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Sample records for involves saccharomyces cerevisiae

  1. Polymorphisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in wine production.

    PubMed

    Vigentini, Ileana; Fracassetti, Daniela; Picozzi, Claudia; Foschino, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The setting up of new molecular methods for Saccharomyces cerevisiae typing is valuable in enology. Actually, the ability to discriminate different strains in wine making can have a benefit both for the control of the fermentation process and for the preservation of wine typicity. This study focused on the screening of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in wine production that could evolve rapidly considering the selective pressure of the isolation environment. Preliminary screening of 30 genes in silico was performed, followed by the selection of 10 loci belonging to 8 genes. The sequence analysis showed a low polymorphism and a degree of heterozygosity. However, a new potential molecular target was recognized in the TPS1 gene coding for the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase enzyme involved in the ethanol resistance mechanism. This gene showed a 1.42% sequence diversity with seven different nucleotide substitutions. Moreover, classic techniques were applied to a collection of 50 S. cerevisiae isolates, mostly with enologic origin. Our results confirmed that the wine making was not carried out only by the inoculated commercial starter because indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae present during fermentation were detected. In addition, a high genetic relationship among some commercial cultures was found, highlighting imprecision or fraudulent practices by starter manufacturers.

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes Involved in Survival of Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Jarolim, Stefanie; Ayer, Anita; Pillay, Bethany; Gee, Allison C.; Phrakaysone, Alex; Perrone, Gabriel G.; Breitenbach, Michael; Dawes, Ian W.

    2013-01-01

    The heat-shock response in cells, involving increased transcription of a specific set of genes in response to a sudden increase in temperature, is a highly conserved biological response occurring in all organisms. Despite considerable attention to the processes activated during heat shock, less is known about the role of genes in survival of a sudden temperature increase. Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the maintenance of heat-shock resistance in exponential and stationary phase were identified by screening the homozygous diploid deletants in nonessential genes and the heterozygous diploid mutants in essential genes for survival after a sudden shift in temperature from 30 to 50°. More than a thousand genes were identified that led to altered sensitivity to heat shock, with little overlap between them and those previously identified to affect thermotolerance. There was also little overlap with genes that are activated or repressed during heat-shock, with only 5% of them regulated by the heat-shock transcription factor. The target of rapamycin and protein kinase A pathways, lipid metabolism, vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar protein sorting, and mitochondrial genome maintenance/translation were critical to maintenance of resistance. Mutants affected in l-tryptophan metabolism were heat-shock resistant in both growth phases; those affected in cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis and DNA double-strand break repair were resistant in stationary phase, and in mRNA catabolic processes in exponential phase. Mutations affecting mitochondrial genome maintenance were highly represented in sensitive mutants. The cell division transcription factor Swi6p and Hac1p involved in the unfolded protein response also play roles in maintenance of heat-shock resistance. PMID:24142923

  3. Dihydroxyacetone detoxification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves formaldehyde dissimilation.

    PubMed

    Molin, Mikael; Blomberg, Anders

    2006-05-01

    To investigate Saccharomyces cerevisiae physiology during growth on the conditionally toxic triose dihydroxyacetone (DHA), protein expression was studied in strains overexpressing either of the two dihydroxyacetone kinase isogenes, DAK1 or DAK2, that grow well utilizing DHA as a carbon and energy source. DHA metabolism was found mostly similar to ethanol utilization, involving a strong component of glucose derepression, but also involved DHA-specific regulatory changes. A specific and strong (10- to 30-fold induction of formaldehyde dehydrogenase, Fdhlp, indicated activation of the formaldehyde dissimilation pathway in DHA medium. The importance of this pathway was further supported by impaired adaptation to DHA growth and DHA survival in a glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (SFA1) deletion mutant. Glutathione synthase (GSH1) deletion led to decreased DHA survival in agreement with the glutathione cofactor requirement for the SFA1-encoded activity. DHA toxicity did, however, not solely appear related to formaldehyde accumulation, because SFA1 overexpression only enhanced formaldehyde but not DHA tolerance. In further agreement with a low DHA-to-formaldehyde flux, GSH supplements in the low microM range also fully suppressed the DHA sensitivity of a gsh1Delta strain. Under growth reduction on high (100 mM) DHA medium we report increased levels of advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation on total protein. Under these high-DHA conditions expression of several stress-related proteins, e.g. a heat-shock protein (Hsp104p) and the oxidative stress indicator, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (Ahp1p) was also found induced. However, hallmark determinants of oxidative stress tolerance (e.g. YAP1, SKN7, HYR1/GPX3 and SOD2) were redundant for DHA tolerance, thus indicating mechanisms of DHA toxicity largely independent of central oxidative stress defence mechanisms. We conclude that mechanisms for DHA growth and detoxification appear complex and that the

  4. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context.

  5. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:27733850

  6. Factors involved in anaerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ishtar Snoek, I S; Yde Steensma, H

    2007-01-01

    Life in the absence of molecular oxygen requires several adaptations. Traditionally, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation has attracted much attention in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as this is the basis for the use of this yeast in the production of alcohol and in baking. It has also been clear that under anaerobic conditions the yeast is not able to synthesize sterols and unsaturated fatty acids and that for anaerobic growth these have to be added to the media. More recently it has been found that many more factors play a role. Several other biosynthetic reactions also require molecular oxygen and the yeast must have alternatives for these. In addition, the composition of the cell wall and cell membrane show major differences when aerobic and anaerobic cells are compared. All these changes are reflected by the observation that the transcription of more than 500 genes changes significantly between aerobically and anaerobically growing cultures. In this review we will give an overview of the factors that play a role in the survival in the absence of molecular oxygen.

  7. FPG1, a gene involved in foam formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Lucía; Veiga-Crespo, Patricia; Villa, Tomás G

    2011-06-01

    Foam formation in fermentations conducted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, either at the beginning of the fermentation process or at the end in the case of sparkling wines, is due, to a large extent, to cell wall mannoproteins, which provide hydrophobicity to the yeast cells and favour their floating index as well as stabilization of the foam. The foam may be an undesirable by-product if it accumulates on top of the fermentation tanks, but its formation is a good property in either beer or sparkling wines. It is therefore important to know the yeast genes involved in foam formation, in order to suppress or potentiate their expression according to the end product to be obtained. The present study identified and characterized, for the first time in an oenological S. cerevisiae strain, a gene involved in foam formation, named FPG1 (foam-promoting gene). The protein encoded by FPG1 is a mannoprotein precursor present in the cell wall and somewhat homologous to Awa1p, a foaming protein described in a sake S. cerevisiae strain. A foamless strain was prepared by FPG1 deletion, and a foam hyper-producing strain was also constructed, thus allowing the conclusion that Fpg1p is a mannoprotein involved in yeast frothing.

  8. Ergosteryl-β-glucosidase (Egh1) involved in sterylglucoside catabolism and vacuole formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Tani, Motohiro; Ishibashi, Yohei; Endo, Ikumi; Okino, Nozomu; Ito, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Sterylglucosides (SGs) are composed of a glucose and sterol derivatives, and are distributed in fungi, plants and mammals. We recently identified EGCrP1 and EGCrP2 (endoglycoceramidase-related proteins 1 and 2) as a β-glucocerebrosidase and steryl-β-glucosidase, respectively, in Cryptococcus neoformans. We herein describe an EGCrP2 homologue (Egh1; ORF name, Yir007w) involved in SG catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The purified recombinant Egh1 hydrolyzed various β-glucosides including ergosteryl β-glucoside (EG), cholesteryl β-glucoside, sitosteryl β-glucoside, para-nitrophenyl β-glucoside, 4-methylumberifellyl β-glucoside and glucosylceramide. The disruption of EGH1 in S. cerevisiae BY4741 (egh1Δ) resulted in the accumulation of EG and fragmentation of vacuoles. The expression of EGH1 in egh1Δ (revertant) reduced the accumulation of EG, and restored the morphology of vacuoles. The accumulation of EG was not detected in EGH1 and UGT51(ATG26) double-disrupted mutants (ugt51Δegh1Δ), indicating that EG was synthesized by Ugt51(Atg26) and degraded by Egh1 in vivo. These results clearly demonstrated that Egh1 is an ergosteryl-β-glucosidase that is functionally involved in the EG catabolic pathway and vacuole formation in S. cerevisiae.

  9. Identification of a gene, FMP21, whose expression levels are involved in thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of high temperature tolerance in yeasts is important for the molecular breeding of high temperature-tolerant yeasts that can be used in bioethanol production. We identified genes whose expression is correlated with the degree of thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA microarray analysis. Gene expression profiles of three S. cerevisiae strains showing different levels of thermotolerance were compared, and we chose three of them as candidate genes. Among these genes, FMP21 was investigated as a thermotolerance-related gene in S. cerevisiae by comparing the growth at high temperature with the gene expression in eight strains. The expression ratio of FMP21 at 37°C was correlated with the doubling time ratio at a coefficient of determination of 0.787. The potential involvement of the Fmp21 in the thermotolerance of yeasts was evaluated. The FMP21 deletion variant showed a decreased respiratory growth rate and increased thermosensitivity. Furthermore, the overexpression of FMP21 improved thermotolerance in yeasts. In conclusion, the function of Fmp21 is important for thermotolerance in yeasts. PMID:25177541

  10. Analysis of nitrated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in mating signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Won; Lee, Na Young; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Lee, Min Young; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a PTM that regulates signal transduction and inflammatory responses, and is related to neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. The cellular function of PTN remains unclear because the low stoichiometry of PTN limits the identification and quantification of nitrated peptides. Effective enrichment is an important aspect of PTN analysis. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo nitroproteome elicited by mating signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel chemical enrichment method followed by LC-MS/MS. Nitroproteome profiling successfully identified changes in the nitration states of 14 proteins during mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae, making this the first reported in vivo nitroproteome in yeast. We investigated the biological functions of these nitroproteins and their relationships to mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae using a protein-protein interaction network. Our results suggest that PTN and denitration may be involved in nonreactive nitrogen species-mediated signal transduction and can provide clues for understanding the functional roles of PTN in vivo.

  11. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Hooykaas, Paul J J; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Bundock, Paul; Soltani, Jalal; van Attikum, Haico; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2006-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic organisms. This species has enabled a detailed study of the (genetic) requirements for Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transformation. For instance research with this yeast has led to the recognition that the transforming DNA molecules integrate into the eukaryotic chromosomes either by homologous recombination, which is the preferred pathway in S. cerevisiae, or by nonhomologous end-joining. Based on the protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of S. cerevisiae methodology has been developed for the transformation of many other yeast and fungal species.

  12. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation.

  13. Involvement of Rho-type GTPase in control of cell size in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yo; Mizuuchi, Eri; Nogami, Satoru; Morishita, Shinichi; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2007-06-01

    Maintaining specific cell size, which is important for many organisms, is achieved by coordinating cell growth and cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the existence of two cell-size checkpoints is proposed: at the first checkpoint, cell size is monitored before budding at the G1/S transition, and at the second checkpoint, actin depolymerization occurring in the small bud is monitored before the G2/M transition. Morphological analyses have revealed that the small GTPase Rho1p participates in cell-size control at both the G1/S and the G2/M boundaries. One group of rho1 mutants (rho1A) underwent premature entry into mitosis, leading to the birth of abnormally small cells. In another group of rho1 mutants (rho1B), the mother cells failed to reach an appropriate size before budding, and expression of the G1 cyclin Cln2p began at an earlier phase of the cell cycle. Analyses of mutants defective in Rho1p effector proteins indicate that Skn7p, Fks1p and Mpk1p are involved in cell-size control. Thus, Rho1p and its downstream regulatory pathways are involved in controlling cell size in S. cerevisiae.

  14. ATG18 and FAB1 are involved in dehydration stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Gema; Margalef-Català, Mar; Salinas, Francisco; Liti, Gianni; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, different dehydration-based technologies have been evaluated for the purpose of cell and tissue preservation. Although some early results have been promising, they have not satisfied the requirements for large-scale applications. The long experience of using quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be a good model organism for studying the link between complex phenotypes and DNA variations. Here, we use QTL analysis as a tool for identifying the specific yeast traits involved in dehydration stress tolerance. Three hybrids obtained from stable haploids and sequenced in the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project showed intermediate dehydration tolerance in most cases. The dehydration resistance trait of 96 segregants from each hybrid was quantified. A smooth, continuous distribution of the anhydrobiosis tolerance trait was found, suggesting that this trait is determined by multiple QTLs. Therefore, we carried out a QTL analysis to identify the determinants of this dehydration tolerance trait at the genomic level. Among the genes identified after reciprocal hemizygosity assays, RSM22, ATG18 and DBR1 had not been referenced in previous studies. We report new phenotypes for these genes using a previously validated test. Finally, our data illustrates the power of this approach in the investigation of the complex cell dehydration phenotype.

  15. Involvement of mitochondria and metacaspase elevation in harpin Pss-induced cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sripriya, Paranthaman; Vedantam, Lakshmi Vasudev; Podile, Appa Rao

    2009-08-15

    Expression of a proteinaceous elicitor harpin(Pss,) encoded by hrpZ of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 61, under GAL1 promoter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y187 resulted in galactose-inducible yeast cell death (YCD). Extracellular treatment of harpin did not affect the growth of yeast. The observed YCD was independent of the stage of cell cycle. "Petite" mutant of S. cerevisiae Y187 pYEUT-hrpZ was insensitive to cell death indicating the involvement of mitochondria in this YCD. Loss in mitochondrial potential, but no leakage of Cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, were notable features in harpin(Pss)-induced YCD. Cyclosporin A had no effect on hrpZ expressing yeast cells, further confirmed that there was no release of Cytochrome c. Elevation of caspase activity has been reported for the first time in this form of cell death induced by harpin expression. Release of reactive oxygen species and clear loss of membrane integrity were evident with the absence of nuclear fragmentation and chromosomal condensation, while annexin V and propidium iodide staining showed features typical of necrosis.

  16. Early transcriptional response to biotic stress in mixed starter fermentations involving Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii.

    PubMed

    Tronchoni, Jordi; Curiel, Jose Antonio; Morales, Pilar; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2017-01-16

    Advances in microbial wine biotechnology have led to the recent commercialization of several non-Saccharomyces starter cultures. These are intended to be used in either simultaneous or sequential inoculation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The different types of microbial interactions that can be stablished during wine fermentation acquire an increased relevance in the context of these mixed-starter fermentations. We analysed the transcriptional response to co-cultivation of S. cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii. The study focused in the initial stages of wine fermentation, before S. cerevisiae completely dominates the mixed cultures. Both species showed a clear response to the presence of each other, even though the portion of the genome showing altered transcription levels was relatively small. Changes in the transcription pattern suggested a stimulation of metabolic activity and growth, as a consequence of the presence of competitors in the same medium. The response of S. cerevisiae seems to take place earlier, as compared to T. delbrueckii. Enhanced glycolytic activity of the mixed culture was confirmed by the CO2 production profile during these early stages of fermentation. Interestingly, HSP12 expression appeared induced by co-cultivation for both of S. cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii in the two time points studied. This might be related with a recently described role of Hsp12 in intercellular communication in yeast. Expression of S. cerevisiae PAU genes was also stimulated in mixed cultures.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Shuttle vectors.

    PubMed

    Gnügge, Robert; Rudolf, Fabian

    2017-01-10

    Yeast shuttle vectors are indispensable tools in yeast research. They enable cloning of defined DNA sequences in Escherichia coli and their direct transfer into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. There are three types of commonly used yeast shuttle vectors: centromeric plasmids, episomal plasmids and integrating plasmids. In this review, we discuss the different plasmid systems and their characteristic features. We focus on their segregational stability and copy number and indicate how to modify these properties. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Elements involved in S-adenosylmethionine-mediated regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MET25 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Cherest, H; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1989-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MET25 gene encodes O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase. Synthesis of this enzyme is repressed by the presence of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) in the growth medium. We identified cis elements required for MET25 expression by analyzing small deletions in the MET25 promoter region. The results revealed a regulatory region, acting as an upstream activation site, that activated transcription of MET25 in the absence of methionine or AdoMet. We found that, for the most part, repression of MET25 expression was due to a lack of activation at this site, reinforced by an independent repression mechanism. The activation region contained a repeated dyad sequence that is also found in the promoter regions of other unlinked but coordinately regulated genes (MET3, MET2, and SAM2). We show that the presence of the two dyads is necessary for maximal gene expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that in addition to this transcriptional regulation, a posttranscriptional regulation, probably targeted at the 5' region of mRNA, is involved in MET25 expression. Images PMID:2552290

  19. IMP2, a gene involved in the expression of glucose-repressible genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lodi, T; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Donnini, C

    1995-09-01

    Two mutants carrying different deletions of the IMP2 coding sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, delta T1, which encodes a protein lacking the last 26 C-terminal amino acids, and delta T2, which completely lacks the coding region, were analysed for derepression of glucose-repressible maltose, galactose, raffinose and ethanol utilization pathways in response to glucose limitation. The role of the IMP2 gene product in the regulation of carbon catabolite repressible enzymes maltase, invertase, alcohol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and L-lactate:ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase (L-LCR) was also analysed. The IMP2 gene product is required for the rapid glucose derepression of all above-mentioned carbon source utilization pathways and of all the enzymes except for L-LCR. NAD-GDH is regulated by IMP2 in the opposite way and, in fact, this enzyme was released at higher levels in both imp2 mutants than in the wild-type strain. Therefore, the product of IMP2 appears to be involved in positive and negative regulation. Both deletions result in growth and catalytic defects; in some cases partial modification of the gene product yielded more dramatic effects than its complete absence. Moreover, evidence is provided that the IMP2 gene product regulates galactose- and maltose-inducible genes at the transcriptional level and is a positive regulator of maltase, maltose permease and galactose permease gene expression.

  20. Involvement of Sac1 phosphoinositide phosphatase in the metabolism of phosphatidylserine in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2014-04-01

    Sac1 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that preferentially dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Mutation of SAC1 causes not only the accumulation of phosphoinositides but also reduction of the phosphatidylserine (PS) level in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we characterized the mechanism underlying the PS reduction in SAC1-deleted cells. Incorporation of (32) P into PS was significantly delayed in sac1∆ cells. Such a delay was also observed in SAC1- and PS decarboxylase gene-deleted cells, suggesting that the reduction in the PS level is caused by a reduction in the rate of biosynthesis of PS. A reduction in the PS level was also observed with repression of STT4 encoding phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase or deletion of VPS34 encoding phophatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, the combination of mutations of SAC1 and STT4 or VPS34 did not restore the reduced PS level, suggesting that both the synthesis and degradation of phosphoinositides are important for maintenance of the PS level. Finally, we observed an abnormal PS distribution in sac1∆ cells when a specific probe for PS was expressed. Collectively, these results suggested that Sac1 is involved in the maintenance of a normal rate of biosynthesis and distribution of PS.

  1. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge regarding Saccharomyces cerevisiae has accumulated over time, and today S. cerevisiae serves as a widley used biotechnological production organism as well as a eukaryotic model system. The high transformation efficiency, in addition to the availability of the complete yeast genome sequence, has facilitated genetic manipulation of this microorganism, and new approaches are constantly being taken to metabolicially engineer this organism in order to suit specific needs. In this paper, strategies and concepts for metabolic engineering are discussed and several examples based upon selected studies involving S. cerevisiae are reviewed. The many different studies of metabolic engineering using this organism illustrate all the categories of this multidisciplinary field: extension of substrate range, improvements of producitivity and yield, elimination of byproduct formation, improvement of process performance, improvements of cellular properties, and extension of product range including heterologous protein production. PMID:10704473

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldolase. The aldolase activity in various mutant alleles measured as fructose 1,6-bisphosphate cleavage is between 1 to 2% and as condensation of triose phosphates to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is 2 to 5% that of the wild-type. The mutants accumulate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate from glucose during glycolysis and dihydroxyacetone phosphate during gluconeogenesis. This suggests that the aldolase activity is absent in vivo. PMID:6384192

  3. Involvement of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and signaling regulatory pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilms during fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenjian; Chen, Yong; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Nan; Cheng, Hao; Ren, Hengfei; Guo, Ting; Niu, Huanqing; Zhuang, Wei; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-01-01

    Compared to free (free-living) cells, biofilm cells show increased resistance and stability to high-pressure fermentation conditions, although the reasons underlying these phenomena remain unclear. Here, we investigated biofilm formation with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown on fiber surfaces during the process of ethanol fermentation. The development of biofilm colonies was visualized by fluorescent labeling and confocal microscopy. RNA from yeast cells at three different biofilm development periods was extracted and sequenced by high-throughput sequencing. We quantitated gene expression differences between biofilm cells and free cells and found that 2098, 1556, and 927 genes were significantly differentially expressed, respectively. We also validated the expression of previously reported genes and identified novel genes and pathways under the control of this system. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm genes show significant gene expression changes principally in the initial period of biofilm formation compared to later periods. Carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, signal transduction, and oxidoreductase activity were needed for biofilm formation. In contrast to previous findings, we observed some differential expression performances of FLO family genes, indicating that cell aggregation in our immobilized fermentation system was possibly independent of flocculation. Cyclic AMP-protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways regulated signal transduction pathways during yeast biofilm formation. We found that carbohydrate metabolism, especially glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, played a key role in the development of S. cerevisiae biofilms. This work provides an important dataset for future studies aimed at gaining insight into the regulatory mechanisms of immobilized cells in biofilms, as well as for optimizing bioprocessing applications with S. cerevisiae. PMID:25755652

  4. Involvement of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and signaling regulatory pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilms during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenjian; Chen, Yong; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Nan; Cheng, Hao; Ren, Hengfei; Guo, Ting; Niu, Huanqing; Zhuang, Wei; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-01-01

    Compared to free (free-living) cells, biofilm cells show increased resistance and stability to high-pressure fermentation conditions, although the reasons underlying these phenomena remain unclear. Here, we investigated biofilm formation with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown on fiber surfaces during the process of ethanol fermentation. The development of biofilm colonies was visualized by fluorescent labeling and confocal microscopy. RNA from yeast cells at three different biofilm development periods was extracted and sequenced by high-throughput sequencing. We quantitated gene expression differences between biofilm cells and free cells and found that 2098, 1556, and 927 genes were significantly differentially expressed, respectively. We also validated the expression of previously reported genes and identified novel genes and pathways under the control of this system. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm genes show significant gene expression changes principally in the initial period of biofilm formation compared to later periods. Carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, signal transduction, and oxidoreductase activity were needed for biofilm formation. In contrast to previous findings, we observed some differential expression performances of FLO family genes, indicating that cell aggregation in our immobilized fermentation system was possibly independent of flocculation. Cyclic AMP-protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways regulated signal transduction pathways during yeast biofilm formation. We found that carbohydrate metabolism, especially glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, played a key role in the development of S. cerevisiae biofilms. This work provides an important dataset for future studies aimed at gaining insight into the regulatory mechanisms of immobilized cells in biofilms, as well as for optimizing bioprocessing applications with S. cerevisiae.

  5. A common element involved in transcriptional regulation of two DNA alkylation repair genes (MAG and MGT1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, W; Singh, K K; Chen, B; Samson, L

    1993-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAG gene encodes a 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase that protects cells from killing by alkylating agents. MAG mRNA levels are induced not only by alkylating agents but also by DNA-damaging agents that do not produce alkylated DNA. We constructed a MAG-lacZ gene fusion to help identify the cis-acting promoter elements involved in regulating MAG expression. Deletion analysis defined the presence of one upstream activating sequence and one upstream repressing sequence (URS) and suggested the presence of a second URS. One of the MAG URS elements matches a decamer consensus sequence present in the promoters of 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes, including the MGT1 gene, which encodes an O6-methylguanine DNA repair methyltransferase. Two proteins of 26 and 39 kDa bind specifically to the MAG and MGT1 URS elements. We suggest that the URS-binding proteins may play an important role in the coordinate regulation of these S. cerevisiae DNA repair genes. Images PMID:8246943

  6. Involvement of glutathione peroxidase 1 in growth and peroxisome formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in oleic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Ohdate, Takumi; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2012-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to use some fatty acids, such as oleic acid, as a sole source of carbon. β-oxidation, which occurs in a single membrane-enveloped organelle or peroxisome, is responsible for the assimilation of fatty acids. In S. cerevisiae, β-oxidation occurs only in peroxisomes, and H(2)O(2) is generated during this fatty acid-metabolizing pathway. S. cerevisiae has three GPX genes (GPX1, GPX2, and GPX3) encoding atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins. Here we show that expression of GPX1 was induced in medium containing oleic acid as a carbon source in an Msn2/Msn4-dependent manner. We found that Gpx1 was located in the peroxisomal matrix. The peroxisomal Gpx1 showed peroxidase activity using thioredoxin or glutathione as a reducing power. Peroxisome biogenesis was induced when cells were cultured with oleic acid. Peroxisome biogenesis was impaired in gpx1∆ cells, and subsequently, the growth of gpx1∆ cells was lowered in oleic acid-containing medium. Gpx1 contains six cysteine residues. Of the cysteine-substituted mutants of Gpx1, Gpx1(C36S) was not able to restore growth and peroxisome formation in oleic acid-containing medium, therefore, redox regulation of Gpx1 seems to be involved in the mechanism of peroxisome formation.

  7. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  8. Postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.A.; Boyce, J.; Cox, B.

    1981-04-01

    Postreplication events in logarithmically growing excision-defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined after low doses of ultraviolet light. Pulse-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid had interruptions, and when the cells were chased, the interruptions were no longer detected. Since the loss of interruptions was not associated with an exchange of pyrimidine dimers at a detection level of 10 to 20% of the induced dimers, it was concluded that postreplication repair in excision-defective mutants does not involve molecular recombination. Pyrimidine dimers were assayed by utilizing the ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in extracts of Micrococcus luteus and newly developed alkaline sucrose gradient techniques, which yielded chromosomal-size deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment of irradiated cells.

  9. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P.

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:25938495

  10. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer.

  11. CHS5, a gene involved in chitin synthesis and mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, B; Duran, A; Valdivieso, M H

    1997-01-01

    The CHS5 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for wild-type levels of chitin synthase III activity. chs5 cells have reduced levels of this activity. To further understand the role of CHS5 in yeast, the CHS5 gene was cloned by complementation of the Calcofluor resistance phenotype of a chs5 mutant. Transformation of the mutant with a plasmid carrying CHS5 restored Calcofluor sensitivity, wild-type cell wall chitin levels, and chitin synthase III activity levels. DNA sequence analysis reveals that CHS5 encodes a unique polypeptide of 671 amino acids with a molecular mass of 73,642 Da. The predicted sequence shows a heptapeptide repeated 10 times, a carboxy-terminal lysine-rich tail, and some similarity to neurofilament proteins. The effects of deletion of CHS5 indicate that it is not essential for yeast cell growth; however, it is important for mating. Deletion of CHS3, the presumptive structural gene for chitin synthase III activity, results in a modest decrease in mating efficiency, whereas chs5delta cells exhibit a much stronger mating defect. However, chs5 cells produce more chitin than chs3 mutants, indicating that CHS5 plays a role in other processes besides chitin synthesis. Analysis of mating mixtures of chs5 cells reveals that cells agglutinate and make contact but fail to undergo cell fusion. The chs5 mating defect can be partially rescued by FUS1 and/or FUS2, two genes which have been implicated previously in cell fusion, but not by FUS3. In addition, mating efficiency is much lower in fus1 fus2 x chs5 than in fus1 fus2 x wild type crosses. Our results indicate that Chs5p plays an important role in the cell fusion step of mating. PMID:9111317

  12. Dihydroxyacetone kinases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved in detoxification of dihydroxyacetone.

    PubMed

    Molin, Mikael; Norbeck, Joakim; Blomberg, Anders

    2003-01-17

    The genes YML070W/DAK1 and YFL053W/DAK2 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were characterized by a combined genetic and biochemical approach that firmly functionally classified their encoded proteins as dihydroxyacetone kinases (DAKs), an enzyme present in most organisms. The kinetic properties of the two isoforms were similar, exhibiting K(m)((DHA)) of 22 and 5 microm and K(m)((ATP)) of 0.5 and 0.1 mm for Dak1p and Dak2p, respectively. We furthermore show that their substrate, dihydroxyacetone (DHA), is toxic to yeast cells and that the detoxification is dependent on functional DAK. The importance of DAK was clearly apparent for cells where both isogenes were deleted (dak1 Delta dak2 Delta), since this strain was highly sensitive to DHA. In the opposite case, overexpression of either DAK1 or DAK2 made the dak1 Delta dak2 Delta highly resistant to DHA. In fact, overexpression of either DAK provided cells with the capacity to grow efficiently on DHA as the only carbon and energy source, with a generation time of about 5 h. The DHA toxicity was shown to be strongly dependent on the carbon and energy source utilized, since glucose efficiently suppresses the lethality, whereas galactose or ethanol did so to a much lesser extent. However, this suppression was found not to be explained by differences in DHA uptake, since uptake kinetics revealed a simple diffusion mechanism with similar capacity independent of carbon source. Salt addition strongly aggravated the DHA toxicity, independent of carbon source. Furthermore, the DHA toxicity was not linked to the presence of oxygen or to the known harmful agents methylglyoxal and formaldehyde. It is proposed that detoxification of DHA may be a vital part of the physiological response during diverse stress conditions in many species.

  13. Involvement of Vacuolar Sequestration and Active Transport in Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Hop Iso-α-Acids▿ † ¶

    PubMed Central

    Hazelwood, Lucie A.; Walsh, Michael C.; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop α-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-α-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-α-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-α-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-α-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-α-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-α-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-α-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-α-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators. PMID:19915041

  14. Involvement of vacuolar sequestration and active transport in tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hop iso-alpha-acids.

    PubMed

    Hazelwood, Lucie A; Walsh, Michael C; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop alpha-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-alpha-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-alpha-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-alpha-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-alpha-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-alpha-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-alpha-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-alpha-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-alpha-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators.

  15. Hypotonic stress-induced calcium signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves TRP-like transporters on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, M; Groppi, S; Belotti, F; Ambrosini, R; Filippi, G; Martegani, E; Tisi, R

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond to hypotonic stress (HTS) by a cytosolic calcium rise, either generated by an influx of calcium from extracellular medium, when calcium is available, or by a release from intracellular stores in scarcity of extracellular calcium. Calcium release from intracellular compartments is peculiarly inhibited by external calcium in a calcineurin-independent and Cch1-, but not Mid1-, driven manner. HTS-induced calcium release is also negatively regulated by the ER protein Cls2 and involves a poorly characterized protein, FLC2/YAL053W gene product, previously proposed to be required for FAD transport in the ER, albeit, due to its molecular features, it was also previously classified as an ion transporter. A computational analysis revealed that this gene and its three homologs in S. cerevisiae, together with previously identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe pkd2 and Neurospora crassa calcium-related spray protein, belong to a fungal branch of TRP-like ion transporters related to human mucolipin and polycystin 2 calcium transporters. Moreover, disruption of FLC2 gene confers severe sensitivity to Calcofluor white and hyper-activation of the cell wall integrity MAPK cascade, suggesting a role in cell wall maintenance as previously suggested for the fission yeast homolog. Perturbation in cytosolic resting calcium concentration and hyper-activation of calcineurin in exponentially growing cells suggest a role for this transporter in calcium homeostasis in yeast.

  16. Telomere-Mediated Plasmid Segregation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Involves Gene Products Required for Transcriptional Repression at Silencers and Telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Longtine, M. S.; Enomoto, S.; Finstad, S. L.; Berman, J.

    1993-01-01

    Plasmids that contain Saccharomyces cerevisiae TG(1-3) telomere repeat sequences (TRS plasmids) segregate efficiently during mitosis. Mutations in histone H4 reduce the efficiency of TRS-mediated plasmid segregation, suggesting that chromatin structure is involved in this process. Sir2, Sir3 and Sir4 are required for the transcriptional repression of genes located at the silent mating type loci (HML and HMR) and at telomeres (telomere position effect) and are also involved in the segregation of TRS plasmids, indicating that TRS-mediated plasmid segregation involves factors that act at chromosomal telomeres. TRS plasmid segregation differs from the segregation of plasmids carrying the HMR E silencing region: HMR E plasmid segregation function is completely dependent upon Sir2, Sir3 and Sir4, involves Sir1 and is not influenced by mutations in RAP1 that eliminate TRS plasmid segregation. Mutations in SIR1, SIN1, TOP1, TEL1 and TEL2 do not influence TRS plasmid segregation. Unlike transcriptional repression at telomeres, TRS plasmids retain partial segregation function in sir2, sir3, sir4, nat1 and ard1 mutant strains. Thus it is likely that TRS plasmid segregation involves additional factors that are not involved in telomere position effect. PMID:8436267

  17. Genome-wide identification of genes involved in growth and fermentation activity at low temperature in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Zoel; Ramos-Alonso, Lucía; Tronchoni, Jordi; Penacho, Vanessa; García-Ríos, Estéfani; Morales, Pilar; Gonzalez, Ramon; Guillamón, José Manuel

    2016-11-07

    Fermentation at low temperatures is one of the most popular current winemaking practices because of its reported positive impact on the aromatic profile of wines. However, low temperature is an additional hurdle to develop Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts, which are already stressed by high osmotic pressure, low pH and poor availability of nitrogen sources in grape must. Understanding the mechanisms of adaptation of S. cerevisiae to fermentation at low temperature would help to design strategies for process management, and to select and improve wine yeast strains specifically adapted to this winemaking practice. The problem has been addressed by several approaches in recent years, including transcriptomic and other high-throughput strategies. In this work we used a genome-wide screening of S. cerevisiae diploid mutant strain collections to identify genes that potentially contribute to adaptation to low temperature fermentation conditions. Candidate genes, impaired for growth at low temperatures (12°C and 18°C), but not at a permissive temperature (28°C), were deleted in an industrial homozygous genetic background, wine yeast strain FX10, in both heterozygosis and homozygosis. Some candidate genes were required for growth at low temperatures only in the laboratory yeast genetic background, but not in FX10 (namely the genes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis). Other genes related to ribosome biosynthesis (SNU66 and PAP2) were required for low-temperature fermentation of synthetic must (SM) in the industrial genetic background. This result coincides with our previous findings about translation efficiency with the fitness of different wine yeast strains at low temperature.

  18. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC.

  19. Meiotic recombination involving heterozygous large insertions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: formation and repair of large, unpaired DNA loops.

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, H M; Kirkpatrick, D T; Gerton, J L; Petes, T D

    2001-01-01

    Meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves the formation of heteroduplexes, duplexes containing DNA strands derived from two different homologues. If the two strands of DNA differ by an insertion or deletion, the heteroduplex will contain an unpaired DNA loop. We found that unpaired loops as large as 5.6 kb can be accommodated within a heteroduplex. Repair of these loops involved the nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes Rad1p and Rad10p and the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins Msh2p and Msh3p, but not several other NER (Rad2p and Rad14p) and MMR (Msh4p, Msh6p, Mlh1p, Pms1p, Mlh2p, Mlh3p) proteins. Heteroduplexes were also formed with DNA strands derived from alleles containing two different large insertions, creating a large "bubble"; repair of this substrate was dependent on Rad1p. Although meiotic recombination events in yeast are initiated by double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), we showed that DSBs occurring within heterozygous insertions do not stimulate interhomologue recombination. PMID:11514439

  20. The gene ICS3 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in copper homeostasis dependent on extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Alesso, C A; Discola, K F; Monteiro, G

    2015-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes are involved in the uptake, transport, storage and detoxification of copper. Large scale studies have noted that deletion of the gene ICS3 increases sensitivity to copper, Sortin 2 and acid exposure. Here, we report a study on the Δics3 strain, in which ICS3 is related to copper homeostasis, affecting the intracellular accumulation of this metal. This strain is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and copper exposure, but not to other tested transition metals. At pH 6.0, the Δics3 strain accumulates a larger amount of intracellular copper than the wild-type strain, explaining the sensitivity to oxidants in this condition. Unexpectedly, sensitivity to copper exposure only occurs in acidic conditions. This can be explained by the fact that the exposure of Δics3 cells to high copper concentrations at pH 4.0 results in over-accumulation of copper and iron. Moreover, the expression of ICS3 increases in acidic pH, and this is correlated with CCC2 gene expression, since both genes are regulated by Rim101 from the pH regulon. CCC2 is also upregulated in Δics3 in acidic pH. Together, these data indicate that ICS3 is involved in copper homeostasis and is dependent on extracellular pH.

  1. Vacuolar transporter Avt4 is involved in excretion of basic amino acids from the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Takayuki; Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Sugimoto, Naoko; Ishimoto, Masaya; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Basic amino acids (lysine, histidine and arginine) accumulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles should be mobilized to cytosolic nitrogen metabolism under starvation. We found that the decrease of vacuolar basic amino acids in response to nitrogen starvation was impaired by the deletion of AVT4 gene encoding a vacuolar transporter. In addition, overexpression of AVT4 reduced the accumulation of basic amino acids in vacuoles under nutrient-rich condition. In contrast to AVT4, the deletion and overexpression of AVT3, which encodes the closest homologue of Avt4p, did not affect the contents of vacuolar basic amino acids. Consistent with these, arginine uptake into vacuolar membrane vesicles was decreased by Avt4p-, but not by Avt3p-overproduction, whereas various neutral amino acids were excreted from vacuolar membrane vesicles in a manner dependent on either Avt4p or Avt3p. These results suggest that Avt4p is a vacuolar amino acid exporter involving in the recycling of basic amino acids.

  2. Stress-tolerance of baker's-yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells: stress-protective molecules and genes involved in stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2009-05-29

    During the fermentation of dough and the production of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), cells are exposed to numerous environmental stresses (baking-associated stresses) such as freeze-thaw, high sugar concentrations, air-drying and oxidative stresses. Cellular macromolecules, including proteins, nucleic acids and membranes, are seriously damaged under stress conditions, leading to the inhibition of cell growth, cell viability and fermentation. To avoid lethal damage, yeast cells need to acquire a variety of stress-tolerant mechanisms, for example the induction of stress proteins, the accumulation of stress protectants, changes in membrane composition and repression of translation, and by regulating the corresponding gene expression via stress-triggered signal-transduction pathways. Trehalose and proline are considered to be critical stress protectants, as is glycerol. It is known that these molecules are effective for providing protection against various types of environmental stresses. Modifications of the metabolic pathways of trehalose and proline by self-cloning methods have significantly increased tolerance to baking-associated stresses. To clarify which genes are required for stress tolerance, both a comprehensive phenomics analysis and a functional genomics analysis were carried out under stress conditions that simulated those occurring during the commercial baking process. These analyses indicated that many genes are involved in stress tolerance in yeast. In particular, it was suggested that vacuolar H+-ATPase plays important roles in yeast cells under stress conditions.

  3. A genome-wide imaging-based screening to identify genes involved in synphilin-1 inclusion formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Yang, Qian; Zheng, Ju; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hao, Xinxin; Song, Jia; Lebacq, Tom; Franssens, Vanessa; Winderickx, Joris; Nystrom, Thomas; Liu, Beidong

    2016-01-01

    Synphilin-1 is a major component of Parkinson’s disease (PD) inclusion bodies implicated in PD pathogenesis. However, the machinery controlling synphilin-1 inclusion formation remains unclear. Here, we investigated synphilin-1 inclusion formation using a systematic genome-wide, high-content imaging based screening approach (HCI) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By combining with a secondary screening for mutants showing significant changes on fluorescence signal intensity, we filtered out hits that significantly decreased the expression level of synphilin-1. We found 133 yeast genes that didn’t affect synphilin-1 expression but that were required for the formation of synphilin-1 inclusions. Functional enrichment and physical interaction network analysis revealed these genes to encode for functions involved in cytoskeleton organization, histone modification, sister chromatid segregation, glycolipid biosynthetic process, DNA repair and replication. All hits were confirmed by conventional microscopy. Complementation assays were performed with a selected group of mutants, results indicated that the observed phenotypic changes in synphilin-1 inclusion formation were directly caused by the loss of corresponding genes of the deletion mutants. Further growth assays of these mutants showed a significant synthetic sick effect upon synphilin-1 expression, which supports the hypothesis that matured inclusions represent an end stage of several events meant to protect cells against the synphilin-1 cytotoxicity. PMID:27440388

  4. Pyruvate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pronk, J T; Yde Steensma, H; Van Dijken, J P

    1996-12-01

    In yeasts, pyruvate is located at a major junction of assimilatory and dissimilatory reactions as well as at the branch-point between respiratory dissimilation of sugars and alcoholic fermentation. This review deals with the enzymology, physiological function and regulation of three key reactions occurring at the pyruvate branch-point in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: (i) the direct oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, catalysed by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, (ii) decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde, catalysed by pyruvate decarboxylase, and (iii) the anaplerotic carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase. Special attention is devoted to physiological studies on S. cerevisiae strains in which structural genes encoding these key enzymes have been inactivated by gene disruption.

  5. Dynactin is involved in a checkpoint to monitor cell wall synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaya; Igarashi, Ryoji; Sekiya, Mizuho; Utsugi, Takahiko; Morishita, Shinichi; Yukawa, Masashi; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2004-09-01

    Checkpoint controls ensure the completion of cell cycle events with high fidelity in the correct order. Here we show the existence of a novel checkpoint that ensures coupling of cell wall synthesis and mitosis. In response to a defect in cell wall synthesis, S. cerevisiae cells arrest the cell-cycle before spindle pole body separation. This arrest results from the regulation of the M-phase cyclin Clb2p at the transcriptional level through the transcription factor Fkh2p. Components of the dynactin complex are required to achieve the G2 arrest whilst keeping cells highly viable. Thus, the dynactin complex has a function in a checkpoint that monitors cell wall synthesis.

  6. PET genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tzagoloff, A; Dieckmann, C L

    1990-01-01

    We describe a collection of nuclear respiratory-defective mutants (pet mutants) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of 215 complementation groups. This set of mutants probably represents a substantial fraction of the total genetic information of the nucleus required for the maintenance of functional mitochondria in S. cerevisiae. The biochemical lesions of mutants in approximately 50 complementation groups have been related to single enzymes or biosynthetic pathways, and the corresponding wild-type genes have been cloned and their structures have been determined. The genes defined by an additional 20 complementation groups were identified by allelism tests with mutants characterized in other laboratories. Mutants representative of the remaining complementation groups have been assigned to one of the following five phenotypic classes: (i) deficiency in cytochrome oxidase, (ii) deficiency in coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase, (iii) deficiency in mitochondrial ATPase, (iv) absence of mitochondrial protein synthesis, and (v) normal composition of respiratory-chain complexes and of oligomycin-sensitive ATPase. In addition to the genes identified through biochemical and genetic analyses of the pet mutants, we have cataloged PET genes not matched to complementation groups in the mutant collection and other genes whose products function in the mitochondria but are not necessary for respiration. Together, this information provides an up-to-date list of the known genes coding for mitochondrial constituents and for proteins whose expression is vital for the respiratory competence of S. cerevisiae. PMID:2215420

  7. Screening of genes involved in isooctane tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using mRNA differential display.

    PubMed

    Miura, S; Zou, W; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    2000-11-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, KK-211, isolated by the long-term bioprocess of stereoselective reduction in isooctane, showed extremely high tolerance to the solvent, which is toxic to yeast cells, but, in comparison with its wild-type parent, DY-1, showed low tolerance to hydrophilic organic solvents, such as dimethyl sulfoxide and ethanol. In order to detect the isooctane tolerance-associated genes, mRNA differential display (DD) was employed using mRNAs isolated from strains DY-1 and KK-211 cultivated without isooctane, and from strain KK-211 cultivated with isooctane. Thirty genes were identified as being differentially expressed in these three types of cells and were classified into three groups according to their expression patterns. These patterns were further confirmed and quantified by Northern blot analysis. On the DD fingerprints, the expression of 14 genes, including MUQ1, PRY2, HAC1, AGT1, GAC1, and ICT1 (YLR099c) was induced, while the expression of the remaining 16 genes, including JEN1, PRY1, PRY3, and KRE1, was decreased, in strain KK-211 cultivated with isooctane. The genes represented by HAC1, PRY1, and ICT1 have been reported to be associated with cell stress, and AGT1 and GAC1 have been reported to be involved in the uptake of trehalose and the production of glycogen, respectively. MUQ1 and KRE1, encoding proteins associated with cell surface maintenance, were also detected. Based on these results, we concluded that alteration of expression levels of multiple genes, not of a single gene, might be the critical determinant for isooctane tolerance in strain KK-211.

  8. Nucleosome Positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, An; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The DNA of eukaryotic cells is spooled around large histone protein complexes, forming nucleosomes that make up the basis for a high-order packaging structure called chromatin. Compared to naked DNA, nucleosomal DNA is less accessible to regulatory proteins and regulatory processes. The exact positions of nucleosomes therefore influence several cellular processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation, recombination, replication, and DNA repair. Here, we review recent technological advances enabling the genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positions in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discuss the various parameters that determine nucleosome positioning in vivo, including cis factors like AT content, variable tandem repeats, and poly(dA:dT) tracts that function as chromatin barriers and trans factors such as chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription factors, histone-modifying enzymes, and RNA polymerases. In the last section, we review the biological role of chromatin in gene transcription, the evolution of gene regulation, and epigenetic phenomena. PMID:21646431

  9. Chromosome Duplication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Stephen P.; Labib, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The accurate and complete replication of genomic DNA is essential for all life. In eukaryotic cells, the assembly of the multi-enzyme replisomes that perform replication is divided into stages that occur at distinct phases of the cell cycle. Replicative DNA helicases are loaded around origins of DNA replication exclusively during G1 phase. The loaded helicases are then activated during S phase and associate with the replicative DNA polymerases and other accessory proteins. The function of the resulting replisomes is monitored by checkpoint proteins that protect arrested replisomes and inhibit new initiation when replication is inhibited. The replisome also coordinates nucleosome disassembly, assembly, and the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. Finally, when two replisomes converge they are disassembled. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have led the way in our understanding of these processes. Here, we review our increasingly molecular understanding of these events and their regulation. PMID:27384026

  10. [Thermoresistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts].

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhin, V A

    2011-01-01

    Under natural conditions, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduce, as a rule, on the surface of solid or liquid medium. Thus, life cycle of yeast populations is substantially influenced by diurnal changes in ambient temperature. The pattern in the response of unrestricted yeast S. cerevisiae culture to changes in the temperature of cultivation is revealed experimentally. Yeast population, in the absence of environmental constraints on the functioning of cell chemosmotic bioenergetic system, demonstrates the ability of thermoresistance when the temperature of cultivation switches from the range of 12-36 degrees C to 37.5-40 degrees C. During the transient period that is associated with the temperature switching and lasts from 1 to 4 turnover cycles, yeast reproduction rate remains 1.5-2 times higher than under stationary conditions. This is due to evolutionary acquired adaptive activity of cell chemosmotic system. After the adaptive resources exhausting, yeast thermoresistance fully recovers at the temperature range of 12-36 degrees C within one generation time under conditions of both restricted and unrestricted nourishment. Adaptive significance of such thermoresistance seems obvious enough--it allows maintaining high reproduction rate in yeast when ambient temperature is reaching a brief maximum shortly after noon.

  11. Genes involved in sister chromatid separation and segregation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Biggins, S; Bhalla, N; Chang, A; Smith, D L; Murray, A W

    2001-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires the precise coordination of events during the cell cycle. Replicated sister chromatids are held together while they are properly attached to and aligned by the mitotic spindle at metaphase. At anaphase, the links between sisters must be promptly dissolved to allow the mitotic spindle to rapidly separate them to opposite poles. To isolate genes involved in chromosome behavior during mitosis, we microscopically screened a temperature-sensitive collection of budding yeast mutants that contain a GFP-marked chromosome. Nine LOC (loss of cohesion) complementation groups that do not segregate sister chromatids at anaphase were identified. We cloned the corresponding genes and performed secondary tests to determine their function in chromosome behavior. We determined that three LOC genes, PDS1, ESP1, and YCS4, are required for sister chromatid separation and three other LOC genes, CSE4, IPL1, and SMT3, are required for chromosome segregation. We isolated alleles of two genes involved in splicing, PRP16 and PRP19, which impair alpha-tubulin synthesis thus preventing spindle assembly, as well as an allele of CDC7 that is defective in DNA replication. We also report an initial characterization of phenotypes associated with the SMT3/SUMO gene and the isolation of WSS1, a high-copy smt3 suppressor. PMID:11606525

  12. Commitment to Meiosis in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: Involvement of the Spo14 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Honigberg, S. M.; Conicella, C.; Espositio, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the identification, cloning and phenotypic analysis of SPO14, a new gene required for meiosis and spore formation. Studies of strains carrying a temperature-sensitive mutation or a disruption/duplication allele indicate that spo14 mutants have the unusual property of being able to return to mitotic division, even from the late stages of meiotic development. Early meiotic events, such as DNA replication and intragenic and intergenic recombination, occur normally. In contrast, later meiotic processes are defective in spo14 mutants: the meiosis I division appears to be executed at slightly depressed levels, the meiosis II division is reduced more severely, and no spores are formed. Epistasis tests using mutants defective in recombination or reductional division support these findings. Based on these data, we suggest that the SPO14 gene product is involved in the coordinate induction of late meiotic events and that this induction is responsible for the phenomenon of commitment. PMID:1582554

  13. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-related protein Arp2 is involved in the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Arp2p is an essential yeast actin-related protein. Disruption of the corresponding ARP2 gene leads to a terminal phenotype characterized by the presence of a single large bud. Thus, Arp2p may be important for a late stage of the cell cycle (Schwob, E., and R.P. Martin, 1992. Nature (Lond.). 355:179-182). We have localized Arp2p by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific peptide antibodies revealed punctate staining under the plasma membrane, which partially colocalizes with actin. Temperature-sensitive arp2 mutations were created by PCR mutagenesis and selected by an ade2/SUP11 sectoring screen. One temperature-sensitive mutant that was characterized, arp2-H330L, was osmosensitive and had an altered actin cytoskeleton at a nonpermissive temperature, suggesting a role of Arp2p in the actin cytoskeleton. Random budding patterns were observed in both haploid and diploid arp2- H330L mutant cells. Endocytosis, as judged by Lucifer yellow uptake, was severely reduced in the mutant, at all temperatures. In addition, genetic interaction was observed between temperature-sensitive alleles arp2-H330L and cdc10-1. CDC10 is a gene encoding a neck filament- associated protein that is necessary for polarized growth and cytokinesis. Overall, the immunolocalization, mutant phenotypes, and genetic interaction suggest that the Arp2 protein is an essential component of the actin cytoskeleton that is involved in membrane growth and polarity, as well as in endocytosis. PMID:8698808

  14. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  15. Involvement of the PP2C-like phosphatase Ptc2p in the DNA checkpoint pathways of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Marsolier, M C; Roussel, P; Leroy, C; Mann, C

    2000-04-01

    RAD53 encodes a conserved protein kinase that acts as a central transducer in the DNA damage and the DNA replication checkpoint pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify new elements of these pathways acting with or downstream of RAD53, we searched for genes whose overexpression suppressed the toxicity of a dominant-lethal form of RAD53 and identified PTC2, which encodes a protein phosphatase of the PP2C family. PTC2 overexpression induces hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents in wild-type cells and is lethal to rad53, mec1, and dun1 mutants with low ribonucleotide reductase activity. Deleting PTC2 specifically suppresses the hydroxyurea hypersensitivity of mec1 mutants and the lethality of mec1Delta. PTC2 is thus implicated in one or several functions related to RAD53, MEC1, and the DNA checkpoint pathways.

  16. Lead toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van der Heggen, Maarten; Martins, Sara; Flores, Gisela; Soares, Eduardo V

    2010-12-01

    The effect of Pb on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell structure and function was examined. Membrane integrity was assessed by the release of UV-absorbing compounds and by the intracellular K(+) efflux. No leakage of UV(260)-absorbing compounds or loss of K(+) were observed in Pb (until 1,000 μmol/l) treated cells up to 30 min; these results suggest that plasma membrane seems not to be the immediate and primary target of Pb toxicity. The effect of Pb on yeast metabolism was examined using the fluorescent probe FUN-1 and compared with the ability to reproduce, evaluated by colony-forming units counting. The exposition of yeast cells, during 60 min to 1,000 μmol/l Pb, induces a decrease in the ability to process FUN-1 although the cells retain its proliferation capacity. A more prolonged contact time (120 min) of yeast cells with Pb induces a marked (> 50%) loss of yeast cells metabolic activity and replication competence through a mechanism which most likely requires protein synthesis.

  17. The transcriptional control machinery as well as the cell wall integrity and its regulation are involved in the detoxification of the organic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lilin; Liu, Ningning; Ma, Xiao; Jiang, Linghuo

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, we have identified 339 dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-sensitive and nine DMSO-tolerant gene mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a functional genomics approach. Twelve of these identified DMSO-sensitive mutations are of genes involved in the general control of gene expression mediated by the SWR1 complex and the RNA polymerase II mediator complex, whereas 71 of them are of genes involved in the protein trafficking and vacuolar sorting processes. In addition, twelve of these DMSO-sensitive mutations are of genes involved in the cell wall integrity (CWI) and its regulation. DMSO-tolerant mutations are of genes mainly involved in the metabolism and the gene expression control. Therefore, the transcriptional control machinery, the CWI and its regulation as well as the protein trafficking and sorting process play critical roles in the DMSO detoxification in yeast cells.

  18. Molecular and enological characterization of a natural Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae hybrid.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; González, Sara Susana; Combina, Mariana; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2015-07-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a main role in the winemaking process, although other species, like Saccharomyces uvarum or Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been associated with must fermentations. It has been reported in recent years, that yeast hybrids of different Saccharomyces species might be responsible for wine productions. Although S. cerevisiae×Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids have been well studied, very little attention has been paid to S. cerevisiae×S. uvarum hybrids. In this work we characterized the genomic composition of S6U, a widely used commercial S. cerevisiae×S. uvarum yeast hybrid isolated in wine fermentations containing one copy of the genome of each parental species, which suggests a relatively recent hybridization event. We also studied its performance under diverse enological conditions. The results show enhanced performance under low temperature enological conditions, increased glycerol production, lower acetic acid production and increased production of interesting aroma compounds. We also examined the transcriptomic response of the S6U hybrid strain compared with the reference species under enological conditions. The results show that although the hybrid strain transcriptome is more similar to S. uvarum than to S. cerevisiae, it presents specifically regulated genes involved in stress response, lipids and amino acid metabolism. The enological performance and aroma profile of this S. cerevisiae×S. uvarum hybrid makes it a good candidate for participating in winemaking, especially at low temperatures.

  19. Involvement of oxidative stress response genes in redox homeostasis, the level of reactive oxygen species, and ageing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Drakulic, Tamara; Temple, Mark D; Guido, Ron; Jarolim, Stefanie; Breitenbach, Michael; Attfield, Paul V; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking oxidative stress response genes were used to investigate which genes are required under normal aerobic conditions to maintain cellular redox homeostasis, using intracellular glutathione redox potential (glutathione E(h)) to indicate the redox environment of the cells. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMP) were also assessed by FACS using dihydroethidium and rhodamine 123 as fluorescent probes. Cells became more oxidised as strains shifted from exponential growth to stationary phase. During both phases the presence of reduced thioredoxin and the activity of glutathione reductase were important for redox homeostasis. Thioredoxin reductase contributed less during exponential phase when there was a strong requirement for active Yap1p transcription factor, but was critical during stationary phase. The absence of ROS detoxification systems, such as catalases or superoxide dismutases, had a lesser effect on glutathione E(h), but a more pronounced effect on ROS levels and MMP. These results reflect the major shift in ROS generation as cells switch from fermentative to respiratory metabolism and also showed that there was not a strong correlation between ROS production, MMP and cellular redox environment. Heterogeneity was detected in populations of strains with compromised anti-oxidant defences, and as cells aged they shifted from one cell type with low ROS content to another with much higher intracellular ROS.

  20. Molecular characterization of SIG1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene involved in negative regulation of G-protein-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Dignard, D; Harcus, D; Whiteway, M; Thomas, D Y

    1994-01-01

    Two recessive mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIG1 (suppressor of inhibitory G-protein) gene have been identified by their ability to suppress the signalling defect of dominant-negative variants of the mating response G-protein beta-subunit. The mutations and deletion of SIG1 enhance the sensitivity of the cells to pheromone and stimulate the basal transcription of a mating specific gene, FUS1, suggesting that Sig1p plays a negatively regulatory role in G beta gamma-mediated signal transduction. An additional function of Sig1p in vegetatively growing cells is suggested by the finding that the mutations and deletion of SIG1 cause temperature-sensitive growth defects. The SIG1 gene encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 65 kDa that contains at the amino-terminus two zinc finger-like sequence motifs. Epistasis experiments localize the action of Sig1p within the pheromone signalling pathway at a position at or shortly after the G-protein. We propose that Sig1p represents a novel negative regulator of G beta gamma-mediated signal transduction. Images PMID:8039500

  1. Viruses and prions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wickner, Reed B; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Esteban, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a key experimental organism for the study of infectious diseases, including dsRNA viruses, ssRNA viruses, and prions. Studies of the mechanisms of virus and prion replication, virus structure, and structure of the amyloid filaments that are the basis of yeast prions have been at the forefront of such studies in these classes of infectious entities. Yeast has been particularly useful in defining the interactions of the infectious elements with cellular components: chromosomally encoded proteins necessary for blocking the propagation of the viruses and prions, and proteins involved in the expression of viral components. Here, we emphasize the L-A dsRNA virus and its killer-toxin-encoding satellites, the 20S and 23S ssRNA naked viruses, and the several infectious proteins (prions) of yeast.

