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Sample records for involves sequential activation

  1. Possible involvement of cytochrome c release and sequential activation of caspases in ceramide-induced apoptosis in SK-N-MC cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Uehara, T; Tokumitsu, A; Okuma, Y; Nomura, Y

    1999-12-01

    Ceramide is characterized as a second messenger of apoptosis induced by various agents such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), Fas ligand, hydrogen peroxide, heat shock and ionizing radiation. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of ceramide-induced apoptosis using a human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-MC. N-Acetyl-sphingosine (C2-ceramide), a cell-permeable ceramide analogue, was able to induce apoptosis in SK-N-MC cells as estimated by DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. C2-ceramide-induced DNA fragmentation was blocked by caspase inhibitor (Z-Asp-CH(2)-DCB). An increase in caspase-3 (CPP32)-like protease activity was evident during C2-ceramide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that caspases are involved in this apoptosis. Moreover, enzymatic cleavage of VDVAD-AFC and LEHD-AFC (specific substrates for caspase-2 and -9, respectively) was increased by treatment with C2-ceramide. To elucidate which types of caspase are activated in C2-ceramide-treated cells, we performed Western blot analysis using antibodies against each isoform. Both proforms of caspase-2 and -3 were decreased in response to C2-ceramide in a time-dependent manner. Mitochondrial cytochrome c is also time-dependently released into the cytosol in response to treatment with C2-ceramide. Addition of cytochrome c into the S-100 fractions prepared from SK-N-MC cells could activate caspase-2 in cell-free systems. These results suggest the possibility that cytochrome c released to the cytosol can activate caspases (caspase-9, -3, and -2) during C2-ceramide-induced apoptosis of SK-N-MC cells.

  2. The sequential structure of brain activation predicts skill.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Bothell, Daniel; Fincham, Jon M; Moon, Jungaa

    2016-01-29

    In an fMRI study, participants were trained to play a complex video game. They were scanned early and then again after substantial practice. While better players showed greater activation in one region (right dorsal striatum) their relative skill was better diagnosed by considering the sequential structure of whole brain activation. Using a cognitive model that played this game, we extracted a characterization of the mental states that are involved in playing a game and the statistical structure of the transitions among these states. There was a strong correspondence between this measure of sequential structure and the skill of different players. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis, it was possible to recognize, with relatively high accuracy, the cognitive states participants were in during particular scans. We used the sequential structure of these activation-recognized states to predict the skill of individual players. These findings indicate that important features about information-processing strategies can be identified from a model-based analysis of the sequential structure of brain activation. PMID:26707716

  3. Involvement of Working Memory in College Students' Sequential Pattern Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; De Los Reyes, Andres; Rowan, James D.; Lee, Bern; Delise, Justin; Molina, Sabrina; Cogdill, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    When learning highly organized sequential patterns of information, humans and nonhuman animals learn rules regarding the hierarchical structures of these sequences. In three experiments, we explored the role of working memory in college students' sequential pattern learning and performance in a computerized task involving a sequential…

  4. Sequential Recruitment and Combinatorial Assembling of Multiprotein Complexes in Transcriptional Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Vincent; Lee, Chiu Fan; Lei, Jinzhi; Métivier, Raphaël; Glass, Leon

    2006-05-01

    In human cells, estrogenic signals induce cyclical association and dissociation of specific proteins with the DNA in order to activate transcription of estrogen-responsive genes. These oscillations can be modeled by assuming a large number of sequential reactions represented by linear kinetics with random kinetic rates. Application of the model to experimental data predicts robust binding sequences in which proteins associate with the DNA at several different phases of the oscillation. Our methods circumvent the need to derive detailed kinetic graphs, and are applicable to other oscillatory biological processes involving a large number of sequential steps.

  5. Endogenous sequential cortical activity evoked by visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Miller, Jae-Eun Kang; Hamm, Jordan P; Jackson, Jesse; Yuste, Rafael

    2015-06-10

    Although the functional properties of individual neurons in primary visual cortex have been studied intensely, little is known about how neuronal groups could encode changing visual stimuli using temporal activity patterns. To explore this, we used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging to record the activity of neuronal populations in primary visual cortex of awake mice in the presence and absence of visual stimulation. Multidimensional analysis of the network activity allowed us to identify neuronal ensembles defined as groups of cells firing in synchrony. These synchronous groups of neurons were themselves activated in sequential temporal patterns, which repeated at much higher proportions than chance and were triggered by specific visual stimuli such as natural visual scenes. Interestingly, sequential patterns were also present in recordings of spontaneous activity without any sensory stimulation and were accompanied by precise firing sequences at the single-cell level. Moreover, intrinsic dynamics could be used to predict the occurrence of future neuronal ensembles. Our data demonstrate that visual stimuli recruit similar sequential patterns to the ones observed spontaneously, consistent with the hypothesis that already existing Hebbian cell assemblies firing in predefined temporal sequences could be the microcircuit substrate that encodes visual percepts changing in time. PMID:26063915

  6. Endogenous Sequential Cortical Activity Evoked by Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jae-eun Kang; Hamm, Jordan P.; Jackson, Jesse; Yuste, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Although the functional properties of individual neurons in primary visual cortex have been studied intensely, little is known about how neuronal groups could encode changing visual stimuli using temporal activity patterns. To explore this, we used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging to record the activity of neuronal populations in primary visual cortex of awake mice in the presence and absence of visual stimulation. Multidimensional analysis of the network activity allowed us to identify neuronal ensembles defined as groups of cells firing in synchrony. These synchronous groups of neurons were themselves activated in sequential temporal patterns, which repeated at much higher proportions than chance and were triggered by specific visual stimuli such as natural visual scenes. Interestingly, sequential patterns were also present in recordings of spontaneous activity without any sensory stimulation and were accompanied by precise firing sequences at the single-cell level. Moreover, intrinsic dynamics could be used to predict the occurrence of future neuronal ensembles. Our data demonstrate that visual stimuli recruit similar sequential patterns to the ones observed spontaneously, consistent with the hypothesis that already existing Hebbian cell assemblies firing in predefined temporal sequences could be the microcircuit substrate that encodes visual percepts changing in time. PMID:26063915

  7. Movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-02-03

    Manipulation of DNA and cells/spores using dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to perform sample preparation protocols for polymerized chain reaction (PCR) based assays for various applications. This is accomplished by movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping. DEP forces induce a dipole in particles, and these particles can be trapped in non-uniform fields. The particles can be trapped in the high field strength region of one set of electrodes. By switching off this field and switching on an adjacent electrodes, particles can be moved down a channel with little or no flow.

  8. Modulation of neural activity during observational learning of actions and their sequential orders.

    PubMed

    Frey, Scott H; Gerry, Valerie E

    2006-12-20

    How does the brain transform perceptual representations of others' actions into motor representations that can be used to guide behavior? Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to record human brain activity while subjects watched others construct multipart objects under varied task demands. We find that relative to resting baseline, passive action observation increases activity within inferior frontal and parietal cortices implicated in action encoding (mirror system) and throughout a distributed network of areas involved in motor representation, including dorsal premotor cortex, pre-supplementary motor area, cerebellum, and basal ganglia (experiments 1 and 2). Relative to passive observation, these same areas show increased activity when subjects observe with the intention to subsequently reproduce component actions using the demonstrated sequential procedures (experiment 1). Observing the same actions with the intention of reproducing component actions, but without the requirement to use the demonstrated sequential procedure, increases activity in the same regions, although to a lesser degree (experiment 2). These findings demonstrate that when attempting to learn behaviors through observation, the observers' intentions modulate responses in a widely distributed network of cortical and subcortical regions implicated previously in action encoding and/or motor representation. Among these regions, only activity within the right intraparietal sulcus predicts the accuracy with which observed procedures are subsequently performed. Successful formation of motor representations of sequential procedures through observational learning is dependent on computations implemented within this parietal region. PMID:17182769

  9. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

  10. Adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer: A sequential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Kwon, Janice . E-mail: Janice.kwon@lhsc.on.ca; D'Souza, David; Gawlik, Christine; Stitt, Larry; Whiston, Frances; Nascu, Patricia; Wong, Eugene; Carey, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiotherapy for women with advanced endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective cohort study of women with Stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) and carboplatin (350 mg/m{sup 2}) every 3 weeks, followed sequentially by external beam radiotherapy (RT) to the pelvis (45 Gy), followed by an additional two cycles of chemotherapy. Para-aortic RT and/or HDR vault brachytherapy (BT) were added at the discretion of the treating physician. Results: Thirty-three patients (median age, 63 years) received treatment between April 2002 and June 2005. Median follow-up was 21 months. Stage distribution was as follows: IIIA (21%), IIIC (70%), IVB (9%). Combination chemotherapy was successfully administered to 30 patients (91%) and 25 patients (76%), before and after RT respectively. Nine patients (27%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 chemotherapy toxicities. All patients completed pelvic RT; 19 (58%) received standard 4-field RT and 14 (42%) received intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Ten (30%) received extended field radiation. Four patients (12%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 RT toxicities. Six (18%) patients developed chronic RT toxicity. There were no treatment-related deaths. Two-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 55%. There was only one pelvic relapse (3%). Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with combination chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer was well tolerated. This protocol may be suitable for further evaluation in a clinical trial.

