparable to that of the wild type. The structure of helix 44 in 30S ribosomal subunits from cells grown at 37 degrees C and from cells subjected to cold shock was also analyzed by binding a 32P-labeled oligonucleotide complementary to the antiDB region and by chemical probing with DMS and kethoxal. Both approaches clearly indicate that this region is in a double-stranded conformation and therefore not available for base pairing with mRNA. PMID:11073215

  11. Response to chemoradiotherapy and lymph node involvement in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    García-Flórez, Luis J; Gómez-Álvarez, Guillermo; Frunza, Ana M; Barneo-Serra, Luis; Fresno-Forcelledo, Manuel F

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To establish the association between lymph node involvement and the response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Data of 130 patients with mid and low locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical surgery over a 5-year period were reviewed. Tumor staging was done by endorectal ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy was determined by T-downstaging and tumor regression grading (TRG). Pathologic complete response (pCR) is defined as the absence of tumor cells in the surgical specimen (ypT0N0). The varying degrees TRG were classified according to Mandard’s scoring system. The evaluation of the response is based on the comparison between previous clinico-radiological staging and the results of pathological evaluation. χ2 and Spearman’s correlation tests were used for the comparison of variables. RESULTS: Pathologic complete response (pCR, ypT0N0, TRG1) was observed in 19 cases (14.6%), and other 18 (13.8%) had only very few residual malignant cells in the rectal wall (TRG2). T-downstaging was found in 63 (48.5%). Mean lymph node retrieval was 9.4 (range 0-38). In 37 cases (28.5%) more than 12 nodes were identified in the surgical specimen. Preoperative lymph node involvement was seen in 77 patients (59.2%), 71 N1 and 6 N2. Postoperative lymph node involvement was observed in 41 patients (31.5%), 29 N1 and 12 N2, while the remaining 89 were N0 (68.5%). In relation to ypT stage, we found nodal involvement of 9.4% in ypT0-1, 22.2% in ypT2 and 43.7% in ypT3-4. Of the 37 patients considered “responders” to neoadjuvant therapy (TRG1 and 2), there were only 4 N+ (10.8%) and the remainder N0 (89.2%). In the “non responders” group (TRG 3, 4 and 5), 37 cases were N+ (39.8%) and 56 (60.2%) were N0 (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer is associated with lymph node involvement. PMID:26425268

  12. User and stakeholder involvement for relevant, reliable and robust local-scale climate projections in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neby, Simon; Sobolowski, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    How can users and stakeholders be actively involved with providing input to and using output from local-scale climate projections? How can the scientific community better understand the needs of local actors? And how should communication and cooperation efforts be organized? These are critical questions we aim to answer in a climate services project funded by the Norwegian Research Council (R3: Relevant, Reliable and Robust local-scale climate projections for Norway). The project takes into consideration not only the scientific issues in establishing useful local-scale climate projections, but also addresses the "usability gap" between climate information and decision-making. The lack of effective communication between scientists and user communities often result in outputs and products that are not matched with decision-relevant climate information. In the R3 project, the scientific participants actively engage with a range of users that have quite different information needs: municipalities, infrastructure developers, agriculture, energy producers, insurance companies, and more. In this particular presentation, we present our experiences concerning three specific issues that relate to the stakeholder-science interface: 1) Preferences are not clear-cut and pre-defined. In practice, this means that stakeholders often do not have precise information about their needs, nor precise information about how, where and whether their needs can be voiced. Similarly, science communities tend to presuppose that stakeholders are interested and have well-articulated needs, which is hardly the case. Collectively, that means that there is a need for an approach that guides the articulation and prioritization of preferences in a manner that integrates both scientific and stakeholder perspectives and takes the integrity of both perspectives seriously. 2) Technologies are unclear. Although information may be produced and used, past experiences, trial and error processes and pragmatic

  13. Translations and Translators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nida, Eugene A.

    1979-01-01

    The necessity for stylistic appropriateness in translation as well as correct content is discussed. To acquire this skill, translators must be trained in stylistics through close examination of their own language and must have practice in translating for different audiences at different levels. (PMJ)

  14. Yeast 18 S rRNA Is Directly Involved in the Ribosomal Response to Stringent AUG Selection during Translation Initiation*

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Naoki; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Wang, Suzhi; Thorson, Elizabeth; Winter, Zachery; Ohira, Takahiro; Ii, Miki; Valášek, Leoš; Brown, Susan J.; Asano, Katsura

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the 40 S ribosomal subunit serves as the platform of initiation factor assembly, to place itself precisely on the AUG start codon. Structural arrangement of the 18 S rRNA determines the overall shape of the 40 S subunit. Here, we present genetic evaluation of yeast 18 S rRNA function using 10 point mutations altering the polysome profile. All the mutants reduce the abundance of the mutant 40 S, making it limiting for translation initiation. Two of the isolated mutations, G875A, altering the core of the platform domain that binds eIF1 and eIF2, and A1193U, changing the h31 loop located below the P-site tRNAiMet, show phenotypes indicating defective regulation of AUG selection. Evidence is provided that these mutations reduce the interaction with the components of the preinitiation complex, thereby inhibiting its function at different steps. These results indicate that the 18 S rRNA mutations impair the integrity of scanning-competent preinitiation complex, thereby altering the 40 S subunit response to stringent AUG selection. Interestingly, nine of the mutations alter the body/platform domains of 18 S rRNA, potentially affecting the bridges to the 60 S subunit, but they do not change the level of 18 S rRNA intermediates. Based on these results, we also discuss the mechanism of the selective degradation of the mutant 40 S subunits. PMID:20699223

  15. Re-localization of cellular protein SRp20 during poliovirus infection: bridging a viral IRES to the host cell translation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D; Semler, Bert L

    2011-07-01

    Poliovirus IRES-mediated translation requires the functions of certain canonical as well as non-canonical factors for the recruitment of ribosomes to the viral RNA. The interaction of cellular proteins PCBP2 and SRp20 in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells has been previously described, and these two proteins were shown to function synergistically in viral translation. To further define the mechanism of ribosome recruitment for the initiation of poliovirus IRES-dependent translation, we focused on the role of the interaction between cellular proteins PCBP2 and SRp20. Work described here demonstrates that SRp20 dramatically re-localizes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected neuroblastoma cells during the course of infection. Importantly, SRp20 partially co-localizes with PCBP2 in the cytoplasm of infected cells, corroborating our previous in vitro interaction data. In addition, the data presented implicate the presence of these two proteins in viral translation initiation complexes. We show that in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells, SRp20 is associated with PCBP2 bound to poliovirus RNA, indicating that this interaction occurs on the viral RNA. Finally, we generated a mutated version of SRp20 lacking the RNA recognition motif (SRp20ΔRRM) and found that this protein is localized similar to the full length SRp20, and also partially co-localizes with PCBP2 during poliovirus infection. Expression of this mutated version of SRp20 results in a ∼100 fold decrease in virus yield for poliovirus when compared to expression of wild type SRp20, possibly via a dominant negative effect. Taken together, these results are consistent with a model in which SRp20 interacts with PCBP2 bound to the viral RNA, and this interaction functions to recruit ribosomes to the viral RNA in a direct or indirect manner, with the participation of additional protein-protein or protein-RNA interactions.

  16. Translation: An Integration of Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohanty, Niranjan

    1994-01-01

    Discusses translation in the Indian context. Posits that translation involves cultural transfer in addition to linguistic meaning. Shows that several established models of translation can accommodate the inclusion of cultural features. Illustrates this with two translations of Orissan poetry. Concludes that the translator is a creative agent in…

  17. Knowledge translation strategies to improve the use of evidence in public health decision making in local government: intervention design and implementation plan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation strategies are an approach to increase the use of evidence within policy and practice decision-making contexts. In clinical and health service contexts, knowledge translation strategies have focused on individual behavior change, however the multi-system context of public health requires a multi-level, multi-strategy approach. This paper describes the design of and implementation plan for a knowledge translation intervention for public health decision making in local government. Methods Four preliminary research studies contributed findings to the design of the intervention: a systematic review of knowledge translation intervention effectiveness research, a scoping study of knowledge translation perspectives and relevant theory literature, a survey of the local government public health workforce, and a study of the use of evidence-informed decision-making for public health in local government. A logic model was then developed to represent the putative pathways between intervention inputs, processes, and outcomes operating between individual-, organizational-, and system-level strategies. This formed the basis of the intervention plan. Results The systematic and scoping reviews identified that effective and promising strategies to increase access to research evidence require an integrated intervention of skill development, access to a knowledge broker, resources and tools for evidence-informed decision making, and networking for information sharing. Interviews and survey analysis suggested that the intervention needs to operate at individual and organizational levels, comprising workforce development, access to evidence, and regular contact with a knowledge broker to increase access to intervention evidence; develop skills in appraisal and integration of evidence; strengthen networks; and explore organizational factors to build organizational cultures receptive to embedding evidence in practice. The logic model incorporated these

  18. Subcellular localization of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases involved in the processing of N-linked oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, A.; Johnson, K.D.; Szumilo, T.; Elbein, A.D.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    Using isopycnic sucrose gradients, we have ascertained the subcellular location of several enzymes involved in the processing of the N-linked oligosaccharides of glycoproteins in developing cotyledons of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. All are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi complex as determined by co-sedimentation with the ER marker, NADH-cytochrome c reductase, or the Golgi marker, glucan synthase I. Glucosidase activity, which removes glucose residues from Glc/sub 3/Man/sub 9/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/, was found exclusively in the ER. All other processing enzymes, which act subsequent to the glucose trimming steps, are associates with Golgi. These include mannosidase I (removes 1-2 mannose residues from Man/sub 6-9/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/), mannosidase II (removes mannose residues from GlcNAcMan/sub 5/(GlcNAc)/sub 2/), and fucosyltransferase (transfers a fucose residue to the Asn-linked GlcNAc of appropriate glycans). The authors have previously reported the localization of two other glycan modifying enzymes (GlcNAc-transferase and xylosyltranferase activities) in the Golgi complex. Attempts at subfractionation of the Golgi fraction on shallow sucrose gradients yielded similar patterns of distribution for all the Golgi processing enzymes. Subfractionation on Percoll gradients resulted in two peaks of the Golgi marker enzyme inosine diphosphatase, whereas the glycan processing enzymes were all enriched in the peak of lower density. These results do not lend support to the hypothesis that N-linked oligosaccharide processing enzymes are associated with Golgi cisternae of different densities.

  19. Involvement of pre- and postsynaptic NMDA receptors at local circuit interneuron connections in rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    De-May, C L; Ali, A B

    2013-01-03

    To investigate the involvement of N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in local neocortical synaptic transmission, dual whole-cell recordings - combined with biocytin labelling - were obtained from bitufted adapting, multipolar adapting or multipolar non-adapting interneurons and pyramidal cells in layers II-V of rat (postnatal days 17-22) sensorimotor cortex. The voltage dependency of the amplitude of Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) received by the three types of interneuron appeared to coincide with the interneuron subclass; upon depolarisation, EPSPs received by multipolar non-adapting interneurons either decreased in amplitude or appeared insensitive, multipolar adapting interneuron EPSP amplitudes increased or appeared insensitive, whereas bitufted interneuron EPSP amplitudes increased or decreased. Connections were challenged with the NMDA receptor antagonist d-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5) (50μM) revealing NMDA receptors to contribute to EPSPs received by all cell types, this also abolished the non-conventional voltage dependency. Reciprocal connections were frequent between pyramidal cells and multipolar interneurons, and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) elicited in pyramidal cells by both multipolar adapting and multipolar non-adapting interneurons were sensitive to a significant reduction in amplitude by d-AP5. The involvement of presynaptic NMDA receptors was indicated by coefficient of variation analysis and an increase in the failures of transmission. Furthermore, by loading MK-801 into the pre- or postsynaptic neurons, we observed that a reduction in inhibition requires presynaptic and not postsynaptic NMDA receptors. These results suggest that NMDA receptors possess pre- and postsynaptic roles at selective neocortical synapses that are probably important in governing spike-timing and information flow.

  20. Involvement in Decision Making and Satisfaction With Treatment Among Partners of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Symes, Yael; Song, Lixin; Heineman, Rachael G; Barbosa, Brittney D; Tatum, Kimberly; Greene, Giselle; Weaver, Mark; Chen, Ronald C

    2015-11-01

    To examine partner involvement in treatment decision making for localized prostate cancer, congruence between partner involvement and patient preference, reasons for partner noninvolvement, and partner satisfaction with patient treatment
. Cross-sectional exploratory study.
 100 counties in North Carolina. 281 partners of men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. Participants completed a phone survey. Logistic regression analyses were used. Partners' involvement in treatment decision making, partner satisfaction with treatment, activities of partner involvement, and reasons for noninvolvement. Of the 228 partners (81%) related to decision making, 205 (73%) were very satisfied with the treatment the patients received, and partner involvement was congruent with patient preference in 242 partners (86%). Partners reported several reasons for noninvolvement. Most partners engaged in multiple activities during treatment decision making for localized prostate cancer and were satisfied with the patient's treatment. Partner involvement was mostly congruent with patient preference. Partners' active involvement in treatment decision making for localized prostate cancer (e.g., being involved in patients' conversations with doctors) should be encouraged and facilitated for those who prefer this type of decision making. 
.

  1. Genetic Control of Chromatin States in Humans Involves Local and Distal Chromosomal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grubert, Fabian; Zaugg, Judith B.; Kasowski, Maya; Ursu, Oana; Spacek, Damek V.; Martin, Alicia R.; Greenside, Peyton; Srivas, Rohith; Phanstiel, Doug H.; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Heidari, Nastaran; Euskirchen, Ghia; Huber, Wolfgang; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Kundaje, Anshul; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Deciphering the impact of genetic variants on gene regulation is fundamental to understanding human disease. Although gene regulation often involves long-range interactions, it is unknown to what extent non-coding genetic variants influence distal molecular phenotypes. Here, we integrate chromatin profiling for three histone marks in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 75 sequenced individuals with LCL-specific Hi-C and ChIA-PET-based chromatin contact maps to uncover one of the largest collections of local and distal histone quantitative trait loci (hQTLs). Distal QTLs are enriched within topologically associated domains and exhibit largely concordant variation of chromatin state coordinated by proximal and distal non-coding genetic variants. Histone QTLs are enriched for common variants associated with autoimmune diseases and enable identification of putative target genes of disease-associated variants from genome-wide association studies. These analyses provide insights into how genetic variation can affect human disease phenotypes by coordinated changes in chromatin at interacting regulatory elements. PMID:26300125

  2. A novel protein involved in heart development in Ambystoma mexicanum is localized in endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jia, P; Zhang, C; Huang, X P; Poda, M; Akbas, F; Lemanski, S L; Erginel-Unaltuna, N; Lemanski, L F

    2008-11-01

    The discovery of the naturally occurring cardiac non-function (c) animal strain in Ambystoma mexicanum (axolotl) provides a valuable animal model to study cardiomyocyte differentiation. In homozygous mutant animals (c/c), rhythmic contractions of the embryonic heart are absent due to a lack of organized myofibrils. We have previously cloned a partial sequence of a peptide cDNA (N1) from an anterior-endoderm-conditioned-medium RNA library that had been shown to be able to rescue the mutant phenotype. In the current studies we have fully cloned the N1 full length cDNA sequence from the library. N1 protein has been detected in both adult heart and skeletal muscle but not in any other adult tissues. GFP-tagged expression of the N1 protein has revealed localization of the N1 protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Results from in situ hybridization experiments have confirmed the dramatic decrease of expression of N1 mRNA in mutant (c/c) embryos indicating that the N1 gene is involved in heart development.

  3. Local circuitry involving parvalbumin-positive basket cells in the CA2 region of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Audrey; Eastlake, Karen; Trigg, Hayley L; Thomson, Alex M

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing recognition that the CA2 region of the hippocampus has its own distinctive properties, inputs, and pathologies. The dendritic and axonal patterns of some interneurons in this region are also strikingly different from those described previously in CA1 and CA3. The local circuitry in this region, however, had yet to be studied in detail. Accordingly, using dual intracellular recordings and biocytin-filling, excitatory and inhibitory connections involving CA2 parvalbumin-positive basket cells were characterized for the first time. CA2 basket cells targeted neighboring pyramidal cells and received excitatory inputs from them. CA2 basket cells that resembled those in CA1 with a fast spiking behavior and dendritic tree confined to the region of origin received depressing excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In contrast, unlike CA1 basket cells but like CA1 Oriens-Lacunosum Moleculare (OLM) cells, the majority of CA2 basket cells had horizontally oriented dendrites in Stratum Oriens (SO), which extended into all three CA subfields, had an adapting firing pattern, presented a "sag" in their voltage responses to hyperpolarizing current injection, and received facilitating EPSPs. The expression of I(h) did not influence the EPSP time courses and paired pulse ratios (PPR). Estimates of the probability of release (p) for the depressing and facilitating EPSPs were correlated with the PPR. Connections with low probabilities of release had higher PPR. Quantal amplitude (q) for the facilitating connections was larger than q at depressing inputs onto fast spiking basket cells.

  4. Accumulation of cynaropicrin in globe artichoke and localization of enzymes involved in its biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Eljounaidi, K; Comino, C; Moglia, A; Cankar, K; Genre, A; Hehn, A; Bourgaud, F; Beekwilder, J; Lanteri, S

    2015-10-01

    Globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) belongs to the Asteraceae family, in which one of the most biologically significant class of secondary metabolites are sesquiterpene lactones (STLs). In globe artichoke the principal STL is the cynaropicrin, which contributes to approximately 80% of its characteristic bitter taste. Cynaropicrin content was assessed in globe artichoke tissues and was observed to accumulate in leaves of different developmental stages. In the receptacle, a progressive decrease was observed during inflorescence development, while the STL could not be detected in the inflorescence bracts. Almost undetectable amounts were found in the roots and inflorescence stems at the commercial stage. Cynaropicrin content was found to correlate with expression of genes encoding CcGAS, CcGAO and CcCOS, which are involved in the STL biosynthesis. A more detailed study of leaf material revealed that cynaropicrin predominantly accumulates in the trichomes, and not in the apoplastic cavity fluids. Analysis of the promoter regions of CcGAO and CcCOS revealed the presence of L1-box motifs, which confers trichome-specific expression in Arabidopsis, suggesting that cynaropicrin is not only stored but also synthesized in trichomes. A transient expression of GFP fusion proteins was performed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants: the CcGAS fluorescence signal was located in the cytoplasm while the CcGAO and CcCOS localized to the endoplasmatic reticulum.

  5. The predicted RNA binding proteins Pes4 and Mip6 regulate mRNA levels, translation, and localization during sporulation in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Zhang, Kai; Sternglanz, Rolf; Neiman, Aaron M

    2017-02-13

    In response to starvation, diploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and form haploid spores, a process collectively referred to as sporulation. The differentiation into spores requires extensive changes in gene expression. The transcriptional activator Ndt80 is a central regulator of this process, which controls many genes essential for sporulation. Ndt80 induces ∼300 genes coordinately during meiotic prophase, but different mRNAs within the NDT80-regulon are translated at different times during sporulation. The protein kinase Ime2 and RNA binding protein Rim4 are general regulators of meiotic translational delay, but how differential timing of individual transcripts is achieved was not known. This report describes the characterization of two related NDT80-induced genes, PES4 and MIP6, encoding predicted RNA binding proteins. These genes are necessary to regulate the steady state expression, translational timing, and localization of a set of mRNAs that are transcribed by NDT80 but not translated until the end of meiosis II. Mutations in the predicted RNA binding domains within PES4 alter the stability of target mRNAs. PES4 and MIP6 affect only a small portion of the NDT80-regulon indicating that they act as modulators of the general Ime2/Rim4 pathway for specific transcripts.

  6. For "Translation and Theories"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Lili

    2009-01-01

    Translation studies stem from comparative literature and contrastive analysis. It involves the transfer of messages between two different language systems and cultures, and Munday (2001, p.1) notes that translation "by its nature" "is multilingual and also interdisciplinary". Translation subjects are the texts in various…

  7. Post-translational modifications of myofilament proteins involved in length-dependent prolongation of relaxation in rabbit right ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Monasky, Michelle M; Taglieri, Domenico M; Jacobson, Alice K; Haizlip, Kaylan M; Solaro, R John; Janssen, Paul M L

    2013-07-01

    The phosphorylation state of several cardiac myofilament proteins changes with the level of stretch in intact, twitch-contracting cardiac muscles. It remains unclear which kinases are involved in the length-dependent phosphorylation of these proteins. We set out to investigate which kinases are involved after a step-wise change in cardiac muscle length. We hypothesize that myofilament protein phosphorylation by PKCβII and PKA alters contractile kinetics during length-dependent activation. Right ventricular intact trabeculae were isolated from New Zealand White rabbit hearts and stimulated to contract at 1Hz. Twitch force recordings where taken at taut and optimal muscle lengths before and after administration of kinase inhibitors at 37°C. PKCβII inhibition significantly decreased time from stimulation to peak force (TTP), time from peak force to 50% relaxation (RT50), and 90% relaxation (RT90) at optimal muscle length. This led to a loss in the length-dependent increase of RT50 and RT90 in the presence of the PKCβII inhibitor, whereas the length-dependent increase in RT50 and RT90 was seen in the controls. PKA inhibition using H-89 significantly decreased TTP at both taut and optimal muscle lengths. Detection of Ser/Thr phosphorylation with ProQ-diamond staining indicates a role for PKCβII in the phosphorylation of tropomyosin and myosin light chain-2 (MLC2) and PKA for tropomyosin, troponin-I, MLC2, myosin binding protein-C, troponin-T (TnT) 3 and TnT4. Our data provide evidence for two signaling kinases acting upon myofilament proteins during length-dependent activation, and provide further insight for length-dependent myofilament function.

  8. Longitudinal epigenetic and gene expression profiles analyzed by three-component analysis reveal down-regulation of genes involved in protein translation in human aging

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Marc; Jin, Seung-Gi; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xiong, Wenying; Gogoshin, Grigoriy; Rodin, Andrei S.; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2015-01-01

    Data on biological mechanisms of aging are mostly obtained from cross-sectional study designs. An inherent disadvantage of this design is that inter-individual differences can mask small but biologically significant age-dependent changes. A serially sampled design (same individual at different time points) would overcome this problem but is often limited by the relatively small numbers of available paired samples and the statistics being used. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new vector-based approach, termed three-component analysis, which incorporates temporal distance, signal intensity and variance into one single score for gene ranking and is combined with gene set enrichment analysis. We tested our method on a unique age-based sample set of human skin fibroblasts and combined genome-wide transcription, DNA methylation and histone methylation (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) data. Importantly, our method can now for the first time demonstrate a clear age-dependent decrease in expression of genes coding for proteins involved in translation and ribosome function. Using analogies with data from lower organisms, we propose a model where age-dependent down-regulation of protein translation-related components contributes to extend human lifespan. PMID:25977295

  9. Efficient Incorporation of Multiple Selenocysteines Involves an Inefficient Decoding Step Serving as a Potential Translational Checkpoint and Ribosome Bottleneck▿

    PubMed Central

    Stoytcheva, Zoia; Tujebajeva, Rosa M.; Harney, John W.; Berry, Marla J.

    2006-01-01

    Selenocysteine is incorporated into proteins via “recoding” of UGA from a stop codon to a sense codon, a process that requires specific secondary structures in the 3′ untranslated region, termed selenocysteine incorporation sequence (SECIS) elements, and the protein factors that they recruit. Whereas most selenoprotein mRNAs contain a single UGA codon and a single SECIS element, selenoprotein P genes encode multiple UGAs and two SECIS elements. We have identified evolutionary adaptations in selenoprotein P genes that contribute to the efficiency of incorporating multiple selenocysteine residues in this protein. The first is a conserved, inefficiently decoded UGA codon in the N-terminal region, which appears to serve both as a checkpoint for the presence of factors required for selenocysteine incorporation and as a “bottleneck,” slowing down the progress of elongating ribosomes. The second adaptation involves the presence of introns downstream of this inefficiently decoded UGA which confer the potential for nonsense-mediated decay when factors required for selenocysteine incorporation are limiting. Third, the two SECIS elements in selenoprotein P mRNA function with differing efficiencies, affecting both the rate and the efficiency of decoding different UGAs. The implications for how these factors contribute to the decoding of multiple selenocysteine residues are discussed. PMID:17000762

  10. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  11. Structural modeling and mutational analysis of yeast eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A reveal new critical residues and reinforce its involvement in protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Camila A. O.; Cano, Veridiana S. P.; Rangel, Suzana M.; Apponi, Luciano H.; Frigieri, Mariana C.; Muniz, João R. C.; Garcia, Wanius; Park, Myung H.; Garratt, Richard C.; Zanelli, Cleslei F.; Valentini, Sandro R.

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a protein that is highly conserved and essential for cell viability. This factor is the only protein known to contain the unique and essential amino acid residue hypusine. This work focused on the structural and functional characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF5A. The tertiary structure of yeast eIF5A was modeled based on the structure of its Leishmania mexicana homologue and this model was used to predict the structural localization of new site-directed and randomly generated mutations. Most of the 40 new mutants exhibited phenotypes that resulted from eIF-5A protein-folding defects. Our data provided evidence that the C-terminal α-helix present in yeast eIF5A is an essential structural element, whereas the eIF5A N-terminal 10 amino acid extension not present in archaeal eIF5A homologs, is not. Moreover, the mutants containing substitutions at or in the vicinity of the hypusine modification site displayed nonviable or temperature-sensitive phenotypes and were defective in hypusine modification. Interestingly, two of the temperature-sensitive strains produced stable mutant eIF5A proteins – eIF5AK56A and eIF5AQ22H,L93F – and showed defects in protein synthesis at the restrictive temperature. Our data revealed important structural features of eIF5A that are required for its vital role in cell viability and underscored an essential function of eIF5A in the translation step of gene expression. PMID:18341589

  12. Translational readthrough generates new astrocyte AQP4 isoforms that modulate supramolecular clustering, glial endfeet localization, and water transport.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Manuela; Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Rosito, Stefania; Simone, Laura; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Trojano, Maria; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Regulation of water homeostasis is a central feature of central nervous system pathophysiology. In this context, several lines of evidence suggest a crucial role for the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and its plasma membrane supramolecular organization as the key element. Here, we demonstrate the expression in tissues of additional isoforms of AQP4 characterized by a C-terminal extension generated by programmed translational readthrough. These extended isoforms (AQP4ex) display a perivascular polarization and expression in dystrophin-dependent pools. AQP4ex reduces supramolecular clustering tendency and allows AQP4 interactions with syntrophin. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of two serines in the extended C-terminus of AQP4ex showed potential regulation of water permeability by phosphorylation. Finally, AQP4ex expression can be positively modulated by gentamicin treatment, demonstrating the possibility of regulating the AQP4 translational readthrough frequency. This novel regulatory mechanism could have important pathophysiological implications for conditions in which alternations have been reported in AQP4 structure.

  13. Translation of a behavioral weight loss intervention for mid-life, low-income women in local health departments.

    PubMed

    Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D; Garcia, Beverly A; Johnston, Larry F; Gizlice, Ziya; Ni, Andy; Cai, Jianwen; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Gustafson, Alison A; Norwood, Arnita F; Glasgow, Russell E; Gold, Alison D; Graham, John W; Evenson, Kelly R; Trost, Stewart; Keyserling, Thomas C

    2013-09-01

    To translate a behavioral weight loss intervention for mid-life, low-income women in real world settings. In this pragmatic clinical trial, we randomly selected six North Carolina county health departments and trained their current staff to deliver a 16-session evidence-based behavioral weight loss intervention (special intervention, SI). SI weight loss outcomes were compared to a delayed intervention (DI) control group. Of 432 women expressing interest, 189 completed baseline measures and were randomized within health departments to SI (N = 126) or DI (N = 63). At baseline, average age was 51 years, 53% were African American, mean weight was 100 kg, and BMI averaged 37 kg/m2 . A total of 96 (76%) SI and 55 (87%) DI participants returned for 5-month follow-up measures. The crude weight change was -3.1 kg in the SI and -0.4 kg in the DI group, for a difference of 2.8 kg (95% CI 1.4 to 4.1, p = 0.0001). Diet quality and physical activity improved significantly more in the SI group, and estimated intervention costs were $327 per participant. This pragmatic short-term weight loss intervention targeted to low-income mid-life women yielded meaningful weight loss when translated to the county health department setting. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  14. Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

  15. Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

  16. 20 CFR 670.800 - How do Job Corps centers and service providers become involved in their local communities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How do Job Corps centers and service providers become involved in their local communities? 670.800 Section 670.800 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Community Connections...

  17. 20 CFR 670.800 - How do Job Corps centers and service providers become involved in their local communities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How do Job Corps centers and service providers become involved in their local communities? 670.800 Section 670.800 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Community Connections...

  18. Pancreatic β-cell prosurvival effects of the incretin hormones involve post-translational modification of Kv2.1 delayed rectifier channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S-J; Widenmaier, S B; Choi, W S; Nian, C; Ao, Z; Warnock, G; McIntosh, C H S

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are the major incretin hormones that exert insulinotropic and anti-apoptotic actions on pancreatic β-cells. Insulinotropic actions of the incretins involve modulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. In multiple cell types, Kv channel activity has been implicated in cell volume changes accompanying initiation of the apoptotic program. Focusing on Kv2.1, we examined whether regulation of Kv channels in β-cells contributes to the prosurvival effects of incretins. Overexpression of Kv2.1 in INS-1 β-cells potentiated apoptosis in response to mitochondrial and ER stress and, conversely, co-stimulation with GIP/GLP-1 uncoupled this potentiation, suppressing apoptosis. In parallel, incretins promoted phosphorylation and acetylation of Kv2.1 via pathways involving protein kinase A (PKA)/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase-1 (MSK-1) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT)/histone deacetylase (HDAC). Further studies demonstrated that acetylation of Kv2.1 was mediated by incretin actions on nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of CREB binding protein (CBP) and its interaction with Kv2.1. Regulation of β-cell survival by GIP and GLP-1 therefore involves post-translational modifications (PTMs) of Kv channels by PKA/MSK-1 and HAT/HDAC. This appears to be the first demonstration of modulation of delayed rectifier Kv channels contributing to the β-cell prosurvival effects of incretins and of 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-stimulated export of a nuclear lysine acetyltransferase that regulates cell surface ion channel function. PMID:21818121

  19. A bacterial homolog YciH of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF1 regulates stress-related gene expression and is unlikely to be involved in translation initiation fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Ilya A; Evfratov, Sergey A; Dzama, Margarita M; Pletnev, Philipp I; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Butenko, Ivan O; Pobeguts, Olga V; Golovina, Anna Ya; Govorun, Vadim M; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Sergiev, Petr V; Dontsova, Olga A

    2015-01-01

    YciH is a bacterial protein, homologous to eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF1. Preceding evidence obtained with the aid of in vitro translation initiation system suggested that it may play a role of a translation initiation factor, ensuring selection against suboptimal initiation complexes. Here we studied the effect of Escherichia coli yciH gene inactivation on translation of model mRNAs. Neither the translation efficiency of leaderless mRNAs, nor mRNAs with non AUG start codons, was found to be affected by YciH in vivo. Comparative proteome analysis revealed that yciH gene knockout leads to a more than fold2- increase in expression of 66 genes and a more than fold2- decrease in the expression of 20 genes. Analysis of these gene sets allowed us to suggest a role of YciH as an inhibitor of translation in a stress response rather than the role of a translation initiation factor. PMID:26177339

  20. Fiducial-based translational localization accuracy of electromagnetic tracking system and on-board kilovoltage imaging system.

    PubMed

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Malinowski, Kathleen; Hubenshmidt, James; Dimmer, Steve; Mayse, Martin L; Bradley, Jeffrey; Chaudhari, Amir; Lechleiter, Kirsten; Goddu, Sree Krishna Murty; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel A; Parikh, Parag

    2008-03-01

    The Calypso medical four-dimensional localization system uses AC electromagnetics, which do not require ionizing radiation, for accurate, real-time tumor tracking. This investigation compared the static and dynamic tracking accuracy of this system to that of an on-board imaging kilovoltage X-ray system for concurrent use of the two systems. The localization accuracies of a kilovoltage imaging system and a continuous electromagnetic tracking system were compared. Using an in-house developed four-dimensional stage, quality-assurance fixture containing three radiofrequency transponders was positioned at a series of static locations and then moved through the ellipsoidal and nonuniform continuous paths. The transponder positions were tracked concurrently by the Calypso system. For static localization, the transponders were localized using portal images and digitally reconstructed radiographs by commercial matching software. For dynamic localization, the transponders were fluoroscopically imaged, and their positions were determined retrospectively using custom-written image processing programs. The localization data sets were synchronized with and compared to the known quality assurance fixture positions. The experiment was repeated to retrospectively track three transponders implanted in a canine lung. The root mean square error of the on-board imaging and Calypso systems was 0.1 cm and 0.0 cm, respectively, for static localization, 0.22 mm and 0.33 mm for dynamic phantom positioning, and 0.42 mm for the canine study. The results showed that both localization systems provide submillimeter accuracy. The Calypso and on-board imaging tracking systems offer distinct sets of advantages and, given their compatibility, patients could benefit from the complementary nature of the two systems when used concurrently.

  1. Fiducial-Based Translational Localization Accuracy of Electromagnetic Tracking System and On-Board Kilovoltage Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi Malinowski, Kathleen; Hubenshmidt, James; Dimmer, Steve; Mayse, Martin L.; Bradley, Jeffrey; Chaudhari, Amir; Lechleiter, Kirsten; Goddu, Sree Krishna Murty; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: The Calypso medical four-dimensional localization system uses AC electromagnetics, which do not require ionizing radiation, for accurate, real-time tumor tracking. This investigation compared the static and dynamic tracking accuracy of this system to that of an on-board imaging kilovoltage X-ray system for concurrent use of the two systems. Methods and Materials: The localization accuracies of a kilovoltage imaging system and a continuous electromagnetic tracking system were compared. Using an in-house developed four-dimensional stage, quality-assurance fixture containing three radiofrequency transponders was positioned at a series of static locations and then moved through the ellipsoidal and nonuniform continuous paths. The transponder positions were tracked concurrently by the Calypso system. For static localization, the transponders were localized using portal images and digitally reconstructed radiographs by commercial matching software. For dynamic localization, the transponders were fluoroscopically imaged, and their positions were determined retrospectively using custom-written image processing programs. The localization data sets were synchronized with and compared to the known quality assurance fixture positions. The experiment was repeated to retrospectively track three transponders implanted in a canine lung. Results: The root mean square error of the on-board imaging and Calypso systems was 0.1 cm and 0.0 cm, respectively, for static localization, 0.22 mm and 0.33 mm for dynamic phantom positioning, and 0.42 mm for the canine study. Conclusion: The results showed that both localization systems provide submillimeter accuracy. The Calypso and on-board imaging tracking systems offer distinct sets of advantages and, given their compatibility, patients could benefit from the complementary nature of the two systems when used concurrently.

  2. Some free boundary problems involving non-local diffusion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, José Antonio; Vázquez, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the study of evolution processes involving degenerate parabolic equations which may exhibit free boundaries. The equations we have selected follow two recent trends in diffusion theory: considering anomalous diffusion with long-range effects, which leads to fractional operators or other operators involving kernels with large tails; and the combination of diffusion and aggregation effects, leading to delicate long-term equilibria whose description is still incipient. PMID:26261360

  3. The application of targeted mass spectrometry-based strategies to the detection and localization of post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Chicooree, Navin; Unwin, Richard D; Griffiths, John R

    2015-01-01

    This review describes some of the more interesting and imaginative ways in which mass spectrometry has been utilized to study a number of important post-translational modifications over the past two decades; from circa 1990 to 2013. A diverse range of modifications is covered, including citrullination, sulfation, hydroxylation and sumoylation. A summary of the biological role of each modification described, along with some brief mechanistic detail, is also included. Emphasis has been placed on strategies specifically aimed at detecting target modifications, as opposed to more serendipitous modification discovery approaches, which rely upon straightforward product ion scanning methods. The authors have intentionally excluded from this review both phosphorylation and glycosylation since these major modifications have been extensively reviewed elsewhere.

  4. NMR-based localization of ions involved in salting out of hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Poznański, Jarosław

    2006-01-01

    NaCl-induced aggregation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was monitored by NMR spectroscopy. Small, but significant, changes induced by salt addition in TOCSY spectra were attributed to the effect of local reorganization of protein backbone upon ion binding. Salt-induced variations in HN and H alpha chemical shifts were mapped on the HEWL 3D structure which allowed the construction of a scheme of the spatial localization of potential ion binding sites. It was found that in a 0.5 M NaCl solution six chloride anions and at least one sodium cation are bound to preferred sites on the HEWL surface.

  5. Translational repression of the Drosophila nanos mRNA involves the RNA helicase Belle and RNA coating by Me31B and Trailer hitch.

    PubMed

    Götze, Michael; Dufourt, Jérémy; Ihling, Christian; Rammelt, Christiane; Pierson, Stephanie; Sambrani, Nagraj; Temme, Claudia; Sinz, Andrea; Simonelig, Martine; Wahle, Elmar

    2017-10-01

    Translational repression of maternal mRNAs is an essential regulatory mechanism during early embryonic development. Repression of the Drosophila nanos mRNA, required for the formation of the anterior-posterior body axis, depends on the protein Smaug binding to two Smaug recognition elements (SREs) in the nanos 3' UTR. In a comprehensive mass spectrometric analysis of the SRE-dependent repressor complex, we identified Smaug, Cup, Me31B, Trailer hitch, eIF4E, and PABPC, in agreement with earlier data. As a novel component, the RNA-dependent ATPase Belle (DDX3) was found, and its involvement in deadenylation and repression of nanos was confirmed in vivo. Smaug, Cup, and Belle bound stoichiometrically to the SREs, independently of RNA length. Binding of Me31B and Tral was also SRE-dependent, but their amounts were proportional to the length of the RNA and equimolar to each other. We suggest that "coating" of the RNA by a Me31B•Tral complex may be at the core of repression. © 2017 Götze et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Michigan Wetlands: Yours To Protect. A Citizen's Guide to Local Involvement in Wetland Protection. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikiel, Wilfred

    This guidebook is designed to assist concerned Michigan citizens, local governments, conservation organizations, landowners, and others in their efforts to initiate wetlands protection activities. Chapter 1 focuses on wetland functions, values, losses, and the urgent need to protect wetland resources. Chapter 2 discusses wetland identification and…

  7. Assembly of heterodimeric luciferase after de novo synthesis of subunits in rabbit reticulocyte lysate involves hsc70 and hsp40 at a post-translational stage.

    PubMed

    Tyedmers, J; Kruse, M; Lerner, M; Demand, J; Höhfeld, J; Solsbacher, J; Volkmer, J; Zimmermann, R

    2000-06-01

    Heterodimeric luciferase from Vibrio harveyi had been established as a unique model enzyme for direct measurements of the effects of molecular chaperones and folding catalysts on protein folding and subunit assembly after de novo synthesis of subunits in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. It was observed that luciferase assembly can be separated in time from synthesis of the two subunits and that under these post-translational conditions assembly was inhibited by either ATP depletion or inhibition of peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerases, that is, by addition of cyclosporin A or FK506. Furthermore, it was observed that the inhibitory effect of FK506 on luciferase assembly can be suppressed by addition of purified cyclophilin, thereby providing the first direct evidence for the involvement of peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerases in protein biogenesis in the eukaryotic cytosol. Here the ATP requirement in luciferase assembly has been characterized. Depletion of either Hsp90 or CCT from reticulocyte lysate did not interfere with luciferase assembly. However, addition of purified Hsc70 stimulated luciferase assembly. While addition of purified Hsp40 did not have any effect on luciferase assembly, the stimulatory effect of Hsc70 was further increased by Hsp40. Thus, after synthesis of the two subunits in reticulocyte lysate assembly of heterodimeric luciferase involves Hsc70 and its co-chaperone Hsp40. Therefore, Hsc70 aids protein biogenesis in the eukaryotic cytosol not only at the levels of nascent polypeptide chains and precursor proteins that have to be kept competent for transport into cell organelles, but also at the level of subunits that have to be kept competent for assembly.

  8. Margin involvement at prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer: does a low-risk group exist?

    PubMed

    Watkins, John M; Laszewski, Michael; Watkins, Patricia L; Dufan, Tarek A; Adducci, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether additional pathology details may provide risk stratification for patients with involved surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). Eligible patients underwent RP between 2003 and 2010. Patients with preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥20, follow-up <12 months, lymph node or seminal vesicle involvement, or who received radiation therapy or hormone therapy prior to PSA relapse were excluded. Surgical specimens were reviewed by a study pathologist, blinded to outcomes. Survival analysis methods were employed to assess disease control and survival rates, as well as association of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-specific factors for endpoints. Of 355 RP cases, 279 patients were eligible for the present analysis. At a median follow-up of 53 months (range, 16-127), 31/114 (27%) of patients with involved surgical margins experienced PSA relapse, as compared with 7/165 (4%) for negative margins (hazard ratio, 4.997; 95% confidence interval, 2.425-10.296; P < .0001). Detailed pathology review demonstrated associations between PSA relapse and Gleason score at RP, extent of margin involvement (width), capsule penetration, and perineural invasion. Subgroup analysis identified low risk (4%) of 5-year PSA relapse for patients with Gleason ≤6 mm and margin width ≤4 mm (single maximal or cumulative). All subgroups with higher Gleason score or wider margin were associated with >20% risk of PSA relapse at 5 years. Within the present study, Gleason score, 6 patients with margin width ≤4 mm appear to have low rates of early PSA relapse following RP. Low-grade cases with larger extent of margin involvement or higher risk Gleason score patients with any margin involvement have high rates of early PSA relapse. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preferential translation mediated by Hsp81-3 5'-UTR during heat shock involves ribosome entry at the 5'-end rather than an internal site in Arabidopsis suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hideyuki; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Kato, Ko

    2008-01-01

    Translational inhibition of most mRNAs and preferential translation of mRNAs coding heat shock proteins (Hsps) occur in most cells under heat shock stress. For most Hsp mRNAs, preferential translation in heat-shocked cells is conferred by their 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs). However, the preferential translation directed by 5'-UTRs during heat shock remains mostly unknown in plants. Here, we found that the mRNA of Hsp81-3, which is an Arabidopsis Hsp90 family gene, continued to be associated with polysomes in heat-shocked Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells. The Hsp81-3 5'-UTR was found to contribute to the efficient translation of capped reporter mRNAs in heat-shocked Arabidopsis protoplasts using a transient expression assay. Further characterization of the Hsp81-3 5'-UTR revealed that the anterior half of the 5'-UTR is important for the efficient translation in heat-shocked protoplasts. Moreover, the Hsp81-3 5'-UTR was highly capable of enhancing translation from uncapped reporter mRNAs relative to the 5'-UTR of a housekeeping gene in both normal and heat-shocked protoplasts. These Hsp81-3 5'-UTR-directed translations both in capped and uncapped reporter mRNAs were substantially reduced by the insertion of an upstream AUG at the 5'-end of the 5'-UTR, indicating that ribosomes are recruited to the 5'-end of the Hsp81-3 5'-UTR regardless of temperature and the presence or absence of the cap structure. These results suggest that the preferential translation of Hsp81-3 mRNA in heat-shocked Arabidopsis cells involves a ribosome scanning from the 5'-end of the 5'-UTR rather than ribosome entry to the internal site.