  2. Multicopy suppression of oxidant-sensitive eos1 mutation by IZH2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the involvement of Eos1 in zinc homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshihide; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2010-05-01

    EOS1 is required for tolerance to oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; mutants are defective in the gene sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and tolerant to tunicamycin. To clarify the function of Eos1, we screened yeast genomic DNA libraries for heterologous genes that, when overexpressed from a plasmid, can suppress the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive eos1 mutation. We identified one such gene, IZH2, which has previously been reported to be a Zap1-regulated gene. However, the EOS1 and IZH2 genes do not themselves appear to be functionally interchangeable. Double disruption of the EOS1 and IZH2 genes yielded a slow-growth phenotype, suggesting that the two proteins are involved in related cellular processes. DNA microarray analysis revealed decreased expression of Zap1-regulated genes in the eos1-deletion mutant (Deltaeos1). Thus, it is likely that Eos1 is involved in zinc homeostasis.

  3. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  4. Identification of SLF1 as a new copper homeostasis gene involved in copper sulfide mineralization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W; Farrell, R A; Stillman, D J; Winge, D R

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at least 12 genes are important for cells to propagate in medium containing elevated concentrations of copper salts (J. Welch, S. Fogel, C. Buchman, and M. Karin, EMBO J. 8:255-260, 1989). Complementation studies were carried out on a copper-sensitive mutation (cup14) from this group. A new yeast gene, designated SLF1, was identified as a multicopy suppressor of the cup14 mutation. Slf1 is important for the physiological process of copper sulfide (CuS) mineralization on the surface of cells cultured in medium containing copper salts. CuS mineralization causes the cells to turn brown. Disruption of SLF1, which is located close to the telomere region of chromosome IV, leads to limited copper sensitivity, and the resulting cells lack the normal brownish coloration when grown in CuSO4-containing medium. Overproduction of Slf1 in wild-type cells confers superresistance to CuSO4 and enhances the coloration of cells cultured in the presence of CuSO4. Upon addition of KCN to Cu-grown cells, the brownish coloration was bleached instantly, and copper ions were solubilized. These data are consistent with Slf1-dependent accumulation of CuS complexes on the cell surface. Disruption of SFL1 also results in loss of the ability of yeast cells to deplete Cu but not Cd ions from the growth medium, whereas overexpression enhances Ca depletion ability and the resulting deposition of CuS particles. It is proposed that Slfl participates in a copper homeostasis pathway, distinct from the Cup1 detoxification system, that leads to sulfide generation and CuS biomineralization on the cell surface. This process may coordinate with the Cup1 pathway at different copper concentrations to prevent copper-induced toxicity. PMID:8628314

  5. Cell wall construction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klis, Frans M; Boorsma, Andre; De Groot, Piet W J

    2006-02-01

    In this review, we discuss new insights in cell wall architecture and cell wall construction in the ascomycetous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transcriptional profiling studies combined with biochemical work have provided ample evidence that the cell wall is a highly adaptable organelle. In particular, the protein population that is anchored to the stress-bearing polysaccharides of the cell wall, and forms the interface with the outside world, is highly diverse. This diversity is believed to play an important role in adaptation of the cell to environmental conditions, in growth mode and in survival. Cell wall construction is tightly controlled and strictly coordinated with progression of the cell cycle. This is reflected in the usage of specific cell wall proteins during consecutive phases of the cell cycle and in the recent discovery of a cell wall integrity checkpoint. When the cell is challenged with stress conditions that affect the cell wall, a specific transcriptional response is observed that includes the general stress response, the cell wall integrity pathway and the calcineurin pathway. This salvage mechanism includes increased expression of putative cell wall assemblases and some potential cross-linking cell wall proteins, and crucial changes in cell wall architecture. We discuss some more enzymes involved in cell wall construction and also potential inhibitors of these enzymes. Finally, we use both biochemical and genomic data to infer that the architectural principles used by S. cerevisiae to build its cell wall are also used by many other ascomycetous yeasts and also by some mycelial ascomycetous fungi.

  6. Mechanisms of Ethanol Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet is also sensitive to higher ethanol concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Ethanol tolerance is associated with interplay of complex networks at the genome level. Although significant eff...

  7. Regulation of Mitotic Exit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Baro, Bàrbara; Queralt, Ethel; Monje-Casas, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) is an essential signaling pathway, closely related to the Hippo pathway in mammals, which promotes mitotic exit and initiates cytokinesis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the MEN components and their regulation.

  8. Tangential Ultrafiltration of Aqueous "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae" Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Carlos M.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.; Xavier, Ana M. R. B.; Eusebio, M. F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental work on ultrafiltration is presented to illustrate the practical and theoretical principles of this separation technique. The laboratory exercise comprises experiments with pure water and with aqueous "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (from commercial Baker's yeast) suspensions. With this work students detect the characteristic phenomena…

  9. A halotolerant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaxiola, R; Corona, M; Zinker, S

    1996-01-01

    FRD, a nuclear and dominant spontaneous mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of growing in up to 2 M NaCl, was isolated. Compared with parental cells, the mutant cells have a lower intracellular Na+/K+ ratio, shorter generation times in the presence of 1 M NaCl, and alterations in gene expression. PMID:8631691

  10. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  14. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Mohseni, Soudabeh; Mardani Jouneghani, Rasoul; Pourhossein, Meraj; Iravani, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs) by biotransformations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and analysis of the sizes and shapes of the NPs produced. Dried and freshly cultured S. cerevisiae were used as the biocatalyst. Dried yeast synthesized few NPs, but freshly cultured yeast produced a large amount of them. Silver NPs were spherical, 2-20 nm in diameter, and the NPs with the size of 5.4 nm were the most frequent ones. NPs were seen inside the cells, within the cell membrane, attached to the cell membrane during the exocytosis, and outside of the cells.

  15. Replicative and chronological aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Longo, Valter D; Shadel, Gerald S; Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian

    2012-07-03

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has directly or indirectly contributed to the identification of arguably more mammalian genes that affect aging than any other model organism. Aging in yeast is assayed primarily by measurement of replicative or chronological life span. Here, we review the genes and mechanisms implicated in these two aging model systems and key remaining issues that need to be addressed for their optimization. Because of its well-characterized genome that is remarkably amenable to genetic manipulation and high-throughput screening procedures, S. cerevisiae will continue to serve as a leading model organism for studying pathways relevant to human aging and disease.

  16. "Malonate uptake and metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae".

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei Ning; Tan, Kee Yang

    2013-09-01

    Malonyl-CoA plays an important role in the synthesis and elongation of fatty acids in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Malonyl-CoA is at a low concentration inside the cell and is produced mainly from acetyl-CoA through the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase. It would be beneficial to find an alternative source of malonyl-CoA to increase its intracellular concentration and overall synthesis of the fatty acids. MatB gene from the bacteria Rhizobium leguminosarium bv. trifolii encodes for a malonyl-CoA synthetase which catalyzes the formation of the malonyl-CoA directly from malonate and CoA. However, results from high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) proved that Saccharomyces cerevisiae itself does not contain enough cytoplasmic malonate within them and is unable to uptake exogenously supplied malonate in the form of malonic acid. A dicarboxylic acid plasma membrane transporter with the ability to uptake exogenous malonic acid was identified from another species of yeast known as Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the gene encoding this transporter is identified as the mae1 gene. From the experiments thus far, the mae1 gene had been successfully cloned and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression and functional ability of the encoded plasma membrane dicarboxylic acid transporter were also demonstrated and verified using specialized technologies such as RT-PCR, yeast immunofluorescence, HPLC, and LC-MS.

  17. Genetic evidence that Ras-like GTPases, Gtr1p, and Gtr2p, are involved in epigenetic control of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Takeshi Hayashi, Naoyuki; Wang, Yonggang; Kobayashi, Hideki

    2008-04-11

    Gtr1p and Gtr2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are members of the Ras-like GTP binding family and interact genetically with Prp20p (yeast RCC1), which is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Gsp1p (yeast homolog of Ran, involved in nuclear export). Recently, Gtr1p and Gtr2p were suggested to be molecular switches in the rapamycin-sensitive TOR signaling pathway. Here, we show that Gtr1p and Gtr2p genetically interact with the chromatin remodeling factor Ino80p. Gtr2p interacted physically with both Rvb1p and Rvb2p. Consistent with these results, Gtr2p localized to chromatin and could activate transcription. Gtr1p and Gtr2p were found to be involved in chromatin silencing in the vicinity of telomeres. Gtr1p and Gtr2p were required to repress nitrogen catabolite-repressed genes, which are repressed by the TOR signaling pathway. We propose that Gtr1p and Gtr2p are involved in epigenetic control of gene expression in the TOR signaling pathway.

  18. Progress in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-09-01

    The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial ("white") biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context.

    PubMed

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; Gonzalez, Ramon; Patil, Kiran R

    2016-11-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype-metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype-phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles being hidden in common laboratory conditions. Predecessors of laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, the wild and the domesticated yeasts, have been evolutionarily shaped by highly variable environments, very distinct from laboratory conditions, and most interestingly by social life within microbial communities. Here we present a brief review of the genotypic and phenotypic peculiarities of S. cerevisiae in the context of its social lifestyle beyond laboratory environments. Accounting for this ecological context and the origin of the laboratory strains in experimental design and data analysis would be essential in improving the understanding of genotype-environment-phenotype relationships.

  20. Integral Membrane Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Stroud, Robert M; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic integral membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallography or functional characterization in a purified state. Since expression is often a limiting factor when studying this difficult class of biological macromolecules, the intent of this chapter is to focus on the expression of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae is a prime candidate for the expression of eukaryotic IMPs because it offers the convenience of using episomal expression plasmids, selection of positive transformants, posttranslational modifications, and it can properly fold and target IMPs. Here we present a generalized protocol and insights based on our collective knowledge as an aid to overcoming the challenges faced when expressing eukaryotic IMPs in S. cerevisiae.

  1. Redox interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum in mixed culture under enological conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheraiti, Naoufel; Guezenec, Stéphane; Salmon, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Wine yeast starters that contain a mixture of different industrial yeasts with various properties may soon be introduced to the market. The mechanisms underlying the interactions between the different strains in the starter during alcoholic fermentation have never been investigated. We identified and investigated some of these interactions in a mixed culture containing two yeast strains grown under enological conditions. The inoculum contained the same amount (each) of a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a natural hybrid strain of S. cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum. We identified interactions that affected biomass, by-product formation, and fermentation kinetics, and compared the redox ratios of monocultures of each strain with that of the mixed culture. The redox status of the mixed culture differed from that of the two monocultures, showing that the interactions between the yeast strains involved the diffusion of metabolite(s) within the mixed culture. Since acetaldehyde is a potential effector of fermentation, we investigated the kinetics of acetaldehyde production by the different cultures. The S. cerevisiae-S. uvarum hybrid strain produced large amounts of acetaldehyde for which the S. cerevisiae strain acted as a receiving strain in the mixed culture. Since yeast response to acetaldehyde involves the same mechanisms that participate in the response to other forms of stress, the acetaldehyde exchange between the two strains could play an important role in inhibiting some yeast strains and allowing the growth of others. Such interactions could be of particular importance in understanding the ecology of the colonization of complex fermentation media by S. cerevisiae.

  2. Cisplatin upregulates Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in iron homeostasis through activation of the iron insufficiency-responsive transcription factor Aft1.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akiko; Ohashi, Kazuaki; Naganuma, Akira

    2007-02-01

    The response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cisplatin was investigated by examining variations in gene expression using cDNA microarrays and confirming the results by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The mRNA levels of 14 proteins involved in iron homeostasis were shown to be increased by cisplatin. Interestingly, the expression of all 14 genes is known to be regulated by Aft1, a transcription factor activated in response to iron insufficiency. The promoter of one of these genes, FET3, has been relatively well studied, so we performed a reporter assay using the FET3 promoter and showed that an Aft1 binding site in the promoter region is indispensable for induction of transcription by cisplatin. The active domain of Aft1 necessary for activation of the FET3 promoter by cisplatin is identical to the one required for activation by bathophenanthroline sulfonate, an inhibitor of cellular iron uptake. Furthermore, we found that cisplatin inhibits the uptake of (55)Fe(II) into yeast cells. These findings suggest that cisplatin activates Aft1 through the inhibition of iron uptake into the cells, after which the expression of Aft1 target genes involved in iron uptake might be induced.

  3. FLO11 Gene Is Involved in the Interaction of Flor Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a Biofilm-Promoting Synthetic Hexapeptide.

    PubMed

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Carmona, Lourdes; Zara, Severino; Marcos, Jose F

    2013-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae "flor" yeasts have the ability to form a buoyant biofilm at the air-liquid interface of wine. The formation of biofilm, also called velum, depends on FLO11 gene length and expression. FLO11 encodes a cell wall mucin-like glycoprotein with a highly O-glycosylated central domain and an N-terminal domain that mediates homotypic adhesion between cells. In the present study, we tested previously known antimicrobial peptides with different mechanisms of antimicrobial action for their effect on the viability and ability to form biofilm of S. cerevisiae flor strains. We found that PAF26, a synthetic tryptophan-rich cationic hexapeptide that belongs to the class of antimicrobial peptides with cell-penetrating properties, but not other antimicrobial peptides, enhanced biofilm formation without affecting cell viability in ethanol-rich medium. The PAF26 biofilm enhancement required a functional FLO11 but was not accompanied by increased FLO11 expression. Moreover, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that the PAF26 peptide binds flor yeast cells and that a flo11 gene knockout mutant lost the ability to bind PAF26 but not P113, a different cell-penetrating antifungal peptide, demonstrating that the FLO11 gene is selectively involved in the interaction of PAF26 with cells. Taken together, our data suggest that the cationic and hydrophobic PAF26 hexapeptide interacts with the hydrophobic and negatively charged cell wall, favoring Flo11p-mediated cell-to-cell adhesion and thus increasing biofilm biomass formation. The results are consistent with previous data that point to glycosylated mucin-like proteins at the fungal cell wall as potential interacting partners for antifungal peptides.

  4. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose/whey fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Pedro MR; Oliveira, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Lactose is an interesting carbon source for the production of several bio-products by fermentation, primarily because it is the major component of cheese whey, the main by-product of dairy activities. However, the microorganism more widely used in industrial fermentation processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, does not have a lactose metabolization system. Therefore, several metabolic engineering approaches have been used to construct lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae strains, particularly involving the expression of the lactose genes of the phylogenetically related yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also the lactose genes from Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger, as reviewed here. Due to the existing large amounts of whey, the production of bio-ethanol from lactose by engineered S. cerevisiae has been considered as a possible route for whey surplus. Emphasis is given in the present review on strain improvement for lactose-to-ethanol bioprocesses, namely flocculent yeast strains for continuous high-cell-density systems with enhanced ethanol productivity. PMID:21326922

  5. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose/whey fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Lucília; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Oliveira, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Lactose is an interesting carbon source for the production of several bio-products by fermentation, primarily because it is the major component of cheese whey, the main by-product of dairy activities. However, the microorganism more widely used in industrial fermentation processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, does not have a lactose metabolization system. Therefore, several metabolic engineering approaches have been used to construct lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae strains, particularly involving the expression of the lactose genes of the phylogenetically related yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also the lactose genes from Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger, as reviewed here. Due to the existing large amounts of whey, the production of bio-ethanol from lactose by engineered S. cerevisiae has been considered as a possible route for whey surplus. Emphasis is given in the present review on strain improvement for lactose-to-ethanol bioprocesses, namely flocculent yeast strains for continuous high-cell-density systems with enhanced ethanol productivity.

  6. 2μ plasmid in Saccharomyces species and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Strope, Pooja K.; Kozmin, Stanislav G.; Skelly, Daniel A.; Magwene, Paul M.; Dietrich, Fred S.; McCusker, John H.

    2015-01-01

    We determined that extrachromosomal 2μ plasmid was present in 67 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-genome strains; in addition to variation in the size and copy number of 2μ, we identified three distinct classes of 2μ. We identified 2μ presence/absence and class associations with populations, clinical origin and nuclear genotypes. We also screened genome sequences of S. paradoxus, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. eubayanus, S. mikatae, S. arboricolus and S. bayanus strains for both integrated and extrachromosomal 2μ. Similar to S. cerevisiae, we found no integrated 2μ sequences in any S. paradoxus strains. However, we identified part of 2μ integrated into the genomes of some S. uvarum, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae and S. bayanus strains, which were distinct from each other and from all extrachromosomal 2μ. We identified extrachromosomal 2μ in one S. paradoxus, one S. eubayanus, two S. bayanus and 13 S. uvarum strains. The extrachromosomal 2μ in S. paradoxus, S. eubayanus and S. cerevisiae were distinct from each other. In contrast, the extrachromosomal 2μ in S. bayanus and S. uvarum strains were identical with each other and with one of the three classes of S. cerevisiae 2μ, consistent with interspecific transfer. PMID:26463005

  7. 2μ plasmid in Saccharomyces species and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Strope, Pooja K; Kozmin, Stanislav G; Skelly, Daniel A; Magwene, Paul M; Dietrich, Fred S; McCusker, John H

    2015-12-01

    We determined that extrachromosomal 2μ plasmid was present in 67 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-genome strains; in addition to variation in the size and copy number of 2μ, we identified three distinct classes of 2μ. We identified 2μ presence/absence and class associations with populations, clinical origin and nuclear genotypes. We also screened genome sequences of S. paradoxus, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. eubayanus, S. mikatae, S. arboricolus and S. bayanus strains for both integrated and extrachromosomal 2μ. Similar to S. cerevisiae, we found no integrated 2μ sequences in any S. paradoxus strains. However, we identified part of 2μ integrated into the genomes of some S. uvarum, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae and S. bayanus strains, which were distinct from each other and from all extrachromosomal 2μ. We identified extrachromosomal 2μ in one S. paradoxus, one S. eubayanus, two S. bayanus and 13 S. uvarum strains. The extrachromosomal 2μ in S. paradoxus, S. eubayanus and S. cerevisiae were distinct from each other. In contrast, the extrachromosomal 2μ in S. bayanus and S. uvarum strains were identical with each other and with one of the three classes of S. cerevisiae 2μ, consistent with interspecific transfer.

  8. Cell Wall Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Guillaume; Bussey, Howard

    2006-01-01

    An extracellular matrix composed of a layered meshwork of β-glucans, chitin, and mannoproteins encapsulates cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organelle determines cellular morphology and plays a critical role in maintaining cell integrity during cell growth and division, under stress conditions, upon cell fusion in mating, and in the durable ascospore cell wall. Here we assess recent progress in understanding the molecular biology and biochemistry of cell wall synthesis and its remodeling in S. cerevisiae. We then review the regulatory dynamics of cell wall assembly, an area where functional genomics offers new insights into the integration of cell wall growth and morphogenesis with a polarized secretory system that is under cell cycle and cell type program controls. PMID:16760306

  9. Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other fungi

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Shigeyuki; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2010-01-01

    Transformation (i.e., genetic modification of a cell by the incorporation of exogenous DNA) is indispensable for manipulating fungi. Here, we review the transformation methods for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida albicans, Pichia pastoris and Aspergillus species and discuss some common modifications to improve transformation efficiency. We also present a model of the mechanism underlying S. cerevisiae transformation, based on recent reports and the mechanism of transfection in mammalian systems. This model predicts that DNA attaches to the cell wall and enters the cell via endocytotic membrane invagination, although how DNA reaches the nucleus is unknown. Polyethylene glycol is indispensable for successful transformation of intact cells and the attachment of DNA and also possibly acts on the membrane to increase the transformation efficiency. Both lithium acetate and heat shock, which enhance the transformation efficiency of intact cells but not that of spheroplasts, probably help DNA to pass through the cell wall. PMID:21468206

  10. Fatty Acid Synthetase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harold P.; Volkmann, Carol M.; Chao, Fu-Chuan

    1967-01-01

    A light particle fraction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, obtained from the crude ribosomal material, and containing the fatty acid synthetase, consisted primarily of 27S and 47S components. This fraction has a protein-ribonucleic acid ratio of about 13. Electron micrographs showed particles ranging in diameter between 100 and 300 A in this material. By use of density gradient analysis, the fatty acid synthetase was found in the 47S component. This component contained particles which were predominantly 300 A in diameter and which were considerably flatter than ribosomes, and it consisted almost entirely of protein. Images PMID:6025308

  11. Components of microtubular structures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Pillus, L; Solomon, F

    1986-01-01

    Most studies of cytoskeletal organelles have concentrated on molecular analyses of abundant and biochemically accessible structures. In many of the classical cases, however, the nature of the system chosen has precluded a concurrent genetic analysis. The mitotic spindle of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one example of an organelle that can be studied by both classical and molecular genetics. We show here that this microtubule structure also can be examined biochemically. The spindle can be isolated by selective extractions of yeast cells by using adaptations of methods successfully applied to animal cells. In this way, microtubule-associated proteins of the yeast spindle are identified. Images PMID:3517870

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Sellem, Carole H.; Pitayu, Laras; Vasnier, Christelle; Delahodde, Agnès; Dassa, Emmanuel P.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabditis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction and whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression. We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny, and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content. We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g., NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8, or GRIM-19 human orthologs) in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm. All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly, or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression. PMID:26124772

  13. Mitochondrial inheritance and fermentative : oxidative balance in hybrids between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa; Antúnez, Oreto; Pérez-Ortín, Josè Enrique; Barrio, Eladio; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-07-01

    Breeding between Saccharomyces species is a useful tool for obtaining improved wine yeast strains, combining fermentative features of parental species. In this work, 25 artificial Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces uvarum hybrids were constructed by spore conjugation. A multi-locus PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis, targeting six nuclear gene markers and the ribosomal region including the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two internal transcribed spacers, showed that the hybrid genome is the result of two chromosome sets, one coming from S. cerevisiae and the other from S. uvarum. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) typing showed uniparental inheritance in all hybrids. Furthermore, sibling hybrids, obtained by repeated crosses between the same parental strains, showed the same mtDNA, suggesting that the mitochondrial transmission is not stochastic or species-specific, but dependent on the parental strains. Finally four hybrids, two of which with S. cerevisiae mtDNA and two with S. uvarum mtDNA, were subjected to transcriptome analysis. Our results showed that the hybrids bearing S. cerevisiae mtDNA exhibited less expression of genes involved in glycolysis/fermentation pathways and in hexose transport compared to hybrids with S. uvarum mtDNA. Respiration assay confirmed the increased respiratory activity of hybrids with the S. cerevisiae mtDNA genome. These findings suggest that mtDNA type and fermentative : respiratory performances are correlated in S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum hybrids and the mtDNA type is an important trait for constructing new improved hybrids for winemaking.

  14. Plasmid-mediate transfer of FLO1 into industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 strain creates a strain useful for repeat-batch fermentations involving flocculation-sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Daniel G; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Pereira, Francisco B; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2012-03-01

    The flocculation gene FLO1 was transferred into the robust industrial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 by the lithium acetate method. The recombinant strain showed a fermentation performance similar to that of the parental strain. In 10 repeat-batch cultivations in VHG medium with 345 g glucose/L and cell recycling by flocculation-sedimentation, an average final ethanol concentration of 142 g/L and an ethanol productivity of 2.86 g/L/h were achieved. Due to the flocculent nature of the recombinant strain it is possible to reduce the ethanol production cost because of lower centrifugation and distillation costs.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context

    PubMed Central

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; Gonzalez, Ramon; Patil, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype–metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype–phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles being hidden in common laboratory conditions. Predecessors of laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, the wild and the domesticated yeasts, have been evolutionarily shaped by highly variable environments, very distinct from laboratory conditions, and most interestingly by social life within microbial communities. Here we present a brief review of the genotypic and phenotypic peculiarities of S. cerevisiae in the context of its social lifestyle beyond laboratory environments. Accounting for this ecological context and the origin of the laboratory strains in experimental design and data analysis would be essential in improving the understanding of genotype–environment–phenotype relationships. PMID:27634775

  16. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes.

  17. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial (“white”) biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate. PMID:18772282

  18. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  19. Oral treatment with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 modulates immune responses and interferes with signal pathways involved in the activation of inflammation in a murine model of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Martins, Flaviano S; Elian, Samir D A; Vieira, Angélica T; Tiago, Fabiana C P; Martins, Ariane K S; Silva, Flávia C P; Souza, Ericka L S; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Araújo, Helena R C; Pimenta, Paulo F; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Teixeira, Mauro M; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2011-04-01

    Salmonella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens that cause several diarrheal diseases ranging from self-limiting gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. Previous results from our laboratory showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 isolated from 'cachaça' production presented probiotic properties due to its ability to protect against experimental infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In this study, the effects of oral treatment with S. cerevisiae 905 were evaluated at the immunological level in a murine model of typhoid fever. Treatment with S. cerevisiae 905 inhibited weight loss and increased survival rate after Salmonella challenge. Immunological data demonstrated that S. cerevisiae 905 decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and modulated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 and JNK, but not ERK1/2), NF-κB and AP-1, signaling pathways which are involved in the transcriptional activation of proinflammatory mediators. Experiments in germ-free mice revealed that probiotic effects were due, at least in part, to the binding of Salmonella to the yeast. In conclusion, S. cerevisiae 905 acts as a potential new biotherapy against S. Typhimurium infection due to its ability to bind bacteria and modulate signaling pathways involved in the activation of inflammation in a murine model of typhoid fever.

  20. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  1. Synchronization of the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A number of model organisms have provided the basis for our understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. These model organisms are generally much easier to manipulate than mammalian cells and as such provide amenable tools for extensive genetic and biochemical analysis. One of the most common model organisms used to study the cell cycle is the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model provides the ability to synchronise cells efficiently at different stages of the cell cycle, which in turn opens up the possibility for extensive and detailed study of mechanisms regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, we describe methods in which budding yeast cells are arrested at a particular phase of the cell cycle and then released from the block, permitting the study of molecular mechanisms that drive the progression through the cell cycle.

  2. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  3. Involvement of Aif1 in apoptosis triggered by lack of Hxk2 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Amigoni, Loredana; Frigerio, Gianluca; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2016-05-01

    We recently showed that in hxk2Δ cells, showing constitutive localization of active Ras at the mitochondria, addition of acetic acid caused an increase of both apoptotic and necrotic cells compared with the wild-type strain, providing a new role for hexokinase 2 (EC 2.7.1.1) as an anti-apoptotic factor, besides its known role as a glycolytic enzyme and as a regulator of gene transcription of several Mig1-regulated genes. We also demonstrated that apoptosis induced by lack of Hxk2 may not require the activation of Yca1. Here, we show that deletion of HXK2 causes hypersensitivity to H2O2 and that addition of this well-known apoptotic stimulus to hxk2Δ cells causes an increase in the level ROS, apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential. We also show that deletion of AIF1 in hxk2Δ cells enhances survival after induction of apoptosis with both H2O2 and acetic acid, rescues the reduction of both growth rate and cell size, abrogates both H2O2 and acetic acid-induced ROS accumulation and decreases cell death, suggesting that Aif1 might be involved in both H2O2 and acetic acid-induced cell death in hxk2Δ cells. Moreover, we show that active Ras proteins relocalize to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in hxk2Δ aif1Δ cells.

  4. Kinetics of phosphomevalonate kinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David E; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-01-01

    The mevalonate-based isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway is responsible for producing cholesterol in humans and is used commercially to produce drugs, chemicals, and fuels. Heterologous expression of this pathway in Escherichia coli has enabled high-level production of the antimalarial drug artemisinin and the proposed biofuel bisabolane. Understanding the kinetics of the enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway is critical to optimize the pathway for high flux. We have characterized the kinetic parameters of phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK, EC 2.7.4.2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a previously unstudied enzyme. An E. coli codon-optimized version of the S. cerevisiae gene was cloned into pET-52b+, then the C-terminal 6X His-tagged protein was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) and purified on a Ni²⁺ column. The KM of the ATP binding site was determined to be 98.3 µM at 30°C, the optimal growth temperature for S. cerevisiae, and 74.3 µM at 37°C, the optimal growth temperature for E. coli. The K(M) of the mevalonate-5-phosphate binding site was determined to be 885 µM at 30°C and 880 µM at 37°C. The V(max) was determined to be 4.51 µmol/min/mg enzyme at 30°C and 5.33 µmol/min/mg enzyme at 37°C. PMK is Mg²⁺ dependent, with maximal activity achieved at concentrations of 10 mM or greater. Maximum activity was observed at pH = 7.2. PMK was not found to be substrate inhibited, nor feedback inhibited by FPP at concentrations up to 10 µM FPP.

  5. Isolation of Candida glabrata Homologs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae KRE9 and KNH1 Genes and Their Involvement in Cell Wall β-1,6-Glucan Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagahashi, Shigehisa; Lussier, Marc; Bussey, Howard

    1998-01-01

    The Candida glabrata KRE9 (CgKRE9) and KNH1 (CgKNH1) genes have been isolated as multicopy suppressors of the tetracycline-sensitive growth of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with the disrupted KNH1 locus and the KRE9 gene placed under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. Although a cgknh1Δ mutant showed no phenotype beyond slightly increased sensitivity to the K1 killer toxin, disruption of CgKRE9 resulted in several phenotypes similar to those of the S. cerevisiae kre9Δ null mutant: a severe growth defect on glucose medium, resistance to the K1 killer toxin, a 50% reduction of β-1,6-glucan, and the presence of aggregates of cells with abnormal morphology on glucose medium. Replacement in C. glabrata of the cognate CgKRE9 promoter with the tetracycline-responsive promoter in a cgknh1Δ background rendered cell growth tetracycline sensitive on media containing glucose or galactose. cgkre9Δ cells were shown to be sensitive to calcofluor white specifically on glucose medium. In cgkre9 mutants grown on glucose medium, cellular chitin levels were massively increased. PMID:9748432

  6. Biogeographical characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    PubMed Central

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Aguzzi, Irene; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualize patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast,” is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere.” Agricultural practices such as farming (organic versus conventional) and floor management systems have selected different populations within this species that are phylogenetically distinct. In fact, recent ecological and geographic studies highlighted that unique strains are associated with particular grape varieties in specific geographical locations. These studies also highlighted that significant diversity and regional character, or ‘terroir,’ have been introduced into the winemaking process via this association. This diversity of wild strains preserves typicity, the high quality, and the unique flavor of wines. Recently, different molecular methods were developed to study population dynamics of S. cerevisiae strains in both vineyards and wineries. In this review, we will provide an update on the current molecular methods used to reveal the geographical distribution of S. cerevisiae wine yeast. PMID:23805132

  7. Cold Osmotic Shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patching, J. W.; Rose, A. H.

    1971-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 366 is susceptible to cold osmotic shock. Exponentially growing cells from batch cultures grown in defined medium at 30 C, after being suspended in 0.8 m mannitol containing 10 mm ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid and then resuspended in ice-cold 0.5 mm MgCl2, accumulated the nonmetabolizable solutes d-glucosamine-hydrochloride and 2-aminoisobutyrate at slower rates than unshocked cells; shocked cells retained their viability. Storage of unshocked batch-grown cells in buffer at 10 C led to an increase in ability to accumulate glucosamine, and further experiments were confined to cells grown in a chemostat under conditions of glucose limitation, thereby obviating the need for storing cells before use. A study was made of the effect of the different stages in the cold osmotic shock procedure, including the osmotic stress, the chelating agent, and the cold Mg2+-containing diluent, on viability and solute-accumulating ability. Growth of shocked cells in defined medium resembled that of unshocked cells; however, in malt extract-yeast extract-glucose-peptone medium, the shocked cells had a longer lag phase of growth and initially grew at a slower rate. Cold osmotic shock caused the release of low-molecular-weight compounds and about 6 to 8% of the cell protein. Neither the cell envelope enzymes, invertase, acid phosphatase and l-leucine-β-naphthylamidase, nor the cytoplasmic enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, were released when yeast cells were subjected to cold osmotic shock. PMID:5001201

  8. Limited proteolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L; Encinas, M V; Jabalquinto, A M; Cardemil, E

    1993-08-01

    Incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with trypsin under native conditions cases a time-dependent loss of activity and the production of protein fragments. Cleavage sites determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses identified protease-sensitive peptide bonds between amino acid residues at positions 9-10 and 76-77. Additional fragmentation sites were also detected in a region approximately 70-80 amino acids before the carboxyl end of the protein. These results suggest that the enzyme is formed by a central compact domain comprising more than two thirds of the whole protein structure. From proteolysis experiments carried out in the presence of substrates, it could be inferred that CO2 binding specifically protects position 76-77 from trypsin action. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements demonstrated that CO2 binding induces a protein conformational change, and a dissociation constant for the enzyme CO2 complex of 8.2 +/- 0.6 mM was determined.

  9. Stationary phase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Washburne, M; Braun, E; Johnston, G C; Singer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Growth and proliferation of microorganisms such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled in part by the availability of nutrients. When proliferating yeast cells exhaust available nutrients, they enter a stationary phase characterized by cell cycle arrest and specific physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes. These changes include thickening of the cell wall, accumulation of reserve carbohydrates, and acquisition of thermotolerance. Recent characterization of mutant cells that are conditionally defective only for the resumption of proliferation from stationary phase provides evidence that stationary phase is a unique developmental state. Strains with mutations affecting entry into and survival during stationary phase have also been isolated, and the mutations have been shown to affect at least seven different cellular processes: (i) signal transduction, (ii) protein synthesis, (iii) protein N-terminal acetylation, (iv) protein turnover, (v) protein secretion, (vi) membrane biosynthesis, and (vii) cell polarity. The exact nature of the relationship between these processes and survival during stationary phase remains to be elucidated. We propose that cell cycle arrest coordinated with the ability to remain viable in the absence of additional nutrients provides a good operational definition of starvation-induced stationary phase. PMID:8393130

  10. A biochemically structured model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lei, F; Rotbøll, M; Jørgensen, S B

    2001-07-12

    A biochemically structured model for the aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose and ethanol is presented. The model focuses on the pyruvate and acetaldehyde branch points where overflow metabolism occurs when the growth changes from oxidative to oxido-reductive. The model is designed to describe the onset of aerobic alcoholic fermentation during steady-state as well as under dynamical conditions, by triggering an increase in the glycolytic flux using a key signalling component which is assumed to be closely related to acetaldehyde. An investigation of the modelled process dynamics in a continuous cultivation revealed multiple steady states in a region of dilution rates around the transition between oxidative and oxido-reductive growth. A bifurcation analysis using the two external variables, the dilution rate, D, and the inlet concentration of glucose, S(f), as parameters, showed that a fold bifurcation occurs close to the critical dilution rate resulting in multiple steady-states. The region of dilution rates within which multiple steady states may occur depends strongly on the substrate feed concentration. Consequently a single steady state may prevail at low feed concentrations, whereas multiple steady states may occur over a relatively wide range of dilution rates at higher feed concentrations.

  11. Functional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome.

    PubMed

    Giaever, Guri; Chu, Angela M; Ni, Li; Connelly, Carla; Riles, Linda; Véronneau, Steeve; Dow, Sally; Lucau-Danila, Ankuta; Anderson, Keith; André, Bruno; Arkin, Adam P; Astromoff, Anna; El-Bakkoury, Mohamed; Bangham, Rhonda; Benito, Rocio; Brachat, Sophie; Campanaro, Stefano; Curtiss, Matt; Davis, Karen; Deutschbauer, Adam; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Flaherty, Patrick; Foury, Francoise; Garfinkel, David J; Gerstein, Mark; Gotte, Deanna; Güldener, Ulrich; Hegemann, Johannes H; Hempel, Svenja; Herman, Zelek; Jaramillo, Daniel F; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L; Kötter, Peter; LaBonte, Darlene; Lamb, David C; Lan, Ning; Liang, Hong; Liao, Hong; Liu, Lucy; Luo, Chuanyun; Lussier, Marc; Mao, Rong; Menard, Patrice; Ooi, Siew Loon; Revuelta, Jose L; Roberts, Christopher J; Rose, Matthias; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Scherens, Bart; Schimmack, Greg; Shafer, Brenda; Shoemaker, Daniel D; Sookhai-Mahadeo, Sharon; Storms, Reginald K; Strathern, Jeffrey N; Valle, Giorgio; Voet, Marleen; Volckaert, Guido; Wang, Ching-yun; Ward, Teresa R; Wilhelmy, Julie; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Yang, Yonghong; Yen, Grace; Youngman, Elaine; Yu, Kexin; Bussey, Howard; Boeke, Jef D; Snyder, Michael; Philippsen, Peter; Davis, Ronald W; Johnston, Mark

    2002-07-25

    Determining the effect of gene deletion is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function. Conventional genetic screens exhibit biases, and genes contributing to a phenotype are often missed. We systematically constructed a nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames, or ORFs) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA sequences dubbed 'molecular bar codes' uniquely identify each strain, enabling their growth to be analysed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We show that previously known and new genes are necessary for optimal growth under six well-studied conditions: high salt, sorbitol, galactose, pH 8, minimal medium and nystatin treatment. Less than 7% of genes that exhibit a significant increase in messenger RNA expression are also required for optimal growth in four of the tested conditions. Our results validate the yeast gene-deletion collection as a valuable resource for functional genomics.

  12. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek; Schölz, Christian; Wagner, Sebastian A; Magnes, Christoph; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on acetyl-CoA generation in distinct subcellular compartments. Mitochondrial acetylation levels correlated with acetyl-CoA concentration in vivo and acetyl-CoA acetylated lysine residues nonenzymatically in vitro. We developed a method to estimate acetylation stoichiometry and found that the vast majority of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylation had a very low stoichiometry. However, mitochondrial acetylation occurred at a significantly higher basal level than cytoplasmic acetylation, consistent with the distinct acetylation dynamics and higher acetyl-CoA concentration in mitochondria. High stoichiometry acetylation occurred mostly on histones, proteins present in histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes, and on transcription factors. These data show that a majority of acetylation occurs at very low levels in exponentially growing yeast and is uniformly affected by exposure to acetyl-CoA.

  13. Regulation of Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Waechter, Charles J.; Lester, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence is presented which indicates that the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine by the methylation pathway in growing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is repressed by the presence of choline in the growth medium. This result, obtained previously for glucose-grown cells, was also observed for lactate-grown cells, of which half of the phosphatidylcholine is mitochondrial. A respiration-deficient mutant of the parent wild-type strain has been studied, and its inability to form functional mitochondria cannot be due to an impaired methylation pathway, as it has been shown to incorporate 14C-CH3-methionine into all of the methylated glycerophosphatides. The incorporation rate is depressed by the inclusion of 1 mm choline in the growth medium, suggesting a regulatory effect similar to that demonstrated for the wild-type strain. The effects of choline on the glycerophospholipid composition of lactate and glucose-grown cells is presented. The repressive effects of the two related bases, mono- and dimethylethanolamine, were examined, and reduced levels of 14C-CH3-methionine incorporation were found for cells grown in the presence of these bases. The effect of choline on the methylation rates is reversible and glucosegrown cells regain the nonrepressed level of methylation activity in 60 to 80 min after removal of choline from the growth medium. Images PMID:5547992

  14. Papulacandin B resistance in budding and fission yeasts: isolation and characterization of a gene involved in (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Castro, C; Ribas, J C; Valdivieso, M H; Varona, R; del Rey, F; Duran, A

    1995-01-01

    Papulacandin B, an antifungal agent that interferes with the synthesis of yeast cell wall (1,3)beta-D-glucan, was used to isolate resistant mutants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The resistance to papulacandin B always segregated as a recessive character that defines a single complementation group in both yeasts (pbr1+ and PBR1, respectively). Determination of several kinetic parameters of (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity revealed no differences between S. pombe wild-type and pbr1 mutant strains except in the 50% inhibitory concentration for papulacandin B of the synthases (about a 50-fold increase in mutant activity). Inactivation of the synthase activity of both yeasts after in vivo treatment with the antifungal agent showed that mutant synthases were more resistant than the corresponding wild-type ones. Detergent dissociation of the S. pombe synthase into soluble and particulate fractions and subsequent reconstitution indicated that the resistance character of pbr1 mutants resides in the particulate fraction of the enzyme. Cloning and sequencing of PBR1 from S. cerevisiae revealed a gene identical to others recently reported (FKS1, ETG1, CWH53, and CND1). Its disruption leads to reduced levels of both (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity and the alkali-insoluble cell wall fraction. Transformants containing the PBR1 gene reverse the defect in (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthase. It is concluded that Pbr1p is probably part of the (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthase complex. PMID:7592316

  15. Regulation of dimorphism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: involvement of the novel protein kinase homolog Elm1p and protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed Central

    Blacketer, M J; Koehler, C M; Coats, S G; Myers, A M; Madaule, P

    1993-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes ELM1, ELM2, and ELM3 were identified on the basis of the phenotype of constitutive cell elongation. Mutations in any of these genes cause a dimorphic transition to a pseudohyphal growth state characterized by formation of expanded, branched chains of elongated cells. Furthermore, elm1, elm2, and elm3 mutations cause cells to grow invasively under the surface of agar medium. S. cerevisiae is known to be a dimorphic organism that grows either as a unicellular yeast or as filamentous cells termed pseudohyphae; although the yeast-like form usually prevails, pseudohyphal growth may occur during conditions of nitrogen starvation. The morphologic and physiological properties caused by elm1, elm2, and elm3 mutations closely mimic pseudohyphal growth occurring in conditions of nitrogen starvation. Therefore, we propose that absence of ELM1, ELM2, or ELM3 function causes constitutive execution of the pseudohyphal differentiation pathway that occurs normally in conditions of nitrogen starvation. Supporting this hypothesis, heterozygosity at the ELM2 or ELM3 locus significantly stimulated the ability to form pseudohyphae in response to nitrogen starvation. ELM1 was isolated and shown to code for a novel protein kinase homolog. Gene dosage experiments also showed that pseudohyphal differentiation in response to nitrogen starvation is dependent on the product of CDC55, a putative B regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, and a synthetic phenotype was observed in elm1 cdc55 double mutants. Thus, protein phosphorylation is likely to regulate differentiation into the pseudohyphal state. Images PMID:8395007

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PRM1 homolog in Neurospora crassa is involved in vegetative and sexual cell fusion events but also has postfertilization functions.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, André; Diamond, Spencer; Glass, N Louise

    2009-02-01

    Cell-cell fusion is essential for a variety of developmental steps in many eukaryotic organisms, during both fertilization and vegetative cell growth. Although the molecular mechanisms associated with intracellular membrane fusion are well characterized, the molecular mechanisms of plasma membrane merger between cells are poorly understood. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, cell fusion events occur during both vegetative and sexual stages of its life cycle, thus making it an attractive model for studying the molecular basis of cell fusion during vegetative growth vs. sexual reproduction. In the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the few proteins implicated in plasma membrane merger during mating is Prm1p; prm1Delta mutants show an approximately 50% reduction in mating cell fusion. Here we report on the role of the PRM1 homolog in N. crassa. N. crassa strains with deletions of a Prm1-like gene (Prm1) showed an approximately 50% reduction in both vegetative and sexual cell fusion events, suggesting that PRM1 is part of the general cell fusion machinery. However, unlike S. cerevisiae, N. crassa strains carrying a Prm1 deletion exhibited complete sterility as either a male or female mating partner, a phenotype that was not complemented in a heterokaryon with wild type (WT). Crosses with DeltaPrm1 strains were blocked early in sexual development, well before development of ascogenous hyphae. The DeltaPrm1 sexual defect in N. crassa was not suppressed by mutations in Sad-1, which is required for meiotic silencing of unpaired DNA (MSUD). However, mutations in Sad-1 increased the number of progeny obtained in crosses with a DeltaPrm1 (Prm1-gfp) complemented strain. These data indicate multiple roles for PRM1 during sexual development.

  17. YHR150w and YDR479c encode peroxisomal integral membrane proteins involved in the regulation of peroxisome number, size, and distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Torres-Guzman, Juan C; Tam, Yuen Yi C; Aitchison, John D; Rachubinski, Richard A

    2003-04-28

    The peroxin Pex24p of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica exhibits high sequence similarity to two hypothetical proteins, Yhr150p and Ydr479p, encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Like YlPex24p, both Yhr150p and Ydr479p have been shown to be integral to the peroxisomal membrane, but unlike YlPex24p, their levels of synthesis are not increased upon a shift of cells from glucose- to oleic acid-containing medium. Peroxisomes of cells deleted for either or both of the YHR150w and YDR479c genes are increased in number, exhibit extensive clustering, are smaller in area than peroxisomes of wild-type cells, and often exhibit membrane thickening between adjacent peroxisomes in a cluster. Peroxisomes isolated from cells deleted for both genes have a decreased buoyant density compared with peroxisomes isolated from wild-type cells and still exhibit clustering and peroxisomal membrane thickening. Overexpression of the genes PEX25 or VPS1, but not the gene PEX11, restored the wild-type phenotype to cells deleted for one or both of the YHR150w and YDR479c genes. Together, our data suggest a role for Yhr150p and Ydr479p, together with Pex25p and Vps1p, in regulating peroxisome number, size, and distribution in S. cerevisiae. Because of their role in peroxisome dynamics, YHR150w and YDR479c have been designated as PEX28 and PEX29, respectively, and their encoded peroxins as Pex28p and Pex29p.

  18. The SUP35 omnipotent suppressor gene is involved in the maintenance of the non-Mendelian determinant [psi+] in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ter-Avanesyan, M D; Dagkesamanskaya, A R; Kushnirov, V V; Smirnov, V N

    1994-07-01

    The SUP35 gene of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a 76.5-kD ribosome-associated protein (Sup35p), the C-terminal part of which exhibits a high degree of similarity to EF-1 alpha elongation factor, while its N-terminal region is unique. Mutations in or overexpression of the SUP35 gene can generate an omnipotent suppressor effect. In the present study the SUP35 wild-type gene was replaced with deletion alleles generated in vitro that encode Sup35p lacking all or a part of the unique N-terminal region. These 5'-deletion alleles lead, in a haploid strain, simultaneously to an antisuppressor effect and to loss of the non-Mendelian determinant [psi+]. The antisuppressor effect is dominant while the elimination of the [psi+] determinant is a recessive trait. A set of the plasmid-borne deletion alleles of the SUP35 gene was tested for the ability to maintain [psi+]. It was shown that the first 114 amino acids of Sup35p are sufficient to maintain the [psi+] determinant. We propose that the Sup35p serves as a trans-acting factor required for the maintenance of [psi+].

  19. Fal1p is an essential DEAD-box protein involved in 40S-ribosomal-subunit biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kressler, D; de la Cruz, J; Rojo, M; Linder, P

    1997-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, FAL1, was found by sequence comparison as a homolog of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A (eIF4A). Fal1p has 55% identity and 73% similarity on the amino acid level to yeast eIF4A, the prototype of ATP-dependent RNA helicases of the DEAD-box protein family. Although clearly grouped in the eIF4A subfamily, the essential Fal1p displays a different subcellular function and localization. An HA epitope-tagged Fal1p is localized predominantly in the nucleolus. Polysome analyses in a temperature-sensitive fal1-1 mutant and a Fal1p-depleted strain reveal a decrease in the number of 40S ribosomal subunits. Furthermore, these strains are hypersensitive to the aminoglycoside antibiotics paromomycin and neomycin. Pulse-chase labeling of pre-rRNA and steady-state-level analysis of pre-rRNAs and mature rRNAs by Northern hybridization and primer extension in the Fal1p-depleted strain show that Fal1p is required for pre-rRNA processing at sites A0, A1, and A2. Consequently, depletion of Fal1p leads to decreased 18S rRNA levels and to an overall deficit in 40S ribosomal subunits. Together, these results implicate Fal1p in the 18S rRNA maturation pathway rather than in translation initiation. PMID:9372960

  20. Selected non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are metabolically active during spontaneous and inoculated must fermentations, and by producing a plethora of by-products, they can contribute to the definition of the wine aroma. Thus, use of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts as mixed starter cultures for inoculation of wine fermentations is of increasing interest for quality enhancement and improved complexity of wines. We initially characterized 34 non-Saccharomyces yeasts of the genera Candida, Lachancea (Kluyveromyces), Metschnikowia and Torulaspora, and evaluated their enological potential. This confirmed that non-Saccharomyces yeasts from wine-related environments represent a rich sink of unexplored biodiversity for the winemaking industry. From these, we selected four non-Saccharomyces yeasts to combine with starter cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed fermentation trials. The kinetics of growth and fermentation, and the analytical profiles of the wines produced indicate that these non-Saccharomyces strains can be used with S. cerevisiae starter cultures to increase polysaccharide, glycerol and volatile compound production, to reduce volatile acidity, and to increase or reduce the total acidity of the final wines, depending on yeast species and inoculum ratio used. The overall effects of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on fermentation and wine quality were strictly dependent on the Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio that mimicked the differences of fermentation conditions (natural or simultaneous inoculated fermentation).

  1. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  2. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites.

  3. Effect of different glucose concentrations on proteome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Francesca; Francesca, Guidi; Magherini, Francesca; Francesca, Magherini; Gamberi, Tania; Tania, Gamberi; Borro, Marina; Marina, Borro; Simmaco, Maurizio; Maurizio, Simmaco; Modesti, Alessandra; Alessandra, Modesti

    2010-07-01

    We performed a proteomic study to understand how Saccharomyces cerevisiae adapts its metabolism during the exponential growth on three different concentrations of glucose; this information will be necessary to understand yeast carbon metabolism in different environments. We induced a natural diauxic shift by growing yeast cells in glucose restriction thus having a fast and complete glucose exhaustion. We noticed differential expressions of groups of proteins. Cells in high glucose have a decreased growth rate during the initial phase of fermentation; in glucose restriction and in high glucose we found an over-expression of a protein (Peroxiredoxin) involved in protection against oxidative stress insult. The information obtained in our study validates the application of a proteomic approach for the identification of the molecular bases of environmental variations such as fermentation in high glucose and during a naturally induced diauxic shift.

  4. A global topology map of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun; Melén, Karin; Österberg, Marie; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is, arguably, the best understood eukaryotic model organism, yet comparatively little is known about its membrane proteome. Here, we report the cloning and expression of 617 S. cerevisiae membrane proteins as fusions to a C-terminal topology reporter and present experimentally constrained topology models for 546 proteins. By homology, the experimental topology information can be extended to 15,000 membrane proteins from 38 fully sequenced eukaryotic genomes. membrane proteins | membrane proteomics | yeast

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae vaginitis: microbiology and in vitro antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Echeverría-Irigoyen, María Julia; Eraso, Elena; Cano, Josep; Gomáriz, María; Guarro, Josep; Quindós, Guillermo

    2011-09-01

    Genitourinary infections by Saccharomyces cerevisiae are rare. Here, we describe eight S. cerevisiae vulvovaginitis episodes where molecular (Affirm VPIII) and conventional microbiological methods (culture and carbohydrate assimilation) have proven to be inadequate for diagnostic purposes. DNA sequencing allowed the correct identification of the pathogen. All isolates were susceptible to most antifungal agents, with two of them also found to be susceptible-dose-dependent to itraconazole.

  6. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae.

  7. Global mapping of DNA conformational flexibility on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Menconi, Giulia; Bedini, Andrea; Barale, Roberto; Sbrana, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    In this study we provide the first comprehensive map of DNA conformational flexibility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae complete genome. Flexibility plays a key role in DNA supercoiling and DNA/protein binding, regulating DNA transcription, replication or repair. Specific interest in flexibility analysis concerns its relationship with human genome instability. Enrichment in flexible sequences has been detected in unstable regions of human genome defined fragile sites, where genes map and carry frequent deletions and rearrangements in cancer. Flexible sequences have been suggested to be the determinants of fragile gene proneness to breakage; however, their actual role and properties remain elusive. Our in silico analysis carried out genome-wide via the StabFlex algorithm, shows the conserved presence of highly flexible regions in budding yeast genome as well as in genomes of other Saccharomyces sensu stricto species. Flexibile peaks in S. cerevisiae identify 175 ORFs mapping on their 3'UTR, a region affecting mRNA translation, localization and stability. (TA)n repeats of different extension shape the central structure of peaks and co-localize with polyadenylation efficiency element (EE) signals. ORFs with flexible peaks share common features. Transcripts are characterized by decreased half-life: this is considered peculiar of genes involved in regulatory systems with high turnover; consistently, their function affects biological processes such as cell cycle regulation or stress response. Our findings support the functional importance of flexibility peaks, suggesting that the flexible sequence may be derived by an expansion of canonical TAYRTA polyadenylation efficiency element. The flexible (TA)n repeat amplification could be the outcome of an evolutionary neofunctionalization leading to a differential 3'-end processing and expression regulation in genes with peculiar function. Our study provides a new support to the functional role of flexibility in genomes and a

  8. LPT1 encodes a membrane-bound O-acyltransferase involved in the acylation of lysophospholipids in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hisanori; Shimada, Atsushi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ohya, Mihoko; Takase, Juri; Miyashita, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Hisashi; Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Reiko; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2007-11-23

    Phospholipids are major components of cellular membranes that participate in a range of cellular processes. Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key molecule in the phospholipid biosynthetic pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SLC1 has been identified as the gene encoding lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase, which catalyzes PA synthesis. However, despite the importance of PA, disruption of SLC1 does not affect cell viability (Nagiec, M. M., Wells, G. B., Lester, R. L., and Dickson, R. C. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 22156-22163). We originally aimed to identify the acetyl-CoA:lyso platelet-activating factor acetyltransferase (lysoPAF AT) gene in yeast. Screening of a complete set of yeast deletion clones (4741 homozygous diploid clones) revealed a single mutant strain, YOR175c, with a defect in lysoPAF AT activity. YOR175c has been predicted to be a member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase superfamily, and we designated the gene LPT1. An Lpt1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Other than lysoPAF AT activity, Lpt1 catalyzed acyltransferase activity with a wide variety of lysophospholipids as acceptors, including lysophosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylglycerol, lysophosphatidylinositol, and lysophosphatidylserine. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine accumulated in the Deltalpt1 mutant strain. Although the Deltalpt1 mutant strain did not show other detectable defects, the Deltalpt1 Deltaslc1 double mutant strain had a synthetic lethal phenotype. These results indicate that, in concert with Slc1, Lpt1 plays a central role in PA biosynthesis, which is essential for cell viability.

  9. Constitutive and carbon source-responsive promoter elements are involved in the regulated expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae malate synthase gene MLS1.

    PubMed

    Caspary, F; Hartig, A; Schüller, H J

    1997-08-01

    The malate synthase gene, MLS1, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is transcriptionally regulated by the carbon source in the growth medium. A MLS1-lacZ fusion gene, expressed at a basal level in the presence of 2% glucose, is derepressed more than 100-fold under conditions of sugar limitation. No evidence for MLS1 induction by oleic acid was found. By deletion analysis of the MLS1 control region, we identified two sites, UAS1 and UAS2, as important for efficient derepression of the gene. Both sites contain sequences that resemble the previously characterized carbon source-responsive element (CSRE) found in the promoter of the isocitrate lyase gene ICL1. Indeed, UAS1 and UAS2 in the MLS1 upstream region turn out to be functional CSRE sequence variants. This finding allowed us to define a modified version of the CSRE consensus sequence (CCRTYSRNCCG). Protein binding to UAS1MLS1 was observed with extracts from derepressed but not from repressed cells, and could be competed for by an excess of the unlabelled CSRE (ICL1) sequence. No competition was observed with a mutated CSRE variant. Site-directed mutagenesis of both CSREs in the MLS1 promoter reduced gene activation under derepressing conditions to 20% of the wild-type level. The same decrease was observed with the wild-type MLS1 promoter in a cat8 mutant, lacking an activator of CSRE-dependent transcription. The CSRE/Cat8p-independent activation of MLS1 is mediated by constitutive UAS elements. The pleiotropic transcription factor Abf1p, which binds to the MLS1 upstream region, may contribute to constitutive activation. Thus, in order to ensure the severe glucose repression of MLS1 observed, repressor elements that respond to the carbon source must counteract constitutive activation. In summary, ICL1 and MLS1 share common cis-acting elements, although a distinct mechanism of carbon source control also contributes to MLS1 regulation.

  10. Identification of critical amino acid residues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase: definition of the ATP site involved in carboxy-phosphate formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Lim, A L; Powers-Lee, S G

    1997-08-15

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetases (CPSases) utilize two molecules of ATP at two homologous domains, B and C, with ATP(B) used to form the enzyme-bound intermediate carboxy-phosphate and ATP(C) used to phosphorylate the carbamate intermediate. To further define the role of one CPSase peptide suggested by affinity labeling studies to be near the ATP(B) site, we have carried out site-directed mutagenic analysis of peptide 234-242 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine-specific CPSase. Mutants E234A, E234D, E236A, E236D and E238A were unable to complement the CPSase-deficient yeast strain LPL26 whereas mutants Y237A, E238D, R241K, R241E and R241P supported LPL26 growth as well as wild-type CPSase. Kinetic analysis of E234A and Y237A indicated impaired utilization of ATP(B) but not of ATP(C). D242A, a temperature-sensitive mutant, retained no detectable activity when assayed in vitro. These findings, together with the affinity labeling data and primary sequence analysis, strongly suggest that the yeast CPSase peptide 234-242 is located at the ATP(B) site and that some of its residues are important for functioning of the enzyme. D242 appears to occupy a critical structural position and E234, E236 and E238 appear to be critical for function, with the spatial arrangement of the carboxyl side chain also critical for E234 and E236.