  11. Ponto-medullary nuclei involved in the generation of sequential pharyngeal swallowing and concomitant protective laryngeal adduction in situ

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Tara G; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Both swallowing and respiration involve postinspiratory laryngeal adduction. Swallowing-related postinspiratory neurons are likely to be located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and those involved in respiration are found in the Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF). The function of KF and NTS in the generation of swallowing and its coordination with respiration was investigated in perfused brainstem preparations of juvenile rats (n = 41). Orally injected water evoked sequential pharyngeal swallowing (s-PSW) seen as phasic, spindle-shaped bursting of vagal nerve activity (VNA) against tonic postinspiratory discharge. KF inhibition by microinjecting isoguvacine (GABAA receptor agonist) selectively attenuated tonic postinspiratory VNA (n = 10, P < 0.001) but had no effect on frequency or timing of s-PSW. KF disinhibition after bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist) microinjections caused an increase of the tonic VNA (n = 8, P < 0.01) resulting in obscured and delayed phasic s-PSW. Occurrence of spontaneous PSW significantly increased after KF inhibition (P < 0.0001) but not after KF disinhibition (P = 0.14). NTS isoguvacine microinjections attenuated the occurrence of all PSW (n = 5, P < 0.01). NTS bicuculline microinjections (n = 6) resulted in spontaneous activation of a disordered PSW pattern and long-lasting suppression of respiratory activity. Pharmacological manipulation of either KF or NTS also triggered profound changes in respiratory postinspiratory VNA. Our results indicate that the s-PSW comprises two functionally distinct components. While the primary s-PSW is generated within the NTS, a KF-mediated laryngeal adductor reflex safeguards the lower airways from aspiration. Synaptic interaction between KF and NTS is required for s-PSW coordination with respiration as well as for proper gating and timing of s-PSW. PMID:24639482

  12. Sequential Folding using Light-activated Polystyrene Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yonghee; Lee, Hyeok; Hwang, Taesoon; Lee, Jong-Gu; Cho, Maenghyo

    2015-01-01

    A pre-strained polystyrene (PS) polymer sheet is deformed when it approaches the glass transition state as a result of light absorption. By controlling the light absorption of the polymer sheet, non-contact sequential folding can be accomplished. Line patterns of different transparencies and shapes are used to control the light absorption. The line pattern shape is closely related to the folding angle and folding start time. The relation between the line pattern design and folding performance was evaluated experimentally to develop a technique for folding PS sheets. The results show that sequential folding of PS sheets can be accomplished by changing the degree of transparency of the line pattern. Using the technique developed in this study, self-folding origami structures with complicated shapes can be designed and manufactured. PMID:26559611

  13. Release of alkanes from sedimentary organic matter via sequential degradation involving catalytic hydropyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Love, G.D.; McAulay, A.; Snape, C.E.

    1996-12-31

    Fixed-bed pyrolysis of petroleum source rocks (type I and II kerogens) and high-volatile coals (type III ketogens) at high hydrogen pressures (> 10 MN, hydropyrolysis) in the presence of a dispersed sulphided molydenum catalyst gives rise to extremely high oil (dichloromethane-soluble) yields (>60%) with overall conversions of the organic matter being greater than 90%. The yields and conformations of the hopanes and steranes released from a selection of petroleum source rocks and coals by sequential dichloromethane and pyridine extraction, catalytic hydrogenation and hydropyrolysis will be presented, together with the influence of hydrogen pressure and heating rate on alkane yields and sterochemistry. The aim of the hydrogenation step (conducted at 300{degrees}C cf. 520{degrees}C for hydropyrolysis) in this sequential degradation scheme is to cleave only the weaker covalent bonds. The findings have demonstrated the unique ability of hydropyrolysis to mainline the yields of covalently-bound alkanes while maintaining the biologically-inherited 17{beta}(H), 21{beta}(H) stereochemistries of the hopanes, largely intact, even for coals. The total alkane yields from hydropyrolysis represented ca 30% w/w of the organic matter remaining in immature type I kerogens with yields of the C{sub 29}-C{sub 35} 17{beta}(H), 21{beta}(H) hopanes being much higher than from both normal pyrolysis and the hydrogenation step.

  14. Recombinant Drosophila prophenoloxidase 1 is sequentially cleaved by α-chymotrypsin during in vitro activation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Anrui; Li, Xuquan; Hillyer, Julián F; Beerntsen, Brenda T; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Ling, Erjun

    2014-07-01

    Insect prophenoloxidase (PPO) is an essential innate immunity protein to induce pathogen into melanization. In Bombyx mori, pro-phenoloxidase-activating enzyme (PPAE) can directly cleave and activate PPO. However, PPO in Manduca sexta cannot be cleaved into active phenoloxidase (PO) by serine proteases unless cofactors are involved, which indicates that PPO activation is complicated. Here we use recombinant Drosophila melanogaster prophenoloxidase 1 (rPPO1) to study the mechanism of PPO activation induced by a typical serine protease, α-chymotrypsin. Small amounts of α-chymotrypsin cleave rPPO1 at the N- and C-terminus to produce a large fragment rPPO1(N1/C1) that needs further cleavage by α-chymotrypsin to produce a smaller fragment rPO1(60-kD) with PO activity. rPO1(60-kD) oxidizes dopamine without being affected by high temperature, or by having salt and Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) in the solution. After incubation with dopamine, rPO1(60-kD) cannot be detected using reducing SDS-PAGE due to formation of a large complex. Trypsin, another typical serine protease, cleaves rPPO1 at the N- and C-terminus to produce a small fragment rPPO1(N'/C') without PO activity. Several rPPO1 mutants were created through over-expressing active fragments that have direct PO activity. They are easily cleaved by low amounts of α-chymotrypsin without increasing PO activity. Therefore, rPPO1 can be sequentially cleaved in at least three places by α-chymotrypsin to produce activated rPO1(60-kD).

  15. Sequential analysis of sperm functional aspects involved in fertilisation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abu, D A H; Franken, D R; Hoffman, B; Henkel, R

    2012-05-01

    The development of diagnostic techniques in andrology as a second level of approach to the diagnosis of male factor infertility has enthused the focus of researchers on the development of a sequential diagnostic programme for these men. Semen samples of 78 men form couples undergoing in vitro fertilisation therapy were used in the study. The semen samples were used to test sperm functional aspects known to interfere with fertilisation. These tests included semen profile, DNA integrity, apoptosis, chromatin packaging, acridin orange staining, zona binding capacity, zona-induced acrosome reaction (AR). Results were correlated with fertilisation outcome. Statistical analyses of the recorded data were carried out using a logistic regression analysis model on all sperm functional tests. A negative and significant association with the fertilisation rates was recorded for DNA damage (r = -0.56; P ≤ 0.0005). A positive significant correlation was recorded between fertilisation rates and sperm with normal DNA (r = -0.57, P ≤ 0.0004), and zona-induced AR (r = 0.33, P ≤ 0.002). Diagnostic andrology can be regarded as a mandatory part of the male factor patient's work-up schedule to assist clinicians with the most suitable therapeutic modality to follow.

  16. Sequential injection spectrophotometric system for evaluation of mushroom tyrosinase-inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Moonrungsee, Nuntaporn; Shimamura, Tomoko; Kashiwagi, Takehiro; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Higuchi, Keiro; Ukeda, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-15

    A sequential injection (SI) spectrophotometric method with absorbance detection at 475 nm has been developed for evaluating activity of some compounds on an inhibition of the mushroom tyrosinase. The method involved a reaction of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) and mushroom tyrosinase to form the o-dopaquinone. The decrease of the o-dopaquinone was related to an increase of tyrosinase-inhibitory activity. Under the optimum conditions (concentration and volume of L-DOPA and mushroom tyrosinase of 2.0 mM, 60 μL and 142 U mL(-1), 15 μL, respectively), some antioxidant compounds were examined for the tyrosinase-inhibitory activity. A batch enzymatic assay of tyrosinase-inhibitory activity was applied as the reference method for comparison. The results of IC(50) values obtained from the proposed method and the batch method were correlated well, with r(2) of 0.969. The SIA provides higher precision and degrees of automation, consumes smaller amounts of chemicals and it is simpler and faster than the batch method.

  17. Dissociated sequential activity and stimulus encoding in the dorsomedial striatum during spatial working memory

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghpour, Hessameddin; Wiskerke, Joost; Choi, Jung Yoon; Taliaferro, Joshua P; Au, Jennifer; Witten, Ilana B

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the striatum has an important role in spatial working memory. The neural dynamics in the striatum have been described in tasks with short delay periods (1–4 s), but remain largely uncharacterized for tasks with longer delay periods. We collected and analyzed single unit recordings from the dorsomedial striatum of rats performing a spatial working memory task with delays up to 10 s. We found that neurons were activated sequentially, with the sequences spanning the entire delay period. Surprisingly, this sequential activity was dissociated from stimulus encoding activity, which was present in the same neurons, but preferentially appeared towards the onset of the delay period. These observations contrast with descriptions of sequential dynamics during similar tasks in other brains areas, and clarify the contribution of the striatum to spatial working memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19507.001 PMID:27636864

  18. Carcinosarcoma of urothelial organs: sequential involvement of urinary bladder, ureter, and renal pelvis.

    PubMed

    Orsatti, G; Corgan, F J; Goldberg, S A

    1993-03-01

    We report a case of true carcinosarcoma involving the urinary bladder, ureter, and renal pelvis in an eighty-year-old man. The patient underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor and left nephrectomy, followed by combination chemo- and radiotherapy. He died eighteen months after the nephrectomy.

  19. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  20. Sequential muscle activity and its functional role in the upper extremity and trunk during overarm throwing.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Masaya; Kadota, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Shizuka; Kudo, Katzutoshi; Ohtsuki, Tatsuyuki

    2002-04-01

    The proximal-to-distal segmental sequence has been identified in many sports activities, including baseball pitching and ball kicking. However, proximal-to-distal sequential muscle activity has not been identified. The aims of this study were to establish whether sequential muscle activity does occur and, if it does, to determine its functional role. We recorded surface electromyograms (EMGs) for 17 muscles from the upper extremity and abdomen during overarm throwing and detected the onset and peak times as indices of muscle activity. The following electromyographic properties were commonly identified in the participants. First, sequential muscle activity was observed from the scapular protractors to the shoulder horizontal flexors and from the shoulder horizontal flexors to the elbow extensor, but not from the elbow extensor to the wrist flexor or forearm pronator. Secondly, the external oblique contralateral to the throwing arm became activated before the ipsilateral external oblique. This sequence is considered to be very effective for the generation of high force and energy in the trunk. Thirdly, the ipsilateral external oblique began its activity almost at foot strike. Finally, the main activity of the rectus abdominis appeared just before the point of release.

  1. Phenotypic analysis and effects of sequential administration of activated canine lymphocytes on healthy beagles.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yuki; Takagi, Satoshi; Osaki, Tomohiro; Okumura, Masahiro; Fujinaga, Toru

    2008-06-01

    We attempted to accumulate the basic data for evaluation of activated lymphocyte therapy for small animal medicine. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from healthy dogs were activated using anti-CD3 antibody and human recombinant (hr) interleukin (IL)-2 and reactivated using hr interferon (IFN)-alpha and hr IL-2. The property of obtained cells was compared with PBMCs. The number of cells was shown to have increased approximately>50 -fold by cultivation. The proportion of CD8+ cells was significantly increased, the cytotoxicity of the cultured cells was revealed to have been reinforced. Additionally, CD56 mRNA levels tended to have increased. The cells obtained by this method were confirmed to be activated lymphocytes. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of sequential administration of the obtained cells to healthy dogs. By sequential administration of the activated lymphocytes, the cell proliferative activity, proportion of CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells, and serum IFN-gamma concentration were shown to have increased, and no severe adverse effects were observed. Consequently, activated lymphocytes could be induced using anti-CD3 antibody and IL-2 in healthy dogs, and sequential administration of activated lymphocytes reinforced the recipient's immunity.