  10. De novo translation initiation on membrane-bound ribosomes as a mechanism for localization of cytosolic protein mRNAs to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Reid, David W.; Cox, Amanda H.

    2014-01-01

    The specialized protein synthesis functions of the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum compartments are conferred by the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway, which directs the cotranslational trafficking of signal sequence-encoding mRNAs from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although subcellular mRNA distributions largely mirror the binary pattern predicted by the SRP pathway model, studies in mammalian cells, yeast, and Drosophila have also demonstrated that cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs are broadly represented on ER-bound ribosomes. A mechanism for such noncanonical mRNA localization remains, however, to be identified. Here, we examine the hypothesis that de novo translation initiation on ER-bound ribosomes serves as a mechanism for localizing cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs to the ER. As a test of this hypothesis, we performed single molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of subcellular mRNA distributions and report that a substantial fraction of mRNAs encoding the cytosolic protein GAPDH resides in close proximity to the ER. Consistent with these data, analyses of subcellular mRNA and ribosome distributions in multiple cell lines demonstrated that cytosolic protein mRNA-ribosome distributions were strongly correlated, whereas signal sequence-encoding mRNA-ribosome distributions were divergent. Ribosome footprinting studies of ER-bound polysomes revealed a substantial initiation codon read density enrichment for cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs. We also demonstrate that eukaryotic initiation factor 2α is bound to the ER via a salt-sensitive, ribosome-independent mechanism. Combined, these data support ER-localized translation initiation as a mechanism for mRNA recruitment to the ER. PMID:25142066

  11. De novo translation initiation on membrane-bound ribosomes as a mechanism for localization of cytosolic protein mRNAs to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Reid, David W; Cox, Amanda H; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2014-10-01

    The specialized protein synthesis functions of the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum compartments are conferred by the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway, which directs the cotranslational trafficking of signal sequence-encoding mRNAs from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although subcellular mRNA distributions largely mirror the binary pattern predicted by the SRP pathway model, studies in mammalian cells, yeast, and Drosophila have also demonstrated that cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs are broadly represented on ER-bound ribosomes. A mechanism for such noncanonical mRNA localization remains, however, to be identified. Here, we examine the hypothesis that de novo translation initiation on ER-bound ribosomes serves as a mechanism for localizing cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs to the ER. As a test of this hypothesis, we performed single molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of subcellular mRNA distributions and report that a substantial fraction of mRNAs encoding the cytosolic protein GAPDH resides in close proximity to the ER. Consistent with these data, analyses of subcellular mRNA and ribosome distributions in multiple cell lines demonstrated that cytosolic protein mRNA-ribosome distributions were strongly correlated, whereas signal sequence-encoding mRNA-ribosome distributions were divergent. Ribosome footprinting studies of ER-bound polysomes revealed a substantial initiation codon read density enrichment for cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs. We also demonstrate that eukaryotic initiation factor 2α is bound to the ER via a salt-sensitive, ribosome-independent mechanism. Combined, these data support ER-localized translation initiation as a mechanism for mRNA recruitment to the ER. © 2014 Jagannathan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. Does Renal Tubular Injury-Induced Local Tissue Hypoxia Involve Post-Transplantation Erythrocytosis?

    PubMed

    Unal, A; Ata, S; Karakurkcu, C; Ciraci, M Z; Kocyigit, I; Sipahioglu, M H; B Tokgoz; Oymak, O

    2017-10-01

    The pathogenesis of post-transplantation erythrocytosis (PTE) is not well understood and appears to be multifactorial. Our hypothesis in this study was that several factors, including toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor, immunologic factors, and chronic allograft nephropathy, can trigger local tissue hypoxia in peritubular interstitium, which is where production of erythropoietin (EPO) takes place. This local interstitial tissue hypoxia can cause an increase in renal EPO production, which induces the development of PTE. This cross-sectional study included 15 renal transplant recipients, in whom polycythemia developed after kidney transplantation, with elevated hematocrit level to >51%. Forty-eight age- and gender-matched renal transplant recipients with normal hematocrit level were included as the renal transplant control group. In addition, 13 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were also included as the healthy control group. We used urine hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α) levels to evaluate whether there is local tissue hypoxia in renal allograft. HIF-2α levels were measured by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum EPO and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels were also measured. HIF-2α levels were significantly lower in the polycythemia group than the other two groups, but there was no significant difference between the healthy control group and the renal transplant control group with regard to HIF-2α levels. There was no significant difference among the 3 study groups in terms of levels of serum EPO and IGF-1. Local tissue hypoxia in renal allograft does not seem to play an important role in the development of PTE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary endobronchial plasmacytoma involving local lymph nodes and presenting with rare immunoglobulin G lambda monoclonal gammopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sen; Li, Xin; Song, Zuoqing; Zhao, Honglin; Qiu, Xiaomin; Gong, Lei; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma occurring as a primary pulmonary lesion is rare. The present report describes a 42-year-old Chinese man diagnosed with primary pulmonary plasmacytoma following left lower lobectomy. Of note, an extremely rare immunoglobulin G lambda paraprotein was documented in the patient’s serum by immunofixation electrophoresis. The patient has been well, showing no local recurrence or multifocal disease during a 15-month follow-up. PMID:22679619

  14. Biochemical localization of a protein involved in Gluconacetobacter hansenii cellulose synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Prashanti R; Catchmark, Jeffrey M; Brown, Nicole Robitaille; Tien, Ming

    2011-02-08

    Using subcellular fractionation and Western blot methods, we have shown that AcsD, one of the proteins encoded by the Acetobacter cellulose synthase (acs) operon, is localized in the periplasmic region of the cell. AcsD protein was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using histidine tag affinity methods. The purified protein was used to obtain rabbit polyclonal antibodies. The purity of the subcellular fractions was assessed by marker enzyme assays.

  15. Translations and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresguerres, Romualdo

    We analyze the role played by local translational symmetry in the context of gauge theories of fundamental interactions. Translational connections and fields are introduced, with special attention being paid to their universal coupling to other variables, as well as to their contributions to field equations and to conserved quantities.

  16. Aminopropyltransferases Involved in Polyamine Biosynthesis Localize Preferentially in the Nucleus of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belda-Palazón, Borja; Ruiz, Leticia; Martí, Esmeralda; Tárraga, Susana; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Culiáñez, Francisco; Farràs, Rosa; Carrasco, Pedro; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Plant aminopropyltransferases consist of a group of enzymes that transfer aminopropyl groups derived from decarboxylated S-adenosyl-methionine (dcAdoMet or dcSAM) to propylamine acceptors to produce polyamines, ubiquitous metabolites with positive charge at physiological pH. Spermidine synthase (SPDS) uses putrescine as amino acceptor to form spermidine, whereas spermine synthase (SPMS) and thermospermine synthase (TSPMS) use spermidine as acceptor to synthesize the isomers spermine and thermospermine respectively. In previous work it was shown that both SPDS1 and SPDS2 can physically interact with SPMS although no data concerning the subcellular localization was reported. Here we study the subcellular localization of these enzymes and their protein dimer complexes with gateway-based Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) binary vectors. In addition, we have characterized the molecular weight of the enzyme complexes by gel filtration chromatography with in vitro assembled recombinant enzymes and with endogenous plant protein extracts. Our data suggest that aminopropyltransferases display a dual subcellular localization both in the cytosol and nuclear enriched fractions, and they assemble preferably as dimers. The BiFC transient expression data suggest that aminopropyltransferase heterodimer complexes take place preferentially inside the nucleus. PMID:23056524

  17. Mutational Pressure in Zika Virus: Local ADAR-Editing Areas Associated with Pauses in Translation and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Khrustalev, Vladislav V.; Khrustaleva, Tatyana A.; Sharma, Nitin; Giri, Rajanish

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) spread led to the recent medical health emergency of international concern. Understanding the variations in virus system is of utmost need. Using available complete sequences of ZIKV we estimated directions of mutational pressure along the length of consensus sequences of three lineages of the virus. Results showed that guanine usage is growing in ZIKV RNA plus strand due to adenine to guanine transitions, while adenine usage is growing due to cytosine to adenine transversions. Especially high levels of guanine have been found in two-fold degenerated sites of certain areas of RNA plus strand with high amount of secondary structure. The usage of cytosine in two-fold degenerated sites shows direct dependence on the amount of secondary structure in 52% (consensus sequence of East African ZIKV lineage)—32% (consensus sequence of epidemic strains) of the length of RNA minus strand. These facts are the evidences of ADAR-editing of both strands of ZIKV genome during pauses in replication. RNA plus strand can also be edited by ADAR during pauses in translation caused by the appearance of groups of rare codons. According to our results, RNA minus strand of epidemic ZIKV strain has lower number of points in which polymerase can be stalled (allowing ADAR-editing) compared to other strains. The data on preferable directions of mutational pressure in epidemic ZIKV strain is useful for future vaccine development and understanding the evolution of new strains. PMID:28275585

  18. Mutational Pressure in Zika Virus: Local ADAR-Editing Areas Associated with Pauses in Translation and Replication.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav V; Khrustaleva, Tatyana A; Sharma, Nitin; Giri, Rajanish

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) spread led to the recent medical health emergency of international concern. Understanding the variations in virus system is of utmost need. Using available complete sequences of ZIKV we estimated directions of mutational pressure along the length of consensus sequences of three lineages of the virus. Results showed that guanine usage is growing in ZIKV RNA plus strand due to adenine to guanine transitions, while adenine usage is growing due to cytosine to adenine transversions. Especially high levels of guanine have been found in two-fold degenerated sites of certain areas of RNA plus strand with high amount of secondary structure. The usage of cytosine in two-fold degenerated sites shows direct dependence on the amount of secondary structure in 52% (consensus sequence of East African ZIKV lineage)-32% (consensus sequence of epidemic strains) of the length of RNA minus strand. These facts are the evidences of ADAR-editing of both strands of ZIKV genome during pauses in replication. RNA plus strand can also be edited by ADAR during pauses in translation caused by the appearance of groups of rare codons. According to our results, RNA minus strand of epidemic ZIKV strain has lower number of points in which polymerase can be stalled (allowing ADAR-editing) compared to other strains. The data on preferable directions of mutational pressure in epidemic ZIKV strain is useful for future vaccine development and understanding the evolution of new strains.

  19. Tele-Autonomous control involving contact. Final Report Thesis; [object localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Lejun; Volz, Richard A.; Conway, Lynn; Walker, Michael W.

    1990-01-01

    Object localization and its application in tele-autonomous systems are studied. Two object localization algorithms are presented together with the methods of extracting several important types of object features. The first algorithm is based on line-segment to line-segment matching. Line range sensors are used to extract line-segment features from an object. The extracted features are matched to corresponding model features to compute the location of the object. The inputs of the second algorithm are not limited only to the line features. Featured points (point to point matching) and featured unit direction vectors (vector to vector matching) can also be used as the inputs of the algorithm, and there is no upper limit on the number of the features inputed. The algorithm will allow the use of redundant features to find a better solution. The algorithm uses dual number quaternions to represent the position and orientation of an object and uses the least squares optimization method to find an optimal solution for the object's location. The advantage of using this representation is that the method solves for the location estimation by minimizing a single cost function associated with the sum of the orientation and position errors and thus has a better performance on the estimation, both in accuracy and speed, than that of other similar algorithms. The difficulties when the operator is controlling a remote robot to perform manipulation tasks are also discussed. The main problems facing the operator are time delays on the signal transmission and the uncertainties of the remote environment. How object localization techniques can be used together with other techniques such as predictor display and time desynchronization to help to overcome these difficulties are then discussed.

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of short-chain family reductases involved in menthol biosynthesis in peppermint.

    PubMed

    Turner, Glenn W; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney B

    2012-06-01

    Biosynthesis of the p-menthane monoterpenes in peppermint occurs in the secretory cells of the peltate glandular trichomes and results in the accumulation of primarily menthone and menthol. cDNAs and recombinant enzymes are well characterized for eight of the nine enzymatic steps leading from the 5-carbon precursors to menthol, and subcellular localization of several key enzymes suggests a complex network of substrate and product movement is required during oil biosynthesis. In addition, studies concerning the regulation of oil biosynthesis have demonstrated a temporal partition of the pathway into an early, biosynthetic program that results in the accumulation of menthone and a later, oil maturation program that leads to menthone reduction and concomitant menthol accumulation. The menthone reductase responsible for the ultimate pathway reduction step, menthone-menthol reductase (MMR), has been characterized and found to share significant sequence similarity with its counterpart reductase, a menthone-neomenthol reductase, which catalyzes a minor enzymatic reaction associated with oil maturation. Further, the menthone reductases share significant sequence similarity with the temporally separate and mechanistically different isopiperitenone reductase (IPR). Here we present immunocytochemical localizations for these reductases using a polyclonal antibody raised against menthone-menthol reductase. The polyclonal antibody used for this study showed little specificity between these three reductases, but by using it for immunostaining of tissues of different ages we were able to provisionally separate staining of an early biosynthetic enzyme, IPR, found in young, immature leaves from that of the oil maturation enzyme, MMR, found in older, mature leaves. Both reductases were localized to the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of the secretory cells of peltate glandular trichomes, and were absent from all other cell types examined.

  1. Isolation of a trans-acting factor involved in localization of Paracentrotus lividus maternal mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, C; Romancino, D P; Ingrassia, A; Vizzini, A; Di Carlo, M

    1999-01-01

    Localization of Paracentrotus lividus bep maternal mRNAs at the animal pole occurs by association with the cytoskeleton and involves a 54-kDa protein, called LP54, that is able to bind to the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of bep mRNAs. We describe here the isolation and purification of this protein. Antibodies raised against purified LP54 allowed us to establish its localization in P. lividus eggs and embryos. This localization coincides with the mRNAs with which it is associated, that is, the animal pole in the egg, and, after fertilization, the regions derived from this part of the egg, and finally the oral ectoderm of the pluteus. Association with the cytoskeleton was shown by the copurification of LP54 in a microtubule preparation. Involvement in bep mRNA localization was demonstrated by microinjection of anti-LP54 antibodies in P. lividus eggs, which caused alteration of spatial distribution of bep3 mRNA. PMID:10573120

  2. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization

    PubMed Central

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  3. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization.

    PubMed

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  4. Luman is involved in osteoclastogenesis through the regulation of DC-STAMP expression, stability and localization

    PubMed Central

    Kanemoto, Soshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Teruhito; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Cui, Min; Asada, Rie; Cui, Xiang; Hino, Kenta; Kaneko, Masayuki; Takai, Tomoko; Matsuhisa, Koji; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Luman (also known as CREB3) is a type-II transmembrane transcription factor belonging to the OASIS family that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane under normal conditions. In response to ER stress, OASIS-family members are subjected to regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), following which the cleaved N-terminal fragments translocate to the nucleus. In this study, we show that treatment of bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) with cytokines – macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL (also known as TNFSF11) – causes a time-dependent increase in Luman expression, and that Luman undergoes RIP and becomes activated during osteoclast differentiation. Small hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated knockdown of Luman in BMMs prevented the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts, concomitant with the suppression of DC-STAMP, a protein that is essential for cell–cell fusion in osteoclastogenesis. The N-terminus of Luman facilitates promoter activity of DC-STAMP, resulting in upregulation of DC-STAMP expression. Furthermore, Luman interacts with DC-STAMP, and controls its stability and localization. These results suggest that Luman regulates the multinucleation of osteoclasts by promoting cell fusion of mononuclear osteoclasts through DC-STAMP induction and intracellular distribution during osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26503158

  5. Involvement of the Electrophilic Isothiocyanate Sulforaphane in Arabidopsis Local Defense Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Mats X.; Nilsson, Anders K.; Johansson, Oskar N.; Boztaş, Gülin; Adolfsson, Lisa E.; Pinosa, Francesco; Petit, Christel Garcia; Aronsson, Henrik; Mackey, David; Tör, Mahmut; Hamberg, Mats; Ellerström, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Plants defend themselves against microbial pathogens through a range of highly sophisticated and integrated molecular systems. Recognition of pathogen-secreted effector proteins often triggers the hypersensitive response (HR), a complex multicellular defense reaction where programmed cell death of cells surrounding the primary site of infection is a prominent feature. Even though the HR was described almost a century ago, cell-to-cell factors acting at the local level generating the full defense reaction have remained obscure. In this study, we sought to identify diffusible molecules produced during the HR that could induce cell death in naive tissue. We found that 4-methylsulfinylbutyl isothiocyanate (sulforaphane) is released by Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf tissue undergoing the HR and that this compound induces cell death as well as primes defense in naive tissue. Two different mutants impaired in the pathogen-induced accumulation of sulforaphane displayed attenuated programmed cell death upon bacterial and oomycete effector recognition as well as decreased resistance to several isolates of the plant pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Treatment with sulforaphane provided protection against a virulent H. arabidopsidis isolate. Glucosinolate breakdown products are recognized as antifeeding compounds toward insects and recently also as intracellular signaling and bacteriostatic molecules in Arabidopsis. The data presented here indicate that these compounds also trigger local defense responses in Arabidopsis tissue. PMID:25371552

  6. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A.; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  7. Increasing conservation management action by involving local people in natural resource monitoring.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Finn; Mendoza, Marlynn M; Tagtag, Anson; Alviola, Phillip A; Balete, Danilo S; Jensen, Arne E; Enghoff, Martin; Poulsen, Michael K

    2007-11-01

    There is a need for a better understanding of the status of the environment. At the same time, concerns have been raised regarding alienation of the local populace from environmental decisions. One proposed solution is participatory environmental monitoring. When evaluating the usefulness of environmental monitoring, the focus may be on accuracy, as is usually done by scientists, or on efficiency in terms of conservation impact. To test whether investment in participatory biodiversity monitoring makes economic sense for obtaining data for management decisions, we compared the cost efficiency of participatory and conventional biodiversity monitoring methods in Philippine parks. We found that, from a government perspective, investment in monitoring that combines scientific with participatory methods is strikingly more effective than a similar level of investment in conventional scientific methods alone in generating conservation management interventions. Moreover, the local populace seemed to benefit from more secure de facto user rights over land and other resources. Participatory biodiversity monitoring not only represents a cost-effective alternative when conventional monitoring is impossible, but it is also an unexpectedly powerful complementary approach, capable of generating a much higher level of conservation management intervention, where conventional monitoring already takes place.

  8. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

  9. Definition of regions in human c-myc that are involved in transformation and nuclear localization.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, J; de Lange, T; Ramsay, G; Jakobovits, E; Bishop, J M; Varmus, H; Lee, W

    1987-01-01

    To study the relationship between the primary structure of the c-myc protein and some of its functional properties, we made in-frame insertion and deletion mutants of the normal human c-myc coding domain that was expressed from a retroviral promoter-enhancer. We assessed the effects of these mutations on the ability of c-myc protein to cotransform normal rat embryo cells with a mutant ras gene, induce foci in a Rat-1-derived cell line (Rat-1a), and localize in nuclei. Using the cotransformation assay, we found two regions of the protein (amino acids 105 to 143 and 321 to 439) where integrity was critical: one region (amino acids 1 to 104) that tolerated insertion and small deletion mutations, but not large deletions, and another region (amino acids 144) to 320) that was largely dispensable. Comparison with regions that were important for transformation of Rat-1a cells revealed that some are essential for both activities, but others are important for only one or the other, suggesting that the two assays require different properties of the c-myc protein. Deletion of each of three regions of the c-myc protein (amino acids 106 to 143, 320 to 368, and 370 to 412) resulted in partial cytoplasmic localization, as determined by immunofluorescence or immunoprecipitation following subcellular fractionation. Some abnormally located proteins retained transforming activity; most proteins lacking transforming activity appeared to be normally located. Images PMID:3299053

  10. The implementation of a translational study involving a primary care based behavioral program to improve blood pressure control: The HTN-IMPROVE study protocol (01295)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the impact of hypertension and widely accepted target values for blood pressure (BP), interventions to improve BP control have had limited success. Objectives We describe the design of a 'translational' study that examines the implementation, impact, sustainability, and cost of an evidence-based nurse-delivered tailored behavioral self-management intervention to improve BP control as it moves from a research context to healthcare delivery. The study addresses four specific aims: assess the implementation of an evidence-based behavioral self-management intervention to improve BP levels; evaluate the clinical impact of the intervention as it is implemented; assess organizational factors associated with the sustainability of the intervention; and assess the cost of implementing and sustaining the intervention. Methods The project involves three geographically diverse VA intervention facilities and nine control sites. We first conduct an evaluation of barriers and facilitators for implementing the intervention at intervention sites. We examine the impact of the intervention by comparing 12-month pre/post changes in BP control between patients in intervention sites versus patients in the matched control sites. Next, we examine the sustainability of the intervention and organizational factors facilitating or hindering the sustained implementation. Finally, we examine the costs of intervention implementation. Key outcomes are acceptability and costs of the program, as well as changes in BP. Outcomes will be assessed using mixed methods (e.g., qualitative analyses--pattern matching; quantitative methods--linear mixed models). Discussion The study results will provide information about the challenges and costs to implement and sustain the intervention, and what clinical impact can be expected. PMID:20637095

  11. Translational Meta-analytical Methods to Localize the Regulatory Patterns of Neurological Disorders in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sochat, Vanessa; David, Maude; Wall, Dennis P

    2015-01-01

    The task of mapping neurological disorders in the human brain must be informed by multiple measurements of an individual’s phenotype - neuroimaging, genomics, and behavior. We developed a novel meta-analytical approach to integrate disparate resources and generated transcriptional maps of neurological disorders in the human brain yielding a purely computational procedure to pinpoint the brain location of transcribed genes likely to be involved in either onset or maintenance of the neurological condition. PMID:26958307

  12. Microevolutionary Events Involving Narrow Host Plasmids Influences Local Fixation of Vancomycin-Resistance in Enterococcus Populations

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana R.; Novais, Carla; Tedim, Ana P.; Francia, María Victoria; Baquero, Fernando; Peixe, Luísa; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistance in enterococci (VRE) is associated with isolates within ST18, ST17, ST78 Enterococcus faecium (Efm) and ST6 Enterococcus faecalis (Efs) human adapted lineages. Despite of its global spread, vancomycin resistance rates in enterococcal populations greatly vary temporally and geographically. Portugal is one of the European countries where Tn1546 (vanA) is consistently found in a variety of environments. A comprehensive multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE isolates (75 Efm and 29 Efs) from Portuguese hospitals and aquatic surroundings (1996–2008) was performed to clarify the local dynamics of VRE. Clonal relatedness was established by PFGE and MLST while plasmid characterization comprised the analysis of known relaxases, rep initiator proteins and toxin-antitoxin systems (TA) by PCR-based typing schemes, RFLP comparison, hybridization and sequencing. Tn1546 variants were characterized by PCR overlapping/sequencing. Intra- and inter-hospital dissemination of Efm ST18, ST132 and ST280 and Efs ST6 clones, carrying rolling-circle (pEFNP1/pRI1) and theta-replicating (pCIZ2-like, Inc18, pHTβ-like, two pRUM-variants, pLG1-like, and pheromone-responsive) plasmids was documented. Tn1546 variants, mostly containing ISEf1 or IS1216, were located on plasmids (30–150 kb) with a high degree of mosaicism and heterogeneous RFLP patterns that seem to have resulted from the interplay between broad host Inc18 plasmids (pIP501, pRE25, pEF1), and narrow host RepA_N plasmids (pRUM, pAD1-like). TAs of Inc18 (ω-ε-ζ) and pRUM (Axe-Txe) plasmids were infrequently detected. Some plasmid chimeras were persistently recovered over years from different clonal lineages. This work represents the first multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE, revealing a frequent recombinatorial diversification of a limited number of interacting clonal backgrounds, plasmids and transposons at local scale. These interactions provide a continuous process of parapatric clonalization driving a full

  13. [Physico-chemical signals involved in host localization and in the induction of mosquito bites].

    PubMed

    Torres-Estrada, José Luis; Rodríguez, Mario H

    2003-01-01

    Disease vector female mosquitoes respond to physic-chemical signals to localize vertebrate hosts for blood meals. Zoophylic mosquitoes preferentially respond to CO2 and octenol released in the breath and bodily fluids, while anthropophylic mosquitoes respond to lactic acid and a variety of sweat compounds. These compounds are modified by saprophytic microorganisms in the skin sebaceous glands. Other factors present in human dwellings contribute to the integration of microsystems with characteristic odors that have different attraction for mosquitoes, explaining the focalization of malaria transmission in few households in endemic areas. The identification of the chemical attractants and their molecular receptors could be used to complement new methods to attract mosquitoes to traps during epidemiological surveys, to increase their contact with insecticides in control interventions, and for genetic manipulation to divert mosquito bites towards other animal populations. The English version of this paper is available at:http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.

  14. Localization of CD9 Molecule on Bull Spermatozoa: Its Involvement in the Sperm-Egg Interaction.

    PubMed

    Antalíková, J; Jankovičová, J; Simon, M; Cupperová, P; Michalková, K; Horovská, Ľ

    2015-06-01

    Tetraspanin CD9 is one of the egg membrane proteins known to be essential in fertilization process. The presence and localization of CD9 molecule in spermatozoa and its possible function in reproduction are still unclear. In our study, we describe the localization of CD9 on bull spermatozoa. In the immunofluorescence assay, the positive signal has been observed in the high proportion of sperm cells as a fine grains either on the apical part or through the entire anterior region of sperm head. CD9 recognized by monoclonal antibody IVA-50 was detected on freshly ejaculated (83.4 ± 3.7%) and frozen-thawed (84.3 ± 2.3%) sperm. The same reaction pattern was observed on sperm capacitated for 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 4 h (83.6 ± 2.0%; 84.0 ± 1.5%; 85.7 ± 0.8%; 77.5 ± 10.8%). The presence of CD9 exclusively on plasma membrane of the bovine sperm has been detected by Western blot analysis of the protein fractions after the discontinuous sucrose gradient fractionation of the bull sperm. Moreover, probable role of the sperm CD9 molecule in fertilization process of cattle has been suggested as sperm treatment with anti-CD9 antibody significantly reduced (by 25%, p ≤ 0.001) the number of fertilized oocytes compared to control group in fertilization assay in vitro.

  15. Translating the Folk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    This article looks at issues affecting Robert Garioch's translation into Scots of a sonnet from Giuseppe Gioachino Belli's Romaneschi collection. It begins with the discussion of a problem involved in writing in dialects with no settled written standard. This 'standardizing' poetry is then looked at in terms of translation and theories of the…

  16. Localization of a translocation breakpoint involved in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, T.L.; Gray, B.A.; Lee, S.

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome, with features including toe syndactyly, genital anomalies, unusual facies, and occasional organ malformations. The gene(s) for this autosomal recessive disorder has not been mapped. Recent biochemical studies suggest that the defect may involve the penultimate step in cholesterol synthesis, as patients have low serum cholesterol and increased 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) levels. However, the enzyme putatively involved (7-DHC reductase) has not been isolated. We identified an SLOS patient with a de novo balanced chromosome translocation [t(7;20)(q32.1;q13.2)], and we propose that the translocation interrupts one of the patient`s SLOS alleles. We are pursuing positional cloning to identify the SLOS gene. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we recently identified a chromosome 7 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) that spans the breakpoint and places it onto physical and genetic maps. We are in the process of narrowing this region via overlapping YACs and YAC subclones, from which we will isolate candidate cDNAs. Any candidate gene disrupted by the translocation and mutated on the other allele will be proven to be the SLOS gene. Functional analysis of an SLOS cDNA may also determine its relationship to cholesterol metabolism and the observed biochemical abnormalities.

  17. 22 CFR 92.78 - Translating documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Service are not authorized to translate documents or to certify to the correctness of translations... of a translation; to take an acknowledgment of the preparation of a translation; and to authenticate the seal and signature of a local official affixed to a translation. Separate fees should be...

  18. 22 CFR 92.78 - Translating documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Service are not authorized to translate documents or to certify to the correctness of translations... of a translation; to take an acknowledgment of the preparation of a translation; and to authenticate the seal and signature of a local official affixed to a translation. Separate fees should be...

  19. Translational tolerance of mitochondrial genes to metabolic energy stress involves TISU and eIF1-eIF4GI cooperation in start codon selection.

    PubMed

    Sinvani, Hadar; Haimov, Ora; Svitkin, Yuri; Sonenberg, Nahum; Tamarkin-Ben-Harush, Ana; Viollet, Benoit; Dikstein, Rivka

    2015-03-03

    Protein synthesis is a major energy-consuming process, which is rapidly repressed upon energy stress by AMPK. How energy deficiency affects translation of mRNAs that cope with the stress response is poorly understood. We found that mitochondrial genes remain translationally active upon energy deprivation. Surprisingly, inhibition of translation is partially retained in AMPKα1/AMPKα2 knockout cells. Mitochondrial mRNAs are enriched with TISU, a translation initiator of short 5' UTR, which confers resistance specifically to energy stress. Purified 48S preinitiation complex is sufficient for initiation via TISU AUG, when preceded by a short 5' UTR. eIF1 stimulates TISU but inhibits non-TISU-directed initiation. Remarkably, eIF4GI shares this activity and also interacts with eIF1. Furthermore, eIF4F is released upon 48S formation on TISU. These findings describe a specialized translation tolerance mechanism enabling continuous translation of TISU genes under energy stress and reveal that a key step in start codon selection of short 5' UTR is eIF4F release.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins involved in mycolic acid synthesis and transport localize dynamically to the old growing pole and septum.

    PubMed

    Carel, Clément; Nukdee, Kanjana; Cantaloube, Sylvain; Bonne, Mélanie; Diagne, Cheikh T; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Zerbib, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism that controls space-time coordination of elongation and division of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is critical for fighting the tubercle bacillus. Most of the numerous enzymes involved in the synthesis of Mycolic acid - Arabinogalactan-Peptidoglycan complex (MAPc) in the cell wall are essential in vivo. Using a dynamic approach, we localized Mtb enzymes belonging to the fatty acid synthase-II (FAS-II) complexes and involved in mycolic acid (MA) biosynthesis in a mycobacterial model of Mtb: M. smegmatis. Results also showed that the MA transporter MmpL3 was present in the mycobacterial envelope and was specifically and dynamically accumulated at the poles and septa during bacterial growth. This localization was due to its C-terminal domain. Moreover, the FAS-II enzymes were co-localized at the poles and septum with Wag31, the protein responsible for the polar localization of mycobacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The dynamic localization of FAS-II and of the MA transporter with Wag31, at the old-growing poles and at the septum suggests that the main components of the mycomembrane may potentially be synthesized at these precise foci. This finding highlights a major difference between mycobacteria and other rod-shaped bacteria studied to date. Based on the already known polar activities of envelope biosynthesis in mycobacteria, we propose the existence of complex polar machinery devoted to the biogenesis of the entire envelope. As a result, the mycobacterial pole would represent the Achilles' heel of the bacillus at all its growing stages.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteins Involved in Mycolic Acid Synthesis and Transport Localize Dynamically to the Old Growing Pole and Septum

    PubMed Central

    Cantaloube, Sylvain; Bonne, Mélanie; Diagne, Cheikh T.; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Zerbib, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism that controls space-time coordination of elongation and division of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is critical for fighting the tubercle bacillus. Most of the numerous enzymes involved in the synthesis of Mycolic acid - Arabinogalactan-Peptidoglycan complex (MAPc) in the cell wall are essential in vivo. Using a dynamic approach, we localized Mtb enzymes belonging to the fatty acid synthase-II (FAS-II) complexes and involved in mycolic acid (MA) biosynthesis in a mycobacterial model of Mtb: M. smegmatis. Results also showed that the MA transporter MmpL3 was present in the mycobacterial envelope and was specifically and dynamically accumulated at the poles and septa during bacterial growth. This localization was due to its C-terminal domain. Moreover, the FAS-II enzymes were co-localized at the poles and septum with Wag31, the protein responsible for the polar localization of mycobacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The dynamic localization of FAS-II and of the MA transporter with Wag31, at the old-growing poles and at the septum suggests that the main components of the mycomembrane may potentially be synthesized at these precise foci. This finding highlights a major difference between mycobacteria and other rod-shaped bacteria studied to date. Based on the already known polar activities of envelope biosynthesis in mycobacteria, we propose the existence of complex polar machinery devoted to the biogenesis of the entire envelope. As a result, the mycobacterial pole would represent the Achilles' heel of the bacillus at all its growing stages. PMID:24817274

  2. Nuclear Localization of Diacylglycerol Kinase Alpha in K562 Cells Is Involved in Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Fiume, Roberta; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Capello, Daniela; Ratti, Stefano; Gesi, Marco; Manzoli, Lucia; Graziani, Andrea; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Cocco, Lucio; Follo, Matilde Y

    2017-09-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) signaling is an essential regulator of cell motility and proliferation. A portion of PI metabolism and signaling takes place in the nuclear compartment of eukaryotic cells, where an array of kinases and phosphatases localize and modulate PI. Among these, Diacylglycerol Kinases (DGKs) are a class of phosphotransferases that phosphorylate diacylglycerol and induce the synthesis of phosphatidic acid. Nuclear DGKalpha modulates cell cycle progression, and its activity or expression can lead to changes in the phosphorylated status of the Retinoblastoma protein, thus, impairing G1/S transition and, subsequently, inducing cell cycle arrest, which is often uncoupled with apoptosis or autophagy induction. Here we report for the first time not only that the DGKalpha isoform is highly expressed in the nuclei of human erythroleukemia cell line K562, but also that its nuclear activity drives K562 cells through the G1/S transition during cell cycle progression. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2550-2557, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Putrescine-Dependent Re-Localization of TvCP39, a Cysteine Proteinase Involved in Trichomonas vaginalis Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gamez, Bertha Isabel; Quintas-Granados, Laura Itzel; Arroyo, Rossana; Vázquez-Carrillo, Laura Isabel; Ramón-Luing, Lucero De los Angeles; Carrillo-Tapia, Eduardo; Alvarez-Sánchez, María Elizbeth

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are involved in the regulation of some Trichomonas vaginalis virulence factors such as the transcript, proteolytic activity, and cytotoxicity of TvCP65, a cysteine proteinase (CP) involved in the trichomonal cytotoxicity. In this work, we reported the putrescine effect on TvCP39, other CP that also participate in the trichomonal cytotoxicity. Parasites treated with 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DAB) (an inhibitor of putrescine biosynthesis), diminished the amount and proteolytic activity of TvCP39 as compared with untreated parasites. Inhibition of putrescine biosynthesis also reduced ∼80% the tvcp39 mRNA levels according to RT-PCR and qRT-PCR assays. Additionally, actinomycin D-treatment showed that the tvcp39 mRNA half-life decreased in the absence of putrescine. However, this reduction was restored by exogenous putrescine addition, suggesting that putrescine is necessary for tvcp39 mRNA stability. TvCP39 was localized in the cytoplasm but, in DAB treated parasites transferred into exogenous putrescine culture media, TvCP39 was re-localized to the nucleus and nuclear periphery of trichomonads. Interestingly, the amount and proteolytic activity of TvCP39 was recovered as well as the tvcp39 mRNA levels were restored when putrescine exogenous was added to the DAB-treated parasites. In conclusion, our data show that putrescine regulate the TvCP39 expression, protein amount, proteolytic activity, and cellular localization. PMID:25251406

  4. Putrescine-dependent re-localization of TvCP39, a cysteine proteinase involved in Trichomonas vaginalis cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Gamez, Bertha Isabel; Quintas-Granados, Laura Itzel; Arroyo, Rossana; Vázquez-Carrillo, Laura Isabel; Ramón-Luing, Lucero De los Angeles; Carrillo-Tapia, Eduardo; Alvarez-Sánchez, María Elizbeth

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are involved in the regulation of some Trichomonas vaginalis virulence factors such as the transcript, proteolytic activity, and cytotoxicity of TvCP65, a cysteine proteinase (CP) involved in the trichomonal cytotoxicity. In this work, we reported the putrescine effect on TvCP39, other CP that also participate in the trichomonal cytotoxicity. Parasites treated with 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DAB) (an inhibitor of putrescine biosynthesis), diminished the amount and proteolytic activity of TvCP39 as compared with untreated parasites. Inhibition of putrescine biosynthesis also reduced ∼ 80% the tvcp39 mRNA levels according to RT-PCR and qRT-PCR assays. Additionally, actinomycin D-treatment showed that the tvcp39 mRNA half-life decreased in the absence of putrescine. However, this reduction was restored by exogenous putrescine addition, suggesting that putrescine is necessary for tvcp39 mRNA stability. TvCP39 was localized in the cytoplasm but, in DAB treated parasites transferred into exogenous putrescine culture media, TvCP39 was re-localized to the nucleus and nuclear periphery of trichomonads. Interestingly, the amount and proteolytic activity of TvCP39 was recovered as well as the tvcp39 mRNA levels were restored when putrescine exogenous was added to the DAB-treated parasites. In conclusion, our data show that putrescine regulate the TvCP39 expression, protein amount, proteolytic activity, and cellular localization.

  5. Vacuolar amino acid transporters upregulated by exogenous proline and involved in cellular localization of proline in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Ikuhisa; Watanabe, Daisuke; Tsolmonbaatar, Ariunzaya; Kaino, Tomohiro; Ohtsu, Iwao; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-07-14

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the AVT genes (AVT1-7), which encode vacuolar amino acid transporters belonging to the amino acid vacuolar transport (AVT)-family, were significantly upregulated in response to exogenous proline. To reveal a novel role of the Avt proteins in proline homeostasis, we analyzed the effects of deletion or overexpression of the AVT genes on the subcellular distribution of amino acids after the addition of proline to the cells grown in minimal medium. Among seven AVT gene disruptants, avt1Δ and avt7Δ showed the lowest ratios of vacuolar proline. Consistently, overexpression of the AVT1 gene specifically enhanced the vacuolar localization of proline. Since double disruption of the AVT1 and AVT7 genes did not completely abrogate vacuolar accumulation of proline, it is presumed that Avt1 has a dominant role, and Avt7 and other Avt proteins have redundant functions, in the localization of proline into the vacuolar lumen. In contrast, deletion of the AVT3 gene increased vacuolar proline, although the highly expressed AVT3 gene interfered with the accumulation of proline in the vacuole. Based on these results, it appears that Avt3 is the major protein involved in the export of proline from the vacuole. We also observed vacuolar membrane localization of GFP-fused Avt1, Avt3, and Avt7 proteins. Taken together, our data suggest that the AVT genes induced by exogenous proline are involved in the bidirectional transport of proline across the vacuolar membrane.

  6. Non-stereotactic method involving combination of ultrasound-guided wire localization and vacuum-assisted breast biopsy for microcalcification

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeeyeon; Park, Ho Yong; Jung, Jin Hyang; Kim, Wan Wook; Hwang, Seung Ook; Kwon, Taek Ju; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Stereotactic breast biopsy is a standard intervention for evaluation of “microcalcification-only” lesions. However, an expensive stereotactic device and radiologic expertise are necessary for this procedure. We herein report a non-stereotactic technique involving the combination of wire localization and vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) under ultrasound (US) guidance. Methods Twenty-two consecutive patients with category 3 or 4a microcalcification only as shown by mammography underwent the above-mentioned non-stereotactic combination method involving US-guided wire localization and VABB. The location of the microcalcification was measured by manual stereotaxis, and the microcalcification was confirmed by specimen mammography after the procedure. Results The mean number ± standard deviation of removed cores and calcified cores was 28.4±13.4 and 2.2±0.9, respectively. In one case, the procedure was repeated 3 times. The histologic diagnoses were fibrocystic change (n=14), fibroadenoma (n=4), sclerosing adenosis (n=1), usual ductal hyperplasia (n=2), and atypical ductal hyperplasia (n=1). Conclusions “Microcalcification-only” breast lesions can be easily evaluated with the combination of non-stereotactic US-guided wire localization and VABB. This would be an effective diagnostic technique for breast lesion which reveals only microcalcification. PMID:27294037

  7. Should consent forms used in clinical trials be translated into the local dialects? A survey among past participants in rural Ghana.

    PubMed

    Baiden, Frank; Akazili, James; Chatio, Samuel; Achana, Fabian Sebastian; Oduro, Abraham Rexford; Ravinetto, Raffaella; Hodgson, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    Obtaining informed consent is part of the expression of the principle of participant autonomy during clinical trials. It is critical that participants understand the content of informed consent forms and remain in a position to seek independent advice on its content. We conducted a survey among past participants of a clinical trial in the Kassena-Nankana Districts of rural northern Ghana about the usefulness of informed consent forms that are written in the local dialects. The written forms of local dialects are largely undeveloped. We contacted a randomly selected sample of caregivers whose children were enrolled in a completed clinical trial and interviewed them using a structured questionnaire. Analysis sought to determine participants' preference and whether or not they were likely to find confidants who will be able to read, understand and give advice on the content of the informed consent form to them when they take the informed consent forms home. We interviewed 394 caregivers, 88.6% of whom were women. About half (54%) of the respondents wanted the informed consent forms to be in the English language. Caregivers with higher than primary level education were more likely to prefer the informed consent form to be in English than those with no formal education (74% versus 26%, p = 0.04). The majority (85%) indicated that they would be able to find close confidants who would be able to read and explain it to them if it is in English. In contrast, only 8% thought they would be able to do the same if the informed consent form was written in the local language. Respondents were more likely to find close confidants to read and explain the informed consent form if it were written in English than if it were written in the local language (94% versus 19%, p value < 0.01). The practice of translating informed consent forms into undeveloped local dialects and giving such copies to trial participants to send home needs to be re-evaluated. In populations where the

  8. Postnatal changes of local neuronal circuits involved in activation of jaw-closing muscles.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomio; Nakamura, Shiro; Takamatsu, Junichi; Tokita, Kenichi; Gemba, Akiko; Nakayama, Kiyomi

    2007-04-01

    Feeding behaviour in mammals changes from suckling to mastication during postnatal development and the neuronal circuits controlling feeding behaviour should change in parallel to the development of orofacial structures. In this review we discuss the location of excitatory premotor neurons for jaw-closing motoneurons (JCMNs) and postnatal changes of excitatory synaptic transmission from the supratrigeminal region (SupV) to JCMNs. We show that neurons located in SupV and the reticular formation dorsal to the facial nucleus most likely excite JCMNs. Excitatory inputs from SupV to JCMNs are mediated by activation of glutamate and glycine receptors in neonatal rats, whereas glycinergic inputs from SupV to JCMNs become inhibitory with age. We also show that the incidence of post-spike afterdepolarization increases during postnatal development, whereas the amplitude and half-duration of the medium-duration afterhyperpolarization decrease with age. Such postnatal changes in synaptic transmission from SupV to JCMNs and membrane properties of JCMNs might be involved in the transition from suckling to mastication.