  11. Transcriptional changes associated with ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dragana; Chambers, Paul J; Stanley, Grant A; Borneman, Anthony; Fraser, Sarah

    2010-09-01

    Saccharomyces spp. are widely used for ethanol production; however, fermentation productivity is negatively affected by the impact of ethanol accumulation on yeast metabolic rate and viability. This study used microarray and statistical two-way ANOVA analysis to compare and evaluate gene expression profiles of two previously generated ethanol-tolerant mutants, CM1 and SM1, with their parent, Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A, in the presence and absence of ethanol stress. Although sharing the same parentage, the mutants were created differently: SM1 by adaptive evolution involving long-term exposure to ethanol stress and CM1 using chemical mutagenesis followed by adaptive evolution-based screening. Compared to the parent, differences in the expression levels of genes associated with a number of gene ontology categories in the mutants suggest that their improved ethanol stress response is a consequence of increased mitochondrial and NADH oxidation activities, stimulating glycolysis and other energy-yielding pathways. This leads to increased activity of energy-demanding processes associated with the production of proteins and plasma membrane components, which are necessary for acclimation to ethanol stress. It is suggested that a key function of the ethanol stress response is restoration of the NAD(+)/NADH redox balance, which increases glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and higher glycolytic flux in the ethanol-stressed cell. Both mutants achieved this by a constitutive increase in carbon flux in the glycerol pathway as a means of increasing NADH oxidation.

  12. Genomic evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-09-10

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains.

  13. Modulation of efficiency of translation termination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Antonets, Kirill S; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Derkatch, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense suppression is a readthrough of premature termination codons. It typically occurs either due to the recognition of stop codons by tRNAs with mutant anticodons, or due to a decrease in the fidelity of translation termination. In the latter case, suppressors usually promote the readthrough of different types of nonsense codons and are thus called omnipotent nonsense suppressors. Omnipotent nonsense suppressors were identified in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in 1960s, and most of subsequent studies were performed in this model organism. Initially, omnipotent suppressors were localized by genetic analysis to different protein- and RNA-encoding genes, mostly the components of translational machinery. Later, nonsense suppression was found to be caused not only by genomic mutations, but also by epigenetic elements, prions. Prions are self-perpetuating protein conformations usually manifested by infectious protein aggregates. Modulation of translational accuracy by prions reflects changes in the activity of their structural proteins involved in different aspects of protein synthesis. Overall, nonsense suppression can be seen as a "phenotypic mirror" of events affecting the accuracy of the translational machine. However, the range of proteins participating in the modulation of translation termination fidelity is not fully elucidated. Recently, the list has been expanded significantly by findings that revealed a number of weak genetic and epigenetic nonsense suppressors, the effect of which can be detected only in specific genetic backgrounds. This review summarizes the data on the nonsense suppressors decreasing the fidelity of translation termination in S. cerevisiae, and discusses the functional significance of the modulation of translational accuracy.

  14. Proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under high gravity fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Chong, Poh Kuan; Gan, Chee Sian; Wright, Phillip C

    2006-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae KAY446 was utilized for ethanol production, with glucose concentrations ranging from 120 g/L (normal) to 300 g/L (high). Although grown in a high glucose environment, S. cerevisiae still retained the ability to produce ethanol with a high degree of glucose utilization. iTRAQ-mediated shotgun proteomics was applied to identify relative expression change of proteins under the different glucose conditions. A total of 413 proteins were identified from three replicate, independent LC-MS/MS runs. Unsurprisingly, many proteins in the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway showed significant changes in expression level. Twenty five proteins involved in amino acid metabolism decreased their expression, while the expressions of 12 heat-shock related proteins were also identified. Under high glucose conditions, ethanol was produced as a major product. However, the assimilation of glucose as well as a number of byproducts was also enhanced. Therefore, to optimize the ethanol production under very high gravity conditions, a number of pathways will need to be deactivated, while still maintaining the correct cellular redox or osmotic state. Proteomics is demonstrated here as a tool to aid in this forward metabolic engineering.

  15. Genomic Evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese Rice Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains. PMID:25212861

  16. Molecular mechanisms of ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet sensitive to ethanol at higher concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Although significant efforts have been made to study ethanol-stress response in past decades, molecular mecha...

  17. Improving biomass sugar utilization by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient utilization of all available sugars in lignocellulosic biomass, which is more abundant than available commodity crops and starch, represents one of the most difficult technological challenges for the production of bioethanol. The well-studied yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has played a...

  18. Interaction between Hanseniaspora uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2015-08-03

    During wine fermentation, Saccharomyces clearly dominate over non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, and several factors could be related to this dominance. However, the main factor causing the reduction of cultivable non-Saccharomyces populations has not yet been fully established. In the present study, various single and mixed fermentations were performed to evaluate some of the factors likely responsible for the interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum. Alcoholic fermentation was performed in compartmented experimental set ups with ratios of 1:1 and 1:9 and the cultivable population of both species was followed. The cultivable H. uvarum population decreased sharply at late stages when S. cerevisiae was present in the other compartment, similarly to alcoholic fermentations in non-compartmented vessels. Thus, cell-to-cell contact did not seem to be the main cause for the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum. Other compounds related to fermentation performance (such as sugar and ethanol) and/or certain metabolites secreted by S. cerevisiae could be related to the sharp decrease in H. uvarum cultivability. When these factors were analyzed, it was confirmed that metabolites from S. cerevisiae induced lack of cultivability in H. uvarum, however ethanol and other possible compounds did not seem to induce this effect but played some role during the process. This study contributes to a new understanding of the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum populations during the late stages of wine fermentation.

  19. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  20. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  1. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases

  2. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster region from the human MLL gene, a gene frequently involved in translocations in leukemia patients, flanked by positive and negative selection markers. A translocation between the YAC and a yeast chromosome, whose breakpoint falls within the MLL DNA, physically separates the markers and forms the basis for the selection. When RAD52 is deleted, essentially all of the selected and screened cells contain simple translocations. The detectable translocation rates are the same in haploids and diploids, although the mechanisms involved and true translocation rates may be distinct. A unique double-strand break induced within the MLL sequences increases the number of detectable translocation events 100- to 1000-fold. This novel system provides a tractable assay for answering basic mechanistic questions about the development of chromosomal translocations. PMID:11973293

  3. Dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptome during bread dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Zhu, Bo; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Marchal, Kathleen; Dornez, Emmie; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2013-12-01

    The behavior of yeast cells during industrial processes such as the production of beer, wine, and bioethanol has been extensively studied. In contrast, our knowledge about yeast physiology during solid-state processes, such as bread dough, cheese, or cocoa fermentation, remains limited. We investigated changes in the transcriptomes of three genetically distinct Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during bread dough fermentation. Our results show that regardless of the genetic background, all three strains exhibit similar changes in expression patterns. At the onset of fermentation, expression of glucose-regulated genes changes dramatically, and the osmotic stress response is activated. The middle fermentation phase is characterized by the induction of genes involved in amino acid metabolism. Finally, at the latest time point, cells suffer from nutrient depletion and activate pathways associated with starvation and stress responses. Further analysis shows that genes regulated by the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, the major pathway involved in the response to osmotic stress and glycerol homeostasis, are among the most differentially expressed genes at the onset of fermentation. More importantly, deletion of HOG1 and other genes of this pathway significantly reduces the fermentation capacity. Together, our results demonstrate that cells embedded in a solid matrix such as bread dough suffer severe osmotic stress and that a proper induction of the HOG pathway is critical for optimal fermentation.

  4. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to desiccation and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jatinder; Kumar, Deept; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Singhal, Vibha; Jervis, Jody; Garst, James F; Slaughter, Stephen M; DeSantis, Andrea M; Potts, Malcolm; Helm, Richard F

    2005-12-01

    A transcriptional analysis of the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4743 to controlled air-drying (desiccation) and subsequent rehydration under minimal glucose conditions was performed. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle was observed to increase during drying and remained in this state during the rehydration phase. When the BY4743 expression profile for the dried sample was compared to that of a commercially prepared dry active yeast, strikingly similar expression changes were observed. The fact that these two samples, dried by different means, possessed very similar transcriptional profiles supports the hypothesis that the response to desiccation is a coordinated event independent of the particular conditions involved in water removal. Similarities between "stationary-phase-essential genes" and those upregulated during desiccation were also noted, suggesting commonalities in different routes to reduced metabolic states. Trends in extracellular and intracellular glucose and trehalose levels suggested that the cells were in a "holding pattern" during the rehydration phase, a concept that was reinforced by cell cycle analyses. Application of a "redescription mining" algorithm suggested that sulfur metabolism is important for cell survival during desiccation and rehydration.

  5. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  6. Dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Transcriptome during Bread Dough Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Zhu, Bo; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Marchal, Kathleen; Dornez, Emmie

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of yeast cells during industrial processes such as the production of beer, wine, and bioethanol has been extensively studied. In contrast, our knowledge about yeast physiology during solid-state processes, such as bread dough, cheese, or cocoa fermentation, remains limited. We investigated changes in the transcriptomes of three genetically distinct Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during bread dough fermentation. Our results show that regardless of the genetic background, all three strains exhibit similar changes in expression patterns. At the onset of fermentation, expression of glucose-regulated genes changes dramatically, and the osmotic stress response is activated. The middle fermentation phase is characterized by the induction of genes involved in amino acid metabolism. Finally, at the latest time point, cells suffer from nutrient depletion and activate pathways associated with starvation and stress responses. Further analysis shows that genes regulated by the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, the major pathway involved in the response to osmotic stress and glycerol homeostasis, are among the most differentially expressed genes at the onset of fermentation. More importantly, deletion of HOG1 and other genes of this pathway significantly reduces the fermentation capacity. Together, our results demonstrate that cells embedded in a solid matrix such as bread dough suffer severe osmotic stress and that a proper induction of the HOG pathway is critical for optimal fermentation. PMID:24056467

  7. The Reference Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Stacia R.; Dietrich, Fred S.; Fisk, Dianna G.; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dwight, Selina S.; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D.; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Miyasato, Stuart R.; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called “S288C 2010,” was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science. PMID:24374639

  8. The reference genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: then and now.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stacia R; Dietrich, Fred S; Fisk, Dianna G; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C; Dwight, Selina S; Hitz, Benjamin C; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J Michael

    2014-03-20

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called "S288C 2010," was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science.

  9. Protein disulfide isomerase is essential for viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, R; Honey, N; Murant, S J; Bossier, P; Schultz, L; Montgomery, D; Ellis, R W; Freedman, R B; Tuite, M F

    1991-12-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is an enzyme involved in the catalysis of disulfide bond formation in secretory and cell-surface proteins. Using an oligodeoxyribonucleotide designed to detect the conserved 'thioredoxin-like' active site of vertebrate PDIs, we have isolated a gene encoding PDI from the lower eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The nucleotide sequence and deduced open reading frame of the cloned gene predict a 530-amino-acid (aa) protein of Mr 59,082 and a pI of 4.1, physical properties characteristic of mammalian PDIs. Furthermore, the aa sequence shows 30-32% identity with mammalian and avian PDI sequences and has a very similar overall organisation, namely the presence of two approx. 100-aa segments, each of which is repeated, with the most significant homologies to mammalian and avian PDIs being in the regions (a, a') that contain the conserved 'thioredoxin-like' active site. The N-terminal region has the characteristics of a cleavable secretory signal sequence and the C-terminal four aa (-His-Asp-Glu-Leu) are consistent with the protein being a component of the S. cerevisiae endoplasmic reticulum. Transformants carrying multiple copies of this gene (designated PDI1) have tenfold higher levels of PDI activity and overproduce a protein of the predicted Mr. The PDI1 gene is unique in the yeast genome and encodes a single 1.8-kb transcript that is not found in stationary phase cells. Disruption of the PDI1 gene is haplo-lethal indicating that the product of this gene is essential for viability.

  10. Efficient Extraction of Thioreodoxin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Ethanol▿

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiharu; Nomura, Wataru; Takeuchi, Yoko; Ohdate, Takumi; Tamasu, Shogo; Kitaoka, Atsushi; Kiyokawa, Yoshifumi; Masutani, Hiroshi; Murata, Kazuo; Wakai, Yoshinori; Izawa, Shingo; Yodoi, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxin, an antioxidant protein, is a promising molecule for development of functional foods because it protects the gastric mucosa and reduces the allergenicity of allergens. To establish a method for obtaining an ample amount of yeast thioredoxin, we found here that thioredoxin is released from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by treatment with 20% ethanol. We also found that Japanese sake contains a considerable amount of thioredoxin. PMID:17209065

  11. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  12. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae.

  13. Efficient screening of environmental isolates for Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are suitable for brewing.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Hidehiko; Hino, Mika; Takashita, Hideharu; Kajiwara, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Keiko; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2014-01-01

    We developed an efficient screening method for Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from environmental isolates. MultiPlex PCR was performed targeting four brewing S. cerevisiae genes (SSU1, AWA1, BIO6, and FLO1). At least three genes among the four were amplified from all S. cerevisiae strains. The use of this method allowed us to successfully obtain S. cerevisiae strains.

  14. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  15. Glycerol stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Cellular responses and evolved adaptations.

    PubMed

    Mattenberger, Florian; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Hallsworth, John E; Fares, Mario A

    2017-03-01

    Glycerol synthesis is key to central metabolism and stress biology in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yet the cellular adjustments needed to respond and adapt to glycerol stress are little understood. Here, we determined impacts of acute and chronic exposures to glycerol stress in S. cerevisiae. Glycerol stress can result from an increase of glycerol concentration in the medium due to the S. cerevisiae fermenting activity or other metabolic activities. Acute glycerol-stress led to a 50% decline in growth rate and altered transcription of more than 40% of genes. The increased genetic diversity in S. cerevisiae population, which had evolved in the standard nutrient medium for hundreds of generations, led to an increase in growth rate and altered transcriptome when such population was transferred to stressful media containing a high concentration of glycerol; 0.41 M (0.990 water activity). Evolution of S. cerevisiae populations during a 10-day period in the glycerol-containing medium led to transcriptome changes and readjustments to improve control of glycerol flux across the membrane, regulation of cell cycle, and more robust stress response; and a remarkable increase of growth rate under glycerol stress. Most of the observed regulatory changes arose in duplicated genes. These findings elucidate the physiological mechanisms, which underlie glycerol-stress response, and longer-term adaptations, in S. cerevisiae; they also have implications for enigmatic aspects of the ecology of this otherwise well-characterized yeast.

  16. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae invasive infection: The first reported case in Morocco].

    PubMed

    Maleb, A; Sebbar, E; Frikh, M; Boubker, S; Moussaoui, A; El Mekkaoui, A; Khannoussi, W; Kharrasse, G; Belefquih, B; Lemnouer, A; Ismaili, Z; Elouennass, M

    2017-02-07

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a cosmopolitan yeast, widely used in agro-alimentary and pharmaceutical industry. Its impact in human pathology is rare, but maybe still underestimated compared to the real situation. This yeast is currently considered as an emerging and opportunistic pathogen. Risk factors are immunosuppression and intravascular device carrying. Fungemias are the most frequent clinical forms. We report the first case of S. cerevisiae invasive infection described in Morocco, and to propose a review of the literature cases of S. cerevisiae infections described worldwide. A 77-year-old patient, with no notable medical history, who was hospitalized for a upper gastrointestinal stenosis secondary to impassable metastatic gastric tumor. Its history was marked by the onset of septic shock, with S. cerevisiae in his urine and in his blood, with arguments for confirmation of invasion: the presence of several risk factors in the patient, positive direct microbiological examination, abundant and exclusive culture of S. cerevisiae from clinical samples. Species identification was confirmed by the study of biochemical characteristics of the isolated yeast. Confirmation of S. cerevisiae infection requires a clinical suspicion in patients with risk factors, but also a correct microbiological diagnosis.

  17. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines.

  18. Growth of non-Saccharomyces yeasts affects nutrient availability for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2012-07-02

    Yeast produces numerous secondary metabolites during fermentation that impact final wine quality. Although it is widely recognized that growth of diverse non-Saccharomyces (NS) yeast can positively affect flavor complexity during Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine fermentation, the inability to control spontaneous or co-fermentation processes by NS yeast has restricted their use in winemaking. We selected two NS yeasts from our Uruguayan native collection to study NS-S. cerevisiae interactions during wine fermentation. The selected strains of Hanseniaspora vineae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima had different yeast assimilable nitrogen consumption profiles and had different effects on S. cerevisiae fermentation and growth kinetics. Studies in which we varied inoculum size and using either simultaneous or sequential inoculation of NS yeast and S. cerevisiae suggested that competition for nutrients had a significant effect on fermentation kinetics. Sluggish fermentations were more pronounced when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24h after the initial stage of fermentation with a NS strain compared to co-inoculation. Monitoring strain populations using differential WL nutrient agar medium and fermentation kinetics of mixed cultures allowed for a better understanding of strain interactions and nutrient addition effects. Limitation of nutrient availability for S. cerevisiae was shown to result in stuck fermentations as well as to reduce sensory desirability of the resulting wine. Addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and a vitamin mix to a defined medium allowed for a comparison of nutrient competition between strains. Addition of DAP and the vitamin mix was most effective in preventing stuck fermentations.

  19. Overproduction of threonine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to hydroxynorvaline.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, C; Calderon, I L

    1992-01-01

    In this work, we isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce threonine from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutants were selected for resistance to the threonine analog alpha-amino-beta-hydroxynorvalerate (hydroxynorvaline), and, of these, the ones able to excrete threonine to the medium were chosen. The mutant strains produce between 15 and 30 times more threonine than the wild type does, and, to a lesser degree, they also accumulate isoleucine. Genetic and biochemical studies have revealed that the threonine overproduction is, in all cases studied, associated with the presence in the strain of a HOM3 allele coding for a mutant aspartate kinase that is totally or partially insensitive to feedback inhibition by threonine. This enzyme seems, therefore, to be crucial in the regulation of threonine biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The results obtained suggest that this strategy could be efficiently applied to the isolation of threonine-overproducing strains of yeasts other than S. cerevisiae, even those used industrially. PMID:1622238

  20. Genetic engineering of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Genetic engineering has been successfully applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains for different purposes: extension of substrate range, improvement of productivity and yield, elimination of by-products, improvement of process performance and cellular properties, and extension of product range. The potential of genetically engineered yeasts for the massive production of biofuels as bioethanol and other nonfuel products from renewable resources as lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates has been recognized. For such applications, robust industrial strains of S. cerevisiae have to be used. Here, some relevant genetic and genomic characteristics of industrial strains are discussed in relation to the problematic of the genetic engineering of such strains. General molecular tools applicable to the manipulation of S. cerevisiae industrial strains are presented and examples of genetically engineered industrial strains developed for the production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass are given.

  1. Antimutagenic and antioxidant activity of Lisosan G in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Frassinetti, Stefania; Della Croce, Clara Maria; Caltavuturo, Leonardo; Longo, Vincenzo

    2012-12-01

    In the present study the antimutagenic and antioxidant effects of a powder of grain (Lisosan G) in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. Results showed that Lisosan G treatment decreased significantly the intracellular ROS concentration and mutagenesis induced by hydrogen peroxide in S. cerevisiae D7 strain. The effect of Lisosan G was then evaluated by using superoxide dismutase (SOD) proficient and deficient strains of S. cerevisiae. Lisosan G showed protective activity in sod1Δ and sod2Δ mutant strains, indicating an in vivo antioxidant effect. A high radical scavenging activity of Lisosan G was also demonstrated in vitro using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The obtained results showed a protective effect of Lisosan G in yeast cells, indicating that its antioxidant capacity contributes to its antimutagenic action.

  2. Consolidated bioprocessing for bioethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Willem H; Lynd, Lee R; den Haan, Riaan; McBride, John E

    2007-01-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of lignocellulose to bioethanol refers to the combining of the four biological events required for this conversion process (production of saccharolytic enzymes, hydrolysis of the polysaccharides present in pretreated biomass, fermentation of hexose sugars, and fermentation of pentose sugars) in one reactor. CBP is gaining increasing recognition as a potential breakthrough for low-cost biomass processing. Although no natural microorganism exhibits all the features desired for CBP, a number of microorganisms, both bacteria and fungi, possess some of the desirable properties. This review focuses on progress made toward the development of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) for CBP. The current status of saccharolytic enzyme (cellulases and hemicellulases) expression in S. cerevisiae to complement its natural fermentative ability is highlighted. Attention is also devoted to the challenges ahead to integrate all required enzymatic activities in an industrial S. cerevisiae strain(s) and the need for molecular and selection strategies pursuant to developing a yeast capable of CBP.

  3. Dual effects of plant steroidal alkaloids on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Simons, Veronika; Morrissey, John P; Latijnhouwers, Maita; Csukai, Michael; Cleaver, Adam; Yarrow, Carol; Osbourn, Anne

    2006-08-01

    Many plant species accumulate sterols and triterpenes as antimicrobial glycosides. These secondary metabolites (saponins) provide built-in chemical protection against pest and pathogen attack and can also influence induced defense responses. In addition, they have a variety of important pharmacological properties, including anticancer activity. The biological mechanisms underpinning the varied and diverse effects of saponins on microbes, plants, and animals are only poorly understood despite the ecological and pharmaceutical importance of this major class of plant secondary metabolites. Here we have exploited budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to investigate the effects of saponins on eukaryotic cells. The tomato steroidal glycoalkaloid alpha-tomatine has antifungal activity towards yeast, and this activity is associated with membrane permeabilization. Removal of a single sugar from the tetrasaccharide chain of alpha-tomatine results in a substantial reduction in antimicrobial activity. Surprisingly, the complete loss of sugars leads to enhanced antifungal activity. Experiments with alpha-tomatine and its aglycone tomatidine indicate that the mode of action of tomatidine towards yeast is distinct from that of alpha-tomatine and does not involve membrane permeabilization. Investigation of the effects of tomatidine on yeast by gene expression and sterol analysis indicate that tomatidine inhibits ergosterol biosynthesis. Tomatidine-treated cells accumulate zymosterol rather than ergosterol, which is consistent with inhibition of the sterol C(24) methyltransferase Erg6p. However, erg6 and erg3 mutants (but not erg2 mutants) have enhanced resistance to tomatidine, suggesting a complex interaction of erg mutations, sterol content, and tomatidine resistance.

  4. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions.

  5. Host Factors That Affect Ty3 Retrotransposition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Aye, Michael; Irwin, Becky; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Chen, Eric; Garrus, Jennifer; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    The retrovirus-like element Ty3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrates at the transcription initiation region of RNA polymerase III. To identify host genes that affect transposition, a collection of insertion mutants was screened using a genetic assay in which insertion of Ty3 activates expression of a tRNA suppressor. Fifty-three loci were identified in this screen. Corresponding knockout mutants were tested for the ability to mobilize a galactose-inducible Ty3, marked with the HIS3 gene. Of 42 mutants tested, 22 had phenotypes similar to those displayed in the original assay. The proteins encoded by the defective genes are involved in chromatin dynamics, transcription, RNA processing, protein modification, cell cycle regulation, nuclear import, and unknown functions. These mutants were induced for Ty3 expression and assayed for Gag3p protein, integrase, cDNA, and Ty3 integration upstream of chromosomal tDNAVal(AAC) genes. Most mutants displayed differences from the wild type in one or more intermediates, although these were typically not as severe as the genetic defect. Because a relatively large number of genes affecting retrotransposition can be identified in yeast and because the majority of these genes have mammalian homologs, this approach provides an avenue for the identification of potential antiviral targets. PMID:15579677

  6. Mating-type genes and MAT switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2012-05-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break.

  7. A Novel Inositol Pyrophosphate Phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, Elizabeth A.; Chong, Lucy S.; Wu, Mingxuan; Crooke, Elliott; Fiedler, Dorothea; Resnick, Adam C.; Rolfes, Ronda J.

    2016-01-01

    Inositol pyrophosphates are high energy signaling molecules involved in cellular processes, such as energetic metabolism, telomere maintenance, stress responses, and vesicle trafficking, and can mediate protein phosphorylation. Although the inositol kinases underlying inositol pyrophosphate biosynthesis are well characterized, the phosphatases that selectively regulate their cellular pools are not fully described. The diphosphoinositol phosphate phosphohydrolase enzymes of the Nudix protein family have been demonstrated to dephosphorylate inositol pyrophosphates; however, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog Ddp1 prefers inorganic polyphosphate over inositol pyrophosphates. We identified a novel phosphatase of the recently discovered atypical dual specificity phosphatase family as a physiological inositol pyrophosphate phosphatase. Purified recombinant Siw14 hydrolyzes the β-phosphate from 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5PP-IP5 or IP7) in vitro. In vivo, siw14Δ yeast mutants possess increased IP7 levels, whereas heterologous SIW14 overexpression eliminates IP7 from cells. IP7 levels increased proportionately when siw14Δ was combined with ddp1Δ or vip1Δ, indicating independent activity by the enzymes encoded by these genes. We conclude that Siw14 is a physiological phosphatase that modulates inositol pyrophosphate metabolism by dephosphorylating the IP7 isoform 5PP-IP5 to IP6. PMID:26828065

  8. Biotransformation of malachite green by Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 463.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, J P; Govindwar, S P

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, use of microbial biomass for decolourization of textile industry wastewater is becoming a promising alternative in which some bacteria and fungi are used to replace present treatment processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 463 decolourized the triphenylmethane dyes (malachite green, cotton blue, methyl violet and crystal violet) by biosorption, showing different decolourization patterns. However, malachite green decolourized by biosorption at the initial stage and further biodegradation occurred, about 85% in plain distilled water within 7 h, and about 95.5% in 5% glucose medium within 4 h, under aerobic conditions and at room temperature. Decolourization of malachite green depends on various conditions, such as concentration of dye, concentration of cells, composition of medium and agitation. HPLC, UV-VIS, FTIR and TLC analysis of samples extracted with ethyl acetate from decolourized culture flasks confirmed the biodegradation of malachite green into several metabolites. A study of the enzymes responsible for the biodegradation of malachite green in the control and cells obtained after decolourization showed the activities of laccase, lignin peroxidase, NADH-DCIP reductase, malachite green reductase and aminopyrine N-demethylase in control cells. A significant increase in the activities of NADH-DCIP reductase and MG reductase was observed in the cells obtained after decolourization, indicating a major involvement of reductases in malachite green degradation.

  9. Lipid droplet autophagy in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    van Zutphen, Tim; Todde, Virginia; de Boer, Rinse; Kreim, Martin; Hofbauer, Harald F.; Wolinski, Heimo; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that play a key role in cellular and organismal lipid homeostasis. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) and steryl esters, which are stored in LDs, are typically mobilized in growing cells or upon hormonal stimulation by LD-associated lipases and steryl ester hydrolases. Here we show that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LDs can also be turned over in vacuoles/lysosomes by a process that morphologically resembles microautophagy. A distinct set of proteins involved in LD autophagy is identified, which includes the core autophagic machinery but not Atg11 or Atg20. Thus LD autophagy is distinct from endoplasmic reticulum–autophagy, pexophagy, or mitophagy, despite the close association between these organelles. Atg15 is responsible for TAG breakdown in vacuoles and is required to support growth when de novo fatty acid synthesis is compromised. Furthermore, none of the core autophagy proteins, including Atg1 and Atg8, is required for LD formation in yeast. PMID:24258026

  10. D-lactic acid production by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Tomiko; Tokuhiro, Kenro; Nagamori, Eiji; Onishi, Toru; Saitoh, Satoshi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Haruo

    2006-02-01

    Poly D-lactic acid is an important polymer because it improves the thermostability of poly L-lactic acid by the stereo complex formation. We constructed a metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae that produces D-lactic acid efficiently. In this recombinant, the coding region of pyruvate decarboxylase 1 (PDC1) was completely deleted, and two copies of the D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) gene from Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides strain NBRC3426 were introduced into the genome. The D-lactate production reached 61.5 g/l, the amount of glucose being transformed into D-lactic acid being 61.2% under neutralizing conditions. Additionally, the yield of free D-lactic acid was also shown to be 53.0% under non-neutralizing conditions. It was confirmed that D-lactic acid of extremely high optical purity of 99.9% or higher. Our finding obtained the possibility of a new approach for pure d-lactic acid production without a neutralizing process compared with other techniques involving lactic acid bacteria and transgenic Escherichia coli.

  11. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae as unusual antibodies in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Fagoonee, S; De Luca, L; De Angelis, C; Castelli, A; Rizzetto, M; Pellicano, R

    2009-03-01

    Autoantibodies are disease markers of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Antinuclear antibodies, smooth muscle antibodies, antibodies to liver/kidney microsome type 1, and perinuclear antibodies to neutrophil cytoplasm constitute the ''conventional'' battery of autoantibodies, while an emerging interest to evaluate new autoantibodies as diagnostic or prognostic markers, such as the anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies, is detectable (ASCA). This paper focuses mainly on the findings and the potential role of ASCA in AIH. These antibodies are present in 5-6.3% of blood donors and in the gastrointestinal setting, ASCA have been found most often in Crohn's disease and with lower frequency in the course of ulcerative colitis and celiac disease. Furthermore, they have been described, to a lesser extent, in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis and in AIH. ASCA occur in 20-30% of patients suffering from AIH with a statistically significant increase observed only for IgG ASCA in type 1 AIH. This probably indicates collateral immune reactivities to the primary pathogenic process. The outcome of hepatitis is not influenced by the presence of ASCA. In conclusion, ASCA positivity does not imply that there exists a distinct subgroup of patients with AIH and these autoantibodies are not involved in the pathogenetic mechanism of AIH.

  12. Tanshinones extend chronological lifespan in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2014-10-01

    Natural products with anti-aging property have drawn great attention recently but examples of such compounds are exceedingly scarce. By applying a high-throughput assay based on yeast chronological lifespan measurement, we screened the anti-aging activity of 144 botanical materials and found that dried roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge have significant anti-aging activity. Tanshinones isolated from the plant including cryptotanshione, tanshinone I, and tanshinone IIa, are the active components. Among them, cryptotanshinone can greatly extend the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chronological lifespan (up to 2.5 times) in a dose- and the-time-of-addition-dependent manner at nanomolar concentrations without disruption of cell growth. We demonstrate that cryptotanshinone prolong chronological lifespan via a nutrient-dependent regime, especially essential amino acid sensing, and three conserved protein kinases Tor1, Sch9, and Gcn2 are required for cryptotanshinone-induced lifespan extension. In addition, cryptotanshinone significantly increases the lifespan of SOD2-deleted mutants. Altogether, those data suggest that cryptotanshinone might be involved in the regulation of, Tor1, Sch9, Gcn2, and Sod2, these highly conserved longevity proteins modulated by nutrients from yeast to humans.

  13. Global landscape of protein complexes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Nevan J; Cagney, Gerard; Yu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Gouqing; Guo, Xinghua; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Li, Joyce; Pu, Shuye; Datta, Nira; Tikuisis, Aaron P; Punna, Thanuja; Peregrín-Alvarez, José M; Shales, Michael; Zhang, Xin; Davey, Michael; Robinson, Mark D; Paccanaro, Alberto; Bray, James E; Sheung, Anthony; Beattie, Bryan; Richards, Dawn P; Canadien, Veronica; Lalev, Atanas; Mena, Frank; Wong, Peter; Starostine, Andrei; Canete, Myra M; Vlasblom, James; Wu, Samuel; Orsi, Chris; Collins, Sean R; Chandran, Shamanta; Haw, Robin; Rilstone, Jennifer J; Gandi, Kiran; Thompson, Natalie J; Musso, Gabe; St Onge, Peter; Ghanny, Shaun; Lam, Mandy H Y; Butland, Gareth; Altaf-Ul, Amin M; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Shilatifard, Ali; O'Shea, Erin; Weissman, Jonathan S; Ingles, C James; Hughes, Timothy R; Parkinson, John; Gerstein, Mark; Wodak, Shoshana J; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F

    2006-03-30

    Identification of protein-protein interactions often provides insight into protein function, and many cellular processes are performed by stable protein complexes. We used tandem affinity purification to process 4,562 different tagged proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each preparation was analysed by both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to increase coverage and accuracy. Machine learning was used to integrate the mass spectrometry scores and assign probabilities to the protein-protein interactions. Among 4,087 different proteins identified with high confidence by mass spectrometry from 2,357 successful purifications, our core data set (median precision of 0.69) comprises 7,123 protein-protein interactions involving 2,708 proteins. A Markov clustering algorithm organized these interactions into 547 protein complexes averaging 4.9 subunits per complex, about half of them absent from the MIPS database, as well as 429 additional interactions between pairs of complexes. The data (all of which are available online) will help future studies on individual proteins as well as functional genomics and systems biology.

  14. A novel putative reductase (Cpd1p) and the multidrug exporter Snq2p are involved in resistance to cercosporin and other singlet oxygen-generating photosensitizers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ververidis, P; Davrazou, F; Diallinas, G; Georgakopoulos, D; Kanellis, A K; Panopoulos, N

    2001-05-01

    Phytopathogenic Cercospora species produce cercosporin, a photoactivated perylenequinone toxin that belongs to a family of photosensitizers which absorb light energy and produce extremely cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species. In this work, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system for the identification and cloning of genes whose products mediate cercosporin detoxification. Two genesexpressed in high-copy number vectors conferred cercosporin resistance to an otherwise sensitive strain. One gene codes for Snq2p, a well-characterized multidrug, ABC-type, efflux protein. The other, designated CPD1 (Cercosporin Photosensitizer Detoxification), encodes a novel protein with significant similarity to the FAD-dependent pyridine nucleotide reductases. We showed that over-expression of either of these proteins can also mediate resistance to other singlet oxygen-generating compounds. The involvement of Snq2p and Cpd1p in photosensitizer detoxification reinforces previous observations which suggested that singlet oxygen acts on membrane lipids and that cellular resistance to cercosporin is mediated by a mechanism involving toxin efflux and/or toxin reduction.

  15. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    PubMed

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts.

  16. Identification of Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall Mannan Chemotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, T. N.; Ballou, Clinton E.

    1972-01-01

    We have obtained evidence for two structurally and antigenically different Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall mannans. One, which occurs widely and is found in S. cerevisiae strain 238C, is already known to be a neutral mannan which yields mannose, mannobiose, mannotriose, and mannotetraose on acetolysis of the (1 → 6)-linked backbone. The other, which was found in S. cerevisiae brewer's strains, is a phosphomannan with a structure very similar to that of Kloeckera brevis mannan. S. cerevisiae (brewer's yeast strain) was agglutinated by antiserum prepared against Kloeckera brevis cells. The mannan, isolated from a proteolytic digest of the cell wall of the former, did not react with S. cerevisiae 238C antiserum, whereas it cross-reacted strongly with K. brevis antiserum. Controlled acetolysis cleaved the (1 → 6)-linkages in the polysaccharide backbone and released mannose, mannobiose, mannotriose, and mannotriose phosphate. Mild acid treatment of the phosphomannan hydrolyzed the phosphodiester linkage, yielding phosphomonoester mannan and mannose. The resulting phosphomonoester mannan reacted with antiserum prepared against K. brevis possessing monoester phosphate groups on the cell surface. α-d-Mannose-1-phosphate completely inhibited the precipitin reaction between brewer's yeast mannan and the homologous antiserum. Flocculent and nonflocculent strains of this yeast were shown to have similar structural and immunological properties. PMID:4559821

  17. Genetic mapping of quantitative phenotypic traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2012-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a favorite production organism in industrial biotechnology presenting new challenges to yeast engineers in terms of introducing advantageous traits such as stress tolerances. Exploring subspecies diversity of S. cerevisiae has identified strains that bear industrially relevant phenotypic traits. Provided that the genetic basis of such phenotypic traits can be identified inverse engineering allows the targeted modification of production strains. Most phenotypic traits of interest in S. cerevisiae strains are quantitative, meaning that they are controlled by multiple genetic loci referred to as quantitative trait loci (QTL). A straightforward approach to identify the genetic basis of quantitative traits is QTL mapping which aims at the allocation of the genetic determinants to regions in the genome. The application of high-density oligonucleotide arrays and whole-genome re-sequencing to detect genetic variations between strains has facilitated the detection of large numbers of molecular markers thus allowing high-resolution QTL mapping over the entire genome. This review focuses on the basic principle and state of the art of QTL mapping in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore we discuss several approaches developed during the last decade that allow down-scaling of the regions identified by QTL mapping to the gene level. We also emphasize the particular challenges of QTL mapping in nonlaboratory strains of S. cerevisiae.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a starter culture in Mycella.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T K; Tempel, T V; Cantor, M D; Jakobsen, M

    2001-09-19

    The potential use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae FB7 as an additional starter culture for the production of Mycella, a Danish Gorgonzola type cheese, was investigated. Two dairy productions of Mycella, each containing batches of experimental cheeses with S. cerevisiae added and reference cheeses without yeast added were carried out. For both experimental and reference cheeses, chemical analysis (pH, a(w), NaCl, water and fat content) were carried out during the ripening period, but no significant differences were found. The evolution of lactic acid bacteria was almost identical in both the experimental and reference cheeses and similar results were found for the number of yeast. S. cerevisiae FB7 was found to be predominant in the core of the experimental cheeses throughout the ripening period, while Debaryomyces hansenii dominated in the reference cheese and on the surface of the experimental cheeses. In the cheeses with S. cerevisiae FB7, an earlier sporulation and an improved growth of Penicillium roqueforti was observed compared to the reference cheeses. Furthermore, in the experimental cheese, synergistic interactions were also found in the aroma analysis, the degradation of casein and by the sensory analysis. The observed differences indicate a positive contribution to the overall quality of Mycella by S. cerevisiae FB7.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a nomadic yeast with no niche?

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Matthew R.; Greig, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Different species are usually thought to have specific adaptations, which allow them to occupy different ecological niches. But recent neutral ecology theory suggests that species diversity can simply be the result of random sampling, due to finite population sizes and limited dispersal. Neutral models predict that species are not necessarily adapted to specific niches, but are functionally equivalent across a range of habitats. Here, we evaluate the ecology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the most important microbial species in human history. The artificial collection, concentration and fermentation of large volumes of fruit for alcohol production produce an environment in which S. cerevisiae thrives, and therefore it is assumed that fruit is the ecological niche that S. cerevisiae inhabits and has adapted to. We find very little direct evidence that S. cerevisiae is adapted to fruit, or indeed to any other specific niche. We propose instead a neutral nomad model for S. cerevisiae, which we believe should be used as the starting hypothesis in attempting to unravel the ecology of this important microbe. PMID:25725024

  20. [Mitochondria inheritance in yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Fizikova, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the main mechanisms of mitochondria inheritance in yeast Saccharonmyces cerevisiae. The genetic mechanisms of functionally active mitochondria inheritance in eukaryotic cells is one of the most relevant in modem researches. A great number of genetic diseases are associated with mitochondria dysfunction. Plasticity of eukaryotic cell metabolism according to the environmental changes is ensured by adequate mitochondria functioning by means of ATP synthesis coordination, reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis regulation and is an important factor of cell adaptation to stress. Mitochondria participation in important for cell vitality processes masters the presence of accurate mechanisms of mitochondria functions regulation according to environment fluctuations. The mechanisms of mitochondria division and distribution are highly conserved. Baker yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal model object for mitochondria researches due to energetic metabolism lability, ability to switch over respiration to fermentation, and petite-positive phenotype. Correction of metabolism according to the environmental changes is necessary for cell vitality. The influence of respiratory, carbon, amino acid and phosphate metabolism on mitochondria functions was shown. As far as the mechanisms that stabilize functions of mitochondria and mtDNA are highly conserve, we can project yeast regularities on higher eukaryotes systems. This makes it possible to approximate understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of a great number of human diseases.

  1. Interaction of Prions Causes Heritable Traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Ryzhova, Tatyana A; Volkov, Kirill V; Zadorsky, Sergey P; Sopova, Julia V; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Galkin, Alexey P

    2016-12-01

    The concept of "protein-based inheritance" defines prions as epigenetic determinants that cause several heritable traits in eukaryotic microorganisms, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Podospora anserina. Previously, we discovered a non-chromosomal factor, [NSI+], which possesses the main features of yeast prions, including cytoplasmic infectivity, reversible curability, dominance, and non-Mendelian inheritance in meiosis. This factor causes omnipotent suppression of nonsense mutations in strains of S. cerevisiae bearing a deleted or modified Sup35 N-terminal domain. In this work, we identified protein determinants of [NSI+] using an original method of proteomic screening for prions. The suppression of nonsense mutations in [NSI+] strains is determined by the interaction between [SWI+] and [PIN+] prions. Using genetic and biochemical methods, we showed that [SWI+] is the key determinant of this nonsense suppression, whereas [PIN+] does not cause nonsense suppression by itself but strongly enhances the effect of [SWI+]. We demonstrated that interaction of [SWI+] and [PIN+] causes inactivation of SUP45 gene that leads to nonsense suppression. Our data show that prion interactions may cause heritable traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. Interaction of Prions Causes Heritable Traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhova, Tatyana A.; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G.; Galkin, Alexey P.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of "protein-based inheritance" defines prions as epigenetic determinants that cause several heritable traits in eukaryotic microorganisms, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Podospora anserina. Previously, we discovered a non-chromosomal factor, [NSI+], which possesses the main features of yeast prions, including cytoplasmic infectivity, reversible curability, dominance, and non-Mendelian inheritance in meiosis. This factor causes omnipotent suppression of nonsense mutations in strains of S. cerevisiae bearing a deleted or modified Sup35 N-terminal domain. In this work, we identified protein determinants of [NSI+] using an original method of proteomic screening for prions. The suppression of nonsense mutations in [NSI+] strains is determined by the interaction between [SWI+] and [PIN+] prions. Using genetic and biochemical methods, we showed that [SWI+] is the key determinant of this nonsense suppression, whereas [PIN+] does not cause nonsense suppression by itself but strongly enhances the effect of [SWI+]. We demonstrated that interaction of [SWI+] and [PIN+] causes inactivation of SUP45 gene that leads to nonsense suppression. Our data show that prion interactions may cause heritable traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:28027291

  3. Overproduction of fatty acids in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Daoyi; Cheng, Yongbo; Zhu, Fayin; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2014-09-01

    The long hydrocarbon fatty acyl chain is energy rich, making it an ideal precursor for liquid transportation fuels and high-value oleo chemicals. As Saccharomyces cerevisiae has many advantages for industrial production compared to Escherichia coli. Here, we attempted to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids. First, disruption of the beta-oxidation pathway, elimination of the acyl-CoA synthetases, overexpression of different thioesterases and acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC1, and engineering the supply of precursor acetyl-CoA. The engineered strain XL122 produced more than 120 mg/L of fatty acids. In parallel, we inactivated ADH1, the dominant gene for ethanol production, to redirect the metabolic flux to fatty acids synthesis. The engineered strain DG005 produced about 140 mg/L fatty acids. Additionally, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase was identified as a critical bottleneck of fatty acids synthesis in S. cerevisiae with a cell-free system. However, overexpression of ACC1 has little effect on fatty acids biosynthesis. As it has been reported that phosphorylation of ACC1 may influent its activity, so phosphorylation sites of ACC1 were further identified. Although the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear, our results provide rationale for future studies to target this critical step. All these efforts, particularly the discovery of the limiting step are critical for developing a "cell factory" for the overproduction of fatty acids by using type I fatty acids synthase in yeast or other fungi.

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tti2 Regulates PIKK Proteins and Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kyle S.; Duennwald, Martin L.; Karagiannis, Jim; Genereaux, Julie; McCarton, Alexander S.; Brandl, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The TTT complex is composed of the three essential proteins Tel2, Tti1, and Tti2. The complex is required to maintain steady state levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) proteins, including mTOR, ATM/Tel1, ATR/Mec1, and TRRAP/Tra1, all of which serve as regulators of critical cell signaling pathways. Due to their association with heat shock proteins, and with newly synthesized PIKK peptides, components of the TTT complex may act as cochaperones. Here, we analyze the consequences of depleting the cellular level of Tti2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that yeast expressing low levels of Tti2 are viable under optimal growth conditions, but the cells are sensitive to a number of stress conditions that involve PIKK pathways. In agreement with this, depleting Tti2 levels decreased expression of Tra1, Mec1, and Tor1, affected their localization and inhibited the stress responses in which these molecules are involved. Tti2 expression was not increased during heat shock, implying that it does not play a general role in the heat shock response. However, steady state levels of Hsp42 increase when Tti2 is depleted, and tti2L187P has a synthetic interaction with exon 1 of the human Huntingtin gene containing a 103 residue polyQ sequence, suggesting a general role in protein quality control. We also find that overexpressing Hsp90 or its cochaperones is synthetic lethal when Tti2 is depleted, an effect possibly due to imbalanced stoichiometry of a complex required for PIKK assembly. These results indicate that Tti2 does not act as a general chaperone, but may have a specialized function in PIKK folding and/or complex assembly. PMID:27172216

  5. Genetic Analysis of Desiccation Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Calahan, Dean; Dunham, Maitreya; DeSevo, Chris; Koshland, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Desiccation tolerance, the ability to survive nearly total dehydration, is a rare strategy for survival and reproduction observed in all taxa. However, the mechanism and regulation of this phenomenon are poorly understood. Correlations between desiccation tolerance and potential effectors have been reported in many species, but their physiological significance has not been established in vivo. Although the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits extreme desiccation tolerance, its usefulness has been hampered by an inability to reduce tolerance more than a few fold by physiological or genetic perturbations. Here we report that fewer than one in a million yeast cells from low-density logarithmic cultures survive desiccation, while 20–40% of cells from saturated cultures survive. Using this greatly expanded metric, we show that mutants defective in trehalose biosynthesis, hydrophilins, responses to hyperosmolarity, and hypersalinity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and DNA damage repair nevertheless retain wild-type levels of desiccation tolerance, suggesting that this trait involves a unique constellation of stress factors. A genome-wide screen for mutants that render stationary cells as sensitive as log phase cells identifies only mutations that block respiration. Respiration as a prerequisite for acquiring desiccation tolerance is corroborated by respiration inhibition and by growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. Suppressors bypassing the respiration requirement for desiccation tolerance reveal at least two pathways, one of which, involving the Mediator transcription complex, is associated with the shift from fermentative to respiratory metabolism. Further study of these regulators and their targets should provide important clues to the sensors and effectors of desiccation tolerance. PMID:21840858

  6. Construction of Killer Industrial Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hau-1 and its Fermentation Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Bijender K.; Sharma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 475, a killer strain. The resultant fusants were characterized for desirable fermentation characteristics. All the technologically important characteristics of distillery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 were retained in the fusants, and in addition the killer trait was also introduced into them. Further, the killer activity was found to be stably maintained during hostile conditions of ethanol fermentations in dextrose or molasses, and even during biomass recycling. PMID:24031519

  7. Yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid: acidic conditions caused by the organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures induce expression of intracellular metal metabolism genes regulated by Aft1p.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Miho; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2006-09-01

    Using two types of genome-wide analysis to investigate yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid, we found that the acidic condition affects metal metabolism. The first type is an expression analysis using DNA microarrays to investigate 'acid shock response' as the first step to adapt to an acidic condition, and 'acid adaptation' by maintaining integrity in the acidic condition. The other is a functional screening using the nonessential genes deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression analysis showed that genes involved in stress response, such as YGP1, TPS1 and HSP150, were induced under the acid shock response. Genes such as FIT2, ARN1 and ARN2, involved in metal metabolism regulated by Aft1p, were induced under the acid adaptation. AFT1 was induced under acid shock response and under acid adaptation with lactic acid. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-fused Aft1p was localized to the nucleus in cells grown in media containing lactic acid, acetic acid, or hydrochloric acid. Both analyses suggested that the acidic condition affects cell wall architecture. The depletion of cell-wall components encoded by SED1, DSE2, CTS1, EGT2, SCW11, SUN4 and YNL300W and histone acetyltransferase complex proteins encoded by YID21, EAF3, EAF5, EAF6 and YAF9 increased resistance to lactic acid. Depletion of the cell-wall mannoprotein Sed1p provided resistance to lactic acid, although the expression of SED1 was induced by exposure to lactic acid. Depletion of vacuolar membrane H+-ATPase and high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins caused acid sensitivity. Moreover, our quantitative PCR showed that expression of PDR12 increased under acid shock response with lactic acid and decreased under acid adaptation with hydrochloric acid.

  8. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    PubMed

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-07-27

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of gene expression evolution between species (comparing S. cerevisiae and its sister species Saccharomyces paradoxus) and within species (comparing two closely related S. cerevisiae strains).

  9. Direct evidence for a xylose metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Batt, C.A.; Carvallo, S.; Easson, D.D.; Akedo, M.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    Xylose transport, xylose reductase, and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzymes in the xylose catabolic pathway necessary for the conversion of xylose xylulose are present, although S. cerevisiae cannot grow on xylose as a sole carbon source. Xylose transport is less efficient than glucose transport, and its rate is dependent upon aeration. Xylose reductase appears to be a xylose inducible enzyme and xylitol dehydrogenase activity is constitutive, although both are repressed by glucose. Both xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are five- to tenfold lower in S. cerevisie as compared to Candida utilis. In vivo conversion of /sup 14/C-xylose in S. cerevisiage is demonstrated and xylitol is detected, although no significant levels of any other /sup 14/C-labeled metabolites (e.g., ethanol) are observed. 22 references.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae thermal inactivation kinetics combined with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    López-Malo, A; Guerrero, S; Alzamora, S M

    1999-10-01

    Inactivation kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during thermal treatments at moderate temperatures (45.0, 47.5, 50.0, 52.5, or 55.0 degrees C) combined with application of 20 kHz of ultrasound were evaluated. S. cerevisiae inactivation under the combined effects of heat and ultrasound followed first-order reaction kinetics, with decimal reduction times (D) that varied from 22.3 to 0.8 min. D values in treatments that combined heat and ultrasound were significantly smaller (P < 0.05) than D values obtained for thermal treatments and were more noticeable at temperatures below 50 degrees C. The dependence of the D value on temperature had a significantly (P < 0.05) greater z value for combined treatments. Yeast heat inactivation kinetics revealed decreased thermal resistance caused by ultrasound.

  11. Advanced biofuel production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-06-01

    Replacement of conventional transportation fuels with biofuels will require production of compounds that can cover the complete fuel spectrum, ranging from gasoline to kerosene. Advanced biofuels are expected to play an important role in replacing fossil fuels because they have improved properties compared with ethanol and some of these may have the energy density required for use in heavy duty vehicles, ships, and aviation. Moreover, advanced biofuels can be used as drop-in fuels in existing internal combustion engines. The yeast cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be turned into a producer of higher alcohols (1-butanol and isobutanol), sesquiterpenes (farnesene and bisabolene), and fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel), and here we discusses progress in metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for production of these advanced biofuels.

  12. Hydrolysis and fermentation of amorphous cellulose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Den Haan, Riaan; Rose, Shaunita H; Lynd, Lee R; van Zyl, Willem H

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we expressed two cellulase encoding genes, an endoglucanase of Trichoderma reesei (EGI) and the beta-glucosidase of Saccharomycopsis fibuligera (BGL1), in combination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The resulting strain was able to grow on phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC) through simultaneous production of sufficient extracellular endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase activity. Anaerobic growth (0.03h(-1)) up to 0.27gl(-1) DCW was observed on medium containing 10gl(-1) PASC as sole carbohydrate source with concomitant ethanol production of up to 1.0gl(-1). We have thus demonstrated the construction of a yeast strain capable of growth on and one-step conversion of amorphous cellulose to ethanol, representing significant progress towards realization of one-step processing of cellulosic biomass in a consolidated bioprocessing configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae growing on pure cellulose.

  13. Glucose- and nitrogen sensing and regulatory mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rødkaer, Steven V; Faergeman, Nils J

    2014-08-01

    Pro- and eukaryotic cells are constantly challenged by varying concentrations of nutrients in their environment. Perceiving and adapting to such changes are therefore crucial for cellular viability. Thus, numerous specialized cellular receptors continuously sense and react to the availability of nutrients such as glucose and nitrogen. When stimulated, these receptors initiate various cellular signaling pathways, which in concert constitute a complex regulatory network. To ensure a highly specific response, these pathways and networks cross-communicate with each other and are regulated at several steps and by numerous different regulators. As numerous of these regulating proteins, biochemical mechanisms, and cellular pathways are evolutionary conserved, complex biochemical information relevant to humans can be obtained by studying simple organisms. Thus, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been recognized as a powerful model system to study fundamental biochemical processes. In the present review, we highlight central signaling pathways and molecular circuits conferring nitrogen- and glucose sensing in S. cerevisiae.

  14. Metabolism of extracellular inositol hexaphosphate (phytate) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Andlid, Thomas A; Veide, Jenny; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2004-12-15

    Iron and zinc deficiencies are global problems, frequently leading to severe illness in vulnerable human populations. Addition of phytases can improve the bioavailability of iron and zinc in food. Saccharomyces cerevisiae would be an ideal candidate as a bioavailability improving food additive if it demonstrates significant phytase activity. The purpose of the paper was to study yeast phytase activity to obtain information required to improve strains. All yeasts tested readily degraded extracellular inositol hexaphosphate (phytate; IP6) in media with IP6 as the sole phosphorous source. Phosphate (Pi) addition yielded repression consistent with the PHO system. However, repression of IP6-degrading enzymes was not only dependent on level of Pi, but also on pH and medium composition. In complex medium, containing Pi at a concentration previously suggested to yield full repression of the secretory acid phosphatases (SAPs; e.g., [Mol. Biol. Cell 11 (2000) 4309]), and at relatively high pH, repression of phytate-degrading enzymes was weak. The capacity to degrade phytate, irrespective of Pi addition or not, was highest at the pH most distant from the pH optimum of the SAPs [Microbiol. Res. 151 (1996) 291], suggesting that expression rather than enzyme activity was affected by pH. In synthetic medium, repression was strong and pH-independent (no IP6 degradation within the range tested). The distinct difference between media shows that, in addition to known regulatory role of Pi for the PHO system, additional factors may be involved. Using a deletion strain, we further demonstrate that the main secretory acid phosphatase Pho5p is not essential for intact phytate-degrading capacity and growth without Pi, neither is Pho3p. However, when constitutively overexpressing PHO5 an increased net phytase activity was obtained, in repressing and non-repressing conditions. This proves that, although redundant in a wild type, Pho5p can catalyze hydrolysis of IP6 and that at least one

  15. Flocculation of industrial and laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sieiro, C; Reboredo, N M; Villa, T G

    1995-06-01

    A comparative study has been made of different laboratory and industrial wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to their flocculation behavior. All strains were inhibited by mannose and only one by maltose. In regard to the stability of these characters in the presence of proteases and high salt concentrations, a relevant degree of variation was found among the strains. This was to such an extent that it did not allow their inclusion in the Flo1 or NewFlo phenotypes. Genetic characterization of one wild-type strain revealed that the flocculation-governing gene was allelic to FLO1 found in genetic strains.

  16. [Purification and properties of intercellular inorganic pyrophosphatase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Gou, P; Yang, S

    1998-06-01

    An inorganic pyrophosphatase (EC3.6.1.1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to PAGE homogeneity by sonication disruption, (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were 7.4-7.8 and 60 degrees C, respectively. The Km was 19.3 mmol/L. The enzyme required Mg2+ as a cofactor for hydrolysis of pyrophosphate and was inhibited by Ca2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, Mn2+.

  17. Improved anaerobic use of arginine by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Martin, Olga; Brandriss, Marjorie C; Schneider, Gisbert; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2003-03-01

    Anaerobic arginine catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was genetically modified to allow assimilation of all four rather than just three of the nitrogen atoms in arginine. This was accomplished by bypassing normal formation of proline, an unusable nitrogen source in the absence of oxygen, and causing formation of glutamate instead. A pro3 ure2 strain expressing a PGK1 promoter-driven PUT2 allele encoding Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase lacking a mitochondrial targeting sequence produced significant cytoplasmic activity, accumulated twice as much intracellular glutamate, and produced twice as much cell mass as the parent when grown anaerobically on limiting arginine as sole nitrogen source.

  18. Fluid-phase endocytosis in yeasts other than Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, N; Puente, P; Leal, F

    1990-05-01

    A FITC-dextran internalization assay with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as positive control was used to determine whether fluid-phase endocytosis is a general characteristic of yeasts. Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Pichia polymorpha, Kluyveromyces phaseolosporus, Yarrowia lipolytica and Candida albicans were clearly positive, whereas results obtained with Debaryomyces marama were inconclusive. In all cases internalized FITC-dextran was found to be localized in the vacuoles and the process was always time- and temperature-dependent. Lower eucaryotes, particularly yeasts, appear to have the ability to incorporate substances from the extracellular medium through fluid-phase endocytosis.

  19. High-throughput expression in microplate format in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Holz, Caterina; Lang, Christine

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a high-throughput technology that allows parallel expression, purification, and analysis of large numbers of cloned cDNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The technology is based on a vector for intracellular protein expression under control of the inducible CUP1 promoter, where the gene products are fused to specific peptide sequences. These N-terminal and C-terminal epitope tags allow the immunological identification and purification of the gene products independent of the protein produced. By introducing the method of recombinational cloning we avoid time-consuming re-cloning steps and enable the easy switching between different expression vectors and host systems.

  20. Expression of acylphosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances ethanol fermentation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Raugei, G.; Modesti, A.; Magherini, F.