  2. Sequential involvement of NMDA receptor-dependent processes in hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex and parietal cortex in memory processing.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, M.S.; Schaeffer, E.; Schmitz, P.K.; Medina, J.H.; Quevedo, J.; Quillfeldt, J.A.; Izquierdo, I.

    1996-08-01

    Rats bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus and/or in the amygdaloid nucleus, in the entorhinal cortex, and in the posterior parietal cortex, were trained in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. At various times after training (immediately, 30, 60 or 90min) they received, through the cannulae, 0.5µl microinfusions of saline or of 5.0µg of AP5 dissolved in saline. A retention test was carried out 24h after training. Retention test performance was hindered by AP5 given into hippocampus, amygdala, or both hippocampus and amygdala immediately but not 30min post-training. The drug was amnestic when given into the entorhinal cortex 30, 60 or 90min after training, or into the parietal cortex 60 or 90min after training, but not at earlier times. The findings suggest a sequential entry in operation, in the post-training period, of NMDA-receptor mediated mechanisms involved in memory processing; first in hippocampus and amygdala, 30min later in entorhinal cortex, and 30min later in posterior parietal cortex.

  3. Sequential activation of Elk-1/Egr-1/GADD45α by arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qiwen; Sutariya, Vijaykumar; Bishayee, Anupam; Bhatia, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Long-term exposure to arsenic, an environmental contaminant, leads to increased risks of cancers. In the present study, we investigated the sequential regulation of Elk-1 and Egr-1 on As3+-induced GADD45α, an effector of G2/M checkpoint. We found that As3+ transcriptionally induced both Elk-1 and Egr-1, and NF-κB binding site was necessary for As3+-induced Egr-1 promoter activity. However, specific inhibition of JNK, ERK, and Elk-1 inhibited Egr-1 induction. Furthermore, silencing of Egr-1 downregulated As3+-induced expression of GADD45α and ChIP assay confirmed the direct binding of Egr-1 to GADD45α promoter. Taken together, our data indicated that the increase of GADD45α in response to As3+ was mediated sequentially by Elk-1 and Egr-1. PMID:25004251

  4. Physicochemical properties and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides sequentially extracted from peony seed dreg.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Sun, Yu-Han; Qu, Jie; Li, Ling; Prasad, Chandan; Wei, Zhao-Jun

    2016-10-01

    The sequential extraction of peony seed dreg polysaccharides (PSDP) with hot buffer (HBSS), chelating agent (CHSS), dilute alkaline (DASS) and concentrated alkaline (CASS) yielded four different polysaccharide fractions. Based on their absorptions at 3600-3200cm(-1) and 1200-800cm(-1), these fractions were confirmed to be polysaccharides. The properties of four PSDPs displayed some slight differences. The CASS showed the highest peak temperature and endothermic enthalpy. The emulsifying activity and emulsifying stability of four PSDPs exhibited a dose-dependent pattern; HBSS showed the highest emulsifying activity, and CHSS displayed the longest emulsifying stability. The four PSDPs also exhibited wide variations in their antioxidant activities. For example, i) CASS showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing power and ABTS radical scavenging activity; ii) HBSS exhibited the highest hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and iii) CHSS displayed the higher ferrous ions chelating ability than others. PMID:27234494

  5. fMRI Sequential-Finger Movement Activation Differentiating Good and Poor Writers

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Todd L.; Berninger, Virginia W.; Stock, Pat; Altemeier, Leah; Trivedi, Pamala; Maravilla, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Good and poor fifth-grade writers differed, after controlling for multiple comparisons, in 42 brain regions on group maps and then individual brain analyses for fMRI contrast between tapping adjacent fingers sequentially and same finger repeatedly. Of these, 11 regions were correlated with both handwriting and spelling (transcription). Gender differences on the fMRI contrast, with girls more activated, occurred only in left superior parietal, which was correlated with handwriting and spelling. Significance of serial-organization of fingers for handwriting and spelling is discussed. PMID:19358006

  6. Localized sequential use of resilient lining to generate orthodontic force in thermoformed active removable appliances.

    PubMed

    Ng, E W H

    2005-12-01

    A new modality of orthodontic treatment based on the thermoformed appliance was developed and trialled clinically. A light-cured resilient lining material commonly used for denture relining was placed locally and sequentially in thermoformed appliances to generate orthodontic forces. The new method appeared to be effective. All the presented cases showed substantial improvement in dental alignment. A number of orthodontic movements were demonstrated. Localized use of resilient lining in thermoformed orthodontic appliances appeared to be a promising alternative to other thermoformed active removable appliance (TARA) treatments. Further studies are required to optimize the procedures and explore its full potential.

  7. Steady-state kinetic behaviour of two- or n-enzyme systems made of free sequential enzymes involved in a metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Legent, Guillaume; Thellier, Michel; Norris, Vic; Ripoll, Camille

    2006-12-01

    The overall rate of functioning of a set of free sequential enzymes of the Michaelis-Menten type involved in a metabolic pathway has been computed as a function of the concentration of the initial substrate under steady-state conditions. Curves monotonically increasing up to a saturation plateau have been obtained in all cases. The shape of these curves is sometimes, but not usually, close to that of a hyperbola. Cases exist in which the overall rate of reaction becomes quasi proportional to the concentration of initial substrate almost up to the saturation plateau, which never occurs with individual enzymes. Increasing the number of enzymes sequentially involved in a metabolic pathway does not seem to generate any particularly original behaviour compared with that of two-enzyme systems.

  8. Coordinated Action of Fast and Slow Reserves for Optimal Sequential and Dynamic Emergency Reserve Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkuti, Surender Reddy; Bijwe, P. R.; Abhyankar, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an optimal dynamic reserve activation plan after the occurrence of an emergency situation (generator/transmission line outage, load increase or both). An optimal plan is developed to handle the emergency situation, using coordinated action of fast and slow reserves, for secure operation with minimum overall cost. This paper considers the reserves supplied by generators (spinning reserves) and loads (demand-side reserves). The optimal backing down of costly/fast reserves and bringing up of slow reserves in each sub-interval in an integrated manner is proposed. The simulation studies are performed on IEEE 30, 57 and 300 bus test systems to demonstrate the advantage of proposed integrated/dynamic reserve activation plan over the conventional/sequential approach.

  9. A cascading activity-based probe sequentially targets E1-E2-E3 ubiquitin enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Monique P C; Witting, Katharina; Berlin, Ilana; Pruneda, Jonathan N; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Chang, Jer-Gung; Merkx, Remco; Bialas, Johanna; Groettrup, Marcus; Vertegaal, Alfred C O; Schulman, Brenda A; Komander, David; Neefjes, Jacques; El Oualid, Farid; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-07-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins with ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like modifiers (Ubls), orchestrated by a cascade of specialized E1, E2 and E3 enzymes, control a wide range of cellular processes. To monitor catalysis along these complex reaction pathways, we developed a cascading activity-based probe, UbDha. Similarly to the native Ub, upon ATP-dependent activation by the E1, UbDha can travel downstream to the E2 (and subsequently E3) enzymes through sequential trans-thioesterifications. Unlike the native Ub, at each step along the cascade, UbDha has the option to react irreversibly with active site cysteine residues of target enzymes, thus enabling their detection. We show that our cascading probe 'hops' and 'traps' catalytically active Ub-modifying enzymes (but not their substrates) by a mechanism diversifiable to Ubls. Our founder methodology, amenable to structural studies, proteome-wide profiling and monitoring of enzymatic activity in living cells, presents novel and versatile tools to interrogate Ub and Ubl cascades. PMID:27182664

  10. Interneuron firing precedes sequential activation of neuronal ensembles in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takuya; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    Neuronal firing sequences that occur during behavioral tasks are precisely reactivated in the neocortex and the hippocampus during rest and sleep. These precise firing sequences are likely to reflect latent memory traces, and their reactivation is believed to be essential for memory consolidation and working memory maintenance. However, how the organized repeating patterns emerge through the coordinated interplay of distinct types of neurons remains unclear. In this study, we monitored ongoing spatiotemporal firing patterns using a multi-neuron calcium imaging technique and examined how the activity of individual neurons is associated with repeated ensembles in hippocampal slice cultures. To determine the cell types of the imaged neurons, we applied an optical synapse mapping method that identifies network connectivity among dozens of neurons. We observed that inhibitory interneurons exhibited an increase in their firing rates prior to the onset of repeating sequences, while the overall activity level of excitatory neurons remained unchanged. A specific repeating sequence emerged preferentially after the firing of a specific interneuron that was located close to the neuron first activated in the sequence. The times of repeating sequences could be more precisely predicted based on the activity patterns of inhibitory cells than excitatory cells. In line with these observations, stimulation of a single interneuron could trigger the emergence of repeating sequences. These findings provide a conceptual framework that interneurons serve as a key regulator of initiating sequential spike activity.