  9. Local structural and environmental factors define the efficiency of an RNA pseudoknot involved in programmed ribosomal frameshift process.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asmita; Bansal, Manju

    2014-10-16

    In programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift, an RNA pseudoknot stalls the ribosome at specific sequence and restarts translation in a new reading frame. A precise understanding of structural characteristics of these pseudoknots and their PRF inducing ability has not been clear to date. To investigate this phenomenon, we have studied various structural aspects of a -1 PRF inducing RNA pseudoknot from BWYV using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. A set of functional and poorly functional forms, for which previous mutational data were available, were chosen for analysis. These structures differ from each other by either single base substitutions or base-pair replacements from the native structure. We have rationalized how certain mutations in RNA pseudoknot affect its function; e.g., a specific base substitution in loop 2 stabilizes the junction geometry by forming multiple noncanonical hydrogen bonds, leading to a highly rigid structure that could effectively resist ribosome-induced unfolding, thereby increasing efficiency. While, a CG to AU pair substitution in stem 1 leads to loss of noncanonical hydrogen bonds between stems and loop, resulting in a less stable structure and reduced PRF inducing ability, inversion of a pair in stem 2 alters specific base-pair geometry that might be required in ribosomal recognition of nucleobase groups, negatively affecting pseudoknot functioning. These observations illustrate that the ability of an RNA pseudoknot to induce -1 PRF with an optimal rate depends on several independent factors that contribute to either the local conformational variability or geometry.

  10. The Drosophila Mitochondrial Translation Elongation Factor G1 Contains a Nuclear Localization Signal and Inhibits Growth and DPP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Trivigno, Catherine; Haerry, Theodor E.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial elongation factor G1 (EF-G1) are recessive lethal and cause death shortly after birth. We have isolated mutations in iconoclast (ico), which encodes the highly conserved Drosophila orthologue of EF-G1. We find that EF-G1 is essential during fly development, but its function is not required in every tissue. In contrast to null mutations, missense mutations exhibit stronger, possibly neomorphic phenotypes that lead to premature death during embryogenesis. Our experiments show that EF-G1 contains a secondary C-terminal nuclear localization signal. Expression of missense mutant forms of EF-G1 can accumulate in the nucleus and cause growth and patterning defects and animal lethality. We find that transgenes that encode mutant human EF-G1 proteins can rescue ico mutants, indicating that the underlying problem of the human disease is not just the loss of enzymatic activity. Our results are consistent with a model where EF-G1 acts as a retrograde signal from mitochondria to the nucleus to slow down cell proliferation if mitochondrial energy output is low. PMID:21364917

  11. Dynamics of electronic excitations relaxation in hydrophilic colloidal CdS quantum dots in gelatin with involvement of localized states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, M. S.; Buganov, O. V.; Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Ovchinnikov, O. V.; Vitukhnovsky, A. G.; Perepelitsa, A. S.; Matsukovich, A. S.; Katsaba, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Dynamics of the 1Se-1S3/2 exciton in colloidal CdS quantum dots with diameter of 3.1 ÷ 4.5 nm in gelatin with involvement of localized states was studied by means of femtosecond photoinduced absorption spectroscopy (pump-probe), thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) observed under permanently excited luminescence. It was found that the bleaching band occurs in the energy region of exciton ground state under excitation by femtosecond laser pulses. The complex dynamics of bleaching recovery is caused by the capture of electron on localized states, found using TSL. The stochastic model describing the dynamics of bleaching recovery is discussed. It is shown that the low efficiency of exciton luminescence is caused by the rapid capture of holes by luminescence centers.

  12. Translation Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurtleff, Richard

    2004-10-01

    Translation matrices together with rotation and boost matrices combine to represent spacetime symmetry transformations. A brief introduction to some of the properties of some not-so-well-known translation and momentum matrices is presented.

  13. eHealth Literacy and Partner Involvement in Treatment Decision Making for Men With Newly Diagnosed Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Lixin; Tatum, Kimberly; Greene, Giselle; Chen, Ronald C

    2017-03-01

    To examine how the eHealth literacy of partners of patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer affects their involvement in decision making, and to identify the factors that influence their eHealth literacy.
. Cross-sectional exploratory study.
. North Carolina.
. 142 partners of men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. 
. A telephone survey and descriptive and multiple linear regression analyses were used.
. The partners' eHealth literacy, involvement in treatment decision making, and demographics, and the health statuses of the patients and their partners. 
. Higher levels of eHealth literacy among partners were significantly associated with their involvement in getting a second opinion, their awareness of treatment options, and the size of the social network they relied on for additional information and support for treatment decision making for prostate cancer. The factor influencing eHealth literacy was the partners' access to the Internet for personal use, which explained some of the variance in eHealth literacy.
. This study described how partners' eHealth literacy influenced their involvement in treatment decision making for prostate cancer and highlighted the influencing factors (i.e., partners' access to the Internet for personal use).
. When helping men with prostate cancer and their partners with treatment decision making, nurses need to assess eHealth literacy levels to determine whether nonelectronically based education materials are needed and to provide clear instructions on how to use eHealth resources.

  14. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein and Dendritic Local Translation of the Alpha Subunit of the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Messenger RNA Are Required for the Structural Plasticity Underlying Olfactory Learning.

    PubMed

    Daroles, Laura; Gribaudo, Simona; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Dubacq, Caroline; Mandairon, Nathalie; Greer, Charles August; Didier, Anne; Trembleau, Alain; Caillé, Isabelle

    2016-07-15

    In the adult brain, structural plasticity allowing gain or loss of synapses remodels circuits to support learning. In fragile X syndrome, the absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to defects in plasticity and learning deficits. FMRP is a master regulator of local translation but its implication in learning-induced structural plasticity is unknown. Using an olfactory learning task requiring adult-born olfactory bulb neurons and cell-specific ablation of FMRP, we investigated whether learning shapes adult-born neuron morphology during their synaptic integration and its dependence on FMRP. We used alpha subunit of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (αCaMKII) mutant mice with altered dendritic localization of αCaMKII messenger RNA, as well as a reporter of αCaMKII local translation to investigate the role of this FMRP messenger RNA target in learning-dependent structural plasticity. Learning induces profound changes in dendritic architecture and spine morphology of adult-born neurons that are prevented by ablation of FMRP in adult-born neurons and rescued by an metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist. Moreover, dendritically translated αCaMKII is necessary for learning and associated structural modifications and learning triggers an FMRP-dependent increase of αCaMKII dendritic translation in adult-born neurons. Our results strongly suggest that FMRP mediates structural plasticity of olfactory bulb adult-born neurons to support olfactory learning through αCaMKII local translation. This reveals a new role for FMRP-regulated dendritic local translation in learning-induced structural plasticity. This might be of clinical relevance for the understanding of critical periods disruption in autism spectrum disorder patients, among which fragile X syndrome is the primary monogenic cause. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Attributed Translations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P. M.; Rosenkrantz, D. J.; Stearns, R. E.

    Attributed translation grammars are introduced as a means of specifying a translation from strings of input symbols to strings of output symbols. Each of these symbols can have a finite set of attributes, each of which can take on a value from a possibly infinite set. Attributed translation grammars can be applied in depth to practical compiling problems.

  16. Translational Implications of Tamil "Hamlets."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanakaraj, S.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of translation when teaching English as a Second Language in a Tamil context. Singles out the fencing episode in Shakespeare's "Hamlet" to illustrate the difficulties of translating cultural aspects. Concludes that successful translations of Shakespeare into Indian languages should involve collaboration between…

  17. Translational Implications of Tamil "Hamlets."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanakaraj, S.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of translation when teaching English as a Second Language in a Tamil context. Singles out the fencing episode in Shakespeare's "Hamlet" to illustrate the difficulties of translating cultural aspects. Concludes that successful translations of Shakespeare into Indian languages should involve collaboration between…

  18. The Measurement of Translation Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Variables that constitute translation ability are discussed, based on a two-year development and validation study of job-related tests of translation ability for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The project involved the development of two parallel forms of the Spanish into English Verbatim Translation Exam (SEVTE). (five references) (LB)

  19. Subcellular localization based comparative study on radioresistant bacteria: A novel approach to mine proteins involve in radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Vishambra, Divya; Srivastava, Malay; Dev, Kamal; Jaiswal, Varun

    2017-08-01

    Radioresistant bacteria (RRB) are among the most radioresistant organisms and has a unique role in evolution. Along with the evolutionary role, radioresistant organisms play important role in paper industries, bioremediation, vaccine development and possibility in anti-aging and anti-cancer treatment. The study of radiation resistance in RRB was mainly focused on cytosolic mechanisms such as DNA repair mechanism, cell cleansing activity and high antioxidant activity. Although it was known that protein localized on outer areas of cell play role in resistance towards extreme condition but the mechanisms/proteins localized on the outer area of cells are not studied for radioresistance. Considering the fact that outer part of cell is more exposed to radiations and proteins present in outer area of the cell may have role in radioresistance. Localization based comparative study of proteome from RRB and non-radio resistant bacteria was carried out. In RRB 20 unique proteins have been identified. Further domain, structural, and pathway analysis of selected proteins were carried out. Out of 20 proteins, 8 proteins were direct involvement in radioresistance and literature study strengthens this, however, 1 proteins had assumed relation in radioresistance. Selected radioresistant proteins may be helpful for optimal use of RRB in industry and health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An epoxide hydrolase involved in the biosynthesis of an insect sex attractant and its use to localize the production site.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latief, Mohatmed; Garbe, Leif A; Koch, Markus; Ruther, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes occurring in virtually any living organism. They catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxide containing lipids and are involved in crucial mechanisms, such as the detoxification of xenobiotics or the regulation of inflammation and blood pressure. Here, we describe a function of a putative EH gene in the biosynthesis of a sex attractant in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis and use this gene to localize the site of pheromone production. Males of this parasitic wasp release a mixture of (4R,5R)-( threo-) and (4R,5S)-( erythro-)5-hydroxy-4-decanolide (HDL) to attract virgin females. Using a stable isotope labeled precursor, we demonstrated that vernolic acid ( erythro-12,13-epoxy-octadec-9Z-enoic acid) is converted by N. vitripennis males to threo-HDL. This suggested the involvement of an EH in hydrolyzing the fatty acid epoxide under inversion of the stereochemistry into the respective diol, which might be further processed by chain shortening and lactonization to HDL. We cloned a putative N. vitripennis EH gene (Nasvi-EH1) encoding 470 amino acids and localized its transcripts in the male rectal papillae by in situ RT-PCR. Chemical analyses and histological studies confirmed that males synthesize the sex attractant in the rectal vesicle and release it via the anal orifice. Involvement of Nasvi-EH1 in HDL biosynthesis was established by RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Injection of Nasvi-EH1 dsRNA into male abdomens inhibited pheromone biosynthesis by 55% and suppressed the targeted gene transcripts in the rectal vesicle by 95%.

  1. An epoxide hydrolase involved in the biosynthesis of an insect sex attractant and its use to localize the production site

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-latief, Mohatmed; Garbe, Leif A.; Koch, Markus; Ruther, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are enzymes occurring in virtually any living organism. They catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxide containing lipids and are involved in crucial mechanisms, such as the detoxification of xenobiotics or the regulation of inflammation and blood pressure. Here, we describe a function of a putative EH gene in the biosynthesis of a sex attractant in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis and use this gene to localize the site of pheromone production. Males of this parasitic wasp release a mixture of (4R,5R)-(threo-) and (4R,5S)-(erythro-)5-hydroxy-4-decanolide (HDL) to attract virgin females. Using a stable isotope labeled precursor, we demonstrated that vernolic acid (erythro-12,13-epoxy-octadec-9Z-enoic acid) is converted by N. vitripennis males to threo-HDL. This suggested the involvement of an EH in hydrolyzing the fatty acid epoxide under inversion of the stereochemistry into the respective diol, which might be further processed by chain shortening and lactonization to HDL. We cloned a putative N. vitripennis EH gene (Nasvi-EH1) encoding 470 amino acids and localized its transcripts in the male rectal papillae by in situ RT-PCR. Chemical analyses and histological studies confirmed that males synthesize the sex attractant in the rectal vesicle and release it via the anal orifice. Involvement of Nasvi-EH1 in HDL biosynthesis was established by RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Injection of Nasvi-EH1 dsRNA into male abdomens inhibited pheromone biosynthesis by 55% and suppressed the targeted gene transcripts in the rectal vesicle by 95%. PMID:18579785

  2. Involving local health departments in community health partnerships: evaluation results from the partnership for the public's health initiative.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Allen; Hsu, Clarissa; Schwartz, Pamela M; Pearson, David; Greenwald, Howard P; Beery, William L; Flores, George; Casey, Maria Campbell

    2008-03-01

    Improving community health "from the ground up" entails a comprehensive ecological approach, deep involvement of community-based entities, and addressing social determinants of population health status. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Office of the Surgeon General, and other authorities have called for public health to be an "inter-sector" enterprise, few models have surfaced that feature local health departments as a key part of the collaborative model for effecting community-level change. This paper presents evaluation findings and lessons learned from the Partnership for the Public's Health (PPH), a comprehensive community initiative that featured a central role for local health departments with their community partners. Funded by The California Endowment, PPH provided technical and financial resources to 39 community partnerships in 14 local health department jurisdictions in California to promote community and health department capacity building and community-level policy and systems change designed to produce long-term improvements in population health. The evaluation used multiple data sources to create progress ratings for each partnership in five goal areas related to capacity building, community health improvement programs, and policy and systems change. Overall results were generally positive; in particular, of the 37 partnerships funded continuously throughout the 5 years of the initiative, between 25% and 40% were able to make a high level of progress in each of the Initiative's five goal areas. Factors associated with partnership success were also identified by local evaluators. These results showed that health departments able to work effectively with community groups had strong, committed leaders who used creative financing mechanisms, inclusive planning processes, organizational changes, and open communication to promote collaboration with the communities they served.

  3. Reducing uncertainty in flood frequency analyses: A comparison of local and regional approaches involving information on extreme historical floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbert, K.; Nguyen, C. C.; Payrastre, O.; Gaume, E.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a detailed comparison of local and regional approaches for flood frequency analyses, with a special emphasis on the effects of (a) the information on extreme floods used in the analysis (historical data or recent extreme floods observed at ungauged sites), and (b) the assumptions associated with regional approaches (statistical homogeneity of considered series, independence of observations). The results presented are based on two case studies: the Ard e ̀ che and Argens rivers regions in south-east of France. Four approaches are compared: 1 - local analysis based on continuous measured series, 2 - local analysis with historical information, 3 - regional index-flood analysis based on continuous series, 4 - regional analysis involving information on extremes (including both historical floods and recent floods observed at ungauged sites). The inference approach used is based on a GEV distribution and a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach for parameters estimation. The comparison relies both on (1) available observed datasets and (2) Monte Carlo simulations in order to evaluate the effects of sampling variability and to analyze the possible influence of regional heterogeneities. The results indicate that a relatively limited level of regional heterogeneity, which may not be detected through homogeneity tests, may significantly affect the performances of regional approaches. These results also illustrate the added value of information on extreme floods, historical floods or recent floods observed at ungauged sites, in both local and regional approaches. As far as possible, gathering such information and incorporating it into flood frequency studies should be promoted. Finally, the presented Monte Carlo simulations appear as an interesting analysis tool for adapting the estimation strategy to the available data for each specific case study.

  4. Allele-specific suppression of a defective trans-Golgi network (TGN) localization signal in Kex2p identifies three genes involved in localization of TGN transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, K; Brickner, J H; Marschall, L G; Nichols, J W; Fuller, R S

    1996-01-01

    Kex2 protease (Kex2p) and Ste13 dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (Ste13p) are required in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for maturation of the alpha-mating factor in a late Golgi compartment, most likely the yeast trans-Golgi network (TGN). Previous studies identified a TGN localization signal (TLS) in the C-terminal cytosolic tail of Kex2p consisting of Tyr-713 and contextual sequences. Further analysis of the Kex2p TLS revealed similarity to the Ste13p TLS. Mutation of the Kex2p TLS results in transport of Kex2p to the vacuole by default. When expression of a GAL1 promoter-driven KEX2 gene is shut off in MAT(alpha) cells, the TGN becomes depleted of Kex2p, resulting in a gradual decline in mating competence which is greatly accelerated by TLS mutations. To identify the genes involved in localization of Kex2p, we isolated second-site suppressors of the rapid loss of mating competence observed upon shutting off expression of a TLS mutant form of Kex2p (Y713A). Seven of 58 suppressors were allele specific, suppressing point mutations at Tyr-713 but not deletions of the TLS or entire C-terminal cytosolic tail. By linkage analysis, the allele-specific suppressors defined three genetic loci, SOI1, S0I2, and S0I3. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrated that these suppressors increased net TGN retention of both Y713A Kex2p and a Ste13p-Pho8p fusion protein containing a point mutation in the Ste13p TLS. SOI1 suppressor alleles reduced the efficiency of localization of wild-type Kex2p to the TGN, implying an impaired ability to discriminate between the normal TLS and a mutant TLS. soi1 mutants also exhibited a recessive defect in vacuolar protein sorting. Suppressor alleles of S0I2 were dominant. These results suggest that the SOI1 and S0I2 genes encode regulators or components of the TLS recognition machinery. PMID:8887651

  5. Evidence for the involvement of lung-specific gammadelta T cell subsets in local responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Alun C; Newton, Darren J; Carding, Simon R; Kaye, Paul M

    2007-12-01

    Although gammadelta T cells are involved in the response to many pathogens, the dynamics and heterogeneity of the local gammadelta T cell response remains poorly defined. We recently identified gammadelta T cells as regulators of macrophages and dendritic cells during the resolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae-mediated lung inflammation. Here, using PCR, spectratype analysis and flow cytometry, we show that multiple gammadelta T cell subsets, including those bearing Vgamma1, Vgamma4 and Vgamma6 TCR, increase in number in the lungs of infected mice, but not in associated lymphoid tissue. These gammadelta T cells displayed signs of activation, as defined by CD69 and CD25 expression. In vivo BrdU incorporation suggested that local expansion, rather than recruitment, was the principal mechanism underlying this increase in gammadelta T cells. This conclusion was supported by the finding that pulmonary gammadelta T cells, but not alphabeta T cells, isolated from mice that had resolved infection exhibited lung-homing capacity in both naive and infected recipients. Together, these data provide novel insights into the origins of the heterogeneous gammadelta T cell response that accompanies lung infection, and the first evidence that inflammation-associated gammadelta T cells may exhibit distinct tissue-homing potential.

  6. Translating Legal Collocations in Contract Agreements by Iraqi EFL Students-Translators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulwahid, Muntaha A.; Hamzah, Zaitul Azma Binti Zainon; Hajimaming, Pabiyah; Alkhawaja, Hussein W.

    2017-01-01

    Legal translation of contract agreements is a challenge to translators as it involves combining the literary translation with the technical terminological precision. In translating legal contract agreements, a legal translator must utilize the lexical or syntactic precision and, more importantly, the pragmatic awareness of the context. This will…

  7. An Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized RRL protein mediates abscisic acid signal transduction through mitochondrial retrograde regulation involving ABI4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuan; Li, Juanjuan; Liu, Jianping; Liu, Kede

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms of abscisic acid (ABA) signalling have been studied for many years; however, how mitochondria-localized proteins play roles in ABA signalling remains unclear. Here an Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRL (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH-LIKE) was shown to function in ABA signalling. A previous study had revealed that the Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRG (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH) is required for cell division in the root meristem. RRL shares 54% and 57% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, with RRG; nevertheless, RRL shows a different function in Arabidopsis. In this study, disruption of RRL decreased ABA sensitivity whereas overexpression of RRL increased ABA sensitivity during seed germination and seedling growth. High expression levels of RRL were found in germinating seeds and developing seedlings, as revealed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining of ProRRL-GUS transgenic lines. The analyses of the structure and function of mitochondria in the knockout rrl mutant showed that the disruption of RRL causes extensively internally vacuolated mitochondria and reduced ABA-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Previous studies have revealed that the expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) in the alternative respiratory pathway is increased by mitochondrial retrograde regulation to regain ROS levels when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is impaired. The APETALA2 (AP2)-type transcription factor ABI4 is a regulator of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a (AOX1a) in mitochondrial retrograde signalling. This study showed that ABA-induced AOX1a and ABI4 expression was inhibited in the rrl mutant, suggesting that RRL is probably involved in ABI4-mediated mitochondrial retrograde signalling. Furthermore, the results revealed that ABI4 is a downstream regulatory factor in RRL-mediated ABA signalling in seed germination and seedling growth.

  8. Involvement of ACSL in local synthesis of neutral lipids in cytoplasmic lipid droplets in human hepatocyte HuH7.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Tetsuaki; Homma, Koichi J; Onoduka, Jun; Mori, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Makita, Minoru; Higashi, Yusuke; Yamashita, Atsushi; Takano, Tatsuya

    2007-06-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) function as intracellular storage depots of neutral lipids. Recently, we identified long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase 3 (ACSL3) as a major LD-associated protein in the human hepatocyte cell line HuH7. In this study, we investigated whether droplet-associated ACSL is involved in lipid metabolism in LDs. Addition of oleic acid (OA) to culture medium was shown to enhance the intracellular accumulation of LDs in the cells, which was accompanied by an increase of droplet ACSL3. When LD-enriched cells induced by OA were further incubated without OA for 3 days, approximately 80% of LDs were retained in the cells. Conversely, cellular LD content was greatly decreased after the addition of an ACSL inhibitor, triacsin C. This was accompanied by a concomitant decrease of the droplet ACSL3. Incubation of isolated LD fractions with (14)C-labeled OA or palmitic acid resulted in [(14)C]acyl-CoA generation in vitro, indicating the presence of ACSL activity in LDs. The droplet ACSL activity varied according to the quantity of LDs in their emergence and disappearance in cells. Incubation of the LD fraction with [(14)C]oleoyl-CoA resulted in radioactive triacylglycerol and cholesteryl esters. These results suggest that LD ACSL activity is involved in local synthesis of neutral lipids and LD formation.

  9. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1): a master regulator of mRNA translation involved in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Musa, J; Orth, M F; Dallmayer, M; Baldauf, M; Pardo, C; Rotblat, B; Kirchner, T; Leprivier, G; Grünewald, T G P

    2016-09-08

    Protein synthesis activity is abnormally enhanced in cancer cells to support their uncontrolled growth. However, this process needs to be tightly restricted under metabolic stress-a condition often found within the tumor microenvironment-to preserve cell viability. mTORC1 is critical to link protein synthesis activity to nutrient and oxygen levels, in part by controlling the 4E-BP1-eIF4E axis. Whereas mTORC1 and eIF4E are known pro-tumorigenic factors, whose expression or activity is increased in numerous cancers, the role of 4E-BP1 in cancer is not yet definitive. On the one hand, 4E-BP1 has tumor suppressor activity by inhibiting eIF4E and, thus, blocking mRNA translation and proliferation. This is corroborated by elevated levels of phosphorylated and hence inactive 4E-BP1, which are detected in various cancers. On the other hand, 4E-BP1 has pro-tumorigenic functions as it promotes tumor adaptation to metabolic and genotoxic stress by selectively enhancing or preventing the translation of specific transcripts. Here we describe the molecular and cellular functions of 4E-BP1 and highlight the distinct roles of 4E-BP1 in cancer depending on the microenvironmental context of the tumor.

  10. Inhibition of translation initiation complex formation by GE81112 unravels a 16S rRNA structural switch involved in P-site decoding

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Schedlbauer, Andreas; Brandi, Letizia; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Giuliodori, Anna Maria; Garofalo, Raffaella; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Connell, Sean R.; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    In prokaryotic systems, the initiation phase of protein synthesis is governed by the presence of initiation factors that guide the transition of the small ribosomal subunit (30S) from an unlocked preinitiation complex (30S preIC) to a locked initiation complex (30SIC) upon the formation of a correct codon–anticodon interaction in the peptidyl (P) site. Biochemical and structural characterization of GE81112, a translational inhibitor specific for the initiation phase, indicates that the main mechanism of action of this antibiotic is to prevent P-site decoding by stabilizing the anticodon stem loop of the initiator tRNA in a distorted conformation. This distortion stalls initiation in the unlocked 30S preIC state characterized by tighter IF3 binding and a reduced association rate for the 50S subunit. At the structural level we observe that in the presence of GE81112 the h44/h45/h24a interface, which is part of the IF3 binding site and forms ribosomal intersubunit bridges, preferentially adopts a disengaged conformation. Accordingly, the findings reveal that the dynamic equilibrium between the disengaged and engaged conformations of the h44/h45/h24a interface regulates the progression of protein synthesis, acting as a molecular switch that senses and couples the 30S P-site decoding step of translation initiation to the transition from an unlocked preIC to a locked 30SIC state. PMID:27071098

  11. The processed isoform of the translation termination factor eRF3 localizes to the nucleus to interact with the ARF tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Yoshifumi; Kumagai, Naomichi; Hosoda, Nao; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • So far, eRF3 has been thought to function exclusively in the cytoplasm. • eRF3 is a nucleo-cutoplasmic shuttling protein. • eRF3 has a leptomycin-sensitive nuclear export signal (NES). • Removal of NES by proteolytic cleavage allows eRF3 to translocate to the nucleus. • The processed eRF3 (p-eRF3) interacts with a nuclear tumor suppressor ARF. - Abstract: The eukaryotic releasing factor eRF3 is a multifunctional protein that plays pivotal roles in translation termination as well as the initiation of mRNA decay. eRF3 also functions in the regulation of apoptosis; eRF3 is cleaved at Ala73 by an as yet unidentified protease into processed isoform of eRF3 (p-eRF3), which interacts with the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). The binding of p-eRF3 with IAPs leads to the release of active caspases from IAPs, which promotes apoptosis. Although full-length eRF3 is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm, p-eRF3 localizes in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. We here focused on the role of p-eRF3 in the nucleus. We identified leptomycin-sensitive nuclear export signal (NES) at amino acid residues 61–71 immediately upstream of the cleavage site Ala73. Thus, the proteolytic cleavage of eRF3 into p-eRF3 leads to release an amino-terminal fragment containing NES to allow the relocalization of eRF3 into the nucleus. Consistent with this, p-eRF3 more strongly interacted with the nuclear ARF tumor suppressor than full-length eRF3. These results suggest that while p-eRF3 interacts with IAPs to promote apoptosis in the cytoplasm, p-eRF3 also has some roles in regulating cell death in the nucleus.

  12. Paraquat Resistant1, a Golgi-localized putative transporter protein, is involved in intracellular transport of paraquat.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianyong; Mu, Jinye; Bai, Jiaoteng; Fu, Fuyou; Zou, Tingting; An, Fengying; Zhang, Jian; Jing, Hongwei; Wang, Qing; Li, Zhen; Yang, Shuhua; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-05-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides worldwide. In green plants, paraquat targets the chloroplast by transferring electrons from photosystem I to molecular oxygen to generate toxic reactive oxygen species, which efficiently induce membrane damage and cell death. A number of paraquat-resistant biotypes of weeds and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants have been identified. The herbicide resistance in Arabidopsis is partly attributed to a reduced uptake of paraquat through plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the biochemical mechanism of paraquat resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis paraquat resistant1 (par1) mutant that shows strong resistance to the herbicide without detectable developmental abnormalities. PAR1 encodes a putative l-type amino acid transporter protein localized to the Golgi apparatus. Compared with the wild-type plants, the par1 mutant plants show similar efficiency of paraquat uptake, suggesting that PAR1 is not directly responsible for the intercellular uptake of paraquat. However, the par1 mutation caused a reduction in the accumulation of paraquat in the chloroplast, suggesting that PAR1 is involved in the intracellular transport of paraquat into the chloroplast. We identified a PAR1-like gene, OsPAR1, in rice (Oryza sativa). Whereas the overexpression of OsPAR1 resulted in hypersensitivity to paraquat, the knockdown of its expression using RNA interference conferred paraquat resistance on the transgenic rice plants. These findings reveal a unique mechanism by which paraquat is actively transported into the chloroplast and also provide a practical approach for genetic manipulations of paraquat resistance in crops.

  13. Daisaku Ikeda and the Culture of Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebert, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Although not functionally multilingual or a translator himself, Daisaku Ikeda has been deeply involved in translation processes, both as a reader and as someone who has produced texts for translation into various languages. This article examines two sources of influence shaping Ikeda's attitude toward translation culture: the flourishing culture…

  14. Daisaku Ikeda and the Culture of Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebert, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Although not functionally multilingual or a translator himself, Daisaku Ikeda has been deeply involved in translation processes, both as a reader and as someone who has produced texts for translation into various languages. This article examines two sources of influence shaping Ikeda's attitude toward translation culture: the flourishing culture…

  15. Increasing the reach: Involving local Muslim religious teachers in a behavioral intervention to eliminate urogenital schistosomiasis in Zanzibar.

    PubMed

    Celone, Mike; Person, Bobbie; Ali, Said M; Lyimo, Jameelat H; Mohammed, Ulfat A; Khamis, Alippo N; Mohammed, Yussra S; Mohammed, Khalfan A; Rollinson, David; Knopp, Stefanie

    2016-11-01

    In Zanzibar, United Republic of Tanzania, Madrassa schools are influential institutions, where children and adults can learn about the interpretation of the Koran. We aimed to explore the involvement of Madrassa teachers for behavior change interventions in a randomized operational research trial designed to investigate the impact of multiple approaches to eliminate urogenital schistosomiasis transmission from Zanzibar. Madrassa teachers performing in the 30 communities of the behavior change study arm were trained in new interactive and participatory teaching methods by the local behavioral team and provided with schistosomiasis-teaching tools for teaching about transmission and prevention in their Madrassa. In July 2014, in a qualitative research study, we conducted 25 semi-structured interviews with Madrassa teachers to find out how they perceived their involvement in interventions against schistosomiasis. In 2014, 5926 among the 8497 registered Madrassa students in 30 communities on Unguja and Pemba islands received health education and participated in interactive behavior change exercises about schistosomiasis. Madrassa teachers reported that they valued their inclusion in the study and the opportunity to educate their students about schistosomiasis transmission, prevention, and treatment. They also perceived personal and community benefits as a result of their training and strongly supported the inclusion of additional Madrassa teachers in future intervention activities. Madrassa teachers are influential in the Zanzibari society, and hence are important change agents within our community-level behavioral intervention. They might constitute an untapped resource that can help to expand and increase acceptance of and participation in schistosomiasis and other neglected tropical disease control activities in African Muslim communities.

  16. Research involving anxiety in non-human primates has potential implications for the assessment and treatment of anxiety in autism spectrum disorder: A translational literature review.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Heather K; O'Reilly, Mark; Lang, Russell; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Kajian, Mandana; Kuhn, Michelle; Longino, Deanna; Rojeski, Laura; Watkins, Laci

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this translational review (i.e. moving from basic primate research toward possible human applications) was to summarize non-human primate literature on anxiety to inform the development of future assessments of anxiety in non-verbal individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Systematic searches of databases identified 67 studies that met inclusion criteria. Each study was analysed and summarised in terms of (a) strategies used to evoke anxiety, (b) non-verbal behavioural indicators of anxiety and (c) physiological indicators of anxiety. Eighteen strategies were used to evoke anxiety, 48 non-verbal behavioural indicators and 17 physiological indicators of anxiety were measured. A number of the strategies used with non-human primates, if modified carefully, could be considered in the ongoing effort to study anxiety in individuals with ASD. Potential applications to the assessment of anxiety in humans with ASD are discussed.

  17. Involvement of lipid rafts in the localization and dysfunction effect of the antitumor ether phospholipid edelfosine in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, F; Fernández, M; Hornillos, V; Delgado, J; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U; Nieto-Miguel, T; Villa-Pulgarín, J A; González-García, C; Ceña, V; Gajate, C

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts and mitochondria are promising targets in cancer therapy. The synthetic antitumor alkyl-lysophospholipid analog edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine) has been reported to target lipid rafts. Here, we have found that edelfosine induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, both responses being abrogated by Bcl-xL overexpression. We synthesized a number of new fluorescent edelfosine analogs, which preserved the proapoptotic activity of the parent drug, and colocalized with mitochondria in HeLa cells. Edelfosine induced swelling in isolated mitochondria, indicating an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability. This mitochondrial swelling was independent of reactive oxygen species generation. A structurally related inactive analog was unable to promote mitochondrial swelling, highlighting the importance of edelfosine molecular structure in its effect on mitochondria. Raft disruption inhibited mitochondrial localization of the drug in cells and edelfosine-induced swelling in isolated mitochondria. Edelfosine promoted a redistribution of lipid rafts from the plasma membrane to mitochondria, suggesting a raft-mediated link between plasma membrane and mitochondria. Our data suggest that direct interaction of edelfosine with mitochondria eventually leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. These observations unveil a new framework in cancer chemotherapy that involves a link between lipid rafts and mitochondria in the mechanism of action of an antitumor drug, thus opening new avenues for cancer treatment. PMID:21593790

  18. Anatomic localization of motor points for the neuromuscular blockade of hand intrinsic muscles involved in thumb-in-palm.

    PubMed

    Im, Sun; Han, Seung Ho; Choi, Jin Hwan; Lee, Je Hoon; Ko, Young Jin; Lee, Jong In; Kim, Hye Won

    2008-09-01

    To determine the location of the motor points and intramuscular branches for the muscles involved in thumb-in-palm and the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, the latter of which, because of its anatomic proximity, may be inadvertently blocked. Hand intrinsic muscles from 20 fresh cadavers were dissected. The point of nerve entry to the muscle belly and the points where the intramuscular endings were located most proximally and distally were defined in relation to a reference line connecting the hook of hamate and the head of the first metacarpal bone. We were able to define a region, located from 66.08% +/- 8.67% to 70.28% +/- 10.62% of the reference line, with the hook of hamate as starting point, where intramuscular endings for the thumb-in-palm muscles were dense and farther from the intramuscular endings for the abductor pollicis brevis. The region around 40% of the reference line was the point where the intramuscular endings were most dense for the abductor pollicis brevis. The results may provide guidelines that could help in localizing the appropriate points for the neuromuscular blockade of thumb-in-palm muscles and, at the same time, help in minimizing the inadvertent block of the abductor pollicis brevis.

  19. Inhibition of nitrogen fixation in symbiotic Medicago truncatula upon Cd exposure is a local process involving leghaemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Leguminous biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is very sensitive to environmental fluctuations. It is still contentious how BNF is regulated under stress conditions. The local or systemic control of BNF and the role played by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in such regulation have still not been elucidated completely. Cadmium, which belongs to the so-called heavy metals, is one of the most toxic substances released into the environment. The mechanisms involved in Cd toxicity are still not completely understood but the overproduction of ROS is one of its characteristic symptoms. In this work, we used a split-root system approach to study nodule BNF and the antioxidant machinery’s response to the application of a mild Cd treatment on one side of a nodulated Medicago truncatula root system. Cd induced the majority of nodule antioxidants without generating any oxidative damage. Cd treatment also provoked BNF inhibition exclusively in nodules directly exposed to Cd, without provoking any effect on plant shoot biomass or chlorophyll content. The overall data suggest that the decline in BNF was not due to a generalized breakdown of the plant but to control exerted through leghaemoglobin/oxygen availability, affecting nitrogenase function. PMID:24151304

  20. Binary translation using peephole translation rules

    DOEpatents

    Bansal, Sorav; Aiken, Alex

    2010-05-04

    An efficient binary translator uses peephole translation rules to directly translate executable code from one instruction set to another. In a preferred embodiment, the translation rules are generated using superoptimization techniques that enable the translator to automatically learn translation rules for translating code from the source to target instruction set architecture.

  1. Lost in the Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Karl

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for working with translators in training situations include meeting them beforehand, identifying their comfort level, clearing jokes, giving them copies of handouts, acknowledging their presence, trying a brief introduction in the local language, speaking slowly, and using simple sentence structure. (JOW)

  2. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  3. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Flax Seeds from the Chernobyl Area Suggests Involvement of Stress, Signaling, and Transcription/Translation in Response to Ionizing Radiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) on April 26, 1986 is the most serious nuclear disaster in human history. However, while the area proximal to the CNPP remains substantially contaminated with long-lived radioisotopes including 90Sr and 137Cs, the local ecosystem has been able...

  5. Does MRI-detected cranial nerve involvement affect the prognosis of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Zong, Jingfeng; Lin, Shaojun; Chen, Yunbin; Wang, Bingyi; Xiao, Youping; Lin, Jin; Li, Rui; Pan, Jianji

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the common cancers in South China. It can easily invade into cranial nerves, especially in patients with local advanced disease. Despite the fact that the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings are not always consistent with the symptoms of CN palsy, MRI is recommended for the detection of CN involvement (CNI). However, the prognostic impact of MRI-detected CNI in NPC patients is still controversial. To investigate the prognostic value of MRI detected CNI, we performed a retrospective analysis on the clinical data of 375 patients with NPC who were initially diagnosed by MRI. All patients had T3-4 disease and received radical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as their primary treatment. The incidence of MRI-detected CNI was 60.8%. A higher incidence of MRI-detected CNI was observed in T4 disease compared with T3 disease (96.8% vs. 42.8%, P<0.001), and a higher incidence was also found in patients with Stage IV disease compared with those with Stage III disease (91.5% vs. 42.3%; P<0.001). The local relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS) of patients with T3 disease, with or without MRI-detected CNI, was superior to that of patients with T4 disease (P<0.05). No significant differences in LRFS, DMFS or OS were observed between T3 patients with or without MRI-detected CNI. The survival of Stage III patients with or without MRI-detected CNI was significantly superior to that of Stage IV patients (P<0.01), but there was no significant difference between Stage III patients with or without MRI-detected CNI for all endpoints. Therefore, when treated with IMRT, MRI-detected CNI in patients with NPC does not appear to affect the prognosis. In patients with clinical T3 disease, the presence of MRI-detected CNI is not sufficient evidence for defining T4 disease.

  6. Expression of genes encoding the rice translation initiation factor, eIF5A, is involved in developmental and environmental responses.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wan-Chi; Huang, Ya-Wen; Tsay, Wen-Su; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh; Huang, Dinq-Ding; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2004-05-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 A (eIF5A) is the only cellular protein known to contain the unusual amino acid hypusine. However, the precise cellular function of eIF5A is to date unknown. In the present study, we report on the characterization of two cDNA clones encoding eIF5A in rice (Oryza sativa). Sequence analysis revealed that the two cDNAs share 93% amino acid sequence identity. Phylogenetic analysis of the eIF5A genes revealed paraphyly of OseIF5A-1 and OseIF5A-2. Analysis at the mRNA level has shown that OseIF5A-1 and OseIF5A-2 are expressed in rice leaves and panicles and high relative amounts of both genes were detected in old leaves. In addition, both OseIF5A-1 and OseIF5A-2 were spatially regulated during rice leaf development. In suspension-cultured cells, the transcripts of OseIF5A genes were strongly reduced after sugar starvation. Abiotic stresses, salt and heavy metal, induce the accumulation of OseIF5A-1 and OseIF5A-2 mRNAs in rice cells. These results suggested that both OseIF5A genes might be regulated by plant development and environmental stresses.

  7. Translation elongation factor EF-Tu is a target for Stp, a serine-threonine phosphatase involved in virulence of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Archambaud, Cristel; Gouin, Edith; Pizarro-Cerda, Javier; Cossart, Pascale; Dussurget, Olivier

    2005-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen that causes listeriosis, a severe food-borne infection. This bacterium, in order to survive and grow in the multiple conditions encountered in the host and the environment, has evolved a large number of regulatory elements, in particular many signal transduction systems based on reversible phosphorylation. The genome sequence has revealed genes for 16 putative two-component systems, four putative tyrosine phosphatases, three putative serine-threonine kinases and two putative serine-threonine phosphatases. We found that one of the latter genes, stp, encodes a functional Mn(2+)-dependent serine-threonine phosphatase similar to PPM eukaryotic phosphatases (Mg(2+)-or Mn(2+)-dependent protein phosphatase) and is required for growth of L. monocytogenes in a murine model of infection. We identified as the first target for Stp, the elongation factor EF-Tu. Post-translational phosphorylation of EF-Tu had been shown to prevent its binding to amino-acylated transfer RNA as well as to kirromycin, an antibiotic known to inhibit EF-Tu function. Accordingly, an stp deletion mutant is less sensitive to kirromycin. These results suggest an important role for Stp in regulating EF-Tu and controlling bacterial survival in the infected host.