    1996-06-01

    Previous experiments in vitro have demonstrated the ability of acylphosphatase to increase the rate of glucose fermentation in yeast. To evaluate the possibility of increasing fermentation in vivo also, a chemically synthesized DNA sequence coding for human muscle acylphosphatase was expressed at high level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ethanol production was measured in these engineered strains in comparison with a control. Acylphosphatase expression strongly increased the rate of ethanol production both in aerobic and anaerobic culture. This finding may be potentially important for the development of more efficient industrial fermentation processes. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Identification of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Hildyard, John C W; Halestrap, Andrew P

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate transport is fundamental for metabolism and mediated by a specific inhibitable carrier. We have identified the yeast mitochondrial pyruvate carrier by measuring inhibitor-sensitive pyruvate uptake into mitochondria from 18 different Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants, each lacking an unattributed member of the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF). Only mitochondria from the YIL006w deletion mutant exhibited no inhibitor-sensitive pyruvate transport, but otherwise behaved normally. YIL006w encodes a 41.9 kDa MCF member with homologous proteins present in both the human and mouse genomes. PMID:12887330

  2. Genetic stabilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae oenological strains by using benomyl.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Lucía; Feijoo-Siota, Lucía; Veiga-Crespo, Patricia; Villa, Tomás G

    2008-06-01

    Wild-type oenological strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are usually aneuploid and heterozygotes; thus, when they are used as starters in must fermentation the resulting wine characteristics may vary from year to year. Treatment of a wild-type S. cerevisiae oenological strain with benomyl (methyl-l-butylcarbamoyl-2-benzimidazole carbamate), an antifungal agent shown to cause chromosome loss in yeasts, resulted in a stable starter strain in which the parental oenological traits were unchanged. The oenological S. cerevisiae strain was treated with benomyl in two different ways (A and B), and sporulation ability and spore viability were subsequently assayed. Treatment A resulted in both the highest numbers of tetrads and a reduction in DNA cell content, while treatment B increased spore viability. Fermentation assays were carried out with spore clones obtained from treatment A, and the concentrations of glycerol, lactic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol resulting from the treated strains were found to be similar to those of the parental strain. Benomyl treatment thus achieved stable, highly sporulating oenological S. cerevisiae strains of low ploidy, but preserved the desirable oenological properties of the parental strain.

  3. Quantifying the complexities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae's ecosystem engineering via fermentation.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Matthew R

    2008-08-01

    The theory of niche construction suggests that organisms may engineer environments via their activities. Despite the potential of this phenomenon being realized by Darwin, the capability of niche construction to generally unite ecological and evolutionary biology has never been empirically quantified. Here I quantify the fitness effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae's ecosystem engineering in a natural ferment in order to understand the interaction between ecological and evolutionary processes. I show that S. cerevisiae eventually dominates in fruit niches, where it is naturally initially rare, by modifying the environment through fermentation (the Crabtree effect) in ways which extend beyond just considering ethanol production. These data show that an additional cause of S. cerevisiae's competitive advantage over the other yeasts in the community is due to the production of heat via fermentation. Even though fermentation is less energetically efficient than respiration, it seems that this trait has been selected for because its net effect provides roughly a 7% fitness advantage over the other members of the community. These data provide an elegant example of niche construction because this trait clearly modifies the environment and therefore the selection pressures to which S. cerevisiae, and other organisms that access the fruit resource, including humans, are exposed to.

  4. The ethanol stress response and ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stanley, D; Bandara, A; Fraser, S; Chambers, P J; Stanley, G A

    2010-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is traditionally used for alcoholic beverage and bioethanol production; however, its performance during fermentation is compromised by the impact of ethanol accumulation on cell vitality. This article reviews studies into the molecular basis of the ethanol stress response and ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae; such knowledge can facilitate the development of genetic engineering strategies for improving cell performance during ethanol stress. Previous studies have used a variety of strains and conditions, which is problematic, because the impact of ethanol stress on gene expression is influenced by the environment. There is however some commonality in Gene Ontology categories affected by ethanol assault that suggests that the ethanol stress response of S. cerevisiae is compromised by constraints on energy production, leading to increased expression of genes associated with glycolysis and mitochondrial function, and decreased gene expression in energy-demanding growth-related processes. Studies using genome-wide screens suggest that the maintenance of vacuole function is important for ethanol tolerance, possibly because of the roles of this organelle in protein turnover and maintaining ion homoeostasis. Accumulation of Asr1 and Rat8 in the nucleus specifically during ethanol stress suggests S. cerevisiae has a specific response to ethanol stress although this supposition remains controversial.

  5. Sucrose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet.

    PubMed

    Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Raghavendran, Vijayendran; Stambuk, Boris Ugarte; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2016-02-01

    Sucrose is an abundant, readily available and inexpensive substrate for industrial biotechnology processes and its use is demonstrated with much success in the production of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally evolved to efficiently consume sugars such as sucrose, is one of the most important cell factories due to its robustness, stress tolerance, genetic accessibility, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse. This minireview is focused on sucrose metabolism in S. cerevisiae, a rather unexplored subject in the scientific literature. An analysis of sucrose availability in nature and yeast sugar metabolism was performed, in order to understand the molecular background that makes S. cerevisiae consume this sugar efficiently. A historical overview on the use of sucrose and S. cerevisiae by humans is also presented considering sugarcane and sugarbeet as the main sources of this carbohydrate. Physiological aspects of sucrose consumption are compared with those concerning other economically relevant sugars. Also, metabolic engineering efforts to alter sucrose catabolism are presented in a chronological manner. In spite of its extensive use in yeast-based industries, a lot of basic and applied research on sucrose metabolism is imperative, mainly in fields such as genetics, physiology and metabolic engineering.

  6. A Computational Approach to Estimating Nondisjunction Frequency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Daniel B.; Burgess, Sean M.

    2016-01-01

    Errors segregating homologous chromosomes during meiosis result in aneuploid gametes and are the largest contributing factor to birth defects and spontaneous abortions in humans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long served as a model organism for studying the gene network supporting normal chromosome segregation. Measuring homolog nondisjunction frequencies is laborious, and involves dissecting thousands of tetrads to detect missegregation of individually marked chromosomes. Here we describe a computational method (TetFit) to estimate the relative contributions of meiosis I nondisjunction and random-spore death to spore inviability in wild type and mutant strains. These values are based on finding the best-fit distribution of 4, 3, 2, 1, and 0 viable-spore tetrads to an observed distribution. Using TetFit, we found that meiosis I nondisjunction is an intrinsic component of spore inviability in wild-type strains. We show proof-of-principle that the calculated average meiosis I nondisjunction frequency determined by TetFit closely matches empirically determined values in mutant strains. Using these published data sets, TetFit uncovered two classes of mutants: Class A mutants skew toward increased nondisjunction death, and include those with known defects in establishing pairing, recombination, and/or synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Class B mutants skew toward random spore death, and include those with defects in sister-chromatid cohesion and centromere function. Epistasis analysis using TetFit is facilitated by the low numbers of tetrads (as few as 200) required to compare the contributions to spore death in different mutant backgrounds. TetFit analysis does not require any special strain construction, and can be applied to previously observed tetrad distributions. PMID:26747203

  7. Specific DNA replication mutations affect telomere length in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A K; Holm, C

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the DNA replication apparatus and the control of telomere length, we examined the effects of several DNA replication mutations on telomere length in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report that a mutation in the structural gene for the large subunit of DNA replication factor C (cdc44/rfc1) causes striking increases in telomere length. A similar effect is seen with mutations in only one other DNA replication gene: the structural gene for DNA polymerase alpha (cdc17/pol1) (M.J. Carson and L. Hartwell, Cell 42:249-257, 1985). For both genes, the telomere elongation phenotype is allele specific and appears to correlate with the penetrance of the mutations. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis reveals that those alleles that cause elongation also exhibit a slowing of DNA replication. To determine whether elongation is mediated by telomerase or by slippage of the DNA polymerase, we created cdc17-1 mutants carrying deletions of the gene encoding the RNA component of telomerase (TLC1). cdc17-1 strains that would normally undergo telomere elongation failed to do so in the absence of telomerase activity. This result implies that telomere elongation in cdc17-1 mutants is mediated by the action of telomerase. Since DNA replication involves transfer of the nascent strand from polymerase alpha to replication factor C (T. Tsurimoto and B. Stillman, J. Biol. Chem. 266:1950-1960, 1991; T. Tsurimoto and B. Stillman, J. Biol. Chem. 266:1961-1968, 1991; S. Waga and B. Stillman, Nature [London] 369:207-212, 1994), one possibility is that this step affects the regulation of telomere length. PMID:8756617

  8. Rearrangements of highly polymorphic regions near telomeres of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, H; Thorburn, P; Haber, J E

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the mitotic and meiotic properties of telomeric regions in various laboratory strains of yeast. Using a sequence (Y probe) derived from a cloned yeast telomere (J. Szostak and E. Blackburn, Cell 29:245-255, 1982), we found that various strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show extensive polymorphisms of restriction endonuclease fragment length. Some of the variation in the lengths of telomeric fragments appears to be under the control of a small number of genes. When DNA from various strains was digested with endonuclease KpnI, nearly all of the fragments homologous to the Y probe were found to be of different size. The pattern of fragments in different strains was extremely variable, with a greater degree of polymorphism than that observed for fragments containing the mobile TY1 element. Tetrad analysis of haploid meiotic segregants from diploids heterozygous for many different Y-homologous KpnI fragments revealed that most of them exhibited Mendelian (2:0) segregation. However, only a small proportion of these fragments displayed the obligate 2:2 parental segregation expected of simple allelic variants at the same chromosome end. From the segregations of these fragments, we concluded that some yeast telomeres lack a Y-homologous sequence and that the chromosome arms containing a Y-homologous sequence are different among various yeast strains. Regions near yeast telomeres frequently undergo rearrangement. Among eight tetrads from three different diploids, we have found three novel Y-homologous restriction fragments that appear to have arisen during meiosis. In all three cases, the appearance of a new fragment was accompanied by the loss of another band. In one of these cases, the rearrangement leading to a novel fragment arose in an isogenic diploid, in which both homologous chromosomes should have been identical. Among these same tetrads we also found examples of apparent mitotic gene conversions and mitotic recombination involving telemetric

  9. Molecular basis of cell integrity and morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, V J; Durán, A; del Rey, F; Snyder, M P; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1995-01-01

    In fungi and many other organisms, a thick outer cell wall is responsible for determining the shape of the cell and for maintaining its integrity. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism for the study of cell wall synthesis, and over the past few decades, many aspects of the composition, structure, and enzymology of the cell wall have been elucidated. The cell wall of budding yeasts is a complex and dynamic structure; its arrangement alters as the cell grows, and its composition changes in response to different environmental conditions and at different times during the yeast life cycle. In the past few years, we have witnessed a profilic genetic and molecular characterization of some key aspects of cell wall polymer synthesis and hydrolysis in the budding yeast. Furthermore, this organism has been the target of numerous recent studies on the topic of morphogenesis, which have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the intracellular events that participate in directed cell wall synthesis. A number of components that direct polarized secretion, including those involved in assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, and a series of novel signal transduction systems and regulatory components have been identified. Analysis of these different components has suggested pathways by which polarized secretion is directed and controlled. Our aim is to offer an overall view of the current understanding of cell wall dynamics and of the complex network that controls polarized growth at particular stages of the budding yeast cell cycle and life cycle. PMID:7565410

  10. Metabolism and Regulation of Glycerolipids in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Susan A.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Carman, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to its genetic tractability and increasing wealth of accessible data, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model system of choice for the study of the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of eukaryotic lipid metabolism. Glycerolipids (e.g., phospholipids and triacylglycerol) and their precursors are synthesized and metabolized by enzymes associated with the cytosol and membranous organelles, including endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and lipid droplets. Genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed that glycerolipids play important roles in cell signaling, membrane trafficking, and anchoring of membrane proteins in addition to membrane structure. The expression of glycerolipid enzymes is controlled by a variety of conditions including growth stage and nutrient availability. Much of this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level and involves the Ino2–Ino4 activation complex and the Opi1 repressor, which interacts with Ino2 to attenuate transcriptional activation of UASINO-containing glycerolipid biosynthetic genes. Cellular levels of phosphatidic acid, precursor to all membrane phospholipids and the storage lipid triacylglycerol, regulates transcription of UASINO-containing genes by tethering Opi1 to the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane and controlling its translocation into the nucleus, a mechanism largely controlled by inositol availability. The transcriptional activator Zap1 controls the expression of some phospholipid synthesis genes in response to zinc availability. Regulatory mechanisms also include control of catalytic activity of glycerolipid enzymes by water-soluble precursors, products and lipids, and covalent modification of phosphorylation, while in vivo function of some enzymes is governed by their subcellular location. Genome-wide genetic analysis indicates coordinate regulation between glycerolipid metabolism and a broad spectrum of metabolic pathways. PMID:22345606

  11. Effects of low-intensity ultrasound on the growth, cell membrane permeability and ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chunhua; Xiong, Feng; He, Ronghai; Zhang, Weiwei; Ma, Haile

    2017-05-01

    Effects of low-intensity ultrasound (at different frequency, treatment time and power) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae in different growth phase were evaluated by the biomass in the paper. In addition, the cell membrane permeability and ethanol tolerance of sonicated Saccharomyces cerevisiae were also researched. The results revealed that the biomass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae increased by 127.03% under the optimum ultrasonic conditions such as frequency 28kHz, power 140W/L and ultrasonic time 1h when Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultured to the latent anaphase. And the membrane permeability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in latent anaphase enhanced by ultrasound, resulting in the augment of extracellular protein, nucleic acid and fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP) contents. In addition, sonication could accelerate the damage of high concentration alcohol to Saccharomyces cerevisiae although the ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was not affected significantly by ultrasound.

  12. Enhanced lysosomal activity by overexpressed aminopeptidase Y in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihee; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains vacuoles corresponding to lysosomes in higher eukaryotes. Lysosomes are dynamic (not silent) organelles in which enzymes can be easily integrated or released when exposed to stressful conditions. Changes in lysosomal enzymes have been observed due to oxidative stress, resulting in an increased function of lysosomes. The protein profiles from H2O2- and NH4Cl-treated lysosomes showed different expression patterns, observed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The aminopeptidase Y protein (APE3) that conspicuously enhanced antimicrobial activity than other proteins was selected for further studies. The S. cerevisiae APE3 gene was isolated and inserted into pYES2.0 expression vector. The GFP gene was inserted downstream to the APE3 gene for confirmation of APE3 targeting to lysosomes, and S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP. The APE3 did not enter in lysosomes and formed an inclusion body at 30 °C, but it inserted to lysosomes as shown by the merger of GFP with lysosomes at 28 °C. Antimicrobial activity of the cloned S. cerevisiae increased about 5 to 10 % against eight strains, compared to normal cells, and galactose induction is increased more two folds than that of normal cells. Therefore, S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP, accumulating a large amount of APE3, resulting in increased lysosomal activity. Increase in endogenous levels of lysosomes and their activity following genetic modification can lead to its use in applications such as antimicrobial agents and apoptosis-inducing materials for cancer cells, and consequently, it may also be possible to use the organelles for improving in vitro functions.

  13. Functional expression of a bacterial xylose isomerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brat, Dawid; Boles, Eckhard; Wiedemann, Beate

    2009-04-01

    In industrial fermentation processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is commonly used for ethanol production. However, it lacks the ability to ferment pentose sugars like d-xylose and l-arabinose. Heterologous expression of a xylose isomerase (XI) would enable yeast cells to metabolize xylose. However, many attempts to express a prokaryotic XI with high activity in S. cerevisiae have failed so far. We have screened nucleic acid databases for sequences encoding putative XIs and finally were able to clone and successfully express a highly active new kind of XI from the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans in S. cerevisiae. Heterologous expression of this enzyme confers on the yeast cells the ability to metabolize d-xylose and to use it as the sole carbon and energy source. The new enzyme has low sequence similarities to the XIs from Piromyces sp. strain E2 and Thermus thermophilus, which were the only two XIs previously functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae. The activity and kinetic parameters of the new enzyme are comparable to those of the Piromyces XI. Importantly, the new enzyme is far less inhibited by xylitol, which accrues as a side product during xylose fermentation. Furthermore, expression of the gene could be improved by adapting its codon usage to that of the highly expressed glycolytic genes of S. cerevisiae. Expression of the bacterial XI in an industrially employed yeast strain enabled it to grow on xylose and to ferment xylose to ethanol. Thus, our findings provide an excellent starting point for further improvement of xylose fermentation in industrial yeast strains.

  14. Investigation of the Best Saccharomyces cerevisiae Growth Condition

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Roshanak; Salari, Rosita

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known as one of the useful yeasts which are utilized in baking and other industries. It can be easily cultured at an economic price. Today the introduction of safe and efficient carriers is being considered. Due to its generally round shape, and the volume that is enclosed by its membrane and cell wall, it is used to encapsulate active materials to protect them from degradation or to introduce a sustained release drug delivery system. Providing the best conditions in order to achieve the best morphological properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a carrier. Methods In this research, the most suitable growth condition of yeast cells which provides the best size for use as drug carriers was found by a bioreactor in a synthetic culture medium. Yeast cell reproduction and growth curves were obtained, based on pour plate colony counting data and UV/Visible sample absorption at 600 nm. Yeast cell growth patterns and growth rates were determined by Matlab mathematical software. Results Results showed that pH=4 and dissolving oxygen (DO) 5% was the best condition for yeast cells to grow and reproduce. This condition also provided the largest size (2 × 3 μ) yeast cells. Conclusion Owing to the yeast cells’ low-cost production and their structural characteristics, they could be used as potent drug carriers. Funding This work was supported by a grant from the Vice Chancellor of Research of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. PMID:28243411

  15. Accumulation and chemical states of radiocesium by fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian

    2014-05-01

    After accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the fall-out radiocesium was deposited on the ground. Filamentous fungus is known to accumulate radiocesium in environment, even though many minerals are involved in soil. These facts suggest that fungus affect the migration behavior of radiocesium in the environment. However, accumulation mechanism of radiocesium by fungus is not understood. In the present study, accumulation and chemical states change of Cs by unicellular fungus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied to elucidate the role of microorganisms in the migration of radiocesium in the environment. Two different experimental conditions were employed; one is the accumulation experiments of radiocesium by S. cerevisiae from the agar medium containing 137Cs and a mineral of zeolite, vermiculite, smectite, mica, or illite. The other is the experiments using stable cesium to examine the chemical states change of Cs. In the former experiment, the cells were grown on membrane filter of 0.45 μm installed on the agar medium. After the grown cells were weighed, radioactivity in the cells was measured by an autoradiography technique. The mineral weight contents were changed from 0.1% to 1% of the medium. In the latter experiment, the cells were grown in the medium containing stable Cs between 1 mM and 10mM. The Cs accumulated cells were analyzed by SEM-EDS and EXAFS. The adsorption experiments of cesium by the cells under resting condition were also conducted to test the effect of cells metabolic activity. Without mineral in the medium, cells of S. cerevisiae accumulated 1.5x103 Bq/g from the medium containing 137Cs of 2.6x102 Bq/g. When mineral was added in the medium, concentration of 137Cs in the cells decreased. The concentration of 137Cs in the cells from the medium containing different minerals were in the following order; smectite, illite, mica > vermiculite > zeolite. This order was nearly the same as the inverse of distribution coefficient of

  16. Involvement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Avo3p/Tsc11p in maintaining TOR complex 2 integrity and coupling to downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsiang-Ling; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Hsien-Ching; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2008-08-01

    Target-of-rapamycin proteins (TORs) are Ser/Thr kinases serving a central role in cell growth control. TORs function in two conserved multiprotein complexes, TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TORC2; the mechanisms underlying their actions and regulation are not fully elucidated. Saccharomyces TORC2, containing Tor2p, Avo1p, Avo2p, Avo3p/Tsc11p, Bit61p, and Lst8p, regulates cell integrity and actin organization. Two classes of avo3 temperature-sensitive (avo3(ts)) mutants that we previously identified display cell integrity and actin defects, yet one is suppressed by AVO1 while the other is suppressed by AVO2 or SLM1, defining two TORC2 downstream signaling mechanisms, one mediated by Avo1p and the other by Avo2p/Slm1p. Employing these mutants, we explored Avo3p functions in TORC2 structure and signaling. By observing binary protein interactions using coimmunoprecipitation, we discovered that the composition of TORC2 and its recruitment of the downstream effectors Slm1p and Slm2p were differentially affected in different avo3(ts) mutants. These molecular defects can be corrected only by expressing AVO3, not by expressing suppressors, highlighting the role of Avo3p as a structural and signaling scaffold for TORC2. Phenotypic modifications of avo3(ts) mutants by deletion of individual Rho1p-GTPase-activating proteins indicate that two TORC2 downstream signaling branches converge on Rho1p activation. Our results also suggest that Avo2p/Slm1p-mediated signaling, but not Avo1p-mediated signaling, links to Rho1p activation specifically through the Rho1p-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tus1p.

  17. Genetic analyses involving interactions between the ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes, lanosterol synthase (Erg7p) and 3-ketoreductase (Erg27p), in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Teske, B.; Taramino, S.; Bhuiyan, M. S. A.; Kumaraswami, N. S.; Randall, S. K.; Barbuch, R.; Eckstein, J.; Balliano, G.; Bard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein interaction studies in the S. cerevisiae ergosterol biosynthetic pathway suggest that enzymes in this pathway may act as an integrated multienzyme complex. The yeast sterol 3-ketoreductase (Erg27p) required for C-4 demethylation of sterols has previously been shown to also be required for the function of the upstream oxidosqualene cyclase/lanosterol synthase (Erg7p); thus, erg27 mutants accumulate oxidosqualenes as precursors rather than 3-ketosterones. In the present study, we have created various mutations in the ERG27 gene. These mutations include 5 C-terminal truncations, 6 internal deletions, and 32 point mutants of which 14 were obtained by site directed mutagenesis and 18 by random mutagenesis. We have characterized these ERG27 mutations by determining the following: Erg27 and Erg7 enzyme activities, presence of Erg27p as determined by western immunoblots, ability to grow on various sterol substrates and GC sterol profiles. Mutations of the predicted catalytic residues, Y202F and K206A, resulted in the endogenous accumulation of 3-ketosterones rather than oxidosqualenes suggesting retention of Erg7 enzyme activity. This novel phenotype demonstrated that the catalytic function of Erg27p can be separated from its Erg7p chaperone ability. Other erg27 mutations resulted in proteins that were present, as determined by western immunoblotting, but unable to interact with the Erg7 protein. We also classify Erg27p as belonging to the SDR (short chain dehydrogenase/reductase) family of enzymes and demonstrate the possibility of homo -or hetero-dimerization of the protein. This study provides new insights into the role of Erg27p in sterol biosynthesis. PMID:18555807

  18. Production of aromatics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae--a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Krömer, Jens O; Nunez-Bernal, Dariela; Averesch, Nils J H; Hampe, Jennifer; Varela, Javier; Varela, Cristian

    2013-01-20

    Aromatics are amongst the most important bulk feedstocks for the chemical industry, however, no viable bioprocess exists today and production is still dependent on petro-chemistry. In this article the production of aromatic precursors such as p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA) and p-amino benzoic acid (PABA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was evaluated using metabolic network analysis. Theoretical mass yields for PHBA and for PABA obtained by metabolic network analysis were 0.58 and 0.53 g g(glucose)⁻¹, respectively. A major setback for microbial production of aromatics is the high toxicity of the products. Therefore, PHBA and PABA toxicity was evaluated in S. cerevisiae. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 38.3 g L⁻¹ for PHBA and 0.62 g L⁻¹ for PABA were observed. However, PABA toxicity could be alleviated in adaptation experiments. Finally, metabolic engineering was used to create proof of principle first generation strains of S. cerevisiae. Overall accumulation of 650 μM PHBA and 250 μM PABA could be achieved.

  19. Early manifestations of replicative aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Maksim I.; Knorre, Dmitry A.; Severin, Fedor F.

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is successfully used as a model organism to find genes responsible for lifespan control of higher organisms. As functional decline of higher eukaryotes can start as early as one quarter of the average lifespan, we asked whether S. cerevisiae can be used to model this manifestation of aging. While the average replicative lifespan of S. cerevisiae mother cells ranges between 15 and 30 division cycles, we found that resistances to certain stresses start to decrease much earlier. Looking into the mechanism, we found that knockouts of genes responsible for mitochondria-to-nucleus (retrograde) signaling, RTG1 or RTG3, significantly decrease the resistance of cells that generated more than four daughters, but not of the younger ones. We also found that even young mother cells frequently contain mitochondria with heterogeneous transmembrane potential and that the percentage of such cells correlates with replicative age. Together, these facts suggest that retrograde signaling starts to malfunction in relatively young cells, leading to accumulation of heterogeneous mitochondria within one cell. The latter may further contribute to a decline in stress resistances.

  20. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    PubMed Central

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L.; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:25584613

  1. PGM2 overexpression improves anaerobic galactose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiae galactose is initially metabolized through the Leloir pathway after which glucose 6-phosphate enters glycolysis. Galactose is controlled both by glucose repression and by galactose induction. The gene PGM2 encodes the last enzyme of the Leloir pathway, phosphoglucomutase 2 (Pgm2p), which catalyses the reversible conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate. Overexpression of PGM2 has previously been shown to enhance aerobic growth of S. cerevisiae in galactose medium. Results In the present study we show that overexpression of PGM2 under control of the HXT7'promoter from an integrative plasmid increased the PGM activity 5 to 6 times, which significantly reduced the lag phase of glucose-pregrown cells in an anaerobic galactose culture. PGM2 overexpression also increased the anaerobic specific growth rate whereas ethanol production was less influenced. When PGM2 was overexpressed from a multicopy plasmid instead, the PGM activity increased almost 32 times. However, this increase of PGM activity did not further improve aerobic galactose fermentation as compared to the strain carrying PGM2 on the integrative plasmid. Conclusion PGM2 overexpression in S. cerevisiae from an integrative plasmid is sufficient to reduce the lag phase and to enhance the growth rate in anaerobic galactose fermentation, which results in an overall decrease in fermentation duration. This observation is of particular importance for the future development of stable industrial strains with enhanced PGM activity. PMID:20507616

  2. Combinatorial metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for terminal alkene production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Binbin; Lee, Dong-Yup; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2015-09-01

    Biological production of terminal alkenes has garnered a significant interest due to their industrial applications such as lubricants, detergents and fuels. Here, we engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce terminal alkenes via a one-step fatty acid decarboxylation pathway and improved the alkene production using combinatorial engineering strategies. In brief, we first characterized eight fatty acid decarboxylases to enable and enhance alkene production. We then increased the production titer 7-fold by improving the availability of the precursor fatty acids. We additionally increased the titer about 5-fold through genetic cofactor engineering and gene expression tuning in rich medium. Lastly, we further improved the titer 1.8-fold to 3.7 mg/L by optimizing the culturing conditions in bioreactors. This study represents the first report of terminal alkene biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, and the abovementioned combinatorial engineering approaches collectively increased the titer 67.4-fold. We envision that these approaches could provide insights into devising engineering strategies to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biochemicals in S. cerevisiae.

  3. Stoichiometric network constraints on xylose metabolism by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yong-Su; Jeffries, Thomas W

    2004-07-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering is constrained by the thermodynamic and stoichiometric feasibility of enzymatic activities of introduced genes. Engineering of xylose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has focused on introducing genes for the initial xylose assimilation steps from Pichia stipitis, a xylose-fermenting yeast, into S. cerevisiae, a yeast traditionally used in ethanol production from hexose. However, recombinant S. cerevisiae created in several laboratories have used xylose oxidatively rather than in the fermentative manner that this yeast metabolizes glucose. To understand the differences between glucose and engineered xylose metabolic networks, we performed a flux balance analysis (FBA) and calculated extreme pathways using a stoichiometric model that describes the biochemistry of yeast cell growth. FBA predicted that the ethanol yield from xylose exhibits a maximum under oxygen-limited conditions, and a fermentation experiment confirmed this finding. Fermentation results were largely consistent with in silico phenotypes based on calculated extreme pathways, which displayed several phases of metabolic phenotype with respect to oxygen availability from anaerobic to aerobic conditions. However, in contrast to the model prediction, xylitol production continued even after the optimum aeration level for ethanol production was attained. These results suggest that oxygen (or some other electron accepting system) is required to resolve the redox imbalance caused by cofactor difference between xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, and that other factors limit glycolytic flux when xylose is the sole carbon source.

  4. Role of social wasps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Stefanini, Irene; Dapporto, Leonardo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Calabretta, Antonio; Di Paola, Monica; De Filippo, Carlotta; Viola, Roberto; Capretti, Paolo; Polsinelli, Mario; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2012-08-14

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most important model organisms and has been a valuable asset to human civilization. However, despite its extensive use in the last 9,000 y, the existence of a seasonal cycle outside human-made environments has not yet been described. We demonstrate the role of social wasps as vector and natural reservoir of S. cerevisiae during all seasons. We provide experimental evidence that queens of social wasps overwintering as adults (Vespa crabro and Polistes spp.) can harbor yeast cells from autumn to spring and transmit them to their progeny. This result is mirrored by field surveys of the genetic variability of natural strains of yeast. Microsatellites and sequences of a selected set of loci able to recapitulate the yeast strain's evolutionary history were used to compare 17 environmental wasp isolates with a collection of strains from grapes from the same region and more than 230 strains representing worldwide yeast variation. The wasp isolates fall into subclusters representing the overall ecological and industrial yeast diversity of their geographic origin. Our findings indicate that wasps are a key environmental niche for the evolution of natural S. cerevisiae populations, the dispersion of yeast cells in the environment, and the maintenance of their diversity. The close relatedness of several wasp isolates with grape and wine isolates reflects the crucial role of human activities on yeast population structure, through clonal expansion and selection of specific strains during the biotransformation of fermented foods, followed by dispersal mediated by insects and other animals.

  5. Transformations of inorganic mercury by Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yannai, S.; Berdicevsky, I.; Duek, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans were incubated with 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 {mu}g of Hg (as HgCl{sub 2}) per ml of Nelson's medium in the presence of trace amounts of oxygen at 28{degree}C for 12 days. Two control media were used, one without added Hg and one without yeast inoculum. Yeast cell growth was estimated after 1, 2, 3, and 8 days of incubation. The contents of organomercury in the system and of elemental mercury released from the media and collected in traps were determined at the end of the experiments. The results were as follows: (1) C. albicans was the more mercury-resistant species, but both yeast species failed to grown in the media containing 0.75 {mu}g of Hg per ml.; (2) The amounts of organomercury produced by the two species were proportional to the amount of HgCl{sub 2} added to the medium. In all cases C. albicans produced considerably larger amounts of methylmercury than S. cerevisiae; (3) The amounts of elemental Hg produced were inversely proportional to the HgCl{sub 2} level added in the case of S. cerevisiae but were all similar in the case of C. albicans;and (4) Neither organomercury nor elemental Hg was produced in any of the control media.

  6. The postmitotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae after spaceflight showed higher viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zong-Chun; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Yan; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed as an ideal model organism for clarifying the biological effects caused by spaceflight conditions. The postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells onboard Practice eight recoverable satellite were subjected to spaceflight for 15 days. After recovery, the viability, the glycogen content, the activities of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, the DNA content and the lipid peroxidation level in yeast cells were analyzed. The viability of the postmitotic yeast cells after spaceflight showed a three-fold increase as compared with that of the ground control cells. Compared to the ground control cells, the lipid peroxidation level in the spaceflight yeast cells markedly decreased. The spaceflight yeast cells also showed an increase in G2/M cell population and a decrease in Sub-G1 cell population. The glycogen content and the activities of hexokinase and succinate dehydrogenase significantly decreased in the yeast cells after spaceflight. In contrast, the activity of malate dehydrogenase showed an obvious increase after spaceflight. These results suggested that microgravity or spaceflight could promote the survival of postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells through regulating carbohydrate metabolism, ROS level and cell cycle progression.

  7. An assay for functional xylose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengqiang; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Suo, Fan; Bao, Xiaoming

    2013-11-15

    It has been considered that more efficient uptake of xylose could promote increased xylose metabolic capacity of several microorganisms. In this study, an assay to screen xylose transporters was established in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, which expresses the xylosidase gene of Bacillus pumilus intracellularly. The absorbed xylose analog p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (pNPX) rapidly hydrolyzed to p-nitrophenol (pNP), which displayed a yellow tint when exposed to xylosidase in vivo. The xylose transporter activities of the strain were computed using the pNP production rate, which was detected extracellularly. This method could be used for both high-throughput screening and smaller scale investigations. AraEp, which is a pentose transporter of Corynebacterium glutamicum, was expressed in S. cerevisiae and exhibited better transport capacity than the endogenous transporters Hxt7p and Gal2p. Moreover, a mutant of AraEp with 103% greater transport capacity was screened out, and the computer simulation suggested that transmembrane domain 5 was an important factor for the transport capacity of AraEp in S. cerevisiae.

  8. Increasing NADH oxidation reduces overflow metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, G N; Eiteman, M A; McEwen, J E; Olsson, L; Nielsen, J

    2007-02-13

    Respiratory metabolism plays an important role in energy production in the form of ATP in all aerobically growing cells. However, a limitation in respiratory capacity results in overflow metabolism, leading to the formation of byproducts, a phenomenon known as "overflow metabolism" or "the Crabtree effect." The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as an important model organism for studying the Crabtree effect. When subjected to increasing glycolytic fluxes under aerobic conditions, there is a threshold value of the glucose uptake rate at which the metabolism shifts from purely respiratory to mixed respiratory and fermentative. It is well known that glucose repression of respiratory pathways occurs at high glycolytic fluxes, resulting in a decrease in respiratory capacity. Despite many years of detailed studies on this subject, it is not known whether the onset of the Crabtree effect is due to limited respiratory capacity or is caused by glucose-mediated repression of respiration. When respiration in S. cerevisiae was increased by introducing a heterologous alternative oxidase, we observed reduced aerobic ethanol formation. In contrast, increasing nonrespiratory NADH oxidation by overexpression of a water-forming NADH oxidase reduced aerobic glycerol formation. The metabolic response to elevated alternative oxidase occurred predominantly in the mitochondria, whereas NADH oxidase affected genes that catalyze cytosolic reactions. Moreover, NADH oxidase restored the deficiency of cytosolic NADH dehydrogenases in S. cerevisiae. These results indicate that NADH oxidase localizes in the cytosol, whereas alternative oxidase is directed to the mitochondria.

  9. Membrane trafficking in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model.

    PubMed

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-09

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  10. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S.; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I.; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. PMID:26071590

  11. Multilocus sequence typing of oenological Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Rosario; Gómez, Alicia; Robles, Virginia; Rodríguez, Patricia; Cebollero, Eduardo; Tabera, Laura; Carrascosa, Alfonso V; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2009-12-01

    This study describes the application of a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis for molecular discrimination at the strain level of Spanish wine yeast strains. The discrimination power of MLST is compared to mitochondrial RFLP analysis. Fragments of the ADP1, ACC1, RPN2, GLN4, and ALA1 genes were amplified by PCR from chromosomal DNA of 18 wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Ten polymorphic sites were found in the five loci analyzed showing 13 different genotypes, with 11 of them represented by only one strain. RFLP analysis of the same 18 wine yeast strains showed seventeen different mitochondrial patterns. Phylogenetic relationships among the strains analyzed, inferred by MLST data, showed wine isolates of S. cerevisiae as a rather homogeneous group. The discrimination potential of mitochondrial RFLP analysis was superior to the MLST scheme used in this work. However, MLST analysis allowed an easy construction of reliable phylogenetic trees. MLST analysis offers the possibility of typing wine S. cerevisiae strains simultaneously to the study of the genetic relationship among them.

  12. Ciclohexadespipeptide beauvericin degradation by different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meca, G; Zhou, T; Li, X Z; Ritieni, A; Mañes, J

    2013-09-01

    The interaction between the mycotoxin beauvericin (BEA) and 9 yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae named LO9, YE-2, YE5, YE-6, YE-4, A34, A17, A42 and A08 was studied. The biological degradations were carried out under aerobic conditions in the liquid medium of Potato Dextrose Broth (PDB) at 25°C for 48 h and in a food/feed system composed of corn flour at 37°C for 3 days, respectively. BEA present in fermented medium and corn flour was determined using liquid chromatography coupled to the mass spectrometry detector in tandem (LC-MS/MS) and the BEA degradation products produced during the fermentations were determined using the technique of the liquid chromatography coupled to a linear ion trap (LIT). Results showed that the S. cerevisiae strains reduced meanly the concentration of the BEA present in PDB by 86.2% and in a food system by 71.1%. All the S. cerevisiae strains used in this study showed a significant BEA reduction during the fermentation process employed.

  13. Osmo-, Thermo- and Ethanol- Tolerances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1

    PubMed Central

    Balakumar, Sandrasegarampillai; Arasaratnam, Vasanthy

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1, which is a locally isolated and improved strain showed viability at 40, 45 and 50°C and produced ethanol at 40, 43 and 45°C. When the cells were given heat shock at 45°C for 30min and grown at 40°C, 100% viability was observed for 60h, and addition of 200gL−1 ethanol has led to complete cell death at 30h. Heat shock given at 45°C (for 30min) has improved the tolerance to temperature induced ethanol shock leading to 37% viability at 30h. When the cells were subjected to ethanol (200gL−1 for 30 min) and osmotic shock (sorbitol 300gL−1), trehalose contents in the cells were increased. The heat shocked cells showed better viability in presence of added ethanol. Soy flour supplementation has improved the viability of S. cerevisiae S1 to 80% in presence of 100gL−1 added ethanol and to 60% in presence of 300gL−1sorbitol. In presence of sorbitol (200gL−1) and ethanol (50gL−1) at 40°C, 46% viability was retained by S. cerevisiae S1 at 48h and it was improved to 80% by soy flour supplementation. PMID:24031814

  14. Effect of fermented sea tangle on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Young; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Yang, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Bae-Jin; Cho, Young-Su

    2011-08-01

    Sea tangle, a kind of brown seaweed, was fermented with Lactobacillus brevis BJ-20. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in fermented sea tangle (FST) was 5.56% (w/w) and GABA in total free amino acid of FST was 49.5%. The effect of FST on the enzyme activities and mRNA protein expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) involved in alcohol metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Yeast was cultured in YPD medium supplemented with different concentrations of FST powder [0, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.0% (w/v)] for 18 h. FST had no cytotoxic effect on the yeast growth. The highest activities and protein expressions of ADH and ALDH from the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae were evident with the 0.4% and 0.8% (w/v) FST-supplemented concentrations, respectively. The highest concentrations of GABA as well as minerals (Zn, Ca, and Mg) were found in the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae cultured in medium supplemented with 0.4% (w/v) FST. The levels of GABA, Zn, Ca, and Mg in S. cerevisiae were strongly correlated with the enzyme activities of ADH and ALDH in yeast. These results indicate that FST can enhance the enzyme activities and protein expression of ADH and ALDH in S. cerevisiae.

  15. Intracellular Signal Triggered by Cholera Toxin in Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Rogelio L.; Castro, Ieso M.; Bambirra, Eduardo A.; Amaral, Sheila C.; Fietto, Luciano G.; Tropia, Maria José M.; Neves, Maria José; Dos Santos, Raquel G.; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Nicoli, Jacques R.

    1998-01-01

    As is the case for Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303 protects Fisher rats against cholera toxin (CT). The addition of glucose or dinitrophenol to cells of S. boulardii grown on a nonfermentable carbon source activated trehalase in a manner similar to that observed for S. cerevisiae. The addition of CT to the same cells also resulted in trehalase activation. Experiments performed separately on the A and B subunits of CT showed that both are necessary for activation. Similarly, the addition of CT but not of its separate subunits led to a cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal in both S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae. These data suggest that trehalase stimulation by CT probably occurred through the cAMP-mediated protein phosphorylation cascade. The requirement of CT subunit B for both the cAMP signal and trehalase activation indicates the presence of a specific receptor on the yeasts able to bind to the toxin, a situation similar to that observed for mammalian cells. This hypothesis was reinforced by experiments with 125I-labeled CT showing specific binding of the toxin to yeast cells. The adhesion of CT to a receptor on the yeast surface through the B subunit and internalization of the A subunit (necessary for the cAMP signal and trehalase activation) could be one more mechanism explaining protection against the toxin observed for rats treated with yeasts. PMID:9464394

  16. Intracellular signal triggered by cholera toxin in Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brandão, R L; Castro, I M; Bambirra, E A; Amaral, S C; Fietto, L G; Tropia, M J; Neves, M J; Dos Santos, R G; Gomes, N C; Nicoli, J R

    1998-02-01

    As is the case for Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303 protects Fisher rats against cholera toxin (CT). The addition of glucose or dinitrophenol to cells of S. boulardii grown on a nonfermentable carbon source activated trehalase in a manner similar to that observed for S.cerevisiae. The addition of CT to the same cells also resulted in trehalase activation. Experiments performed separately on the A and B subunits of CT showed that both are necessary for activation. Similarly, the addition of CT but not of its separate subunits led to a cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal in both S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae. These data suggest that trehalase stimulation by CT probably occurred through the cAMP-mediated protein phosphorylation cascade. The requirement of CT subunit B for both the cAMP signal and trehalase activation indicates the presence of a specific receptor on the yeasts able to bind to the toxin, a situation similar to that observed for mammalian cells. This hypothesis was reinforced by experiments with 125I-labeled CT showing specific binding of the toxin to yeast cells. The adhesion of CT to a receptor on the yeast surface through the B subunit and internalization of the A subunit (necessary for the cAMP signal and trehalase activation) could be one more mechanism explaining protection against the toxin observed for rats treated with yeasts.

  17. Serum Anti-Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Antibodies in Greek Patients with Behcet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaiopoulos, George; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Papp, Maria; Kaklamanis, Faedon; Economou, Efrosyni; Zevgolis, Vassilis; Sourdis, John

    2011-01-01

    We tested 59 Greek patients with Behcet's Disease (BD) for serum anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies. No increase of these antibodies was detected in the cases compared to 55 healthy unrelated blood donors from the same population. This finding is in contrast with the correlation between Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies and BD as reported in other populations. It seems that environmental factors may contribute to disease expression in different populations, producing different effects according to the individual's genetic predisposition. Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies do not seem to be of any significance in the Greek population. PMID:21319357

  18. Transcriptional profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to propolis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Propolis is a natural product of plant resins collected by honeybees (Apis mellifera) from various plant sources. Our previous studies indicated that propolis sensitivity is dependent on the mitochondrial function and that vacuolar acidification and autophagy are important for yeast cell death caused by propolis. Here, we extended our understanding of propolis-mediated cell death in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by applying systems biology tools to analyze the transcriptional profiling of cells exposed to propolis. Methods We have used transcriptional profiling of S. cerevisiae exposed to propolis. We validated our findings by using real-time PCR of selected genes. Systems biology tools (physical protein-protein interaction [PPPI] network) were applied to analyse the propolis-induced transcriptional bevavior, aiming to identify which pathways are modulated by propolis in S. cerevisiae and potentially influencing cell death. Results We were able to observe 1,339 genes modulated in at least one time point when compared to the reference time (propolis untreated samples) (t-test, p-value 0.01). Enrichment analysis performed by Gene Ontology (GO) Term finder tool showed enrichment for several biological categories among the genes up-regulated in the microarray hybridization such as transport and transmembrane transport and response to stress. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of selected genes showed by our microarray hybridization approach was capable of providing information about S. cerevisiae gene expression modulation with a considerably high level of confidence. Finally, a physical protein-protein (PPPI) network design and global topological analysis stressed the importance of these pathways in response of S. cerevisiae to propolis and were correlated with the transcriptional data obtained thorough the microarray analysis. Conclusions In summary, our data indicate that propolis is largely affecting several pathways in the eukaryotic cell. However, the most

  19. Effects of Fusariotoxin T-2 on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces carlsbergensis

    PubMed Central

    Schappert, Keith T.; Khachatourians, George G.

    1983-01-01

    A Fusarium metabolite, T-2 toxin, inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The growth inhibitory concentrations of T-2 toxin were 40 and 100 μg/ml, respectively, for exponentially growing cultures of the two yeasts. S. carlsbergensis was more sensitive to the toxin and exhibited a biphasic dose-response curve. Addition of the toxin at 10 μg/ml of S. carlsbergensis culture resulted in a retardation of growth as measured turbidimetrically, after only 30 to 40 min. This action was reversible upon washing the cells free of the toxin. The sensitivity of the yeasts to the toxin was dependent upon the types and concentrations of carbohydrates used in the growth media. The sensitivity of the cells to the toxin decreased in glucose-repressed cultures. These results suggest that T-2 toxin interferes with mitochondrial functions of these yeasts. Images PMID:16346249

  20. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level.

  1. Redirecting metabolic flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through regulation of cofactors in UMP production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Chenjie; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-04-01

    Although it is generally known that cofactors play a major role in the production of different fermentation products, their role has not been thoroughly and systematically studied. To understand the impact of cofactors on physiological functions, a systematic approach was applied, which involved redox state analysis, energy charge analysis, and metabolite analysis. Using uridine 5'-monophosphate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we demonstrated that regulation of intracellular the ratio of NADPH to NADP(+) not only redistributed the carbon flux between the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways, but also regulated the redox state of NAD(H), resulting in a significant change of ATP, and a significantly altered spectrum of metabolic products.

  2. Bioactive peptides released from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under accelerated autolysis in a wine model system.

    PubMed

    Alcaide-Hidalgo, J M; Pueyo, E; Polo, M C; Martínez-Rodríguez, A J

    2007-09-01

    The ACE inhibitory activity (IACE) and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC-FL) values of yeast peptides isolated from a model wine during accelerated autolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied. Samples were taken at 6, 24, 48, 121, and 144 h of autolysis. Peptide concentration increased throughout autolysis process. Peptides were fractionated into 2 fractions: F1, constituted by hydrophilic peptides, and F2, containing hydrophobic peptides. Both IACE activity and ORAC-FL values increased during 121 h of autolysis, then decreased afterward. Peptide fraction F2 was the main fraction involved in IACE activity and ORAC-FL.

  3. Regulation of Lactobacillus plantarum contamination on the carbohydrate and energy related metabolisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Lin, Xiang-Hua; Li, Hao

    2015-11-01

    During the industrial bioethanol fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are often stressed by bacterial contaminants, especially lactic acid bacteria. Generally, lactic acid bacteria contamination can inhibit S. cerevisiae cell growth through secreting lactic acid and competing with yeast cells for micronutrients and living space. However, whether are there still any other influences of lactic acid bacteria on yeast or not? In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 was co-cultivated with S. cerevisiae S288c to mimic the L. plantarum contamination in industrial bioethanol fermentation. The contaminative L. plantarum-associated expression changes of genes involved in carbohydrate and energy related metabolisms in S. cerevisiae cells were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate the influence of L. plantarum on carbon source utilization and energy related metabolism in yeast cells during bioethanol fermentation. Contaminative L. plantarum influenced the expression of most of genes which are responsible for encoding key enzymes involved in glucose related metabolisms in S. cerevisiae. Specific for, contaminated L. plantarum inhibited EMP pathway but promoted TCA cycle, glyoxylate cycle, HMP, glycerol synthesis pathway, and redox pathway in S. cerevisiae cells. In the presence of L. plantarum, the carbon flux in S. cerevisiae cells was redistributed from fermentation to respiratory and more reducing power was produced to deal with the excess NADH. Moreover, L. plantarum contamination might confer higher ethanol tolerance to yeast cells through promoting accumulation of glycerol. These results also highlighted our knowledge about relationship between contaminative lactic acid bacteria and S. cerevisiae during bioethanol fermentation.

  4. Response to acetaldehyde stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a strain-dependent regulation of several ALD genes and is mediated by the general stress response pathway.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; del Olmo Ml, Marcel lí

    2003-06-01

    One of the stress conditions that yeast may encounter is the presence of acetaldehyde. In a previous study we identified that, in response to this stress, several HSP genes are induced that are also involved in the response to other forms of stress. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) play an important role in yeast acetaldehyde metabolism (e.g. when cells are growing in ethanol). In this work we analyse the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes (ALD) and also the corresponding enzymatic activities under several growth conditions. We investigate three kinds of yeast strains: laboratory strains, strains involved in the alcoholic fermentation stage of wine production and flor yeasts (responsible for the biological ageing of sherry wines). The latter are very important to consider because they grow in media containing high ethanol concentrations, and produce important amounts of acetaldehyde. Under several growth conditions, further addition of acetaldehyde or ethanol in flor yeasts induced the expression of some ALD genes and led to an increase in ALDH activity. This result is consistent with their need to obtain energy from ethanol during biological ageing processes. Our data also suggest that post-transcriptional and/or post-translational mechanisms are involved in regulating the activity of these enzymes. Finally, analyses indicate that the Msn2/4p and Hsf1p transcription factors are necessary for HSP26, ALD2/3 and ALD4 gene expression under acetaldehyde stress, while PKA represses the expression of these genes.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yta7 Regulates Histone Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gradolatto, Angeline; Rogers, Richard S.; Lavender, Heather; Taverna, Sean D.; Allis, C. David; Aitchison, John D.; Tackett, Alan J.

    2008-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yta7 protein is a component of a nucleosome bound protein complex that maintains distinct transcriptional zones of chromatin. We previously found that one protein copurifying with Yta7 is the yFACT member Spt16. Epistasis analyses revealed a link between Yta7, Spt16, and other previously identified members of the histone regulatory pathway. In concurrence, Yta7 was found to regulate histone gene transcription in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. Association at the histone gene loci appeared to occur through binding of the bromodomain-like region of Yta7 with the N-terminal tail of histone H3. Our work suggests a mechanism in which Yta7 is localized to chromatin to establish regions of transcriptional silencing, and that one facet of this cellular mechanism is to modulate transcription of histone genes. PMID:18493054

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa contain heavy metal sequestering phytochelatin.

    PubMed

    Kneer, R; Kutchan, T M; Hochberger, A; Zenk, M H

    1992-01-01

    In fungi, cellular resistance to heavy metal cytotoxicity is mediated either by binding of metal ions to proteins of the metallothionein type or by chelation to phytochelatin-peptides of the general formula (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gly. Hitherto, only one fungus, Candida glabrata has been shown to contain both metal inactivating systems. Here we show by unambiguous FAB-MS analysis that both a metallothionein-free mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as a wildtype strain synthesize phytochelatin (PC2) upon exposure to 250 microM Cd2+ ions. The presence of Zn and/or Cu ions in the nutrient broth also induces PC2 synthesis in this organism. By 109Cd exchange and subsequent monobromobimane fluorescence HPLC, it could be shown that the presence of Cd2+ in the growth medium also induces phytochelatin synthesis in Neurospora crassa, which contains metallothioneins.

  7. Patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast colonies via magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Rômulo P; Barros, Wilson

    2017-01-23

    We report the use of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods to observe pattern formation in colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate substantial signal loss localized in specific regions of the colony rendering useful imaging contrast. This imaging contrast is recognizable as being due to discontinuities in magnetic susceptibility (χ) between different spatial regions. At the microscopic pixel level, the local variations in the magnetic susceptibility (Δχ) induce a loss in the NMR signal, which was quantified via T2 and T2* maps, permitting estimation of Δχ values for different regions of the colony. Interestingly the typical petal/wrinkling patterns present in the colony have a high degree of correlation with the estimated susceptibility distribution. We conclude that the presence of magnetic susceptibility inclusions, together with their spatial arrangement within the colony, may be a potential cause of the susceptibility distribution and therefore the contrast observed on the images.

  8. Molecular architecture of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae activated spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Reinhard; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Dybkov, Olexandr; Hartmuth, Klaus; Pena, Vladimir; Chari, Ashwin; Kumar, Vinay; Lee, Chung-Tien; Urlaub, Henning; Kastner, Berthold; Stark, Holger; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-09-23

    The activated spliceosome (B(act)) is in a catalytically inactive state and is remodeled into a catalytically active machine by the RNA helicase Prp2, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we describe a 3D electron cryomicroscopy structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae B(act) complex at 5.8-angstrom resolution. Our model reveals that in B(act), the catalytic U2/U6 RNA-Prp8 ribonucleoprotein core is already established, and the 5' splice site (ss) is oriented for step 1 catalysis but occluded by protein. The first-step nucleophile-the branchsite adenosine-is sequestered within the Hsh155 HEAT domain and is held 50 angstroms away from the 5'ss. Our structure suggests that Prp2 adenosine triphosphatase-mediated remodeling leads to conformational changes in Hsh155's HEAT domain that liberate the first-step reactants for catalysis.

  9. Technology development for natural product biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Billingsley, John M; DeNicola, Anthony B; Tang, Yi

    2016-12-01

    The explosion of genomic sequence data and the significant advancements in synthetic biology have led to the development of new technologies for natural products discovery and production. Using powerful genetic tools, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been engineered as a production host for natural product pathways from bacterial, fungal, and plant species. With an expanding library of characterized genetic parts, biosynthetic pathways can be refactored for optimized expression in yeast. New engineering strategies have enabled the increased production of valuable secondary metabolites by tuning metabolic pathways. Improvements in high-throughput screening methods have facilitated the rapid identification of variants with improved biosynthetic capabilities. In this review, we focus on the molecular tools and engineering strategies that have recently empowered heterologous natural product biosynthesis.

  10. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future.

  11. Phenotypic effects of membrane protein overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melén, Karin; Blomberg, Anders; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    Large-scale protein overexpression phenotype screens provide an important complement to the more common gene knockout screens. Here, we have targeted the so far poorly understood Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome and report growth phenotypes for a strain collection overexpressing 600 C-terminally tagged integral membrane proteins grown both under normal and three different stress conditions. Although overexpression of most membrane proteins reduce the growth rate in synthetic defined medium, we identify a large number of proteins that, when overexpressed, confer specific resistance to various stress conditions. Our data suggest that regulation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and the Na+/K+ homeostasis system constitute major downstream targets of the yeast PKA/RAS pathway and point to a possible connection between the early secretory pathway and the cells' response to oxidative stress. We also have quantified the expression levels for >550 membrane proteins, facilitating the choice of well expressing proteins for future functional and structural studies. caffeine | paraquat | salt tolerance | yeast

  12. Bioethanol production from cellulosic hydrolysates by engineered industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye-Gi; Jin, Yong-Su; Cha, Young-Lok; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2017-03-01

    Even though industrial yeast strains exhibit numerous advantageous traits for the production of bioethanol, their genetic manipulation has been limited. This study demonstrates that an industrial polyploidy Saccharomyces cerevisiae JHS200 can be engineered through Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9)-based genome editing. Specifically, we generated auxotrophic mutants and introduced a xylose metabolic pathway into the auxotrophic mutants. As expected, the engineered strain (JX123) enhanced ethanol production from cellulosic hydrolysates as compared to other engineered haploid strains. However, the JX123 strain produced substantial amounts of xylitol as a by-product during xylose fermentation. Hypothesizing that the xylitol accumulation might be caused by intracellular redox imbalance from cofactor difference, the NADH oxidase from Lactococcus lactis was introduced into the JX123 strain. The resulting strain (JX123_noxE) not only produced more ethanol, but also produced xylitol less than the JX123 strain. These results suggest that industrial polyploidy yeast can be modified for producing biofuels and chemicals.

  13. Identification of NAD+ capped mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robert W.; Matheny, Tyler; Mizoue, Laura S.; Rao, Bhalchandra S.; Muhlrad, Denise; Parker, Roy

    2017-01-01

    RNAs besides tRNA and rRNA contain chemical modifications, including the recently described 5′ nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) RNA in bacteria. Whether 5′ NAD-RNA exists in eukaryotes remains unknown. We demonstrate that 5′ NAD-RNA is found on subsets of nuclear and mitochondrial encoded mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. NAD-mRNA appears to be produced cotranscriptionally because NAD-RNA is also found on pre-mRNAs, and only on mitochondrial transcripts that are not 5′ end processed. These results define an additional 5′ RNA cap structure in eukaryotes and raise the possibility that this 5′ NAD+ cap could modulate RNA stability and translation on specific subclasses of mRNAs. PMID:28031484

  14. Mechanism and Regulation of Protein Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dever, Thomas E; Kinzy, Terri Goss; Pavitt, Graham D

    2016-05-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of protein synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae The mechanism of protein synthesis is well conserved between yeast and other eukaryotes, and molecular genetic studies in budding yeast have provided critical insights into the fundamental process of translation as well as its regulation. The review focuses on the initiation and elongation phases of protein synthesis with descriptions of the roles of translation initiation and elongation factors that assist the ribosome in binding the messenger RNA (mRNA), selecting the start codon, and synthesizing the polypeptide. We also examine mechanisms of translational control highlighting the mRNA cap-binding proteins and the regulation of GCN4 and CPA1 mRNAs.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide removal with magnetically responsive Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Safarik, Ivo; Sabatkova, Zdenka; Safarikova, Mirka

    2008-09-10

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is a promising chemical sanitizer for use in the food industry. Its residues have to be decomposed, usually using an enzyme process employing catalase. In order to offer an inexpensive biocatalyst and to simplify subsequent manipulation, we have prepared magnetically responsive alginate beads containing entrapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and magnetite microparticles. Larger beads (2-3 mm in diameter) were prepared by dropping the mixture into calcium chloride solution, while microbeads (the diameter of majority of particles ranged between 50 and 100 microm) were prepared using the water in oil emulsification process. In general, microbeads enabled more efficient HP decomposition. The prepared microparticulate biocatalyst caused efficient decomposition of HP in water solutions (up to 2% concentration), leaving very low residual HP concentration after treatment (below 0.001% under appropriate conditions). The biocatalyst was stable; the same catalytic activity was observed after one month storage at 4 degrees C, and the microbeads could be used at least five times.