  11. Transcriptomic Events Involved in Melon Mature-Fruit Abscission Comprise the Sequential Induction of Cell-Wall Degrading Genes Coupled to a Stimulation of Endo and Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Corbacho, Jorge; Romojaro, Félix; Pech, Jean-Claude; Latché, Alain; Gomez-Jimenez, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mature-fruit abscission (MFA) in fleshy-fruit is a genetically controlled process with mechanisms that, contrary to immature-fruit abscission, has not been fully characterized. Here, we use pyrosequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of melon abscission zone (AZ) at three stages during AZ-cell separation in order to understand MFA control at an early stage of AZ-activation. Principal Findings The results show that by early induction of MFA, the melon AZ exhibits major gene induction, while by late induction of MFA, melon AZ shows major gene repression. Although some genes displayed similar regulation in both early and late induction of abscission, such as EXT1-EXT4, EGase1, IAA2, ERF1, AP2D15, FLC, MADS2, ERAF17, SAP5 and SCL13 genes, the majority had different expression patterns. This implies that time-specific events occur during MFA, and emphasizes the value of characterizing multiple time-specific abscission transcriptomes. Analysis of gene-expression from these AZs reveal that a sequential induction of cell-wall-degrading genes is associated with the upregulation of genes involved in endo and exocytosis, and a shift in plant-hormone metabolism and signaling genes during MFA. This is accompanied by transcriptional activity of small-GTPases and synthaxins together with tubulins, dynamins, V-type ATPases and kinesin-like proteins potentially involved in MFA signaling. Early events are potentially controlled by down-regulation of MADS-box, AP2/ERF and Aux/IAA transcription-factors, and up-regulation of homeobox, zinc finger, bZIP, and WRKY transcription-factors, while late events may be controlled by up-regulation of MYB transcription-factors. Significance Overall, the data provide a comprehensive view on MFA in fleshy-fruit, identifying candidate genes and pathways associated with early induction of MFA. Our comprehensive gene-expression profile will be very useful for elucidating gene regulatory networks of the MFA in fleshy-fruit. PMID

  12. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-mediated inhibitory signaling is regulated by sequential phosphorylation mediated by distinct nonreceptor tyrosine kinases: a case study involving PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Tourdot, Benjamin E; Brenner, Michelle K; Keough, Kathleen C; Holyst, Trudy; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2013-04-16

    The activation state of many blood and vascular cells is tightly controlled by a delicate balance between receptors that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) and those that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). Precisely how the timing of cellular activation by ITAM-coupled receptors is regulated by ITIM-containing receptors is, however, poorly understood. Using platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) as a prototypical ITIM-bearing receptor, we demonstrate that initiation of inhibitory signaling occurs via a novel, sequential process in which Src family kinases phosphorylate the C-terminal ITIM, thereby enabling phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of PECAM-1 by other Src homology 2 domain-containing nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). NRTKs capable of mediating the second phosphorylation event include C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Btk and Csk function downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation during ITAM-dependent platelet activation. In ITAM-activated platelets that were treated with a PI3K inhibitor, PECAM-1 was phosphorylated but did not bind the tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, indicating that it was not phosphorylated on its N-terminal ITIM. Csk bound to and phosphorylated PECAM-1 more efficiently than did Btk and required its SH2 domain to perform these functions. Additionally, the phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of Siglec-9 by Csk is enhanced by the prior phosphorylation of its C-terminal ITIM, providing evidence that the ITIMs of other dual ITIM-containing receptors are also sequentially phosphorylated. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sequential ITIM phosphorylation provides a general mechanism for precise temporal control over the recruitment and activation of tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases that dampen ITAM-dependent signals. PMID:23418871

  13. Imaging β-Galactosidase Activity In Vivo Using Sequential Reporter-Enzyme Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    von Degenfeld, Georges; Wehrman, Tom S.; Blau, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence using the reporter enzyme firefly luciferase (Fluc) and the substrate luciferin enables noninvasive optical imaging of living animals with extremely high sensitivity. This type of analysis enables studies of gene expression, tumor growth, and cell migration over time in live animals that were previously not possible. However, a major limitation of this system is that Fluc activity is restricted to the intracellular environment, which precludes important applications of in vivo imaging such as antibody labeling, or serum protein monitoring. In order to expand the application of bioluminescence imaging to other enzymes, we characterized a sequential reporter-enzyme luminescence (SRL) technology for the in vivo detection of β-galactosidase (β-gal) activity. The substrate is a “caged” D-luciferin conjugate that must first be cleaved by β-gal before it can be catalyzed by Fluc in the final, light-emitting step. Hence, luminescence is dependent on and correlates with β-gal activity. A variety of experiments were performed in order to validate the system and explore potential new applications. We were able to visualize non-invasively over time constitutive β-gal activity in engineered cells, as well as inducible tissue-specific β-gal expression in transgenic mice. Since β-gal, unlike Fluc, retains full activity outside of cells, we were able to show that antibodies conjugated to the recombinant β-gal enzyme could be used to detect and localize endogenous cells and extracellular antigens in vivo. In addition, we developed a low-affinity β-gal complementation system that enables inducible, reversible protein interactions to be monitored in real time in vivo, for example, sequential responses to agonists and antagonists of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus, using SRL, the exquisite luminescent properties of Fluc can be combined with the advantages of another enzyme. Other substrates have been described that extend the scope to endogenous

  14. How Cognitive Styles Affect the Learning Behaviors of Online Problem-Solving Based Discussion Activity: A Lag Sequential Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng-Yi; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive styles play an important role in influencing the learning process, but to date no relevant study has been conducted using lag sequential analysis to assess knowledge construction learning patterns based on different cognitive styles in computer-supported collaborative learning activities in online collaborative discussions. This study…

  15. Application of Sequential Quadratic Programming to Minimize Smart Active Flap Rotor Hub Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Leyland, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In an analytical study, SMART active flap rotor hub loads have been minimized using nonlinear programming constrained optimization methodology. The recently developed NLPQLP system (Schittkowski, 2010) that employs Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) as its core algorithm was embedded into a driver code (NLP10x10) specifically designed to minimize active flap rotor hub loads (Leyland, 2014). Three types of practical constraints on the flap deflections have been considered. To validate the current application, two other optimization methods have been used: i) the standard, linear unconstrained method, and ii) the nonlinear Generalized Reduced Gradient (GRG) method with constraints. The new software code NLP10x10 has been systematically checked out. It has been verified that NLP10x10 is functioning as desired. The following are briefly covered in this paper: relevant optimization theory; implementation of the capability of minimizing a metric of all, or a subset, of the hub loads as well as the capability of using all, or a subset, of the flap harmonics; and finally, solutions for the SMART rotor. The eventual goal is to implement NLP10x10 in a real-time wind tunnel environment.

  16. Bioactive bilayered dressing for compromised epidermal tissue regeneration with sequential activity of complementary agents.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ortega, Felisa; Cifuentes, Alberto; Rodríguez, Gema; Aguilar, María Rosa; González-Gómez, Álvaro; Solis, Raul; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Buján, Julia; García-Sanmartin, Josune; Martínez, Alfredo; Román, Julio San

    2015-09-01

    The article deals with the design, preparation, and evaluation of a new bilayered dressing for application in the healing of compromised wounds. The system is based on the sequential release of two complementary bioactive components to enhance the activation of the regeneration of dermal tissue. The internal layer is a highly hydrophilic and biodegradable film of gelatin and hyaluronic acid (HG), crosslinked with the natural compound genipin, which reacts with the amine groups of gelatin. This film is loaded with the proangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial peptide, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP), that is released slowly in the wound site. The external layer, more stable and less hydrophilic, is constituted by a biodegradable polyurethane derived from poly(caprolactone) and pluronic L61. This layer is loaded with resorbable nanoparticles of bemiparin (a fractionated low molecular weight heparin), which promotes the activation of growth factors, FGF and VEGF, and provides a good biomechanical stability and controlled permeability of the bilayered dressing. Experiments carried out in mice demonstrate the excellent angiogenic effect of the HG film in the dermal tissue. Application of the bilayered dressing in the wound healing rabbit ear model shows an improved cicatrization of the wound in both ischemic and non-ischemic defects, favoring epithelialization and reducing noticeably the contraction and the inflammation.

  17. Structural Evidence for a Sequential Release Mechanism for Activation of Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Neeraj; Menon, Santosh T.; Chauhan, Radha; Sachdev, Pallavi; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2010-01-12

    Heptahelical G-protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors couple to heterotrimeric G proteins to relay extracellular signals to intracellular signaling networks, but the molecular mechanism underlying guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) release by the G protein {alpha}-subunit is not well understood. Amino acid substitutions in the conserved {alpha}5 helix of Gi, which extends from the C-terminal region to the nucleotide-binding pocket, cause dramatic increases in basal (receptor-independent) GDP release rates. For example, mutant G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A shows an 18-fold increase in basal GDP release rate and, when expressed in culture, it causes a significant decrease in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. The crystal structure of G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A {center_dot} GDP shows substantial conformational rearrangement of the switch I region and additional striking alterations of side chains lining the catalytic pocket that disrupt the Mg{sup +2} coordination sphere and dislodge bound Mg{sup +2}. We propose a 'sequential release' mechanism whereby a transient conformational change in the {alpha}5 helix alters switch I to induce GDP release. Interestingly, this mechanistic model for heterotrimeric G protein activation is similar to that suggested for the activation of the plant small G protein Rop4 by RopGEF8.

  18. Activated Protein C Enhances Human Keratinocyte Barrier Integrity via Sequential Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Tie2*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Meilang; Chow, Shu-Oi; Dervish, Suat; Chan, Yee-Ka Agnes; Julovi, Sohel M.; Jackson, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Keratinocytes play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory and endothelial barrier protective properties, significantly increased the barrier impedance of keratinocyte monolayers, measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and FITC-dextran flux. In response to APC, Tie2, a tyrosine kinase receptor, was rapidly activated within 30 min, and relocated to cell-cell contacts. APC also increased junction proteins zona occludens, claudin-1 and VE-cadherin. Inhibition of Tie2 by its peptide inhibitor or small interfering RNA abolished the barrier protective effect of APC. Interestingly, APC did not activate Tie2 through its major ligand, angiopoietin-1, but instead acted by binding to endothelial protein C receptor, cleaving protease-activated receptor-1 and transactivating EGF receptor. Furthermore, when activation of Akt, but not ERK, was inhibited, the barrier protective effect of APC on keratinocytes was abolished. Thus, APC activates Tie2, via a mechanism requiring, in sequential order, the receptors, endothelial protein C receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, and EGF receptor, which selectively enhances the PI3K/Akt signaling to enhance junctional complexes and reduce keratinocyte permeability. PMID:21173154

  19. Neuroendocrine mechanism of onset of puberty. Sequential reduction in activity of inhibitory and facilitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bourguignon, J P; Gérard, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, M L; Franchimont, P