  8. Translational regulation of NeuroD1 expression by FMRP: involvement in glutamatergic neuronal differentiation of cultured rat primary neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se Jin; Kim, Ji-Woon; Kim, Ki Chan; Han, So Min; Go, Hyo Sang; Seo, Jung Eun; Choi, Chang Soon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2014-03-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is encoded by Fmr1 gene in which mutation is known to cause fragile X syndrome characterized by mental impairment and other psychiatric symptoms similar to autism spectrum disorders. FMRP plays important roles in cellular mRNA biology such as transport, stability, and translation as an RNA-binding protein. In the present study, we identified potential role of FMRP in the neural differentiation, using cortical neural progenitor cells from Sprague-Dawley rat. We newly found NeuroD1, an essential regulator of glutamatergic neuronal differentiation, as a new mRNA target interacting with FMRP in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. We also identified FMRP as a regulator of neuronal differentiation by modulating NeuroD1 expression. Down-regulation of FMRP by siRNA also increased NeuroD1 expression along with increased pre- and post-synaptic development of glutamatergic neuron, as evidenced by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. On the contrary, cells harboring FMRP over-expression construct showed decreased NeuroD1 expression. Treatment of cultured neural precursor cells with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid known as an inducer of hyper-glutamatergic neuronal differentiation, down-regulated the expression of FMRP, and induced NeuroD1 expression. Our study suggests that modulation of FMRP expression regulates neuronal differentiation by interaction with its binding target mRNA, and provides an example of the gene and environmental interaction regulating glutamatergic neuronal differentiation.

  9. Is Sonic Hedgehog Involved in Human Fracture Healing? - A Prospective Study on Local and Systemic Concentrations of SHH

    PubMed Central

    Eipeldauer, Stefan; Thomas, Anita; Hoechtl-Lee, Leonard; Kecht, Mathias; Binder, Harald; Koettstorfer, Julia; Gregori, Markus; Sarahrudi, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is a new signalling pathway in bone repair. Evidence exist that SHH pathway plays a significant role in vasculogenesis and limb development during embryogenesis. Some in vitro and animal studies has already proven its potential for bone regeneration. However, no data on the role of SHH in the human fracture healing have been published so far. Methods Seventy-five patients with long bone fractures were included into the study and divided in 2 groups. First group contained 69 patients with normal fracture healing. Four patients with impaired fracture healing formed the second group. 34 volunteers donated blood samples as control. Serum samples were collected over a period of 1 year following a standardized time schedule. In addition, SHH levels were measured in fracture haematoma and serum of 16 patients with bone fractures. Results Fracture haematoma and patients serum both contained lower SHH concentrations compared to control serum. The comparison between the patients' serum SHH level and the control serum revealed lower levels for the patients at all measurement time points. Significantly lower concentrations were observed at weeks 1 and 2 after fracture. SHH levels were slightly decreased in patients with impaired fracture healing without statistical significance. Conclusion This is the first study to report local and systemic concentration of SHH in human fracture healing and SHH serum levels in healthy adults. A significant reduction of the SHH levels during the inflammatory phase of fracture healing was found. SHH concentrations in fracture haematoma and serum were lower than the concentration in control serum for the rest of the healing period. Our findings indicate that there is no relevant involvement of SHH in human fracture healing. Fracture repair process seem to reduce the SHH level in human. Further studies are definitely needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25501422

  10. NG2/CSPG4-collagen type VI interplays putatively involved in the microenvironmental control of tumour engraftment and local expansion.

    PubMed

    Cattaruzza, Sabrina; Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Braghetta, Paola; Pazzaglia, Laura; Benassi, Maria Serena; Picci, Piero; Lacrima, Katia; Zanocco, Daniela; Rizzo, Erika; Stallcup, William B; Colombatti, Alfonso; Perris, Roberto

    2013-06-01

    In soft-tissue sarcoma patients, enhanced expression of NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan in pre-surgical primary tumours predicts post-surgical metastasis formation and thereby stratifies patients into disease-free survivors and patients destined to succumb to the disease. Both primary and secondary sarcoma lesions also up-regulate collagen type VI, a putative extracellular matrix ligand of NG2, and this matrix alteration potentiates the prognostic impact of NG2. Enhanced constitutive levels of the proteoglycan in isolated sarcoma cells closely correlate with a superior engraftment capability and local growth in xenogenic settings. This apparent NG2-associated malignancy was also corroborated by the diverse tumorigenic behaviour in vitro and in vivo of immunoselected NG2-expressing and NG2-deficient cell subsets, by RNAi-mediated knock down of endogenous NG2, and by ectopic transduction of full-length or deletion constructs of NG2. Cells with modified expression of NG2 diverged in their interaction with purified Col VI, matrices supplemented with Col VI, and cell-free matrices isolated from wild-type and Col VI null fibroblasts. The combined use of dominant-negative NG2 mutant cells and purified domain fragments of the collagen allowed us to pinpoint the reciprocal binding sites within the two molecules and to assert the importance of this molecular interaction in the control of sarcoma cell adhesion and motility. The NG2-mediated binding to Col VI triggered activation of convergent cell survival- and cell adhesion/migration-promoting signal transduction pathways, implicating PI-3K as a common denominator. Thus, the findings point to an NG2-Col VI interplay as putatively involved in the regulation of the cancer cell-host microenvironment interactions sustaining sarcoma progression.

  11. Biogenesis of mitochondria in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds subjected to temperature stress and recovery involves regulation of the complexome, respiratory chain activity, organellar translation and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michal; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cauliflower curd mitochondrial proteome was investigated under cold, heat and the recovery. For the first time, two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was used to study the plant mitochondrial complexome in heat and heat recovery. Particularly, changes in the complex I and complex III subunits and import proteins, and the partial disintegration of matrix complexes were observed. The presence of unassembled subunits of ATP synthase was accompanied by impairment in mitochondrial translation of its subunit. In cold and heat, the transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were uncorrelated. The in-gel activities of respiratory complexes were particularly affected after stress recovery. Despite a general stability of respiratory chain complexes in heat, functional studies showed that their activity and the ATP synthesis yield were affected. Contrary to cold stress, heat stress resulted in a reduced efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation likely due to changes in alternative oxidase (AOX) activity. Stress and stress recovery differently modulated the protein level and activity of AOX. Heat stress induced an increase in AOX activity and protein level, and AOX1a and AOX1d transcript level, while heat recovery reversed the AOX protein and activity changes. Conversely, cold stress led to a decrease in AOX activity (and protein level), which was reversed after cold recovery. Thus, cauliflower AOX is only induced by heat stress. In heat, contrary to the AOX activity, the activity of rotenone-insensitive internal NADH dehydrogenase was diminished. The relevance of various steps of plant mitochondrial biogenesis to temperature stress response and recovery is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. From actors to authors: a first account about the involvement of patients in the informed consent governance of a major Italian translational research hospital.

    PubMed

    Casati, Sara; Monti, Paolo; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2010-01-01

    From 2007 to 2009 Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, one of the major public research hospitals in Italy, has invested on a participatory action to promote a good practice of informed consent. The project focused on the improvement and innovation of informed consent considered as a participated act through the involvement of all the actors at stake. The main purpose was to improve the informative practices through the participatory innovation of institutional and organizational elements as conditions of possibility. Therefore the project has pursued the involvement of managers, healthcare professionals, patients and their associations in the institutional governance of informed consent. The involvement of citizens and patients within the whole process meant to put them in charge not just as actors or final evaluators of a good practice, but as co-authors in defining standards, tools and conditions for a good practice. Several actions were taken, including a phase of analysis which involved 20 patients from 8 Associations, a phase of innovation and education where 113 patients and citizens worked together with clinicians from 53 Units in deliberative laboratories, the institution of a multidisciplinary committee inclusive of representatives from 6 associations of patients.The project has produced different outcomes: new institutional guidelines adopted by the hospital; the renewal of consent forms and procedures as part of an explicit shared informative process; an increased implementation of institutional standards of good informative practice; the measure and communication of the outcomes of care and their bench-marking; bottom-up building of paths of validation; the creation of participatory electronic tools; an innovative education on the field for patients and clinicians.

  13. Early Carcinogenesis Involves the Establishment of Immune Privilege via Intrinsic and Extrinsic Regulation of Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1: Translational Implications in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Holtzhausen, Alisha; Zhao, Fei; Evans, Kathy S.; Hanks, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    Although prolonged genetic pressure has been conjectured to be necessary for the eventual development of tumor immune evasion mechanisms, recent work is demonstrating that early genetic mutations are capable of moonlighting as both intrinsic and extrinsic modulators of the tumor immune microenvironment. The indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO) immunoregulatory enzyme is emerging as a key player in tumor-mediated immune tolerance. While loss of the tumor suppressor, BIN-1, and the over-expression of cyclooxygenase-2 have been implicated in intrinsic regulation of IDO, recent findings have demonstrated the loss of TβRIII and the upregulation of Wnt5a by developing cancers to play a role in the extrinsic control of IDO activity by local dendritic cell populations residing within tumor and tumor-draining lymph node tissues. Together, these genetic changes are capable of modulating paracrine signaling pathways in the early stages of carcinogenesis to establish a site of immune privilege by promoting the differentiation and activation of local regulatory T cells. Additional investigation of these immune evasion pathways promises to provide opportunities for the development of novel strategies to synergistically enhance the efficacy of the evolving class of T cell-targeted “checkpoint” inhibitors. PMID:25339948

  14. Knowledge Translation in Global Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pablos-Mendez, Ariel; Shademani, Ramesh

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the "know-do gap," present a definition of knowledge translation, and discuss its relative importance in bridging the know-do gap. Some of the underlying causes of the know-do gap are listed, along with ongoing efforts to address them. Knowledge translation is considered a cross-cutting, nonlinear process that involves not only recent…

  15. 20 CFR 670.800 - How do Job Corps centers and service providers become involved in their local communities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... applicable Local Boards wherever geographically feasible. (b) Each Job Corps center must have a Business and... business owners, chief executives or chief operating officers of nongovernmental employers or other private... businesses with employment opportunities in the local area and the areas to which students will return....

  16. Quantifying the Impact of Participation in Local Tobacco Control Groups on the Psychological Empowerment of Involved Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Debra J.; Crankshaw, Erik; Nimsch, Christian; Hinnant, Laurie W.; Hund, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    A core component of Legacy's Statewide Youth Movement Against Tobacco Use is the ability of state and local initiatives to empower youth to effect change in their communities. The authors' conceptual framework proposes that youth empowerment is an outcome of the process by which youths become active participants in local efforts. Youths are…

  17. The nucleic acid-binding zinc finger protein of potato virus M is translated by internal initiation as well as by ribosomal frameshifting involving a shifty stop codon and a novel mechanism of P-site slippage.

    PubMed

    Gramstat, A; Prüfer, D; Rohde, W

    1994-09-25

    The genes for the capsid protein CP and the nucleic acid-binding 12K protein (pr12) of potato virus M (PVM) constitute the 3' terminal gene cluster of the PVM RNA genome. Both proteins are presumably translated from a single subgenomic RNA. We have identified two translational strategies operating in pr12 gene expression. Internal initiation at the first and the second AUG codon of the pr12 coding sequence results in the synthesis of the 12K protein. In addition the protein is produced as a CP/12K transframe protein by ribosomal frameshifting. For these studies parts of the CP and pr12 coding sequences including the putative frameshift region were introduced into an internal position of the beta-glucuronidase gene. Mutational analyses in conjunction with in vitro translation experiments identified a homopolymeric string of four adenosine nucleotides which together with a 3' flanking UGA stop codon were required for efficient frameshifting. The signal AAAAUGA is the first frameshift signal with a shifty stop codon to be analyzed in the eukaryotic system. Substitution of the four consecutive adenosine nucleotides by UUUU increased the efficiency of frameshifting, while substitution by GGGG or CCCC dramatically reduced the synthesis of the transframe protein. Also, UAA and UAG could replace the opal stop codon without effect on the frameshifting event, but mutation of UGA to the sense codon UGG inhibited transframe protein formation. These findings suggest that the mechanism of ribosomal frameshifting at the PVM signal is different from the one described by the 'simultaneous slippage' model in that only the string of four adenosine nucleotides represents the slippery sequence involved in a -1 P-site slippage.

  18. Modulation of efficiency of translation termination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Antonets, Kirill S; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Derkatch, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense suppression is a readthrough of premature termination codons. It typically occurs either due to the recognition of stop codons by tRNAs with mutant anticodons, or due to a decrease in the fidelity of translation termination. In the latter case, suppressors usually promote the readthrough of different types of nonsense codons and are thus called omnipotent nonsense suppressors. Omnipotent nonsense suppressors were identified in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in 1960s, and most of subsequent studies were performed in this model organism. Initially, omnipotent suppressors were localized by genetic analysis to different protein- and RNA-encoding genes, mostly the components of translational machinery. Later, nonsense suppression was found to be caused not only by genomic mutations, but also by epigenetic elements, prions. Prions are self-perpetuating protein conformations usually manifested by infectious protein aggregates. Modulation of translational accuracy by prions reflects changes in the activity of their structural proteins involved in different aspects of protein synthesis. Overall, nonsense suppression can be seen as a "phenotypic mirror" of events affecting the accuracy of the translational machine. However, the range of proteins participating in the modulation of translation termination fidelity is not fully elucidated. Recently, the list has been expanded significantly by findings that revealed a number of weak genetic and epigenetic nonsense suppressors, the effect of which can be detected only in specific genetic backgrounds. This review summarizes the data on the nonsense suppressors decreasing the fidelity of translation termination in S. cerevisiae, and discusses the functional significance of the modulation of translational accuracy.

  19. 20 CFR 670.800 - How do Job Corps centers and service providers become involved in their local communities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) The council must work with Local Boards and must review labor market information to provide... emerging occupations suitable for training. (WIA sec.154(b)(1).) (g) Job Corps is identified as a required...

  20. Quantifying the impact of participation in local tobacco control groups on the psychological empowerment of involved youth.

    PubMed

    Holden, Debra J; Crankshaw, Erik; Nimsch, Christian; Hinnant, Laurie W; Hund, Lisa

    2004-10-01

    A core component of Legacy's Statewide Youth Movement Against Tobacco Use is the ability of state and local initiatives to empower youth to effect change in their communities. The authors' conceptual framework proposes that youth empowerment is an outcome of the process by which youths become active participants in local efforts. Youths are proposed to attain specific skills (e.g., assertiveness, advocacy), attitudes (e.g., domain-specific self-efficacy, perceived sociopolitical control, participatory competence), and knowledge of relevant resources. All are proposed outcomes of their individual participation in these local efforts. Data collected in fall 2002 through a tested survey instrument designed to obtain data on key components of empowerment are presented. Regression modeling was used to examine the extent to which characteristics of empowerment are an outcome of individual participation in these groups. A summary of lessons learned pertaining to effectively measuring empowerment and enhancing the empowerment process through local initiatives is provided.

  1. 18 CFR 707.6 - Early involvement in private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Water Resources Council Implementing Procedures § 707.6 Early involvement in private... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Early involvement...

  2. 18 CFR 707.6 - Early involvement in private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Water Resources Council Implementing Procedures § 707.6 Early involvement in private... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Early involvement...

  3. 18 CFR 707.6 - Early involvement in private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Water Resources Council Implementing Procedures § 707.6 Early involvement in private... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Early involvement...

  4. 18 CFR 707.6 - Early involvement in private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Water Resources Council Implementing Procedures § 707.6 Early involvement in private... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Early involvement...

  5. Implementation of Parent Child Interaction Therapy Within Foster Care: An Attempt to Translate an Evidence-Based Program Within a Local Child Welfare Agency

    PubMed Central

    Topitzes, James; Mersky, Joshua P.; McNeil, Cheryl B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative adaptation of an evidence-based intervention – Parent Child Interaction Therapy or PCIT – to foster parent training services. The authors faced multiple problems that commonly plague translational child welfare research as they developed, implemented and tested their model. The paper discusses how the authors addressed these problems when: 1) specifying the child welfare context in which the intervention model was implemented and tested, choosing an intervention model that responded to child welfare service needs, and tailoring the model for a child welfare context; 2) securing external funding and initiating sustainability plans for model uptake; and 3) forging a university-community partnership to overcome logistical and ethical obstacles. Concluding with a summary of promising preliminary study results, a description of future plans to replicate and spread the model, and a distillation of project lessons, the paper suggests that child welfare translational research with PCIT is very promising. PMID:25729340

  6. Implementation of Parent Child Interaction Therapy Within Foster Care: An Attempt to Translate an Evidence-Based Program Within a Local Child Welfare Agency.

    PubMed

    Topitzes, James; Mersky, Joshua P; McNeil, Cheryl B

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative adaptation of an evidence-based intervention - Parent Child Interaction Therapy or PCIT - to foster parent training services. The authors faced multiple problems that commonly plague translational child welfare research as they developed, implemented and tested their model. The paper discusses how the authors addressed these problems when: 1) specifying the child welfare context in which the intervention model was implemented and tested, choosing an intervention model that responded to child welfare service needs, and tailoring the model for a child welfare context; 2) securing external funding and initiating sustainability plans for model uptake; and 3) forging a university-community partnership to overcome logistical and ethical obstacles. Concluding with a summary of promising preliminary study results, a description of future plans to replicate and spread the model, and a distillation of project lessons, the paper suggests that child welfare translational research with PCIT is very promising.

  7. US Public Health Agency involvement in youth-focused illicit drug policy, planning, and prevention at the local level, 1999-2003.

    PubMed

    McBride, Duane C; Terry-McElrath, Yvonne M; VanderWaal, Curtis J; Chriqui, Jamie F; Myllyluoma, Jana

    2008-02-01

    We examined local public health agencies' involvement in community illicit drug policy advocacy and provision related to youths to determine the extent to which public health agencies were involved in local drug policy activities and could potentially provide an infrastructure for policy alternatives. We conducted telephone interviews from 1999 to 2003 with 1793 US public health agencies in 804 communities surrounding schools participating in the Monitoring the Future study. Respondents reported public health agency planning, priorities, and involvement in alternative drug policy advocacy and prevention activities. We examined results for variance by site sociodemographic characteristics. Most students lived where public health agencies provided resources for community- and school-based drug use prevention. More than one third resided where public health agencies advocated for drug policy alternatives and more than one quarter where public health agencies were involved in juvenile drug court programs. Such activities were significantly higher in urban communities, in the West, and in sites where the proportion of African Americans was above the national average. Although local public health agencies could increase participation levels in drug policy alternatives, current involvement suggests that agencies may provide a base for supporting the development of public health alternatives to deterrence-based drug policies. Such a base may be more likely in communities with the highest need for such policies and services.

  8. ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, H; West, M D; Allsopp, R C; Davison, T S; Wu, Y S; Arrowsmith, C H; Poirier, G G; Benchimol, S

    1997-01-01

    Telomere loss has been proposed as a mechanism for counting cell divisions during aging in normal somatic cells. How such a mitotic clock initiates the intracellular signalling events that culminate in G1 cell cycle arrest and senescence to restrict the lifespan of normal human cells is not known. We investigated the possibility that critically short telomere length activates a DNA damage response pathway involving p53 and p21(WAF1) in aging cells. We show that the DNA binding and transcriptional activity of p53 protein increases with cell age in the absence of any marked increase in the level of p53 protein, and that p21(WAF1) promoter activity in senescent cells is dependent on both p53 and the transcriptional co-activator p300. Moreover, we detected increased specific activity of p53 protein in AT fibroblasts, which exhibit accelerated telomere loss and undergo premature senescence, compared with normal fibroblasts. We investigated the possibility that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is involved in the post-translational activation of p53 protein in aging cells. We show that p53 protein can associate with PARP and inhibition of PARP activity leads to abrogation of p21 and mdm2 expression in response to DNA damage. Moreover, inhibition of PARP activity leads to extension of cellular lifespan. In contrast, hyperoxia, an activator of PARP, is associated with accelerated telomere loss, activation of p53 and premature senescence. We propose that p53 is post-translationally activated not only in response to DNA damage but also in response to the critical shortening of telomeres that occurs during cellular aging. PMID:9312059

  9. Direct association of occludin with ZO-1 and its possible involvement in the localization of occludin at tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Furuse, M; Itoh, M; Hirase, T; Nagafuchi, A; Yonemura, S; Tsukita, S; Tsukita, S

    1994-12-01

    Occludin is an integral membrane protein localizing at tight junctions (TJ) with four transmembrane domains and a long COOH-terminal cytoplasmic domain (domain E) consisting of 255 amino acids. Immunofluorescence and laser scan microscopy revealed that chick full-length occludin introduced into human and bovine epithelial cells was correctly delivered to and incorporated into preexisting TJ. Further transfection studies with various deletion mutants showed that the domain E, especially its COOH-terminal approximately 150 amino acids (domain E358/504), was necessary for the localization of occludin at TJ. Secondly, domain E was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase, and this fusion protein was shown to be specifically bound to a complex of ZO-1 (220 kD) and ZO-2 (160 kD) among various membrane peripheral proteins. In vitro binding analyses using glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins of various deletion mutants of domain E narrowed down the sequence necessary for the ZO-1/ZO-2 association into the domain E358/504. Furthermore, this region directly associated with the recombinant ZO-1 produced in E. coli. We concluded that occludin itself can localize at TJ and directly associate with ZO-1. The coincidence of the sequence necessary for the ZO-1 association with that for the TJ localization suggests that the association with underlying cytoskeletons through ZO-1 is required for occludin to be localized at TJ.

  10. Localization of antigenic sites of the S glycoprotein of feline infectious peritonitis virus involved in neutralization and antibody-dependent enhancement.

    PubMed Central

    Corapi, W V; Darteil, R J; Audonnet, J C; Chappuis, G E

    1995-01-01

    The S glycoprotein of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) has been shown to contain the antigenic sites responsible for eliciting both neutralization and antibody-dependent enhancement. To determine the region of S responsible, overlapping DNA fragments spanning the entire S gene were cloned and expressed as fusion proteins by in vitro transcription and translation. Fusion proteins containing relevant epitopes were identified by radioimmunoprecipitation with neutralizing and enhancing FIPV-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A region spanning residues 509 to 673 reacted with most MAbs tested. Translation in the presence of microsomal membranes did not enhance reactivity, suggesting that glycosylation is not essential for recognition by the MAbs. To localize the antigenic sites further, several MAb-resistant (mar) mutants of FIPV were cloned and sequenced. Amino acid residues that contribute to the neutralizing and enhancing epitopes were localized to two regions, designated A1 and A2, which show partial overlap with the homologous antigenic site A of transmissible gastroenteritis virus. Site A1 contains residues 568 and 591 and is homologous with part of subsite Aa of transmissible gastroenteritis virus. Site A2 contains residues 643, 649, and 656. Double mutations in sites A1 and A2 were found in mar mutants derived from neutralizing and enhancing MAbs 23F4.5 and 18A7.4, while a single mutation in site A2 was found in a mar mutant derived from MAb 24H5.4, which is neutralizing but not enhancing. The data suggest that site A2, which includes residues 643 to 656, is a dominant neutralizing site of FIPV and that sites A1 and A2 may act in concert to induce antibody-dependent enhancement. PMID:7707508

  11. Localization of antimicrobial peptides in the tunic of Ciona intestinalis (Ascidiacea, Tunicata) and their involvement in local inflammatory-like reactions

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, M.A.; Fedders, H.; De Leo, G.; Leippe, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tunicates comprising a wide variety of different species synthesize antimicrobial peptides as important effector molecules of the innate immune system. Recently, two putative gene families coding for antimicrobial peptides were identified in the expressed sequence tag database of the tunicate Ciona intestinalis. Two synthetic peptides representing the cationic core region of one member of each of the families displayed potent antibacterial and antifungal activities. Moreover, the natural peptides were demonstrated to be synthesized and stored in distinct hemocyte types. Here, we investigated the presence of these natural peptides, namely Ci-MAM-A and Ci-PAP-A, in the tunic of C. intestinalis considering that the ascidian tunic is a body surface barrier exposed to constant microbial assault. Furthermore, as the tunic may represent a major route of entry for pathogen invasion after its damage we monitored the location of these peptides upon a local inflammatory-like reaction induced by injection of foreign cells. Using immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy both peptides were localized to the tunic and were massively present in granulocytes of inflamed tissue. Conclusively, antimicrobial peptides may constitute a chemical barrier within the tunic of urochordates. PMID:24371555

  12. Why social science matters in river management: involvement of local stakeholders in monitoring the effects of room for the river measures in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbrugge, Laura; van den Born, Riyan

    2015-04-01

    The Netherlands is a densely populated delta region with a long tradition in flood protection and river management. In response to climate change, adaptive measures are implemented to create more room for the river (and thus increasing water discharge capacity) while at the same time maintaining the multifunctional use of the river system. These functions include for example navigation, water supply, housing and spatial quality, nature development and recreation. The incorporation of social aspects in water management is vital for the development and implementation of sustainable solutions in environmental planning. Active stakeholder involvement has major benefits in terms of trust, public support, social learning and creative decision making. In practice, however, stakeholder involvement is often confined to one-way communication (e.g. information on websites and public hearings) instead of establishing a dialogue with the relevant local stakeholders. Moreover, stakeholders are often involved too late. Our study focusses on stakeholder perceptions and the opportunities for stakeholder participation and collaboration in river management. One way to actively involve stakeholders and invest in a dialogue is through participatory monitoring, i.e. to involve local stakeholders in collecting, analyzing and evaluating monitoring data. Currently, a pilot engineering intervention (2013-2015) is carried out in the Waal river, i.e. the main Rhine branch in The Netherlands. This intervention comprises the substitution of traditional groynes by a 10 km longitudinal dam and will change the appearance of the fluvial landscape dramatically. An interdisciplinary team of scientists, government representatives and other public and private parties is involved in monitoring the hydrological, ecological and socio-economic effects of the longitudinal dam with the aim to develop and improve models, guidelines and tools for integrative river management. This also provides unique

  13. Functional characterization of multiple domains involved in the subcellular localization of the hematopoietic Pbx interacting protein (HPIP).

    PubMed

    Abramovich, Carolina; Chavez, Elizabeth A; Lansdorp, Peter M; Humphries, R Keith

    2002-10-03

    We have previously reported the cloning of the Hematopoietic Pbx Interacting Protein (HPIP), a novel protein discovered through its interaction with Pbx1. HPIP is expressed in early hematopoietic precursors, can bind all members of the Pbx family and can inhibit the transcriptional activation of the oncogene E2A-Pbx. To further understand the function of HPIP, we have analysed its cellular localization and characterized its functional localization domains. Using fluorescence microscopy to follow the distribution of different HPIP sequences fused to GFP, we found that HPIP localizes predominantly to cytoskeletal fibers but has the potential ability to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytosol. The cytoskeletal localization of HPIP is mediated by an N-terminal leucine rich region (between aa 190-218) and can be disrupted by the microtubule destabilizing drug vincristine. The HPIP C-terminal domain (aa 443-731) bears a nuclear export activity that is blocked by the CRM1 inhibitor Leptomycin B. In addition, we found two basic amino acid regions located between aa 485-505 and aa 695-720 that contain nuclear import activities attenuated by nuclear export. These observations support a model in which the constitutive attachment of HPIP to the cytoskeleton could be modified by changes in functional domains implicated in nuclear export, import and cytoskeleton binding sequences, allowing the molecule to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytosol.

  14. NuMA localization, stability, and function in spindle orientation involve 4.1 and Cdk1 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Poulson, Nicholas D.; Foote, Henry P.; Lechler, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The epidermis is a multilayered epithelium that requires asymmetric divisions for stratification. A conserved cortical protein complex, including LGN, nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA), and dynein/dynactin, plays a key role in establishing proper spindle orientation during asymmetric divisions. The requirements for the cortical recruitment of these proteins, however, remain unclear. In this work, we show that NuMA is required to recruit dynactin to the cell cortex of keratinocytes. NuMA's cortical recruitment requires LGN; however, LGN interactions are not sufficient for this localization. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that the 4.1-binding domain of NuMA is important for stabilizing its interaction with the cell cortex. This is functionally important, as loss of 4.1/NuMA interaction results in spindle orientation defects, using two distinct assays. Furthermore, we observe an increase in cortical NuMA localization as cells enter anaphase. Inhibition of Cdk1 or mutation of a single residue in NuMA mimics this effect. NuMA's anaphase localization is independent of LGN and 4.1 interactions, revealing two distinct mechanisms responsible for NuMA cortical recruitment at different stages of mitosis. This work highlights the complexity of NuMA localization and reveals the importance of NuMA cortical stability for productive force generation during spindle orientation. PMID:24109598

  15. Alfalfa Mob1-like proteins are involved in cell proliferation and are localized in the cell division plane during cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Citterio, Sandra; Piatti, Simonetta; Albertini, Emidio; Aina, Roberta; Varotto, Serena; Barcaccia, Gianni . E-mail: gianni.barcaccia@unipd.it

    2006-04-15

    Mps-one-binder (Mob) proteins play a crucial role in yeast cytokinesis. After cloning two Mob1-like genes, MsMob1-A and MsMob1-B from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) we show that, although they are constitutively expressed in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and pods, their transcripts and proteins are mostly produced in actively proliferating tissues. A polyclonal antibody specifically raised against MsMob1 proteins was used for immunolocalization studies in synchronized root tip cells. The subcellular localization of MsMob1-like proteins is demonstrated to be cell cycle-regulated. Cytoplasmic localization is faint and diffused during G{sub 1} and S. It becomes concentrated in punctuate and fibrillar structures in G{sub 2} as well as M phase. At the stage of cytokinesis, the protein is found at the emerging cell plate marking the progressive formation of the septum. Mob1 proteins partially co-localize with microtubules structures functionally related to the spindles and important for cytokinesis in eukaryotic cells. The MsMob1 expression cannot rescue the lethality of the yeast mob1 mutant, suggesting that interaction of Mob1 proteins with their effectors may be species-specific. Localization of Mob1 proteins in the inner layer of the root cap indicates an additional function for this class of proteins in plants, which is likely related to the onset of programmed cell death.

  16. Fungal Iron Availability during Deep Seated Candidiasis Is Defined by a Complex Interplay Involving Systemic and Local Events

    PubMed Central

    Potrykus, Joanna; Stead, David; MacCallum, Donna M.; Urgast, Dagmar S.; Raab, Andrea; van Rooijen, Nico; Feldmann, Jörg; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional immunity – the withholding of nutrients by the host – has long been recognised as an important factor that shapes bacterial-host interactions. However, the dynamics of nutrient availability within local host niches during fungal infection are poorly defined. We have combined laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP MS), MALDI imaging and immunohistochemistry with microtranscriptomics to examine iron homeostasis in the host and pathogen in the murine model of systemic candidiasis. Dramatic changes in the renal iron landscape occur during disease progression. The infection perturbs global iron homeostasis in the host leading to iron accumulation in the renal medulla. Paradoxically, this is accompanied by nutritional immunity in the renal cortex as iron exclusion zones emerge locally around fungal lesions. These exclusion zones correlate with immune infiltrates and haem oxygenase 1-expressing host cells. This local nutritional immunity decreases iron availability, leading to a switch in iron acquisition mechanisms within mature fungal lesions, as revealed by laser capture microdissection and qRT-PCR analyses. Therefore, a complex interplay of systemic and local events influences iron homeostasis and pathogen-host dynamics during disease progression. PMID:24146619

  17. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... necessary and appropriate by the Committee to determine the impact of the proposed action on the human environment; (3) Consult with appropriate Federal, regional, State and local agencies and other potentially... environmental assessment or environmental impact statement (EIS) as set forth in § 51-7.4, or is one that...

  18. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... necessary and appropriate by the Committee to determine the impact of the proposed action on the human environment; (3) Consult with appropriate Federal, regional, State and local agencies and other potentially... environmental assessment or environmental impact statement (EIS) as set forth in § 51-7.4, or is one that...

  19. Surgery for locally advanced recurrent colorectal cancer involving the aortoiliac axis: can we achieve R0 resection and long-term survival?

    PubMed

    Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Mathis, Kellie L; Colibaseanu, Dorin T; Merchea, Amit; Bower, Thomas C; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J

    2013-06-01

    Locally advanced, recurrent colorectal cancer involving the aortoiliac axis may be considered a contraindication for curative surgery because of the technical challenges of achieving a negative margin resection and an assumed poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to assess oncologic outcomes and the ability to achieve an R0 resection in these patients. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database identified 406 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for locally recurrent colorectal cancer between 1997 and 2007. This study was conducted at an academic multidisciplinary tertiary center. The demographic and clinicopathological features of patients undergoing resection for locally advanced disease involving the aortoiliac axis at our institution were reviewed. Twelve patients (7 women, median age 51 years) were identified. Major vessel involvement included internal iliac artery (n = 7), common iliac artery (n = 5), external iliac artery (n = 3), aorta (n = 3), internal iliac vein (n = 2), and external iliac vein (n = 1). R0 resection was achieved in 7 patients, and R1 resection in 5. Eleven patients received intraoperative radiation therapy. Vascular reconstruction (3 aorta, 5 common iliac, 3 external iliac) included synthetic interposition grafts, femoral-femoral bypasses, or primary anastomosis. One patient underwent venous reconstruction of the external iliac vein. No graft complications were encountered, and graft patency at 4 years was 100%. Thirty-day morbidity was seen in 9 patients, 8 of whom had Clavien grade <3. Thirty-day mortality was nil. Overall and disease-free survival at 4 years was 55% and 45%. This study was limited by its sample size, retrospective design, and the number of outcome events. R0 resection of locally advanced recurrent colorectal cancer involving the aortoiliac axis was achieved in over 50% of patients. Overall and disease-free survival was comparable to outcomes seen with locally advanced

  20. Collaborative Translations: Designing Bilingual Instructional Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Christopher S.; Puzio, Kelly; Jiménez, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the role of collaboration and multilingual literacy as 21st-century skills, the authors used design research methods to present, analyze, and refine a strategic reading approach for bilingual students. The collaborative translation strategy involves reading an academic text, translating key passages, and evaluating these translations.…

  1. Collaborative Translations: Designing Bilingual Instructional Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Christopher S.; Puzio, Kelly; Jiménez, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the role of collaboration and multilingual literacy as 21st-century skills, the authors used design research methods to present, analyze, and refine a strategic reading approach for bilingual students. The collaborative translation strategy involves reading an academic text, translating key passages, and evaluating these translations.…

  2. Synaptic Plasticity and Translation Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is…

  3. Synaptic Plasticity and Translation Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is…

  4. ORP5/ORP8 localize to endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contacts and are involved in mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Galmes, Romain; Houcine, Audrey; van Vliet, Alexander R; Agostinis, Patrizia; Jackson, Catherine L; Giordano, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    The oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related proteins ORP5 and ORP8 have been shown recently to transport phosphatidylserine (PS) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the plasma membrane (PM) at ER-PM contact sites. PS is also transferred from the ER to mitochondria where it acts as precursor for mitochondrial PE synthesis. Here, we show that, in addition to ER-PM contact sites, ORP5 and ORP8 are also localized to ER-mitochondria contacts and interact with the outer mitochondrial membrane protein PTPIP51. A functional lipid transfer (ORD) domain was required for this localization. Interestingly, ORP5 and ORP8 depletion leads to defects in mitochondria morphology and respiratory function. © 2016 The Authors.

  5. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Early involvement in... and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM... as early as possible in the planning process for guidance on the scope and level of environmental...

  6. 18 CFR 707.6 - Early involvement in private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Early involvement in... Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL... region or basin in which a comprehensive or Level B study is conducted, guidelines for...

  7. Increasing Business and Parental Involvement in Grades 4-7 by Forming Partnerships between School and Local Businesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinson, Kay S.

    This paper describes a practicum designed to increase parent and business involvement in the educational experiences of students in grades 4-7 at a rural school in the southeastern United States. Teacher surveys and other data indicated that the students had very little experience or understanding of the business world in which they eventually…

  8. Circumferential resection margin positivity after preoperative chemoradiotherapy based on magnetic resonance imaging for locally advanced rectal cancer: implication of boost radiotherapy to the involved mesorectal fascia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Min Jung; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Ho Geun; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Between October 2008 and November 2012, 165 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT4 or cT3 with <2 mm distance from tumour to mesorectal fascia) who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy were analysed. The morphologic patterns on post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging were categorized into five patterns from Pattern A (most-likely negative pathologic circumferential resection margin) to Pattern E (most-likely positive pathologic circumferential resection margin). In addition, the location of mesorectal fascia involvement was classified as lateral, posterior and anterior. The diagnostic accuracy of the morphologic criteria was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results Pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was identified in 17 patients (10.3%). The diagnostic accuracy of predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 0.73 using the five-scale magnetic resonance imaging pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement were 76.5, 65.5, 20.3 and 96.0%, respectively, when cut-off was set between Patterns C and D. On multivariate logistic regression, the magnetic resonance imaging patterns D and E (P= 0.005) and posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement (P= 0.017) were independently associated with increased probability of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement. The rate of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 30.0% when the patient had Pattern D or E with posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement. Conclusions Patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement can be identified using preoperative

  9. Circumferential resection margin positivity after preoperative chemoradiotherapy based on magnetic resonance imaging for locally advanced rectal cancer: implication of boost radiotherapy to the involved mesorectal fascia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Min Jung; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Ho Geun; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-04-01

    To identify patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Between October 2008 and November 2012, 165 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT4 or cT3 with <2 mm distance from tumour to mesorectal fascia) who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy were analysed. The morphologic patterns on post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging were categorized into five patterns from Pattern A (most-likely negative pathologic circumferential resection margin) to Pattern E (most-likely positive pathologic circumferential resection margin). In addition, the location of mesorectal fascia involvement was classified as lateral, posterior and anterior. The diagnostic accuracy of the morphologic criteria was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was identified in 17 patients (10.3%). The diagnostic accuracy of predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 0.73 using the five-scale magnetic resonance imaging pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement were 76.5, 65.5, 20.3 and 96.0%, respectively, when cut-off was set between Patterns C and D. On multivariate logistic regression, the magnetic resonance imaging patterns D and E (P= 0.005) and posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement (P= 0.017) were independently associated with increased probability of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement. The rate of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 30.0% when the patient had Pattern D or E with posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement. Patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement can be identified using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging although

  10. Stakeholders and public involvement for flood protection: traditional river management organisations for a better consideration of local knowledge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utz, Stephan; Lane, Stuart; Reynard, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    This research explores participatory processes in the domain of river management in Switzerland. The main objective is to understand how traditional, highly participatory, local organisations for flood protection have been institutionalised into current river management policy, and to what extent this has impacted on wider participatory processes of producing knowledge. Traditionally, flood protection strategies have been based upon scientific knowledge but have often ignored the capacities of local actors to contribute to the development of the policy. Thus, there may be a gap between scientists, stakeholders and the public that favours controversies and leads to opposition to flood protection projects. In order to reduce this gap and to increase incorporation of local knowledge, participatory processes are set up. They are considered as allowing the integration of all the actors concerned by flood risks to discuss their positions and to develop alternative solutions. This is a particularly important goal in the Swiss political system where direct democracy (the possibility of calling the decision of any level of government into question through a popular vote) means that a reasonable level of project acceptance is a necessary element of project. In order to support implementation of participatory processes, federal funding includes a special grant to cover the additional costs due to these actions. It is considered that, since its introduction in 2008, this grant certainly furthered participatory processes for flood protection projects and fostered water management policy implementation. However, the implication of stakeholders and public in decision-making processes is much well-established than modern river management often assumes. In some regions, flood protection tasks have been traditionally assumed by local organisations such as dyke corporations (DCs). These comprise land and property owners who are DC members and have to participate in flood protection

  11. Prognostic factors for local control in patients receiving radiation therapy for early glottic cancer: anterior commissure involvement and effect of chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Yosuke; Kubota, Akira; Furukawa, Madoka; Sato, Kaname

    2016-04-01

    To assess the prognostic factors for local control in patients with early glottic cancer, we retrospectively analyzed the data of 130 consecutive patients who were treated by definitive radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for early glottic squamous cell carcinoma (UICC sixth edition T1N0M0 and T2N0M0) at Kanagawa cancer center between 1999 and 2011. There were 63 patients with T1 cancer and 67 patients with T2 cancer. Twenty-one patients with T2 tumors were treated by chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The median follow-up period was 73 months (range, 22-165 months). The 5-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 81 %. The 5-year LC rates in the patients with T1 and T2 cancer were 89 and 74 %, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that a higher T stage (T2) (p = 0.0301), anterior commissure involvement (p < 0.000001), and habitual drinking (p = 0.054) were correlated with decreased local control rate. Multivariate analysis identified only anterior commissure involvement as a significant prognostic factor for local control (LC rate 91 vs. 51 %, risk ratio 5.3, 95 % CI 2.3-12, p < 0.001). In the patients with T2 cancer, there was no statistically significant difference in the LC rate between patients who received RT alone and those who received CRT (RT alone 76 % vs. CRT 67 %; p = 0.832). The findings of this study suggest that anterior commissure involvement is a significant factor influencing the prospect of local control. CRT was not found to be effective for T2 patients in this study.