  16. Domestication and Divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Beer Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Gallone, Brigida; Steensels, Jan; Prahl, Troels; Soriaga, Leah; Saels, Veerle; Herrera-Malaver, Beatriz; Merlevede, Adriaan; Roncoroni, Miguel; Voordeckers, Karin; Miraglia, Loren; Teiling, Clotilde; Steffy, Brian; Taylor, Maryann; Schwartz, Ariel; Richardson, Toby; White, Christopher; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-09-08

    Whereas domestication of livestock, pets, and crops is well documented, it is still unclear to what extent microbes associated with the production of food have also undergone human selection and where the plethora of industrial strains originates from. Here, we present the genomes and phenomes of 157 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. Our analyses reveal that today's industrial yeasts can be divided into five sublineages that are genetically and phenotypically separated from wild strains and originate from only a few ancestors through complex patterns of domestication and local divergence. Large-scale phenotyping and genome analysis further show strong industry-specific selection for stress tolerance, sugar utilization, and flavor production, while the sexual cycle and other phenotypes related to survival in nature show decay, particularly in beer yeasts. Together, these results shed light on the origins, evolutionary history, and phenotypic diversity of industrial yeasts and provide a resource for further selection of superior strains. PAPERCLIP.

  17. Calorie restriction extends Saccharomyces cerevisiae lifespan by increasing respiration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-Ju; Kaeberlein, Matt; Andalis, Alex A; Sturtz, Lori A; Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Culotta, Valeria C; Fink, Gerald R; Guarente, Leonard

    2002-07-18

    Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in a wide spectrum of organisms and is the only regimen known to lengthen the lifespan of mammals. We established a model of CR in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this system, lifespan can be extended by limiting glucose or by reducing the activity of the glucose-sensing cyclic-AMP-dependent kinase (PKA). Lifespan extension in a mutant with reduced PKA activity requires Sir2 and NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). In this study we explore how CR activates Sir2 to extend lifespan. Here we show that the shunting of carbon metabolism toward the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and the concomitant increase in respiration play a central part in this process. We discuss how this metabolic strategy may apply to CR in animals.

  18. The concentration of ammonia regulates nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1995-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in a continuous culture at a single dilution rate with input ammonia concentrations whose effects ranged from nitrogen limitation to nitrogen excess and glucose limitation. The rate of ammonia assimilation (in millimoles per gram of cells per hour) was approximately constant. Increased extracellular ammonia concentrations are correlated with increased intracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, increases in levels of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH2), and decreases in levels of NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH1), as well as decreases in the levels of mRNA for the amino acid permease-encoding genes GAP1 and PUT4. The governing factor of nitrogen metabolism might be the concentration of ammonia rather than its flux.

  19. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with its full complement of organelles, synthesizes membrane phospholipids by pathways that are generally common to those found in higher eukaryotes. Phospholipid synthesis in yeast is regulated in response to a variety of growth conditions (e.g., inositol supplementation, zinc depletion, and growth stage) by a coordination of genetic (e.g., transcriptional activation and repression) and biochemical (e.g., activity modulation and localization) mechanisms. Phosphatidate (PA), whose cellular levels are controlled by the activities of key phospholipid synthesis enzymes, plays a central role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, phosphorylation of key phospholipid synthesis catalytic and regulatory proteins controls the metabolism of phospholipid precursors and products. PMID:21275641

  20. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  1. Production of natural products through metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Many high-value metabolites are produced in nature by organisms that are not ideal for large-scale production. Therefore, interest exists in expressing the biosynthetic pathways of these compounds in organisms that are more suitable for industrial production. Recent years have seen developments in both the discovery of various biosynthetic pathways, as well as development of metabolic engineering tools that allow reconstruction of complex pathways in microorganisms. In the present review we discuss recent advances in reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathways of various high-value products in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a commonly used industrial microorganism. Key achievements in the production of different isoprenoids, aromatics and polyketides are presented and the metabolic engineering strategies underlying these accomplishments are discussed.

  2. Preferentially quantized linker DNA lengths in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Ping; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Xi, Liqun; Tsai, Guei-Feng; Segal, Eran; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-09-12

    The exact lengths of linker DNAs connecting adjacent nucleosomes specify the intrinsic three-dimensional structures of eukaryotic chromatin fibers. Some studies suggest that linker DNA lengths preferentially occur at certain quantized values, differing one from another by integral multiples of the DNA helical repeat, approximately 10 bp; however, studies in the literature are inconsistent. Here, we investigate linker DNA length distributions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, using two novel methods: a Fourier analysis of genomic dinucleotide periodicities adjacent to experimentally mapped nucleosomes and a duration hidden Markov model applied to experimentally defined dinucleosomes. Both methods reveal that linker DNA lengths in yeast are preferentially periodic at the DNA helical repeat ( approximately 10 bp), obeying the forms 10n+5 bp (integer n). This 10 bp periodicity implies an ordered superhelical intrinsic structure for the average chromatin fiber in yeast.

  3. On the Mechanism of Gene Silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Steakley, David Lee; Rine, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for gene silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ranging from steric occlusion of DNA binding proteins from their recognition sequences in silenced chromatin to a specific block in the formation of the preinitiation complex to a block in transcriptional elongation. This study provided strong support for the steric occlusion mechanism by the discovery that RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 could be substantially blocked from transcribing from its cognate promoter when embedded in silenced chromatin. Moreover, unlike previous suggestions, we found no evidence for stalled RNA polymerase II within silenced chromatin. The effectiveness of the Sir protein–based silencing mechanism to block transcription activated by Gal4 at promoters in the domain of silenced chromatin was marginal, yet it improved when tested against mutant forms of the Gal4 protein, highlighting a role for specific activators in their sensitivity to gene silencing. PMID:26082137

  4. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains.

  5. Multiple Pathways of Recombination Induced by Double-Strand Breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pâques, Frédéric; Haber, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the principal organism used in experiments to examine genetic recombination in eukaryotes. Studies over the past decade have shown that meiotic recombination and probably most mitotic recombination arise from the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). There are multiple pathways by which such DSBs can be repaired, including several homologous recombination pathways and still other nonhomologous mechanisms. Our understanding has also been greatly enriched by the characterization of many proteins involved in recombination and by insights that link aspects of DNA repair to chromosome replication. New molecular models of DSB-induced gene conversion are presented. This review encompasses these different aspects of DSB-induced recombination in Saccharomyces and attempts to relate genetic, molecular biological, and biochemical studies of the processes of DNA repair and recombination. PMID:10357855

  6. Effects of aeration on formation and localization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.; Jahnke, L.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that two different forms of the enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) are present, depending on the conditions under which the cells are grown. The paper evaluates the usefulness of a method designed to assay both synthetases simultaneously in yeast homogenates. The data presented confirm the possibility of simultaneous detection and estimation of the amount of both ACSs of S. cerevisiae in crude homogenates of this strain, making possible the study of physiological factors involved in the formation of these isoenzymes. One important factor for specifying which of the two enzymes is found in these yeast cells is the presence or absence of oxygen in their environment. Aeration not only affects the ratio of the two ACSs but also appears to affect the cellular distribution of these enzymes. Most of the data presented suggest the possibility that the nonaerobic ACS may serve as a precursor to the aerobic form.

  7. Z curve theory-based analysis of the dynamic nature of nucleosome positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueting; Liu, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Su, Jianzhong; Lv, Jie; Cui, Ying; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Nucleosome is the elementary structural unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Instability of nucleosome positioning plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling in differentiation and disease. In this study, we investigated nucleosome dynamics in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using a geometric model based on Z curve theory. We identified 52,941 stable nucleosomes and 7607 dynamic nucleosomes, compiling them into a genome-wide nucleosome dynamic positioning map and constructing a user-friendly visualization platform (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/nucleosome). Our approach achieved a sensitivity of 90.31% and a specificity of 87.76% for S. cerevisiae. Analysis revealed transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) were enriched in linkers. And among the sparse nucleosomes around TFBSs, dynamic nucleosomes were slightly preferred. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated that stable and dynamic nucleosomes were enriched on genes involved in different biological processes and functions. This study provides an approach for comprehending chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation of genes.

  8. Comparative transcriptome analysis between original and evolved recombinant lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; Le Berre, Véronique; Sokol, Serguei; François, Jean; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-12-01

    The engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for lactose utilization has been attempted with the intent of developing high productivity processes for alcoholic fermentation of cheese whey. A recombinant S. cerevisiae flocculent strain that efficiently ferments lactose to ethanol was previously obtained by evolutionary engineering of an original recombinant that displayed poor lactose fermentation performance. We compared the transcriptomes of the original and the evolved recombinant strains growing in lactose, using cDNA microarrays. Microarray data revealed 173 genes whose expression levels differed more than 1.5-fold. About half of these genes were related to RNA-mediated transposition. We also found genes involved in DNA repair and recombination mechanisms, response to stress, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle control, mitosis regulation, glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation. These transcriptomic data are in agreement with some of the previously identified physiological and molecular differences between the recombinants, and point to further hypotheses to explain those differences.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae GUJ105 From Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Detroja, Rajesh; Rathore, Ankita

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain GUJ105, isolated clinically. The size of the genome is approximately 11.5 Mb and contains 5,447 protein-coding genes. PMID:27908989

  10. A Genomic Approach for the Identification and Classification of Genes Involved in Cell Wall Formation and its Regulation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Piet W. J.; Ruiz, Cristina; Vázquez de Aldana, Carlos R.; Dueňas, Encarnación; Cid, Víctor J.; Del Rey, Francisco; Rodríquez-Peña, José M.; Pérez, Pilar; Andel, Annemiek; Caubín, Julio; Arroyo, Javier; García, Juan C.; Gil, Concha; Molina, María; García, Luis J.; Nombela, César

    2001-01-01

    Using a hierarchical approach, 620 non-essential single-gene yeast deletants generated by EUROFAN I were systematically screened for cell-wall-related phenotypes. By analyzing for altered sensitivity to the presence of Calcofluor white or SDS in the growth medium, altered sensitivity to sonication, or abnormal morphology, 145 (23%) mutants showing at least one cell wall-related phenotype were selected. These were screened further to identify genes potentially involved in either the biosynthesis, remodeling or coupling of cell wall macromolecules or genes involved in the overall regulation of cell wall construction and to eliminate those genes with a more general, pleiotropic effect. Ninety percent of the mutants selected from the primary tests showed additional cell wall-related phenotypes. When extrapolated to the entire yeast genome, these data indicate that over 1200 genes may directly or indirectly affect cell wall formation and its regulation. Twenty-one mutants with altered levels of β1,3-glucan synthase activity and five Calcofluor white-resistant mutants with altered levels of chitin synthase activities were found, indicating that the corresponding genes affect β1,3-glucan or chitin synthesis. By selecting for increased levels of specific cell wall components in the growth medium, we identified 13 genes that are possibly implicated in different steps of cell wall assembly. Furthermore, 14 mutants showed a constitutive activation of the cell wall integrity pathway, suggesting that they participate in the modulation of the pathway either directly acting as signaling components or by triggering the Slt2-dependent compensatory mechanism. In conclusion, our screening approach represents a comprehensive functional analysis on a genomic scale of gene products involved in various aspects of fungal cell wall formation. PMID:18628907

  11. Copper Tolerance and Biosorption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Alcoholic Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Ling-Ling; Jia, Bo; Zhao, Fang; Huang, Wei-Dong; Zhan, Ji-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    At high levels, copper in grape mash can inhibit yeast activity and cause stuck fermentations. Wine yeast has limited tolerance of copper and can reduce copper levels in wine during fermentation. This study aimed to understand copper tolerance of wine yeast and establish the mechanism by which yeast decreases copper in the must during fermentation. Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (lab selected strain BH8 and industrial strains AWRI R2 and Freddo) and a simple model fermentation system containing 0 to 1.50 mM Cu2+ were used. ICP-AES determined Cu ion concentration in the must decreasing differently by strains and initial copper levels during fermentation. Fermentation performance was heavily inhibited under copper stress, paralleled a decrease in viable cell numbers. Strain BH8 showed higher copper-tolerance than strain AWRI R2 and higher adsorption than Freddo. Yeast cell surface depression and intracellular structure deformation after copper treatment were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy; electronic differential system detected higher surface Cu and no intracellular Cu on 1.50 mM copper treated yeast cells. It is most probably that surface adsorption dominated the biosorption process of Cu2+ for strain BH8, with saturation being accomplished in 24 h. This study demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BH8 has good tolerance and adsorption of Cu, and reduces Cu2+ concentrations during fermentation in simple model system mainly through surface adsorption. The results indicate that the strain selected from China's stress-tolerant wine grape is copper tolerant and can reduce copper in must when fermenting in a copper rich simple model system, and provided information for studies on mechanisms of heavy metal stress.

  12. Production of Dengue 2 Envelope Protein in the Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-15

    PRODUCTION OF DENGUE 2 ENVELOPE PROTEIN IN THE YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE FINAL, PHASE I REPORT JOHN M. IVY KATHY HOUTCHENS FEBRUARY 15, 1990...SUBTITLE Production of Dengue 2 Envelope Protein in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ( 6. AUTHOR(S) John M. Ivy Kathy Houtchens 7 PERFORMING...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Mammum 200 words) The four serotypes of dengue viruses are a leading cause of morbidity throughout the tropics and subtropics

  13. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOEpatents

    Krauter, Paula A. W.; Krauter, Gordon W.

    2002-01-01

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  14. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Badotti, Fernanda; Dário, Marcelo G; Alves, Sergio L; Cordioli, Maria Luiza A; Miletti, Luiz C; de Araujo, Pedro S; Stambuk, Boris U

    2008-01-01

    Background Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L) initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. Results We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Conclusion Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by effectively reducing sucrose

  15. The Ssn6-Tup1 repressor complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in the osmotic induction of HOG-dependent and -independent genes.

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, J A; Pascual-Ahuir, A; Proft, M; Serrano, R

    1998-01-01

    The response of yeast to osmotic stress has been proposed to rely on the HOG-MAP kinase signalling pathway and on transcriptional activation mediated by STRE promoter elements. However, the osmotic induction of HAL1, an important determinant of salt tolerance, is HOG independent and occurs through the release of transcriptional repression. We have identified an upstream repressing sequence in HAL1 promoter (URSHAL1) located between -231 and -156. This promoter region was able to repress transcription from a heterologous promoter and to bind proteins in non-stressed cells, but not in salt-treated cells. The repression conferred by URSHAL1 is mediated through the Ssn6-Tup1 protein complex and is abolished in the presence of osmotic stress. The Ssn6-Tup1 co-repressor is also involved in the regulation of HOG-dependent genes such as GPD1, CTT1, ALD2, ENA1 and SIP18, and its deletion can suppress the osmotic sensitivity of hog1 mutants. We propose that the Ssn6-Tup1 repressor complex might be a general component in the regulation of osmostress responses at the transcriptional level of both HOG-dependent and -independent genes. PMID:9564037

  16. The mannoprotein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D R; Cooper, D G; Neufeld, R J

    1988-06-01

    The mannoprotein which is a major component of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier. Mannoprotein emulsifier was extracted in a high yield from whole cells of fresh bakers' yeast by two methods, by autoclaving in neutral citrate buffer and by digestion with Zymolase (Miles Laboratories; Toronto, Ontario, Canada), a beta-1,3-glucanase. Heat-extracted emulsifier was purified by ultrafiltration and contained approximately 44% carbohydrate (mannose) and 17% protein. Treatment of the emulsifier with protease eliminated emulsification. Kerosene-in-water emulsions were stabilized over a broad range of conditions, from pH 2 to 11, with up to 5% sodium chloride or up to 50% ethanol in the aqueous phase. In the presence of a low concentration of various solutes, emulsions were stable to three cycles of freezing and thawing. An emulsifying agent was extracted from each species or strain of yeast tested, including 13 species of genera other than Saccharomyces. Spent yeast from the manufacture of beer and wine was demonstrated to be a possible source for the large-scale production of this bioemulsifier.

  17. The mannoprotein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, D R; Cooper, D G; Neufeld, R J

    1988-01-01

    The mannoprotein which is a major component of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier. Mannoprotein emulsifier was extracted in a high yield from whole cells of fresh bakers' yeast by two methods, by autoclaving in neutral citrate buffer and by digestion with Zymolase (Miles Laboratories; Toronto, Ontario, Canada), a beta-1,3-glucanase. Heat-extracted emulsifier was purified by ultrafiltration and contained approximately 44% carbohydrate (mannose) and 17% protein. Treatment of the emulsifier with protease eliminated emulsification. Kerosene-in-water emulsions were stabilized over a broad range of conditions, from pH 2 to 11, with up to 5% sodium chloride or up to 50% ethanol in the aqueous phase. In the presence of a low concentration of various solutes, emulsions were stable to three cycles of freezing and thawing. An emulsifying agent was extracted from each species or strain of yeast tested, including 13 species of genera other than Saccharomyces. Spent yeast from the manufacture of beer and wine was demonstrated to be a possible source for the large-scale production of this bioemulsifier. PMID:3046488

  18. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Estevinho, Letícia M

    2009-08-01

    Mead is a traditional drink, which results from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey carried out by yeasts. However, when it is produced in a homemade way, mead producers find several problems, namely, the lack of uniformity in the final product, delayed and arrested fermentations, and the production of "off-flavours" by the yeasts. These problems are usually associated with the inability of yeast strains to respond and adapt to unfavourable and stressful growth conditions. The main objectives of this work were to evaluate the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from honey of the Trás-os-Montes (Northeast Portugal), to produce mead. Five strains from honey, as well as one laboratory strain and one commercial wine strain, were evaluated in terms of their fermentation performance under ethanol, sulphur dioxide and osmotic stress. All the strains showed similar behaviour in these conditions. Two yeasts strains isolated from honey and the commercial wine strain were further tested for mead production, using two different honey (a dark and a light honey), enriched with two supplements (one commercial and one developed by the research team), as fermentation media. The results obtained in this work show that S. cerevisiae strains isolated from honey, are appropriate for mead production. However it is of extreme importance to take into account the characteristics of the honey, and supplements used in the fermentation medium formulation, in order to achieve the best results in mead production.

  19. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering.

  20. Production of recombinant Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Lezzi, Chiara; Bleve, Gianluca; Spagnolo, Stefano; Perrotta, Carla; Grieco, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase is able to oxidize various phenolic compounds, thus being an enzyme of great importance for a number of biotechnological applications. The tyrosinase-coding PPO2 gene was isolated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using total RNA extracted from the mushroom fruit bodies as template. The gene was sequenced and cloned into pYES2 plasmid, and the resulting pY-PPO2 recombinant vector was then used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by enzymatic activity staining with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) indicated that the recombinant tyrosinase is biologically active. The recombinant enzyme was overexpressed and biochemically characterized, showing that the catalytic constants of the recombinant tyrosinase were higher than those obtained when a commercial tyrosinase was used, for all the tested substrates. The present study describes the recombinant production of A. bisporus tyrosinase in active form. The produced enzyme has similar properties to the one produced in the native A. bisporus host, and its expression in S. cerevisiae provides good potential for protein engineering and functional studies of this important enzyme.

  1. Metabolomic approach for improving ethanol stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Erika; Nakayama, Yasumune; Mukai, Yukio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for brewing and ethanol production. The ethanol sensitivity of yeast cells is still a serious problem during ethanol fermentation, and a variety of genetic approaches (e.g., random mutant screening under selective pressure of ethanol) have been developed to improve ethanol tolerance. In this study, we developed a strategy for improving ethanol tolerance of yeast cells based on metabolomics as a high-resolution quantitative phenotypic analysis. We performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify 36 compounds on 14 mutant strains including knockout strains for transcription factor and metabolic enzyme genes. A strong relation between metabolome of these mutants and their ethanol tolerance was observed. Data mining of the metabolomic analysis showed that several compounds (such as trehalose, valine, inositol and proline) contributed highly to ethanol tolerance. Our approach successfully detected well-known ethanol stress related metabolites such as trehalose and proline thus, to further prove our strategy, we focused on valine and inositol as the most promising target metabolites in our study. Our results show that simultaneous deletion of LEU4 and LEU9 (leading to accumulation of valine) or INM1 and INM2 (leading to reduction of inositol) significantly enhanced ethanol tolerance. This study shows the potential of the metabolomic approach to identify target genes for strain improvement of S. cerevisiae with higher ethanol tolerance.

  2. Ethanol production using immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae in lyophilized cellulose gel.

    PubMed

    Winkelhausen, Eleonora; Velickova, Elena; Amartey, Samuel A; Kuzmanova, Slobodanka

    2010-12-01

    A new lyophilization technique was used for immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) gels. The suitability of the lyophilized HEC gels to serve as immobilization matrices for the yeast cells was assessed by calculating the immobilization efficiency and the cell retention in three consecutive batches, each in duration of 72 h. Throughout the repeated batch fermentation, the immobilization efficiency was almost constant with an average value of 0.92 (12-216 h). The maximum value of cell retention was 0.24 g immobilized cells/g gel. Both parameters indicated that lyophilized gels are stable and capable of retaining the immobilized yeast cells. Showing the yeast cells propagation within the polymeric matrix, the scanning electron microscope images also confirmed that the lyophilization technique for immobilization of S. cerevisiae cells in the HEC gels was successful. The activity of the immobilized yeast cells was demonstrated by their capacity to convert glucose to ethanol. Ethanol yield of 0.40, 0.43 and 0.30 g ethanol/g glucose corresponding to 79%, 84% and 60% of the theoretical yield was attained in the first, second and third batches, respectively. The cell leakage was less than 10% of the average concentration of the immobilized cells.

  3. Sweet wine production by two osmotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, Teresa; de Lerma, Nieves López; Moreno, Juan; Peinado, Rafael A; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan C

    2013-06-01

    The use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce sweet wine is difficult because yeast is affected by a hyperosmotic stress due to the high sugar concentrations in the fermenting must. One possible alternative could be the coimmobilization of the osmotolerant yeast strains S. cerevisiae X4 and X5 on Penicillium chrysogenum strain H3 (GRAS) for the partial fermentation of raisin musts. This immobilized has been, namely, as yeast biocapsules. Traditional sweet wine (that is, without fermentation of the must) and must partially fermented by free yeast cells were also used for comparison. Partially fermented sweet wines showed higher concentration of the volatile compounds than traditionally produced wines. The wines obtained by immobilized yeast cells reached minor concentrations of major alcohols than wines by free cells. The consumption of specific nitrogen compounds was dependent on yeast strain and the cellular immobilization. A principal component analysis shows that the compounds related to the response to osmotic stress (glycerol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, and butanediol) clearly differentiate the wines obtained with free yeasts but not the wines obtained with immobilized yeasts.

  4. Brefeldin A causes a defect in secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vogel, J P; Lee, J N; Kirsch, D R; Rose, M D; Sztul, E S

    1993-02-15

    Brefeldin A (BFA) blocks secretion in mammalian cells and causes the redistribution of Golgi resident membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (Klausner, R. D., Donaldson, J. G., and Lippincott-Schwartz, J. (1992) J. Cell Biol. 116, 1071-1080). The target(s) of BFA and its mechanism of action remain unknown. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an ideal organism in which to identify the BFA targets, since many molecules essential for vesicular traffic have been already identified taking advantage of the powerful genetics of this system. Unfortunately, wild type S. cerevisiae strains are largely insensitive to BFA (Hayashi, T., Takatsuki, A., and Tamura, G. (1982) Agric. Biol. Chem. 46, 2241-2248). Here we demonstrate that an erg6 mutant (Gaber, R., Copple, D., Kennedy, B., Vidal, M., and Bard, M. (1989) Mol. Cell. Biol. 9, 3447-3456) defective in the biosynthesis of ergosterol is sensitive to BFA. Treatment of erg6 cells with BFA results in an arrest in growth and causes a block in secretion similar to that seen in mammalian cells treated with BFA. Our data suggest that the changes in the erg6 strain allows BFA entry and that this strain can be used to examine the molecular mechanism of BFA action.

  5. Analysis of novel Sir3 binding regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Risa; Ohashi, Tomoe; Kugou, Kazuto; Ichino, Ayako; Taniguchi, Kei; Ohta, Kunihiro; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Oki, Masaya

    2016-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HMR, HML, telomere and rDNA regions are silenced. Silencing at the rDNA region requires Sir2, and silencing at the HMR, HML and telomere regions requires binding of a protein complex, consisting of Sir2, Sir3 and Sir4, that mediates repression of gene expression. Here, several novel Sir3 binding domains, termed CN domains (Chromosomal Novel Sir3 binding region), were identified using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip analysis of S. cerevisiae chromosomes. Furthermore, analysis of G1-arrested cells demonstrated that Sir3 binding was elevated in G1-arrested cells compared with logarithmically growing asynchronous cells, and that Sir3 binding varied with the cell cycle. In addition to 14 CN regions identified from analysis of logarithmically growing asynchronous cells (CN1-14), 11 CN regions were identified from G1-arrested cells (CN15-25). Gene expression at some CN regions did not differ between WT and sir3Δ strains. Sir3 at conventional heterochromatic regions is thought to be recruited to chromosomes by Sir2 and Sir4; however, in this study, Sir3 binding occurred at some CN regions even in sir2Δ and sir4Δ backgrounds. Taken together, our results suggest that Sir3 exhibits novel binding parameters and gene regulatory functions at the CN binding domains.

  6. Proteome analysis of aerobically and anaerobically grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hensbergen, Paul J; Balog, Crina I A; Deelder, André M; Brandt, Raymond; Snoek, I S Ishtar; Steensma, H Yde; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2009-01-30

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to grow under aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions. We and others previously found that transcription levels of approximately 500 genes differed more than two-fold when cells from anaerobic and aerobic conditions were compared. Here, we addressed the effect of anaerobic growth at the post-transcriptional level by comparing the proteomes of cells isolated from steady-state glucose-limited anaerobic and aerobic cultures. Following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry we identified 110 protein spots, corresponding to 75 unique proteins, of which the levels differed more than two-fold between aerobically and anaerobically-grown cells. For 21 of the 110 spots, the intensities decreased more than two-fold whereas the corresponding mRNA levels increased or did not change significantly under anaerobic conditions. The intensities of the other 89 spots changed in the same direction as the mRNA levels of the corresponding genes, although to different extents. For some genes of glycolysis a small increase in mRNA levels, 1.5-2 fold, corresponded to a 5-10 fold increase in protein levels. Extrapolation of our results suggests that transcriptional regulation is the major but not exclusive mechanism for adaptation of S. cerevisiae to anaerobic growth conditions.

  7. Anaerobic glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Modig, Tobias; Granath, Katarina; Adler, Lennart; Lidén, Gunnar

    2007-05-01

    Glycerol formation is vital for reoxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form; NADH) under anaerobic conditions and for the hyperosmotic stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, relatively few studies have been made on hyperosmotic stress under anaerobic conditions. To study the combined effect of salt stress and anaerobic conditions, industrial and laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae were grown anaerobically on glucose in batch-cultures containing 40 g/l NaCl. The time needed for complete glucose conversion increased considerably, and the specific growth rates decreased by 80-90% when the cells were subjected to the hyperosmotic conditions. This was accompanied by an increased yield of glycerol and other by-products and reduced biomass yield in all strains. The slowest fermenting strain doubled its glycerol yield (from 0.072 to 0.148 g/g glucose) and a nearly fivefold increase in acetate formation was seen. In more tolerant strains, a lower increase was seen in the glycerol and in the acetate, succinate and pyruvate yields. Additionally, the NADH-producing pathway from acetaldehyde to acetate was analysed by overexpressing the stress-induced gene ALD3. However, this had no or very marginal effect on the acetate and glycerol yields. In the control experiments, the production of NADH from known sources well matched the glycerol formation. This was not the case for the salt stress experiments in which the production of NADH from known sources was insufficient to explain the formed glycerol.

  8. Regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phospholipid precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, M A; Homann, M J; Bae-Lee, M S; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells resulted in a reduction of membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) activity in cell extracts. The reduction of activity did not occur when inositol was absent from the growth medium. Under the growth conditions where a reduction of enzyme activity occurred, there was a corresponding qualitative reduction of enzyme subunit as determined by immunoblotting with antiserum raised against purified phosphatidylserine synthase. Water-soluble phospholipid precursors did not effect purified phosphatidylserine synthase activity. Phosphatidylserine synthase (activity and enzyme subunit) was not regulated by the availability of water-soluble phospholipid precursors in S. cerevisiae VAL2C(YEp CHO1) and the opi1 mutant. VAL2C(YEp CHO1) is a plasmid-bearing strain that over produces phosphatidylserine synthase activity, and the opi1 mutant is an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant. The results of this study suggest that the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase by the availability of phospholipid precursors occurs at the level of enzyme formation and not at the enzyme activity level. Furthermore, the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase is coupled to inositol synthesis. Images PMID:3023284

  9. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol.

  10. Metabolic engineering of recombinant protein secretion by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jin; Tyo, Keith E J; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels and chemicals, and it is also provides a platform for the production of many heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. Therefore, many studies have focused on metabolic engineering S. cerevisiae to improve the recombinant protein production, and with the development of systems biology, it is interesting to see how this approach can be applied both to gain further insight into protein production and secretion and to further engineer the cell for improved production of valuable proteins. In this review, the protein post-translational modification such as folding, trafficking, and secretion, steps that are traditionally studied in isolation will here be described in the context of the whole system of protein secretion. Furthermore, examples of engineering secretion pathways, high-throughput screening and systems biology applications of studying protein production and secretion are also given to show how the protein production can be improved by different approaches. The objective of the review is to describe individual biological processes in the context of the larger, complex protein synthesis network.

  11. Cell Wall β-(1,6)-Glucan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Clavaud, Cécile; Simenel, Catherine; Fontaine, Thierry; Delepierre, Muriel; Latgé, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Despite its essential role in the yeast cell wall, the exact composition of the β-(1,6)-glucan component is not well characterized. While solubilizing the cell wall alkali-insoluble fraction from a wild type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a recombinant β-(1,3)-glucanase followed by chromatographic characterization of the digest on an anion exchange column, we observed a soluble polymer that eluted at the end of the solvent gradient run. Further characterization indicated this soluble polymer to have a molecular mass of ∼38 kDa and could be hydrolyzed only by β-(1,6)-glucanase. Gas chromatographymass spectrometry and NMR (1H and 13C) analyses confirmed it to be a β-(1,6)-glucan polymer with, on average, branching at every fifth residue with one or two β-(1,3)-linked glucose units in the side chain. This polymer peak was significantly reduced in the corresponding digests from mutants of the kre genes (kre9 and kre5) that are known to play a crucial role in the β-(1,6)-glucan biosynthesis. In the current study, we have developed a biochemical assay wherein incubation of UDP-[14C]glucose with permeabilized S. cerevisiae yeasts resulted in the synthesis of a polymer chemically identical to the branched β-(1,6)-glucan isolated from the cell wall. Using this assay, parameters essential for β-(1,6)-glucan synthetic activity were defined. PMID:19279004

  12. The ORD1 gene encodes a transcription factor involved in oxygen regulation and is identical to IXR1, a gene that confers cisplatin sensitivity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J R; Bilanchone, V W; Cumsky, M G

    1994-01-01

    The yeast COX5a and COX5b genes encode isoforms of subunit Va of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein complex cytochrome c oxidase. These genes have been shown to be inversely regulated at the level of transcription by oxygen, which functions through the metabolic coeffector heme. In earlier studies we identified several regulatory elements that control transcriptional activation and aerobic repression of one of these genes, COX5b. Here, we report the isolation of trans-acting mutants that are defective in the aerobic repression of COX5b transcription. The mutants fall into two complementation groups. One group specifies ROX1, which encodes a product reported to be involved in transcriptional repression. The other group identified the gene we have designated ORD1. Mutations in ORD1 cause overexpression of COX5b aerobically but do not affect the expression of the hypoxic genes CYC7, HEM13, and ANB1. ORD1 mutations also do not affect the expression of the aerobic genes COX5a, CYC1, ROX1, ROX3, and TIF51A. The yeast genome contains a single ORD1 gene that resides on chromosome XI. Strains carrying chromosomal deletions of the ORD1 locus are viable and exhibit phenotypes similar to, but less severe than, that of the original mutant. The nucleotide sequence of ORD1 revealed that it is identical to IXR1, a yeast gene whose product contains two high mobility group boxes, binds to platinated DNA, and confers sensitivity to the antitumor drug cisplatin. Consistent with the latter observations, we found that the ORD1 product could bind to both the upstream region of COX5b and to DNA modified with cisplatin. Images PMID:8041793

  13. Exploring the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Volatile Metabolome: Indigenous versus Commercial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Zélia; Melo, André; Figueiredo, Ana Raquel; Coimbra, Manuel A.; Gomes, Ana C.; Rocha, Sílvia M.

    2015-01-01

    Winemaking is a highly industrialized process and a number of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are used around the world, neglecting the diversity of native yeast strains that are responsible for the production of wines peculiar flavours. The aim of this study was to in-depth establish the S. cerevisiae volatile metabolome and to assess inter-strains variability. To fulfill this objective, two indigenous strains (BT2652 and BT2453 isolated from spontaneous fermentation of grapes collected in Bairrada Appellation, Portugal) and two commercial strains (CSc1 and CSc2) S. cerevisiae were analysed using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography (HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS) tandem with multivariate analysis. A total of 257 volatile metabolites were identified, distributed over the chemical families of acetals, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, terpenic compounds, esters, ethers, furan-type compounds, hydrocarbons, pyrans, pyrazines and S-compounds. Some of these families are related with metabolic pathways of amino acid, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism as well as mono and sesquiterpenic biosynthesis. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used with a dataset comprising all variables (257 volatile components), and a distinction was observed between commercial and indigenous strains, which suggests inter-strains variability. In a second step, a subset containing esters and terpenic compounds (C10 and C15), metabolites of particular relevance to wine aroma, was also analysed using PCA. The terpenic and ester profiles express the strains variability and their potential contribution to the wine aromas, specially the BT2453, which produced the higher terpenic content. This research contributes to understand the metabolic diversity of indigenous wine microflora versus commercial strains and achieved knowledge that may be further exploited to produce wines with peculiar aroma properties. PMID:26600152

  14. Stoichiometry and compartmentation of NADH metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bakker, B M; Overkamp, K M; van Maris AJ; Kötter, P; Luttik, M A; van Dijken JP; Pronk, J T

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, reduction of NAD(+) to NADH occurs in dissimilatory as well as in assimilatory reactions. This review discusses mechanisms for reoxidation of NADH in this yeast, with special emphasis on the metabolic compartmentation that occurs as a consequence of the impermeability of the mitochondrial inner membrane for NADH and NAD(+). At least five mechanisms of NADH reoxidation exist in S. cerevisiae. These are: (1) alcoholic fermentation; (2) glycerol production; (3) respiration of cytosolic NADH via external mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenases; (4) respiration of cytosolic NADH via the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle; and (5) oxidation of intramitochondrial NADH via a mitochondrial 'internal' NADH dehydrogenase. Furthermore, in vivo evidence indicates that NADH redox equivalents can be shuttled across the mitochondrial inner membrane by an ethanol-acetaldehyde shuttle. Several other redox-shuttle mechanisms might occur in S. cerevisiae, including a malate-oxaloacetate shuttle, a malate-aspartate shuttle and a malate-pyruvate shuttle. Although key enzymes and transporters for these shuttles are present, there is as yet no consistent evidence for their in vivo activity. Activity of several other shuttles, including the malate-citrate and fatty acid shuttles, can be ruled out based on the absence of key enzymes or transporters. Quantitative physiological analysis of defined mutants has been important in identifying several parallel pathways for reoxidation of cytosolic and intramitochondrial NADH. The major challenge that lies ahead is to elucidate the physiological function of parallel pathways for NADH oxidation in wild-type cells, both under steady-state and transient-state conditions. This requires the development of techniques for accurate measurement of intracellular metabolite concentrations in separate metabolic compartments.

  15. Heterologous expression of cellulase genes in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Davison, Steffi A; den Haan, Riaan; van Zyl, Willem Heber

    2016-09-01

    Enzyme cost is a major impediment to second-generation (2G) cellulosic ethanol production. One strategy to reduce enzyme cost is to engineer enzyme production capacity in a fermentative microorganism to enable consolidated bio-processing (CBP). Ideally, a strain with a high secretory phenotype, high fermentative capacity as well as an innate robustness to bioethanol-specific stressors, including tolerance to products formed during pre-treatment and fermentation of lignocellulosic substrates should be used. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust fermentative yeast but has limitations as a potential CBP host, such as low heterologous protein secretion titers. In this study, we evaluated natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains for superior secretion activity and other industrially relevant characteristics needed during the process of lignocellulosic ethanol production. Individual cellulases namely Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (β-glucosidase), Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase), and Trichoderma reesei Cel5A (endoglucanase) were utilized as reporter proteins. Natural strain YI13 was identified to have a high secretory phenotype, demonstrating a 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher Cel7A and Cel5A activity, respectively, compared to the reference strain S288c. YI13 also demonstrated other industrially relevant characteristics such as growth vigor, high ethanol titer, multi-tolerance to high temperatures (37 and 40 °C), ethanol (10 % w/v), and towards various concentrations of a cocktail of inhibitory compounds commonly found in lignocellulose hydrolysates. This study accentuates the value of natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains to serve as potential robust and highly productive chassis organisms for CBP strain development.

  16. Exploring the northern limit of the distribution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus in North America.

    PubMed

    Charron, Guillaume; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Bertin, Chloé; Dubé, Alexandre K; Landry, Christian R

    2014-03-01

    We examined the northern limit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus in northeast America. We collected 876 natural samples at 29 sites and applied enrichment methods for the isolation of mesophilic yeasts. We uncovered a large diversity of yeasts, in some cases, associated with specific substrates. Sequencing of the ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 loci allowed to assign 226 yeast strains at the species level, including 41 S. paradoxus strains. Our intensive sampling suggests that if present, S. cerevisiae is rare at these northern latitudes. Our sampling efforts spread across several months of the year revealed that successful sampling increases throughout the summer and diminishes significantly at the beginning of the fall. The data obtained on the ecological context of yeasts corroborate what was previously reported on Pichiaceae, Saccharomycodaceae, Debaryomycetaceae and Phaffomycetaceae yeast families. We identified 24 yeast isolates that could not be assigned to any known species and that may be of taxonomic, medical, or biotechnological importance. Our study reports new data on the taxonomic diversity of yeasts and new resources for studying the evolution and ecology of S. paradoxus.

  17. Genomic reconstruction to improve bioethanol and ergosterol production of industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Tong, Mengmeng; Gao, Kehui; Di, Yanan; Wang, Pinmei; Zhang, Chunfang; Wu, Xuechang; Zheng, Daoqiong

    2015-02-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is the common yeast used in the fields of bread making, brewing, and bioethanol production. Growth rate, stress tolerance, ethanol titer, and byproducts yields are some of the most important agronomic traits of S. cerevisiae for industrial applications. Here, we developed a novel method of constructing S. cerevisiae strains for co-producing bioethanol and ergosterol. The genome of an industrial S. cerevisiae strain, ZTW1, was first reconstructed through treatment with an antimitotic drug followed by sporulation and hybridization. A total of 140 mutants were selected for ethanol fermentation testing, and a significant positive correlation between ergosterol content and ethanol production was observed. The highest performing mutant, ZG27, produced 7.9 % more ethanol and 43.2 % more ergosterol than ZTW1 at the end of fermentation. Chromosomal karyotyping and proteome analysis of ZG27 and ZTW1 suggested that this breeding strategy caused large-scale genome structural variations and global gene expression diversities in the mutants. Genetic manipulation further demonstrated that the altered expression activity of some genes (such as ERG1, ERG9, and ERG11) involved in ergosterol synthesis partly explained the trait improvement in ZG27.

  18. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Enhanced Biofuel Precursor Production

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoling; Feng, Huixing; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Wei Ning

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically modified for enhanced biofuel precursor production by knocking out genes encoding mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase and over-expression of a heterologous ATP-citrate lyase. A comparative iTRAQ-coupled 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to obtain a global overview of ubiquitous protein expression changes in S. cerevisiae engineered strains. More than 300 proteins were identified. Among these proteins, 37 were found differentially expressed in engineered strains and they were classified into specific categories based on their enzyme functions. Most of the proteins involved in glycolytic and pyruvate branch-point pathways were found to be up-regulated and the proteins involved in respiration and glyoxylate pathway were however found to be down-regulated in engineered strains. Moreover, the metabolic modification of S. cerevisiae cells resulted in a number of up-regulated proteins involved in stress response and differentially expressed proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis pathways. These LC-MS/MS based proteomics analysis results not only offered extensive information in identifying potential protein-protein interactions, signal pathways and ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by the engineered pathways, but also provided a meaningful biological information platform serving further modification of yeast cells for enhanced biofuel production. PMID:24376832

  19. Changes and roles of membrane compositions in the adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Shuxian; Liu, Huaqing; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Chenfeng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Bioethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often stressed by the accumulation of ethanol. Cell membrane is the first assaulting target of ethanol. Ethanol-adapted S. cerevisiae strains provide opportunity to shed light on membrane functions in the ethanol tolerance. This study aimed at clarifying the roles of cell membrane in the ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae through comparing membrane components between S. cerevisiae parental strain and ethanol-adapted strains. A directed evolutionary engineering was performed to obtain the ethanol-adapted S. cerevisiae strains. The parental, ethanol-adapted M5 and M10 strains were selected to be compared the percentage of viable cells after exposing to ethanol stress and cell membrane compositions (i.e., ergosterol, trehalose, and fatty acids). Compared with the parental strain, M5 or M10 strain had higher survival rate in the presence of 10% v/v ethanol. Compared with that in the parental strain, contents of trehalose, ergosterol, and fatty acids increased about 15.7, 12.1, and 29.3%, respectively, in M5 strain, and about 47.5, 107.8, and 61.5%, respectively, in M10 strain. Moreover, expression differences of genes involved in fatty acids metabolisms among the parental, M5 and M10 strains were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and results demonstrated that M5 or M10 strain had higher expression of ACC1 and OLE1 than the parental strain. These results indicated that although being exposed to step-wise increased ethanol, S. cerevisiae cells might remodel membrane components or structure to adapt to the ethanol stress.

  20. [Invertase Overproduction May Provide for Inulin Fermentation by Selection Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Naumov, G I; Naumova, E S

    2015-01-01

    In some recent publications, the ability of selection strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment inulin was attributed to inulinase activity. The review summarizes the literature data indicating that overproduction of invertase, an enzyme common to S. cerevisiae, may be responsible for this phenomenon.

  1. Invertase SUC2 Is the key hydrolase for inulin degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-An; Li, Fu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Specific Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were recently found to be capable of efficiently utilizing inulin, but genetic mechanisms of inulin hydrolysis in yeast remain unknown. Here we report functional characteristics of invertase SUC2 from strain JZ1C and demonstrate that SUC2 is the key enzyme responsible for inulin metabolism in S. cerevisiae.

  2. Invertase SUC2 Is the Key Hydrolase for Inulin Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-An

    2013-01-01

    Specific Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were recently found to be capable of efficiently utilizing inulin, but genetic mechanisms of inulin hydrolysis in yeast remain unknown. Here we report functional characteristics of invertase SUC2 from strain JZ1C and demonstrate that SUC2 is the key enzyme responsible for inulin metabolism in S. cerevisiae. PMID:23104410

  3. Creation of a synthetic xylose-inducible promoter for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently used to produce ethanol from glucose, but it cannot utilize five-carbon sugars contained in the hemicellulose component of biomass feedstocks. S. cerevisiae strains engineered for xylose fermentation have been made using constitutive promoters to express the req...

  4. ISOLATION OF A CYTOCHROME P-450 STRUCTURAL GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have transformed a Saccharomyces cerevisiae host with an S. cerevisiae genomic library contained in the shuttle vector YEp24 and screened the resultant transformants for resistance to ketoconazole (Kc), an inhibitor of the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) enzyme lanosterol 14-demethyl...

  5. Antimicrobial properties and death-inducing mechanisms of saccharomycin, a biocide secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Branco, Patrícia; Francisco, Diana; Monteiro, Margarida; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Arneborg, Nils; Prista, Catarina; Albergaria, Helena

    2017-01-01

    We recently found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain CCMI 885) secretes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) derived from the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) that are active against various wine-related yeast and bacteria. Here, we show that several other S. cerevisiae strains also secrete natural biocide fractions during alcoholic fermentation, although at different levels, which correlates with the antagonistic effect exerted against non-Saccharomyces yeasts. We, therefore, term this biocide saccharomycin. The native AMPs were purified by gel-filtration chromatography and its antimicrobial activity was compared to that exhibited by chemically synthesized analogues (AMP1 and AMP2/3). Results show that the antimicrobial activity of the native AMPs is significantly higher than that of the synthetic analogues (AMP1 and AMP2/3), but a conjugated action of the two synthetic peptides is observed. Moreover, while the natural AMPs are active at pH 3.5, the synthetic peptides are not, since they are anionic and cannot dissolve at this acidic pH. These findings suggest that the molecular structure of the native biocide probably involves the formation of aggregates of several peptides that render them soluble under acidic conditions. The death mechanisms induced by the AMPs were also evaluated by means of epifluorescence microscopy-based methods. Sensitive yeast cells treated with the synthetic AMPs show cell membrane disruption, apoptotic molecular markers, and internalization of the AMPs. In conclusion, our work shows that saccharomycin is a natural biocide secreted by S. cerevisiae whose activity depends on the conjugated action of GAPDH-derived peptides. This study also reveals that S. cerevisiae secretes GAPDH-derived peptides as a strategy to combat other microbial species during alcoholic fermentations.

  6. Genetic determinants of mitochondrial response to arsenic in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vujcic, Marija; Shroff, Meghna; Singh, Keshav K

    2007-10-15

    We have used yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a tool to identify the importance of mitochondrial processes involved in arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in humans. We screened 466 single-gene knockout strains of yeast S. cerevisiae known to be involved in biogenesis of mitochondria for sodium arsenite (AsIII) and sodium arsenate (AsV) sensitivity. We identified 72 arsenite-sensitive and 81 arsenate-sensitive mutants. We categorized the identified mutants based on the various mitochondrial processes, including nucleic acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and vacuolar acidification. We have identified 65 human orthologues to proteins involved in arsenite sensitivity and 3 human orthologues to arsenite resistance. Furthermore, 23 human orthologues to arsenate sensitivity and 20 human orthologues to arsenate-resistant proteins, including MSH3, COX10, GCSH, PPOX, and MTHFD1, were also identified. Using PathwayAssist software, we did cellular network analysis between identified mitochondrial proteins. Three types of interactions, (a) protein-protein interactions, (b) common transcriptional regulators, and (c) common target genes, were identified. We found that RTG (retrograde) genes involved in mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling regulate both arsenite sensitivity and resistance. Furthermore, our study revealed that ABF1, a multifunctional transcriptional factor, regulates genes involved in both arsenite and arsenate sensitivity and resistance. However, REB1 and RAP1 transcriptional regulators were common to only arsenate- and arsenite-sensitive genes, respectively. These studies indicate that multiple pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis protect yeast S. cerevisiae from arsenic-induced toxicity. Together, our studies suggest that evolutionary conserved mitochondrial networks identified in yeast S. cerevisiae must play an important role in arsenic-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  7. Improved galactose fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through inverse metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Sung; Hong, Min-Eui; Jung, Suk-Chae; Ha, Suk-Jin; Yu, Byung Jo; Koo, Hyun Min; Park, Sung Min; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Park, Jae Chan; Jin, Yong-Su

    2011-03-01

    Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae is capable of fermenting galactose into ethanol, ethanol yield and productivity from galactose are significantly lower than those from glucose. An inverse metabolic engineering approach was undertaken to improve ethanol yield and productivity from galactose in S. cerevisiae. A genome-wide perturbation library was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and then fast galactose-fermenting transformants were screened using three different enrichment methods. The characterization of genetic perturbations in the isolated transformants revealed three target genes whose overexpression elicited enhanced galactose utilization. One confirmatory (SEC53 coding for phosphomannomutase) and two novel targets (SNR84 coding for a small nuclear RNA and a truncated form of TUP1 coding for a general repressor of transcription) were identified as overexpression targets that potentially improve galactose fermentation. Beneficial effects of overexpression of SEC53 may be similar to the mechanisms exerted by overexpression of PGM2 coding for phosphoglucomutase. While the mechanism is largely unknown, overexpression of SNR84, improved both growth and ethanol production from galactose. The most remarkable improvement of galactose fermentation was achieved by overexpression of the truncated TUP1 (tTUP1) gene, resulting in unrivalled galactose fermentation capability, that is 250% higher in both galactose consumption rate and ethanol productivity compared to the control strain. Moreover, the overexpression of tTUP1 significantly shortened lag periods that occurs when substrate is changed from glucose to galactose. Based on these results we proposed a hypothesis that the mutant Tup1 without C-terminal repression domain might bring in earlier and higher expression of GAL genes through partial alleviation of glucose repression. mRNA levels of GAL genes (GAL1, GAL4, and GAL80) indeed increased upon overexpression of tTUP. The results presented in this study illustrate

  8. Exclusion of Saccharomyces kudriavzevii from a wine model system mediated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-López, F Noé; Pérez-Través, Laura; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the competition and potential hybrid generation between the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii in a wine-model environment. Our main goal was to understand why S. kudriavzevii has not been found in wine fermentations whilst their hybrids are present. Auxotrophic mutants (Ura(-) and Lys(-)) were used to favour the selection of hybrids and to specifically differentiate the two species in mixed fermentations carried out at different temperatures (17 °C, 24 °C and 31 °C). Both yeasts showed a reduction in their maximum specific growth rates in mixed fermentations, indicating a clear antagonistic effect between the two microorganisms. Temperature played an important role in this competition. In this way, S. kudriavzevii was less affected at 17 °C, but S. cerevisiae was clearly the best competitor at 31 °C, preventing the growth of S. kudriavzevii. Population levels of S. kudriavzevii always significantly decreased in the presence of S. cerevisiae. Ethanol was measured throughout the fermentations and in all cases S. kudriavzevii growth was arrested when ethanol levels were < 5 g/l, indicating that this compound did not influence the competitive exclusion of S. kudriavzevii. Killer factors were also discarded due to the K(-) R(-) phenotype of both strains. Finally, no prototrophic interspecific hybrids were isolated in small-scale fermentations at any temperature assayed. Our results show that the lack of competitiveness exhibited by S. kudriavzevii, especially at high temperatures, explains the absence of this species in wine fermentations, suggesting that natural S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids most likely originated in wild environments rather than in industrial fermentations.

  9. An experimental study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae U3 snRNA conformation in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Ségault, V; Mougin, A; Grégoire, A; Banroques, J; Branlant, C

    1992-01-01

    The conformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae U3 snRNA (snR17A RNA) in solution was studied using enzymatic and chemical probes. In vitro synthesized and authentic snR17A RNAs have a similar conformation in solution. The S. cerevisiae U3 snRNA is folded in two distinct domains. The 5'-domain has a low degree of compactness; it is constituted of two stem-loop structures separated by a single-stranded segment, which has recently been proposed to basepair with the 5'-ETS of pre-ribosomal RNA. We demonstrate that, as previously proposed, the 5'-terminal region of U3 snRNA has a different structure in higher and lower eukaryotes and that this may be related to pre-rRNA 5'-ETS evolution. The S. cerevisiae U3 snRNA 3'-domain has a cruciform secondary structure and a compact conformation resulting from an higher order structure involving the single-stranded segments at the center of the cross and the bottom parts of helices. Compared to tRNA, where long range interactions take place between terminal loops, this represents another kind of tertiary folding of RNA molecules that will deserve further investigation, especially since the implicated single-strands have highly evolutionarily conserved primary structures that are involved in snRNP protein binding. Images PMID:1630915

  10. Rck1 promotes pseudohyphal growth via the activation of Ubp3 phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Min; Chang, Miwha; Park, Yong-Sung; Yun, Cheol-Won

    2016-01-15

    Previously, we reported that Rck1 up-regulates Ras2 and pseudohyphal growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we further investigate the involvement of Rck1 in the activation of pseudohyphal growth. Rck1 activated phosphorylation of the deubiquitinase Ubp3 through a direct protein interaction between Rck1 and Ubp3. The N-terminal Bre5 binding region of Ubp3 physically interacted with Rck1, and Ubp3 and Rck1 co-precipitated. Overexpression of UBP3 using a high-copy plasmid resulted in the upregulation of Ras2, and deletion of UBP3 blocked the upregulation of Ras2 by RCK1 overexpression. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 resulted in accumulation of Ras2, indicating that Rck1 is involved in Ras2 degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. Furthermore, deletion of UBP3 blocked the upregulation of FLO11, a flocculin required for pseudohyphal and invasive growth induced by RCK1 overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Rck1 promotes S. cerevisiae pseudohyphal growth via the activation of Ubp3 phosphorylation.

  11. Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes regulated by vanillin.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2015-01-01

    During pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, a variety of fermentation inhibitors, including acetic acid and vanillin, are released. Using DNA microarray analysis, this study explored genes of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that respond to vanillin-induced stress. The expression of 273 genes was upregulated and that of 205 genes was downregulated under vanillin stress. Significantly induced genes included MCH2, SNG1, GPH1, and TMA10, whereas NOP2, UTP18, FUR1, and SPR1 were down regulated. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of upregulated genes suggested that vanillin might regulate gene expression in a stress response element (STRE)-dependent manner, in addition to a pathway that involved the transcription factor Yap1p. Retardation in the cell growth of mutant strains indicated that MCH2, SNG1, and GPH1 are intimately involved in vanillin stress response. Deletion of the genes whose expression levels were decreased under vanillin stress did not result in a notable change in S. cerevisiae growth under vanillin stress. This study will provide the basis for a better understanding of the stress response of the yeast S. cerevisiae to fermentation inhibitors.

  12. Molecular characterization of propolis-induced cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Savoldi, Marcela; Bonatto, Diego; Barros, Mário Henrique; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Berretta, Andresa A; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2011-03-01

    Propolis, a natural product of plant resins, is used by the bees to seal holes in their honeycombs and protect the hive entrance. However, propolis has also been used in folk medicine for centuries. Here, we apply the power of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism for studies of genetics, cell biology, and genomics to determine how propolis affects fungi at the cellular level. Propolis is able to induce an apoptosis cell death response. However, increased exposure to propolis provides a corresponding increase in the necrosis response. We showed that cytochrome c but not endonuclease G (Nuc1p) is involved in propolis-mediated cell death in S. cerevisiae. We also observed that the metacaspase YCA1 gene is important for propolis-mediated cell death. To elucidate the gene functions that may be required for propolis sensitivity in eukaryotes, the full collection of about 4,800 haploid S. cerevisiae deletion strains was screened for propolis sensitivity. We were able to identify 138 deletion strains that have different degrees of propolis sensitivity compared to the corresponding wild-type strains. Systems biology revealed enrichment for genes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, vacuolar acidification, negative regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, regulation of macroautophagy associated with protein targeting to vacuoles, and cellular response to starvation. Validation studies indicated that propolis sensitivity is dependent on the mitochondrial function and that vacuolar acidification and autophagy are important for yeast cell death caused by propolis.

  13. A role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein in direct alkylation repair.

    PubMed

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-12-26

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity.

  14. Adaptive evolution of a lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombinant.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; François, Jean; Parrou, Jean Luc; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-03-01

    The construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that ferment lactose has biotechnological interest, particularly for cheese whey fermentation. A flocculent lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae recombinant expressing the LAC12 (lactose permease) and LAC4 (beta-galactosidase) genes of Kluyveromyces lactis was constructed previously but showed poor efficiency in lactose fermentation. This strain was therefore subjected to an evolutionary engineering process (serial transfer and dilution in lactose medium), which yielded an evolved recombinant strain that consumed lactose twofold faster, producing 30% more ethanol than the original recombinant. We identified two molecular events that targeted the LAC construct in the evolved strain: a 1,593-bp deletion in the intergenic region (promoter) between LAC4 and LAC12 and a decrease of the plasmid copy number by about 10-fold compared to that in the original recombinant. The results suggest that the intact promoter was unable to mediate the induction of the transcription of LAC4 and LAC12 by lactose in the original recombinant and that the deletion established the transcriptional induction of both genes in the evolved strain. We propose that the tuning of the expression of the heterologous LAC genes in the evolved recombinant was accomplished by the interplay between the decreased copy number of both genes and the different levels of transcriptional induction for LAC4 and LAC12 resulting from the changed promoter structure. Nevertheless, our results do not exclude other possible mutations that may have contributed to the improved lactose fermentation phenotype. This study illustrates the usefulness of simple evolutionary engineering approaches in strain improvement. The evolved strain efficiently fermented threefold-concentrated cheese whey, providing an attractive alternative for the fermentation of lactose-based media.