    1992-01-01

    In humans and in several animal species, puberty results from changes in pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in the hypothalamus. In particular, the frequency of pulsatile GnRH secretion increases at the onset of puberty, as can be shown by using hypothalamic explants of male rats of 15 and 25 d. Previous observations from us and others suggested that the initiation of puberty could involve a facilitatory effect of excitatory amino acids mediated through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. We found that GnRH secretion could be activated through NMDA receptors only around the time of onset of puberty (25 d). The aim of this study was to clarify why this activation did not occur earlier (at 15 d) and could no longer be observed by the end of puberty (at 50 d). We studied GnRH secretion in the presence of MK-801, a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors or AP-5, a competitive antagonist. We showed that, in the hypothalamus of immature male rats (15 d), a highly potent inhibitory control of pulsatile GnRH secretion in vitro was mediated through NMDA receptors. These data were confirmed in vivo because administration of the antagonist MK-801 (0.001 mg/kg) to immature male rats resulted in early pubertal development. Onset of puberty (25 d) was characterized by the disappearance of that NMDA receptor-mediated inhibition, thus unmasking a facilitatory effect also mediated through NMDA receptors. During puberty, there was a reduction in activity of this facilitatory control which was no longer opposed by its inhibitory counterpart. We conclude that a sequential reduction in activity of inhibitory and facilitatory NMDA receptors provides a developmental basis for the neuroendocrine mechanism of onset of puberty. Images PMID:1430201

  20. Sequential action of FRUITFULL as a modulator of the activity of the floral regulators SVP and SOC1.

    PubMed

    Balanzà, Vicente; Martínez-Fernández, Irene; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The role in flowering time of the MADS-box transcription factor fruitfulL (FUL) has been proposed in many works. FUL has been connected to several flowering pathways as a target of the photoperiod, ambient temperature, and age pathways and it is has been shown to promote flowering in a partially redundant manner with suppressor of overexpression of constans 1 (SOC1). However, the position of FUL in these genetic networks, as well as the functional output of FUL activity during floral transition, remains unclear. In this work, a genetic approach has been undertaken to understand better the functional hierarchies involving FUL and other MADS-box factors with well established roles as floral integrators such as SOC1, short vegetative phase (svp) or flowering locus C (FLC). Our results suggest a prominent role of FUL in promoting reproductive transition when photoinductive signalling is suppressed by short-day conditions or by high levels of FLC expression, as in non-vernalized winter ecotypes. A model is proposed where the sequential formation of FUL-SVP and FUL-SOC1 heterodimers may mediate the vegetative and meristem identity transitions, counteracting the repressive effect of FLC and SVP on flowering.

  1. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition.

  2. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID

  3. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity of CD45 is activated by sequential phosphorylation by two kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1994-01-01

    We describe a potential regulatory mechanism for the transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Phosphorylation on both tyrosine and serine residues in vitro results in an activation of CD45 specifically toward one artificial substrate but not another. The activation of these kinases appears to be order dependent, as it is enhanced when phosphorylation of tyrosine precedes that of serine but phosphorylation in the reverse order yields no activation. Any of four protein-tyrosine kinases tested, in combination with the protein-serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II, was capable of mediating this activation in vitro. The time course of phosphorylation of CD45 in response to T-cell activation is consistent with the possibility that this regulatory mechanism is utilized in vivo. Images PMID:7518565

  4. Sequential Reinstatement of Neocortical Activity during Slow Oscillations Depends on Cells’ Global Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peyrache, Adrien; Benchenane, Karim; Khamassi, Mehdi; Wiener, Sidney I.; Battaglia, Francesco P.

    2009-01-01

    During Slow Wave Sleep (SWS), cortical activity is dominated by endogenous processes modulated by slow oscillations (0.1–1 Hz): cell ensembles fluctuate between states of sustained activity (UP states) and silent epochs (DOWN states). We investigate here the temporal structure of ensemble activity during UP states by means of multiple single unit recordings in the prefrontal cortex of naturally sleeping rats. As previously shown, the firing rate of each PFC cell peaks at a distinct time lag after the DOWN/UP transition in a consistent order. We show here that, conversely, the latency of the first spike after the UP state onset depends primarily on the session-averaged firing rates of cells (which can be considered as an indirect measure of their intrinsic excitability). This latency can be explained by a simple homogeneous process (Poisson model) of cell firing, with sleep averaged firing rates employed as parameters. Thus, at DOWN/UP transitions, neurons are affected both by a slow process, possibly originating in the cortical network, modulating the time course of firing for each cell, and by a fast, relatively stereotyped reinstatement of activity, related mostly to global activity levels. PMID:20130754

  5. Understanding the sequential activation of Type III and Type VI Secretion Systems in Salmonella typhimurium using Boolean modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Three pathogenicity islands, viz. SPI-1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1), SPI-2 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 2) and T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), present in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium have been implicated in the virulence of the pathogen. While the regulation of SPI-1 and SPI-2 (both encoding components of the Type III Secretion System - T3SS) are well understood, T6SS regulation is comparatively less studied. Interestingly, inter-connections among the regulatory elements of these three virulence determinants have also been suggested to be essential for successful infection. However, till date, an integrated view of gene regulation involving the regulators of these three secretion systems and their cross-talk is not available. Results In the current study, relevant regulatory information available from literature have been integrated into a single Boolean network, which portrays the dynamics of T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS mediated virulence. Some additional regulatory interactions involving a two-component system response regulator YfhA have also been predicted and included in the Boolean network. These predictions are aimed at deciphering the effects of osmolarity on T6SS regulation, an aspect that has been suggested in earlier studies, but the mechanism of which was hitherto unknown. Simulation of the regulatory network was able to recreate in silico the experimentally observed sequential activation of SPI-1, SPI-2 and T6SS. Conclusions The present study integrates relevant gene regulatory data (from literature and our prediction) into a single network, representing the cross-communication between T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS. This holistic view of regulatory interactions is expected to improve the current understanding of pathogenesis of S. typhimurium. PMID:24079299

  6. Comparison between sequential and simultaneous application of activated carbon with membrane bioreactor for trace organic contaminant removal.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Luong N; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu H; Tung, Kuo-Lun

    2013-02-01

    The removal efficiency of 22 selected trace organic contaminants by sequential application of granular activated carbon (GAC) and simultaneous application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) with membrane bioreactor (MBR) was compared in this study. Both sequential application of GAC following MBR treatment (MBR-GAC) and simultaneous application of PAC within MBR (PAC-MBR) achieved improved removal (over 95%) of seven hydrophilic and biologically persistent compounds, which were less efficiently removed by MBR-only treatment (negligible to 70%). However, gradual breakthrough of these compounds occurred over an extended operation period. Charged compounds, particularly, fenoprop and diclofenac, demonstrated the fastest breakthrough (complete and 50-70%, in MBR-GAC and PAC-MBR, respectively). Based on a simple comparison from the long-term performance stability and activated carbon usage points of view, PAC-MBR appears to be a better option than MBR-GAC treatment. PMID:23313687

  7. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  8. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  9. Use of solid phase extraction for the sequential injection determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Inês C; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Bordalo, Adriano A; Rangel, António O S S

    2012-08-30

    In this work, a solid phase extraction sequential injection methodology for the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems was developed. The determination of the enzymatic activity was based on the spectrophotometric detection of a coloured product, p-nitrophenol, at 405 nm. The p-nitrophenol is the product of the catalytic decomposition of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, a non-coloured substrate. Considering the low levels expected in natural waters and exploiting the fact of alkaline phosphatase being a metalloprotein, the enzyme was pre-concentrated in-line using a NTA Superflow resin charged with Zn(2+) ions. The developed sequential injection method enabled a quantification range of 0.044-0.441 unit mL(-1) of enzyme activity with a detection limit of 0.0082 unit mL(-1) enzyme activity (1.9 μmol L(-1) of pNP) and a determination rate of 17 h(-1). Recovery tests confirmed the accuracy of the developed sequential injection method and it was effectively applied to different natural waters and to plant root extracts. PMID:22939148

  10. Measuring psychological engagement in youth activity involvement.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Heather L; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Busseri, Michael A; Gadbois, Shannon; Bowker, Anne; Findlay, Leanne

    2015-12-01

    Although psychological engagement (e.g., enjoyment, concentration) may be critical in fostering positive outcomes of youth activity participation, too few studies have been conducted to establish its role in development. Furthermore, an established measurement tool is lacking. In the current study, we evaluated a brief engagement measure with two Canadian samples of youth (Sample 1, N = 290, mean age = 16.9 years, 62% female; Sample 2, N = 1827, mean age = 13.1 years, 54% female). We conducted a confirmatory factor analysis with structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized structure of the model. We also assessed the measure's validity by testing relations between engagement and both perceived outcomes and positive features of activity settings. Psychological engagement was best captured by three latent cognitive, affective, and relational/spiritual factors and a second-order latent factor. Also, as anticipated, psychological engagement was associated with features of the activity setting and perceived impact.

  11. Young People's Perceptions of the Mathematics Involved in Everyday Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Amanda; Ruthven, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    English secondary students were shown pictures of everyday activities and interviewed about whether math was involved. They were aware of daily math and did not have difficulties identifying math in practical or traditionally female activities. However, they restricted math to activities involving single-solution problems and formal rather than…

  12. Motivational considerations in physical activity involvement.

    PubMed

    Lewthwaite, R

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine movement science research on personal and social-environmental motivational influences in physical activity contexts. Motivation is defined as a process in which internal and external factors direct and energize thoughts, feelings, and actions. Motivation is described as a consequence of meaning, which is derived from a combination of personal and social factors, including personal goals or incentives, expectations of personal efficacy, movement-related perceptual and affective experiences, and social and physical features of the environment. Recent literature from sport and exercise psychology is presented on these variables, their determinants, and their consequences for choice, effort, persistence, and performance behavior in exercise and sport contexts.

  13. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Justice programs and the sequential intercept model: case examples in national dissemination of intervention for justice-involved veterans.

    PubMed

    Blue-Howells, Jessica H; Clark, Sean C; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James F

    2013-02-01

    Veterans are a significant subpopulation in criminal justice populations, comprising between 9% and 10% of arrestee, jail, prison, and community-supervision populations. In order to address the needs of justice-involved veterans, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veterans Justice Programs (VJP) offer services to veterans at multiple points in their involvement in the criminal justice system. Within the context of the VA's national mandate to develop VJP, this article presents best practice case examples using the Sequential Intercept Model as the intervention frame, and discusses each in context of a community psychology framework for innovation dissemination. The case examples demonstrate how central program guidance is adapted locally to meet the national mandate using strategies that fit the local environment, illustrating the innovations in action orientation, boundary spanning, and flexibility of organizations. This review provides examples of creative reinvention that expand on the mandate and work to meet local needs. To optimize services to veterans released from custody or supervised in the community, future study of the implementation of this national mandate should examine all VJP sites to identify the full range of best practices in local program implementation. PMID:22924802

  14. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Justice programs and the sequential intercept model: case examples in national dissemination of intervention for justice-involved veterans.