  12. Early Glaucoma Involves Both Deep Local, and Shallow Widespread, Retinal Nerve Fiber Damage of the Macular Region

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Donald C.; Slobodnick, Anastasia; Raza, Ali S.; de Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Teng, Christopher C.; Ritch, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To better understand the nature of early glaucomatous damage of the macula by comparing the results from 10-2 visual fields, optical coherence tomography (OCT) macular cube scans, and OCT circumpapillary circle scans. Methods. One eye of each of 66 glaucoma patients or suspects, with a mean deviation (MD) on the 24-2 visual field (VF) test of better than −6 decibels (dB), was prospectively tested with 10-2 VFs and OCT macular cube and circumpapillary circle scans. Thickness and probability maps of the retinal ganglion cell plus inner plexiform (RGC+) layers were generated. A hemifield was considered abnormal if both the macular RGC+ and the 10-2 probability plots were abnormal (cluster criteria). The thickness plots of the circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) were analyzed in the context of a model that predicted the region of the disc associated with macular damage. Results. Twenty-seven hemifields (20 eyes) had abnormal 10-2 and RGC+ probability plots: 7 in upper VF/inferior retina, 6 in lower VF/superior retina, and 7 in both hemifields. Both shallow widespread and deep local thinning of the circumpapillary RNFL were observed. The local defects were more common and closer to fixation in the upper VF/inferior retina as predicted. Conclusions. A model of glaucomatous damage of the macula predicted the location of both the widespread and local defects in the temporal and inferior disc quadrants. Optical coherence tomography scans of the circumpapillary RNFL and the macular RGC+ layer can aid in the identification of these defects and help in the interpretation of 24-2 and 10-2 VF tests. PMID:24370831

  13. Informing Women on Menopause and Hormone Therapy: Know the Menopause a Multidisciplinary Project Involving Local Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Serena; Satolli, Roberto; Colombo, Cinzia; Senatore, Sabrina; Cotichini, Rodolfo; Da Cas, Roberto; Spila Alegiani, Stefania; Mosconi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy (HT) in the menopause is still a tricky question among healthcare providers, women and mass media. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy was a Consensus Conference (CC) organized in 2008: the project Know the Menopause has been launched to shift out the results to women and healthcare providers and to assess the impact of the cc’s statement. Methods And Findings: The project, aimed at women aged 45-60 years, was developed in four Italian Regions: Lombardy, Tuscany, Lazio, Sicily, each with one Local Health Unit (LHU) as “intervention” and one as “control”. Activities performed were: survey on the press; training courses for health professionals; educational materials for target populations; survey aimed at women, general practitioners (GPs), and gynaecologists; data analysis on HT drugs’ prescription. Local activities were: training courses; public meetings; dissemination on mass media. About 3,700 health professionals were contacted and 1,800 participated in the project. About 146,500 printed leaflets on menopause were distributed to facilitate the dialogue among women and health care professionals. Training courses and educational cascade-process activities: participation ranged 25- 72% of GPs, 17-71% of gynaecologists, 14-78% of pharmacists, 34-85% of midwives. Survey: 1,281 women interviewed. More than 90% believed menopause was a normal phase in life. More than half did not receive information about menopause and therapies. HT prescription analysis: prevalence fell from 6% to 4% in five years. No differences in time trends before-after the intervention. Major limitations are: organizational difficulties met by LHU, too short time for some local activities. Conclusions A huge amount of information was spread through health professionals and women. The issue of menopause was also used to discuss women’s wellbeing. This project offered an opportunity to launch a multidisciplinary, multimodal approach to

  14. Rab4b Is a Small GTPase Involved in the Control of the Glucose Transporter GLUT4 Localization in Adipocyte

    PubMed Central

    Kaddai, Vincent; Gonzalez, Teresa; Keslair, Frédérique; Grémeaux, Thierry; Bonnafous, Stéphanie; Gugenheim, Jean; Tran, Albert; Gual, Philippe; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Cormont, Mireille

    2009-01-01

    Background Endosomal small GTPases of the Rab family, among them Rab4a, play an essential role in the control of the glucose transporter GLUT4 trafficking, which is essential for insulin-mediated glucose uptake. We found that adipocytes also expressed Rab4b and we observed a consistent decrease in the expression of Rab4b mRNA in human and mice adipose tissue in obese diabetic states. These results led us to study this poorly characterized Rab member and its potential role in glucose transport. Methodology/Principal Findings We used 3T3-L1 adipocytes to study by imaging approaches the localization of Rab4b and to determine the consequence of its down regulation on glucose uptake and endogenous GLUT4 location. We found that Rab4b was localized in endosomal structures in preadipocytes whereas in adipocytes it was localized in GLUT4 and in VAMP2-positive compartments, and also in endosomal compartments containing the transferrin receptor (TfR). When Rab4b expression was decreased with specific siRNAs by two fold, an extent similar to its decrease in obese diabetic subjects, we observed a small increase (25%) in basal deoxyglucose uptake and a more sustained increase (40%) in presence of submaximal and maximal insulin concentrations. This increase occurred without any change in GLUT4 and GLUT1 expression levels and in the insulin signaling pathways. Concomitantly, GLUT4 but not TfR amounts were increased at the plasma membrane of basal and insulin-stimulated adipocytes. GLUT4 seemed to be targeted towards its non-endosomal sequestration compartment. Conclusion/Significance Taken our results together, we conclude that Rab4b is a new important player in the control of GLUT4 trafficking in adipocytes and speculate that difference in its expression in obese diabetic states could act as a compensatory effect to minimize the glucose transport defect in their adipocytes. PMID:19590752

  15. Does similarity in educational level between health promotion volunteers and local residents affect activity involvement of the volunteers?

    PubMed

    Murayama, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Atsuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether similarity in educational level, as a socioeconomic background factor, between health promotion volunteers (HPVs) and residents in the district where HPVs work encourages the volunteers' involvement in providing activities. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. A total of 512 HPVs in a Japanese city with 5 districts. We focused on the number of activities related to working as an HPV as an aspect of involvement in the HPV role. HPV individual educational level was collected from a questionnaire. District educational level was obtained from the Japanese census database. Of 512 questionnaires, 363 were returned and used for the analysis. Multiple regression analysis stratified by district educational level indicated that a higher educational level in HPVs was significantly associated with a greater number of self-motivated activities in the districts with a higher educational level, although the association between a lower HPV educational level and more activity involvement was not found in districts with a lower educational level. It is important to consider similarity in educational level, as a socioeconomic status factor, between HPVs and the districts in which they will work when recruiting new members and when allocating HPVs to work areas. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [Systemic approach to ecologic safety at objects with radiation jeopardy, involved into localization of low and medium radioactive waste].

    PubMed

    Veselov, E I

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with specifying systemic approach to ecologic safety of objects with radiation jeopardy. The authors presented stages of work and algorithm of decisions on preserving reliability of storage for radiation jeopardy waste. Findings are that providing ecologic safety can cover 3 approaches: complete exemption of radiation jeopardy waste, removal of more dangerous waste from present buildings and increasing reliability of prolonged localization of radiation jeopardy waste at the initial place. The systemic approach presented could be realized at various radiation jeopardy objects.

  17. Biomedical informatics and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams. PMID:20187952

  18. Biomedical informatics and translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2010-02-26

    Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams.

  19. Mechanism of local anesthetic effect. Involvement of F0 in the inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthase by phenothiazines.

    PubMed

    Dabbeni-Sala, F; Palatini, P

    1990-02-02

    The mechanism whereby tertiary amine local anesthetics affect the activity of membrane proteins was investigated by studying the interaction of phenothiazines with mitochondrial ATP synthase. These drugs caused inhibition of the activity of the membrane-bound enzyme at concentrations that do not perturb the phospholipid bilayer. The inhibitory effect appeared consequent to interaction with multiple sites located on both the F1 and the F0 components of the enzyme complex, since: (a) Dixon plots were parabolic; (b) the membrane-bound enzyme was more sensitive to the drug effect than the isolated F1 component; (c) conditions that decreased oligomycin sensitivity also decreased the sensitivity to phenothiazines; (d) irreversible binding of photochemically activated phenothiazines to the ATP synthase complex, followed by detachment of the F1 moiety and reconstitution with purified F1 resulted in an inhibited enzyme complex. These data are interpreted as indicating that tertiary amine local anesthetics affect the activity of membrane proteins by interacting with hydrophobic sites located on both their integral and peripheral domains.

  20. Identification of Ourmiavirus 30K movement protein amino acid residues involved in symptomatology, viral movement, subcellular localization and tubule formation.

    PubMed

    Margaria, Paolo; Anderson, Charles T; Turina, Massimo; Rosa, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Several plant viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) classified in the 30K superfamily. Despite a great functional diversity, alignment analysis of MP sequences belonging to the 30K superfamily revealed the presence of a central core region, including amino acids potentially critical for MP structure and functionality. We performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) MP, and studied the effects of amino acid substitutions on MP properties and virus infection. We identified five OuMV mutants that were impaired in systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana, and two mutants showing necrosis and pronounced mosaic symptoms, respectively, in N. benthamiana. Green fluorescent protein fusion constructs (GFP:MP) of movement-defective MP alleles failed to localize in distinct foci at the cell wall, whereas a GFP fusion with wild-type MP (GFP:MPwt) mainly co-localized with plasmodesmata and accumulated at the periphery of epidermal cells. The movement-defective mutants also failed to produce tubular protrusions in protoplasts isolated from infected leaves, suggesting a link between tubule formation and the ability of OuMV to move. In addition to providing data to support the importance of specific amino acids for OuMV MP functionality, we predict that these conserved residues might be critical for the correct folding and/or function of the MP of other viral species in the 30K superfamily. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genes Involved in Cell Wall Localization and Side Chain Formation of Rhamnose-Glucose Polysaccharide in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Tsukioka, Yuichi; Tomihisa, Kiyotaka; Nakano, Yoshio; Koga, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    We identified in Streptococcus mutans six new genes (rgpA through rgpF), whose disruption results in a loss of serotype-specific antigenicity, specified by the glucose side chains of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide from the cell wall. Rhamnose and glucose content of the cell wall decreased drastically in all these disruption mutants, except that in the rgpE mutant only the glucose content decreased. RgpC and RgpD are homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporter components and may be involved in polysaccharide export, whereas RgpE may be a transferase of side chain glucose. PMID:9791140

  2. Genes involved in cell wall localization and side chain formation of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Tsukioka, Y; Tomihisa, K; Nakano, Y; Koga, T

    1998-11-01

    We identified in Streptococcus mutans six new genes (rgpA through rgpF), whose disruption results in a loss of serotype-specific antigenicity, specified by the glucose side chains of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide from the cell wall. Rhamnose and glucose content of the cell wall decreased drastically in all these disruption mutants, except that in the rgpE mutant only the glucose content decreased. RgpC and RgpD are homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporter components and may be involved in polysaccharide export, whereas RgpE may be a transferase of side chain glucose.

  3. The DARE study of relapse prevention in depression: design for a phase 1/2 translational randomised controlled trial involving mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and supported self monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression is a common condition that typically has a relapsing course. Effective interventions targeting relapse have the potential to dramatically reduce the point prevalence of the condition. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based intervention that has shown efficacy in reducing depressive relapse. While trials of MBCT to date have met the core requirements of phase 1 translational research, there is a need now to move to phase 2 translational research - the application of MBCT within real-world settings with a view to informing policy and clinical practice. The aim of this trial is to examine the clinical impact and health economics of MBCT under real-world conditions and where efforts have been made to assess for and prevent resentful demoralization among the control group. Secondary aims of the project involve extending the phase 1 agenda to an examination of the effects of co-morbidity and mechanisms of action. Methods/Design This study is designed as a prospective, multi-site, single-blind, randomised controlled trial using a group comparison design between involving the intervention, MBCT, and a self-monitoring comparison condition, Depression Relapse Active Monitoring (DRAM). Follow-up is over 2 years. The design of the study indicates recruitment from primary and secondary care of 204 participants who have a history of 3 or more episodes of Major Depression but who are currently well. Measures assessing depressive relapse/recurrence, time to first clinical intervention, treatment expectancy and a range of secondary outcomes and process variables are included. A health economics evaluation will be undertaken to assess the incremental cost of MBCT. Discussion The results of this trial, including an examination of clinical, functional and health economic outcomes, will be used to assess the role that this treatment approach may have in recommendations for treatment of depression in Australia and elsewhere. If the

  4. Leveraging The Affordable Care Act To Enroll Justice-Involved Populations In Medicaid: State And Local Efforts.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Sachini N; Huskamp, Haiden A; Riedel, Lauren E; McGinty, Emma E; Webster, Daniel; Toone, Robert E; Barry, Colleen L

    2015-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to enroll criminal justice-involved populations in health insurance, particularly Medicaid. As a result, many state and county corrections departments have launched programs that incorporate Medicaid enrollment in discharge planning. Our study characterizes the national landscape of programs enrolling criminal justice-involved populations in Medicaid as of January 2015. We provide an overview of sixty-four programs operating in jails, prisons, or community probation and parole systems that enroll individuals during detention, incarceration, and the release process. We describe the variation among the programs in terms of settings, personnel, timing of eligibility screening, and target populations. Seventy-seven percent of the programs are located in jails, and 56 percent use personnel from public health or social service agencies. We describe four practices that have facilitated the Medicaid enrollment process: suspending instead of terminating Medicaid benefits upon incarceration, presuming that an individual is eligible for Medicaid before the process is completed, allowing enrollment during incarceration, and accepting alternative forms of identification for enrollment. The criminal justice system is a complex one that requires a variety of approaches to enroll individuals in Medicaid. Future research should examine how these approaches influence health and criminal justice outcomes. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  5. Leveraging The Affordable Care Act To Enroll Justice-Involved Populations In Medicaid: State And Local Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Bandara, Sachini N.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Riedel, Lauren E.; McGinty, Emma E.; Webster, Daniel; Toone, Robert E.; Barry, Colleen L.

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to enroll criminal justice–involved populations in health insurance, particularly Medicaid. As a result, many state and county corrections departments have launched programs that incorporate Medicaid enrollment in discharge planning. Our study characterizes the national landscape of programs enrolling criminal justice–involved populations in Medicaid as of January 2015. We provide an overview of sixty-four programs operating in jails, prisons, or community probation and parole systems that enroll individuals during detention, incarceration, and the release process. We describe the variation among the programs in terms of settings, personnel, timing of eligibility screening, and target populations. Seventy-seven percent of the programs are located in jails, and 56 percent use personnel from public health or social service agencies. We describe four practices that have facilitated the Medicaid enrollment process: suspending instead of terminating Medicaid benefits upon incarceration, presuming that an individual is eligible for Medicaid before the process is completed, allowing enrollment during incarceration, and accepting alternative forms of identification for enrollment. The criminal justice system is a complex one that requires a variety of approaches to enroll individuals in Medicaid. Future research should examine how these approaches influence health and criminal justice outcomes. PMID:26643624

  6. Translator's preface.

    PubMed

    Lamiell, James T

    2013-08-01

    Presents a preface from James T. Lamiell, who translates Wilhelm Wundt's Psychology's Struggle for Existence (Die Psychologie im Kampf ums Dasein), in which Wundt advised against the impending divorce of psychology from philosophy, into English. Lamiell comments that more than a decade into the 21st century, it appears that very few psychologists have any interest at all in work at the interface of psychology and philosophy. He notes that one clear indication of this is that the Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, which is Division 24 of the American Psychological Association (APA), remains one of the smallest of the APA's nearly 60 divisions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Russian Translation.

    PubMed

    O'dette, R E

    1957-03-29

    This discussion has described the status of the large United States program for translation from the Russian. A partial description of what is being done or planned, and by whom, has been provided as a guide for those who wish to follow the subject further. The urge to pass on useful information has necessarily restricted the space which might also have been profitably devoted to the philosophic aspects of the problem. Although it is not said with any sense of pride in achievement-because much more remains to be done than has been done-it would seem fair to describe the current national translation activity, including all contributions to it, as a phenomenon. Phenomena in scientific communication are not common: a full appreciation of their significance requires more analysis than results from a simple listing of their outward characteristics. But a few observations might be made in conclusion. Most United States scientists probably feel that, as a nation, we are and should be world leaders in science, even though this feeling is neither nurtured nor expressed in a spirit of violent competition. If this assumption is allowed, the point which seems to remain is that the United States will not retain its position casually. Our scientists expect to maintain an awareness of the scientific achievements and failures of the other nations of the world. But we must especially become more aware of the advances of Soviet science, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The evidence points toward this last conclusion, regardless of whether one is concerned with the production of ideas or things, increase in man's knowledge of himself and his environment, conflict between idealisms, or simply the national security.

  8. Endoscopic transsphenoidal anterior petrosal approach for locally aggressive tumors involving the internal auditory canal, jugular fossa, and cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Masahiro; Kondo, Kenji; Hanakita, Shunya; Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Yoshino, Masanori; Teranishi, Yu; Kin, Taichi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Reports about endoscopic endonasal surgery for skull base tumors involving the lateral part of petrous apex remain scarce. The authors present their experience with the endoscopic transsphenoidal anterior petrosal (ETAP) approach through the retrocarotid space for tumors involving the internal auditory canal, jugular fossa, and cavernous sinus. METHODS The authors performed the ETAP approach in 10 patients with 11 tumors (bilateral in 1 patient) that extensively occupied the lateral part of petrous apex, e.g., the internal auditory canal and jugular fossa. Eight patients presented with diplopia (unilateral abducens nerve palsy), 3 with tinnitus, and 1 with unilateral hearing loss with facial palsy. After wide anterior sphenoidotomy, the sellar floor, clival recess, and carotid prominence were verified. Tumors were approached via an anteromedial petrosectomy through the retrocarotid triangular space, defined by the cavernous and vertical segments of the internal carotid artery (ICA), the clivus, and the petrooccipital fissure. The surgical window was easily enlarged by drilling the petrous bone along the petrooccipital fissure. After exposure of the tumor and ICA, dissection and resection of the tumor were mainly performed under direct visualization with 30° and 70° endoscopes. RESULTS Gross-total resection was achieved in 8 patients (9 tumors). In a patient with invasive meningioma, the tumor was strongly adherent to the ICA, necessitating partial resection. Postoperatively, all 8 patients who had presented with abducens nerve palsy preoperatively showed improvement within 6 months. In the patient presenting with hearing loss and facial palsy, the facial palsy completely resolved within 3 months, but hearing loss remained. Regarding complications, 3 patients showed mild and transient abducens nerve palsy resolving within 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Postoperative CSF rhinorrhea requiring surgical repair was observed in 1 patient. No patient

  9. Knowledge in motion: The cultural politics of modern science translations in Arabic.

    PubMed

    Elshakry, Marwa S

    2008-12-01

    This essay looks at the problem of the global circulation of modem scientific knowledge by looking at science translations in modern Arabic. In the commercial centers of the late Ottoman Empire, emerging transnational networks lay behind the development of new communities of knowledge, many of which sought to break with old linguistic and literary norms to redefine the basis of their authority. Far from acting as neutral purveyors of "universal truths," scientific translations thus served as key instruments in this ongoing process of sociopolitical and epistemological transformation and mediation. Fierce debates over translators' linguistic strategies and choices involved deliberations over the character of language and the nature of "science" itself. They were also crucially shaped by such geopolitical factors as the rise of European imperialism and anticolonial nationalism in the region. The essay concludes by arguing for the need for greater attention to the local factors involved in the translation of scientific concepts across borders.

  10. Of Texts AND Translations And Rhizomes: Postcolonial Anxieties and Deracinations and Knowledge Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Vaidehi

    2006-01-01

    This article uncovers some problems involved in culling and translating non-western texts--written in other languages, at particular times, for specific audiences, and rooted in particular local milieus--before assembling them into academic arguments in English in the west. Based on my longterm, evolving endeavour regarding English- and…

  11. Of Texts AND Translations And Rhizomes: Postcolonial Anxieties and Deracinations and Knowledge Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Vaidehi

    2006-01-01

    This article uncovers some problems involved in culling and translating non-western texts--written in other languages, at particular times, for specific audiences, and rooted in particular local milieus--before assembling them into academic arguments in English in the west. Based on my longterm, evolving endeavour regarding English- and…

  12. Conservation of the RNA Transport Machineries and Their Coupling to Translation Control across Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Pianzola, Paula; Suter, Beat

    2012-01-01

    Restriction of proteins to discrete subcellular regions is a common mechanism to establish cellular asymmetries and depends on a coordinated program of mRNA localization and translation control. Many processes from the budding of a yeast to the establishment of metazoan embryonic axes and the migration of human neurons, depend on this type of cell polarization. How factors controlling transport and translation assemble to regulate at the same time the movement and translation of transported mRNAs, and whether these mechanisms are conserved across kingdoms is not yet entirely understood. In this review we will focus on some of the best characterized examples of mRNA transport machineries, the “yeast locasome” as an example of RNA transport and translation control in unicellular eukaryotes, and on the Drosophila Bic-D/Egl/Dyn RNA localization machinery as an example of RNA transport in higher eukaryotes. This focus is motivated by the relatively advanced knowledge about the proteins that connect the localizing mRNAs to the transport motors and the many well studied proteins involved in translational control of specific transcripts that are moved by these machineries. We will also discuss whether the core of these RNA transport machineries and factors regulating mRNA localization and translation are conserved across eukaryotes. PMID:22666086

  13. Histamine response and local cooling in the human skin: involvement of H1- and H2-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, M; Jamieson, M J; Kirch, W

    1999-01-01

    Aims Histamine may contribute locally to cutaneous blood flow control under normal and pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to observe the influence of skin temperature on histamine vasodilation, and the roles of H1-and H2-receptors using novel noninvasive methods. Methods Eleven healthy subjects received, double-blind, single doses of the H1-receptor antagonist cetirizine (10 mg), cetirizine (10 mg) plus the H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine (400 mg), or placebo on separate occasions. Histamine was dosed cumulatively by iontophoresis to the forearm skin at 34° C and 14° C. Laser-Doppler flux (LDF) was measured at the same sites using customised probeholder/iontophoretic chambers with Peltier cooling elements. Finger mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured and cutaneous vascular conductance calculated as LDF/MAP. Results Histamine vasodilation was reduced in cold skin. Cetirizine shifted the histamine dose-response at both temperatures: statistically significantly at 14° C only. Combined H1- and H2-receptor antagonism shifted the response significantly at both temperatures. Conclusions H1- and H2-receptors mediate histamine-induced skin vasodilation. The sensitivity of these receptors, particularly the H1- receptor, is attenuated at low skin temperature. Whether the reduced effect in cold skin represents specific receptor or postreceptor desensitization, or nonspecific attenuation of cutaneous vasodilation remains to be elucidated. PMID:10417499

  14. Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase, an enzyme involved in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis, is localized at the pericycle of the root.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Hayashi, A; Amano, Y; Kohno, J; Iwanari, H; Usuda, S; Yamada, Y

    1991-03-05

    Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase (H6H; EC 1.14.11.11) catalyzes the first reaction in the biosynthetic pathway from hyoscyamine to scopolamine in several solanaceous plants. Four monoclonal antibodies were raised against H6H purified from cultured roots of Hyoscyamus niger. The IgG1 antibody mAb5 inhibited H6H activities present in cell-free extracts of H. niger roots and specifically recognized 38-40-kDa proteins from six different scopolamine-producing plant species in Western blot analysis after sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The other three monoclonal antibodies all recognized SDS-denatured H6H protein from Hyoscyamus species, but did not bind to native H6H. Western blot analysis of protein extracts from various tissues of H. niger using these antibodies showed that H6H is abundant in cultured roots, present in plant roots, but absent in leaf, stem, calyx, cultured cells, and cultured shoots. Immunohistochemical studies using monoclonal antibody and immunogold-silver enhancement detected H6H only in the pericycle cells of the young root in several scopolamine-producing plants. Mature roots that underwent secondary growth and lacked the pericycle did not react with the antibody. This pericycle-specific localization of scopolamine biosynthesis provides an anatomical explanation for the tissue-specific biosynthesis of tropane alkaloids and may be important for translocation of tropane alkaloids from the root to the aerial parts.

  15. Localization of the central rhythm generator involved in spontaneous consummatory licking in rats: functional ablation and electrical brain stimulation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Brozek, G; Zhuravin, I A; Megirian, D; Bures, J

    1996-01-01

    Localization of the central rhythm generator (CRG) of spontaneous consummatory licking was studied in freely moving rats by microinjection of tetrodotoxin (TTX) into the pontine reticular formation. Maximum suppression of spontaneous water consumption was elicited by TTX (1 ng) blockade of the oral part of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRG), whereas TTX injections into more caudal or rostral locations caused significantly weaker disruption of drinking. To verify the assumption that TTX blocked the proper CRG of licking rather than some relay in its output, spontaneously drinking thirsty rats were intracranially stimulated via electrodes chronically implanted into the oral part of the NRG. Lick-synchronized stimulation (a 100-ms train of 0.1-ms-wide rectangular pulses at 100 Hz and 25-150 microA) applied during continuous licking (after eight regular consecutive licks) caused a phase shift of licks emitted after stimulus delivery. The results suggest that the stimulation has reset the CRG of licking without changing its frequency. The reset-inducing threshold current was lowest during the tongue retraction and highest during the tongue protrusion period of the lick cycle. It is concluded that the CRG of licking is located in the oral part of NRG. PMID:8622936

  16. Localization of BiP to translating ribosomes increases soluble accumulation of secreted eukaryotic proteins in an E. coli cell-free system

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, John P.; Bonomo, Jeanne; Swartz, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident Hsp70 chaperone, BiP, docks to the Sec translocon and interacts co-translationally with polypeptides entering the ER to encourage proper folding. In order to recreate this interaction in E. coli cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) reactions, a fusion protein was formed between the ribosome binding portion of the E. coli protein Trigger Factor (TF) and BiP. The biophysical affinity to ribosomes as well as the characteristic Hsp70 ATPase activity were both verified for the fusion protein. When added to E. coli-based CFPS reactions, the TF-BiP fusion chaperone increased soluble yields of several protein fragments that are normally secreted through the ER and have poor solubility in typical CFPS reactions. For comparison, a fusion between TF and the native E. coli Hsp70, DnaK, was also constructed. This fusion was also biologically active and increased soluble yields of certain protein targets in CFPS. The TF-BiP fusion described in this study can be seen as a first step in reconstituting and better understanding ER folding pathways in the prokaryotic environment of E. coli CFPS. PMID:21351069

  17. Localization of BiP to translating ribosomes increases soluble accumulation of secreted eukaryotic proteins in an Escherichia coli cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Welsh, John P; Bonomo, Jeanne; Swartz, James R

    2011-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident Hsp70 chaperone, BiP, docks to the Sec translocon and interacts co-translationally with polypeptides entering the ER to encourage proper folding. In order to recreate this interaction in Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) reactions, a fusion protein was formed between the ribosome-binding portion of the E. coli protein trigger factor (TF) and BiP. The biophysical affinity to ribosomes as well as the characteristic Hsp70 ATPase activity were both verified for the fusion protein. When added to E. coli-based CFPS reactions, the TF-BiP fusion chaperone increased soluble yields of several protein fragments that are normally secreted through the ER and have poor solubility in typical CFPS reactions. For comparison, a fusion between TF and the native E. coli Hsp70, DnaK, was also constructed. This fusion was also biologically active and increased soluble yields of certain protein targets in CFPS. The TF-BiP fusion described in this study can be seen as a first step in reconstituting and better understanding ER folding pathways in the prokaryotic environment of E. coli CFPS. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Modified development in transgenic tobacco plants expressing a rolA::GUS translational fusion and subcellular localization of the fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Vilaine, F; Rembur, J; Chriqui, D; Tepfer, M

    1998-09-01

    The rolA gene is transferred naturally by Agrobacterium rhizogenes to the genome of host plants, where it induces dramatic changes in development of transformed plants, including dwarfism and leaf wrinkling. The predicted translation product of the rolA gene is a small (11.4 kDa), basic (pI = 11.2) protein, which has no clearly significant similarity to sequences in the data bases. We have introduced into the tobacco genome a gene encoding a rolA::GUS fusion protein. Expression of this gene led to synthesis of an RNA and a protein of expected size, and the transformed plants exhibited the dwarfism and leaf wrinkling typical of rolA plants, but to a lesser degree than plants transformed with the wild-type rolA gene. The distribution of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity was compared in subcellular fractions of leaf extracts from plants expressing either the rolA::gus gene or a control gus construct. As expected, in the control plants, GUS activity was essentially cytosolic. In contrast, in plants expressing the rolA::gus gene the highest specific activity was associated with the plasmalemma fraction.

  19. Involvement of two genetic lineages of Sarcoptes scabiei mites in a local mange epizootic of wild mammals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Makouloutou, Patrice; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yokoyama, Mayumi; Takeuchi, Masahiko; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Sato, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Similar to wild mammals on the continents, mange caused by the mange mite, Sarcoptes scabiei (Acari: Sarcoptidae) is spreading in wild mammals in most of Japan. We collected crusted or alopetic skin from 120 raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides viverrinus), three raccoons (Procyon lotor), six Japanese badgers (Meles anakuma), one Japanese marten (Martes melampus), one stray dog (Canis lupus familiaris), four wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax), and one Japanese serow (Capricornis crispus), mainly in an area where mangy wild animals have been increasingly noted in the past 4 yr. The second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region of the ribosomal RNA gene and the partial 16S and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox-1) genes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were characterized in these skin samples. The ITS2 sequencing (404 base pairs [bp]) identified the causative mite for mangy skin lesions of 128 animals as S. scabiei, regardless of host origin. The cat mite (Notoedres cati) was the cause in one raccoon dog and one raccoon. Most mites had almost identical ITS2 nucleotide sequences to those recorded in a variety of mammals worldwide. Partial 16S and cox-1 fragments of mtDNA amplified and sequenced successfully (331 bp and 410 bp, respectively) showed an identical nucleotide sequence except for one site (C vs. T) for the former and four sites (G, C, C, C vs. A, T, T, T, respectively) for the latter fragment. These substitutions were always synchronized, with the two mitochondrial DNA haplotypes (i.e., C/GCCC and T/ATTT) appearing to separately colonize in geographic units. The T/ATTT haplotype fell into a clade where animal-derived mites worldwide dominated, whereas the C/GCCC haplotype formed a geographic branch unique to Japanese isolates. These results suggest that heterologous populations of monospecific S. scabiei are expanding their populations and distributions regardless of host species in an apparently local mange epizootic of wild mammals in Japan.

  20. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion. PMID:25946314

  1. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  2. Functional adaptation of long bone extremities involves the localized ``tuning'' of the cortical bone composition; evidence from Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Kevin; Kerns, Jemma G.; Birch, Helen L.; Gikas, Panagiotis D.; Parker, Anthony W.; Matousek, Pavel; Goodship, Allen E.

    2014-11-01

    In long bones, the functional adaptation of shape and structure occurs along the whole length of the organ. This study explores the hypothesis that adaptation of bone composition is also site-specific and that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of bone (and, thus, its mechanical properties) varies along the organ's length. Raman spectroscopy was used to map the chemical composition of long bones along their entire length in fine spatial resolution (1 mm), and then biochemical analysis was used to measure the mineral, collagen, water, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content where site-specific differences were seen. The results show that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of the bone material in human tibiae varies by <5% along the mid-shaft but decreases by >10% toward the flared extremities of the bone. Comparisons with long bones from other large animals (horses, sheep, and deer) gave similar results with bone material composition changing across tens of centimeters. The composition of the bone apatite also varied with the phosphate-to-carbonate ratio decreasing toward the ends of the tibia. The data highlight the complexity of adaptive changes and raise interesting questions about the biochemical control mechanisms involved. In addition to their biological interest, the data provide timely information to researchers developing Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive tool for measuring bone composition in vivo (particularly with regard to sampling and measurement protocol).

  3. Translating Translations: Selecting and Using Translated Early Childhood Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Rosa Milagros; Lee, Sung Yoon; Valdivia, Rebeca; Zhang, Chun

    2001-01-01

    This article provides early intervention professionals with strategies for selecting and using translated materials. It stresses the importance of considering both the intended audience of the material and the quality of the translation itself. The article notes that many Web-based translator programs fail to capture the idiomatic usage or…

  4. A novel chloroplast localized Rab GTPase protein CPRabA5e is involved in stress, development, thylakoid biogenesis and vesicle transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Karim, Sazzad; Alezzawi, Mohamed; Garcia-Petit, Christel; Solymosi, Katalin; Khan, Nadir Zaman; Lindquist, Emelie; Dahl, Peter; Hohmann, Stefan; Aronsson, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    A novel Rab GTPase protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, CPRabA5e (CP = chloroplast localized) is located in chloroplasts and has a role in transport. Transient expression of CPRabA5e:EGFP fusion protein in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves, and immunoblotting using Arabidopsis showed localization of CPRabA5e in chloroplasts (stroma and thylakoids). Ypt31/32 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved in regulating vesicle transport, and CPRabA5e a close homolog of Ypt31/32, restores the growth of the ypt31Δ ypt32(ts) mutant at 37 °C in yeast complementation. Knockout mutants of CPRabA5e displayed delayed seed germination and growth arrest during oxidative stress. Ultrastructural studies revealed that after preincubation at 4 °C mutant chloroplasts contained larger plastoglobules, lower grana, and more vesicles close to the envelopes compared to wild type, and vesicle formation being enhanced under oxidative stress. This indicated altered thylakoid development and organization of the mutants. A yeast-two-hybrid screen with CPRabA5e as bait revealed 13 interacting partner proteins, mainly located in thylakoids and plastoglobules. These proteins are known or predicted to be involved in development, stress responses, and photosynthesis related processes, consistent with the stress phenotypes observed. The results observed suggest a role of CPRabA5e in transport to and from thylakoids, similar to cytosolic Rab proteins involved in vesicle transport.

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel chloroplast/mitochondria co-localized glutathione reductase 3 involved in salt stress response in rice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Meng; Lin, Wan-Rong; Kao, Yun-Ting; Hsu, Yi-Ting; Yeh, Ching-Hui; Hong, Chwan-Yang; Kao, Ching Huei

    2013-11-01

    Glutathione reductases (GRs) are important components of the antioxidant machinery that plants use to respond against abiotic stresses. In rice, one cytosolic and two chloroplastic GR isoforms have been identified. In this work, we describe the cloning and characterization of the full-length cDNA encoding OsGR3, a chloroplast-localized GR that up to now was considered as a non-functional enzyme because of assumed lack of N-terminal conserved domains. The expression of OsGR3 in E. coli validated that it can be translated as a protein with GR activity. OsGR3 shows 76 and 53 % identity with OsGR1 (chloroplastic) and OsGR2 (cytosolic), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 2 chloroplastic GRs in Poaceae species, including rice, sorghum and brachypodium, but only one chloroplastic GR in dicots. A plastid transit peptide is located at the N terminus of OsGR3, and genetic transformation of rice with a GR3-GFP fusion construct further confirmed its localization in chloroplasts. Furthermore, OsGR1 and OsGR3 are also targeted to mitochondria, which suggest a combined antioxidant mechanism in both chloroplasts and mitochondria. However, both isoforms showed a distinct response to salinity: the expression of OsGR3 but not OsGR1 was induced by salt stress. In addition, the transcript level of OsGR3 was greatly increased with salicylic acid treatment but was not significantly affected by methyl jasmonate, dehydration or heat shock stress. Our results provide new clues about the possible roles of functional OsGR3 in salt stress and biotic stress tolerance.

  6. Assessment of esophageal involvement in systemic sclerosis and morphea (localized scleroderma) by clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pH metric features: a prospective comparative hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Arif, Tasleem; Masood, Qazi; Singh, Jaswinder; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-02-15

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a generalized disorder of unknown etiology affecting the connective tissue of the body. It affects the skin and various internal organs. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is seen in almost 90% of the patients. Esophagus is the most frequently affected part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal motility disturbance classically manifests as a reduced lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and loss of distal esophageal body peristalsis. Consequently, SSc patients may be complicated by erosive esophagitis and eventually by Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, is characterized by predominant skin involvement, with occasional involvement of subjacent muscles and usually sparing the internal organs. The involvement of esophagus in morphea has been studied very scarcely. The proposed study will investigate the esophageal involvement in the two forms of scleroderma (systemic and localized), compare the same and address any need of upper gastrointestinal evaluation in morphea (localized scleroderma) patients. 56 and 31 newly and already diagnosed cases of SSc and morphea respectively were taken up for the study. All the patients were inquired about the dyspeptic symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation and/or dysphagia). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring were done in 52, 47 and 41 patients of SSc; and 28, 25 and 20 patients of morphea respectively. Esophageal symptoms were present in 39 cases (69.6%) of SSc which were mild in 22 (39.3%), moderate in 14 (25%), severe in three (5.3%); while only four cases (7.1%) of morphea had esophageal symptoms all of which were mild in severity. Reflux esophagitis was seen in 17 cases (32.7%) of SSc and only two cases (7.14%) of morphea. Manometric abnormalities were seen in 32 cases (68.1%) of SSc and none in morphea. Ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring documented abnormal reflux in

  7. v-Src-induced nuclear localization of YAP is involved in multipolar spindle formation in tetraploid cells.

    PubMed

    Kakae, Keiko; Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Kuga, Takahisa; Saito, Youhei; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Nakayama, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine kinase, c-Src, is involved in a variety of signaling events, including cell division. We have reported that v-Src, which is a mutant variant of the cellular proto-oncogene, c-Src, causes delocalization of Aurora B kinase, resulting in a furrow regression in cytokinesis and the generation of multinucleated cells. However, the effect of v-Src on mitotic spindle formation is unknown. Here we show that v-Src-expressing HCT116 and NIH3T3 cells undergo abnormal cell division, in which cells separate into more than two cells. Upon v-Src expression, the proportion of multinucleated cells is increased in a time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that v-Src increases the number of cells having a ≥4N DNA content. Microscopic analysis showed that v-Src induces the formation of multipolar spindles with excess centrosomes. These results suggest that v-Src induces multipolar spindle formation by generating multinucleated cells. Tetraploidy activates the tetraploidy checkpoint, leading to a cell cycle arrest of tetraploid cells at the G1 phase, in which the nuclear exclusion of the transcription co-activator YAP plays a critical role. In multinucleated cells that are induced by cytochalasin B and the Plk1 inhibitor, YAP is excluded from the nucleus. However, v-Src prevents this nuclear exclusion of YAP through a decrease in the phosphorylation of YAP at Ser127 in multinucleated cells. Furthermore, v-Src decreases the expression level of p53, which also plays a critical role in the cell cycle arrest of tetraploid cells. These results suggest that v-Src promotes abnormal spindle formation in at least two ways: generation of multinucleated cells and a weakening of the tetraploidy checkpoint.

  8. PKM2 Subcellular Localization Is Involved in Oxaliplatin Resistance Acquisition in HT29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ginés, Alba; Bystrup, Sara; Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Guardia, Cristina; Musulén, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is the main cause of treatment failure in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). However, molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. In a previous work we identified low levels of PKM2 as a putative oxaliplatin-resistance marker in HT29 CRC cell lines and also in patients. In order to assess how PKM2 influences oxaliplatin response in CRC cells, we silenced PKM2 using specific siRNAs in HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. MTT test demonstrated that PKM2 silencing induced resistance in HT29 and SW480 cells and sensitivity in HCT116 cells. Same experiments in isogenic HCT116 p53 null cells and double silencing of p53 and PKM2 in HT29 cells failed to show an influence of p53. By using trypan blue stain and FITC-Annexin V/PI tests we detected that PKM2 knockdown was associated with an increase in cell viability but not with a decrease in apoptosis activation in HT29 cells. Fluorescence microscopy revealed PKM2 nuclear translocation in response to oxaliplatin in HCT116 and HT29 cells but not in OXA-resistant HTOXAR3 cells. Finally, by using a qPCR Array we demonstrated that oxaliplatin and PKM2 silencing altered cell death gene expression patterns including those of BMF, which was significantly increased in HT29 cells in response to oxaliplatin, in a dose and time-dependent manner, but not in siPKM2-HT29 and HTOXAR3 cells. BMF gene silencing in HT29 cells lead to a decrease in oxaliplatin-induced cell death. In conclusion, our data report new non-glycolytic roles of PKM2 in response to genotoxic damage and proposes BMF as a possible target gene of PKM2 to be involved in oxaliplatin response and resistance in CRC cells. PMID:25955657

  9. CELF4 Regulates Translation and Local Abundance of a Vast Set of mRNAs, Including Genes Associated with Regulation of Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenzhi; Mahaffey, Connie L.; Curk, Tomaž; Rot, Gregor; Ule, Jernej; Frankel, Wayne N.

    2012-01-01

    RNA–binding proteins have emerged as causal agents of complex neurological diseases. Mice deficient for neuronal RNA–binding protein CELF4 have a complex neurological disorder with epilepsy as a prominent feature. Human CELF4 has recently been associated with clinical features similar to those seen in mutant mice. CELF4 is expressed primarily in excitatory neurons, including large pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and it regulates excitatory but not inhibitory neurotransmission. We examined mechanisms underlying neuronal hyperexcitability in Celf4 mutants by identifying CELF4 target mRNAs and assessing their fate in the absence of CELF4 in view of their known functions. CELF4 binds to at least 15%–20% of the transcriptome, with striking specificity for the mRNA 3′ untranslated region. CELF4 mRNA targets encode a variety of proteins, many of which are well established in neuron development and function. While the overall abundance of these mRNA targets is often dysregulated in Celf4 deficient mice, the actual expression changes are modest at the steady-state level. In contrast, by examining the transcriptome of polysome fractions and the mRNA distribution along the neuronal cell body-neuropil axis, we found that CELF4 is critical for maintaining mRNA stability and availability for translation. Among biological processes associated with CELF4 targets that accumulate in neuropil of mutants, regulation of synaptic plasticity and transmission are the most prominent. Together with a related study of the impact of CELF4 loss on sodium channel Nav1.6 function, we suggest that CELF4 deficiency leads to abnormal neuronal function by combining a specific effect on neuronal excitation with a general impairment of synaptic transmission. These results also expand our understanding of the vital roles RNA–binding proteins play in regulating and shaping the activity of neural circuits. PMID:23209433

  10. Intracellular Localization of Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase and Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 in Adipocytes: Potential Involvement of a Membrane Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Sharon F.; Martin, Sally; Carozzi, Amanda J.; Hill, Michelle M.; James, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositide (PI) 3-kinase binds to tyrosyl-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in insulin-treated adipocytes, and this step plays a central role in the regulated movement of the glucose transporter, GLUT4, from intracellular vesicles to the cell surface. PDGF, which also activates PI 3-kinase in adipocytes, has no significant effect on GLUT4 trafficking in these cells. We propose that this specificity may be mediated by differential localization of PI 3-kinase in response to insulin versus PDGF activation. Using subcellular fractionation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we show that insulin- and PDGF-stimulated PI 3-kinase activities are located in an intracellular high speed pellet (HSP) and in the plasma membrane (PM), respectively. The HSP is also enriched in IRS-1, insulin-stimulated tyrosyl-phosphorylated IRS-1 and intracellular GLUT4-containing vesicles. Using sucrose density gradient sedimentation, we have been able to segregate the HSP into two separate subfractions: one enriched in IRS-1, tyrosyl-phosphorylated IRS-1, PI 3-kinase as well as cytoskeletal elements, and another enriched in membranes, including intracellular GLUT4 vesicles. Treatment of the HSP with nonionic detergent, liberates all membrane constituents, whereas IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase remain insoluble. Conversely, at high ionic strength, membranes remain intact, whereas IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase become freely soluble. We further show that this IRS-1–PI 3-kinase complex exists in CHO cells overexpressing IRS-1 and, in these cells, the cytosolic pool of IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase is released subsequent to permeabilization with Streptolysin-O, whereas the particulate fraction of these proteins is retained. These data suggest that IRS-1, PI 3-kinase, as well as other signaling intermediates, may form preassembled complexes that may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton. This complex must be in close apposition to the cell surface, enabling access to the insulin receptor and presumably

  11. Consensus Translation: A Sociolinguistic Approach to the Translation of Community Oriented Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, L. Leann

    An approach to translation is discussed which takes into account the sociolinguistic factors involved in a translated document designed for use with a linguistically, culturally and educationally heterogeneous population, such as the U.S. Spanish-heritage community. The translation project described resulted in the Spanish-language questionnaire…

  12. Interleukin-6 and interleukin-6 receptor expression, localization, and involvement in pain-sensing neuron activation in a mouse intervertebral disc injury model.