  15. The plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: structure, function, and biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    van der Rest, M E; Kamminga, A H; Nakano, A; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-01-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive flux of lipids from these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow of lipids is separate from vesicle-mediated protein transport. Recent advances in the analysis of membrane budding and membrane fusion indicate that the mechanisms of protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi and from the Golgi to plasma membrane are similar. The majority of plasma membrane proteins transport solutes across the membrane. A number of ATP-dependent export systems have been detected that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to transport of molecules out of the cell. The hydrolysis of ATP by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase generates a proton motive force which is used to drive secondary transport processes. In S. cerevisiae, many substrates are transported by more than one system. Transport of monosaccharide is catalyzed by uniport systems, while transport of disaccharides, amino acids, and nucleosides is mediated by proton symport systems. Transport activity can be regulated at the level of transcription, e.g., induction and (catabolite) repression, but transport proteins can also be affected posttranslationally by a process termed catabolite inactivation. Catabolite inactivation is triggered by the addition of fermentable sugars, intracellular acidification, stress conditions, and/or nitrogen starvation. Phosphorylation and/or ubiquitination of the transport proteins has been proposed as an initial step in the controlled inactivation and degradation of the target enzyme. The use of artificial membranes, like secretory vesicles and plasma membranes

  16. Transcriptome-based characterization of interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in lactose-grown chemostat cocultures.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Filipa; Sieuwerts, Sander; de Hulster, Erik; Almering, Marinka J H; Luttik, Marijke A H; Pronk, Jack T; Smid, Eddy J; Bron, Peter A; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2013-10-01

    Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, two microorganisms that co-occur in kefir fermentations, were studied during anaerobic growth on lactose. By combining physiological and transcriptome analysis of the two strains in the cocultures, five mechanisms of interaction were identified. (i) Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus hydrolyzes lactose, which cannot be metabolized by S. cerevisiae, to galactose and glucose. Subsequently, galactose, which cannot be metabolized by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, is excreted and provides a carbon source for yeast. (ii) In pure cultures, Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus grows only in the presence of increased CO2 concentrations. In anaerobic mixed cultures, the yeast provides this CO2 via alcoholic fermentation. (iii) Analysis of amino acid consumption from the defined medium indicated that S. cerevisiae supplied alanine to the bacterium. (iv) A mild but significant low-iron response in the yeast transcriptome, identified by DNA microarray analysis, was consistent with the chelation of iron by the lactate produced by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. (v) Transcriptome analysis of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in mixed cultures showed an overrepresentation of transcripts involved in lipid metabolism, suggesting either a competition of the two microorganisms for fatty acids or a response to the ethanol produced by S. cerevisiae. This study demonstrates that chemostat-based transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool to investigate microbial interactions in mixed populations.

  17. Improving flavor metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by mixed culture with Bacillus licheniformis for Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor making.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing; Wu, Qun; Wang, Li; Wang, Diqiang; Chen, Liangqiang; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Microbial interactions could impact the metabolic behavior of microbes involved in food fermentation, and therefore they are important for improving food quality. This study investigated the effect of Bacillus licheniformis, the dominant bacteria in the fermentation process of Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor, on the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results indicated that S. cerevisiae inhibited the growth of B. licheniformis in all mixed culture systems and final viable cell count was lower than 20 cfu/mL. Although growth of S. cerevisiae was barely influenced by B. licheniformis, its metabolism was changed as initial inoculation ratio varied. The maximum ethanol productions were observed in S. cerevisiae and B. licheniformis at 10(6):10(7) and 10(6):10(8) ratios and have increased by 16.8 % compared with single culture of S. cerevisiae. According to flavor compounds, the culture ratio 10(6):10(6) showed the highest level of total concentrations of all different kinds of flavor compounds. Correlation analyses showed that 12 flavor compounds, including 4 fatty acids and their 2 corresponding esters, 1 terpene, and 5 aromatic compounds, that could only be produced by S. cerevisiae were significantly correlated with the initial inoculation amount of B. licheniformis. These metabolic changes in S. cerevisiae were not only a benefit for liquor aroma, but may also be related to its inhibition effect in mixed culture. This study could help to reveal the microbial interactions in Chinese liquor fermentation and provide guidance for optimal arrangement of mixed culture fermentation systems.

  18. Increasing cocoa butter-like lipid production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of selected cocoa genes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongjun; Gossing, Michael; Bergenholm, David; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-12-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) extracted from cocoa beans mainly consists of three different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POP, C16:0-C18:1-C16:0), 1-palmitoyl-3-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POS, C16:0-C18:1-C18:0) and 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (SOS, C18:0-C18:1-C18:0), but CB supply is limited. Therefore, CB-like lipids (CBL, which are composed of POP, POS and SOS) are in great demand. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces TAGs as storage lipids, which are also mainly composed of C16 and C18 fatty acids. However, POP, POS and SOS are not among the major TAG forms in yeast. TAG synthesis is mainly catalyzed by three enzymes: glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPAT) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). In order to produce CBL in S. cerevisiae, we selected six cocoa genes encoding GPAT, LPAT and DGAT potentially responsible for CB biosynthesis from the cocoa genome using a phylogenetic analysis approach. By expressing the selected cocoa genes in S. cerevisiae, we successfully increased total fatty acid production, TAG production and CBL production in some S. cerevisiae strains. The relative CBL content in three yeast strains harboring cocoa genes increased 190, 230 and 196% over the control strain, respectively; especially, the potential SOS content of the three yeast strains increased 254, 476 and 354% over the control strain. Moreover, one of the three yeast strains had a 2.25-fold increased TAG content and 6.7-fold higher level of CBL compared with the control strain. In summary, CBL production by S. cerevisiae were increased through expressing selected cocoa genes potentially involved in CB biosynthesis.

  19. Characterization of the Viable but Nonculturable (VBNC) State in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Salma, Mohammad; Rousseaux, Sandrine; Sequeira-Le Grand, Anabelle; Divol, Benoit; Alexandre, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC) state has been thoroughly studied in bacteria. In contrast, it has received much less attention in other microorganisms. However, it has been suggested that various yeast species occurring in wine may enter in VBNC following sulfite stress.In order to provide conclusive evidences for the existence of a VBNC state in yeast, the ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enter into a VBNC state by applying sulfite stress was investigated. Viable populations were monitored by flow cytometry while culturable populations were followed by plating on culture medium. Twenty-four hours after the application of the stress, the comparison between the culturable population and the viable population demonstrated the presence of viable cells that were non culturable. In addition, removal of the stress by increasing the pH of the medium at different time intervals into the VBNC state allowed the VBNC S. cerevisiae cells to “resuscitate”. The similarity between the cell cycle profiles of VBNC cells and cells exiting the VBNC state together with the generation rate of cells exiting VBNC state demonstrated the absence of cellular multiplication during the exit from the VBNC state. This provides evidence of a true VBNC state. To get further insight into the molecular mechanism pertaining to the VBNC state, we studied the involvement of the SSU1 gene, encoding a sulfite pump in S. cerevisiae. The physiological behavior of wild-type S. cerevisiae was compared to those of a recombinant strain overexpressing SSU1 and null Δssu1 mutant. Our results demonstrated that the SSU1 gene is only implicated in the first stages of sulfite resistance but not per se in the VBNC phenotype. Our study clearly demonstrated the existence of an SO2-induced VBNC state in S. cerevisiae and that the stress removal allows the “resuscitation” of VBNC cells during the VBNC state. PMID:24204887

  20. Regulation of xylose metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Salusjärvi, Laura; Kankainen, Matti; Soliymani, Rabah; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka; Penttilä, Merja; Ruohonen, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background Considerable interest in the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol has led to metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for fermentation of xylose. In the present study, the transcriptome and proteome of recombinant, xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic batch cultures on xylose were compared with those of glucose-grown cells both in glucose repressed and derepressed states. The aim was to study at the genome-wide level how signalling and carbon catabolite repression differ in cells grown on either glucose or xylose. The more detailed knowledge whether xylose is sensed as a fermentable carbon source, capable of catabolite repression like glucose, or is rather recognised as a non-fermentable carbon source is important for further engineering this yeast for more efficient anaerobic fermentation of xylose. Results Genes encoding respiratory proteins, proteins of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles, and gluconeogenesis were only partially repressed by xylose, similar to the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators HAP4, CAT8 and SIP1-2 and 4. Several genes that are repressed via the Snf1p/Mig1p-pathway during growth on glucose had higher expression in the cells grown on xylose than in the glucose repressed cells but lower than in the glucose derepressed cells. The observed expression profiles of the transcription repressor RGT1 and its target genes HXT2-3, encoding hexose transporters suggested that extracellular xylose was sensed by the glucose sensors Rgt2p and Snf3p. Proteome analyses revealed distinct patterns in phosphorylation of hexokinase 2, glucokinase and enolase isoenzymes in the xylose- and glucose-grown cells. Conclusion The results indicate that the metabolism of yeast growing on xylose corresponds neither to that of fully glucose repressed cells nor that of derepressed cells. This may be one of the major reasons for the suboptimal fermentation of xylose by recombinant S. cerevisiae strains

  1. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    PubMed Central

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment. PMID:23614011

  2. Introducing a new breed of wine yeast: interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Jennifer R; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L; Dunn, Barbara L; Chambers, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment.

  3. Calcium dependence of eugenol tolerance and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen K; McAinsh, Martin; Cantopher, Hanna; Sandison, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Eugenol is a plant-derived phenolic compound which has recognised therapeutical potential as an antifungal agent. However little is known of either its fungicidal activity or the mechanisms employed by fungi to tolerate eugenol toxicity. A better exploitation of eugenol as a therapeutic agent will therefore depend on addressing this knowledge gap. Eugenol initiates increases in cytosolic Ca2+ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae which is partly dependent on the plasma membrane calcium channel, Cch1p. However, it is unclear whether a toxic cytosolic Ca2+elevation mediates the fungicidal activity of eugenol. In the present study, no significant difference in yeast survival was observed following transient eugenol treatment in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, using yeast expressing apoaequorin to report cytosolic Ca2+ and a range of eugenol derivatives, antifungal activity did not appear to be coupled to Ca2+ influx or cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. Taken together, these results suggest that eugenol toxicity is not dependent on a toxic influx of Ca2+. In contrast, careful control of extracellular Ca2+ (using EGTA or BAPTA) revealed that tolerance of yeast to eugenol depended on Ca2+ influx via Cch1p. These findings expose significant differences between the antifungal activity of eugenol and that of azoles, amiodarone and carvacrol. This study highlights the potential to use eugenol in combination with other antifungal agents that exhibit differing modes of action as antifungal agents to combat drug resistant infections.

  4. Purification and biochemical properties of calmodulin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Uno, I; Ishikawa, T; Anraku, Y

    1987-10-01

    Calmodulin from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to complete homogeneity by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and HPLC gel filtration. The biochemical properties of the purified protein as calmodulin were examined under various criteria and its similarity and dissimilarity to other calmodulins have been described. Like other calmodulins, yeast calmodulin activated bovine phosphodiesterase and pea NAD kinase in a Ca2+-dependent manner, but its concentration for half-maximal activation was 8-10 times that of bovine calmodulin. The amino acid composition of yeast calmodulin was different from those of calmodulins from other lower eukaryotes in that it contained no tyrosine, but more leucine and had a high ratio of serine to threonine. Yeast calmodulin did not contain tryptophanyl or tyrosyl residues, so its ultraviolet spectrum reflected the absorbance of phenylalanyl residues, and had a molar absorption coefficient at 259 nm of 1900 M-1 cm-1. Ca2+ ions changed the secondary structure of yeast calmodulin, causing a 3% decrease in the alpha-helical content, unlike its effect on other calmodulins. Antibody against yeast calmodulin did not cross-react with bovine calmodulin, and antibody against bovine calmodulin did not cross-react with yeast calmodulin, presumably due to differences in the amino acid sequences of the antigenic sites. It is concluded that the molecular structure of yeast calmodulin differs from those of calmodulins from other sources, but that its Ca2+-dependent regulatory functions are highly conserved and essentially similar to those of calmodulins of higher eukaryotes.

  5. Distribution and regulation of stochasticity and plasticity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE PAGES

    Dar, R. D.; Karig, D. K.; Cooke, J. F.; ...

    2010-09-01

    Stochasticity is an inherent feature of complex systems with nanoscale structure. In such systems information is represented by small collections of elements (e.g. a few electrons on a quantum dot), and small variations in the populations of these elements may lead to big uncertainties in the information. Unfortunately, little is known about how to work within this inherently noisy environment to design robust functionality into complex nanoscale systems. Here, we look to the biological cell as an intriguing model system where evolution has mediated the trade-offs between fluctuations and function, and in particular we look at the relationships and trade-offsmore » between stochastic and deterministic responses in the gene expression of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We find gene regulatory arrangements that control the stochastic and deterministic components of expression, and show that genes that have evolved to respond to stimuli (stress) in the most strongly deterministic way exhibit the most noise in the absence of the stimuli. We show that this relationship is consistent with a bursty 2-state model of gene expression, and demonstrate that this regulatory motif generates the most uncertainty in gene expression when there is the greatest uncertainty in the optimal level of gene expression.« less

  6. Kem Mutations Affect Nuclear Fusion in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.; Ljungdahl, P. O.; Fink, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    We have identified mutations in three genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KEM1, KEM2 and KEM3, that enhance the nuclear fusion defect of kar1-1 yeast during conjugation. The KEM1 and KEM3 genes are located on the left arm of chromosome VII. Kem mutations reduce nuclear fusion whether the kem and the kar1-1 mutations are in the same or in different parents (i.e., in both kem kar1-1 X wild-type and kem X kar1-1 crosses). kem1 X kem1 crosses show a defect in nuclear fusion, but kem1 X wild-type crosses do not. Mutant kem1 strains are hypersensitive to benomyl, lose chromosomes at a rate 10-20-fold higher than KEM(+) strains, and lose viability upon nitrogen starvation. In addition, kem1/kem1 diploids are unable to sporulate. Cells containing a kem1 null allele grow very poorly, have an elongated rod-shape and are defective in spindle pole body duplication and/or separation. The KEM1 gene, which is expressed as a 5.5-kb mRNA transcript, contains a 4.6-kb open reading frame encoding a 175-kD protein. PMID:2076815

  7. Metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae for branched-chain ester productions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jifeng; Mishra, Pranjul; Ching, Chi Bun

    2016-12-10

    Medium branched-chain esters can be used not only as a biofuel but are also useful chemicals with various industrial applications. The development of economically feasible and environment friendly bio-based fuels requires efficient cell factories capable of producing desired products in high yield. Herein, we sought to use a number of strategies to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for high-level production of branched-chain esters. Mitochondrion-based expression of ATF1 gene in a base strain with an overexpressed valine biosynthetic pathway together with expression of mitochondrion-relocalized α-ketoacid decarboxylase (encoded by ARO10) and alcohol dehydrogenase (encoded by ADH7) not only produced isobutyl acetate, but also 3-methyl-1-butyl acetate and 2-methyl-1-butyl acetate. Further segmentation of the downstream esterification step into the cytosol to utilize the cytosolic acetyl-CoA pool for acetyltransferase (ATF)-mediated condensation enabled an additional fold improvement of ester productions. The best titre attained in the present study is 260.2mg/L isobutyl acetate, 296.1mg/L 3-methyl-1-butyl acetate and 289.6mg/L 2-methyl-1-butyl acetate.

  8. Redundant Regulation of Cdk1 Tyrosine Dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Erin K; Dysart, Michael; Lianga, Noel; Williams, Elizabeth C; Pilon, Sophie; Doré, Carole; Deneault, Jean-Sebastien; Rudner, Adam D

    2016-03-01

    Cdk1 activity drives both mitotic entry and the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in all eukaryotes. The kinase Wee1 and the phosphatase Cdc25 regulate the mitotic activity of Cdk1 by the reversible phosphorylation of a conserved tyrosine residue. Mutation of cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe blocks Cdk1 dephosphorylation and causes cell cycle arrest. In contrast, deletion of MIH1, the cdc25 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is viable. Although Cdk1-Y19 phosphorylation is elevated during mitosis in mih1∆ cells, Cdk1 is dephosphorylated as cells progress into G1, suggesting that additional phosphatases regulate Cdk1 dephosphorylation. Here we show that the phosphatase Ptp1 also regulates Cdk1 dephosphorylation in vivo and can directly dephosphorylate Cdk1 in vitro. Using a novel in vivo phosphatase assay, we also show that PP2A bound to Rts1, the budding yeast B56-regulatory subunit, regulates dephosphorylation of Cdk1 independently of a function regulating Swe1, Mih1, or Ptp1, suggesting that PP2A(Rts1) either directly dephosphorylates Cdk1-Y19 or regulates an unidentified phosphatase.

  9. Redundant Regulation of Cdk1 Tyrosine Dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Erin K.; Dysart, Michael; Lianga, Noel; Williams, Elizabeth C.; Pilon, Sophie; Doré, Carole; Deneault, Jean-Sebastien; Rudner, Adam D.

    2016-01-01

    Cdk1 activity drives both mitotic entry and the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in all eukaryotes. The kinase Wee1 and the phosphatase Cdc25 regulate the mitotic activity of Cdk1 by the reversible phosphorylation of a conserved tyrosine residue. Mutation of cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe blocks Cdk1 dephosphorylation and causes cell cycle arrest. In contrast, deletion of MIH1, the cdc25 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is viable. Although Cdk1-Y19 phosphorylation is elevated during mitosis in mih1∆ cells, Cdk1 is dephosphorylated as cells progress into G1, suggesting that additional phosphatases regulate Cdk1 dephosphorylation. Here we show that the phosphatase Ptp1 also regulates Cdk1 dephosphorylation in vivo and can directly dephosphorylate Cdk1 in vitro. Using a novel in vivo phosphatase assay, we also show that PP2A bound to Rts1, the budding yeast B56-regulatory subunit, regulates dephosphorylation of Cdk1 independently of a function regulating Swe1, Mih1, or Ptp1, suggesting that PP2ARts1 either directly dephosphorylates Cdk1-Y19 or regulates an unidentified phosphatase. PMID:26715668

  10. Rapid Identification of Chemical Genetic Interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described. PMID:25867090

  11. Systematic Identification of Balanced Transposition Polymorphisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Faddah, Dina A.; Ganko, Eric W.; McCoach, Caroline; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Hanlon, Sean E.; Mann, Frederick G.; Mieczkowska, Joanna O.; Jones, Corbin D.; Lieb, Jason D.; Vision, Todd J.

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput techniques for detecting DNA polymorphisms generally do not identify changes in which the genomic position of a sequence, but not its copy number, varies among individuals. To explore such balanced structural polymorphisms, we used array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to conduct a genome-wide screen for single-copy genomic segments that occupy different genomic positions in the standard laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S90) and a polymorphic wild isolate (Y101) through analysis of six tetrads from a cross of these two strains. Paired-end high-throughput sequencing of Y101 validated four of the predicted rearrangements. The transposed segments contained one to four annotated genes each, yet crosses between S90 and Y101 yielded mostly viable tetrads. The longest segment comprised 13.5 kb near the telomere of chromosome XV in the S288C reference strain and Southern blotting confirmed its predicted location on chromosome IX in Y101. Interestingly, inter-locus crossover events between copies of this segment occurred at a detectable rate. The presence of low-copy repetitive sequences at the junctions of this segment suggests that it may have arisen through ectopic recombination. Our methodology and findings provide a starting point for exploring the origins, phenotypic consequences, and evolutionary fate of this largely unexplored form of genomic polymorphism. PMID:19503594

  12. Endomitotic effect of a cell cycle mutation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, D.; Ananthaswamy, H.N.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1981-03-01

    A recessive temperature-sensitive mutation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been isolated and shown to cause an increase in ploidy in both haploids and diploids. Genetic analysis revealed that the strain carrying the mutation was an aa diploid, although MNNG mutagenesis had been done on an a haploid strain. When the mutant strain was crossed with an ..cap alpha cap alpha.. diploid and the resultant tetraploid sporulated, some of the meiotic progeny of this tetraploid were themselves tetraploid, as shown by both genetic analysis and DNA measurements, instead of diploid as expected of tetraploid meiosis. The ability of these tetraploids to continue to produce tetraploid meiotic progeny was followed for four generations. It was found that tetraploidization was independent of sporulation temperature, but was dependent on the temperature of germination and the growth of the spores. Increase in ploidy occurred when the spores were germinated and grown at 30/sup 0/, but did not occur at 23/sup 0/. Two cycles of sporulation and growth at 23/sup 0/ resulted in haploids, which were shown to diploidize within 24 hr when grown at 30/sup 0/.

  13. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  14. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; de Llanos, Rosa; Romero, Antonia María; Puig, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox cofactor in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that in response to iron deficiency, an RNA-binding protein denoted Cth2 coordinates a global metabolic rearrangement that aims to optimize iron utilization. The Cth2 protein contains two Cx8Cx5Cx3H tandem zinc fingers (TZFs) that specifically bind to adenosine/uridine-rich elements within the 3′ untranslated region of many mRNAs to promote their degradation. The Cth2 protein shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Once inside the nucleus, Cth2 binds target mRNAs and stimulates alternative 3′ end processing. A Cth2/mRNA-containing complex is required for export to the cytoplasm, where the mRNA is degraded by the 5′ to 3′ degradation pathway. This post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism limits iron utilization in nonessential pathways and activates essential iron-dependent enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase, which is required for DNA synthesis and repair. Recent findings indicate that the TZF-containing tristetraprolin protein also functions in modulating human iron homeostasis. Elevated iron concentrations can also be detrimental for cells. The Rnt1 RNase III exonuclease protects cells from excess iron by promoting the degradation of a subset of the Fe acquisition system when iron levels rise. PMID:23903042

  15. Influence of culture conditions on glutathione production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lucielen Oliveira; Gonzales, Tatiane Araujo; Ubeda, Beatriz Torsani; Monte Alegre, Ranulfo

    2007-12-01

    A strategy of experimental design using a fractional factorial design (FFD) and a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) were carried out with the aim to obtain the best conditions of temperature (20-30 degrees C), agitation rate (100-300 rpm), initial pH (5.0-7.0), inoculum concentration (5-15%), and glucose concentration (30-70 g/l) for glutathione (GSH) production in shake-flask culture by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 7754. By a FFD (2(5-2)), the agitation rate, temperature, and pH were found to be significant factors for GSH production. In CCRD (2(2)) was obtained a second-order model equation, and the percent of variation explained by the model was 95%. The results showed that the optimal culture conditions were agitation rate, 300 rpm; temperature, 20 degrees C; initial pH, 5; glucose, 54 g/l; and inoculum concentration, 5%. The highest GSH concentration (154.5 mg/l) was obtained after 72 h of fermentation.

  16. d-Xylulose Fermentation to Ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chiang, L C; Gong, C S; Chen, L F; Tsao, G T

    1981-08-01

    We used commercial bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to study the conversion of d-xylulose to ethanol in the presence of d-xylose. The rate of ethanol production increased with an increase in yeast cell density. The optimal temperature for d-xylulose fermentation was 35 degrees C, and the optimal pH range was 4 to 6. The fermentation of d-xylulose by yeast resulted in the production of ethanol as the major product; small amounts of xylitol and glycerol were also produced. The production of xylitol was influenced by pH as well as temperature. High pH values and low temperatures enhanced xylitol production. The rate of d-xylulose fermentation decreased when the production of ethanol yielded concentrations of 4% or more. The slow conversion rate of d-xylulose to ethanol was increased by increasing the yeast cell density. The overall production of ethanol from d-xylulose by yeast cells under optimal conditions was 90% of the theoretical yield.

  17. D-xylulose fermentation to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.C.; Gong, C.S.; Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-08-01

    Commercial bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was used to study the conversion of D-xylulose to ethanol in the presence of D-xylose. The rate of ethanol production increased with an increase in yeast cell density. The optimal temperature for D-xylulose fermentation was 35 degrees Celcius, and the optimal pH range was 4 to 6. The fermentation of D-xylulose by yeast resulted in the production of ethanol as the major product; small amounts of xylitol and glycerol were also produced. The production of xylitol was influenced by pH as well as temperature. High pH values and low temperatures enhanced xylitol production. The rate of D-xylulose fermentation decreased when the production of ethanol yielded concentrations of 4% or more. The slow conversion rate of D-xylulose to ethanol was increased by increasing the yeast cell density. The overall production of ethanol from D-xylulose by yeast cells under optimal conditions was 90% of the theoretical yield. (Refs. 21).

  18. Distribution and regulation of stochasticity and plasticity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Karig, David K; Cooke, John F; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    Stochasticity is an inherent feature of complex systems with nanoscale structure. In such systems information is represented by small collections of elements (e.g. a few electrons on a quantum dot), and small variations in the populations of these elements may lead to big uncertainties in the information. Unfortunately, little is known about how to work within this inherently noisy environment to design robust functionality into complex nanoscale systems. Here, we look to the biological cell as an intriguing model system where evolution has mediated the trade-offs between fluctuations and function, and in particular we look at the relationships and trade-offs between stochastic and deterministic responses in the gene expression of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We find gene regulatory arrangements that control the stochastic and deterministic components of expression, and show that genes that have evolved to respond to stimuli (stress) in the most strongly deterministic way exhibit the most noise in the absence of the stimuli. We show that this relationship is consistent with a bursty 2-state model of gene expression, and demonstrate that this regulatory motif generates the most uncertainty in gene expression when there is the greatest uncertainty in the optimal level of gene expression.

  19. Class C ABC transporters and Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sasser, Terry L; Fratti, Rutilio A

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion is carried out by core machinery that is conserved throughout eukaryotes. This is comprised of Rab GTPases and their effectors, and SNARE proteins, which together are sufficient to drive the fusion of reconstituted proteoliposomes. However, an outer layer of factors that are specific to individual trafficking pathways in vivo regulates the spatial and temporal occurrence of fusion. The homotypic fusion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar lysosomes utilizes a growing set of factors to regulate the fusion machinery that include members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Yeast vacuoles have five class C ABC transporters that are known to transport a variety of toxins into the vacuole lumen as part of detoxifying the cell. We have found that ABCC transporters can also regulate vacuole fusion through novel mechanisms. For instance Ybt1 serves as negative regulator of fusion through its effects on vacuolar Ca2+ homeostasis. Additional studies showed that Ycf1 acts as a positive regulator by affecting the efficient recruitment of the SNARE Vam7. Finally, we discuss the potential interface between the translocation of lipids across the membrane bilayer, also known as lipid flipping, and the efficiency of fusion. PMID:25610719

  20. Effect of calcofluor white on chitin synthases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, C; Valdivieso, M H; Ribas, J C; Durán, A

    1988-01-01

    The growths of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type strain and another strain containing a disrupted structural gene for chitin synthase (chs1::URA3), defective in chitin synthase 1 (Chs1) but showing a new chitin synthase activity (Chs2), were affected by Calcofluor. To be effective, the interaction of Calcofluor with growing cells had to occur at around pH 6. Treatment of growing cells from these strains with the fluorochrome led to an increase in the total levels of Chs1 and Chs2 activities measured on permeabilized cells. During treatment, basal levels (activities expressed in the absence of exogenous proteolytic activation) of Chs1 and Chs2 increased nine- and fourfold, respectively, through a mechanism dependent on protein synthesis, since the effect was abolished by cycloheximide. During alpha-factor treatment, both Chs1 and Chs2 levels increased; however, as opposed to what occurred during the mitotic cell cycle, there was no further increase in Chs1 or Chs2 activities by Calcofluor treatment. Images PMID:2965145

  1. Kinetic and Morphological Observations on Saccharomyces cerevisiae During Spheroplast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Sven; Theilade, Jørgen; Birch-Andersen, Aksel

    1969-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produced elongated cells under our growth conditions was investigated. By digestion of the cell walls with snail enzyme, the cells became spheroplasts after a transient state which we termed “prospheroplast.” The prospheroplast could be lysed like the spheroplast, but it retained the shape of the original yeast cell if osmotically protected. Prospheroplasts and spheroplasts were prepared, and thin sections of samples taken throughout the process of wall removal were studied in the electron microscope, at regular intervals up to the time of complete conversion to spheroplasts. In addition, cell wall remnants recovered from spheroplast preparations were shadow cast for electron microscopy. This material revealed structures resembling bud scars with attached membranous matter. The kinetic studies showed that after a certain period of time all cells were transformed into prospheroplasts, whereas spheroplast formation started later, depending on the enzyme concentration. In sections, the prospheroplasts appeared to be formed by detachment of the cell walls. Both the prospheroplasts and the spheroplasts showed asymmetric cytoplasmic membranes in which the outer leaflets appeared coated with a dense fibrillar layer. The experiments suggest that, after enzyme digestion, the cytoplasmic membrane retains a coating which is rigid in the prospheroplast but which loses rigidity when the cell is transformed into a spheroplast. Images PMID:5784226

  2. Generation of henipavirus nucleocapsid proteins in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Serva, Andrius; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Slibinskas, Rimantas; Staniulis, Juozas; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Shiell, Brian J; Wang, Lin-Fa; Michalski, Wojtek P

    2007-03-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses are newly emerged, zoonotic viruses and their genomes have nucleotide and predicted amino acid homologies placing them in the family Paramyxoviridae. Currently these viruses are classified in the new genus Henipavirus, within the subfamily Paramyxovirinae, family Paramyxoviridae. The genes encoding HeV and NiV nucleocapsid proteins were cloned into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression vector pFGG3 under control of GAL7 promoter. A high level of expression of these proteins (18-20 mg l(-1) of yeast culture) was obtained. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed the primary structure of both proteins with 92% sequence coverage obtained using MS/MS analysis. Electron microscopy demonstrated the assembly of typical herring-bone structures of purified recombinant nucleocapsid proteins, characteristic for other paramyxoviruses. The nucleocapsid proteins revealed stability in yeast and can be easily purified by cesium chloride gradient ultracentrifugation. HeV nucleocapsid protein was detected by sera derived from fruit bats, humans, horses infected with HeV, and NiV nucleocapsid protein was immunodetected with sera from, fruit bats, humans and pigs. The development of an efficient and cost-effective system for generation of henipavirus nucleocapsid proteins might help to improve reagents for diagnosis of viruses.

  3. Characterization of two telomeric DNA processing reactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, A W; Claus, T E; Szostak, J W

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated two reactions that occur on telomeric sequences introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells by transformation. The elongation reaction added repeats of the yeast telomeric sequence C1-3A to telomeric sequences at the end of linear DNA molecules. The reaction worked on the Tetrahymena telomeric sequence C4A2 and also on the simple repeat CA. The reaction was orientation specific: it occurred only when the GT-rich strand ran 5' to 3' towards the end of the molecule. Telomere elongation occurred by non-template-directed DNA synthesis rather than any type of recombination with chromosomal telomeres, because C1-3A repeats could be added to unrelated DNA sequences between the CA-rich repeats and the terminus of the transforming DNA. The elongation reaction was very efficient, and we believe that it was responsible for maintaining an average telomere length despite incomplete replication by template-directed DNA polymerase. The resolution reaction processed a head-to-head inverted repeat of telomeric sequences into two new telomeres at a frequency of 10(-2) per cell division. Images PMID:3062364

  4. Sulfate assimilation mediates tellurite reduction and toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, Lars-Göran; Logg, Katarina; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Sunnerhagen, Per; Käll, Mikael; Blomberg, Anders; Warringer, Jonas

    2010-10-01

    Despite a century of research and increasing environmental and human health concerns, the mechanistic basis of the toxicity of derivatives of the metalloid tellurium, Te, in particular the oxyanion tellurite, Te(IV), remains unsolved. Here, we provide an unbiased view of the mechanisms of tellurium metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring deviations in Te-related traits of a complete collection of gene knockout mutants. Reduction of Te(IV) and intracellular accumulation as metallic tellurium strongly correlated with loss of cellular fitness, suggesting that Te(IV) reduction and toxicity are causally linked. The sulfate assimilation pathway upstream of Met17, in particular, the sulfite reductase and its cofactor siroheme, was shown to be central to tellurite toxicity and its reduction to elemental tellurium. Gene knockout mutants with altered Te(IV) tolerance also showed a similar deviation in tolerance to both selenite and, interestingly, selenomethionine, suggesting that the toxicity of these agents stems from a common mechanism. We also show that Te(IV) reduction and toxicity in yeast is partially mediated via a mitochondrial respiratory mechanism that does not encompass the generation of substantial oxidative stress. The results reported here represent a robust base from which to attack the mechanistic details of Te(IV) toxicity and reduction in a eukaryotic organism.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Default Mating Behavior in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dorer, R.; Boone, C.; Kimbrough, T.; Kim, J.; Hartwell, L. H.

    1997-01-01

    Haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells find each other during conjugation by orienting their growth toward each other along pheromone gradients (chemotropism). However, when their receptors are saturated for pheromone binding, yeast cells must select a mate by executing a default pathway in which they choose a mating partner at random. We previously demonstrated that this default pathway requires the SPA2 gene. In this report we show that the default mating pathway also requires the AXL1, FUS1, FUS2, FUS3, PEA2, RVS161, and BNI1 genes. These genes, including SPA2, are also important for efficient cell fusion during chemotropic mating. Cells containing null mutations in these genes display defects in cell fusion that subtly affect mating efficiency. In addition, we found that the defect in default mating caused by mutations in SPA2 is partially suppressed by multiple copies of two genes, FUS2 and MFA2. These findings uncover a molecular relationship between default mating and cell fusion. Moreover, because axl1 mutants secrete reduced levels of a-factor and are defective at both cell fusion and default mating, these results reveal an important role for a-factor in cell fusion and default mating. We suggest that default mating places a more stringent requirement on some aspects of cell fusion than does chemotropic mating. PMID:9135999

  6. Defects arising from whole-genome duplications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Andalis, Alex A; Storchova, Zuzana; Styles, Cora; Galitski, Timothy; Pellman, David; Fink, Gerald R

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons among closely related species have led to the proposal that the duplications found in many extant genomes are the remnants of an ancient polyploidization event, rather than a result of successive duplications of individual chromosomal segments. If this interpretation is correct, it would support Ohno's proposal that polyploidization drives evolution by generating the genetic material necessary for the creation of new genes. Paradoxically, analysis of contemporary polyploids suggests that increased ploidy is an inherently unstable state. To shed light on this apparent contradiction and to determine the effects of nascent duplications of the entire genome, we generated isogenic polyploid strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our data show that an increase in ploidy results in a marked decrease in a cell's ability to survive during stationary phase in growth medium. Tetraploid cells die rapidly, whereas isogenic haploids remain viable for weeks. Unlike haploid cells, which arrest growth as unbudded cells, tetraploid cells continue to bud and form mitotic spindles in stationary phase. The stationary-phase death of tetraploids can be prevented by mutations or conditions that result in growth arrest. These data show that whole-genome duplications are accompanied by defects that affect viability and subsequent survival of the new organism. PMID:15280227

  7. Four Acyltransferases Uniquely Contribute to Phospholipid Heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Oelkers, Peter; Pokhrel, Keshav

    2016-01-01

    Diverse acyl-CoA species and acyltransferase isoenzymes are components of a complex system that synthesizes glycerophospholipids and triacylglycerols. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has four main acyl-CoA species, two main glycerol-3-phosphate 1-O-acyltransferases (Gat1p, Gat2p), and two main 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferases (Lpt1p, Slc1p). The in vivo contribution of these isoenzymes to phospholipid heterogeneity was determined using haploids with compound mutations: gat1Δlpt1Δ, gat2Δlpt1Δ, gat1Δslc1Δ, and gat2Δslc1Δ. All mutations mildly reduced [3H]palmitic acid incorporation into phospholipids relative to triacylglycerol. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified few differences from wild type in gat1Δlpt1Δ, dramatic differences in gat2Δslc1Δ, and intermediate changes in gat2Δlpt1Δ and gat1Δslc1Δ. Yeast expressing Gat1p and Lpt1p had phospholipids enriched with acyl chains that were unsaturated, 18 carbons long, and paired for length. These alterations prevented growth at 18.5°C and in 10% ethanol. Therefore, Gat2p and Slc1p dictate phospholipid acyl chain composition in rich media at 30°C. Slc1p selectively pairs acyl chains of different lengths. PMID:27920551

  8. Bread, beer and wine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae diversity reflects human history.

    PubMed

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Merdinoglu, Didier; Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Karst, Francis

    2007-05-01

    Fermented beverages and foods have played a significant role in most societies worldwide for millennia. To better understand how the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main fermenting agent, evolved along this historical and expansion process, we analysed the genetic diversity among 651 strains from 56 different geographical origins, worldwide. Their genotyping at 12 microsatellite loci revealed 575 distinct genotypes organized in subgroups of yeast types, i.e. bread, beer, wine, sake. Some of these groups presented unexpected relatedness: Bread strains displayed a combination of alleles intermediate between beer and wine strains, and strains used for rice wine and sake were most closely related to beer and bread strains. However, up to 28% of genetic diversity between these technological groups was associated with geographical differences which suggests local domestications. Focusing on wine yeasts, a group of Lebanese strains were basal in an F(ST) tree, suggesting a Mesopotamia-based origin of most wine strains. In Europe, migration of wine strains occurred through the Danube Valley, and around the Mediterranean Sea. An approximate Bayesian computation approach suggested a postglacial divergence (most probable period 10,000-12,000 bp). As our results suggest intimate association between man and wine yeast across centuries, we hypothesize that yeast followed man and vine migrations as a commensal member of grapevine flora.

  9. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-02-25

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review.

  10. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26927067

  11. Recycling Carbon Dioxide during Xylose Fermentation by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Walker, Berkley; Seo, Seung-Oh; Kwak, Suryang; Liu, Jing-Jing; Kim, Heejin; Ort, Donald R; Wang, Shu-Guang; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-02-17

    Global climate change caused by the emission of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a grand challenge to humanity. To alleviate the trend, the consumption of fossil fuels needs to be largely reduced and alternative energy technologies capable of controlling GHG emissions are anticipated. In this study, we introduced a synthetic reductive pentose phosphate pathway (rPPP) into a xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain SR8 to achieve simultaneous lignocellulosic bioethanol production and carbon dioxide recycling. Specifically, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum and phosphoribulokinase from Spinacia oleracea were introduced into the SR8 strain. The resulting strain with the synthetic rPPP was able to exhibit a higher yield of ethanol and lower yields of byproducts (xylitol and glycerol) than a control strain. In addition, the reduced release of carbon dioxide by the engineered strain was observed during xylose fermentation, suggesting that the carbon dioxide generated by pyruvate decarboxylase was partially reassimilated through the synthetic rPPP. These results demonstrated that recycling of carbon dioxide from the ethanol fermentation pathway in yeast can be achieved during lignocellulosic bioethanol production through a synthetic carbon conservative metabolic pathway. This strategy has a great potential to alleviate GHG emissions during the production of second-generation ethanol.

  12. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of ginsenosides.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhubo; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xianan; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Beibei; Wang, Dong; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2013-11-01

    Ginsenosides are the primary bioactive components of ginseng, which is a popular medicinal herb and exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. Protopanaxadiol is the aglycon of several dammarane-type ginsenosides, which also has anticancer activity. For microbial production of protopanaxadiol, dammarenediol-II synthase and protopanaxadiol synthase genes of Panax ginseng, together with a NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase gene of Arabidopsis thaliana, were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in production of 0.05 mg/g DCW protopanaxadiol. Increasing squalene and 2,3-oxidosqualene supplies through overexpressing truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, squalene synthase and 2,3-oxidosqualene synthase genes, together with increasing protopanaxadiol synthase activity through codon optimization, led to 262-fold increase of protopanaxadiol production. Finally, using two-phase extractive fermentation resulted in production of 8.40 mg/g DCW protopanaxadiol (1189 mg/L), together with 10.94 mg/g DCW dammarenediol-II (1548 mg/L). The yeast strains engineered in this work can serve as the basis for creating an alternative way for production of ginsenosides in place of extraction from plant sources.

  13. Cellular memory of acquired stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qiaoning; Haroon, Suraiya; Bravo, Diego González; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2012-10-01

    Cellular memory of past experiences has been observed in several organisms and across a variety of experiences, including bacteria "remembering" prior nutritional status and amoeba "learning" to anticipate future environmental conditions. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains a multifaceted memory of prior stress exposure. We previously demonstrated that yeast cells exposed to a mild dose of salt acquire subsequent tolerance to severe doses of H(2)O(2). We set out to characterize the retention of acquired tolerance and in the process uncovered two distinct aspects of cellular memory. First, we found that H(2)O(2) resistance persisted for four to five generations after cells were removed from the prior salt treatment and was transmitted to daughter cells that never directly experienced the pretreatment. Maintenance of this memory did not require nascent protein synthesis after the initial salt pretreatment, but rather required long-lived cytosolic catalase Ctt1p that was synthesized during salt exposure and then distributed to daughter cells during subsequent cell divisions. In addition to and separable from the memory of H(2)O(2) resistance, these cells also displayed a faster gene-expression response to subsequent stress at >1000 genes, representing transcriptional memory. The faster gene-expression response requires the nuclear pore component Nup42p and serves an important function by facilitating faster reacquisition of H(2)O(2) tolerance after a second cycle of salt exposure. Memory of prior stress exposure likely provides a significant advantage to microbial populations living in ever-changing environments.

  14. Assembly of evolved ligninolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The ligninolytic enzymatic consortium produced by white-rot fungi is one of the most efficient oxidative systems found in nature, with many potential applications that range from the production of 2nd generation biofuels to chemicals synthesis. In the current study, two high redox potential oxidoreductase fusion genes (laccase -Lac- and versatile peroxidase -Vp-) that had been evolved in the laboratory were re-assembled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, cell viability and secretion were assessed after co-transforming the Lac and Vp genes into yeast. Several expression cassettes were inserted in vivo into episomal bi-directional vectors in order to evaluate inducible promoter and/or terminator pairs of different strengths in an individual and combined manner. The synthetic white-rot yeast model harboring Vp(GAL1/CYC1)-Lac(GAL10/ADH1) displayed up to 1000 and 100 Units per L of peroxidase and laccase activity, respectively, representing a suitable point of departure for future synthetic biology studies. PMID:24830983

  15. Phosphatidylcholine Supply to Peroxisomes of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ramprecht, Claudia; Zellnig, Günther; Leitner, Erich; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major phospholipid (PL) of all organelle membranes, is synthesized via two different pathways. Methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) catalyzed by the methyl transferases Cho2p/Pem1p and Opi3p/Pem2p as well as incorporation of choline through the CDP (cytidine diphosphate)-choline branch of the Kennedy pathway lead to PC formation. To determine the contribution of these two pathways to the supply of PC to peroxisomes (PX), yeast mutants bearing defects in the two pathways were cultivated under peroxisome inducing conditions, i.e. in the presence of oleic acid, and subjected to biochemical and cell biological analyses. Phenotype studies revealed compromised growth of both the cho20Δopi3Δ (mutations in the methylation pathway) and the cki1Δdpl1Δeki1Δ (mutations in the CDP-choline pathway) mutant when grown on oleic acid. Analysis of peroxisomes from the two mutant strains showed that both pathways produce PC for the supply to peroxisomes, although the CDP-choline pathway seemed to contribute with higher efficiency than the methylation pathway. Changes in the peroxisomal lipid pattern of mutants caused by defects in the PC biosynthetic pathways resulted in changes of membrane properties as shown by anisotropy measurements with fluorescent probes. In summary, our data define the origin of peroxisomal PC and demonstrate the importance of PC for peroxisome membrane formation and integrity. PMID:26241051

  16. Biochemical basis of mitochondrial acetaldehyde dismutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thielen, J; Ciriacy, M

    1991-01-01

    As reported previously, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient in all four known genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1 through ADH4) produce considerable amounts of ethanol during aerobic growth on glucose. It has been suggested that ethanol production in such adh0 cells is a corollary of acetaldehyde dismutation in mitochondria. This could be substantiated further by showing that mitochondrial ethanol formation requires functional electron transport, while the proton gradient or oxidative phosphorylation does not interfere with reduction of acetaldehyde in isolated mitochondria. This acetaldehyde-reducing activity is different from classical alcohol dehydrogenases in that it is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane and also is unable to carry out ethanol oxidation. The putative cofactor is NADH + H+ generated by a soluble, matrix-located aldehyde dehydrogenase upon acetaldehyde oxidation to acetate. This enzyme has been purified from mitochondria of glucose-grown cells. It is clearly different from the known mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, which is absent in glucose-grown cells. Both acetaldehyde-reducing and acetaldehyde-oxidizing activities are also present in the mitochondrial fraction of fermentation-proficient (ADH+) cells. Mitochondrial acetaldehyde dismutation may have some significance in the removal of surplus acetaldehyde and in the formation of acetate in mitochondria during aerobic glucose fermentation. Images FIG. 4 PMID:1938903

  17. Dissection of Filamentous Growth by Transposon Mutagenesis in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mosch, H. U.; Fink, G. R.

    1997-01-01

    Diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains starved for nitrogen undergo a developmental transition from growth as single yeast form (YF) cells to a multicellular form consisting of filaments of pseudohyphal (PH) cells. Filamentous growth is regulated by an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that includes the small GTP-binding proteins Ras2p and Cdc42p, the protein kinases Ste20p, Ste11p and Ste7p, and the transcription factor Ste12p. Here, we designed a genetic screen for mutant strains defective for filamentous growth (dfg) to identify novel targets of the filamentation signaling pathway, and we thereby identified 16 different genes, CDC39, STE12, TEC1, WHI3, NAB1, DBR1, CDC55, SRV2, TPM1, SPA2, BNI1, DFG5, DFG9, DFG10, BUD8 and DFG16, mutations that block filamentous growth. Phenotypic analysis of dfg mutant strains genetically dissects filamentous growth into the cellular processes of signal transduction, bud site selection, cell morphogenesis and invasive growth. Epistasis tests between dfg mutant alleles and dominant activated alleles of the RAS2 and STE11 genes, RAS2(Val19) and STE11-4, respectively, identify putative targets for the filamentation signaling pathway. Several of the genes described here have homologues in filamentous fungi, where they also regulate fungal development. PMID:9055077

  18. TOR and RAS pathways regulate desiccation tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Aaron Z.; Gibney, Patrick A.; Botstein, David; Koshland, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to desiccation in cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is inducible; only one in a million cells from an exponential culture survive desiccation compared with one in five cells in stationary phase. Here we exploit the desiccation sensitivity of exponentially dividing cells to understand the stresses imposed by desiccation and their stress response pathways. We found that induction of desiccation tolerance is cell autonomous and that there is an inverse correlation between desiccation tolerance and growth rate in glucose-, ammonia-, or phosphate-limited continuous cultures. A transient heat shock induces a 5000–fold increase in desiccation tolerance, whereas hyper-ionic, -reductive, -oxidative, or -osmotic stress induced much less. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the Sch9p-regulated branch of the TOR and Ras-cAMP pathway inhibits desiccation tolerance by inhibiting the stress response transcription factors Gis1p, Msn2p, and Msn4p and by activating Sfp1p, a ribosome biogenesis transcription factor. Among 41 mutants defective in ribosome biogenesis, a subset defective in 60S showed a dramatic increase in desiccation tolerance independent of growth rate. We suggest that reduction of a specific intermediate in 60S biogenesis, resulting from conditions such as heat shock and nutrient deprivation, increases desiccation tolerance. PMID:23171550

  19. Septin-Associated Protein Kinases in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Adam M.; Finnigan, Gregory C.; Roelants, Françoise M.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a family of eukaryotic GTP-binding proteins that associate into linear rods, which, in turn, polymerize end-on-end into filaments, and further assemble into other, more elaborate super-structures at discrete subcellular locations. Hence, septin-based ensembles are considered elements of the cytoskeleton. One function of these structures that has been well-documented in studies conducted in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is to serve as a scaffold that recruits regulatory proteins, which dictate the spatial and temporal control of certain aspects of the cell division cycle. In particular, septin-associated protein kinases couple cell cycle progression with cellular morphogenesis. Thus, septin-containing structures serve as signaling platforms that integrate a multitude of signals and coordinate key downstream networks required for cell cycle passage. This review summarizes what we currently understand about how the action of septin-associated protein kinases and their substrates control information flow to drive the cell cycle into and out of mitosis, to regulate bud growth, and especially to direct timely and efficient execution of cytokinesis and cell abscission. Thus, septin structures represent a regulatory node at the intersection of many signaling pathways. In addition, and importantly, the activities of certain septin-associated protein kinases also regulate the state of organization of the septins themselves, creating a complex feedback loop. PMID:27847804

  20. Distribution and regulation of stochasticity and plasticity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, R. D.; Karig, D. K.; Cooke, J. F.; Cox, C. D.; Simpson, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Stochasticity is an inherent feature of complex systems with nanoscale structure. In such systems information is represented by small collections of elements (e.g. a few electrons on a quantum dot), and small variations in the populations of these elements may lead to big uncertainties in the information. Unfortunately, little is known about how to work within this inherently noisy environment to design robust functionality into complex nanoscale systems. Here, we look to the biological cell as an intriguing model system where evolution has mediated the trade-offs between fluctuations and function, and in particular we look at the relationships and trade-offs between stochastic and deterministic responses in the gene expression of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We find gene regulatory arrangements that control the stochastic and deterministic components of expression, and show that genes that have evolved to respond to stimuli (stress) in the most strongly deterministic way exhibit the most noise in the absence of the stimuli. We show that this relationship is consistent with a bursty 2-state model of gene expression, and demonstrate that this regulatory motif generates the most uncertainty in gene expression when there is the greatest uncertainty in the optimal level of gene expression.

  1. RNA–DNA sequence differences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Isabel X.; Grunseich, Christopher; Chung, Youree G.; Kwak, Hojoong; Ramrattan, Girish; Zhu, Zhengwei; Cheung, Vivian G.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of RNA sequences and structures, such as those from editing and alternative splicing, result in two or more RNA transcripts from a DNA template. It was thought that in yeast, RNA editing only occurs in tRNAs. Here, we found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae have all 12 types of RNA–DNA sequence differences (RDDs) in the mRNA. We showed these sequence differences are propagated to proteins, as we identified peptides encoded by the RNA sequences in addition to those by the DNA sequences at RDD sites. RDDs are significantly enriched at regions with R-loops. A screen of yeast mutants showed that RDD formation is affected by mutations in genes regulating R-loops. Loss-of-function mutations in ribonuclease H, senataxin, and topoisomerase I that resolve RNA–DNA hybrids lead to increases in RDD frequency. Our results demonstrate that RDD is a conserved process that diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and provide a mechanistic link between R-loops and RDDs. PMID:27638543

  2. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to stress-free acidification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Gelling, Cristy; Rogers, Peter L; Dawes, Ian W; Rosche, Bettina

    2009-02-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch culture revealed that more than 829 genes were regulated in response to an environmental shift from pH 6 to pH 3 by added sulfuric acid. This shift in pH was not detrimental to the rate of growth compared to a control culture that was maintained at pH 6 and the transcriptional changes most strikingly implicated not up- but down-regulation of stress responses. In addition, the transcriptional changes upon acid addition indicated remodeling of the cell wall and central carbon metabolism. The overall trend of changes was similar for the pH-shift experiment and the pH 6 control. However, the changes in the pH 6 control were much weaker and occurred 2.5 h later than in the pH-shift experiment. Thus, the reaction to the steep pH decrease was an immediate response within the normal repertoire of adaptation shown in later stages of fermentation at pH 6. Artificially preventing the yeast from acidifying the medium may be considered physiologically stressful under the tested conditions.

  3. Coordinated regulation of growth genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Matthew G; Heideman, Warren

    2007-05-15

    It is imperative that quiescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond rapidly to fresh medium: the cell that initiates growth and division soonest has the most progeny. Several laboratories have used DNA microarrays to identify transcripts that are altered when fresh medium is added to quiescent cells. We combined published data with our own to address several questions: Do these experiments taken together identify a core set of genes that is reproducibly affected when quiescent cells are stimulated by nutrient repletion? Is this gene set coregulated in response to other environmental challenges? Does promoter histone occupancy correlate with the mRNA data? Despite diverse experimental designs, the data were highly correlated, generating a set of nutrient repletion transcripts. Glucose addition accounted for the response. These transcripts were also coregulated in response to diverse stresses. Promoters were associated with increased histone acetylation and decreased histone occupancy when induced, and high histone occupancy with low acetylation when repressed. The presence of RRPE and PAC promoter elements correlated with nutrient responsiveness and a dynamic pattern of histone occupancy and acetylation. Correlative evidence supports the idea that some mRNAs may be upregulated by release from sequestration in RNA-protein complexes.

  4. Molecular analysis of the PHO81 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Creasy, C L; Madden, S L; Bergman, L W

    1993-01-01

    The PHO81 gene product is a positive regulatory factor required for the synthesis of the phosphate repressible acid phosphatase (encoded by the PHO5 gene) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic analysis has suggested that PHO81 may be the signal acceptor molecule; however, the biochemical function of the PHO81 gene product is not known. We have cloned the PHO81 gene and sequenced the promoter. A PHO81-LacZ fusion was shown to be a valid reporter since its expression is regulated by the level of inorganic phosphate and is controlled by the same regulatory factors that regulate PHO5 expression. To elucidate the mechanism by which PHO81 functions, we have isolated and cloned dominant mutations in the PHO81 gene which confer constitutive synthesis of acid phosphatase. We have demonstrated that overexpression of the negative regulatory factor, PHO80, but not the negative regulatory factor PHO85, partially blocks the constitutive acid phosphatase synthesis in a strain containing a dominant constitutive allele of PHO81. This suggests that PHO81 may function by interacting with PHO80 or that these molecules compete for the same target. Images PMID:8493108

  5. Water-Transfer Slows Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aviv; Weindling, Esther; Rabinovich, Efrat; Nachman, Iftach; Fuchs, Shai; Chuartzman, Silvia; Gal, Lihi; Schuldiner, Maya; Bar-Nun, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Transferring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to water is known to extend their lifespan. However, it is unclear whether this lifespan extension is due to slowing the aging process or merely keeping old yeast alive. Here we show that in water-transferred yeast, the toxicity of polyQ proteins is decreased and the aging biomarker 47Q aggregates at a reduced rate and to a lesser extent. These beneficial effects of water-transfer could not be reproduced by diluting the growth medium and depended on de novo protein synthesis and proteasomes levels. Interestingly, we found that upon water-transfer 27 proteins are downregulated, 4 proteins are upregulated and 81 proteins change their intracellular localization, hinting at an active genetic program enabling the lifespan extension. Furthermore, the aging-related deterioration of the heat shock response (HSR), the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD), was largely prevented in water-transferred yeast, as the activities of these proteostatic network pathways remained nearly as robust as in young yeast. The characteristics of young yeast that are actively maintained upon water-transfer indicate that the extended lifespan is the outcome of slowing the rate of the aging process. PMID:26862897

  6. Asparaginyl deamidation in two glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, Alexander; Quezada, Héctor; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; González, Alicia

    2005-03-25

    The non-enzymatic deamidation of asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous damage of several proteins under physiological conditions. In many cases, deamidation and isoaspartyl formation alters the biological activity or stability of the native polypeptide. Rates of deamidation of particular residues depend on many factors including protein structure and solvent exposure. Here, we investigated the spontaneous deamidation of the two NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which have different kinetic properties and are differentially expressed in this yeast. Our results show that Asn54, present in Gdh3p but missing in the GDH1-encoded homologue, is readily deamidated in vitro under alkaline conditions. Relative to the native enzyme, deamidated Gdh3p shows reduced protein stability. The different deamidation rates of the two isoenzymes could explain to some extent, the relative in vivo instability of the allosteric Gdh3p enzyme, compared to that of Gdh1p. It is thus possible that spontaneous asparaginyl modification could play a role in the metabolic regulation of ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis.

  7. Nutrient sensing and signaling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Michaela; Schothorst, Joep; Kankipati, Harish Nag; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a favorite organism for pioneering studies on nutrient-sensing and signaling mechanisms. Many specific nutrient responses have been elucidated in great detail. This has led to important new concepts and insight into nutrient-controlled cellular regulation. Major highlights include the central role of the Snf1 protein kinase in the glucose repression pathway, galactose induction, the discovery of a G-protein-coupled receptor system, and role of Ras in glucose-induced cAMP signaling, the role of the protein synthesis initiation machinery in general control of nitrogen metabolism, the cyclin-controlled protein kinase Pho85 in phosphate regulation, nitrogen catabolite repression and the nitrogen-sensing target of rapamycin pathway, and the discovery of transporter-like proteins acting as nutrient sensors. In addition, a number of cellular targets, like carbohydrate stores, stress tolerance, and ribosomal gene expression, are controlled by the presence of multiple nutrients. The protein kinase A signaling pathway plays a major role in this general nutrient response. It has led to the discovery of nutrient transceptors (transporter receptors) as nutrient sensors. Major shortcomings in our knowledge are the relationship between rapid and steady-state nutrient signaling, the role of metabolic intermediates in intracellular nutrient sensing, and the identity of the nutrient sensors controlling cellular growth. PMID:24483210

  8. Phylogenetic Portrait of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Functional Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gibney, Patrick A.; Hickman, Mark J.; Bradley, Patrick H.; Matese, John C.; Botstein, David

    2013-01-01

    The genome of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) contains approximately 5800 protein-encoding genes, the majority of which are associated with some known biological function. Yet the extent of amino acid sequence conservation of these genes over all phyla has only been partially examined. Here we provide a more comprehensive overview and visualization of the conservation of yeast genes and a means for browsing and exploring the data in detail, down to the individual yeast gene, at http://yeast-phylogroups.princeton.edu. We used data from the OrthoMCL database, which has defined orthologs from approximately 150 completely sequenced genomes, including diverse representatives of the archeal, bacterial, and eukaryotic domains. By clustering genes based on similar patterns of conservation, we organized and visualized all the protein-encoding genes in yeast as a single heat map. Most genes fall into one of eight major clusters, called “phylogroups.” Gene ontology analysis of the phylogroups revealed that they were associated with specific, distinct trends in gene function, generalizations likely to be of interest to a wide range of biologists. PMID:23749449

  9. Proteomic Profiling of Autophagosome Cargo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Mayumi; Fujii, Kiyonaga; Noda, Nobuo N.; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is a bulk protein-degradation system ubiquitously conserved in eukaryotic cells. During autophagy, cytoplasmic components are enclosed in a membrane compartment, called an autophagosome. The autophagosome fuses with the vacuole/lysosome and is degraded together with its cargo. Because autophagy is important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis by degrading unwanted proteins and organelles, identification of autophagosome cargo proteins (i.e., the targets of autophagy) will aid in understanding the physiological roles of autophagy. In this study, we developed a method for monitoring intact autophagosomes ex vivo by detecting the fluorescence of GFP-fused aminopeptidase I, the best-characterized selective cargo of autophagosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This method facilitated optimization of a biochemical procedure to fractionate autophagosomes. A combination of LC-MS/MS with subsequent statistical analyses revealed a list of autophagosome cargo proteins; some of these are selectively enclosed in autophagosomes and delivered to the vacuole in an Atg11-independent manner. The methods we describe will be useful for analyzing the mechanisms and physiological significance of Atg11-independent selective autophagy. PMID:24626240

  10. Regulation by ammonium of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bogonez, E; Satrústegui, J; Machado, A

    1985-06-01

    The activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) (EC 1.4.1.4; NADP-GDH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is decreased under conditions in which intracellular ammonia concentrations increases. A high internal ammonia concentration can be obtained (a) by increasing the ammonium sulphate concentration in the culture medium, and (b) by growing the yeast either in acetate + ammonia media, where the pH of the medium rises during growth, or in heavily buffered glucose + ammonia media at pH 7.5. Under these conditions cellular oxoglutarate concentrations do not vary and changes in NADP-GDH activity appear to provide a constant rate of oxoglutarate utilization. The following results suggest that the decrease in NADP-GDH activity in ammonia-accumulating yeast cells is brought about by repression of synthesis: (i) after a shift to high ammonium sulphate concentrations, the number of units of activity per cell decreased as the inverse of cell doubling; and (ii) the rate of degradation of labelled NADP-GDH was essentially the same in ammonia-accumulating yeast cells and in controls, whereas the synthesis constant was much lower in the ammonia-accumulating cells than in the controls.