    PubMed

    Blue-Howells, Jessica H; Clark, Sean C; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James F

    2013-02-01

    Veterans are a significant subpopulation in criminal justice populations, comprising between 9% and 10% of arrestee, jail, prison, and community-supervision populations. In order to address the needs of justice-involved veterans, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veterans Justice Programs (VJP) offer services to veterans at multiple points in their involvement in the criminal justice system. Within the context of the VA's national mandate to develop VJP, this article presents best practice case examples using the Sequential Intercept Model as the intervention frame, and discusses each in context of a community psychology framework for innovation dissemination. The case examples demonstrate how central program guidance is adapted locally to meet the national mandate using strategies that fit the local environment, illustrating the innovations in action orientation, boundary spanning, and flexibility of organizations. This review provides examples of creative reinvention that expand on the mandate and work to meet local needs. To optimize services to veterans released from custody or supervised in the community, future study of the implementation of this national mandate should examine all VJP sites to identify the full range of best practices in local program implementation.

  15. Exploring Extension Involvement in Farm to School Program Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here examined Extension professionals' involvement in farm-to-school program activities. Results of an online survey distributed to eight state Extension systems indicate that on average, Extension professionals are involved with one farm to school program activity, with most supporting school or community garden programs.…

  16. Monitoring Lipase/Esterase Activity by Stopped Flow in a Sequential Injection Analysis System Using p-Nitrophenyl Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Pliego, Jorge; Mateos, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez, Jorge; Valero, Francisco; Baeza, Mireia; Femat, Ricardo; Camacho, Rosa; Sandoval, Georgina; Herrera-López, Enrique J.

    2015-01-01

    Lipases and esterases are biocatalysts used at the laboratory and industrial level. To obtain the maximum yield in a bioprocess, it is important to measure key variables, such as enzymatic activity. The conventional method for monitoring hydrolytic activity is to take out a sample from the bioreactor to be analyzed off-line at the laboratory. The disadvantage of this approach is the long time required to recover the information from the process, hindering the possibility to develop control systems. New strategies to monitor lipase/esterase activity are necessary. In this context and in the first approach, we proposed a lab-made sequential injection analysis system to analyze off-line samples from shake flasks. Lipase/esterase activity was determined using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as the substrate. The sequential injection analysis allowed us to measure the hydrolytic activity from a sample without dilution in a linear range from 0.05–1.60 U/mL, with the capability to reach sample dilutions up to 1000 times, a sampling frequency of five samples/h, with a kinetic reaction of 5 min and a relative standard deviation of 8.75%. The results are promising to monitor lipase/esterase activity in real time, in which optimization and control strategies can be designed. PMID:25633600

  17. Monitoring lipase/esterase activity by stopped flow in a sequential injection analysis system using p-nitrophenyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    Pliego, Jorge; Mateos, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez, Jorge; Valero, Francisco; Baeza, Mireia; Femat, Ricardo; Camacho, Rosa; Sandoval, Georgina; Herrera-López, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    Lipases and esterases are biocatalysts used at the laboratory and industrial level. To obtain the maximum yield in a bioprocess, it is important to measure key variables, such as enzymatic activity. The conventional method for monitoring hydrolytic activity is to take out a sample from the bioreactor to be analyzed off-line at the laboratory. The disadvantage of this approach is the long time required to recover the information from the process, hindering the possibility to develop control systems. New strategies to monitor lipase/esterase activity are necessary. In this context and in the first approach, we proposed a lab-made sequential injection analysis system to analyze off-line samples from shake flasks. Lipase/esterase activity was determined using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as the substrate. The sequential injection analysis allowed us to measure the hydrolytic activity from a sample without dilution in a linear range from 0.05-1.60 U/mL, with the capability to reach sample dilutions up to 1000 times, a sampling frequency of five samples/h, with a kinetic reaction of 5 min and a relative standard deviation of 8.75%. The results are promising to monitor lipase/esterase activity in real time, in which optimization and control strategies can be designed. PMID:25633600

  18. Colocalization and Sequential Enzyme Activity in Aqueous Biphasic Systems: Experiments and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Davis, Bradley W; Aumiller, William M; Hashemian, Negar; An, Songon; Armaou, Antonios; Keating, Christine D

    2015-11-17

    Subcellular compartmentalization of biomolecules and their reactions is common in biology and provides a general strategy for improving and/or controlling kinetics in metabolic pathways that contain multiple sequential enzymes. Enzymes can be colocalized in multiprotein complexes, on scaffolds or inside subcellular organelles. Liquid organelles formed by intracellular phase coexistence could provide an additional means of sequential enzyme colocalization. Here we use experiment and computation to explore the kinetic consequences of sequential enzyme compartmentalization into model liquid organelles in a crowded polymer solution. Two proteins of the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway, ASL (adenylosuccinate lyase, Step 8) and ATIC (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase, Steps 9 and 10), were studied in a polyethylene glycol/dextran aqueous two-phase system. Dextran-rich phase droplets served as model liquid compartments for enzyme colocalization. In this system, which lacks any specific binding interactions between the phase-forming polymers and the enzymes, we did not observe significant rate enhancements from colocalization for the overall reaction under our experimental conditions. The experimental results were used to adapt a mathematical model to quantitatively describe the kinetics. The mathematical model was then used to explore additional, experimentally inaccessible conditions to predict when increased local concentrations of enzymes and substrates can (or cannot) be expected to yield increased rates of product formation. Our findings indicate that colocalization within these simplified model liquid organelles can lead to enhanced metabolic rates under some conditions, but that very strong partitioning into the phase that serves as the compartment is necessary. In vivo, this could be provided by specific binding affinities between components of the liquid compartment and the molecules to be

  19. Bone morphogenetic protein-induced cell differentiation involves Atg7 and Wnt16 sequentially in human stem cell-derived osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Mogi, Makio; Hase, Naoko; Hiyama, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Kawai, Rie; Matsumoto, Toru; Nakata, Kazuhiko

    2016-09-10

    We established a differentiation method for homogeneous α7 integrin-positive human skeletal muscle stem cell (α7(+)hSMSC)-derived osteoblast-like cells with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. To explore the early signaling cascade for osteoblastic differentiation, we examined the upregulation of autophagy-related gene (Atg) and wingless/int1 (Wnt) signaling during BMP-2-mediated human osteoblastic differentiation. In a screening experiment, BMP-2 increased the mRNA and protein levels of Atg7, Wnt16, and Lrp5/Fzd2 (a Wnt receptor), but not microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (LC3; a mammalian homolog of yeast Atg8), TFE3, Beclin1, Atg5, Atg12, Wnt3a, or Wnt5, together with the amounts of autophagosomes and autophagy fluxes. Treatment with siRNAs against Atg7 and Wnt16 individually suppressed the BMP-2-induced increase in osteoblastic differentiation. The osteoblastic phenotype, involving osteocalcin (BGLAP), osteopontin (SPP1), and osterix (SP7) expression, decreased when autophagy was inhibited by chloroquine (an autophagy inhibitor), but increased after treatment with rapamycin (an autophagy enhancer). Taken together with our previous findings, we have revealed a unique sequential cascade of BMP-2→Atg7→Wnt16→Lrp5/Fzd2→matrix metalloproteinase-13→osteoblastic differentiation. This cascade results in a potent increase in osteoblastic cell differentiation, indicating the unique involvement of Atg7, autophagy, and Wnt16 signaling in BMP-2-induced differentiation of α7(+)hSMSCs into osteoblast-like cells at a relatively early stage. PMID:27397580

  20. High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistors with Dielectric and Active Layers Printed Sequentially by Ultrasonic Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Ming; Sanjib, Das; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Ivanov, Ilia N; Gu, Gong; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2013-01-01

    High-performance, flexible organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are reported with PVP dielectric and TIPS-PEN active layers sequentially deposited by ultrasonic spray-coating on plastic substrate. OFETs fabricated in ambient air with a bottom-gate/top-contact geometry are shown to achieve on/off ratios of >104 and mobilities as high as 0.35 cm2/Vs. These rival the characteristics of the best solution-processible small molecule FETs fabricated by other fabrication methods such as drop casting and ink-jet printing.

  1. Resveratrol Induces Hepatic Mitochondrial Biogenesis Through the Sequential Activation of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Joe, Yeonsoo; Zheng, Min; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Yu, Jae-Kyoung; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Ryter, Stefan W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured cells, through increased guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). We sought to determine the role of NO, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and its reaction product (carbon monoxide [CO]) in the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by the natural antioxidant resveratrol. Results: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, induced mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 hepatoma cells, and in vivo, through stimulation of PGC-1α. NO-induced mitochondrial biogenesis required cGMP, and was mimicked by the cGMP analogue (8-bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate [8-Br-cGMP]). Activation of mitochondrial biogenesis by SNAP required HO-1, as it could be reversed by genetic interference of HO-1; and by treatment with the HO inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin-IX (SnPP) in vitro and in vivo. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP)-IX, an HO-1 inducing agent, stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, which could be reversed by the CO scavenger hemoglobin. Application of CO, using the CO-releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3), stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, in a cGMP-dependent manner. Both CoPP and CORM-3-induced mitochondrial biogenesis required NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation and phosphorylation of Akt. The natural antioxidant resveratrol induced mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, in a manner dependent on NO biosynthesis, cGMP synthesis, Nrf2-dependent HO-1 activation, and endogenous CO production. Furthermore, resveratrol preserved mitochondrial biogenesis during lipopolysaccharides-induced hepatic inflammation in vivo. Innovation and Conclusions: The complex interplay between endogenous NO and CO production may underlie the mechanism by which natural antioxidants induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Strategies aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis may be used as therapeutics

  2. Sequential changes in chromatin structure during transcriptional activation in the beta globin LCR and its target gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihoon; Kim, AeRi

    2010-09-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during transcriptional activation. The changes include the association of transcriptional activators, formation of hypersensitive sites and covalent modifications of histones. To understand the order of the various changes accompanying transcriptional activation, we analyzed the mouse beta globin gene, which is transcriptionally inducible in erythroid MEL cells over a time course of HMBA treatment. Transcription of the globin genes requires the locus control region (LCR) consisting of several hypersensitive sites (HSs). Erythroid specific transcriptional activators such as NF-E2, GATA-1, TAL1 and EKLF were associated with the LCR in the uninduced state before transcriptional activation. The HSs of the LCR were formed in this state as revealed by high sensitivity to DNase I and MNase attack. However the binding of transcriptional activators and the depletion of histones were observed in the promoter of the beta globin gene only after transcriptional activation. In addition, various covalent histone modifications were sequentially detected in lysine residues of histone H3 during the activation. Acetylation of K9, K36 and K27 was notable in both LCR HSs and gene after induction but before transcriptional initiation. Inactive histone marks such as K9me2, K36me2 and K27me2 were removed coincident with transcriptional initiation in the gene region. Taken together, these results indicate that LCR has a substantially active structure in the uninduced state while transcriptional activation serially adds active marks, including histone modifications, and removes inactive marks in the target gene of the LCR.