    PubMed

    Sainoh, Takeshi; Orita, Sumihisa; Miyagi, Masayuki; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Gen; Aoki, Yasuchika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    The pathological mechanism of intractable low back pain is unclear. However, intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a primary cause of low back pain, and pain-related mediators, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), have been correlated with discogenic pain. The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of local IL-6 and IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) expression after IVD injury as well as determine the involvement of IL-6/IL-6 signaling in discogenic pain. To do this, quantitative and immunohistological analyses in a mouse model of IVD injury were performed. Firstly, we measured the local expression levels of IL-6 and IL-6R in IVDs by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Secondly, we immunohistochemically confirmed their localization in injured IVDs. Lastly, we evaluated the effects of intradiscal injection of an IL-6 inhibitor by evaluating pain-related protein, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that innervate IVDs. Injured IVDs showed increased production of IL-6 and IL-6R. IL-6 and IL-6R expression in the injured IVD were predominantly localized in the annulus fibrosus and endplate, and intradiscal injection of the IL-6 inhibitor suppressed CGRP expression in the DRG neurons. These results show that IL-6 and IL-6R expression levels are responsive to IVD injury and that inhibition of IL-6/IL-6R signaling may be a promising analgesic treatment for degenerative disc diseases.

  13. Uncovering Genes and Ploidy Involved in the High Diversity in Root Hair Density, Length and Response to Local Scarce Phosphate in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Stetter, Markus G.; Schmid, Karl; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Plant root hairs increase the root surface to enhance the uptake of sparingly soluble and immobile nutrients, such as the essential nutrient phosphorus, from the soil. Here, root hair traits and the response to scarce local phosphorus concentration were studied in 166 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana using split plates. Root hair density and length were correlated, but highly variable among accessions. Surprisingly, the well-known increase in root hair density under low phosphorus was mostly restricted to genotypes that had less and shorter root hairs under P sufficient conditions. By contrast, several accessions with dense and long root hairs even had lower hair density or shorter hairs in local scarce phosphorus. Furthermore, accessions with whole-genome duplications developed more dense but phosphorus-insensitive root hairs. The impact of genome duplication on root hair density was confirmed by comparing tetraploid accessions with their diploid ancestors. Genome-wide association mapping identified candidate genes potentially involved in root hair responses tp scarce local phosphate. Knock-out mutants in identified candidate genes (CYR1, At1g32360 and RLP48) were isolated and differences in root hair traits in the mutants were confirmed. The large diversity in root hair traits among accessions and the diverse response when local phosphorus is scarce is a rich resource for further functional analyses. PMID:25781967

  14. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Maria R.; Rocca, Bruno J.; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T.; Tripodi, Sergio A.; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  15. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria R; Rocca, Bruno J; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T; Tripodi, Sergio A; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis.

  16. Eukaryotic translation initiation factors and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Umar; Ur Rahman, Muhammad Saif; Jia, Zhenyu; Jiang, Cao

    2017-06-01

    Recent technological advancements have shown tremendous mechanistic accomplishments in our understanding of the mechanism of messenger RNA translation in eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic messenger RNA translation is very complex process that includes four phases (initiation, elongation, termination, and ribosome recycling) and diverse mechanisms involving protein and non-protein molecules. Translation regulation is principally achieved during initiation step of translation, which is organized by multiple eukaryotic translation initiation factors. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor proteins help in stabilizing the formation of the functional ribosome around the start codon and provide regulatory mechanisms in translation initiation. Dysregulated messenger RNA translation is a common feature of tumorigenesis. Various oncogenic and tumor suppressive genes affect/are affected by the translation machinery, making the components of the translation apparatus promising therapeutic targets for the novel anticancer drug. This review provides details on the role of eukaryotic translation initiation factors in messenger RNA translation initiation, their contribution to onset and progression of tumor, and how dysregulated eukaryotic translation initiation factors can be used as a target to treat carcinogenesis.

  17. A multicenter study shows PTEN deletion is strongly associated with seminal vesicle involvement and extracapsular extension in localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Dean A; Jamaspishvili, Tamara; Wei, Wei; Feng, Ziding; Good, Jennifer; Hawley, Sarah; Fazli, Ladan; McKenney, Jesse K; Simko, Jeff; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Carroll, Peter R; Gleave, Martin; Lance, Raymond; Lin, Daniel W; Nelson, Peter S; Thompson, Ian M; True, Lawrence D; Brooks, James D; Squire, Jeremy A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Loss of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene is a promising marker of aggressive prostate cancer. Active surveillance and watchful waiting are increasingly recommended to patients with small tumors felt to be low risk, highlighting the difficulties of Gleason scoring in this setting. There is an urgent need for predictive biomarkers that can be rapidly deployed to aid in clinical decision-making. Our objectives were to assess the incidence and ability of PTEN alterations to predict aggressive disease in a multicenter study. METHODS We used recently developed probes optimized for sensitivity and specificity in a four-color FISH deletion assay to study the Canary Retrospective multicenter Prostate Cancer Tissue Microarray (TMA). This TMA was constructed specifically for biomarker validation from radical prostatectomy specimens, and is accompanied by detailed clinical information with long-term follow-up. RESULTS In 612 prostate cancers, the overall rate of PTEN deletion was 112 (18.3%). Hemizygous PTEN losses were present in 55/612 (9.0%) of cancers, whereas homozygous PTEN deletion was observed in 57/612 (9.3%) of tumors. Significant associations were found between PTEN status and pathologic stage (P < 0.0001), seminal vesicle invasion (P = 0.0008), extracapsular extension (P < 0.0001), and Gleason score (P = 0.0002). In logistic regression analysis of clinical and pathological variables, PTEN deletion was significantly associated with extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle involvement, and higher Gleason score. In the 406 patients in which clinical information was available, PTEN homozygous (P = 0.009) deletion was associated with worse post-operative recurrence-free survival (number of events = 189), pre-operative prostate specific antigen (PSA) (P < 0.001), and pathologic stage (P = 0.03). CONCLUSION PTEN status assessed by FISH is an independent predictor for recurrence-free survival in

  18. A multicenter study shows PTEN deletion is strongly associated with seminal vesicle involvement and extracapsular extension in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Dean A; Jamaspishvili, Tamara; Wei, Wei; Feng, Ziding; Good, Jennifer; Hawley, Sarah; Fazli, Ladan; McKenney, Jesse K; Simko, Jeff; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Carroll, Peter R; Gleave, Martin; Lance, Raymond; Lin, Daniel W; Nelson, Peter S; Thompson, Ian M; True, Lawrence D; Brooks, James D; Squire, Jeremy A

    2015-08-01

    Loss of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene is a promising marker of aggressive prostate cancer. Active surveillance and watchful waiting are increasingly recommended to patients with small tumors felt to be low risk, highlighting the difficulties of Gleason scoring in this setting. There is an urgent need for predictive biomarkers that can be rapidly deployed to aid in clinical decision-making. Our objectives were to assess the incidence and ability of PTEN alterations to predict aggressive disease in a multicenter study. We used recently developed probes optimized for sensitivity and specificity in a four-color FISH deletion assay to study the Canary Retrospective multicenter Prostate Cancer Tissue Microarray (TMA). This TMA was constructed specifically for biomarker validation from radical prostatectomy specimens, and is accompanied by detailed clinical information with long-term follow-up. In 612 prostate cancers, the overall rate of PTEN deletion was 112 (18.3%). Hemizygous PTEN losses were present in 55/612 (9.0%) of cancers, whereas homozygous PTEN deletion was observed in 57/612 (9.3%) of tumors. Significant associations were found between PTEN status and pathologic stage (P < 0.0001), seminal vesicle invasion (P = 0.0008), extracapsular extension (P < 0.0001), and Gleason score (P = 0.0002). In logistic regression analysis of clinical and pathological variables, PTEN deletion was significantly associated with extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle involvement, and higher Gleason score. In the 406 patients in which clinical information was available, PTEN homozygous (P = 0.009) deletion was associated with worse post-operative recurrence-free survival (number of events = 189), pre-operative prostate specific antigen (PSA) (P < 0.001), and pathologic stage (P = 0.03). PTEN status assessed by FISH is an independent predictor for recurrence-free survival in multivariate models, as were seminal

  19. A clinical study to assess the pathological involvement of occult supraclavicular lymphnode metastasis in case of locally advanced operable breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Virani, S J; Patni, S; Shah, R

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node (SCLN) recurrence after early breast cancer appears to be worse than for other locoregional recurrences, but better than for distant metastases. Prophylactic radiotherapy (RT) to supraclavicular region decreases risk of ipsilateral SCLN recurrence. Currently, all patients with locally advanced breast cancer are considered high-risk for SCLN metastasis and treated with prophylactic RT. This study is carried out to identify risk factors associated with occult SCLN metastases in locally advanced breast cancer. Total 48 female patients of all ages presenting with locally advanced carcinoma of breast who were operable by protocol criteria were included in the study. All the patients underwent modified radical mastectomy with supraclavicular lymphnode dissection. The resected specimen was processed for the histopathological analysis. Occult SCLN metastases are found in 25% (12/48) of the patients in this study. Eleven factors were identified and analyzed to know whether or not they are associated with SCLN metastasis. Of those only pathological N stage (7% for involvement (7% for patients without Level III involvement and 52% for with Level III involvement) are significantly associated with high-risk for occult supraclavicular lymphnode metastasis. Other factors such as age, menopausal status, T stage, pathologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, hormone receptor, and Her2 neu receptor status are not associated with risk for SCLN metastasis. Our study has shown that only high axillary disease burden in terms of more than 10 node positivity or more than 75% positive node out of total dissected nodes is associated with occult supraclavicular lymphnode metastasis breast cancer.

  20. Involvement of local serotonin-2A but not serotonin-1B receptors in the reinforcing effects of ethanol within the posterior ventral tegmental area of female Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Toalston, Jamie E.; Oster, Scott M.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Previous studies indicated that ethanol could be self-infused into the posterior ventral tegmental area (p-VTA) and that activation of local serotonin-3 (5-HT3) receptors was involved. 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the effects of 5-HT and ethanol on VTA dopamine neurons. Objective The current study used the intracranial self-administration (ICSA) procedure to determine the involvement of local 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptors in the self-infusion of ethanol into the p-VTA. Materials and methods Female Wistar rats were implanted unilaterally with a guide cannula aimed at the p-VTA. Seven days after surgery, rats were placed into the two-lever operant conditioning chambers for ICSA tests. The tests consisted of four acquisition sessions with self-infusion of 200 mg% ethanol alone, two or three sessions with co-infusion of the 5-HT1B antagonist GR 55562 (10, 100, or 200 μM) or the 5-HT2A antagonist R-96544 (10, 100, or 200 μM) with 200 mg% ethanol, and one final session with 200 mg% ethanol alone. Results During the acquisition sessions, all rats readily self-infused ethanol and discriminated the active from inactive lever. Co-infusion of GR 55562, at all three doses, had no effect on the self-infusion of ethanol. In contrast, co-infusion of R-96544, at the two higher doses, attenuated responding on the active lever for ethanol infusion (p<0.05). Conclusion The results suggest that the reinforcing effects of ethanol within the p-VTA are modulated, at least in part, by activation of local 5-HT2A, but not 5-HT1B, receptors. PMID:19165471

  1. The Translated Dowling Polynomials and Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Mangontarum, Mahid M.; Macodi-Ringia, Amila P.; Abdulcarim, Normalah S.

    2014-01-01

    More properties for the translated Whitney numbers of the second kind such as horizontal generating function, explicit formula, and exponential generating function are proposed. Using the translated Whitney numbers of the second kind, we will define the translated Dowling polynomials and numbers. Basic properties such as exponential generating functions and explicit formula for the translated Dowling polynomials and numbers are obtained. Convexity, integral representation, and other interesting identities are also investigated and presented. We show that the properties obtained are generalizations of some of the known results involving the classical Bell polynomials and numbers. Lastly, we established the Hankel transform of the translated Dowling numbers. PMID:27433494

  2. The Translated Dowling Polynomials and Numbers.

    PubMed

    Mangontarum, Mahid M; Macodi-Ringia, Amila P; Abdulcarim, Normalah S

    2014-01-01

    More properties for the translated Whitney numbers of the second kind such as horizontal generating function, explicit formula, and exponential generating function are proposed. Using the translated Whitney numbers of the second kind, we will define the translated Dowling polynomials and numbers. Basic properties such as exponential generating functions and explicit formula for the translated Dowling polynomials and numbers are obtained. Convexity, integral representation, and other interesting identities are also investigated and presented. We show that the properties obtained are generalizations of some of the known results involving the classical Bell polynomials and numbers. Lastly, we established the Hankel transform of the translated Dowling numbers.

  3. Research on the application of satellite remote sensing to local, state, regional and national programs involved with resource management and environmental quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    A program designed to involve state, regional and local agency personnel in the application of remote sensing is reported. During this period fifteen applications projects were initiated in support of twenty-five separate state, county and municipal agencies or entities. Eight of the projects were completed with positive results which aided the agencies involved. These results included information which contributed to decisions on: (1) selection of a route for a scenic parkway, (2) policy development on open land use, (3) policy related to urban development, (4) a major reservoir project by a governor's staff, (5) control tactics and damage assessment during flooding conditions on the Kansas and Missouri rivers, and (6) initiating a program of habitat inventory by remote sensing by the Kansas Forestry, Fish and Game Commission.

  4. Process evaluation of a knowledge translation intervention using facilitation of local stakeholder groups to improve neonatal survival in the Quang Ninh province, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Leif; Huy, Tran Q; Duc, Duong M; Ekholm Selling, Katarina; Hoa, Dinh P; Thuy, Nguyen T; Nga, Nguyen T; Persson, Lars-Åke; Wallin, Lars

    2016-01-13

    Annually, 2.8 million neonatal deaths occur worldwide, despite the fact that three-quarters of them could be prevented if available evidence-based interventions were used. Facilitation of community groups has been recognized as a promising method to translate knowledge into practice. In northern Vietnam, the Neonatal Health - Knowledge Into Practice trial evaluated facilitation of community groups (2008-2011) and succeeded in reducing the neonatal mortality rate (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95 % confidence interval 0.30-0.89). The aim of this paper is to report on the process (implementation and mechanism of impact) of this intervention. Process data were excerpted from diary information from meetings with facilitators and intervention groups, and from supervisor records of monthly meetings with facilitators. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. An evaluation including attributes and skills of facilitators (e.g., group management, communication, and commitment) was performed at the end of the intervention using a six-item instrument. Odds ratios were analyzed, adjusted for cluster randomization using general linear mixed models. To ensure eight active facilitators over 3 years, 11 Women's Union representatives were recruited and trained. Of the 44 intervention groups, composed of health staff and commune stakeholders, 43 completed their activities until the end of the study. In total, 95 % (n = 1508) of the intended monthly meetings with an intervention group and a facilitator were conducted. The overall attendance of intervention group members was 86 %. The groups identified 32 unique problems and implemented 39 unique actions. The identified problems targeted health issues concerning both women and neonates. Actions implemented were mainly communication activities. Communes supported by a group with a facilitator who was rated high on attributes and skills (n = 27) had lower odds of neonatal mortality (odds ratio, 0.37; 95 % confidence

  5. Optical microscopy of targeted drug delivery and local distribution in skin of a topical minocycline: implications in translational research and guidance for therapeutic dose selection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermsmeier, Maiko; Sawant, Tanvee; Lac, Diana; Yamamoto, Akira; Chen, Xin; Huang, Susan Y.; Nagavarapu, Usha; Evans, Conor L.; Chan, Kin Foong; Daniels, AnnaMarie

    2017-02-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin condition commonly resulting in negative aesthetic and social impacts on those affected. Minocycline, currently available as an oral antibiotic for moderate to severe acne, has a known minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the acne-causing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in vitro, with its anti-inflammatory properties also eliciting inhibitory effects on pro-inflammatory molecules. A novel topical gel composition containing solubilized minocycline (BPX-01) has been developed to directly deliver the drug to the skin. Because minocycline is a known fluorophore, fluorescence microscopy and concurrent quantitative measurements were performed on excised human facial skin dosed with different concentrations, in order to determine the spatial distribution of the drug and quantification of its local concentration in the epidermis and the pilosebaceous unit where P. acnes generally reside. Local minocycline delivery confirmed achievement of an adequate therapeutic dose to support clinical studies. Subsequently, a 4-week double-blind, randomized, vehicle controlled clinical study was performed to assess the safety and efficacy of 1% minocycline BPX-01 applied daily. No instances of cutaneous toxicity were reported, and a greater than 1 log reduction of P. acnes count was observed at week 4 with statistical significance from baseline and vehicle control. In addition, no detectable amounts of minocycline in the plasma were reported, suggesting the potential of this new formulation to diminish the known systemic adverse effects associated with oral minocycline. Follow-on clinical plans are underway to further establish the safety of BPX-01 and to evaluate its efficacy against inflammatory acne lesions in a 225 patient multi-center dose-finding study.

  6. Translation Theory and Translation Studies in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Qin

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is a comparative study of "translation theory" and "translation studies" in China and the West. Its focus is to investigate whether there is translation theory in the Chinese tradition. My study begins with an examination of the debate in China over whether there has already existed a system of translation…

  7. Translation Theory and Translation Studies in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Qin

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is a comparative study of "translation theory" and "translation studies" in China and the West. Its focus is to investigate whether there is translation theory in the Chinese tradition. My study begins with an examination of the debate in China over whether there has already existed a system of translation…

  8. Rice OsVAMP714, a membrane-trafficking protein localized to the chloroplast and vacuolar membrane, is involved in resistance to rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Kawagoe, Yasushi; Mochizuki, Susumu; Inoue, Haruhiko; Mori, Masaki; Nishizawa, Yoko; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Matsui, Minami; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Membrane trafficking plays pivotal roles in many cellular processes including plant immunity. Here, we report the characterization of OsVAMP714, an intracellular SNARE protein, focusing on its role in resistance to rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Disease resistance tests using OsVAMP714 knockdown and overexpressing rice plants demonstrated the involvement of OsVAMP714 in blast resistance. The overexpression of OsVAMP7111, whose product is highly homologous to OsVAMP714, did not enhance blast resistance to rice, implying a potential specificity of OsVAMP714 to blast resistance. OsVAMP714 was localized to the chloroplast in mesophyll cells and to the cellular periphery in epidermal cells of transgenic rice plant leaves. We showed that chloroplast localization is critical for the normal OsVAMP714 functioning in blast resistance by analyzing the rice plants overexpressing OsVAMP714 mutants whose products did not localize in the chloroplast. We also found that OsVAMP714 was located in the vacuolar membrane surrounding the invasive hyphae of M. oryzae. Furthermore, we showed that OsVAMP714 overexpression promotes leaf sheath elongation and that the first 19 amino acids, which are highly conserved between animal and plant VAMP7 proteins, are crucial for normal rice plant growths. Our studies imply that the OsVAMP714-mediated trafficking pathway plays an important role in rice blast resistance as well as in the vegetative growth of rice.

  9. Computational identification of post-translational modification-based nuclear import regulations by characterizing nuclear localization signal-import receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Rong; Liu, Zhonghao; Hu, Jianjun

    2014-10-01

    The binding affinity between a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and its import receptor is closely related to corresponding nuclear import activity. PTM-based modulation of the NLS binding affinity to the import receptor is one of the most understood mechanisms to regulate nuclear import of proteins. However, identification of such regulation mechanisms is challenging due to the difficulty of assessing the impact of PTM on corresponding nuclear import activities. In this study we proposed NIpredict, an effective algorithm to predict nuclear import activity given its NLS, in which molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) were used to characterize the NLS-import receptor interaction, and the support vector regression machine (SVR) was used to learn the relationship between the characterized NLS-import receptor interaction and the corresponding nuclear import activity. Our experiments showed that nuclear import activity change due to NLS change could be accurately predicted by the NIpredict algorithm. Based on NIpredict, we developed a systematic framework to identify potential PTM-based nuclear import regulations for human and yeast nuclear proteins. Application of this approach has identified the potential nuclear import regulation mechanisms by phosphorylation of two nuclear proteins including SF1 and ORC6.

  10. Increasing involvement in local schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuselier, Stephen; Dusenberry, Paul

    In recent years, school science curriculum has come under severe criticism by several panels convened to study the U.S. education system. In September 1989, President Bush convened the historic “Education Summit” with the nation's governors in Charlottesville, Va. The major outcome of the summit was the creation of national goals for education reform and the framework for achieving them. Perhaps no goal is more challenging for science than the one that states, “By the year 2000, U.S. students will be first in the world in science and mathematics achievement."

  11. Broadening measures of success: results of a behavioral health translational research training program.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Julie A; Williamson, Heather J; Eaves, Emery R; Levin, Bruce L; Burton, Donna L; Massey, Oliver T

    2017-07-24

    While some research training programs have considered the importance of mentoring in inspiring professionals to engage in translational research, most evaluations emphasize outcomes specific to academic productivity as primary measures of training program success. The impact of such training or mentoring programs on stakeholders and local community organizations engaged in translational research efforts has received little attention. The purpose of this evaluation is to explore outcomes other than traditional academic productivity in a translational research graduate certificate program designed to pair graduate students and behavioral health professionals in collaborative service-learning projects. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with scholars, community mentors, and academic mentors were conducted regarding a translational research program to identify programmatic impacts. Interviews were transcribed and coded by the research team to identify salient themes related to programmatic outcomes. Results are framed using the Translational Research Impact Scale which is organized into three overarching domains of potential impact: (1) research-related impacts, (2) translational impacts, and (3) societal impacts. This evaluation demonstrates the program's impact in all three domains of the TRIS evaluation framework. Graduate certificate participants (scholars) reported that gaining experience in applied behavioral health settings added useful skills and expertise to their present careers and increased their interest in pursuing translational research. Scholars also described benefits resulting from networks gained through participation in the program, including valuable ties between the university and community behavioral health organizations. This evaluation of the outcomes of a graduate certificate program providing training in translational research highlights the need for more community-oriented and practice-based measures of success. Encouraging practitioner

  12. Translating global recommendations on HIV and infant feeding to the local context: the development of culturally sensitive counselling tools in the Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Leshabari, Sebalda C; Koniz-Booher, Peggy; Åstrøm, Anne N; de Paoli, Marina M; Moland, Karen M

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper describes the process used to develop an integrated set of culturally sensitive, evidence-based counselling tools (job aids) by using qualitative participatory research. The aim of the intervention was to contribute to improving infant feeding counselling services for HIV positive women in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. Methods Formative research using a combination of qualitative methods preceded the development of the intervention and mapped existing practices, perceptions and attitudes towards HIV and infant feeding (HIV/IF) among mothers, counsellors and community members. Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol guided the development of the overall intervention strategy. Theories of behaviour change, a review of the international HIV/IF guidelines and formative research findings contributed to the definition of performance and learning objectives. Key communication messages and colourful graphic illustrations related to infant feeding in the context of HIV were then developed and/or adapted from existing generic materials. Draft materials were field tested with intended audiences and subjected to stakeholder technical review. Results An integrated set of infant feeding counselling tools, referred to as 'job aids', was developed and included brochures on feeding methods that were found to be socially and culturally acceptable, a Question and Answer Guide for counsellors, a counselling card on the risk of transmission of HIV, and an infant feeding toolbox for demonstration. Each brochure describes the steps to ensure safer infant feeding using simple language and images based on local ideas and resources. The brochures are meant to serve as both a reference material during infant feeding counselling in the ongoing prevention of mother to child transmission (pMTCT) of HIV programme and as take home material for the mother. Conclusion The study underscores the importance of formative research and a systematic theory based approach to

  13. The translational regulator Cup controls NMJ presynaptic terminal morphology

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Kaushiki P.; Carrillo, Robert A.; Zinn, Kai

    2015-01-01

    During oogenesis and early embryonic development in Drosophila, translation of proteins from maternally deposited mRNAs is tightly controlled. We and others have previously shown that translational regulatory proteins that function during oogenesis also have essential roles in the nervous system. Here we examine the role of Cup in neuromuscular system development. Maternal Cup controls translation of localized mRNAs encoding the Oskar and Nanos proteins and binds to the general translation initiation factor eIF4E. In this paper, we show that zygotic Cup protein is localized to presynaptic terminals at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). cup mutant NMJs have strong phenotypes characterized by the presence of small clustered boutons called satellite boutons. They also exhibit an increase in the frequency of spontaneous glutamate release events (mEPSPs). Reduction of eIF4E expression synergizes with partial loss of Cup expression to produce satellite bouton phenotypes. The presence of satellite boutons is often associated with increases in retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and we show that synaptic BMP signaling is elevated in cup mutants. cup genetically interacts with four genes (EndoA, WASp, Dap160, and Synj) encoding proteins involved in endocytosis that are also neuronal modulators of the BMP pathway. Endophilin protein, encoded by the EndoA gene, is downregulated in a cup mutant. Our results are consistent with a model in which Cup and eIF4E work together to ensure efficient localization and translation of endocytosis proteins in motor neurons and control the strength of the retrograde BMP signal. PMID:26102195

  14. Literature in Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Mary Ellen

    An examination of literature in translation is vital to literary interpretation and, ultimately, essential to mutual understanding among peoples from different cultures. Teaching translations requires consideration of linguistic, social, and temporal areas. Translations require alterations in language since languages never translate precisely from…

  15. Intraoperative radiation therapy as adjuvant treatment in locally advanced stage tumours involving the middle ear: a hypothesis-generating retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cristalli, G; Mercante, G; Marucci, L; Soriani, A; Telera, S; Spriano, G

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety, effectiveness and functional outcomes of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage tumours involving the middle ear. Data on 13 consecutive patients treated for malignant tumor of external auditory canal involving the middle ear were retrospectively reviewed. Median follow-up was 33 months (range 6-133). Five (38%) patients were stage III and 8 (62%) were Stage IV according to the University of Pittsburgh staging system. Lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) was performed in all cases. LTBR was associated with parotidectomy in 5 (38%) cases, and with neck dissection and parotidectomy in 6 (46%) cases. No patients had gross residual tumour. Surgical treatment was followed by IORT (12 Gy) and IMRT (50 Gy). Adjuvant chemotherapy was used in 4 (30%) cases. Preoperative and postoperative audiometric tests were performed to assess hearing loss. 5-year local-control (LC), 5-year distant-metastasis (DM), 5-year disease-free-survival (DFS) and 5-year overall-survival (OS) were calculated with Kaplan-Meyer method. Significant changes in bone conduction were reported after treatment. Partial flap necrosis was the only early complication observed in three (23%) cases, while meningeal fistula was seen in one (7.6%) case as a late complication. The 5-year LC-rate was 68%. The 5-year DM-rate was 90%. The 5-year DFS-rate was 61%. The 5-year OS-rate was 69%. IORT followed by IMRT for the treatment of advanced external auditory canal and middle ear tumours seems to be safe. No intraoperative death was reported. IORT may reduce the postoperative irradiation of remnant tissue obtaining the same full dose on the tumour bed. No complications of the residual external ear were observed. Detriment of neurosensory hearing may be expected. Future studies are required to confirm the benefit of this procedure in the ear.

  16. [Functional disability indexes: translation difficulties and cross cultural adaptation problems].

    PubMed

    Guermazi, Mohammad; Yahia, Monem; Kessomtini, Wassia; Elleuch, Mohamed; Ghroubi, Sameh; Ould, Sidya Abderrahman; Mrabet, Fouzia; Fki, Hbib; Fermanian, Jacques; Poiraudeau, Serge; Revel, Michel; Baklouti, Sofiène; Elleuch, Mohamed Habib

    2005-05-01

    To summarize the difficulties involved in translating tests in Arabic and to describe the translation methods and to apply those to functional indexes. Four functional indexes were translated and then subjected to the following test validation methods: back translation, pre-test, and review by an expert committee. Translation problems were underlined. These include in particular the different types of equivalence between the source language and the target language (semantics, idioms, conceptual... equivalences). Problems related to comprehensive literal words were the most observed. The current method combining translation with back translation is not sufficient and must be used with, a pre-test and a review committee.

  17. Evidence for the involvement of lung-specific γδ T cell subsets in local responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Alun C; Newton, Darren J; Carding, Simon R; Kaye, Paul M

    2007-01-01

    Although γδ T cells are involved in the response to many pathogens, the dynamics and heterogeneity of the local γδ T cell response remains poorly defined. We recently identified γδ T cells as regulators of macrophages and dendritic cells during the resolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae-mediated lung inflammation. Here, using PCR, spectratype analysis and flow cytometry, we show that multiple γδ T cell subsets, including those bearing Vγ1, Vγ4 and Vγ6 TCR, increase in number in the lungs of infected mice, but not in associated lymphoid tissue. These γδ T cells displayed signs of activation, as defined by CD69 and CD25 expression. In vivo BrdU incorporation suggested that local expansion, rather than recruitment, was the principal mechanism underlying this increase in γδ T cells. This conclusion was supported by the finding that pulmonary γδ T cells, but not αβ T cells, isolated from mice that had resolved infection exhibited lung-homing capacity in both naive and infected recipients. Together, these data provide novel insights into the origins of the heterogeneous γδ T cell response that accompanies lung infection, and the first evidence that inflammation-associated γδ T cells may exhibit distinct tissue-homing potential. PMID:18022862

  18. [Involvement of local dietetics professionals in risk communication program on food safety in municipal governments and their attitude towards the program].

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Rie; Nomura, Marika; Horiguchi, Itsuko; Tanaka, Hisako; Marui, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to gather statistical references on food safety education that encourages competence of food choice from the view-point of food safety. A survey on the involvement of the risk communication program on food safety in municipal governments and the attitude of local dietetics professionals towards the program was conducted. In November, 2006, self-reported questionnaires were mailed to 1990 local dietetics professionals who worked in municipal governments in Japan. Descriptive statistics and cross tables were used for data analysis. 1162 questionnaires were mailed and 1130 available surveys were returned. Among the respondents, 41.5% answered that they inform the community about food safety, but 49.9% answered that they did not get information from the community. Most of the respondents answered that risk communication of food safety was important; 21.8% answered "extremely agree" and 62.3% answered "rather agree" on a scale of four from "extremely agree" to "do not agree". More than one-half of the dietetics professionals answered that their confidence in conducting risk communication was low; 20.5% answered "no confidence" and 52.5% answered "hardly have confidence" on a scale of four from "without confidence" to "with confidence". More than 80% of the respondents answered that they needed "professional knowledge" and "support from professional agencies". This study suggests that educating local dietetics professionals about professional knowledge on food safety, and obtaining support from special agencies will be essential in the upgrade of risk communication program on food safety in a community.

  19. Single Posterior Approach for En-Bloc Resection and Stabilization for Locally Advanced Pancoast Tumors Involving the Spine: Single Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sunna, Tarek; Liberman, Moishe; Boubez, Ghassan; Wang, Zhi; Shedid, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Monocentric prospective study. Purpose To assess the safety and effectiveness of the posterior approach for resection of advanced Pancoast tumors. Overview of Literature In patients with advanced Pancoast tumors invading the spine, most surgical teams consider the combined approach to be necessary for “en-bloc” resection to control visceral, vascular, and neurological structures. We report our preliminary experience with a single-stage posterior approach. Methods We included all patients who underwent posterior en-bloc resection of advanced Pancoast tumors invading the spine in our institution between January 2014 and May 2015. All patients had locally advanced tumors without N2 nodes or distant metastases. All patients, except 1, benefited from induction treatment consisting of a combination of concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatin-VP16) and radiation. Results Five patients were included in this study. There were 2 men and 3 women with a mean age of 55 years (range, 46–61 years). The tumor involved 2 adjacent levels in 1 patient, 3 levels in 1 patient, and 4 levels in 3 patients. There were no intraoperative complications. The mean operative time was 9 hours (range, 8–12 hours), and the mean estimated blood loss was 3.2 L (range, 1.5–7 L). No patient had a worsened neurological condition at discharge. Four complications occurred in 4 patients. Three complications required reoperation and none was lethal. The mean follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 9–24 months). Four patients harbored microscopically negative margins (R0 resection) and remained disease free. One patient harbored a microscopically positive margin (R1 resection) and exhibited local recurrence at 8 months following radiation treatment. Conclusions The posterior approach was a valuable option that avoided the need for a second-stage operation. Induction chemoradiation is highly suitable for limiting the risk of local recurrence. PMID:27994780

  20. Intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) induces local and systemic antitumor effects that involve both activated T and NK cells as well as enhanced IC retention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Richard K; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Ranheim, Erik A; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Alderson, Kory L; Gan, Jacek; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-09-01

    hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) is an immunocytokine consisting of human IL-2 linked to hu14.18 mAb, which recognizes the GD2 disialoganglioside. Phase 2 clinical trials of i.v. hu14.18-IL-2 (i.v.-IC) in neuroblastoma and melanoma are underway and have already demonstrated activity in neuroblastoma. We showed previously that intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IT-IC) results in enhanced antitumor activity in mouse models compared with i.v.-IC. The studies presented in this article were designed to determine the mechanisms involved in this enhanced activity and to support the future clinical testing of intratumoral administration of immunocytokines. Improved survival and inhibition of growth of both local and distant tumors were observed in A/J mice bearing s.c. NXS2 neuroblastomas treated with IT-IC compared with those treated with i.v.-IC or control mice. The local and systemic antitumor effects of IT-IC were inhibited by depletion of NK cells or T cells. IT-IC resulted in increased NKG2D receptors on intratumoral NKG2A/C/E⁺ NKp46⁺ NK cells and NKG2A/C/E⁺ CD8⁺ T cells compared with control mice or mice treated with i.v.-IC. NKG2D levels were augmented more in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with splenocytes, supporting the localized nature of the intratumoral changes induced by IT-IC treatment. Prolonged retention of IC at the tumor site was seen with IT-IC compared with i.v.-IC. Overall, IT-IC resulted in increased numbers of activated T and NK cells within tumors, better IC retention in the tumor, enhanced inhibition of tumor growth, and improved survival compared with i.v.-IC.

  1. Narcissism lost: on translating and being translated.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Maria Inês N E; Brakel, Arthur

    2010-08-01

    The authors present a detailed account of the experiences shared in translating and having one's work translated. Carneiro maintains that, in order to communicate with their readers, writers should relinquish the narcissistic satisfaction they derive from their texts in the original. Beyond this, she feels that, owing to a good understanding between her and her translator, the creativity in her original text persists in the translation. Brakel introduces himself to the IJPA readership and shows how he works when translating the cultural and linguistic nuances and peculiarities of Brazilian Portuguese. He concludes with some thoughts about the affect he experiences from his original work and the work he has translated. Copyright © 2009 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  2. Training Tools for Translators and Interpreters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Qinai, Jamal

    2010-01-01

    The present paper reviews the traditional methodologies of translator training and proposes an eclectic multi-componential approach that involves a set of interdisciplinary skills with the ultimate objective of meeting market demand. Courses on translation for specific purposes (TSP) and think-aloud protocols (TAP) along with self-monitoring and…

  3. Translation and Advertising: Going Global. Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguinot, Candace; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the identity-forming power of translation in advertising copy. In the marketing of goods and services across cultural boundaries, an understanding of culture and semiotics that goes well beyond both language and design is involved. Translators must understand marketing, the legal jurisdictions of their market, how cultural differences…

  4. Ethnographic Encounters: The Processes of Cultural Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Shirley Ann

    2002-01-01

    Explores some of the ways in which the contested concept of cultural translation has been interpreted in anthropology. Describes what cultural translation now involves for practitioners who research and teach within interdisciplinary frameworks--particularly those constituted by the interface between anthropology and modern language learning.…

  5. Lost in Translation: The Power of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, Sandy; Fitzsimons, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines some philosophical aspects of translation as a metaphor for education--a metaphor that avoids the closure of final definitions, in favour of an ongoing and tentative process of interpretation and revision. Translation, it is argued, is a complex process involving language, within and among cultures, and in the exercise of power.…

  6. Translation and articulation in biological motion perception.

    PubMed

    Masselink, Jana; Lappe, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Recent models of biological motion processing focus on the articulational aspect of human walking investigated by point-light figures walking in place. However, in real human walking, the change in the position of the limbs relative to each other (referred to as articulation) results in a change of body location in space over time (referred to as translation). In order to examine the role of this translational component on the perception of biological motion we designed three psychophysical experiments of facing (leftward/rightward) and articulation discrimination (forward/backward and leftward/rightward) of a point-light walker viewed from the side, varying translation direction (relative to articulation direction), the amount of local image motion, and trial duration. In a further set of a forward/backward and a leftward/rightward articulation task, we additionally tested the influence of translational speed, including catch trials without articulation. We found a perceptual bias in translation direction in all three discrimination tasks. In the case of facing discrimination the bias was limited to short stimulus presentation. Our results suggest an interaction of articulation analysis with the processing of translational motion leading to best articulation discrimination when translational direction and speed match articulation. Moreover, we conclude that the global motion of the center-of-mass of the dot pattern is more relevant to processing of translation than the local motion of the dots. Our findings highlight that translation is a relevant cue that should be integrated in models of human motion detection.

  7. The value of high-resolution MRI technique in patients with rectal carcinoma: pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumferential resection margin and local staging.

    PubMed

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery.

  8. The Value of High-Resolution MRI Technique in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma: Pre-Operative Assessment of Mesorectal Fascia Involvement, Circumferential Resection Margin and Local Staging

    PubMed Central

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. Material/Methods The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. Results The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery. PMID:25806096

  9. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  10. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2015-05-19

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  11. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2016-03-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  12. Translational Research from an Informatics Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstam, Elmer; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Turley, James P.; Smith, Jack W.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical and translational research (CTR) is an essential part of a sustainable global health system. Informatics is now recognized as an important en-abler of CTR and informaticians are increasingly called upon to help CTR efforts. The US National Institutes of Health mandated biomedical informatics activity as part of its new national CTR grant initiative, the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Traditionally, translational re-search was defined as the translation of laboratory discoveries to patient care (bench to bedside). We argue, however, that there are many other kinds of translational research. Indeed, translational re-search requires the translation of knowledge dis-covered in one domain to another domain and is therefore an information-based activity. In this panel, we will expand upon this view of translational research and present three different examples of translation to illustrate the point: 1) bench to bedside, 2) Earth to space and 3) academia to community. We will conclude with a discussion of our local translational research efforts that draw on each of the three examples.

  13. The Xenopus ELAV protein ElrB represses Vg1 mRNA translation during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Colegrove-Otero, Lucy J; Devaux, Agathe; Standart, Nancy

    2005-10-01

    Xenopus laevis Vg1 mRNA undergoes both localization and translational control during oogenesis. We previously characterized a 250-nucleotide AU-rich element, the Vg1 translation element (VTE), in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of this mRNA that is responsible for the translational repression. UV-cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments, described here, revealed that the known AU-rich element binding proteins, ElrA and ElrB, and TIA-1 and TIAR interact with the VTE. The levels of these proteins during oogenesis are most consistent with a possible role for ElrB in the translational control of Vg1 mRNA, and ElrB, in contrast to TIA-1 and TIAR, is present in large RNP complexes. Immunodepletion of TIA-1 and TIAR from Xenopus translation extract confirmed that these proteins are not involved in the translational repression. Mutagenesis of a potential ElrB binding site destroyed the ability of the VTE to bind ElrB and also abolished translational repression. Moreover, multiple copies of the consensus motif both bind ElrB and support translational control. Therefore, there is a direct correlation between ElrB binding and translational repression by the Vg1 3'-UTR. In agreement with the reporter data, injection of a monoclonal antibody against ElrB into Xenopus oocytes resulted in the production of Vg1 protein, arguing for a role for the ELAV proteins in the translational repression of Vg1 mRNA during early oogenesis.

  14. Accumulation of Polyribosomes in Dendritic Spine Heads, But Not Bases and Necks, during Memory Consolidation Depends on Cap-Dependent Translation Initiation.

    PubMed

    Ostroff, Linnaea E; Botsford, Benjamin; Gindina, Sofya; Cowansage, Kiriana K; LeDoux, Joseph E; Klann, Eric; Hoeffer, Charles

    2017-02-15

    Translation in dendrites is believed to support synaptic changes during memory consolidation. Although translational control mechanisms are fundamental mediators of memory, little is known about their role in local translation. We previously found that polyribosomes accumulate in dendritic spines of the adult rat lateral amygdala (LA) during consolidation of aversive pavlovian conditioning and that this memory requires cap-dependent initiation, a primary point of translational control in eukaryotic cells. Here we used serial electron microscopy reconstructions to quantify polyribosomes in LA dendrites when consolidation was blocked by the cap-dependent initiation inhibitor 4EGI-1. We found that 4EGI-1 depleted polyribosomes in dendritic shafts and selectively prevented their upregulation in spine heads, but not bases and necks, during consolidation. Cap-independent upregulation was specific to spines with small, astrocyte-associated synapses. Our results reveal that cap-dependent initiation is involved in local translation during learning and that local translational control varies with synapse type.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Translation initiation is a central regulator of long-term memory formation. Local translation in dendrites supports memory by providing necessary proteins at synaptic sites, but it is unknown whether this requires initiation or bypasses it. We used serial electron microscopy reconstructions to examine polyribosomes in dendrites when memory formation was blocked by an inhibitor of translation initiation. This revealed two major pools of polyribosomes that were upregulated during memory formation: one pool in dendritic spine heads that was initiation dependent and another pool in the bases and necks of small spines that was initiation independent. Thus, translation regulation differs between spine types and locations, and translation that occurs closest to individual synapses during memory formation is initiation dependent. Copyright © 2017 the

  15. Use of in vitro translation extract depleted in specific initiation factors for the investigation of translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Gallie, Daniel R

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression often involves the control of translation mediated through one or more initiation factors that are required for the translation of eukaryotic mRNAs. Genetic and molecular biological approaches can be highly useful in the initial identification of translational regulation, but the use of in vitro translation lysates can be essential in elucidating the details of translational regulatory mechanisms. Wheat germ lysate has long been used for in vitro translation studies. The noncompetitive conditions that prevail in this lysate as it is normally produced, however, preclude the translational regulatory analysis of many mRNAs involving the preferential recruitment of initiation factors. The development of lysate depleted in specific translation initiation factors converts wheat germ lysate from a noncompetitive system to one that is competitive in a fast and simple procedure that enables it to be used in the analysis of many more translational regulatory mechanisms than is currently possible with unfractionated lysate.