  11. Fredericamycin A affects mitochondrial inheritance and morphology in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yuko; Yukawa, Masashi; Kimura, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Ojika, Makoto; Sakagami, Youji; Tsuchiya, Eiko

    2005-11-01

    Fredericamycin A (FMA) is an antibiotic product of Streptomyces griseus that exhibits modest antitumor activity in vivo and in vitro, but, its functions in vivo are poorly understood. We identified this compound as an inducer of G1 arrest in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FMA exhibits an IC50 of 24 nM towards the growth of a disruptant of multi-drug resistance genes, W303-MLC30, and its cytotoxicity is a function of the time of exposure as well as drug dose. Addition of 0.8 microM of FMA caused aggregation of mitochondria within 10 min of incubation and the drug induced petites at high frequency after 4 h of incubation. Rho(-) cells were about 20 times more resistant to FMA than isogenic rho(+) cells. Overexpression of topoisomerase I, a previously suggested target of the drug, did not alleviate the sensitivity of the cells to FMA or the aggregation of mitochondria. Our results suggest that mitochondria are the primary target site of FMA.

  12. A role for ubiquitination in mitochondrial inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fisk, H A; Yaffe, M P

    1999-06-14

    The smm1 mutation suppresses defects in mitochondrial distribution and morphology caused by the mdm1-252 mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells harboring only the smm1 mutation themselves display temperature-sensitive growth and aberrant mitochondrial inheritance and morphology at the nonpermissive temperature. smm1 maps to RSP5, a gene encoding an essential ubiquitin-protein ligase. The smm1 defects are suppressed by overexpression of wild-type ubiquitin but not by overexpression of mutant ubiquitin in which lysine-63 is replaced by arginine. Furthermore, overexpression of this mutant ubiquitin perturbs mitochondrial distribution and morphology in wild-type cells. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the ubiquitin ligase activity of Rsp5p is essential for its function in mitochondrial inheritance. A second mutation, smm2, which also suppressed mdm1-252 defects, but did not cause aberrant mitochondrial distribution and morphology, mapped to BUL1, encoding a protein interacting with Rsp5p. These results indicate that protein ubiquitination mediated by Rsp5p plays an essential role in mitochondrial inheritance, and reveal a novel function for protein ubiquitination.

  13. Dimethyl sulfoxide induces oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Pączka, Aleksandra; Mołoń, Mateusz; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2013-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is used as a cryoprotectant for the preservation of cells, including yeast, and as a solvent for chemical compounds. We report that DMSO induces oxidative stress in the yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae wt strain EG-103 and its mutants Δsod1, Δsod2, and Δsod1 Δsod2 were used. Yeast were subjected to the action of 1-14% DMSO for 1 h at 28 °C. DMSO induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of yeast growth, the effect being more pronounced for mutants devoid of SOD (especially Δsod1 Δsod2). Cell viability was compromised. DMSO-concentration-dependent activity loss of succinate dehydrogenase, a FeS enzyme sensitive to oxidative stress, was observed. DMSO enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species, estimated with dihydroethidine in a concentration-dependent manner, the effect being again more pronounced in mutants devoid of superoxide dismutases. The content of cellular glutathione was increased with increasing DMSO concentrations, which may represent a compensatory response. Membrane fluidity, estimated by fluorescence polarization of DPH, was decreased by DMSO. These results demonstrate that DMSO, although generally considered to be antioxidant, induces oxidative stress in yeast cells.

  14. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Fumihisa; Shibata, Michiko; Torigoe, Motoki; Matsumoto, Yuta; Yamamoto, Shinsuke; Takizawa, Noboru; Hada, Yoshio; Mori, Yoshihisa; Takarabe, Kenichi

    2013-06-01

    In our previous studies on the tolerance of small plants and animals to the high hydrostatic pressure of 7.5 GPa, it was shown that all the living samples could be borne at this high pressure, which is more than one order of magnitude higher than the proteinic denaturation pressure. To make this inconsistency clear, we have extended these studies to a smaller sized fungus, budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate (PC72, Sumitomo 3M), and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar (PDA). It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for 12 and 24 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is weaker than that of tardigrades.

  15. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker’s yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to “ postdict ” the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  16. Genotoxicity assessment of amaranth and allura red using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Hafiza Sumara; ur Rahman, Sajjad; Mahmood, Shahid; Anwer, Sadaf

    2013-01-01

    Amaranth (E123) and Allura red (E129), very important food azo dyes used in food, drug, paper, cosmetic and textile industries, were assessed for their genotoxic potential through comet assay in yeast cells. Comet assay was standardized by with different concentration of H(2)O(2). Concentrations of Amaranth and Allura red were maintained in sorbitol buffer starting from 9.76 to 5,000 μg/mL and 1 × 10(4) cells were incubated at two different incubation temperatures 28 and 37°C. Amaranth (E123) and Allura red (E129) were found to exhibit their genotoxic effect directly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. No significant genotoxic activity was observed for Amaranth and Allura red at 28°C but at 37°C direct relation of Amaranth concentration with comet tail was significant and no positive relation was seen with time exposure factor. At 37°C the minimum concentration of Amaranth and Allura red at which significant DNA damage observed through comet assay was 1,250 μg/mL in 2nd h post exposure time. The results indicated that food colors should be carefully used in baking products as heavy concentration of food colors could affect the fermentation process of baking.

  17. Codon recognition during frameshift suppression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaber, R F; Culbertson, M R

    1984-01-01

    A genetic approach has been used to establish the molecular basis of 4-base codon recognition by frameshift suppressor tRNA containing an extra nucleotide in the anticodon. We have isolated all possible base substitution mutations at the position 4 (N) in the 3'-CCCN-5' anticodon of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae frameshift suppressor glycine tRNA encoded by the SUF16 gene. Base substitutions at +1 frameshift sites in the his4 gene have also been obtained such that all possible 4-base 5'-GGGN-3' codons have been identified. By testing for suppression in different strains that collectively represent all 16 possible combinations of position 4 nucleotides, we show that frameshift suppression does not require position 4 base pairing. Nonetheless, position 4 interactions influence the efficiency of suppression. Our results suggest a model in which 4-base translocation of mRNA on the ribosome is directed primarily by the number of nucleotides in the anticodon loop, whereas the resulting efficiency of suppression is dependent on the nature of position 4 nucleotides. Images PMID:6390183

  18. Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of simultaneous cellobiose and xylose fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Suk-Jin; Galazka, Jonathan M.; Rin Kim, Soo; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yang, Xiaomin; Seo, Jin-Ho; Louise Glass, N.; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Jin, Yong-Su

    2011-01-01

    The use of plant biomass for biofuel production will require efficient utilization of the sugars in lignocellulose, primarily glucose and xylose. However, strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae presently used in bioethanol production ferment glucose but not xylose. Yeasts engineered to ferment xylose do so slowly, and cannot utilize xylose until glucose is completely consumed. To overcome these bottlenecks, we engineered yeasts to coferment mixtures of xylose and cellobiose. In these yeast strains, hydrolysis of cellobiose takes place inside yeast cells through the action of an intracellular β-glucosidase following import by a high-affinity cellodextrin transporter. Intracellular hydrolysis of cellobiose minimizes glucose repression of xylose fermentation allowing coconsumption of cellobiose and xylose. The resulting yeast strains, cofermented cellobiose and xylose simultaneously and exhibited improved ethanol yield when compared to fermentation with either cellobiose or xylose as sole carbon sources. We also observed improved yields and productivities from cofermentation experiments performed with simulated cellulosic hydrolyzates, suggesting this is a promising cofermentation strategy for cellulosic biofuel production. The successful integration of cellobiose and xylose fermentation pathways in yeast is a critical step towards enabling economic biofuel production. PMID:21187422

  19. Comparative Genomics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Natural Isolates for Bioenergy Production

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Rovinskiy, Nikolay; Lewis, Jeffrey A.; Sardi, Maria; Schackwitz, Wendy S.; Martin, Joel A.; Deshpande, Shweta; Daum, Christopher G.; Lipzen, Anna; Sato, Trey K.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic plant material is a viable source of biomass to produce alternative energy including ethanol and other biofuels. However, several factors—including toxic byproducts from biomass pretreatment and poor fermentation of xylose and other pentose sugars—currently limit the efficiency of microbial biofuel production. To begin to understand the genetic basis of desirable traits, we characterized three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with robust growth in a pretreated lignocellulosic hydrolysate or tolerance to stress conditions relevant to industrial biofuel production, through genome and transcriptome sequencing analysis. All stress resistant strains were highly mosaic, suggesting that genetic admixture may contribute to novel allele combinations underlying these phenotypes. Strain-specific gene sets not found in the lab strain were functionally linked to the tolerances of particular strains. Furthermore, genes with signatures of evolutionary selection were enriched for functional categories important for stress resistance and included stress-responsive signaling factors. Comparison of the strains’ transcriptomic responses to heat and ethanol treatment—two stresses relevant to industrial bioethanol production—pointed to physiological processes that were related to particular stress resistance profiles. Many of the genotype-by-environment expression responses occurred at targets of transcription factors with signatures of positive selection, suggesting that these strains have undergone positive selection for stress tolerance. Our results generate new insights into potential mechanisms of tolerance to stresses relevant to biofuel production, including ethanol and heat, present a backdrop for further engineering, and provide glimpses into the natural variation of stress tolerance in wild yeast strains. PMID:25364804

  20. In vivo Reconstitution of Algal Triacylglycerol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Kanehara, Kazue; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    The current fascination with algal biofuel production stems from a high lipid biosynthetic capacity and little conflict with land plant cultivation. However, the mechanisms which enable algae to accumulate massive oil remain elusive. An enzyme for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CrDGTT2, can produce a large amount of TAG when expressed in yeast or higher plants, suggesting a unique ability of CrDGTT2 to enhance oil production in a heterologous system. Here, we performed metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by taking advantage of CrDGTT2. We suppressed membrane phospholipid biosynthesis at the log phase by mutating OPI3, enhanced TAG biosynthetic pathway at the stationary phase by overexpressing PAH1 and CrDGTT2, and suppressed TAG hydrolysis on growth resumption from the stationary phase by knocking out DGK1. The resulting engineered yeast cells accumulated about 70-fold of TAG compared with wild type cells. Moreover, TAG production was sustainable. Our results demonstrated the enhanced and sustainable TAG production in the yeast synthetic platform. PMID:26913021

  1. Increased ethanol production by deletion of HAP4 in recombinant xylose-assimilating Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-12-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAP4 gene encodes a transcription activator that plays a key role in controlling the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial respiration and reductive pathways. This work examines the effect of knockout of the HAP4 gene on aerobic ethanol production in a xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strain. A hap4-deleted recombinant yeast strain (B42-DHAP4) showed increased maximum concentration, production rate, and yield of ethanol compared with the reference strain MA-B42, irrespective of cultivation medium (glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures). Notably, B42-DHAP4 was capable of producing ethanol from xylose as the sole carbon source under aerobic conditions, whereas no ethanol was produced by MA-B42. Moreover, the rate of ethanol production and ethanol yield (0.44 g/g) from the detoxified hydrolysate of wood chips was markedly improved in B42-DHAP4 compared to MA-B42. Thus, the results of this study support the view that deleting HAP4 in xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strains represents a useful strategy in ethanol production processes.

  2. Different patterns of extracellular proteolytic activity in W303a and BY4742 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Seredyński, Rafał; Wolna, Dorota; Kędzior, Mateusz; Gutowicz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Protease secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures is a complex process, important for the application of this organism in the food industry and biotechnology. Previous studies provide rather quantitative data, yielding no information about the number of enzymes involved in proteolysis and their individual biochemical properties. Here we demonstrate that W303a and BY4742 S. cerevisiae strains reveal different patterns of spontaneous and gelatin-induced extracellular proteolytic activity. We applied the gelatin zymography assay to track changes of the proteolytic profile in time, finding the protease secretion dependent on the growth phase and the presence of the protein inducer. Detected enzymes were characterized regarding their substrate specificity, pH tolerance, and susceptibility to inhibitors. In case of the W303a strain, only one type of gelatin-degrading secretory protease (presumably metalloproteinase) was observed. However, the BY4742 strain secreted different proteases of the various catalytic types, depending on the substrate availability. Our study brings the evidence that S. cerevisiae strains secrete several kinds of proteases depending on the presence and type of the substrate. Protein induction may cause not only quantitative but also qualitative changes in the extracellular proteolytic patterns.

  3. [Advances in functional genomics studies underlying acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Xu, Guihong; Xu, Jianren; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Industrial microorganisms are subject to various stress conditions, including products and substrates inhibitions. Therefore, improvement of stress tolerance is of great importance for industrial microbial production. Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in the cellulosic hydrolysates, which affects seriously on cell growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptive response and tolerance of acetic acid of S. cerevisiae benefit breeding of robust strains of industrial yeast for more efficient production. In recent years, more insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying acetic acid tolerance have been revealed through analysis of global gene expression and metabolomics analysis, as well as phenomics analysis by single gene deletion libraries. Novel genes related to response to acetic acid and improvement of acetic acid tolerance have been identified, and novel strains with improved acetic acid tolerance were constructed by modifying key genes. Metal ions including potassium and zinc play important roles in acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae, and the effect of zinc was first discovered in our previous studies on flocculating yeast. Genes involved in cell wall remodeling, membrane transport, energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, as well as global transcription regulation were discussed. Exploration and modification of the molecular mechanisms of yeast acetic acid tolerance will be done further on levels such as post-translational modifications and synthetic biology and engineering; and the knowledge obtained will pave the way for breeding robust strains for more efficient bioconversion of cellulosic materials to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

  4. Deletion of host histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases strongly affects Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Jalal; van Heusden, Gerard Paul H; Hooykaas, Paul J J

    2009-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen that genetically transforms plant cells by transferring a part of its Ti-plasmid, the T-strand, to the host cell. Under laboratory conditions, it can also transform cells from many different nonplant organisms, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Collections of S. cerevisiae strains have been developed with systematic deletion of all coding sequences. Here, we used these collections to identify genes involved in the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) of S. cerevisiae. We found that deletion of genes (GCN5, NGG1, YAF9 and EAF7) encoding subunits of the SAGA, SLIK, ADA and NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complexes highly increased the efficiency of AMT, while deletion of genes (HDA2, HDA3 and HST4) encoding subunits of histone deacetylase complexes decreased AMT. These effects are specific for AMT as the efficiency of chemical (lithium acetate) transformation was not or only slightly affected by these deletions. Our data are consistent with a positive role of host histone deacetylation in AMT.

  5. Effect of a water soluble derivative of alpha-tocopherol on radiation response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Verma, N C; Kagiya, V T

    2001-12-01

    The radioprotection conferred by a highly water soluble glucose derivative of alpha-tocopherol, namely, 2-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl) methyl-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-6-ol (TMG) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. Cells grown in standard YEPD-agar medium and irradiated in the presence of TMG showed a concentration dependent higher survival up to 10 mM of TMG in comparison to cells irradiated in distilled water. Treatment of TMG to cells given either before or immediately after irradiation but not during irradiation, had no effect on their radiation response. S. cerevisiae strain LP1383 (rad52) which is defective in recombination repair showed enhanced radioresistance only when subjected to irradiation in presence of TMG. Cells of rad52 strain grown in the medium containing TMG showed a radiation response similar to that of cells grown in the medium without TMG. The nature of TMG dependent enhanced radioresistance was studied by scoring the mutations in the strain D-7, which behaved like wild type strain in complete medium, at trp and ilv loci. Our study indicated that TMG confers radioresistance in S. cerevisiae possibly by two mechanisms viz. (i), by eliminating radiation induced reactive free radicals when the irradiation is carried out in the presence of TMG and (ii), by activating an error prone repair process involving RAD52 gene, when the cells are grown in the medium containing TMG.

  6. Adhesion-dependent rupturing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on biological antimicrobial nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nowlin, Kyle; Boseman, Adam; Covell, Alan; LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that some nanostructured surfaces (NSS), many of which are derived from surfaces found on insect cuticles, rupture and kill adhered prokaryotic microbes. Most important, the nanoscale topography is directly responsible for this effect. Although parameters such as cell adhesion and cell wall rigidity have been suggested to play significant roles in this process, there is little experimental evidence regarding the underlying mechanisms involving NSS-induced microbial rupture. In this work, we report the NSS-induced rupturing of a eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that the amount of NSS-induced rupture of S. cerevisiae is dependent on both the adhesive qualities of the yeast cell and the nanostructure geometry of the NSS. Thus, we are providing the first empirical evidence that these parameters play a direct role in the rupturing of microbes on NSS. Our observations of this phenomenon with S. cerevisiae, particularly the morphological changes, are strikingly similar to that reported for bacteria despite the differences in the yeast cell wall structure. Consequently, NSS provide a novel approach for the control of microbial growth and development of broad-spectrum microbicidal surfaces. PMID:25551144

  7. Therapeutic activity of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based probiotic and inactivated whole yeast on vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Ballet, Nathalie; Sabbatini, Samuele; Roselletti, Elena; Cayzeele Decherf, Amélie; Pélerin, Fanny; Luciano, Eugenio; Perito, Stefano; Jüsten, Peter; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2017-01-02

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most prevalent vaginal infection worldwide and Candida albicans is its major agent. Vulvovaginal candidiasis is characterized by disruption of the vaginal microbiota composition, as happens following large spectrum antibiotic usage. Recent studies support the effectiveness of oral and local probiotic treatment for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a safe yeast used as, or for, the production of ingredients for human nutrition and health. Here, we demonstrate that vaginal administration of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae live yeast (GI) and, in part, inactivated whole yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (IY), used as post-challenge therapeutics, was able to positively influence the course of vaginal candidiasis by accelerating the clearance of the fungus. This effect was likely due to multiple interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Candida albicans. Both live and inactivated yeasts induced coaggregation of Candida and consequently inhibited its adherence to epithelial cells. However, only the probiotic yeast was able to suppress some major virulence factors of Candida albicans such as the ability to switch from yeast to mycelial form and the capacity to express several aspartyl proteases. The effectiveness of live yeast was higher than that of inactivated whole yeast suggesting that the synergy between mechanical effects and biological effects were dominant over purely mechanical effects. The protection of epithelial cells to Candida-induced damage was also observed. Overall, our data show for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based ingredients, particularly the living cells, can exert beneficial therapeutic effects on a widespread vaginal mucosal infection.

  8. Tuning Chocolate Flavor through Development of Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Starter Cultures with Increased Acetate Ester Production.

    PubMed

    Meersman, Esther; Steensels, Jan; Struyf, Nore; Paulus, Tinneke; Saels, Veerle; Mathawan, Melissa; Allegaert, Leen; Vrancken, Gino; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-11-20

    Microbial starter cultures have extensively been used to enhance the consistency and efficiency of industrial fermentations. Despite the advantages of such controlled fermentations, the fermentation involved in the production of chocolate is still a spontaneous process that relies on the natural microbiota at cocoa farms. However, recent studies indicate that certain thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures can be used as starter cultures for cocoa pulp fermentation. In this study, we investigate the potential of specifically developed starter cultures to modulate chocolate aroma. Specifically, we developed several new S. cerevisiae hybrids that combine thermotolerance and efficient cocoa pulp fermentation with a high production of volatile flavor-active esters. In addition, we investigated the potential of two strains of two non-Saccharomyces species that produce very large amounts of fruity esters (Pichia kluyveri and Cyberlindnera fabianii) to modulate chocolate aroma. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the cocoa liquor revealed an increased concentration of various flavor-active esters and a decrease in spoilage-related off-flavors in batches inoculated with S. cerevisiae starter cultures and, to a lesser extent, in batches inoculated with P. kluyveri and Cyb. fabianii. Additionally, GC-MS analysis of chocolate samples revealed that while most short-chain esters evaporated during conching, longer and more-fat-soluble ethyl and acetate esters, such as ethyl octanoate, phenylethyl acetate, ethyl phenylacetate, ethyl decanoate, and ethyl dodecanoate, remained almost unaffected. Sensory analysis by an expert panel confirmed significant differences in the aromas of chocolates produced with different starter cultures. Together, these results show that the selection of different yeast cultures opens novel avenues for modulating chocolate flavor.

  9. Tuning Chocolate Flavor through Development of Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Starter Cultures with Increased Acetate Ester Production

    PubMed Central

    Meersman, Esther; Steensels, Jan; Struyf, Nore; Paulus, Tinneke; Saels, Veerle; Mathawan, Melissa; Allegaert, Leen; Vrancken, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Microbial starter cultures have extensively been used to enhance the consistency and efficiency of industrial fermentations. Despite the advantages of such controlled fermentations, the fermentation involved in the production of chocolate is still a spontaneous process that relies on the natural microbiota at cocoa farms. However, recent studies indicate that certain thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures can be used as starter cultures for cocoa pulp fermentation. In this study, we investigate the potential of specifically developed starter cultures to modulate chocolate aroma. Specifically, we developed several new S. cerevisiae hybrids that combine thermotolerance and efficient cocoa pulp fermentation with a high production of volatile flavor-active esters. In addition, we investigated the potential of two strains of two non-Saccharomyces species that produce very large amounts of fruity esters (Pichia kluyveri and Cyberlindnera fabianii) to modulate chocolate aroma. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the cocoa liquor revealed an increased concentration of various flavor-active esters and a decrease in spoilage-related off-flavors in batches inoculated with S. cerevisiae starter cultures and, to a lesser extent, in batches inoculated with P. kluyveri and Cyb. fabianii. Additionally, GC-MS analysis of chocolate samples revealed that while most short-chain esters evaporated during conching, longer and more-fat-soluble ethyl and acetate esters, such as ethyl octanoate, phenylethyl acetate, ethyl phenylacetate, ethyl decanoate, and ethyl dodecanoate, remained almost unaffected. Sensory analysis by an expert panel confirmed significant differences in the aromas of chocolates produced with different starter cultures. Together, these results show that the selection of different yeast cultures opens novel avenues for modulating chocolate flavor. PMID:26590272

  10. Quantitative comparison of transient growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces kluyveri, and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Christoph; Von Stockar, Urs

    2003-03-30

    A multitude of metabolic regulations occur in yeast, particularly under dynamic process conditions, such as under sudden glucose excess. However, quantification of regulations and classification of yeast strains under these conditions have yet to be elucidated, which requires high-frequency and consistent quantification of the metabolic response. The present study aimed at quantifying the dynamic regulation of the central metabolism of strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. kluyveri, and Kluyveromyces lactis upon sudden glucose excess, accomplished by a shift-up in dilution rate inside of the oxidative region using a small metabolic flux model. It was found that, under transient growth conditions, S. kluyveri behaved like K. lactis, while classification using steady-state conditions would position S. kluyveri close to S. cerevisiae. For transient conditions and based on the observation whether excess glucose is initially used for catabolism (energy) or anabolism (carbon), we propose to classify strains into energy-driven, such as S. cerevisiae, and carbon-driven, such as S. kluyveri and K. lactis, strains. Furthermore, it was found that the delayed onset of fermentative catabolism in carbon-driven strains is a consequence of low catabolic flux and the initial shunt of glucose in non-nitrogen-containing biomass constituents. The MFA model suggests that energy limitation forced the cell to ultimately increase catabolic flux, while the capacity of oxidative catabolism is not sufficient to process this flux oxidatively. The combination of transient experiments and its exploitation with reconciled intrinsic rates using a small metabolic model could corroborate earlier findings of metabolic regulations, such as tight glucose control in carbon-driven strains and transient changes in biomass composition, as well as explore new regulations, such as assimilation of ethanol before glucose. The benefit from using small metabolic flux models is the richness of information and the

  11. FigA, a Putative Homolog of Low-Affinity Calcium System Member Fig1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Is Involved in Growth and Asexual and Sexual Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhu; Zheng, Hailin; Long, Nanbiao; Carbó, Natalia; Chen, Peiying; Aguilar, Pablo S.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-mediated signaling pathways are widely employed in eukaryotes and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at least two different calcium uptake systems have been identified: the high-affinity calcium influx system (HACS) and the low-affinity calcium influx system (LACS). Compared to the HACS, the LACS in fungi is not well known. In this study, FigA, a homolog of the LACS member Fig1 from S. cerevisiae, was functionally characterized in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Loss of figA resulted in retardant hyphal growth and a sharp reduction of conidial production. Most importantly, FigA is essential for the homothallic mating (self-fertilization) process; further, FigA is required for heterothallic mating (outcrossing) in the absence of HACS midA. Interestingly, in a figA deletion mutant, adding extracellular Ca2+ rescued the hyphal growth defects but could not restore asexual and sexual reproduction. Furthermore, quantitative PCR results revealed that figA deletion sharply decreased the expression of brlA and nsdD, which are known as key regulators during asexual and sexual development, respectively. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagging at the C terminus of FigA (FigA::GFP) showed that FigA localized to the center of the septum in mature hyphal cells, to the location between vesicles and metulae, and between the junctions of metulae and phialides in conidiophores. Thus, our findings suggest that FigA, apart from being a member of a calcium uptake system in A. nidulans, may play multiple unexplored roles during hyphal growth and asexual and sexual development. PMID:24376003

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae THI4p is a suicide thiamine thiazole synthase.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Abeydeera, N Dinuka; Bale, Shridhar; Pai, Pei-Jing; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Russell, David H; Ealick, Steven E; Begley, Tadhg P

    2011-10-26

    Thiamine pyrophosphate 1 is an essential cofactor in all living systems. Its biosynthesis involves the separate syntheses of the pyrimidine 2 and thiazole 3 precursors, which are then coupled. Two biosynthetic routes to the thiamine thiazole have been identified. In prokaryotes, five enzymes act on three substrates to produce the thiazole via a complex oxidative condensation reaction, the mechanistic details of which are now well established. In contrast, only one gene product is involved in thiazole biosynthesis in eukaryotes (THI4p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Here we report the preparation of fully active recombinant wild-type THI4p, the identification of an iron-dependent sulphide transfer reaction from a conserved cysteine residue of the protein to a reaction intermediate and the demonstration that THI4p is a suicide enzyme undergoing only a single turnover.

  13. Characterization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Malate Permease by Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Camarasa, Carole; Bidard, Frédérique; Bony, Muriel; Barre, Pierre; Dequin, Sylvie

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, l-malic acid transport is not carrier mediated and is limited to slow, simple diffusion of the undissociated acid. Expression in S. cerevisiae of the MAE1 gene, encoding Schizosaccharomyces pombe malate permease, markedly increased l-malic acid uptake in this yeast. In this strain, at pH 3.5 (encountered in industrial processes), l-malic acid uptake involves Mae1p-mediated transport of the monoanionic form of the acid (apparent kinetic parameters: Vmax = 8.7 nmol/mg/min; Km = 1.6 mM) and some simple diffusion of the undissociated l-malic acid (Kd = 0.057 min−1). As total l-malic acid transport involved only low levels of diffusion, the Mae1p permease was further characterized in the recombinant strain. l-Malic acid transport was reversible and accumulative and depended on both the transmembrane gradient of the monoanionic acid form and the ΔpH component of the proton motive force. Dicarboxylic acids with stearic occupation closely related to l-malic acid, such as maleic, oxaloacetic, malonic, succinic and fumaric acids, inhibited l-malic acid uptake, suggesting that these compounds use the same carrier. We found that increasing external pH directly inhibited malate uptake, resulting in a lower initial rate of uptake and a lower level of substrate accumulation. In S. pombe, proton movements, as shown by internal acidification, accompanied malate uptake, consistent with the proton/dicarboxylate mechanism previously proposed. Surprisingly, no proton fluxes were observed during Mae1p-mediated l-malic acid import in S. cerevisiae, and intracellular pH remained constant. This suggests that, in S. cerevisiae, either there is a proton counterflow or the Mae1p permease functions differently from a proton/dicarboxylate symport. PMID:11526017

  14. Impact of oxygenation on the performance of three non-Saccharomyces yeasts in co-fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Kirti; Bauer, Florian F; Setati, Mathabatha E

    2017-03-01

    The sequential or co-inoculation of grape must with non-Saccharomyces yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains has recently become a common practice in winemaking. The procedure intends to enhance unique aroma and flavor profiles of wine. The extent of the impact of non-Saccharomyces strains depends on their ability to produce biomass and to remain metabolically active for a sufficiently long period. However, mixed-culture wine fermentations tend to become rapidly dominated by S. cerevisiae, reducing or eliminating the non-Saccharomyces yeast contribution. For an efficient application of these yeasts, it is therefore essential to understand the environmental factors that modulate the population dynamics of such ecosystems. Several environmental parameters have been shown to influence population dynamics, but their specific effect remains largely uncharacterized. In this study, the population dynamics in co-fermentations of S. cerevisiae and three non-Saccharomyces yeast species: Torulaspora delbrueckii, Lachancea thermotolerans, and Metschnikowia pulcherrima, was investigated as a function of oxygen availability. In all cases, oxygen availability strongly influenced population dynamics, but clear species-dependent differences were observed. Our data show that L. thermotolerans required the least oxygen, followed by T. delbrueckii and M. pulcherrima. Distinct species-specific chemical volatile profiles correlated in all cases with increased persistence of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, in particular increases in some higher alcohols and medium chain fatty acids. The results highlight the role of oxygen in regulating the succession of yeasts during wine fermentations and suggests that more stringent aeration strategies would be necessary to support the persistence of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in real must fermentations.

  15. The impact of zinc sulfate addition on the dynamic metabolic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to long term acetic acid stress treatment and identification of key metabolites involved in the antioxidant effect of zinc.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chun; Zhang, Mingming; Fang, Qing; Xiong, Liang; Zhao, Xinqing; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Bai, Fengwu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms of how zinc protects the cells against acetic acid toxicity and acts as an antioxidant are still not clear. Here we present results of the metabolic profiling of the eukaryotic model yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to long term high concentration acetic acid stress treatment in the presence and absence of zinc supplementation. Zinc addition decreased the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of chronic acetic acid stress. The dynamic changes in the accumulation of intermediates in central carbon metabolism were observed, and higher contents of intracellular alanine, valine and serine were observed by zinc supplementation. The most significant change was observed in alanine content, which is 3.51-fold of that of the control culture in cells in the stationary phase. Subsequently, it was found that 0.5 g L(-1) alanine addition resulted in faster glucose consumption in the presence of 5 g L(-1) acetic acid, and apparently decreased ROS accumulation in zinc-supplemented cells. This indicates that alanine exerted its antioxidant effect at least partially through the detoxification of acetic acid. In addition, intracellular glutathione (GSH) accumulation was enhanced by zinc addition, which is related to the protection of yeast cells from the oxidative injury caused by acetic acid. Our studies revealed for the first time that zinc modulates cellular amino acid metabolism and redox balance, especially biosynthesis of alanine and glutathione to exert its antioxidant effect.

  16. Ethanol fermentation in an immobilized cell reactor using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Ghasem; Younesi, Habibollah; Syahidah Ku Ismail, Ku

    2004-05-01

    Fermentation of sugar by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for production of ethanol in an immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was successfully carried out to improve the performance of the fermentation process. The fermentation set-up was comprised of a column packed with beads of immobilized cells. The immobilization of S. cerevisiae was simply performed by the enriched cells cultured media harvested at exponential growth phase. The fixed cell loaded ICR was carried out at initial stage of operation and the cell was entrapped by calcium alginate. The production of ethanol was steady after 24 h of operation. The concentration of ethanol was affected by the media flow rates and residence time distribution from 2 to 7 h. In addition, batch fermentation was carried out with 50 g/l glucose concentration. Subsequently, the ethanol productions and the reactor productivities of batch fermentation and immobilized cells were compared. In batch fermentation, sugar consumption and ethanol production obtained were 99.6% and 12.5% v/v after 27 h while in the ICR, 88.2% and 16.7% v/v were obtained with 6 h retention time. Nearly 5% ethanol production was achieved with high glucose concentration (150 g/l) at 6 h retention time. A yield of 38% was obtained with 150 g/l glucose. The yield was improved approximately 27% on ICR and a 24 h fermentation time was reduced to 7 h. The cell growth rate was based on the Monod rate equation. The kinetic constants (K(s) and mu(m)) of batch fermentation were 2.3 g/l and 0.35 g/lh, respectively. The maximum yield of biomass on substrate (Y(X-S)) and the maximum yield of product on substrate (Y(P-S)) in batch fermentations were 50.8% and 31.2% respectively. Productivity of the ICR were 1.3, 2.3, and 2.8 g/lh for 25, 35, 50 g/l of glucose concentration, respectively. The productivity of ethanol in batch fermentation with 50 g/l glucose was calculated as 0.29 g/lh. Maximum production of ethanol in ICR when compared to batch reactor has shown to increase

  17. Rapid and efficient galactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Quarterman, Josh; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Feng, Xueyang; Liu, Ian Y; Zhao, Huimin; Arkin, Adam P; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-07-10

    In the important industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, galactose metabolism requires energy production by respiration; therefore, this yeast cannot metabolize galactose under strict anaerobic conditions. While the respiratory dependence of galactose metabolism provides benefits in terms of cell growth and population stability, it is not advantageous for producing fuels and chemicals since a substantial fraction of consumed galactose is converted to carbon dioxide. In order to force S. cerevisiae to use galactose without respiration, a subunit (COX9) of a respiratory enzyme was deleted, but the resulting deletion mutant (Δcox9) was impaired in terms of galactose assimilation. Interestingly, after serial sub-cultures on galactose, the mutant evolved rapidly and was able to use galactose via fermentation only. The evolved strain (JQ-G1) produced ethanol from galactose with a 94% increase in yield and 6.9-fold improvement in specific productivity as compared to the wild-type strain. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis demonstrated a three-fold reduction in carbon flux through the TCA cycle of the evolved mutant with redirection of flux toward the fermentation pathway. Genome sequencing of the JQ-G1 strain revealed a loss of function mutation in a master negative regulator of the Leloir pathway (Gal80p). The mutation (Glu348*) in Gal80p was found to act synergistically with deletion of COX9 for efficient galactose fermentation, and thus the double deletion mutant Δcox9Δgal80 produced ethanol 2.4 times faster and with 35% higher yield than a single knockout mutant with deletion of GAL80 alone. When we introduced a functional COX9 cassette back into the JQ-G1 strain, the JQ-G1-COX9 strain showed a 33% reduction in specific galactose uptake rate and a 49% reduction in specific ethanol production rate as compared to JQ-G1. The wild-type strain was also subjected to serial sub-cultures on galactose but we failed to isolate a mutant capable of utilizing galactose without

  18. Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke powder using Saccharomyces cerevisiae KCCM50549 without pretreatment for inulin hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seok-Hwan; Ryu, Ji-Myoung; Lee, Hongweon; Jeon, Jae Heung; Sok, Dai-Eun; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KCCM50549, was found to efficiently ferment the inulin-containing carbohydrates in Jerusalem artichoke without acidic or enzymatic pretreatment prior to fermentation. S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 could utilize almost completely the fructo-oligosaccharides present in Jerusalem artichoke (up to degree of polymerization (DP) of 15), in contrast to the other S. cerevisiae strain such as NCYC625 that fermented the fructo-oligosaccharides with DP of up to around six. Inulin-fermenting S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 produced c.a. 1.6 times more ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC625. Direct ethanol fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke flour at 180 g/L without any supplements or pretreatments by S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 in a 5 L jar fermentor yielded 36.2 g/L of ethanol within 36 h. The conversion efficiency of inulin-type sugars to ethanol was 70% of the theoretical ethanol yield.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley

    PubMed Central

    de Ponzzes-Gomes, Camila M.P.B.S.; de Mélo, Dângelly L.F.M.; Santana, Caroline A.; Pereira, Giuliano E.; Mendonça, Michelle O.C.; Gomes, Fátima C.O.; Oliveira, Evelyn S.; Barbosa, Antonio M.; Trindade, Rita C.; Rosa, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 × 105 cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production. PMID:25242923

  20. From one to many: expanding the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome panel.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stacia R; Weng, Shuai; Binkley, Gail; Paskov, Kelley; Song, Giltae; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, thousands of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes have been sequenced to varying degrees of completion. The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) has long been the keeper of the original eukaryotic reference genome sequence, which was derived primarily from S. cerevisiae strain S288C. Because new technologies are pushing S. cerevisiae annotation past the limits of any system based exclusively on a single reference sequence, SGD is actively working to expand the original S. cerevisiae systematic reference sequence from a single genome to a multi-genome reference panel. We first commissioned the sequencing of additional genomes and their automated analysis using the AGAPE pipeline. Here we describe our curation strategy to produce manually reviewed high-quality genome annotations in order to elevate 11 of these additional genomes to Reference status. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/.

  1. Ethanol production from carob extract by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Irfan; Bialka, Katherine L; Demirci, Ali; Karhan, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    Carob has been widely grown in the Mediterranean region for a long time. It has been regarded as only a forest tree and has been neglected for other economical benefits. However, in recent years, this fruit has gained attention for several applications. As petroleum has become depleted, renewable energy production has started to gain attention all over the world; including the production of ethanol from underutilized agricultural products such as carob. In this project, the optimum extraction conditions were determined for the carob fruit by using the response surface design method. The obtained extract was utilized for production of ethanol by using suspended Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation. The effect of various fermentation parameters such as pH, media content and inoculum size were evaluated for ethanol fermentation in carob extract. Also, in order to determine economically appropriate nitrogen sources, four different nitrogen sources were evaluated. The optimum extraction condition for carob extract was determined to be 80 degrees C, 2h in 1:4 dilution rate (fruit: water ratio) according to the result of response surface analysis (115.3g/L). When the fermentation with pH at 5.5 was applied, the final ethanol concentration and production rates were 42.6g/L and 3.37 g/L/h, respectively, which were higher than using an uncontrolled pH. Among inoculum sizes of 1%, 3%, and 5%, 3% was determined as the best inoculum size. The maximum production rate and final ethanol concentration were 3.48 g/L/h and 44.51%, respectively, with an alternative nitrogen source of meat-bone meal. Overall, this study suggested that carob extract can be utilized for production of ethanol in order to meet the demands of renewable energy.

  2. Genetic effects of fresh cigarette smoke in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gairola, C

    1982-09-01

    Ability of fresh cigarette smoke from University of Kentucky reference cigarette 2R1 to induce gene conversion, reverse mutation and mitotic crossing-over in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was examined. A closed cell suspension-recycle system using 2 peristaltic pumps interconnected to a single-port reverse-phase smoking machine was developed to provide complete exposure of cells to smoke within 0.2--10 sec of its generation. The exposed cells showed a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of all the 3 genetic endpoints examined. Cell age was an important factor with younger cells being more sensitive than older. Filtration studies showed that the gas phase possessed as much as 25% of the total whole-smoke activity. Activated charcoal reduced the activity of smoke in direct proportion to its amount in the filter. Acetate filter did not appreciably alter the activity. A comparison of whole smoke from various cigarettes showed that: (1) the nicotine content of a cigarette does not affect the genetic activity of smoke; (2) burley and flue-cured tobaccos have differential activity in gene conversion and reverse mutation systems; and (3) the genetic effects of whole smoke are not peculiar to tobacco pyrolysis because similar effects are produced by smokes from lettuce and other non-tobacco cigarettes. It is concluded that the yeast D7 system can be used effectively for the quantitative evaluation of genetic effects of smoke from different cigarettes, and both whole cigarette smoke and its gas phase possess mutagenic as well as recombinogenic activity that can be modified by the use of filters.

  3. Genetic basis of arsenite and cadmium tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, Michael; Perrone, Gabriel G; Kristiansson, Erik; Traini, Mathew; Ye, Tian; Dawes, Ian W; Nerman, Olle; Tamás, Markus J

    2009-01-01

    Background Arsenic and cadmium are widely distributed in nature and pose serious threats to the environment and human health. Exposure to these nonessential toxic metals may result in a variety of human diseases including cancer. However, arsenic and cadmium toxicity targets and the cellular systems contributing to tolerance acquisition are not fully known. Results To gain insight into metal action and cellular tolerance mechanisms, we carried out genome-wide screening of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid and homozygous diploid deletion mutant collections and scored for reduced growth in the presence of arsenite or cadmium. Processes found to be required for tolerance to both metals included sulphur and glutathione biosynthesis, environmental sensing, mRNA synthesis and transcription, and vacuolar/endosomal transport and sorting. We also identified metal-specific defence processes. Arsenite-specific defence functions were related to cell cycle regulation, lipid and fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, and the cytoskeleton whereas cadmium-specific defence functions were mainly related to sugar/carbohydrate metabolism, and metal-ion homeostasis and transport. Molecular evidence indicated that the cytoskeleton is targeted by arsenite and that phosphorylation of the Snf1p kinase is required for cadmium tolerance. Conclusion This study has pin-pointed core functions that protect cells from arsenite and cadmium toxicity. It also emphasizes the existence of both common and specific defence systems. Since many of the yeast genes that confer tolerance to these agents have homologues in humans, similar biological processes may act in yeast and humans to prevent metal toxicity and carcinogenesis. PMID:19284616

  4. Plasmid accumulation reduces life span in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Alaric A; Aris, John P

    2003-10-24

    Aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is under the control of multiple pathways. The production and accumulation of extrachromosomal rDNA circles (ERCs) is one pathway that has been proposed to bring about aging in yeast. To test this proposal, we have developed a plasmid-based model system to study the role of DNA episomes in reduction of yeast life span. Recombinant plasmids containing different replication origins, cis-acting partitioning elements, and selectable marker genes were constructed and analyzed for their effects on yeast replicative life span. Plasmids containing the ARS1 replication origin reduce life span to the greatest extent of the plasmids analyzed. This reduction in life span is partially suppressed by a CEN4 centromeric element on ARS1 plasmids. Plasmids containing a replication origin from the endogenous yeast 2 mu circle also reduce life span, but to a lesser extent than ARS1 plasmids. Consistent with this, ARS1 and 2 mu origin plasmids accumulate in approximately 7-generation-old cells, but ARS1/CEN4 plasmids do not. Importantly, ARS1 plasmids accumulate to higher levels in old cells than 2 mu origin plasmids, suggesting a correlation between plasmid accumulation and life span reduction. Reduction in life span is neither an indirect effect of increased ERC levels nor the result of stochastic cessation of growth. The presence of a fully functional 9.1-kb rDNA repeat on plasmids is not required for, and does not augment, reduction in life span. These findings support the view that accumulation of DNA episomes, including episomes such as ERCs, cause cell senescence in yeast.

  5. Capturing of the monoterpene olefin limonene produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jongedijk, Esmer; Cankar, Katarina; Ranzijn, Jorn; van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Monoterpene olefins such as limonene are plant compounds with applications as flavouring and fragrance agents, as solvents and potentially also in polymer and fuel chemistry. We engineered baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to express a (-)-limonene synthase from Perilla frutescens and a (+)-limonene synthase from Citrus limon. Both proteins were expressed either with their native plastid targeting signal or in a truncated form in which the plastidial sorting signal was removed. The yeast host strain for expression was AE9 K197G, which expresses a mutant Erg20 enzyme. This enzyme catalyses the formation of geranyl diphosphate, which is the precursor for monoterpenes. Several methods were tested to capture limonene produced by the yeast. Extraction from the culture medium by pentane, or by the addition of CaCl2 followed by solid-phase micro-extraction, did not lead to detectable limonene, indicating that limonene is rapidly lost from the culture medium. Volatile terpenes such as limonene may also be trapped in a dodecane phase added to the medium during fermentation. This method resulted in recovery of 0.028 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.060 mg/l (-)-limonene in strains using the truncated Citrus and Perilla synthases, respectively. Trapping the headspace during culture of the limonene synthase-expressing strains resulted in higher titres, at 0.12 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.49 mg/l (-)-limonene. These results show that the volatile properties of the olefins produced require specific methods for efficient recovery of these molecules from biotechnological production systems.

  6. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  7. [Rab GTPases networks in membrane traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Nagano, Makoto; Toshima, Junko Y; Toshima, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking between membranous compartments is essential for organelle biogenesis, structure, and identity. Rab/Ypt GTPases are well-characterized regulators of intracellular membrane trafficking, functioning as molecular switches that alternate between GTP- and GDP-bound forms. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 11 Rab/Ypt GTPases have been identified and their functions are known to be conserved in their mammalian counterparts. In yeast, the secretory pathway is regulated by sequential activation and inactivation (the so-called Rab cascade) of three types of yeast Rab protein -Ypt1p, Ypt31p/32p and Sec4p -via specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). In addition to these Rabs, we and others have recently demonstrated that Ypt6p is predominantly localized to the early Golgi compartment, and functions as another regulator of anterograde transport for intra-Golgi trafficking in the secretory pathway. On the other hand, the endocytic pathway is known to be regulated by three yeast Rab5s (Vps21p, Ypt52p and Ypt53p) and one Rab7 (Ypt7p). Rab5 and Rab7 are key determinants of endosome identity, and the Rab5-Rab7 cascade is important for the progression from early to late endosome. Our recent study demonstrates that the endocytic pathway branches into two vacuolar targeting pathways, the Rab5-dependent vacuole protein sorting (VPS) pathway and the Rab5-independent pathway. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that regulate the localization and activity of yeast Rab GTPases in intracellular membrane trafficking.

  8. Mating-type Gene Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Haber, James E

    2015-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two alternative mating types designated MATa and MATα. These are distinguished by about 700 bp of unique sequences, Ya or Yα, including divergent promoter sequences and part of the open reading frames of genes that regulate mating phenotype. Homothallic budding yeast, carrying an active HO endonuclease gene, HO, can switch mating type through a recombination process known as gene conversion, in which a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) created immediately adjacent to the Y region results in replacement of the Y sequences with a copy of the opposite mating type information, which is harbored in one of two heterochromatic donor loci, HMLα or HMRa. HO gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that only half of the cells in a lineage switch to the opposite MAT allele, thus promoting conjugation and diploid formation. Study of the silencing of these loci has provided a great deal of information about the role of the Sir2 histone deacetylase and its associated Sir3 and Sir4 proteins in creating heterochromatic regions. MAT switching has been examined in great detail to learn about the steps in homologous recombination. MAT switching is remarkably directional, with MATa recombining preferentially with HMLα and MATα using HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by a cis-acting recombination enhancer located near HML. RE is turned off in MATα cells but in MATa binds multiple copies of the Fkh1 transcription factor whose forkhead-associated phosphothreonine binding domain localizes at the DSB, bringing HML into conjunction with MATa.

  9. The effect of acetaminophen on ubiquitin homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huseinovic, Angelina; van Leeuwen, Jolanda S.; van Welsem, Tibor; Stulemeijer, Iris; van Leeuwen, Fred; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Kooter, Jan M.; Vos, J. Chris

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), although considered a safe drug, is one of the major causes of acute liver failure by overdose, and therapeutic chronic use can cause serious health problems. Although the reactive APAP metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) is clearly linked to liver toxicity, toxicity of APAP is also found without drug metabolism of APAP to NAPQI. To get more insight into mechanisms of APAP toxicity, a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for APAP-resistant deletion strains was performed. In this screen we identified genes related to the DNA damage response. Next, we investigated the link between genotype and APAP-induced toxicity or resistance by performing a more detailed screen with a library containing mutants of 1522 genes related to nuclear processes, like DNA repair and chromatin remodelling. We identified 233 strains that had an altered growth rate relative to wild type, of which 107 showed increased resistance to APAP and 126 showed increased sensitivity. Gene Ontology analysis identified ubiquitin homeostasis, regulation of transcription of RNA polymerase II genes, and the mitochondria-to-nucleus signalling pathway to be associated with APAP resistance, while histone exchange and modification, and vesicular transport were connected to APAP sensitivity. Indeed, we observed a link between ubiquitin levels and APAP resistance, whereby ubiquitin deficiency conferred resistance to APAP toxicity while ubiquitin overexpression resulted in sensitivity. The toxicity profile of various chemicals, APAP, and its positional isomer AMAP on a series of deletion strains with ubiquitin deficiency showed a unique resistance pattern for APAP. Furthermore, exposure to APAP increased the level of free ubiquitin and influenced the ubiquitination of proteins. Together, these results uncover a role for ubiquitin homeostasis in APAP-induced toxicity. PMID:28291796

  10. Phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Currently, pursuing yeast strains that display both a high potential fitness for alcoholic fermentation and a favorable impact on quality is a major goal in the alcoholic beverage industry. This considerable industrial interest has led to many studies characterizing the phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial yeast populations. In this study, 20 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins exhibited high phenotypic diversity when their response to nine biotechnologically relevant conditions was examined. Next, the fermentation fitness and metabolic traits of eight selected strains with a unique phenotypic profile were evaluated in a high-sugar synthetic medium under two nitrogen regimes. Although the strains exhibited significant differences in nitrogen requirements and utilization rates, a direct relationship between nitrogen consumption, specific growth rate, cell biomass, cell viability, acetic acid and glycerol formation was only observed under high-nitrogen conditions. In contrast, the strains produced more succinic acid under the low-nitrogen regime, and a direct relationship with the final cell biomass was established. Glucose and fructose utilization patterns depended on both yeast strain and nitrogen availability. For low-nitrogen fermentation, three strains did not fully degrade the fructose. This study validates phenotypic and metabolic diversity among commercial wine yeasts and contributes new findings on the relationship between nitrogen availability, yeast cell growth and sugar utilization. We suggest that measuring nitrogen during the stationary growth phase is important because yeast cells fermentative activity is not exclusively related to population size, as previously assumed, but it is also related to the quantity of nitrogen consumed during this growth phase. PMID:24949272

  11. Phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Catarina; Lage, Patrícia; Vilela, Alice; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Currently, pursuing yeast strains that display both a high potential fitness for alcoholic fermentation and a favorable impact on quality is a major goal in the alcoholic beverage industry. This considerable industrial interest has led to many studies characterizing the phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial yeast populations. In this study, 20 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins exhibited high phenotypic diversity when their response to nine biotechnologically relevant conditions was examined. Next, the fermentation fitness and metabolic traits of eight selected strains with a unique phenotypic profile were evaluated in a high-sugar synthetic medium under two nitrogen regimes. Although the strains exhibited significant differences in nitrogen requirements and utilization rates, a direct relationship between nitrogen consumption, specific growth rate, cell biomass, cell viability, acetic acid and glycerol formation was only observed under high-nitrogen conditions. In contrast, the strains produced more succinic acid under the low-nitrogen regime, and a direct relationship with the final cell biomass was established. Glucose and fructose utilization patterns depended on both yeast strain and nitrogen availability. For low-nitrogen fermentation, three strains did not fully degrade the fructose. This study validates phenotypic and metabolic diversity among commercial wine yeasts and contributes new findings on the relationship between nitrogen availability, yeast cell growth and sugar utilization. We suggest that measuring nitrogen during the stationary growth phase is important because yeast cells fermentative activity is not exclusively related to population size, as previously assumed, but it is also related to the quantity of nitrogen consumed during this growth phase.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a dinucleoside triphosphatase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Brevet, A; Chen, J; Fromant, M; Blanquet, S; Plateau, P

    1991-01-01

    An enzyme able to cleave dinucleoside triphosphates has been purified 3,750-fold from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Contrary to the enzymes previously shown to catabolize Ap4A in yeast, this enzyme is a hydrolase rather than a phosphorylase. The dinucleoside triphosphatase molecular ratio estimated by gel filtration is 55,000. Dinucleoside triphosphatase activity is strongly stimulated by the presence of divalent cations. Mn2+ displays the strongest stimulating effect, followed by Mg2+, Co2+, Cd2+, and Ca2+. The Km value for Ap3A is 5.4 microM (50 mM Tris-HCl [pH 7.8], 5 mM MgCl2, and 0.1 mM EDTA; 37 degrees C). Dinucleoside polyphosphates are substrates of this enzyme, provided that they contain more than two phosphates and that at least one of the two bases is a purine (Ap3A, Ap3G, Ap3C, Gp3G, Gp3C, m7Gp3A, m7Gp3G, Ap4A, Ap4G, Ap4C, Ap4U, Gp4G, and Ap5A are substrates; AMP, ADP, ATP, Ap2A, and Cp4U are not). Among the products, a nucleoside monophosphate is always formed. The specificity of cleavage of methylated dinucleoside triphosphates and the molecular weight of dinucleoside triphosphatase indicate that this enzyme is different from the mRNA decapping enzyme previously characterized (A. Stevens, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:2005-2010, 1988). Images PMID:1653209

  13. Interaction between lanthanide ions and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ene, Cristian D; Ruta, Lavinia L; Nicolau, Ioana; Popa, Claudia V; Iordache, Virgil; Neagoe, Aurora D; Farcasanu, Ileana C

    2015-10-01

    Lanthanides are a group of non-essential elements with important imaging and therapeutic applications. Although trivalent lanthanide ions (Ln³⁺) are used as potent blockers of Ca²⁺ channels, the systematic studies correlating Ln³⁺ accumulation and toxicity to Ca²⁺ channel blocking activity are scarce. In this study, we made use of the eukaryotic model Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate the correlation between Ln³⁺ accumulation, their toxicity and their capacity to block the exogenous stress-induced Ca²⁺ influx into the cytosol. It was found that the Ln³⁺ blocked the Ca²⁺ entry into the yeast cells only when present at concentration high enough to allow rapid binding to cell surface. At lower concentrations, Ln³⁺ were taken up by the cell, but Ca²⁺ blockage was no longer achieved. At 1 mM concentration, all ions from the Ln³⁺ series could block Ca²⁺ entry into cytosol with the exception of La³⁺, and to a lesser extent, Pr³⁺ and Nd³⁺. The plasma membrane Ca²⁺-channel Cch1/Mid1 contributed to La³⁺ and Gd³⁺ entry into the cells, with a significant preference for La³⁺. The results open the possibility to obtain cells loaded with controlled amounts and ratios of Ln³⁺.

  14. Ecological and genetic barriers differentiate natural populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE PAGES

    Clowers, Katie J.; Heilberger, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S.; ...

    2015-05-06

    How populations that inhabit the same geographical area become genetically differentiated is not clear. To investigate this, we characterized phenotypic and genetic differences between two populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that in some cases inhabit the same environment but show relatively little gene flow. We profiled stress sensitivity in a group of vineyard isolates and a group of oak-soil strains and found several niche-related phenotypes that distinguish the populations. We performed bulk-segregant mapping on two of the distinguishing traits: The vineyard-specific ability to grow in grape juice and oak-specific tolerance to the cell wall damaging drug Congo red. To implicate causalmore » genes, we also performed a chemical genomic screen in the lab-strain deletion collection and identified many important genes that fell under quantitative trait loci peaks. One gene important for growth in grape juice and identified by both the mapping and the screen was SSU1, a sulfite-nitrite pump implicated in wine fermentations. The beneficial allele is generated by a known translocation that we reasoned may also serve as a genetic barrier. We found that the translocation is prevalent in vineyard strains, but absent in oak strains, and presents a postzygotic barrier to spore viability. Furthermore, the translocation was associated with a fitness cost to the rapid growth rate seen in oak-soil strains. Lastly, our results reveal the translocation as a dual-function locus that enforces ecological differentiation while producing a genetic barrier to gene flow in these sympatric populations.« less

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of the SUL1 Promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rich, Matthew S; Payen, Celia; Rubin, Alan F; Ong, Giang T; Sanchez, Monica R; Yachie, Nozomu; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fields, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, beneficial mutations selected during sulfate-limited growth are typically amplifications of the SUL1 gene, which encodes the high-affinity sulfate transporter, resulting in fitness increases of >35% . Cis-regulatory mutations have not been observed at this locus; however, it is not clear whether this absence is due to a low mutation rate such that these mutations do not arise, or they arise but have limited fitness effects relative to those of amplification. To address this question directly, we assayed the fitness effects of nearly all possible point mutations in a 493-base segment of the gene's promoter through mutagenesis and selection. While most mutations were either neutral or detrimental during sulfate-limited growth, eight mutations increased fitness >5% and as much as 9.4%. Combinations of these beneficial mutations increased fitness only up to 11%. Thus, in the case of SUL1, promoter mutations could not induce a fitness increase similar to that of gene amplification. Using these data, we identified functionally important regions of the SUL1 promoter and analyzed three sites that correspond to potential binding sites for the transcription factors Met32 and Cbf1 Mutations that create new Met32- or Cbf1-binding sites also increased fitness. Some mutations in the untranslated region of the SUL1 transcript decreased fitness, likely due to the formation of inhibitory upstream open reading frames. Our methodology-saturation mutagenesis, chemostat selection, and DNA sequencing to track variants-should be a broadly applicable approach.