  3. Enzyme:nanoparticle bioconjugates with two sequential enzymes: stoichiometry and activity of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Keating, Christine D

    2010-12-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bioconjugates in which the enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and/or citrate synthase (CS) were adsorbed to 30 nm diameter Au nanoparticles. Enzyme:Au stoichiometry and kinetic parameters (specific activity, k(cat), K(M), and activity per particle) were determined for MDH:Au, CS:Au, and three types of dual-activity MDH/CS:Au bioconjugates. For single-activity bioconjugates (MDH:Au and CS:Au), the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle was dependent upon the enzyme concentration in solution, with multilayers forming at high enzyme:Au solution ratios. The specific activity of adsorbed enzyme increased with increasing number adsorbed per particle for CS:Au, but was less sensitive to stoichiometry for MDH:Au. Dual activity bioconjugates were prepared in three ways: (1) by adsorption of MDH followed by CS, (2) by adsorption of CS followed by MDH, and (3) by coadsorption of both enzymes from the same solution. The resulting bioconjugates differed substantially in the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle, the specific activity of the adsorbed enzymes, and also the enzymatic activity per particle. Bioconjugates formed by adding CS to the Au nanoparticles before MDH was added exhibited higher specific activities for both enzymes than those formed by adding the enzymes in the reverse order. These bioconjugates also had 3-fold higher per-particle sequential activity for conversion of malate to citrate, despite substantially fewer copies of both enzymes present.

  4. A Bayesian active learning strategy for sequential experimental design in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Edouard; Lajaunie, Christian; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2014-09-26

    BackgroundDynamical models used in systems biology involve unknown kinetic parameters. Setting these parameters is a bottleneck in many modeling projects. This motivates the estimation of these parameters from empirical data. However, this estimation problem has its own difficulties, the most important one being strong ill-conditionedness. In this context, optimizing experiments to be conducted in order to better estimate a system¿s parameters provides a promising direction to alleviate the difficulty of the task.ResultsBorrowing ideas from Bayesian experimental design and active learning, we propose a new strategy for optimal experimental design in the context of kinetic parameter estimation in systems biology. We describe algorithmic choices that allow to implement this method in a computationally tractable way and make it fully automatic. Based on simulation, we show that it outperforms alternative baseline strategies, and demonstrate the benefit to consider multiple posterior modes of the likelihood landscape, as opposed to traditional schemes based on local and Gaussian approximations.ConclusionThis analysis demonstrates that our new, fully automatic Bayesian optimal experimental design strategy has the potential to support the design of experiments for kinetic parameter estimation in systems biology.

  5. Sequential hepatogenic transdifferentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells: relevance of different extracellular signaling molecules, transcription factors involved, and expression of new key marker genes.

    PubMed

    Bonora-Centelles, A; Jover, R; Mirabet, V; Lahoz, A; Carbonell, F; Castell, J V; Gómez-Lechón, M J

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue contains a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) population known as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) capable of differentiating into different cell types. Our aim was to induce hepatic transdifferentiation of ASCs by sequential exposure to several combinations of cytokines, growth factors, and hormones. The most efficient hepatogenic protocol includes fibroblastic growth factors (FGF) 2 and 4 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) (step 1), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), FGF2, FGF4, and nicotinamide (Nic) (step 2), and oncostatin M (OSM), dexamethasone (Dex), and insulin-tranferrin-selenium (step 3). This protocol activated transcription factors [GATA6, Hex, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and beta (CEBPalpha and beta), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1alpha), and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4alpha)], which promoted a characteristic hepatic phenotype, as assessed by new informative markers for the step-by-step hepatic transdifferentiation of hMSC [early markers: albumin (ALB), alpha-2-macroglobuline (alpha2M), complement protein C3 (C3), and selenoprotein P1 (SEPP1); late markers: cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), apolipoprotein E (APOE), acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (ACSL1), and angiotensin II receptor, type 1 (AGTR1)]. The loss of adipose adult stem cell phenotype was detected by losing expression of Thy1 and inhibitor of DNA binding 3 (Id3). The reexpression of phosphoenolpyruvate corboxykinase (PEPCK), apolipoprotein C3 (APOCIII), aldolase B (ALDOB), and cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) was achieved by transduction with a recombinant adenovirus for HNF4alpha and finally hepatic functionality was also assessed by analyzing specific biochemical markers. We conclude that ASCs could represent an alternative tool in clinical therapy for liver dysfunction and regenerative medicine.

  6. Empirical Evidence or Intuition? An Activity Involving the Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overway, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Students need to have basic understanding of scientific method during their introductory science classes and for this purpose an activity was devised which involved a game based on famous Monty Hall game problem. This particular activity allowed students to banish or confirm their intuition based on empirical evidence.

  7. A Profile of Latino School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Participation in school-based extracurricular activities influences educational success. Thus, it is important to depict a profile of school-based extracurricular activity involvement for a Latino student population that is marginalized in schools. This research uses the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 and logistic regression analyses to…

  8. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activities of Sequential Spray Applications of Decontamination Treatments on Chicken Carcasses

    PubMed Central

    Benli, Hakan; Sanchez-Plata, Marcos X.; Ilhak, Osman Irfan; Núñez De González, Maryuri T.; Keeton, Jimmy T.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sequential applications of ɛ-polylysine (EPL) or lauramide arginine ethyl ester (LAE) sprays followed by an acidic calcium sulfate (ACS) spray on inoculated chicken carcasses to reduce Salmonella (Salmonella enterica serovars including Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella enteritidis) contamination during 6 days of storage (4.4°C). Secondly, reductions of the resident microflora were studied on uninoculated chicken carcasses following the sequential application of the treatments, chilling and 10 days of storage at 4.4°C. The treatment of Salmonella inoculated carcasses with 300 mg/L EPL followed by 30% ACS (EPL300-ACS30) sprays reduced Salmonella counts initially by 1.5 log cfu/mL and then by 1.2 log cfu/mL (p<0.05) following 6 days of storage at 4.4°C. Likewise, 200 mg/L LAE followed by 30% ACS (LAE200-ACS30) treatment reduced initial Salmonella counts on poultry carcasses by 1.8, 1.4 and 1.8 log cfu/mL (p<0.05), respectively, after 0, 3, and 6 days storage. Immediately after the treatments, EPL300-ACS30 and LAE200-ACS30 both reduced Escherichia coli counts significantly by 2.6 and 2.9 log cfu/mL, respectively. EPL300-ACS30 and LAE200-ASC30 were effective in lowering psychrotroph counts by 1 log cfu/mL on day 10 when compared to the control and distilled water treatments. This study demonstrated that EPL300-ACS30 and LAE200-ACS30 were effective in reducing Salmonella on inoculated chicken carcasses both after treatment and during the storage at 4.4°C for up to 6 days. In addition, reductions in psychrotroph counts indicated that these treatments might have the potential to increase the shelf-life of poultry carcasses. PMID:25656180

  9. Evaluation of antimicrobial activities of sequential spray applications of decontamination treatments on chicken carcasses.

    PubMed

    Benli, Hakan; Sanchez-Plata, Marcos X; Ilhak, Osman Irfan; Núñez De González, Maryuri T; Keeton, Jimmy T

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sequential applications of ɛ-polylysine (EPL) or lauramide arginine ethyl ester (LAE) sprays followed by an acidic calcium sulfate (ACS) spray on inoculated chicken carcasses to reduce Salmonella (Salmonella enterica serovars including Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella enteritidis) contamination during 6 days of storage (4.4°C). Secondly, reductions of the resident microflora were studied on uninoculated chicken carcasses following the sequential application of the treatments, chilling and 10 days of storage at 4.4°C. The treatment of Salmonella inoculated carcasses with 300 mg/L EPL followed by 30% ACS (EPL300-ACS30) sprays reduced Salmonella counts initially by 1.5 log cfu/mL and then by 1.2 log cfu/mL (p<0.05) following 6 days of storage at 4.4°C. Likewise, 200 mg/L LAE followed by 30% ACS (LAE200-ACS30) treatment reduced initial Salmonella counts on poultry carcasses by 1.8, 1.4 and 1.8 log cfu/mL (p<0.05), respectively, after 0, 3, and 6 days storage. Immediately after the treatments, EPL300-ACS30 and LAE200-ACS30 both reduced Escherichia coli counts significantly by 2.6 and 2.9 log cfu/mL, respectively. EPL300-ACS30 and LAE200-ASC30 were effective in lowering psychrotroph counts by 1 log cfu/mL on day 10 when compared to the control and distilled water treatments. This study demonstrated that EPL300-ACS30 and LAE200-ACS30 were effective in reducing Salmonella on inoculated chicken carcasses both after treatment and during the storage at 4.4°C for up to 6 days. In addition, reductions in psychrotroph counts indicated that these treatments might have the potential to increase the shelf-life of poultry carcasses. PMID:25656180

  10. Bringing Person-Centeredness and Active Involvement into Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torenholt, Rikke; Engelund, Gitte; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the use and applicability of cultural probes--an explorative participatory method to gain insights into a person's life and thoughts--to achieve person-centeredness and active involvement in self-management education for people with chronic illness. Design/methodology/approach: An education toolkit…

  11. Moon Watch: A Parental-Involvement Homework Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter; Gonzalez-Jensen, Margarita; Moy, Tracy

    2000-01-01

    Presents the goals, philosophy, and methods of the SPLASH (Student-Parent Laboratories Achieving Science at Home) program. Describes an at-home, parental-involvement activity called Moon Watch in which students and their parents observe how the phases of the moon and the moon's position in the sky change over a two-week period. (WRM)

  12. Adolescent Involvement in Extracurricular Activities: Influences on Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Donna; Dyk, Patricia Hyjer; Jones, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Study examined adolescents' participation in sports, school, and community extracurricular activities to assess the influence of different involvement roles and adult support on leadership skills. The study found that males and females who perceived their adult support more positively had more positive perceptions of their leadership skills.…

  13. Microbial respiration activities correlated to sequentially separated, particulate and water-soluble organic matter fractions from arable and forest topsoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M.; Wirth, S.; Ellerbrock, R.; Sommer, M.