  16. Histone H3K9 modifications are a local chromatin event involved in ethanol-induced neuroadaptation of the NR2B gene.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley; Lieu, Mai; Carreon, Stephanie; Li, Ji

    2011-09-01

    Expression of the NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) gene is upregulated following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment and withdrawal, which underlies behavioral alterations in addiction. The goal of this study was to characterize the changes of histone modifications induced by CIE treatment and its subsequent removal associated to the upregulation of NR2B gene transcription. To investigate the involvement of histone acetylation in the effect of ethanol on the NR2B gene, we examined the influence of CIE on histone acetylation in the 5' regulatory region of NR2B using a qChIP assay. CIE treatment and its subsequent removal produced a remarkable and selected increase in histone H3K9 acetylation. Interestingly, the majority of the increased H3K9 acetylation occurred after ethanol removal, which was coincident with a decrease in H3K9 methylation in the same time duration. Further examination of the mechanisms of ethanol-induced alterations on the histone modifications revealed that CIE-induced acetylation of H3K9 was not due to the changes in global enzyme activities or the expression of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylase (HDACs). Instead, we found a significant downregulation in some histone methyltransferases (HMTs) at both the global level and the local chromatin of the NR2B gene following CIE treatment. Moreover, our experiments also indicated a decrease of G9a, Suv39 h1 and HDAC1-3 in the chromatin of the NR2B gene promoter, which may be responsible for the altered H3K9 modifications. Taken together, the findings suggest a mechanism where the changes in H3K9 modifications in the local chromatin of the NR2B gene underlie alcohol-induced neuroadaptation.

  17. PARAQUAT RESISTANT1, a Golgi-Localized Putative Transporter Protein, Is Involved in Intracellular Transport of Paraquat1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianyong; Mu, Jinye; Bai, Jiaoteng; Fu, Fuyou; Zou, Tingting; An, Fengying; Zhang, Jian; Jing, Hongwei; Wang, Qing; Li, Zhen; Yang, Shuhua; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-01-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides worldwide. In green plants, paraquat targets the chloroplast by transferring electrons from photosystem I to molecular oxygen to generate toxic reactive oxygen species, which efficiently induce membrane damage and cell death. A number of paraquat-resistant biotypes of weeds and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants have been identified. The herbicide resistance in Arabidopsis is partly attributed to a reduced uptake of paraquat through plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the biochemical mechanism of paraquat resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis paraquat resistant1 (par1) mutant that shows strong resistance to the herbicide without detectable developmental abnormalities. PAR1 encodes a putative l-type amino acid transporter protein localized to the Golgi apparatus. Compared with the wild-type plants, the par1 mutant plants show similar efficiency of paraquat uptake, suggesting that PAR1 is not directly responsible for the intercellular uptake of paraquat. However, the par1 mutation caused a reduction in the accumulation of paraquat in the chloroplast, suggesting that PAR1 is involved in the intracellular transport of paraquat into the chloroplast. We identified a PAR1-like gene, OsPAR1, in rice (Oryza sativa). Whereas the overexpression of OsPAR1 resulted in hypersensitivity to paraquat, the knockdown of its expression using RNA interference conferred paraquat resistance on the transgenic rice plants. These findings reveal a unique mechanism by which paraquat is actively transported into the chloroplast and also provide a practical approach for genetic manipulations of paraquat resistance in crops. PMID:23471133

  18. The composition, localization and function of low-temperature-adapted microbial communities involved in methanogenic degradations of cellulose and chitin from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau wetland soils.

    PubMed

    Dai, Y; Yan, Z; Jia, L; Zhang, S; Gao, L; Wei, X; Mei, Z; Liu, X

    2016-07-01

    To reveal the microbial communities from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau wetland soils that have the potential to be used in the utilization of cellulosic and chitinous biomass at low temperatures (≤25°C). Soil samples collected from six wetlands on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau were supplemented with or without cellulose and chitin flakes, and anaerobically incubated at 25 and 15°C; high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to access the composition and localization (in the slurry and on the surface) of enriched microbial communities; a hypothetical model was constructed to demonstrate the functional roles of involved microbes mainly at genus level. Overall, microbial communities from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau wetlands showed significant potential to convert both cellulose and chitin to methane at low temperatures; Clostridium III, Clostridium XIVa, Paludibacter, Parcubacteria, Saccharofermentans, Pelotomaculum, Methanosaeta, Methanobrevibacter, Methanoregula, Methanospirillum and Methanosarcina participated in methanogenic degradation of both cellulose and chitin through the roles of hydrolytic, saccharolytic and secondary fermenters and methanogens respectively. Acetotrophic methanogens were mainly enriched in the slurries, while hydrogenotrophic methanogens could be both in the slurries and on the surface. The composition and localization of microbial communities that could effectively convert cellulose and chitin to methane at low temperatures have been revealed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing methods, and reviewing the literatures on the microbial pure culture helped to elucidate functional roles of significantly enriched microbes. This study will contribute to the understanding of carbon and nitrogen cycling of cellulose and chitin in cold-area wetlands and provide fundamental information to obtain microbial resources for the utilization of biomass wastes at low temperatures. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  20. GPCR signalling to the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Musnier, Astrid; Blanchot, Benoît; Reiter, Eric; Crépieux, Pascale

    2010-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in most physiological processes, many of them being engaged in fully differentiated cells. These receptors couple to transducers of their own, primarily G proteins and beta-arrestins, which launch intracellular signalling cascades. Some of these signalling events regulate the translational machinery to fine-tune general cell metabolism or to alter protein expression pattern. Though extensively documented for tyrosine kinase receptors, translational regulation by GPCRs is still poorly appreciated. The objective of this review paper is to address the following questions: i) is there a "GPCR signature" impacting on the translational machinery, and ultimately on the type of mRNA translated? ii) are the regulatory networks involved similar as those utilized by tyrosine kinase receptors? In particular, we will discuss the specific features of translational control mediated by GPCRs and highlight the intrinsic properties of GPCRs these mechanisms could rely on.

  1. Identification and lateral membrane localization of cyclin M3, likely to be involved in renal Mg2+ handling in seawater fish

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Zinia; Hayashi, Naoko; Inoue, Hana; Umezawa, Takahiro; Kimura, Yuuri; Doi, Hiroyuki; Romero, Michael F.; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2014-01-01

    The kidney of marine teleosts is the major site of Mg2+ excretion and produces urine with a high Mg2+ concentration. However, the transporters involved in Mg2+ excretion are poorly understood. The cyclin M (Cnnm; also known as ancient conserved domain protein) family comprises membrane proteins homologous to the bacterial Mg2+ and Co2+ efflux protein, CorC. To understand the molecular mechanism of Mg2+ homeostasis in marine teleosts, we analyzed the expression of the Cnnm family genes in the seawater (SW) pufferfish, torafugu (Takifugu rubripes), and the closely related euryhaline species, mefugu (Takifugu obscurus). Database mining and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Takifugu genome contains six members of the Cnnm family: two orthologs of Cnnm1, one of Cnnm2, one of Cnnm3, and two of Cnnm4. RT-PCR analyses indicated that Cnnm2, Cnnm3, and Cnnm4a are expressed in the kidney, whereas other members are mainly expressed in the brain. Renal expression of Cnnm3 was upregulated in SW mefugu, whereas renal expression of Cnnm2 was upregulated in freshwater (FW) mefugu. No significant difference was observed in renal expression of Cnnm4a between SW and FW mefugu. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses of the SW mefugu kidney revealed that Cnnm3 is expressed in the proximal tubule, and its product localizes to the lateral membrane. When Cnnm3 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, whole cellular Mg2+ content and free intracellular Mg2+ activity significantly decreased. These results suggest that Cnnm3 is involved in body fluid Mg2+ homeostasis in marine teleosts. PMID:24965791

  2. Identification and lateral membrane localization of cyclin M3, likely to be involved in renal Mg2+ handling in seawater fish.

    PubMed

    Islam, Zinia; Hayashi, Naoko; Inoue, Hana; Umezawa, Takahiro; Kimura, Yuuri; Doi, Hiroyuki; Romero, Michael F; Hirose, Shigehisa; Kato, Akira

    2014-09-01

    The kidney of marine teleosts is the major site of Mg(2+) excretion and produces urine with a high Mg(2+) concentration. However, the transporters involved in Mg(2+) excretion are poorly understood. The cyclin M (Cnnm; also known as ancient conserved domain protein) family comprises membrane proteins homologous to the bacterial Mg(2+) and Co(2+) efflux protein, CorC. To understand the molecular mechanism of Mg(2+) homeostasis in marine teleosts, we analyzed the expression of the Cnnm family genes in the seawater (SW) pufferfish, torafugu (Takifugu rubripes), and the closely related euryhaline species, mefugu (Takifugu obscurus). Database mining and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Takifugu genome contains six members of the Cnnm family: two orthologs of Cnnm1, one of Cnnm2, one of Cnnm3, and two of Cnnm4. RT-PCR analyses indicated that Cnnm2, Cnnm3, and Cnnm4a are expressed in the kidney, whereas other members are mainly expressed in the brain. Renal expression of Cnnm3 was upregulated in SW mefugu, whereas renal expression of Cnnm2 was upregulated in freshwater (FW) mefugu. No significant difference was observed in renal expression of Cnnm4a between SW and FW mefugu. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses of the SW mefugu kidney revealed that Cnnm3 is expressed in the proximal tubule, and its product localizes to the lateral membrane. When Cnnm3 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, whole cellular Mg(2+) content and free intracellular Mg(2+) activity significantly decreased. These results suggest that Cnnm3 is involved in body fluid Mg(2+) homeostasis in marine teleosts.

  3. Involvement of endothelial progenitor cells in the formation of plexiform lesions in broiler chickens: possible role of local immune/inflammatory response*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xun; Juan, Fan-guo; Shah, Ali Q.

    2017-01-01

    Plexiform lesions (PLs), which are often accompanied by perivascular infiltrates of mononuclear cells, represent the hallmark lesions of pulmonary arteries in humans suffering from severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been recently implicated in the formation of PLs in human patients. PLs rarely develop in rodent animal models of PAH but can develop spontaneously in broiler chickens. The aim of the present study was to confirm the presence of EPCs in the PLs in broilers. The immune mechanisms involved in EPC dysfunction were also evaluated. Lungs were collected from commercial broilers at 1 to 4 weeks of age. The right/total ventricle ratios indicated normal pulmonary arterial pressures for all sampled birds. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expressions of EPC markers (CD133 and VEGFR-2) and proangiogenic molecule hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the lung samples. An EPC/lymphocyte co-culture system was used to investigate the functional changes of EPCs under the challenge of immune cells. PLs with different cellular composition were detected in the lungs of broilers regardless of age, and they were commonly surrounded by moderate to dense perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the presence of CD133+ and VEGFR-2+ cells in PLs. These structures also exhibited a strong expression of HGF. Lymphocyte co-culture enhanced EPC apoptosis and completely blocked HGF-stimulated EPC survival and in vitro tube formation. Taken together, this work provides evidence for the involvement of EPCs in the development of PLs in broilers. It is suggested that the local immune cell infiltrate might serve as a contributor to EPC dysfunction by inducing EPC death and limiting their response to angiogenic stimuli. Broiler chickens may be valuable for investigating reversibility of plexogenic arteriopathy using gene-modified inflammation-resistant EPCs. PMID:28070997

  4. Involvement of endothelial progenitor cells in the formation of plexiform lesions in broiler chickens: possible role of local immune/inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xun; Juan, Fan-Guo; Shah, Ali Q

    Plexiform lesions (PLs), which are often accompanied by perivascular infiltrates of mononuclear cells, represent the hallmark lesions of pulmonary arteries in humans suffering from severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been recently implicated in the formation of PLs in human patients. PLs rarely develop in rodent animal models of PAH but can develop spontaneously in broiler chickens. The aim of the present study was to confirm the presence of EPCs in the PLs in broilers. The immune mechanisms involved in EPC dysfunction were also evaluated. Lungs were collected from commercial broilers at 1 to 4 weeks of age. The right/total ventricle ratios indicated normal pulmonary arterial pressures for all sampled birds. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expressions of EPC markers (CD133 and VEGFR-2) and proangiogenic molecule hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the lung samples. An EPC/lymphocyte co-culture system was used to investigate the functional changes of EPCs under the challenge of immune cells. PLs with different cellular composition were detected in the lungs of broilers regardless of age, and they were commonly surrounded by moderate to dense perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the presence of CD133(+) and VEGFR-2(+) cells in PLs. These structures also exhibited a strong expression of HGF. Lymphocyte co-culture enhanced EPC apoptosis and completely blocked HGF-stimulated EPC survival and in vitro tube formation. Taken together, this work provides evidence for the involvement of EPCs in the development of PLs in broilers. It is suggested that the local immune cell infiltrate might serve as a contributor to EPC dysfunction by inducing EPC death and limiting their response to angiogenic stimuli. Broiler chickens may be valuable for investigating reversibility of plexogenic arteriopathy using gene-modified inflammation-resistant EPCs.

  5. Localization of the site of the murine IgG1 molecule that is involved in binding to the murine intestinal Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J K; Tsen, M F; Ghetie, V; Ward, E S

    1994-10-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a recombinant Fc hinge fragment has recently been used to localize the site of the murine IgG1 molecule that is involved in the control of catabolism (the "catabolic site"). In the current study, the effects of these CH2 and CH3 domain mutations (Ile 253 to Ala 253, His 310 to Ala 310, Gln 311 to Asn 311, His 433 to Ala 433 and Asn 434 to Gln 434) on intestinal transfer of Fc hinge fragments in neonatal mice have been analyzed. Studies using direct transfer and competition assays demonstrate that the mutations affect the transmission from intestinal lumen into serum in a way that correlates closely with the effects of the mutations on pharmacokinetics. Binding studies of several of the Fc hinge fragments to isolated neonatal brush borders have been used to confirm the in vivo transmission data. These analyses have resulted in the localization of the binding site for the intestinal transfer receptor, FcRn, to specific residues of the murine Fc hinge fragment. These residues are located at the CH2-CH3 domain interface and overlap with both the catabolic site and staphylococcal protein A (SpA) binding site. The pH dependence of IgG1 or Fc fragment binding to FcRn is consistent with the localization of the FcRn interaction site to a region of the Fc that encompasses two histidine residues (His 310 and His 433). To assess whether one or two FcRn binding sites per Fc hinge are required for intestinal transfer, a hybrid Fc hinge fragment comprising a heterodimer of one Fc hinge with the wild-type IgG1 sequence and a mutant Fc hinge with a defective catabolic site (mutated at His 310, Gln 311, His 433 and Asn 434) has been analyzed in direct and competition transmission assays. The studies demonstrate that the Fc hybrid is transferred with significantly reduced efficiency compared to the wild type Fc hinge homodimer and indicate that the binding to FcRn, and possibly subsequent transfer, is enhanced by the presence of two FcRn binding sites per

  6. Translation between representation languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbaalen, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    A capability for translating between representation languages is critical for effective knowledge base reuse. A translation technology for knowledge representation languages based on the use of an interlingua for communicating knowledge is described. The interlingua-based translation process consists of three major steps: translation from the source language into a subset of the interlingua, translation between subsets of the interlingua, and translation from a subset of the interlingua into the target language. The first translation step into the interlingua can typically be specified in the form of a grammar that describes how each top-level form in the source language translates into the interlingua. In cases where the source language does not have a declarative semantics, such a grammar is also a specification of a declarative semantics for the language. A methodology for building translators that is currently under development is described. A 'translator shell' based on this methodology is also under development. The shell has been used to build translators for multiple representation languages and those translators have successfully translated nontrivial knowledge bases.

  7. Metabolic regulation of histone post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Krautkramer, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Jessica L.; Denu, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications regulate transcription and other DNA-templated functions. This process is dynamically regulated by specific modifying enzymes whose activities require metabolites that either serve as co-substrates or act as activators/inhibitors. Therefore, metabolism can influence histone modification by changing local concentrations of key metabolites. Physiologically, the epigenetic response to metabolism is important for nutrient sensing and environment adaption. In pathologic states, the connection between metabolism and histone modification mediates epigenetic abnormality in complex disease. In this review, we summarize recent studies of the molecular mechanisms involved in metabolic regulation of histone modifications and discuss their biological significance. PMID:25562692

  8. Cotranslational Coat Protein-Mediated Inhibition of Potyviral RNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Besong-Ndika, Jane; Ivanov, Konstantin I.; Hafrèn, Anders; Michon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Potato virus A (PVA) is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus and a member of the family Potyviridae. The PVA coat protein (CP) has an intrinsic capacity to self-assemble into filamentous virus-like particles, but the mechanism responsible for the initiation of viral RNA encapsidation in vivo remains unclear. Apart from virion assembly, PVA CP is also involved in the inhibition of viral RNA translation. In this study, we show that CP inhibits PVA RNA translation in a dose-dependent manner, through a mechanism involving the CP-encoding region. Analysis of this region, however, failed to identify any RNA secondary structure(s) preferentially recognized by CP, suggesting that the inhibition depends on CP-CP rather than CP-RNA interactions. In agreement with this possibility, insertion of an in-frame stop codon upstream of the CP sequence led to a marked decrease in the inhibition of viral RNA translation. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the cotranslational interactions between excess CP accumulating in trans and CP translated from viral RNA in cis are required to initiate the translational repression. This model suggests a mechanism for how viral RNA can be sequestered from translation and specifically selected for encapsidation at the late stages of viral infection. IMPORTANCE The main functions of the CP during potyvirus infection are to protect viral RNA from degradation and to transport it locally, systemically, and from host to host. Although virion assembly is a key step in the potyviral infectious cycle, little is known about how it is initiated and how viral RNA is selected for encapsidation. The results presented here suggest that CP-CP rather than CP-RNA interactions are predominantly involved in the sequestration of viral RNA away from translation. We propose that the cotranslational nature of these interactions may represent a mechanism for the selection of viral RNA for encapsidation. A better understanding of the

  9. Determinants of translation ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Tamar; Prior, Anat; Eddington, Chelsea M.; Arêas da Luz Fontes, Ana B.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguity in translation is highly prevalent, and has consequences for second-language learning and for bilingual lexical processing. To better understand this phenomenon, the current study compared the determinants of translation ambiguity across four sets of translation norms from English to Spanish, Dutch, German and Hebrew. The number of translations an English word received was correlated across these different languages, and was also correlated with the number of senses the word has in English, demonstrating that translation ambiguity is partially determined by within-language semantic ambiguity. For semantically-ambiguous English words, the probability of the different translations in Spanish and Hebrew was predicted by the meaning-dominance structure in English, beyond the influence of other lexical and semantic factors, for bilinguals translating from their L1, and translating from their L2. These findings are consistent with models postulating direct access to meaning from L2 words for moderately-proficient bilinguals. PMID:27882188

  10. Stylistics in Translation Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmkjaer, Kirsten

    1994-01-01

    Suggests that trainee translators can be helped to move between the basic and advanced stages of training through practice in collocational translational stylistics. Describes the method and outlines its differences from monolingual stylistics. Illustrates the method with an example. (HB)

  11. American Translators Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Virginia E.; Stern, Charles M.

    1981-01-01

    Presents history of this twenty-one year old organization whose aims are to achieve even higher standards, to improve conditions and payment for translators, and to gain the respect merited for the translating profession. (BK)

  12. NADPH Thioredoxin Reductase C Is Localized in Plastids of Photosynthetic and Nonphotosynthetic Tissues and Is Involved in Lateral Root Formation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Ferrández, Julia; Pascual, María Belén; González, Maricruz; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    Plastids are organelles present in photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic plant tissues. While it is well known that thioredoxin-dependent redox regulation is essential for leaf chloroplast function, little is known of the redox regulation in plastids of nonphotosynthetic tissues, which cannot use light as a direct source of reducing power. Thus, the question remains whether redox regulation operates in nonphotosynthetic plastid function and how it is integrated with chloroplasts for plant growth. Here, we show that NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC), previously reported as exclusive to green tissues, is also expressed in nonphotosynthetic tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana, where it is localized to plastids. Moreover, we show that NTRC is involved in maintaining the redox homeostasis of plastids also in nonphotosynthetic organs. To test the relationship between plastids of photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissues, transgenic plants were obtained with redox homeostasis restituted exclusively in leaves or in roots, through the expression of NTRC under the control of organ-specific promoters in the ntrc mutant. Our results show that fully functional root amyloplasts are not sufficient for root, or leaf, growth, but fully functional chloroplasts are necessary and sufficient to support wild-type rates of root growth and lateral root formation. PMID:22505729

  13. Generalizing Word Lattice Translation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    demonstrate substantial gains for Chinese -English and Arabic -English translation. Keywords: word lattice translation, phrase-based and hierarchical...introduce in reordering models. Our experiments evaluating the approach demonstrate substantial gains for Chinese -English and Arabic -English translation. 15...Section 4 presents two applications of the noisier channel paradigm, demonstrating substantial performance gains in Arabic -English and Chinese -English

  14. Machine Translation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajis, Katie

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics and capabilities of existing machine translation systems were examined and procurement recommendations were developed. Four systems, SYSTRAN, GLOBALINK, PC TRANSLATOR, and STYLUS, were determined to meet the NASA requirements for a machine translation system. Initially, four language pairs were selected for implementation. These are Russian-English, French-English, German-English, and Japanese-English.

  15. Translational ecology for hydrogeology.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, William H

    2013-01-01

    Translational ecology--a special discipline aimed to improve the accessibility of science to policy makers--will help hydrogeologists contribute to the solution of pressing environmental problems. Patterned after translational medicine, translational ecology is a partnership to ensure that the right science gets done in a timely fashion, so that it can be communicated to those who need it.

  16. Machine Translation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajis, Katie

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics and capabilities of existing machine translation systems were examined and procurement recommendations were developed. Four systems, SYSTRAN, GLOBALINK, PC TRANSLATOR, and STYLUS, were determined to meet the NASA requirements for a machine translation system. Initially, four language pairs were selected for implementation. These are Russian-English, French-English, German-English, and Japanese-English.

  17. Workshop in Translating Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Michael; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A workshop dealing with literature in translation took place in 1974 at the German Department of the University of Cincinnati. This is a report on its procedures and methods. The workshop dealt with discussion of texts, translation of texts, critique of existing translations and interpretation of content. (TL)

  18. Enabling international adoption of LOINC through translation.

    PubMed

    Vreeman, Daniel J; Chiaravalloti, Maria Teresa; Hook, John; McDonald, Clement J

    2012-08-01

    Interoperable health information exchange depends on adoption of terminology standards, but international use of such standards can be challenging because of language differences between local concept names and the standard terminology. To address this important barrier, we describe the evolution of an efficient process for constructing translations of LOINC terms names, the foreign language functions in RELMA, and the current state of translations in LOINC. We also present the development of the Italian translation to illustrate how translation is enabling adoption in international contexts. We built a tool that finds the unique list of LOINC Parts that make up a given set of LOINC terms. This list enables translation of smaller pieces like the core component "hepatitis c virus" separately from all the suffixes that could appear with it, such "Ab.IgG", "DNA", and "RNA". We built another tool that generates a translation of a full LOINC name from all of these atomic pieces. As of version 2.36 (June 2011), LOINC terms have been translated into nine languages from 15 linguistic variants other than its native English. The five largest linguistic variants have all used the Part-based translation mechanism. However, even with efficient tools and processes, translation of standard terminology is a complex undertaking. Two of the prominent linguistic challenges that translators have faced include: the approach to handling acronyms and abbreviations, and the differences in linguistic syntax (e.g. word order) between languages. LOINC's open and customizable approach has enabled many different groups to create translations that met their needs and matched their resources. Distributing the standard and its many language translations at no cost worldwide accelerates LOINC adoption globally, and is an important enabler of interoperable health information exchange.

  19. Enabling international adoption of LOINC through translation

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Daniel J.; Chiaravalloti, Maria Teresa; Hook, John; McDonald, Clement J.

    2012-01-01

    Interoperable health information exchange depends on adoption of terminology standards, but international use of such standards can be challenging because of language differences between local concept names and the standard terminology. To address this important barrier, we describe the evolution of an efficient process for constructing translations of LOINC terms names, the foreign language functions in RELMA, and the current state of translations in LOINC. We also present the development of the Italian translation to illustrate how translation is enabling adoption in international contexts. We built a tool that finds the unique list of LOINC Parts that make up a given set of LOINC terms. This list enables translation of smaller pieces like the core component “hepatitis c virus” separately from all the suffixes that could appear with it, such “Ab.IgG”, “DNA”, and “RNA”. We built another tool that generates a translation of a full LOINC name from all of these atomic pieces. As of version 2.36 (June 2011), LOINC terms have been translated into 9 languages from 15 linguistic variants other than its native English. The five largest linguistic variants have all used the Part-based translation mechanism. However, even with efficient tools and processes, translation of standard terminology is a complex undertaking. Two of the prominent linguistic challenges that translators have faced include: the approach to handling acronyms and abbreviations, and the differences in linguistic syntax (e.g. word order) between languages. LOINC’s open and customizable approach has enabled many different groups to create translations that met their needs and matched their resources. Distributing the standard and its many language translations at no cost worldwide accelerates LOINC adoption globally, and is an important enabler of interoperable health information exchange PMID:22285984

  20. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response controls matrix pre-RNA processing and translation.

    PubMed

    Münch, Christian; Harper, J Wade

    2016-06-30

    The mitochondrial matrix is unique in that it must integrate the folding and assembly of proteins derived from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) senses matrix protein misfolding and induces a program of nuclear gene expression, including mitochondrial chaperonins, to promote mitochondrial proteostasis. While misfolded mitochondrial-matrix-localized ornithine transcarbamylase induces chaperonin expression, our understanding of mammalian UPRmt is rudimentary, reflecting a lack of acute triggers for UPRmt activation. This limitation has prevented analysis of the cellular responses to matrix protein misfolding and the effects of UPRmt on mitochondrial translation to control protein folding loads. Here we combine pharmacological inhibitors of matrix-localized HSP90/TRAP1 (ref. 8) or LON protease, which promote chaperonin expression, with global transcriptional and proteomic analysis to reveal an extensive and acute response of human cells to UPRmt. This response encompasses widespread induction of nuclear genes, including matrix-localized proteins involved in folding, pre-RNA processing and translation. Functional studies revealed rapid but reversible translation inhibition in mitochondria occurring concurrently with defects in pre-RNA processing caused by transcriptional repression and LON-dependent turnover of the mitochondrial pre-RNA processing nuclease MRPP3 (ref. 10). This study reveals that acute mitochondrial protein folding stress activates both increased chaperone availability within the matrix and reduced matrix-localized protein synthesis through translational inhibition, and provides a framework for further dissection of mammalian UPRmt.

  1. Anatomic Location of Tumor Predicts the Accuracy of Motor Function Localization in Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas Involving the Hand Knob Area.

    PubMed

    Fang, S; Liang, J; Qian, T; Wang, Y; Liu, X; Fan, X; Li, S; Wang, Y; Jiang, T

    2017-08-24

    The accuracy of preoperative blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI remains controversial. This study assessed the association between the anatomic location of a tumor and the accuracy of fMRI-based motor function mapping in diffuse lower-grade gliomas. Thirty-five patients with lower-grade gliomas involving motor areas underwent preoperative blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI scans with grasping tasks and received intraoperative direct cortical stimulation. Patients were classified into an overlapping group and a nonoverlapping group, depending on the extent to which blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI and direct cortical stimulation results concurred. Tumor location was quantitatively measured, including the shortest distance from the tumor to the hand knob and the deviation distance of the midpoint of the hand knob in the lesion hemisphere relative to the midline compared with the normal contralateral hemisphere. A 4-mm shortest distance from the tumor to the hand knob value was identified as optimal for differentiating the overlapping and nonoverlapping group with the receiver operating characteristic curve (sensitivity, 84.6%; specificity, 77.8%). The shortest distances from the tumor to the hand knob of ≤4 mm were associated with inaccurate fMRI-based localizations of the hand motor cortex. The shortest distances from the tumor to the hand knob were larger (P = .002), and the deviation distances for the midpoint of the hand knob in the lesion hemisphere were smaller (P = .003) in the overlapping group than in the nonoverlapping group. This study suggests that the shortest distance from the tumor to the hand knob and the deviation distance for the midpoint of the hand knob on the lesion hemisphere are predictive of the accuracy of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI results. Smaller shortest distances from the tumor to the hand knob and larger deviation distances for the midpoint of hand knob on the lesion hemisphere are associated with less accuracy of motor cortex

  2. Metabolic influences on RNA biology and translation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chien-Der; Tu, Benjamin P

    2017-04-01

    Protein translation is one of the most energetically demanding processes for a cell to undertake. Changes in the nutrient environment may result in conditions that cannot support the rates of translation required for cell proliferation. As such, a cell must monitor its metabolic state to determine which mRNAs to translate into protein. How the various RNA species that participate in translation might relay information about metabolic state to regulate this process is not well understood. In this review, we discuss emerging examples of the influence of metabolism on aspects of RNA biology. We discuss how metabolic state impacts the localization and fate of different RNA species, as well as how nutrient cues can impact post-transcriptional modifications of RNA to regulate their functions in the control of translation.

  3. Interaction Network and Localization of Brucella abortus Membrane Proteins Involved in the Synthesis, Transport, and Succinylation of Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Leticia S.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are periplasmic homopolysaccharides that play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. Once synthesized in the cytoplasm by the CβG synthase (Cgs), CβG are transported to the periplasm by the CβG transporter (Cgt) and succinylated by the CβG modifier enzyme (Cgm). Here, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitation techniques to study the interaction network between these three integral inner membrane proteins. Our results indicate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm can form both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Analyses carried out with Cgs mutants revealed that the N-terminal region of the protein (Cgs region 1 to 418) is required to sustain the interactions with Cgt and Cgm as well as with itself. We demonstrated by single-cell fluorescence analysis that in Brucella, Cgs and Cgt are focally distributed in the membrane, particularly at the cell poles, whereas Cgm is mostly distributed throughout the membrane with a slight accumulation at the poles colocalizing with the other partners. In summary, our results demonstrate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm form a membrane-associated biosynthetic complex. We propose that the formation of a membrane complex could serve as a mechanism to ensure the fidelity of CβG biosynthesis by coordinating their synthesis with the transport and modification. IMPORTANCE In this study, we analyzed the interaction and localization of the proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and modification of Brucella abortus cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG), which play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. We demonstrate that these proteins interact, forming a complex located mainly at the cell poles; this is the first experimental evidence of the existence of a multienzymatic complex involved in the metabolism of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria and argues for another example of pole differentiation in Brucella

  4. From Local to EXtreme Environments (FLEXE) Student-Scientist Online Forums: hypothesis-based research examining ways to involve scientists in effective science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.; Carlsen, W.; Fisher, C. R.; Kerlin, S.; Trautmann, N.; Petersen, W.

    2011-12-01

    Science education reform since the mid-1990's has called for a "new way of teaching and learning about science that reflects how science itself is done, emphasizing inquiry as a way of achieving knowledge and understanding about the world" (NRC, 1996). Scientists and engineers, experts in inquiry thinking, have been called to help model these practices for students and demonstrate scientific habits of mind. The question, however, is "how best to involve these experts?" given the very real challenges of limited availability of scientists, varying experience with effective pedagogy, widespread geographic distribution of schools, and the sheer number of students involved. Technology offers partial solutions to enable Student-Scientist Interactions (SSI). The FLEXE Project has developed online FLEXE Forums to support efficient, effective SSIs, making use of web-based and database technology to facilitate communication between students and scientists. More importantly, the FLEXE project has approached this question of "how best to do this?" scientifically, combining program evaluation with hypothesis-based research explicitly testing the effects of such SSIs on student learning and attitudes towards science. FLEXE Forums are designed to showcase scientific practices and habits of mind through facilitated interaction between students and scientists. Through these Forums, students "meet" working scientists and learn about their research and the environments in which they work. Scientists provide students with intriguing "real-life" datasets and challenge students to analyze and interpret the data through guiding questions. Students submit their analyses to the Forum, and scientists provide feedback and connect the instructional activity with real-life practice, showcasing their activities in the field. In the FLEXE project, Forums are embedded within inquiry-based instructional units focused on essential learning concepts, and feature the deep-sea environment in contrast

  5. Interaction network and localization of Brucella abortus membrane proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and succinylation of cyclic β-1,2-glucans.

    PubMed

    Guidolin, Leticia S; Morrone Seijo, Susana M; Guaimas, Francisco F; Comerci, Diego J; Ciocchini, Andrés E

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are periplasmic homopolysaccharides that play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. Once synthesized in the cytoplasm by the CβG synthase (Cgs), CβG are transported to the periplasm by the CβG transporter (Cgt) and succinylated by the CβG modifier enzyme (Cgm). Here, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitation techniques to study the interaction network between these three integral inner membrane proteins. Our results indicate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm can form both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Analyses carried out with Cgs mutants revealed that the N-terminal region of the protein (Cgs region 1 to 418) is required to sustain the interactions with Cgt and Cgm as well as with itself. We demonstrated by single-cell fluorescence analysis that in Brucella, Cgs and Cgt are focally distributed in the membrane, particularly at the cell poles, whereas Cgm is mostly distributed throughout the membrane with a slight accumulation at the poles colocalizing with the other partners. In summary, our results demonstrate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm form a membrane-associated biosynthetic complex. We propose that the formation of a membrane complex could serve as a mechanism to ensure the fidelity of CβG biosynthesis by coordinating their synthesis with the transport and modification. In this study, we analyzed the interaction and localization of the proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and modification of Brucella abortus cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG), which play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. We demonstrate that these proteins interact, forming a complex located mainly at the cell poles; this is the first experimental evidence of the existence of a multienzymatic complex involved in the metabolism of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria and argues for another example of pole differentiation in Brucella. We propose that

  6. Hybridity as a process of technology's 'translation': customizing a national Electronic Patient Record.

    PubMed

    Petrakaki, Dimitra; Klecun, Ela

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how national Electronic Patient Record (EPR) systems are customized in local settings and, in particular, how the context of their origin plays out with the context of their use. It shows how representations of healthcare organizations and of local clinical practice are built into EPR systems within a complex context whereby different stakeholder groups negotiate to produce an EPR package that aims to meet both local and generic needs. The paper draws from research into the implementation of the National Care Record Service, a part of the National Programme for Information Technology (NPfIT), in the English National Health Service (NHS). The paper makes two arguments. First, customization of national EPR is a distributed process that involves cycles of 'translation', which span across geographical, cultural and professional boundaries. Second, 'translation' is an inherently political process during which hybrid technology gets consolidated. The paper concludes, that hybrid technology opens up possibilities for standardization of healthcare.

  7. Identification and localization of the sperm CRISP family protein CiUrabin involved in gamete interaction in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Saito, Takako; Yamada, Lixy; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Harada, Yoshito; Sawada, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Ascidians are hermaphrodites, and most release sperm and eggs nearly simultaneously. Many species, including Halocynthia roretzi and Ciona intestinalis, are self-sterile. We previously reported that the interaction between a 12 EGF-like repeat-containing vitelline-coat (VC) protein, HrVC70, and a sperm GPI-anchored CRISP, HrUrabin, in lipid rafts plays a key role in self-/nonself-recognizable gamete interaction in H. roretzi. On the other hand, we recently identified two pairs of polymorphic genes responsible for self-incompatibility in C. intestinalis by positional cloning: The sperm polycystin 1-like receptors s-Themis-A/B and its fibrinogen-like ligand v-Themis-A/B on the VC. However, it is not known if the orthologs of HrVC70 and HrUrabin also participate in gamete interaction in C. intestinalis since they are from different orders. Here, we tested for a C. intestinalis ortholog (CiUrabin) of HrUrabin by searching the genome database and proteomes of sperm lipid rafts. The identified CiUrabin belongs to the CRISP family, with a PR domain and a GPI-anchor-attachment site. CiUrabin appears to be specifically expressed in the testis and localized at the surface of the sperm head, as revealed by Northern blotting and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The specific interaction between CiVC57, a C. intestinalis ortholog of HrVC70, and CiUrabin was confirmed by Far Western analysis, similarly to the interaction between HrVC70 and HrUrabin. The molecular interaction between CiVC57 and CiUrabin may be involved in the primary binding of sperm to the VC prior to the allorecognition process, mediated by v-Themis-A/B and s-Themis-A/B, during fertilization of C. intestinalis.

  8. Successful reconstruction of irradiated anterior skull base defect using the dual flap technique involving local pericranial flap and radial forearm free flap.

    PubMed

    Yeo, In Sung; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Park, Myong Chul; Lim, Hyoseob; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Lee, Il Jae

    2014-07-01

    Skull base reconstruction presents a challenging therapeutic problem requiring a multispecialty surgical approach and close cooperation between the neurosurgeon, head and neck surgeon, as well as plastic and reconstructive surgeon during all stages of treatment. The principal goal of skull base reconstruction is to separate the intracranial space from the nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cavities, creating support for the brain and providing a water-tight barrier against cerebrospinal fluid leakage and ascending infection. We present a case involving a 58-year-old man with anterior skull base defects (2.5 cm × 3 cm) secondary to the removal of olfactory neuroblastoma. The patient received conventional radiation therapy at 6000 cGy in 30 fractions approximately a month before tumor removal. The patient had radiation therapy before surgery and was planned to have postoperative radiation therapy, which would lead to a higher complication rate of reconstruction. Artificial dura was used for the packing of the dural defect, which was also suspected to increase the complication rate of reconstruction. For these reasons, we chose to apply the dual flap technique, which uses both local pericranial flap and de-epithelized radial forearm free flap for anterior skull base defect to promote wound healing. During 28 months of follow-up after coverage of the anterior skull base defect, the dual flap survived completely, as confirmed through follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was free of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, meningitis, and abscess, and there was minimal donor-site morbidity of the radial forearm free flap. Reconstruction of anterior skull base defects using the dual flap technique is safe, reliable, and associated with low morbidity, and it is ideal for irradiated wounds and low-volume defects.

  9. The involvement of Abl and PTP61F in the regulation of Abi protein localization and stability and lamella formation in Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiu-Hui; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Pan, Rong-Long; Juang, Jyh-Lyh

    2007-11-02

    Most aspects of cellular events are regulated by a series of protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation processes. Abi (Abl interactor protein) functions as a substrate adaptor protein for Abl and a core member of the WAVE complex, relaying signals from Rac to Arp2/3 complex and regulating actin dynamics. It is known that the recruitment of Abi into the lamella promotes polymerization of actin, although how it does this is unclear. In this study, we found PTP61F, a Drosophila homolog of mammalian PTP1B, can reverse the Abl phosphorylation of Abi and colocalizes with Abi in Drosophila S2 cells. Abi can be translocalized from the cytosol to the cell membrane by either increasing Abl or reducing endogenous PTP61F. This reciprocal regulation of Abi phosphorylation is also involved in modulating Abi protein level, which is thought to affect the stability of the WAVE complex. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several important tyrosine phosphorylation sites in Abi. We compared the translocalization and protein half-life of wild type (wt) and phosphomutant Abi and their abilities to restore the lamellipodia structure of the Abi-reduced cells. We found the phosphomutant to have reduced ability to translocalize and to have a protein half-life shorter than that of wt Abi. We also found that although the wt Abi could fully restore the lamellipodia structure, the phosphomutant could not. Together, these findings suggest that the reciprocal regulation of Abi phosphorylation by Abl and PTP61F may regulate the localization and stability of Abi and may regulate the formation of lamella.

  10. rgr oncogene: activation by elimination of translational controls and mislocalization.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Benet, Marta; Calero, Miguel; Jiménez, Maria; Díaz, Roberto; Pellicer, Angel

    2003-07-15

    Previous studies have identified a novel oncogene, rgr, which has homology to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Ral guanine dissociation stimulator (RALGDS). To determine the mechanism of activation of rgr, the wild-type form was isolated. rgr is expressed physiologically at very low levels, due, at least in part, to a long 5'-untranslated region that contains eight AUGs, which inhibit translation of the main open reading frame. When these regulatory sequences are removed, the wild-type gene is expressed at high levels. An investigation of how this GEF could transform cells showed that RGR interacts with RAS, supporting its involvement as a RAS-GEF. Because RAL is localized mainly to the Golgi, the expression of the RGR protein was identified in RK13 cells, a cell line that expresses endogenous rgr. RGR localizes to endomembranes. To determine its location upon transformation, a green fluorescent protein-RGR fusion protein was used to track the movement of RGR. Increasing amounts of expression result in enhanced localization of RGR to the plasma membrane. These results indicate that rgr is activated when its tight translational controls are eliminated and increased expression allows its relocation to the plasma membrane, where efficient activation of RAS occurs.

  11. Minority Voices in Literary Fiction: A Case Study of Translating Multilingual Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurmi, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Translating multilingual texts is still a new field of inquiry. Transplanting a text where the function of embraced multilingual practices is strongly related to local ethnic identities can provide challenges for translators and readers alike. This study discusses the translation strategies adopted by second-year translation students on an…

  12. Minority Voices in Literary Fiction: A Case Study of Translating Multilingual Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurmi, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Translating multilingual texts is still a new field of inquiry. Transplanting a text where the function of embraced multilingual practices is strongly related to local ethnic identities can provide challenges for translators and readers alike. This study discusses the translation strategies adopted by second-year translation students on an…

  13. Genetic Analysis of Chloroplast Translation

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, Alice

    2005-08-15

    The assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus requires the concerted action of hundreds of genes distributed between the two physically separate genomes in the nucleus and chloroplast. Nuclear genes coordinate this process by controlling the expression of chloroplast genes in response to developmental and environmental cues. However, few regulatory factors have been identified. We used mutant phenotypes to identify nuclear genes in maize that modulate chloroplast translation, a key control point in chloroplast gene expression. This project focused on the nuclear gene crp1, required for the translation of two chloroplast mRNAs. CRP1 is related to fungal proteins involved in the translation of mitochondrial mRNAs, and is the founding member of a large gene family in plants, with {approx}450 members. Members of the CRP1 family are defined by a repeated 35 amino acid motif called a ''PPR'' motif. The PPR motif is closely related to the TPR motif, which mediates protein-protein interactions. We and others have speculated that PPR tracts adopt a structure similar to that of TPR tracts, but with a substrate binding surface adapted to bind RNA instead of protein. To understand how CRP1 influences the translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs, we sought proteins that interact with CRP1, and identified the RNAs associated with CRP1 in vivo. We showed that CRP1 is associated in vivo with the mRNAs whose translation it activates. To explore the functions of PPR proteins more generally, we sought mutations in other PPR-encoding genes: mutations in the maize PPR2 and PPR4 were shown to disrupt chloroplast ribosome biogenesis and chloroplast trans-splicing, respectively. These and other results suggest that the nuclear-encoded PPR family plays a major role in modulating the expression of the chloroplast genome in higher plants.