  16. The anatomy of a hypoxic operator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Deckert, J; Torres, A M; Hwang, S M; Kastaniotis, A J; Zitomer, R S

    1998-01-01

    Aerobic repression of the hypoxic genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by the DNA-binding protein Rox1 and the Tup1/Ssn6 general repression complex. To determine the DNA sequence requirements for repression, we carried out a mutational analysis of the consensus Rox1-binding site and an analysis of the arrangement of the Rox1 sites into operators in the hypoxic ANB1 gene. We found that single base pair substitutions in the consensus sequence resulted in lower affinities for Rox1, and the decreased affinity of Rox1 for mutant sites correlated with the ability of these sites to repress expression of the hypoxic ANB1 gene. In addition, there was a general but not complete correlation between the strength of repression of a given hypoxic gene and the compliance of the Rox1 sites in that gene to the consensus sequence. An analysis of the ANB1 operators revealed that the two Rox1 sites within an operator acted synergistically in vivo, but that Rox1 did not bind cooperatively in vitro, suggesting the presence of a higher order repression complex in the cell. In addition, the spacing or helical phasing of the Rox1 sites was not important in repression. The differential repression by the two operators of the ANB1 gene was found to be due partly to the location of the operators and partly to the sequences between the two Rox1-binding sites in each. Finally, while Rox1 repression requires the Tup1/Ssn6 general repression complex and this complex has been proposed to require the aminoterminal regions of histones H3 and H4 for full repression of a number of genes, we found that these regions were dispensable for ANB1 repression and the repression of two other hypoxic genes. PMID:9832521

  17. Telomere Recombination Accelerates Cellular Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Fen; Meng, Fei-Long; Zhou, Jin-Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures located at the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomere integrity is required for cell proliferation and survival. Although the vast majority of eukaryotic species use telomerase as a primary means for telomere maintenance, a few species can use recombination or retrotransposon-mediated maintenance pathways. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use both telomerase and recombination to replicate telomeres, budding yeast provides a useful system with which to examine the evolutionary advantages of telomerase and recombination in preserving an organism or cell under natural selection. In this study, we examined the life span in telomerase-null, post-senescent type II survivors that have employed homologous recombination to replicate their telomeres. Type II recombination survivors stably maintained chromosomal integrity but exhibited a significantly reduced replicative life span. Normal patterns of cell morphology at the end of a replicative life span and aging-dependent sterility were observed in telomerase-null type II survivors, suggesting the type II survivors aged prematurely in a manner that is phenotypically consistent with that of wild-type senescent cells. The shortened life span of type II survivors was extended by calorie restriction or TOR1 deletion, but not by Fob1p inactivation or Sir2p over-expression. Intriguingly, rDNA recombination was decreased in type II survivors, indicating that the premature aging of type II survivors was not caused by an increase in extra-chromosomal rDNA circle accumulation. Reintroduction of telomerase activity immediately restored the replicative life span of type II survivors despite their heterogeneous telomeres. These results suggest that telomere recombination accelerates cellular aging in telomerase-null type II survivors and that telomerase is likely a superior telomere maintenance pathway in sustaining yeast replicative life span. PMID:19557187

  18. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione.

  19. [Construction and fermentation control of reductive TCA pathway for malic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Yan, Daojiang; Wang, Caixia; Zhou, Jiemin; Liu, Yilan; Yang, Maohua; Xing, Jianmin

    2013-10-01

    Malic acid is widely used in food, and chemical industries. Through overexpressing pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase in pdc1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae, malic acid was successfully produced through the reductive TCA pathway. No malic acid was detected in wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, 45 mmol/L malic acid was produced in engineered strain, and the concentration of byproduct ethanol also reduced by 18%. The production of malic acid enhanced 6% by increasing the concentration of Ca2+. In addition, the final concentration reached 52.5 mmol/L malic acid by addition of biotin. The increasing is almost 16% higher than that of the original strain.

  20. Rapid Identification and Enumeration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Wine by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, P.; Querol, A.; Fernández-Espinar, M. T.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the beneficial role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the food industry for food and beverage production, it is able to cause spoilage in wines. We have developed a real-time PCR method to directly detect and quantify this yeast species in wine samples to provide winemakers with a rapid and sensitive method to detect and prevent wine spoilage. Specific primers were designed for S. cerevisiae using the sequence information obtained from a cloned random amplified polymorphic DNA band that differentiated S. cerevisiae from its sibling species Saccharomyces bayanus, Saccharomyces pastorianus, and Saccharomyces paradoxus. The specificity of the primers was demonstrated for typical wine spoilage yeast species. The method was useful for estimating the level of S. cerevisiae directly in sweet wines and red wines without preenrichment when yeast is present in concentrations as low as 3.8 and 5 CFU per ml. This detection limit is in the same order as that obtained from glucose-peptone-yeast growth medium (GPY). Moreover, it was possible to quantify S. cerevisiae in artificially contaminated samples accurately. Limits for accurate quantification in wine were established, from 3.8 × 105 to 3.8 CFU/ml in sweet wine and from 5 × 106 to 50 CFU/ml in red wine. PMID:16269715

  1. Divergence in wine characteristics produced by wild and domesticated strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hyma, Katie E; Saerens, Sofie M; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Fay, Justin C

    2011-11-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the primary species used by wine makers to convert sugar into alcohol during wine fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is found in vineyards, but is also found in association with oak trees and other natural sources. Although wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as other Saccharomyces species are also capable of wine fermentation, a genetically distinct group of S. cerevisiae strains is primarily used to produce wine, consistent with the idea that wine making strains have been domesticated for wine production. In this study, we demonstrate that humans can distinguish between wines produced using wine strains and wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as its sibling species, Saccharomyces paradoxus. Wine strains produced wine with fruity and floral characteristics, whereas wild strains produced wine with earthy and sulfurous characteristics. The differences that we observe between wine and wild strains provides further evidence that wine strains have evolved phenotypes that are distinct from their wild ancestors and relevant to their use in wine production.

  2. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Oshoma, Cyprian E; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J; Smart, Katherine A; Phister, Trevor G; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid.

  3. Divergence in wine characteristics produced by wild and domesticated strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hyma, Katie E; Saerens, Sofie M; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Fay, Justin C

    2011-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the primary species used by wine makers to convert sugar into alcohol during wine fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is found in vineyards, but is also found in association with oak trees and other natural sources. Although wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as other Saccharomyces species are also capable of wine fermentation, a genetically distinct group of S. cerevisiae strains is primarily used to produce wine, consistent with the idea that wine making strains have been domesticated for wine production. In this study, we demonstrate that humans can distinguish between wines produced using wine strains and wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as its sibling species, Saccharomyces paradoxus. Wine strains produced wine with fruity and floral characteristics, whereas wild strains produced wine with earthy and sulfurous characteristics. The differences that we observe between wine and wild strains provides further evidence that wine strains have evolved phenotypes that are distinct from their wild ancestors and relevant to their use in wine production. PMID:22093681

  4. Improved resistance to transition metals of a cobalt-substituted alcohol dehydrogenase 1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cavaletto, M; Pessione, E; Vanni, A; Giunta, C

    2001-11-17

    Cobalt-substituted alcohol dehydrogenase 1 was purified from a yeast culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Its reactivity towards different transition metals was tested and compared with the native zinc enzyme. The cobalt enzyme displayed a catalytic efficiency 100-fold higher than that of the zinc enzyme. Copper, nickel and cadmium exerted a mixed-type inhibition, with a scale of inhibition efficiency: Cu(2+)>Ni(2+)>Cd(2+). In general, a higher resistance of the modified protein to the inhibitory action of transition metals was observed, with two orders of magnitude for copper I(50). The presence of nickel in the complexes enzyme-coenzyme-inhibitor-substrate resulted in a decrease of the ampholytic nature of the catalytic site. On the contrary, cadmium and copper exerted an enhancement of this parameter. Electrostatic or other types of interactions may be involved in conferring a good resistance in the basic pH range, making cobalt enzyme very suitable for biotechnological processes.

  5. Vanillin causes the activation of Yap1 and mitochondrial fragmentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi My; Iwaki, Aya; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Izawa, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin and furfural are derived from lignocellulosic biomass and inhibit yeast growth and fermentation as biomass conversion inhibitors. Furfural has been shown to induce oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since there has been no report on the relationship between vanillin and oxidative stress, we investigated whether vanillin caused oxidative stress in yeast cells. We showed that vanillin caused the nuclear accumulation of Yap1, an oxidative stress responsive transcription factor, and subsequent transcriptional activation of Yap1-target genes. The growth of the null mutant of the YAP1 gene (yap1Δ) was delayed in the presence of vanillin, which indicated that Yap1 plays a role in the acquisition of tolerance to vanillin. We also demonstrated that vanillin facilitated the fragmentation of mitochondria. These findings suggest that the toxicity of vanillin involves damage induced by oxidative stress.

  6. Producing human ceramide-NS by metabolic engineering using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Suguru; Shimamoto, Toshi; Nagano, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Okuhara, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Tojo, Hiromasa; Kodama, Yukiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide is one of the most important intercellular components responsible for the barrier and moisture retention functions of the skin. Because of the risks involved with using products of animal origin and the low productivity of plants, the availability of ceramides is currently limited. In this study, we successfully developed a system that produces sphingosine-containing human ceramide-NS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating the genes for yeast sphingolipid hydroxylases (encoded by SUR2 and SCS7) and introducing the gene for a human sphingolipid desaturase (encoded by DES1). The inactivation of the ceramidase gene YDC1, overexpression of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C gene ISC1, and endoplasmic reticulum localization of the DES1 gene product resulted in enhanced production of ceramide-NS. The engineered yeast strains can serve as hosts not only for providing a sustainable source of ceramide-NS but also for developing further systems to produce sphingosine-containing sphingolipids. PMID:26573460

  7. Novel physiological roles for glutathione in sequestering acetaldehyde to confer acetaldehyde tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Matsufuji, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kohei; Yamauchi, Kosei; Mitsunaga, Tohru; Hayakawa, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we identified novel physiological functions of glutathione in acetaldehyde tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains deleted in the genes encoding the enzymes involved in glutathione synthesis and reduction, GSH1, GSH2 and GLR1, exhibited severe growth defects compared to wild-type under acetaldehyde stress, although strains deleted in the genes encoding glutathione peroxidases or glutathione transferases did not show any growth defects. On the other hand, intracellular levels of reduced glutathione decreased in the presence of acetaldehyde in response to acetaldehyde concentration. Moreover, we show that glutathione can trap a maximum of four acetaldehyde molecules within its molecule in a non-enzymatic manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that glutathione has an important role in acetaldehyde tolerance, as a direct scavenger of acetaldehyde in the cell.

  8. Role of NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1990-01-01

    We cloned GDH2, the gene that encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by purifying the enzyme, making polyclonal antibodies to it, and using the antibodies to screen a lambda gt11 yeast genomic library. A yeast strain with a deletion-disruption allele of GDH2 which replaced the wild-type gene grew very poorly with glutamate as a nitrogen source, but growth improved significantly when the strain was also provided with adenine or other nitrogenous compounds whose biosynthesis requires glutamine. Our results indicate that the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase catalyzes the major, but not sole, pathway for generation of ammonia from glutamate. We also isolated yeast mutants that lacked glutamate synthase activity and present evidence which shows that normally NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase is not involved in glutamate biosynthesis, but that if the enzyme is overexpressed, it may function reversibly in intact cells. PMID:1975578

  9. Alpha mating type-specific expression of mutations leading to constitutive agglutinability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Doi, S; Yoshimura, M

    1985-01-01

    Two mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been isolated and characterized. The mutants were constitutively agglutinable at 36 degrees C, the temperature at which wild-type cells agglutinate only after induction by mating pheromone. The mutant cells had other properties specific for the normal alpha cell type, i.e., conjugation with a cells, response to a mating pheromone, and production of alpha mating pheromone. The two mutations, cag1 and cag2, were recessive and expressed only in alpha cells. cag1 is linked very closely to the MAT locus, but cag2 is unlinked to the MAT locus. These cag mutations complemented ste3-1. These results indicate that CAG genes are novel alpha-specific genes involved in the regulation of sex agglutinin synthesis. PMID:3881403

  10. Calcium signaling mediates the response to cadmium toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Lavinia L; Popa, Valentina C; Nicolau, Ioana; Danet, Andrei F; Iordache, Virgil; Neagoe, Aurora D; Farcasanu, Ileana C

    2014-08-25

    The involvement of Ca(2+) in the response to high Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+) was investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yeast cells responded through a sharp increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) when exposed to Cd(2+), and to a lesser extent to Cu(2+), but not to Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), or Hg(2+). The response to high Cd(2+) depended mainly on external Ca(2+) (transported through the Cch1p/Mid1p channel) but also on vacuolar Ca(2+) (released into the cytosol through the Yvc1p channel). The adaptation to high Cd(2+) was influenced by perturbations in Ca(2+) homeostasis. Thus, the tolerance to Cd(2+) often correlated with sharp Cd(2+)-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) pulses, while the Cd(2+) sensitivity was accompanied by the incapacity to rapidly restore the low cytosolic Ca(2+).

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Mms-Sensitive Mutants of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    1977-01-01

    We have isolated mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Alleles of rad1, rad4, rad6, rad52, rad55 and rad57 were found among these mms mutants. Twenty-nine of the mms mutants which complement the existing radiation-sensitive (rad and rev ) mutants belong to 22 new complementation groups. Mutants from five complementation groups are sensitive only to MMS. Mutants of 11 complementation groups are sensitive to UV or X rays in addition to MMS, mutants of six complementation groups are sensitive to all three agents. The cross-sensitivities of these mms mutants to UV and X rays are discussed in terms of their possible involvement in DNA repair. Sporulation is reduced or absent in homozygous diploids of mms mutants from nine complementation groups. PMID:195865

  12. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Cell Wall Components as Tools for Ochratoxin A Decontamination

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Masek, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall preparations in the adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA). The study involved the use of a brewer’s yeast cell wall devoid of protein substances, glucans obtained by water and alkaline extraction, a glucan commercially available as a dietary supplement for animals and, additionally, dried brewer’s yeast for comparison. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis of the obtained preparations showed bands characteristic for glucans in the resulting spectra. The yeast cell wall preparation, water-extracted glucan and the commercial glucan bound the highest amount of ochratoxin A, above 55% of the initial concentration, and the alkaline-extracted glucan adsorbed the lowest amount of this toxin. It has been shown that adsorption is most effective at a close-to-neutral pH, while being considerably limited in alkaline conditions. PMID:25848694

  13. [Fluorescein transport and antioxidant systems in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under acid stress].

    PubMed

    Abrat, O B; Semchyshyn, H M; Miedzobrodski, J; Lushchak, V I

    2008-01-01

    The influence of acetic acid induced stress on the activity of fluorescein extrusion system and cell survival in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. It was shown that acetic acid caused the inhibition of fluorescein efflux from the cells of both parental strain and its derivative defective in the transcriptional factor War1 which regulates the system of acetate efflux from the cell. The stress induced by 200 mM CH3COOH decreased almost 10 times the survival of strains deficient in the regulatory proteins War1 and Yap1 as compared with respective wild strains. However, pretreatment of the yeast by sublethal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide resulted in the increased resistance to acid stress. Thus it may be supposed that several systems exist which are responsible for acetate extrusion from the yeast cells. Regulatory proteins War1 and Yap1 are involved in the yeast adaptation to the stress induced by acetic acid.

  14. Cis1/Atg31 is required for autophagosome formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, Yukiko; Kawamata, Tomoko; Suzuki, Kuninori; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2007-05-04

    Autophagy is the bulk degradation of cytosolic materials in lysosomes/vacuoles of eukaryotic cells. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 17 Atg proteins are known to be involved in autophagosome formation. Genome wide analyses have shown that Atg17 interacts with numerous proteins. Further studies on these interacting proteins may provide further insights into membrane dynamics during autophagy. Here, we identify Cis1/Atg31 as a protein that exhibits similar phenotypes to Atg17. ATG31 null cells were defective in autophagy and lost viability under starvation conditions. Localization of Atg31 to pre-autophagosomal structures (PAS) was dependent on Atg17. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Atg31 interacts with Atg17. Together, Atg31 is a novel protein that, in concert with Atg17, is required for proper autophagosome formation.

  15. Producing human ceramide-NS by metabolic engineering using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Suguru; Shimamoto, Toshi; Nagano, Hideaki; Tsuruno, Masahiro; Okuhara, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Haruyo; Tojo, Hiromasa; Kodama, Yukiko; Funato, Kouichi

    2015-11-17

    Ceramide is one of the most important intercellular components responsible for the barrier and moisture retention functions of the skin. Because of the risks involved with using products of animal origin and the low productivity of plants, the availability of ceramides is currently limited. In this study, we successfully developed a system that produces sphingosine-containing human ceramide-NS in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating the genes for yeast sphingolipid hydroxylases (encoded by SUR2 and SCS7) and introducing the gene for a human sphingolipid desaturase (encoded by DES1). The inactivation of the ceramidase gene YDC1, overexpression of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C gene ISC1, and endoplasmic reticulum localization of the DES1 gene product resulted in enhanced production of ceramide-NS. The engineered yeast strains can serve as hosts not only for providing a sustainable source of ceramide-NS but also for developing further systems to produce sphingosine-containing sphingolipids.

  16. Genetic determinants of the release of mannoproteins of enological interest by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ramos, Daniel; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2006-12-13

    Cell wall mannoproteins released by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation and aging have recently attracted the attention of enologists and researchers in enology due to their positive effect over a number of technological and quality properties of the wines, including protein and tartaric stability, aroma and color stability, astringency, mouthfeel, malolactic fermentation, or foam properties of sparkling wines. This work has investigated the effect of deletions involving genes related to cell wall biogenesis on the release of mannoproteins, as well as the effect of the released mannoproteins on wine protein stability. When available, the phenotypes have been studied in different genetic backgrounds, in haploid or diploid strains, and in homo- or heterozygosis. Strains deleted for GAS1, GPI7, or KNR4 release higher amounts of mannoproteins and polysaccharides to the medium. These increased amounts of mannoproteins and polysaccharides lead to a stronger stability of Sauvignon Blanc wines against protein haze.

  17. Mapping genomic targets of DNA helicases by chromatin immunoprecipitation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Jennifer; van Attikum, Haico

    2010-01-01

    DNA helicases utilize the energy of nucleotide hydrolysis to unwind the two annealed strands of the DNA helix and are involved in many aspects of DNA metabolism such as replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) has been instrumental in determining the genomic targets of many DNA helicases and DNA helicase-containing complexes including the minichromosome maintenance (Mcm) proteins 2-7, the RecQ helicase Sgs1 as well as the Rvb1 and Rvb2 helicase-containing INO80 and SWR1 chromatin remodeling complexes. Here we describe a ChIP method that has been successfully used to map these proteins at chromosomal double-strand breaks and replication forks in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  18. Fatty Acid-Derived Biofuels and Chemicals Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongjin J; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Volatile energy costs and environmental concerns have spurred interest in the development of alternative, renewable, sustainable, and cost-effective energy resources. Environment-friendly processes involving microbes can be used to synthesize advanced biofuels. These fuels have the potential to replace fossil fuels in supporting high-power demanding machinery such as aircrafts and trucks. From an engineering perspective, the pathway for fatty acid biosynthesis is an attractive route for the production of advanced fuels such as fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and alkanes. The robustness and excellent accessibility to molecular genetics make the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a suitable host for the purpose of bio-manufacturing. Recent advances in metabolic engineering, as well as systems and synthetic biology, have now provided the opportunity to engineer yeast metabolism for the production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals.

  19. Effects of cyclohexane, an industrial solvent, on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on isolated yeast mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, S.; Rangel, P.; Espinola, G.; Aguirre, G. )

    1990-07-01

    Little information on the effects of cyclohexane at the cellular or subcellular level is available. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cyclohexane inhibited respiration and diverse energy-dependent processes. In mitochondria isolated from S. cerevisiae, oxygen uptake and ATP synthesis were inhibited, although ATPase activity was not affected. Cyclohexane effects were similar to those reported for beta-pinene and limonene, suggesting that the cyclohexane ring in these monoterpenes may be a determinant for their biological activities.

  20. Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae--their ecology, genetics and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Hervé

    2013-10-15

    The aging of certain white wines is dependent on the presence of yeast strains that develop a biofilm on the wine surface after the alcoholic fermentation. These strains belong to the genus Saccharomyces and are called flor yeasts. These strains possess distinctive characteristics compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting strain. The most important one is their capacity to form a biofilm on the air-liquid interface of the wine. The major gene involved in this phenotype is FLO11, however other genes are also involved in velum formation by these yeast and will be detailed. Other striking features presented in this review are their aneuploidy, and their mitochondrial DNA polymorphism which seems to reflect adaptive evolution of the yeast to a stressful environment where acetaldehyde and ethanol are present at elevated concentration. The biofilm assures access to oxygen and therefore permits continued growth on non-fermentable ethanol. This specific metabolism explains the peculiar organoleptic profile of these wines, especially their content in acetaldehyde and sotolon. This review deals with these different specificities of flor yeasts and will also underline the existing gaps regarding these astonishing yeasts.

  1. Correlation between Low Temperature Adaptation and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    García-Ríos, Estéfani; Ramos-Alonso, Lucía; Guillamón, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as must composition, juice clarification, fermentation temperature, or inoculated yeast strain, strongly affect the alcoholic fermentation and aromatic profile of wine. As fermentation temperature is effectively controlled by the wine industry, low-temperature fermentation (10–15°C) is becoming more prevalent in order to produce white and “rosé” wines with more pronounced aromatic profiles. Elucidating the response to cold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is of paramount importance for the selection or genetic improvement of wine strains. Previous research has shown the strong implication of oxidative stress response in adaptation to low temperature during the fermentation process. Here we aimed first to quantify the correlation between recovery after shock with different oxidants and cold, and then to detect the key genes involved in cold adaptation that belong to sulfur assimilation, peroxiredoxins, glutathione-glutaredoxins, and thioredoxins pathways. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4743 strain at low and optimal temperatures. The growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted and validated as key genes in the background of two commercial wine strains with a divergent phenotype in their low-temperature growth. We identified three genes, AHP1, MUP1, and URM1, whose deletion strongly impaired low-temperature growth. PMID:27536287

  2. A comprehensive analysis of translational missense errors in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Emily B; Vallabhaneni, Haritha; Mayer, Lauren M; Farabaugh, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    The process of protein synthesis must be sufficiently rapid and sufficiently accurate to support continued cellular growth. Failure in speed or accuracy can have dire consequences, including disease in humans. Most estimates of the accuracy come from studies of bacterial systems, principally Escherichia coli, and have involved incomplete analysis of possible errors. We recently used a highly quantitative system to measure the frequency of all types of misreading errors by a single tRNA in E. coli. That study found a wide variation in error frequencies among codons; a major factor causing that variation is competition between the correct (cognate) and incorrect (near-cognate) aminoacyl-tRNAs for the mutant codon. Here we extend that analysis to measure the frequency of missense errors by two tRNAs in a eukaryote, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The data show that in yeast errors vary by codon from a low of 4 x 10(-5) to a high of 6.9 x 10(-4) per codon and that error frequency is in general about threefold lower than in E. coli, which may suggest that yeast has additional mechanisms that reduce missense errors. Error rate again is strongly influenced by tRNA competition. Surprisingly, missense errors involving wobble position mispairing were much less frequent in S. cerevisiae than in E. coli. Furthermore, the error-inducing aminoglycoside antibiotic, paromomycin, which stimulates errors on all error-prone codons in E. coli, has a more codon-specific effect in yeast.

  3. Correlation between Low Temperature Adaptation and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    García-Ríos, Estéfani; Ramos-Alonso, Lucía; Guillamón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as must composition, juice clarification, fermentation temperature, or inoculated yeast strain, strongly affect the alcoholic fermentation and aromatic profile of wine. As fermentation temperature is effectively controlled by the wine industry, low-temperature fermentation (10-15°C) is becoming more prevalent in order to produce white and "rosé" wines with more pronounced aromatic profiles. Elucidating the response to cold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is of paramount importance for the selection or genetic improvement of wine strains. Previous research has shown the strong implication of oxidative stress response in adaptation to low temperature during the fermentation process. Here we aimed first to quantify the correlation between recovery after shock with different oxidants and cold, and then to detect the key genes involved in cold adaptation that belong to sulfur assimilation, peroxiredoxins, glutathione-glutaredoxins, and thioredoxins pathways. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4743 strain at low and optimal temperatures. The growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted and validated as key genes in the background of two commercial wine strains with a divergent phenotype in their low-temperature growth. We identified three genes, AHP1, MUP1, and URM1, whose deletion strongly impaired low-temperature growth.

  4. Ypq3p-dependent histidine uptake by the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kunio; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Ikeda, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-06-01

    The vacuolar membrane proteins Ypq1p, Ypq2p, and Ypq3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known as the members of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that the ATP-dependent uptake activities of arginine and histidine by the vacuolar membrane vesicles were decreased by ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ mutations, respectively. YPQ1 and AVT1, which are involved in the vacuolar uptake of lysine/arginine and histidine, respectively, were deleted in addition to ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ. The vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from the resulting quadruple deletion mutant ypq1Δypq2Δypq3Δavt1Δ completely lost the uptake activity of basic amino acids, and that of histidine, but not lysine and arginine, was evidently enhanced by overexpressing YPQ3 in the mutant. These results suggest that Ypq3p is specifically involved in the vacuolar uptake of histidine in S. cerevisiae. The cellular level of Ypq3p-HA(3) was enhanced by depletion of histidine from culture medium, suggesting that it is regulated by the substrate.

  5. Proteomic insights into adaptive responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the repeated vacuum fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Zhou, Xiao; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2009-07-01

    The responses and adaptation mechanisms of the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae to vacuum fermentation were explored using proteomic approach. After qualitative and quantitative analyses, a total of 106 spots corresponding to 68 different proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The differentially expressed proteins were involved in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolisms, various signal pathways (Ras/MAPK, Ras-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, and HOG pathway), and heat shock and oxidative responses. Among them, alternations in levels of 17 proteins associated with carbohydrate metabolisms, in particular, the upregulations of proteins involved in glycolysis, trehalose biosynthesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway, suggested vacuum-induced redistribution of the metabolic fluxes. The upregulation of 17 heat stress and oxidative response proteins indicated that multifactors contributed to oxidative stresses by affecting cell redox homeostasis. Taken together with upregulation in 14-3-3 proteins levels, 22 proteins were detected in multispots, respectively, indicating that vacuum might have promoted posttranslational modifications of some proteins in S. cerevisiae. Further investigation revealed that the elevations of the differentially expressed proteins were mainly derived from vacuum stress rather than the absence of oxygen. These findings provide new molecular mechanisms for understanding of adaptation and tolerance of yeast to vacuum fermentation.

  6. Effects of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture on in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, H M; Martin, S A

    1999-09-01

    Previous research has shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture increases lactate utilization and cellulose digestion by pure cultures of ruminal bacteria. Based on these pure culture results, in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations were conducted to determine the effects of 0.35 and 0.73 g/L of Sacc. cerevisiae culture on the fermentation of ground corn, maltose, alfalfa hay, bermudagrass hay, and lactate. In addition, experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of Sacc. cerevisiae culture and monensin on the mixed ruminal microorganism fermentation. In the presence of ground corn, both concentrations of Sacc. cerevisiae culture had little effect on final pH or fermentation products, except the 0.35 g/L treatment increased valerate concentration. Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture had little effect on final pH or fermentation products in maltose or lactate fermentations. When alfalfa hay was the substrate, 0.73 g/L of Sacc. cerevisiae culture increased propionate concentration and both treatments decreased the acetate to propionate ratio. In the case of Coastal bermudagrass hay, 0.73 g/L Sacc. cerevisiae culture increased concentrations of acetate, propionate, CH4, butyrate, isovalerate, valerate, and decreased the acetate to propionate ratio, whereas both treatments increased total volatile fatty acid concentrations. Similar to alfalfa hay, in vitro dry matter disappearance of Coastal bermudagrass hay was numerically increased in the presence of Sacc. cerevisiae culture. Monensin altered the fermentation by decreasing concentrations of CH4 and lactate and increasing concentrations of propionate. There was no interaction between Sacc. cerevisiae culture and monensin. In conclusion, the incorporation of Sacc. cerevisiae culture into mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations of ground corn, maltose, or lactate had little effect on final pH and fermentation products. However, in the presence of alfalfa hay or Coastal bermudagrass hay Sacc

  7. Quantifying the individual effects of ethanol and temperature on the fitness advantage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Z; Arroyo-López, F N; Barrio, E; Querol, A; Guillamón, J M

    2011-09-01

    The presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in grape berries and fresh musts is usually very low. However, as fermentation progresses, the population levels of this species considerably increase. In this study, we use the concept of fitness advantage to measure how increasing ethanol concentrations (0-25%) and temperature values (4-46 °C) in wine fermentations affects competition between S. cerevisiae and several non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Candida zemplinina, Pichia fermentans and Kluyveromyces marxianus). We used a mathematical approach to model the hypothetical time needed for S. cerevisiae to impose itself on a mixed population of the non-Saccharomyces species described above. This approach also took into consideration the influence of environmental factors and the initial population levels of S. cerevisiae (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0%). Our results suggest that Saccharomyces niche construction via ethanol production does not provide a clear ecological advantage (at least not until the ethanol concentration exceeds 9%), whereas a temperature rise (above 15 °C) does give S. cerevisiae a considerable advantage. The initial frequency of S. cerevisiae considerably influences the time it needs to impose itself (until it reaches a final frequency of 99% in the mixed culture), the lowest time values being found at the highest initial frequency. In light of these results, the application of low temperatures in the wine industry could favor the growth and survival of non-Saccharomyces species for a longer period of time.

  8. Isolation of xylose reductase gene of Pichia stipitis and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Takuma, Shinya; Nakashima, Noriyuki; Tantirungkij, Manee

    1991-12-31

    A NADPH/NADH-dependent xylose reductase gene was isolated from the xylose-assimilating yeast, Pichia stipitis. DNA sequence analysis showed that the gene consists of 951 bp. The gene introduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was transcribed to mRNA, and a considerable amount of enzyme activity was observed constitutively, whereas transcription and translation in P steps were inducible. S. cerevisiae carrying the xylose reductase gene could not, however, grow on xylose medium, and could not produce ethanol from xylose. Since xylose uptake and accumulation of xylitol by S. cerevisiae were observed, the conversion of xylitol to xylulose seemed to be limited.

  9. Growth and fermentation characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae NK28 isolated from kiwi fruit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jung-Wan; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2013-09-28

    The influences of glucose concentration, initial medium acidity (pH), and temperature on the growth and ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae NK28, which was isolated from kiwi fruit, were examined in shake flask cultures. The optimal glucose concentration, initial medium pH, and temperature for ethanol production were 200 g/l, pH 6.0, and 35oC, respectively. Under this growth condition, S. cerevisiae NK28 produced 98.9 ± 5.67 g/l ethanol in 24 h with a volumetric ethanol production rate of 4.12 ± 0.24 g/l·h. S. cerevisiae NK28 was more tolerant to heat and ethanol than laboratory strain S. cerevisiae BY4742, and its tolerance to ethanol and fermentation inhibitors was comparable to that of an ethanologen, S. cerevisiae D5A.

  10. "Ant" and "grasshopper" life-history strategies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Spor, Aymé; Wang, Shaoxiao; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Sicard, Delphine

    2008-02-13

    From the evolutionary and ecological points of view, it is essential to distinguish between the genetic and environmental components of the variability of life-history traits and of their trade-offs. Among the factors affecting this variability, the resource uptake rate deserves particular attention, because it depends on both the environment and the genetic background of the individuals. In order to unravel the bases of the life-history strategies in yeast, we grew a collection of twelve strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from different industrial and geographical origins in three culture media differing for their glucose content. Using a population dynamics model to fit the change of population size over time, we estimated the intrinsic growth rate (r), the carrying capacity (K), the mean cell size and the glucose consumption rate per cell. The life-history traits, as well as the glucose consumption rate, displayed large genetic and plastic variability and genetic-by-environment interactions. Within each medium, growth rate and carrying capacity were not correlated, but a marked trade-off between these traits was observed over the media, with high K and low r in the glucose rich medium and low K and high r in the other media. The cell size was tightly negatively correlated to carrying capacity in all conditions. The resource consumption rate appeared to be a clear-cut determinant of both the carrying capacity and the cell size in all media, since it accounted for 37% to 84% of the variation of those traits. In a given medium, the strains that consume glucose at high rate have large cell size and low carrying capacity, while the strains that consume glucose at low rate have small cell size but high carrying capacity. These two contrasted behaviors may be metaphorically defined as "ant" and "grasshopper" strategies of resource utilization. Interestingly, a strain may be "ant" in one medium and "grasshopper" in another. These life-history strategies are discussed

  11. Subcellular potassium and sodium distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuolar mutants.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rito; Álvarez, María C; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José

    2013-09-15

    Living cells accumulate potassium (K⁺) to fulfil multiple functions. It is well documented that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows at very different concentrations of external alkali cations and keeps high and low intracellular concentrations of K⁺ and sodium (Na⁺) respectively. However less attention has been paid to the study of the intracellular distribution of these cations. The most widely used experimental approach, plasma membrane permeabilization, produces incomplete results, since it usually considers only cytoplasm and vacuoles as compartments where the cations are present in significant amounts. By isolating and analysing the main yeast organelles, we have determined the subcellular location of K⁺ and Na⁺ in S. cerevisiae. We show that while vacuoles accumulate most of the intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, the cytosol contains relatively low amounts, which is especially relevant in the case of Na⁺. However K⁺ concentrations in the cytosol are kept rather constant during the K⁺-starvation process and we conclude that, for that purpose, vacuolar K⁺ has to be rapidly mobilized. We also show that this intracellular distribution is altered in four different mutants with impaired vacuolar physiology. Finally, we show that both in wild-type and vacuolar mutants, nuclei contain and keep a relatively constant and important percentage of total intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, which most probably is involved in the neutralization of negative charges.

  12. Construction of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for bioethanol active dry yeast (ADY) production.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhang, Ke; Gao, Kehui; Liu, Zewei; Zhang, Xing; Li, Ou; Sun, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Du, Fengguang; Sun, Peiyong; Qu, Aimin; Wu, Xuechang

    2013-01-01

    The application of active dry yeast (ADY) in bioethanol production simplifies operation processes and reduces the risk of bacterial contamination. In the present study, we constructed a novel ADY strain with improved stress tolerance and ethanol fermentation performances under stressful conditions. The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZTW1 showed excellent properties and thus subjected to a modified whole-genome shuffling (WGS) process to improve its ethanol titer, proliferation capability, and multiple stress tolerance for ADY production. The best-performing mutant, Z3-86, was obtained after three rounds of WGS, producing 4.4% more ethanol and retaining 2.15-fold higher viability than ZTW1 after drying. Proteomics and physiological analyses indicated that the altered expression patterns of genes involved in protein metabolism, plasma membrane composition, trehalose metabolism, and oxidative responses contribute to the trait improvement of Z3-86. This work not only successfully developed a novel S. cerevisiae mutant for application in commercial bioethanol production, but also enriched the current understanding of how WGS improves the complex traits of microbes.

  13. Hyperosmotic stress induces metacaspase- and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rui D; Sotoca, Roberto; Johansson, Björn; Ludovico, Paula; Sansonetty, Filipe; Silva, Manuel T; Peinado, José M; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2005-11-01

    During the last years, several reports described an apoptosis-like programmed cell death process in yeast in response to different environmental aggressions. Here, evidence is presented that hyperosmotic stress caused by high glucose or sorbitol concentrations in culture medium induces in Saccharomyces cerevisiae a cell death process accompanied by morphological and biochemical indicators of apoptotic programmed cell death, namely chromatin condensation along the nuclear envelope, mitochondrial swelling and reduction of cristae number, production of reactive oxygen species and DNA strand breaks, with maintenance of plasma membrane integrity. Disruption of AIF1 had no effect on cell survival, but lack of Yca1p drastically reduced metacaspase activation and decreased cell death indicating that this death process was associated to activation of this protease. Supporting the involvement of mitochondria and cytochrome c in caspase activation, the mutant strains cyc1Deltacyc7Delta and cyc3Delta, both lacking mature cytochrome c, displayed a decrease in caspase activation associated to increased cell survival when exposed to hyperosmotic stress. These findings indicate that hyperosmotic stress triggers S. cerevisiae into an apoptosis-like programmed cell death that is mediated by a caspase-dependent mitochondrial pathway partially dependent on cytochrome c.

  14. Transcriptomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for its adaptation to sulphuric acid-induced stress.

    PubMed

    de Lucena, Rodrigo Mendonça; Elsztein, Carolina; de Barros Pita, Will; de Souza, Rafael Barros; de Sá Leitão Paiva Júnior, Sérgio; de Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio

    2015-11-01

    In bioethanol production plants, yeast cells are generally recycled between fermentation batches by using a treatment with sulphuric acid at a pH ranging from 2.0 to 2.5. We have previously shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to sulphuric acid treatment induce the general stress response pathway, fail to activate the protein kinase A signalling cascade and requires the mechanisms of cell wall integrity and high osmolarity glycerol pathways in order to survive in this stressful condition. In the present work, we used transcriptome-wide analysis as well as physiological assays to identify the transient metabolic responses of S. cerevisiae under sulphuric acid treatment. The results presented herein indicate that survival depends on a metabolic reprogramming of the yeast cells in order to assure the yeast cell viability by preventing cell growth under this harmful condition. It involves the differential expression of a subset of genes related to cell wall composition and integrity, oxidation-reduction processes, carbohydrate metabolism, ATP synthesis and iron uptake. These results open prospects for application of this knowledge in the improvement of industrial processes based on metabolic engineering to select yeasts resistant to acid treatment.

  15. Elimination of glycerol and replacement with alternative products in ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishist K; Divol, Benoit; Prior, Bernard A; Bauer, Florian F

    2011-09-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and typically 2-3% of the sugar fermented is converted to glycerol. Replacing the NAD(+)-regenerating glycerol pathway in S. cerevisiae with alternative NADH reoxidation pathways may be useful to produce metabolites of biotechnological relevance. Under fermentative conditions yeast reoxidizes excess NADH through glycerol production which involves NADH-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (Gpd1p and Gpd2p). Deletion of these two genes limits fermentative activity under anaerobic conditions due to accumulation of NADH. We investigated the possibility of converting this excess NADH to NAD(+) by transforming a double mutant (gpd1∆gpd2∆) with alternative oxidoreductase genes that might restore the redox balance and produce either sorbitol or propane-1,2-diol. All of the modifications improved fermentative ability and/or growth of the double mutant strain in a self-generated anaerobic high sugar medium. However, these strain properties were not restored to the level of the parental wild-type strain. The results indicate an apparent partial NAD(+) regeneration ability and formation of significant amounts of the commodity chemicals like sorbitol or propane-1,2-diol. The ethanol yields were maintained between 46 and 48% of the sugar mixture. Other factors apart from the maintenance of the redox balance appeared to influence the growth and production of the alternative products by the genetically manipulated strains.

  16. The Genetic Basis of Natural Variation in Oenological Traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Francisco; Cubillos, Francisco A.; Soto, Daniela; Garcia, Verónica; Bergström, Anders; Warringer, Jonas; Ganga, M. Angélica; Louis, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for wine alcoholic fermentation. The oenological phenotypes resulting from fermentation, such as the production of acetic acid, glycerol, and residual sugar concentration are regulated by multiple genes and vary quantitatively between different strain backgrounds. With the aim of identifying the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate oenological phenotypes, we performed linkage analysis using three crosses between highly diverged S. cerevisiae strains. Segregants from each cross were used as starter cultures for 20-day fermentations, in synthetic wine must, to simulate actual winemaking conditions. Linkage analysis on phenotypes of primary industrial importance resulted in the mapping of 18 QTLs. We tested 18 candidate genes, by reciprocal hemizygosity, for their contribution to the observed phenotypic variation, and validated five genes and the chromosome II right subtelomeric region. We observed that genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, sugar transport, nitrogen metabolism, and the uncharacterized ORF YJR030W explained most of the phenotypic variation in oenological traits. Furthermore, we experimentally validated an exceptionally strong epistatic interaction resulting in high level of succinic acid between the Sake FLX1 allele and the Wine/European MDH2 allele. Overall, our work demonstrates the complex genetic basis underlying wine traits, including natural allelic variation, antagonistic linked QTLs and complex epistatic interactions between alleles from strains with different evolutionary histories. PMID:23185390

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  18. Metabolic engineering and adaptive evolution for efficient production of D-lactic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Kwon, Eunice Y; Kim, Yong Hwan; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for microbial production of lactic acid (LA) as a monomer of biodegradable poly lactic acid (PLA). Both optical isomers, D-LA and L-LA, are required to produce stereocomplex PLA with improved properties. In this study, we developed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for efficient production of D-LA. D-LA production was achieved by expressing highly stereospecific D-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhA, LEUM_1756) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 in S. cerevisiae lacking natural LA production activity. D-LA consumption after glucose depletion was inhibited by deleting DLD1 encoding D-lactate dehydrogenase and JEN1 encoding monocarboxylate transporter. In addition, ethanol production was reduced by deleting PDC1 and ADH1 genes encoding major pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively, and glycerol production was eliminated by deleting GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. LA tolerance of the engineered D-LA-producing strain was enhanced by adaptive evolution and overexpression of HAA1 encoding a transcriptional activator involved in weak acid stress response, resulting in effective D-LA production up to 48.9 g/L without neutralization. In a flask fed-batch fermentation under neutralizing condition, our evolved strain produced 112.0 g/L D-LA with a yield of 0.80 g/g glucose and a productivity of 2.2 g/(L · h).

  19. Spatial reorganization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enolase to alter carbon metabolism under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Natsuko; Shinohara, Masahiro; Tatsukami, Yohei; Sato, Yasuhiko; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Hypoxia has critical effects on the physiology of organisms. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glycolytic enzymes, including enolase (Eno2p), formed cellular foci under hypoxia. Here, we investigated the regulation and biological functions of these foci. Focus formation by Eno2p was inhibited temperature independently by the addition of cycloheximide or rapamycin or by the single substitution of alanine for the Val22 residue. Using mitochondrial inhibitors and an antioxidant, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was shown to participate in focus formation. Focus formation was also inhibited temperature dependently by an SNF1 knockout mutation. Interestingly, the foci were observed in the cell even after reoxygenation. The metabolic turnover analysis revealed that [U-(13)C]glucose conversion to pyruvate and oxaloacetate was accelerated in focus-forming cells. These results suggest that under hypoxia, S. cerevisiae cells sense mitochondrial ROS and, by the involvement of SNF1/AMPK, spatially reorganize metabolic enzymes in the cytosol via de novo protein synthesis, which subsequently increases carbon metabolism. The mechanism may be important for yeast cells under hypoxia, to quickly provide both energy and substrates for the biosynthesis of lipids and proteins independently of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and also to fit changing environments.

  20. Extreme calorie restriction and energy source starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae represent distinct physiological states.

    PubMed

    Boender, Léonie G M; Almering, Marinka J H; Dijk, Madelon; van Maris, Antonius J A; de Winde, Johannes H; Pronk, Jack T; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2011-12-01

    Cultivation methods used to investigate microbial calorie restriction often result in carbon and energy starvation. This study aims to dissect cellular responses to calorie restriction and starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using retentostat cultivation. In retentostats, cells are continuously supplied with a small, constant carbon and energy supply, sufficient for maintenance of cellular viability and integrity but insufficient for growth. When glucose-limited retentostats cultivated under extreme calorie restriction were subjected to glucose starvation, calorie-restricted and glucose-starved cells were found to share characteristics such as increased heat-shock tolerance and expression of quiescence-related genes. However, they also displayed strikingly different features. While calorie-restricted yeast cultures remained metabolically active and viable for prolonged periods of time, glucose starvation resulted in rapid consumption of reserve carbohydrates, population heterogeneity due to appearance of senescent cells and, ultimately, loss of viability. Moreover, during starvation, calculated rates of ATP synthesis from reserve carbohydrates were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than steady-state ATP-turnover rates calculated under extreme calorie restriction in retentostats. Stringent reduction of ATP turnover during glucose starvation was accompanied by a strong down-regulation of genes involved in protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that extreme calorie restriction and carbon starvation represent different physiological states in S. cerevisiae.

  1. NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Purification, kinetic properties, and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, A; Avendano, A; Riego, L; Gonzalez, A

    2001-11-23

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases (NADP-GDHs) encoded by GDH1 and GDH3 catalyze the synthesis of glutamate from ammonium and alpha-ketoglutarate. The GDH2-encoded NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase degrades glutamate producing ammonium and alpha-ketoglutarate. Until very recently, it was considered that only one biosynthetic NADP-GDH was present in S. cerevisiae. This fact hindered understanding the physiological role of each isoenzyme and the mechanisms involved in alpha-ketoglutarate channeling for glutamate biosynthesis. In this study, we purified and characterized the GDH1- and GDH3-encoded NADP-GDHs; they showed different allosteric properties and rates of alpha-ketoglutarate utilization. Analysis of the relative levels of these proteins revealed that the expression of GDH1 and GDH3 is differentially regulated and depends on the nature of the carbon source. Moreover, the physiological study of mutants lacking or overexpressing GDH1 or GDH3 suggested that these genes play nonredundant physiological roles. Our results indicate that the coordinated regulation of GDH1-, GDH3-, and GDH2-encoded enzymes results in glutamate biosynthesis and balanced utilization of alpha-ketoglutarate under fermentative and respiratory conditions. The possible relevance of the duplicated NADP-GDH pathway in the adaptation to facultative metabolism is discussed.

  2. The proteomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose conditions with amino acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Wright, Phillip C

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol yield by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose (VHG) media with an amino acid supplement was investigated. Amino acid supplementation led to positive cell responses, including reduced lag time and increased cell viability in VHG media. A quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis was used to understand how amino acid supplemented S. cerevisiae responds to high osmotic conditions. iTRAQ data revealed that most proteins involved in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated under high glucose shock. Reactivation of amino acid metabolism was also observed at the end of the lag phase. The relative abundance of most identified proteins, including aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis proteins, and heat-shock proteins, remained unchanged in the hours immediately following application of glucose shock. However, the expression of these proteins increased significantly at the end of the lag phase. Furthermore, the up-regulation of trehalose and glycogen biosynthesis proteins, first maintaining then latterly increasing glycolysis pathway activity was also observed. This was verified by enhanced ethanol yields at 10 and 12 h (0.43 and 0.45 g ethanol/g glucose) compared to 2 h (0.32 g ethanol/g glucose). These data combined with relevant metabolite measurements demonstrates that enhanced ethanol fermentation under VHG conditions can be achieved with the aid of amino acid supplementation.

  3. Physiological and genomic characterisation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae hybrids with improved fermentation performance and mannoprotein release capacity.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Través, Laura; Lopes, Christian A; González, Ramón; Barrio, Eladio; Querol, Amparo

    2015-07-16

    Yeast mannoproteins contribute to several aspects of wine quality by protecting wine against protein haze, reducing astringency, retaining aroma compounds and stimulating lactic-acid bacteria growth. The selection of a yeast strain that simultaneously overproduces mannoproteins and presents good fermentative characteristics is a difficult task. In this work, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae×S. cerevisiae hybrid bearing the two oenologically relevant features was constructed. According to the genomic characterisation of the hybrids, different copy numbers of some genes probably related with these physiological features were detected. The hybrid shared not only a similar copy number of genes SPR1, SWP1, MNN10 and YPS7 related to cell wall integrity with parental Sc1, but also a similar copy number of some glycolytic genes with parental Sc2, such as GPM1 and HXK1, as well as the genes involved in hexose transport, such as HXT9, HXT11 and HXT12. This work demonstrates that hybridisation and stabilisation under winemaking conditions constitute an effective approach to obtain yeast strains with desirable physiological features, like mannoprotein overproducing capacity and improved fermentation performance, which genetically depend of the expression of numerous genes (multigenic characters).

  4. Horizontally acquired oligopeptide transporters favour adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast to oenological environment.

    PubMed

    Marsit, Souhir; Sanchez, Isabelle; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has emerged as a major evolutionary process that has shaped the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts. We recently showed that a large Torulaspora microellipsoides genomic island carrying two oligopeptide transporters encoded by FOT genes increases the fitness of wine yeast during fermentation of grape must. However, the impact of these genes on the metabolic network of S. cerevisiae remained uncharacterized. Here we show that Fot-mediated peptide uptake substantially affects the glutamate node and the NADPH/NADP(+) balance, resulting in the delayed uptake of free amino acids and altered profiles of metabolites and volatile compounds. Transcriptome analysis revealed that cells using a higher amount of oligopeptides from grape must are less stressed and display substantial variation in the expression of genes in the central pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, amino acid and protein biosynthesis, and the oxidative stress response. These regulations shed light on the molecular and metabolic mechanisms involved in the higher performance and fitness conferred by the HGT-acquired FOT genes, pinpointing metabolic effects that can positively affect the organoleptic balance of wines.

  5. Metabolic engineering of a xylose-isomerase-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for rapid anaerobic xylose fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kuyper, Marko; Hartog, Miranda M P; Toirkens, Maurice J; Almering, Marinka J H; Winkler, Aaron A; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T

    2005-02-01

    After an extensive selection procedure, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that express the xylose isomerase gene from the fungus Piromyces sp. E2 can grow anaerobically on xylose with a mu(max) of 0.03 h(-1). In order to investigate whether reactions downstream of the isomerase control the rate of xylose consumption, we overexpressed structural genes for all enzymes involved in the conversion of xylulose to glycolytic intermediates, in a xylose-isomerase-expressing S. cerevisiae strain. The overexpressed enzymes were xylulokinase (EC 2.7.1.17), ribulose 5-phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.6), ribulose 5-phosphate epimerase (EC 5.3.1.1), transketolase (EC 2.2.1.1) and transaldolase (EC 2.2.1.2). In addition, the GRE3 gene encoding aldose reductase was deleted to further minimise xylitol production. Surprisingly the resulting strain grew anaerobically on xylose in synthetic media with a mu(max) as high as 0.09 h(-1) without any non-defined mutagenesis or selection. During growth on xylose, xylulose formation was absent and xylitol production was negligible. The specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic xylose cultures was 1.1 g xylose (g biomass)(-1) h(-1). Mixtures of glucose and xylose were sequentially but completely consumed by anaerobic batch cultures, with glucose as the preferred substrate.

  6. Near-freezing effects on the proteome of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Tomás, Lidia; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Prieto, Jose A; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2016-03-10

    At near-freezing temperatures (0-4°C), the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae stops or is severely limited, and viability decreases. Under these conditions, yeast cells trigger a biochemical response, in which trehalose and glycerol accumulate and protect them against severe cold and freeze injury. However, the mechanisms that allow yeast cells to sustain this response have been not clarified. The effects of severe cold on the proteome of S. cerevisiae have been not investigated and its importance in providing cell survival at near-freezing temperatures and upon freezing remains unknown. Here, we have compared the protein profile of two industrial baker's yeast strains at 30°C and 4°C. Overall, a total of 16 proteins involved in energy-metabolism, translation and redox homeostasis were identified as showing increased abundance at 4°C. The predominant presence of glycolytic proteins among those upregulated at 4°C, likely represents a mechanism to maintain a constant supply of ATP for the synthesis of glycerol and other protective molecules. Accumulation of these molecules is by far the most important component in enhancing viability of baker's yeast strains upon freezing. Overexpression of genes encoding certain proteins associated with translation or redox homeostasis provided specifically protection against extreme cold damage, underlying the importance of these functions in the near-freezing response.

  7. An oxalyl-CoA synthetase is important for oxalate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although oxalic acid is common in nature, our understanding of the mechanism(s) regulating its turnover remains incomplete. In this study we identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl-activating enzyme 3 (ScAAE3) as an enzyme capable of catalyzing the conversion of oxalate to oxalyl-CoA. Based on our fi...

  8. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gaensly, Fernanda; Picheth, Geraldo; Brand, Debora; Bonfim, Tania M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended. PMID:25242932

  9. Modulation of the acute phase response in feedlot steers supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1079 (SC) on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 266 ± 4 kilograms body weight) were separated into three treatment groups (n = 6/treatm...

  10. Cell size and budding during starvation of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, G C

    1977-01-01

    When starved for nitrogen, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced abnormally small cells. Nonetheless, during starvation, only cells of a size characteristic of growing cells were capable of initiating a bud. Even when growth was severely limited, some event(s) in G1 required growth to a critical size for completion. PMID:334753

  11. CDC64 Encodes Cytoplasmic Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase, Ala1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Carolyn; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Polymenis, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The cdc64-1 mutation causes G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae corresponding to a type II Start phenotype. We report that CDC64 encodes Ala1p, an alanyl-tRNA synthetase. Thus, cdc64-1 might affect charging of tRNAAla and thereby initiation of cell division. PMID:10601222

  12. NDT80, a meiosis-specific gene required for exit from pachytene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liuzhong; Ajimura, M.; Padmore, R.; Klein, C.; Kleckner, N.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the identification of a new meiosis-specific gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae called NDT80. DNA cloning and molecular analysis revealed that the NDT80 gene maps on the right arm of chromosome 8 and is transcribed during middle meiotic prophase. 82 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Chromosomal integration of recombinant alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes in saccharomyces cerevisiae for starch conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant constructs of barley '-amylase and Lentinula edodes glucoamylase genes were integrated into the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The insertion was confirmed by PCR amplification of the gene sequence in the chromosomes. The expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE of the enzymes puri...

  14. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have sequenced the structural gene and flanking regions for lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An open reading frame of 530 codons encodes a 60.7-kDa protein. When this gene is disrupted by integrative transformation, the resulting strain req...

  15. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce feruloyl esterase for the release of ferulic acid from switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase gene (faeA) was cloned into Saccharomyces cerevisiae via a yeast expression vector, resulting in efficient expression and secretion of the enzyme in the medium. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and hydrophobic interactio...

  16. Thiamin biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Origin of carbon-2 of the thiazole moiety.

    PubMed Central

    White, R L; Spenser, I D

    1979-01-01

    Radioactivity from [2-14C]glycine enters C-2 of the thiazole moiety of thiamin and no other site, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strains A.T.C.C. 24903 and 39916, H.J. Bunker). Radioactivity from L-[Me-14C]methionine or from DL-[2-14C]tyrosine does not enter thiamin. PMID:384994

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae U1 small nuclear RNA secondary structure contains both universal and yeast-specific domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kretzner, L; Krol, A; Rosbash, M

    1990-01-01

    The five small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) involved in mammalian pre-mRNA splicing (U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6) are well conserved in length, sequence, and especially secondary structure. These five snRNAs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae show notable size and sequence differences from their metazoan counterparts. This is most striking for the large S. cerevisiae U1 and U2 snRNAs, for which no secondary structure models currently exist. Because of the importance of U1 snRNA in the early steps of "spliceosome" assembly, we wanted to compare the highly conserved secondary structure of metazoan U1 snRNA (approximately 165 nucleotides) with that of S. cerevisiae U1 snRNA (568 nucleotides). To this end, we have cloned and sequenced the U1 gene from two other yeast species possessing large U1 RNAs. Using computer-derived structure predictions, phylogenetic comparisons, and structure probing, we have arrived at a secondary structure model for S. cerevisiae U1 snRNA. The results show that most elements of higher eukaryotic U1 snRNA secondary structure are conserved in S. cerevisiae. The hundreds of "extra" nucleotides of yeast U1 RNA, also highly structured, suggest that large insertions and/or deletions have occurred during the evolution of the U1 gene. Images PMID:2405391

  18. Mixing of vineyard and oak-tree ecotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in North American vineyards.

    PubMed

    Hyma, Katie E; Fay, Justin C

    2013-06-01

    Humans have had a significant impact on the distribution and abundance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through its widespread use in beer, bread and wine production. Yet, similar to other Saccharomyces species, S. cerevisiae has also been isolated from habitats unrelated to fermentations. Strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes, wine must and vineyards worldwide are genetically differentiated from strains isolated from oak-tree bark, exudate and associated soil in North America. However, the causes and consequences of this differentiation have not yet been resolved. Historical differentiation of these two groups may have been influenced by geographic, ecological or human-associated barriers to gene flow. Here, we make use of the relatively recent establishment of vineyards across North America to identify and characterize any active barriers to gene flow between these two groups. We examined S. cerevisiae strains isolated from grapes and oak trees within three North American vineyards and compared them to those isolated from oak trees outside of vineyards. Within vineyards, we found evidence of migration between grapes and oak trees and potential gene flow between the divergent oak-tree and vineyard groups. Yet, we found no vineyard genotypes on oak trees outside of vineyards. In contrast, Saccharomyces paradoxus isolated from the same sources showed population structure characterized by isolation by distance. The apparent absence of ecological or genetic barriers between sympatric vineyard and oak-tree populations of S. cerevisiae implies that vineyards play an important role in the mixing between these two groups.

  19. [Construction and preliminary applications of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae detection plasmid using for screening promoter elements].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Fang; Wang, Zhi-Biao; Li, Li-Na; Jian-Mei, A N; Wang-Wei; Cheng, Ke-Di; Kong, Jian-Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Synthetic biology of natu