  14. Coupled transcription and translation within nuclei of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Iborra, F J; Jackson, D A; Cook, P R

    2001-08-10

    It is widely assumed that the vital processes of transcription and translation are spatially separated in eukaryotes and that no translation occurs in nuclei. We localized translation sites by incubating permeabilized mammalian cells with [3H]lysine or lysyl-transfer RNA tagged with biotin or BODIPY; although most nascent polypeptides were cytoplasmic, some were found in discrete nuclear sites known as transcription "factories." Some of this nuclear translation also depends on concurrent transcription by RNA polymerase II. This coupling is simply explained if nuclear ribosomes translate nascent transcripts as those transcripts emerge from still-engaged RNA polymerases, much as they do in bacteria.

  15. How Ribosomes Translate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sulima, Sergey O; Hofman, Isabel J F; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2017-09-18

    A wealth of novel findings, including congenital ribosomal mutations in ribosomopathies and somatic ribosomal mutations in various cancers, have significantly increased our understanding of the relevance of ribosomes in oncogenesis. Here, we explore the growing list of mechanisms by which the ribosome is involved in carcinogenesis-from the hijacking of ribosomes by oncogenic factors and dysregulated translational control, to the effects of mutations in ribosomal components on cellular metabolism. Of clinical importance, the recent success of RNA polymerase inhibitors highlights the dependence on "onco-ribosomes" as an Achilles' heel of cancer cells and a promising target for further therapeutic intervention.Significance: The recent discovery of somatic mutations in ribosomal proteins in several cancers has strengthened the link between ribosome defects and cancer progression, while also raising the question of which cellular mechanisms such defects exploit. Here, we discuss the emerging molecular mechanisms by which ribosomes support oncogenesis, and how this understanding is driving the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1-19. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. CPEB: a life in translation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel D

    2007-06-01

    Nearly two decades ago, Xenopus oocytes were found to contain mRNAs harboring a small sequence in their 3' untranslated regions that control cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational activation during development. This cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE) is the binding platform for CPE-binding protein (CPEB), which promotes polyadenylation-induced translation. Since then, the biochemistry and biology of CPEB has grown rather substantially: mechanistically, CPEB nucleates a complex of factors that regulates poly(A) elongation through, of all things, a deadenylating enzyme; biologically, CPEB mediates many processes including germ-cell development, cell division and cellular senescence, and synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. These observations underscore the growing complexities of CPEB involvement in cell function.

  17. Timing of translation in cross-language qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hudson P O; Black, Amanda M; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2015-01-01

    Although there is increased understanding of language barriers in cross-language studies, the point at which language transformation processes are applied in research is inconsistently reported, or treated as a minor issue. Differences in translation timeframes raise methodological issues related to the material to be translated, as well as for the process of data analysis and interpretation. In this article we address methodological issues related to the timing of translation from Portuguese to English in two international cross-language collaborative research studies involving researchers from Brazil, Canada, and the United States. One study entailed late-phase translation of a research report, whereas the other study involved early phase translation of interview data. The timing of translation in interaction with the object of translation should be considered, in addition to the language, cultural, subject matter, and methodological competencies of research team members. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Kinetic modelling of mitochondrial translation.

    PubMed

    Korla, Kalyani; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome contains 13 protein coding genes, all being part of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes. The process of translation of these protein coding mRNAs in mitochondrial matrix is a good miniature model of translation in cytoplasm. In this work, we have simulated three phases of mitochondrial translation viz. initiation, elongation and termination (including ribosome recycling). The kinetic equations for these phases have been deduced based on the information available in literature. Various factors involved in the process have been included explicitly. Kinetic simulation was done using Octave, open source software. Scripts were written individually for each phase. Initiation begins with mitoribosome, mRNA, fMet-tRNA and initiation factors. The final product of the initiation script, the initiation complex, was introduced as the start point in the successive step, i.e. elongation. Elongation is a particular extensive process where the various aminoacyl-tRNAs already present in the matrix check for matching with the triplet codon in A-site of mitoribosome. This script consists of two parts: one with the time behaviour of the factors involved in the molecular process (using ordinary differential equation solver) and the other including the reading of triplet codon on the mRNA and incorporating the corresponding aminoacyl-tRNA, and then at each step elongating the peptide chain (using loops and conditions). The peptide chain thus formed in the elongation step (in the loops and conditions segment) was released in the termination step. This was followed by mitoribosome recycling where the mitoribosome reached the native state and was ready for the next cycle of translation.

  19. Advanced Translation Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokkan, Elizabeth

    1980-01-01

    The process of translating demands an attempt to draw on contextual knowledge on all relevant areas of society: literature and the study of society together with the use of idiomatic language. Students can be shown this by direct translations which appear incomprehensible. English-to-Norwegian-to-English examples are given. (Author/PJM)

  20. Plurality in Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farahzad, Farzaneh

    This paper discusses factors contributing to differing translations of the same source text, arguing that translation occurs on a continuum rather than having absolute criteria and procedures. Issues examined include the formal properties of the text, the text's "invariant core of meaning," stability in the semantic elements of the text, the text…

  1. Translation as Literary Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Stefano, B. Follkart

    1982-01-01

    It is proposed that literary translation is intrinsically an act of literary criticism. This theory is illustrated by discussion of specific problems in translating Sartre's "La Nausee" and Leonard Forest's "Le pays de la Sagouine," especially the use of verb tense. (MSE)

  2. Science Explorers Translation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Dolores

    This paper describes a pilot project of Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) to translate a science education curriculum for junior and senior high school students into Navajo. The project consisted of translating a video, a teacher's guide, and an interactive multimedia product on the 1993 hantavirus outbreak in the Four Corners area…

  3. Students' Differentiated Translation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how students translate between mathematical representations is of both practical and theoretical importance. This study examined students' processes in their generation of symbolic and graphic representations of given polynomial functions. The purpose was to investigate how students perform these translations. The result of the study…

  4. Translation as (Global) Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Bruce; Tetreault, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article explores translation as a useful point of departure and framework for taking a translingual approach to writing engaging globalization. Globalization and the knowledge economy are putting renewed emphasis on translation as a key site of contest between a dominant language ideology of monolingualism aligned with fast capitalist…

  5. Creativity, Culture and Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaee, Siamak; Wan Yahya, Wan Roselezam; Babaee, Ruzbeh

    2014-01-01

    Some scholars (Bassnett-McGuire, Catford, Brislin) suggest that a good piece of translation should be a strict reflection of the style of the original text while some others (Gui, Newmark, Wilss) consider the original text untranslatable unless it is reproduced. Opposing views by different critics suggest that translation is still a challenging…

  6. Translations toward Connected Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Mark; Leikin, Roza

    2010-01-01

    The translation principle allows students to solve problems in different branches of mathematics and thus to develop connectedness in their mathematical knowledge. Successful application of the translation principle depends on the classroom mathematical norms for the development of discussions and the comparison of different solutions to one…

  7. Text Coherence in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yanping

    2009-01-01

    In the thesis a coherent text is defined as a continuity of senses of the outcome of combining concepts and relations into a network composed of knowledge space centered around main topics. And the author maintains that in order to obtain the coherence of a target language text from a source text during the process of translation, a translator can…

  8. Translation as Literary Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Stefano, B. Follkart

    1982-01-01

    It is proposed that literary translation is intrinsically an act of literary criticism. This theory is illustrated by discussion of specific problems in translating Sartre's "La Nausee" and Leonard Forest's "Le pays de la Sagouine," especially the use of verb tense. (MSE)

  9. Semantics via Machine Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culhane, P. T.

    1977-01-01

    Recent experiments in machine translation have given the semantic elements of collocation in Russian more objective criteria. Soviet linguists in search of semantic relationships have attempted to devise a semantic synthesis for construction of a basic language for machine translation. One such effort is summarized. (CHK)

  10. Terminology, a Translational Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Helga

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of qualified terminology and its implications for terminological activity. Argues that students have to learn how to organize their terminological activity. Suggests that translation is a special kind of intercultural communication and is an indispensable part of translational action. Argues that terminology be examined…

  11. Computer Aids to Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krollmann, Friedrich

    1981-01-01

    Describes the structure and modes of operation of the Bundessprachenamt's (BSprA: Federal Office of Languages of the Federal Republic of Germany) terminology data bank as an aid to translation. Analyzes advantages and disadvantages of each user mode, and discusses probable developments in the immediate future of machine-aided translation. (MES)

  12. A Translation Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadie, Jacqueline

    1999-01-01

    Encourages readers to look at traditional translation activities in a positive and innovative light. A detailed lesson plan is offered, showing how back translation can be exploited with a monolingual class, whether or not the teacher speaks the students' mother tongue. (Author/VWL)

  13. Terminology, a Translational Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Helga

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of qualified terminology and its implications for terminological activity. Argues that students have to learn how to organize their terminological activity. Suggests that translation is a special kind of intercultural communication and is an indispensable part of translational action. Argues that terminology be examined…

  14. Idioms and Back Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The challenges of intercultural communication are an integral part of many undergraduate business communication courses. Marketing gaffes clearly illustrate the pitfalls of translation and underscore the importance of a knowledge of the culture with which one is attempting to communicate. A good way to approach the topic of translation pitfalls in…

  15. Advanced Translation Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokkan, Elizabeth

    1980-01-01

    The process of translating demands an attempt to draw on contextual knowledge on all relevant areas of society: literature and the study of society together with the use of idiomatic language. Students can be shown this by direct translations which appear incomprehensible. English-to-Norwegian-to-English examples are given. (Author/PJM)

  16. The Problems of Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntsman, Jeffrey F.

    The problems confronting the translator of American Indian literature are immense. The history of European Indian relations has obscured many original Indian values and attitudes and has substituted a set of simplistic and unreal Anglo attitudes that translators must transcend. Unlike most Western literature, Indian literature does not instruct,…

  17. Students' Differentiated Translation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how students translate between mathematical representations is of both practical and theoretical importance. This study examined students' processes in their generation of symbolic and graphic representations of given polynomial functions. The purpose was to investigate how students perform these translations. The result of the study…

  18. Translation as (Global) Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Bruce; Tetreault, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article explores translation as a useful point of departure and framework for taking a translingual approach to writing engaging globalization. Globalization and the knowledge economy are putting renewed emphasis on translation as a key site of contest between a dominant language ideology of monolingualism aligned with fast capitalist…

  19. A CASE FOR TRANSLATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    THORNTON-SMITH, C.B.

    MOST OF THE CRITICISMS OF TRANSLATION IN SECONDARY SCHOOL LANGUAGE COURSES FOCUS ON THE SUPPOSEDLY DIFFICULT PROBLEMS OF SELECTING, USING, AND GRADING TRANSLATION TESTS AS OPPOSED TO THE OBJECTIVE TESTS GENERALLY USED BY ADVOCATES OF AUDIOLINGUALISM. BUT MOST OF THESE CRITICISMS FAIL TO RECOGNIZE THAT THE PROCESS OF LEARNING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE…

  20. Translation Ambiguity but Not Word Class Predicts Translation Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Anat; Kroll, Judith F.; Macwhinney, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of word class and translation ambiguity on cross-linguistic representation and processing. Bilingual speakers of English and Spanish performed translation production and translation recognition tasks on nouns and verbs in both languages. Words either had a single translation or more than one translation. Translation…

  1. Examining English-German Translation Ambiguity Using Primed Translation Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddington, Chelsea M.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Many words have more than one translation across languages. Such "translation-ambiguous" words are translated more slowly and less accurately than their unambiguous counterparts. We examine the extent to which word context and translation dominance influence the processing of translation-ambiguous words. We further examine how these factors…

  2. Translation Ambiguity but Not Word Class Predicts Translation Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Anat; Kroll, Judith F.; Macwhinney, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of word class and translation ambiguity on cross-linguistic representation and processing. Bilingual speakers of English and Spanish performed translation production and translation recognition tasks on nouns and verbs in both languages. Words either had a single translation or more than one translation. Translation…

  3. Examining English-German Translation Ambiguity Using Primed Translation Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddington, Chelsea M.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Many words have more than one translation across languages. Such "translation-ambiguous" words are translated more slowly and less accurately than their unambiguous counterparts. We examine the extent to which word context and translation dominance influence the processing of translation-ambiguous words. We further examine how these factors…

  4. Disrupted plasma membrane localization and loss of function reveal regions of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 involved in structural integrity and activity.

    PubMed

    Nivillac, Nicole M I; Wasal, Karanvir; Villani, Daniela F; Naydenova, Zlatina; Hanna, W J Brad; Coe, Imogen R

    2009-10-01

    Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 (hENT1) is an integral membrane protein that transports nucleosides and analog drugs across cellular membranes. Very little is known about intracellular processing and localization of hENT1. Here we show that disruption of a highly conserved triplet (PWN) near the N-terminus, or the last eight C-terminal residues (two hydrophobic triplets separated by a positive arginine) result in loss of plasma membrane localization and/or transport function. To understand the role of specific residues within these regions, we studied the localization patterns of N- or C-terminal deletion and/or substitution mutants of GFP-hENT1 using confocal microscopy. Quantification of GFP-hENT1 (mutant and wildtype) protein at the plasma membrane was conducted using nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) binding. Functionality of the GFP-hENT1 mutants was determined by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by measurement of uridine uptake. Mutation of the proline within the PWN motif disrupts plasma membrane localization. C-terminal mutations (primarily within the hydrophobic triplets) lead to hENT1 retention within the cell (e.g. in the ER). Some mutants still localize to the plasma membrane but show reduced transport activity. These data suggest that these two regions contribute to the structural integrity and thus correct processing and function of hENT1.

  5. Hepatitis C virus 3'UTR regulates viral translation through direct interactions with the host translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yun; Zhou, Kaihong; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-09-01

    The 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) messenger RNA stimulates viral translation by an undetermined mechanism. We identified a high affinity interaction, conserved among different HCV genotypes, between the HCV 3'UTR and the host ribosome. The 3'UTR interacts with 40S ribosomal subunit proteins residing primarily in a localized region on the 40S solvent-accessible surface near the messenger RNA entry and exit sites. This region partially overlaps with the site where the HCV internal ribosome entry site was found to bind, with the internal ribosome entry site-40S subunit interaction being dominant. Despite its ability to bind to 40S subunits independently, the HCV 3'UTR only stimulates translation in cis, without affecting the first round translation rate. These observations support a model in which the HCV 3'UTR retains ribosome complexes during translation termination to facilitate efficient initiation of subsequent rounds of translation.

  6. Localized basis functions and other computational improvements in variational nonorthogonal basis function methods for quantum mechanical scattering problems involving chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    1990-01-01

    The Generalized Newton Variational Principle for 3D quantum mechanical reactive scattering is briefly reviewed. Then three techniques are described which improve the efficiency of the computations. First, the fact that the Hamiltonian is Hermitian is used to reduce the number of integrals computed, and then the properties of localized basis functions are exploited in order to eliminate redundant work in the integral evaluation. A new type of localized basis function with desirable properties is suggested. It is shown how partitioned matrices can be used with localized basis functions to reduce the amount of work required to handle the complex boundary conditions. The new techniques do not introduce any approximations into the calculations, so they may be used to obtain converged solutions of the Schroedinger equation.

  7. Theory of Test Translation Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Backhoff, Eduardo; Contreras-Nino, Luis Angel

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present a theory of test translation whose intent is to provide the conceptual foundation for effective, systematic work in the process of test translation and test translation review. According to the theory, translation error is multidimensional; it is not simply the consequence of defective translation but an inevitable fact…

  8. Theory of Test Translation Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Backhoff, Eduardo; Contreras-Nino, Luis Angel

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present a theory of test translation whose intent is to provide the conceptual foundation for effective, systematic work in the process of test translation and test translation review. According to the theory, translation error is multidimensional; it is not simply the consequence of defective translation but an inevitable fact…

  9. Favorable Local Control From Consolidative Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Neuroblastoma Despite Gross Residual Disease, Positive Margins, or Nodal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Matthew J; Danish, Hasan; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Deng, Claudia; George, Bradley A; Goldsmith, Kelly C; Wasilewski, Karen J; Cash, W Thomas; Khan, Mohammad K; Eaton, Bree R; Esiashvili, Natia

    2017-03-15

    To report the influence of radiation therapy (RT) dose and surgical pathology variables on disease control and overall survival (OS) in patients treated for high-risk neuroblastoma at a single institution. We conducted a retrospective study of 67 high-risk neuroblastoma patients who received RT as part of definitive management from January 2003 until May 2014. At a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 26 patients (38.8%) failed distantly; 4 of these patients also failed locally. One patient progressed locally without distant failure. Local control was 92.5%, and total disease control was 59.5%. No benefit was demonstrated for RT doses over 21.6 Gy with respect to local relapse-free survival (P=.55), disease-free survival (P=.22), or OS (P=.72). With respect to local relapse-free survival, disease-free survival, and OS, no disadvantage was seen for positive lymph nodes on surgical pathology, positive surgical margins, or gross residual disease. Of the patients with gross residual disease, 75% (6 of 8) went on to have no evidence of disease at time of last follow-up, and the 2 patients who failed did so distantly. Patients with high-risk neuroblastoma in this series maintained excellent local control, with no benefit demonstrated for radiation doses over 21.6 Gy, and no disadvantage demonstrated for gross residual disease after surgery, positive surgical margins, or pathologic lymph node positivity. Though the limitations of a retrospective review for an uncommon disease must be kept in mind, with small numbers in some of the subgroups, it seems that dose escalation should be considered only in exceptional circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Favorable Local Control From Consolidative Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Neuroblastoma Despite Gross Residual Disease, Positive Margins, or Nodal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Matthew J.; Danish, Hasan; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Deng, Claudia; George, Bradley A.; Goldsmith, Kelly C.; Wasilewski, Karen J.; Cash, W. Thomas; Khan, Mohammad K.; Eaton, Bree R.; Esiashvili, Natia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report the influence of radiation therapy (RT) dose and surgical pathology variables on disease control and overall survival (OS) in patients treated for high-risk neuroblastoma at a single institution. Methods and Materials We conducted a retrospective study of 67 high-risk neuroblastoma patients who received RT as part of definitive management from January 2003 until May 2014. Results At a median follow-up of 4.5years, 26patients (38.8%) failed distantly; 4 of these patients also failed locally. One patient progressed locally without distant failure. Local control was 92.5%, and total disease control was 59.5%. No benefit was demonstrated for RT doses over 21.6 Gy with respect to local relapse—free survival (P = .55), disease-free survival (P = .22), or OS (P= .72). With respect to local relapse—free survival, disease-free survival, and OS, no disadvantage was seen for positive lymph nodes on surgical pathology, positive surgical margins, or gross residual disease. Of the patients with gross residual disease, 75% (6 of 8) went on to have no evidence of disease at time of last follow-up, and the 2 patients who failed did so distantly. Conclusions Patients with high-risk neuroblastoma in this series maintained excellent local control, with no benefit demonstrated for radiation doses over 21.6 Gy, and no disadvantage demonstrated for gross residual disease after surgery, positive surgical margins, or pathologic lymph node positivity. Though the limitations of a retrospective review for an uncommon disease must be kept in mind, with small numbers in some of the subgroups, it seems that dose escalation should be considered only in exceptional circumstances. PMID:28244417

  11. [Application of morpheme translation method in english translation of TCM].

    PubMed

    Diao, Xiang; Hu, You-Ping

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, application of morpheme translation method in English translation of TCM was introduced, and its superiorities and limitations were analyzed in order to promote the standardization and improve the confused current status of the English translation of TCM.

  12. Translational Epidemiology in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Myrna M.; Brown, Alan S.; Talati, Ardesheer

    2012-01-01

    Translational research generally refers to the application of knowledge generated by advances in basic sciences research translated into new approaches for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease. This direction is called bench-to-bedside. Psychiatry has similarly emphasized the basic sciences as the starting point of translational research. This article introduces the term translational epidemiology for psychiatry research as a bidirectional concept in which the knowledge generated from the bedside or the population can also be translated to the benches of laboratory science. Epidemiologic studies are primarily observational but can generate representative samples, novel designs, and hypotheses that can be translated into more tractable experimental approaches in the clinical and basic sciences. This bedside-to-bench concept has not been explicated in psychiatry, although there are an increasing number of examples in the research literature. This article describes selected epidemiologic designs, providing examples and opportunities for translational research from community surveys and prospective, birth cohort, and family-based designs. Rapid developments in informatics, emphases on large sample collection for genetic and biomarker studies, and interest in personalized medicine—which requires information on relative and absolute risk factors—make this topic timely. The approach described has implications for providing fresh metaphors to communicate complex issues in interdisciplinary collaborations and for training in epidemiology and other sciences in psychiatry. PMID:21646577

  13. Translational regulation in nutrigenomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2011-11-01

    The emergence of genome-wide analysis to interrogate cellular DNA, RNA, and protein content has revolutionized the study of the control network that mediates cellular homeostasis. Nutrigenomics addresses the effect of nutrients on gene expression, which provides a basis for understanding the biological activity of dietary components. Translation of mRNAs represents the last step of genetic flow and primarily defines the proteome. Translational regulation is thus critical for gene expression, in particular, under nutrient excess or deficiency. Until recently, it was unclear how the global effects of translational control are influenced by nutrient signaling. An emerging concept of translational reprogramming addresses how to maintain the expression of specific proteins during pathophysiological conditions by translation of selective mRNAs. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of translational control, nutrient signaling, and their dysregulation in aging and cancer. The mechanistic understanding of translational regulation in response to different nutrient conditions may help identify potential dietary and therapeutic targets to improve human health.

  14. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligases, HUWE1 and NEDD4-1, Are Involved in the Post-translational Regulation of the ABCG1 and ABCG4 Lipid Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Aleidi, Shereen M.; Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J.; Yang, Alryel; Rao, Geetha; Brown, Andrew J.; Gelissen, Ingrid C.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1 has an essential role in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, and dysregulation has been associated with a number of high burden diseases. Previous studies reported that ABCG1 is ubiquitinated and degraded via the ubiquitin proteasome system. However, so far the molecular mechanism, including the identity of any of the rate-limiting ubiquitination enzymes, or E3 ligases, is unknown. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, we identified two HECT domain E3 ligases associated with ABCG1, named HUWE1 (HECT, UBA, and WWE domain containing 1, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase) and NEDD4-1 (Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally down regulated gene 4), of which the latter is the founding member of the NEDD4 family of ubiquitin ligases. Silencing both HUWE1 and NEDD4-1 in cells overexpressing human ABCG1 significantly increased levels of the ABCG1 monomeric and dimeric protein forms, however ABCA1 protein expression was unaffected. In addition, ligase silencing increased ABCG1-mediated cholesterol export to HDL in cells overexpressing the transporter as well as in THP-1 macrophages. Reciprocally, overexpression of both ligases resulted in a significant reduction in protein levels of both the ABCG1 monomeric and dimeric forms. Like ABCG1, ABCG4 protein levels and cholesterol export activity were significantly increased after silencing both HUWE1 and NEDD4-1 in cells overexpressing this closely related ABC half-transporter. In summary, we have identified for the first time two E3 ligases that are fundamental enzymes in the post-translational regulation of ABCG1 and ABCG4 protein levels and cellular cholesterol export activity. PMID:26296893

  15. The E3 ubiquitin ligases, HUWE1 and NEDD4-1, are involved in the post-translational regulation of the ABCG1 and ABCG4 lipid transporters.

    PubMed

    Aleidi, Shereen M; Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J; Yang, Alryel; Rao, Geetha; Brown, Andrew J; Gelissen, Ingrid C

    2015-10-02

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1 has an essential role in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, and dysregulation has been associated with a number of high burden diseases. Previous studies reported that ABCG1 is ubiquitinated and degraded via the ubiquitin proteasome system. However, so far the molecular mechanism, including the identity of any of the rate-limiting ubiquitination enzymes, or E3 ligases, is unknown. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, we identified two HECT domain E3 ligases associated with ABCG1, named HUWE1 (HECT, UBA, and WWE domain containing 1, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase) and NEDD4-1 (Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally down regulated gene 4), of which the latter is the founding member of the NEDD4 family of ubiquitin ligases. Silencing both HUWE1 and NEDD4-1 in cells overexpressing human ABCG1 significantly increased levels of the ABCG1 monomeric and dimeric protein forms, however ABCA1 protein expression was unaffected. In addition, ligase silencing increased ABCG1-mediated cholesterol export to HDL in cells overexpressing the transporter as well as in THP-1 macrophages. Reciprocally, overexpression of both ligases resulted in a significant reduction in protein levels of both the ABCG1 monomeric and dimeric forms. Like ABCG1, ABCG4 protein levels and cholesterol export activity were significantly increased after silencing both HUWE1 and NEDD4-1 in cells overexpressing this closely related ABC half-transporter. In summary, we have identified for the first time two E3 ligases that are fundamental enzymes in the post-translational regulation of ABCG1 and ABCG4 protein levels and cellular cholesterol export activity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Positive AMPA receptor modulation rapidly stimulates BDNF release and increases dendritic mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Jourdi, Hussam; Hsu, Yu-Tien; Zhou, Miou; Qin, Qingyu; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2009-07-08

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates local dendritic mRNA translation and is involved in formation and consolidation of memory. 2H,3H,6aH-pyrrolidino[2'',1''-3',2']1,3-oxazino[6',5'-5,4]-benzo[e]1,4-dioxan-10-one (CX614), one of the best-studied positive AMPA receptor modulators (also known as ampakines), increases BDNF mRNA and protein and facilitates long-term potentiation (LTP) induction. Several other ampakines also improve performance in various behavioral and learning tasks. Since local dendritic protein synthesis has been implicated in LTP stabilization and in memory consolidation, this study investigated whether CX614 could influence synaptic plasticity by upregulating dendritic protein translation. CX614 treatment of primary neuronal cultures and acute hippocampal slices rapidly activated the translation machinery and increased local dendritic protein synthesis. CX614-induced activation of translation was blocked by K252a [(9S,10R,12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester], CNQX, APV, and TTX, and was inhibited in the presence of an extracellular BDNF scavenger, TrkB-Fc. The acute effect of CX614 on translation was mediated by increased BDNF release as demonstrated with a BDNF scavenging assay using TrkB-Fc during CX614 treatment of cultured primary neurons and was blocked by nifedipine, ryanodine, and lack of extracellular Ca(2+) in acute hippocampal slices. Finally, CX614, like BDNF, rapidly increased dendritic translation of an exogenous translation reporter. Together, our results demonstrate that positive modulation of AMPA receptors rapidly stimulates dendritic translation, an effect mediated by BDNF secretion and TrkB receptor activation. They also suggest that increased BDNF secretion and stimulation of local protein synthesis contribute to the effects of ampakines on synaptic plasticity.

  17. Nuclear import of influenza B virus nucleoprotein: Involvement of an N-terminal nuclear localization signal and a cleavage-protection motif

    SciTech Connect

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2013-08-15

    The nucleoprotein of influenza B virus (BNP) shares several characteristics with its influenza A virus counterpart (ANP), including localization in the host's nucleus. However, while the nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) of ANP are well characterized, little is known about those of BNP. In this study, we showed that the fusion protein bearing the BNP N-terminus fused with GFP (N70–GFP) is exclusively nuclear, and identified a highly conserved KRXR motif spanning residues 44–47 as a putative NLS. In addition, we demonstrated that residues 3–15 of BNP, though not an NLS, are also crucial for nuclear import. Results from mutational analyses of N70–GFP and the full-length BNP suggest that this region may be required for protection of the N-terminus from proteolytic cleavage. Altogether, we propose that the N-terminal region of BNP contains the NLS and cleavage-protection motif, which together drive its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • The N-terminal region of BNP is required for nuclear accumulation. • The conserved motif at position 44–47 is a putative nuclear localization signal. • The first 15 amino acids of BNP may function as a cleavage-protection motif. • BNP may get access to the nucleus via a mechanism distinct from ANP.

  18. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-12-18

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701-706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711-735 and defines TFIP11's distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle-targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it's function.

  19. Compulsory Project-Level Involvement and the Use of Program-Level Evaluations: Evaluating the Local Systemic Change for Teacher Enhancement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kelli; Weiss, Iris R.

    2011-01-01

    In 1995, the National Science Foundation (NSF) contracted with principal investigator Iris Weiss and an evaluation team at Horizon Research, Inc. (HRI) to conduct a national evaluation of the Local Systemic Change for Teacher Enhancement program (LSC). HRI conducted the core evaluation under a $6.25 million contract with NSF. This program…

  20. Translational bioinformatics: linking the molecular world to the clinical world.

    PubMed

    Altman, R B

    2012-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics represents the union of translational medicine and bioinformatics. Translational medicine moves basic biological discoveries from the research bench into the patient-care setting and uses clinical observations to inform basic biology. It focuses on patient care, including the creation of new diagnostics, prognostics, prevention strategies, and therapies based on biological discoveries. Bioinformatics involves algorithms to represent, store, and analyze basic biological data, including DNA sequence, RNA expression, and protein and small-molecule abundance within cells. Translational bioinformatics spans these two fields; it involves the development of algorithms to analyze basic molecular and cellular data with an explicit goal of affecting clinical care.

  1. Nanotoxicology and challenges of translation.

    PubMed

    PourGashtasbi, Ghazal

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of translation in nanomedical research practices and contributes to a context- and object-centred research agenda in Science and Technology Studies. In particular, it addresses how nano-specific issues in medical research are exacerbated by uncertainty and unpredictability. Analyzing the relationship between nanomedicine and nanotoxicology I discuss how scientists are involved in highly uncertain processes, which require a contingent and experimental approach to nano-objects in everyday laboratory practices. Consequently, the dealings with nanomedical materials evoke a reformulation of numerous traditional forms of toxicological knowledge and knowledge practices, and challenge the self-concept of toxicology as a testing discipline.

  2. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2015-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial translational control at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Romby, Pascale; Springer, Mathias

    2003-03-01

    Translational regulation allows rapid adaptation of protein synthesis to environmental conditions. In prokaryotes, the synthesis of many RNA-binding proteins is regulated by a translational feedback mechanism involving a competition between their natural substrate and their binding site on mRNA, which are often thought to resemble each other. This article describes the case of threonyl-tRNA synthetase, which represses the translation of its own mRNA. Recent data provide the first opportunity to describe at the atomic level both the extent and the limit of mimicry between the way this enzyme recognizes tRNA(Thr) and its regulatory site in mRNA. The data also give some clues about how the binding of the synthetase to its mRNA inhibits translation.

  4. A comparison of human and machine translation of health promotion materials for public health practice: time, costs, and quality.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anne M; Bergman, Margo; Brownstein, Megumu; Cole, Kate; Kirchhoff, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Most local public health departments serve limited English proficiency groups but lack sufficient resources to translate the health promotion materials that they produce into different languages. Machine translation (MT) with human postediting could fill this gap and work toward decreasing health disparities among non-English speakers. (1) To identify the time and costs associated with human translation (HT) of public health documents, (2) determine the time necessary for human postediting of MT, and (3) compare the quality of postedited MT and HT. A quality comparison of 25 MT and HT documents was performed with public health translators. The public health professionals involved were queried about the workflow, costs, and time for HT of 11 English public health documents over a 20-month period. Three recently translated documents of similar size and topic were then machine translated, the time for human postediting was recorded, and a blind quality analysis was performed. Seattle/King County, Washington. Public health professionals. (1) Estimated times for various HT tasks; (2) observed postediting times for MT documents; (3) actual costs for HT; and (4) comparison of quality ratings for HT and MT. Human translation via local health department methods took 17 hours to 6 days. While HT postediting words per minute ranged from 1.58 to 5.88, MT plus human postediting words per minute ranged from 10 to 30. The cost of HT ranged from $130 to $1220; MT required no additional costs. A quality comparison by bilingual public health professionals showed that MT and HT were equivalently preferred. MT with human postediting can reduce the time and costs of translating public health materials while maintaining quality similar to HT. In conjunction with postediting, MT could greatly improve the availability of multilingual public health materials.

  5. A Comparison of Human and Machine Translation of Health Promotion Materials for Public Health Practice: Time, Costs, and Quality

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Anne M.; Bergman, Margo; Brownstein, Megumu; Cole, Kate; Kirchhoff, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Context Most local public health departments serve limited English proficiency groups but lack sufficient resources to translate the health promotion materials that they produce into different languages. Machine translation (MT) with human postediting could fill this gap and work toward decreasing health disparities among non–English speakers. Objectives (1) To identify the time and costs associated with human translation (HT) of public health documents, (2) determine the time necessary for human postediting of MT, and (3) compare the quality of postedited MT and HT. Design A quality comparison of 25 MT and HT documents was performed with public health translators. The public health professionals involved were queried about the workflow, costs, and time for HT of 11 English public health documents over a 20-month period. Three recently translated documents of similar size and topic were then machine translated, the time for human postediting was recorded, and a blind quality analysis was performed. Setting Seattle/King County, Washington. Participants Public health professionals. Main Outcome Measures (1) Estimated times for various HT tasks; (2) observed postediting times for MT documents; (3) actual costs for HT; and (4) comparison of quality ratings for HT and MT. Results Human translation via local health department methods took 17 hours to 6 days. While HT postediting words per minute ranged from 1.58 to 5.88, MT plus human postediting words per minute ranged from 10 to 30. The cost of HT ranged from $130 to $1220; MT required no additional costs. A quality comparison by bilingual public health professionals showed that MT and HT were equivalently preferred. Conclusions MT with human postediting can reduce the time and costs of translating public health materials while maintaining quality similar to HT. In conjunction with postediting, MT could greatly improve the availability of multilingual public health materials. PMID:24084391

  6. Repression of Gurken translation by a meiotic checkpoint in Drosophila oogenesis is suppressed by a reduction in the dose of eIF1A.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Klovstad, Martha; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2014-10-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the anteroposterior (AP) and dorsoventral (DV) axes of the oocyte and future embryo are established through the localization and translational regulation of gurken (grk) mRNA. This process involves binding of specific factors to the RNA during transport and a dynamic remodeling of the grk-containing ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes once they have reached their destination within the oocyte. In ovaries of spindle-class females, an activated DNA damage checkpoint causes inefficient Grk translation and ventralization of the oocyte. In a screen for modifiers of the oocyte DV patterning defects, we identified a mutation in the eIF1A gene as a dominant suppressor. We show that reducing the function of eIF1A in spnB ovaries suppresses the ventralized eggshell phenotype by restoring Grk expression. This suppression is not the result of more efficient DNA damage repair or of disrupted checkpoint activation, but is coupled to an increase in the amount of grk mRNA associated with polysomes. In spnB ovaries, the activated meiotic checkpoint blocks Grk translation by disrupting the accumulation of grk mRNA in a translationally competent RNP complex that contains the translational activator Oo18 RNA-binding protein (Orb); this regulation involves the translational repressor Squid (Sqd). We further propose that reduction of eIF1A allows more efficient Grk translation possibly because of the presence of specific structural features in the grk 5'UTR.

  7. Translational regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Xu, Hong

    2016-12-15

    Mitochondria are generated by the expression of genes on both nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial biogenesis is highly plastic in response to cellular energy demand, developmental signals and environmental stimuli. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates mitochondrial biogenesis to co-ordinate energy homeostasis with cell growth. The local translation of mitochondrial proteins on the outer membrane facilitates their efficient import and thereby allows prodigious mitochondrial biogenesis during rapid cell growth and proliferation. We postulate that the local translation may also allow cells to promote mitochondrial biogenesis selectively based on the fitness of individual organelle. MDI-Larp complex promotes the biogenesis of healthy mitochondria and thereby is essential for the selective transmission of healthy mitochondria. On the other hand, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1)-Pakin activates protein synthesis on damaged mitochondria to maintain the organelle homeostasis and activity. We also summarize some recent progress on miRNAs' regulation on mitochondrial biogenesis. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. A translational systems biology approach in both animals and humans identifies a functionally related module of accumbal genes involved in the regulation of reward processing and binge drinking in males.

    PubMed

    Stacey, David; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Ruggeri, Barbara; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Band, Hamid; Barker, Gareth; Bokde, Arun; Buchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Easton, Alanna; Fauth-Buehler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jurgen; Garavanh, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Rotter, Andrea; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael; Sommer, Wolfgang; Mameli, Manuel; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Mueller, Christian; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system, composed primarily of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area that project to striatal structures, is considered to be the key mediator of reinforcement-related mechanisms in the brain. Prompted by a genome-wide association meta-analysis implicating the Ras-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene in the regulation of alcohol intake in men, we have recently shown that male Rasgrf2(-/-) mice exhibit reduced ethanol intake and preference accompanied by a perturbed mesolimbic dopamine system. We therefore propose that these mice represent a valid model to further elucidate the precise genes and mechanisms regulating mesolimbic dopamine functioning. Transcriptomic data from the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of male Rasgrf2(-/-) mice and wild-type controls were analyzed by weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We performed follow-up genetic association tests in humans using a sample of male adolescents from the IMAGEN study characterized for binge drinking (n = 905) and ventral striatal activation during an fMRI reward task (n = 608). The WGCNA analyses using accumbal transcriptomic data revealed 37 distinct "modules," or functionally related groups of genes. Two of these modules were significantly associated with Rasgrf2 knockout status: M5 (p < 0.001) and M6 (p < 0.001). In follow-up translational analyses we found that human orthologues for the M5 module were significantly (p < 0.01) enriched with genetic association signals for binge drinking in male adolescents. Furthermore, the most significant locus, originating from the EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4) gene (p < 0.001), was also significantly associated with altered ventral striatal activity in male adolescents performing an fMRI reward task (pempirical < 0.001). It was not possible to determine the extent to which the M5 module was dysregulated in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice by perturbed mesolimbic dopamine signalling or by the loss of Rasgrf2

  9. A translational systems biology approach in both animals and humans identifies a functionally related module of accumbal genes involved in the regulation of reward processing and binge drinking in males

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, David; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Ruggeri, Barbara; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Band, Hamid; Barker, Gareth; Bokde, Arun; Buchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Easton, Alanna; Fauth-Buehler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jurgen; Garavanh, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Rotter, Andrea; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael; Sommer, Wolfgang; Mameli, Manuel; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Mueller, Christian; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Background The mesolimbic dopamine system, composed primarily of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area that project to striatal structures, is considered to be the key mediator of reinforcement-related mechanisms in the brain. Prompted by a genome-wide association meta-analysis implicating the Ras-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene in the regulation of alcohol intake in men, we have recently shown that male Rasgrf2−/− mice exhibit reduced ethanol intake and preference accompanied by a perturbed mesolimbic dopamine system. We therefore propose that these mice represent a valid model to further elucidate the precise genes and mechanisms regulating mesolimbic dopamine functioning. Methods Transcriptomic data from the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of male Rasgrf2−/− mice and wild-type controls were analyzed by weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We performed follow-up genetic association tests in humans using a sample of male adolescents from the IMAGEN study characterized for binge drinking (n = 905) and ventral striatal activation during an fMRI reward task (n = 608). Results The WGCNA analyses using accumbal transcriptomic data revealed 37 distinct “modules,” or functionally related groups of genes. Two of these modules were significantly associated with Rasgrf2 knockout status: M5 (p < 0.001) and M6 (p < 0.001). In follow-up translational analyses we found that human orthologues for the M5 module were significantly (p < 0.01) enriched with genetic association signals for binge drinking in male adolescents. Furthermore, the most significant locus, originating from the EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4) gene (p < 0.001), was also significantly associated with altered ventral striatal activity in male adolescents performing an fMRI reward task (pempirical < 0.001). Limitations It was not possible to determine the extent to which the M5 module was dysregulated in Rasgrf2−/− mice by perturbed mesolimbic

  10. Russian translations for Cochrane.

    PubMed

    Yudina, E V; Ziganshina, L E

    2015-01-01

    Cochrane collaboration has made a huge contribution to the development of evidence-based medicine; Cochrane work is the international gold standard of independent, credible and reliable high-quality information in medicine. Over the past 20 years the Cochrane Collaboration helped transforming decision-making in health and reforming it significantly, saving lives and contributing to longevity [1]. Until recently, Cochrane evidence were available only in English, which represents a significant barrier to their wider use in non-English speaking countries. To provide access to evidence, obtained from Cochrane Reviews, for health professionals and general public (from non-English-speaking countries), bypassing language barriers, Cochrane collaboration in 2014 initiated an international project of translating Plain language summaries of Cochrane Reviews into other languages [2, 3]. Russian translations of Plain language summaries were started in May 2014 by the team from Kazan Federal University (Department of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology; 2014-2015 as an Affiliated Centre in Tatarstan of the Nordic Cochrane Centre, since August 2015 as Cochrane Russia, a Russian branch of Cochrane Nordic, Head - Liliya Eugenevna Ziganshina) on a voluntary basis. To assess the quality of Russian translations of Cochrane Plain Language Summaries (PLS) and their potential impact on the Russian speaking community through user feedback with the overarching aim of furthering the translations project. We conducted the continuous online survey via Google Docs. We invited respondents through the electronic Russian language discussion forum on Essential Medicines (E-lek), links to survey on the Russian Cochrane.org website, invitations to Cochrane contributors registered in Archie from potential Russian-speaking countries. We set up the survey in Russian and English. The respondents were asked to respond to the questionnaire regarding the relevance and potential impact of the Cochrane Russian

  11. Subtitling: Diagonal Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Henrik

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effects of translating televised foreign language materials, including changes in mode and timing. Outlines the necessary skills by which successful subtitlers overcome these complexities. Suggests nine basic fields to consider when creating and evaluating interlingual subtitles. (HB)

  12. Translation, Philosophy, and Deconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florentsen, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Points out that, unlike traditional theory, deconstruction does not believe that language is a transparent medium for communicating meaning. Argues that deconstruction takes its point of departure in literary language. Characterizes translation as untranslatable metaphor. (SR)

  13. Life is translation.

    PubMed

    Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary origin of translation represents one of the key questions that Carl Woese addressed in his work. Here we give a personal account of his results in this area and the effect they have had on the field.

  14. Life is translation

    PubMed Central

    Zagr