    2009-12-01

    Michael Kaiser1, Stephan Wirth2, Ruth H. Ellerbrock3, Michael Sommer3,4 1University of California Merced, Natural Science, 4225 N. Hospital Rd., Atwater, CA 95301 2,3 Leibniz-Center for Agricultural Research (ZALF) e. V. 2 Institute of Landscape Matter Dynamics 3 Institute of Soil Landscape Research Eberswalder Str. 84, D-15374 Muencheberg, Germany 4University of Potsdam, Institute of Geoecology, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany Microbial respiration activities correlated to sequentially separated, particulate and water-soluble organic matter fractions from arable and forest topsoils Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) accounts for roughly half of CO2 evolution from vegetated soil surfaces and plays a crucial role in the ability of soil to mitigate the greenhouse effect. The separation and identification of labile (i.e., easily decomposable) organic matter (OM) fractions from bulk SOM is of particular importance for a mechanistic understanding of microbial decomposition processes and for predicting the response of SOM to changes in land use, management, and climate. This work aimed to reveal differences in the relevance of particulate as well as water-soluble organic matter (OM) fractions from topsoils to the easily biodegradable soil organic matter (SOM). We selected eight paired sites with quite different soil types (Udorthent, Paleudalf, Glossudalf, Aquept, Hapludalf, Aquert, Udert, Haplorthod) and soil properties (e.g., clay content: 28 to 564 g kg-1). For each of these sites, we took samples from adjacent arable and forest topsoils. Physically uncomplexed, macro-, and micro-aggregate-occluded organic particle, as well as water-soluble OM fractions were sequentially separated by a combination of electrostatic attraction, ultrasonic treatment, density separation, sieving, and water extraction. The easily biodegradable SOM of the topsoil samples was determined by measuring microbial respiration during a short-term incubation

  14. Associations between children's physical activities, sedentary behaviours and family structure: a sequential mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Quarmby, T; Dagkas, S; Bridge, M

    2011-02-01

    This mixed method paper explored the effect of family structure on children's physical activities and sedentary pursuits. It furthers the limited understanding of how family structure impacts on children's time in, and reasons behind engaging in, certain physical activities. Children from three inner city comprehensive schools in the Midlands, United Kingdom, participated through questionnaires (n = 381) and semi-structured interviews (n = 62). The results indicated that boys and girls from single parent families spent more time in sedentary activities during the week and at the weekend (P < 0.01) when compared with their intact couple family counterparts. It was identified that children in single-parent families received less parental support due to a lack of time, transport and additional parental responsibilities that created a family environment that encouraged sedentary pursuits. Moreover, the barriers that encouraged sedentary activities also prevented children in single parent families from engaging in lifetime activities during the week. Children from intact couple families recorded more time in lifetime activities than those in single parent families (P < 0.01). Finally, children in two-parent families had more opportunities to engage not only in these activities individually but also in joint activities with their parents, further reinforcing these behaviours.

  15. Associations between Children's Physical Activities, Sedentary Behaviours and Family Structure: A Sequential Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarmby, T.; Dagkas, S.; Bridge, M.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method paper explored the effect of family structure on children's physical activities and sedentary pursuits. It furthers the limited understanding of how family structure impacts on children's time in, and reasons behind engaging in, certain physical activities. Children from three inner city comprehensive schools in the Midlands,…

  16. The Effect of Multiple Sequential Light Sources to Activate Aminolevulinic Acid in the Treatment of Actinic Keratoses: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Mitchel P.; Fabi, Sabrina G.; Guiha, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of research regarding the sequential use of multiple light sources for topical 5-aminolevulinic acid activation in photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis. This study evaluated 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis using blue light combined with red light, pulsed dye laser, and/or intense pulsed light in a retrospective fashion. Field-directed 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy was performed with blue light only, blue light + pulsed dye laser, blue light + intense pulsed light, blue light + pulsed dye laser + intense pulsed light, or blue light + red light + pulsed dye laser + intense pulsed light for nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses of face, scalp, or upper trunk. Blue light + intense pulsed light + pulsed dye laser produced greater patient-reported improvement in actinic keratoses than blue light or blue light + intense pulsed light and greater subject-reported improvement in overall skin quality than blue light + intense pulsed light. The addition of red light led to no further benefit in either outcome measure. Photodynamic therapy with multiple, sequential laser and light sources led to greater patient-graded improvement in actinic keratoses than that with a single light source (blue light), without significant differences in post-treatment adverse events. However, the small, widely disparate number of patients between groups and follow-up times between patients, as well as retrospective assessments based on subjective patient recall, severely limit the significance of these findings. Nevertheless, the results raise interesting questions regarding the use of multiple light and laser sources for photodynamic therapy of actinic keratoses and warrant further research with a prospective, randomized, controlled study. PMID:25276272

  17. Robustness of the Sequential Lineup Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronlund, Scott D.; Carlson, Curt A.; Dailey, Sarah B.; Goodsell, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing movement in the United States and around the world involves promoting the advantages of conducting an eyewitness lineup in a sequential manner. We conducted a large study (N = 2,529) that included 24 comparisons of sequential versus simultaneous lineups. A liberal statistical criterion revealed only 2 significant sequential lineup…

  18. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  19. Sequential phosphorylation of SLP-76 at tyrosine 173 is required for activation of T and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Meirav; Bogin, Yaron; Beach, Dvora; Oellerich, Thomas; Lehne, Johanna; Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Okumura, Mariko; Starosvetsky, Elina; Kosoff, Rachelle; Libman, Evgeny; Koretzky, Gary; Kambayashi, Taku; Urlaub, Henning; Wienands, Jürgen; Chernoff, Jonathan; Yablonski, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Cooperatively assembled signalling complexes, nucleated by adaptor proteins, integrate information from surface receptors to determine cellular outcomes. In T and mast cells, antigen receptor signalling is nucleated by three adaptors: SLP-76, Gads and LAT. Three well-characterized SLP-76 tyrosine phosphorylation sites recruit key components, including a Tec-family tyrosine kinase, Itk. We identified a fourth, evolutionarily conserved SLP-76 phosphorylation site, Y173, which was phosphorylated upon T-cell receptor stimulation in primary murine and Jurkat T cells. Y173 was required for antigen receptor-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) in both T and mast cells, and for consequent downstream events, including activation of the IL-2 promoter in T cells, and degranulation and IL-6 production in mast cells. In intact cells, Y173 phosphorylation depended on three, ZAP-70-targeted tyrosines at the N-terminus of SLP-76 that recruit and activate Itk, a kinase that selectively phosphorylated Y173 in vitro. These data suggest a sequential mechanism whereby ZAP-70-dependent priming of SLP-76 at three N-terminal sites triggers reciprocal regulatory interactions between Itk and SLP-76, which are ultimately required to couple active Itk to its substrate, PLC-γ1. PMID:21725281

  20. Memory Activation and the Availability of Explanations in Sequential Diagnostic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehlhorn, Katja; Taatgen, Niels A.; Lebiere, Christian; Krems, Josef F.

    2011-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic reasoning, it has been argued that memory activation can provide the reasoner with a subset of possible explanations from memory that are highly adaptive for the task at hand. However, few studies have experimentally tested this assumption. Even less empirical and theoretical work has investigated how newly incoming…

  1. Sequential evolution of cortical activity and effective connectivity of swallowing using fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Paul Glad; Otto, Mareile; Platz, Thomas; Eickhoff, Simon B; Lotze, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Swallowing consists of a hierarchical sequence of primary motor and somatosensory processes. The temporal interplay of different phases is complex and clinical disturbances frequent. Of interest was the temporal interaction of the swallowing network. Time resolution optimized functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to describe the temporal sequence of representation sites of swallowing and their functional connectivity. Sixteen young healthy volunteers were investigated who swallowed 2 ml of water 20 times per run with a repetition time for functional imaging of 514 ms. After applying the general linear model approach to identify activation magnitude in preselected regions of interest repeated measures analysis of variance (rmANOVA) was used to detect relevant effects on lateralization, time, and onset. Furthermore, dynamic causal modeling (DCM) was applied to uncover where the input enters the model and the way in which the cortical regions are connected. The temporal analysis revealed a successive activation starting at the premotor cortex, supplementary motor area (SMA), and bilateral thalamus, followed by the primary sensorimotor cortex, the posterior insula, and cerebellum and culminating with activation in the pons shortly before subsiding. The rmANOVA revealed that activation was lateralized initially to the left hemisphere and gradually moved to the right hemisphere over time. The group random effects DCM analysis resulted in a most likely model that consisted of inputs to SMA and M1S1, bidirectionally connected, and a one-way connection from M1S1 to the posterior insula.

  2. Sequential activation of microglia and astrocyte cytokine expression precedes increased Iba-1 or GFAP immunoreactivity following systemic immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Norden, Diana M; Trojanowski, Paige J; Villanueva, Emmanuel; Navarro, Elisa; Godbout, Jonathan P

    2016-02-01

    Activation of the peripheral immune system elicits a coordinated response from the central nervous system. Key to this immune to brain communication is that glia, microglia, and astrocytes, interpret and propagate inflammatory signals in the brain that influence physiological and behavioral responses. One issue in glial biology is that morphological analysis alone is used to report on glial activation state. Therefore, our objective was to compare behavioral responses after in vivo immune (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) challenge to glial specific mRNA and morphological profiles. Here, LPS challenge induced an immediate but transient sickness response with decreased locomotion and social interaction. Corresponding with active sickness behavior (2-12 h), inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression was elevated in enriched microglia and astrocytes. Although proinflammatory cytokine expression in microglia peaked 2-4 h after LPS, astrocyte cytokine, and chemokine induction was delayed and peaked at 12 h. Morphological alterations in microglia (Iba-1(+)) and astrocytes (GFAP(+)), however, were undetected during this 2-12 h timeframe. Increased Iba-1 immunoreactivity and de-ramified microglia were evident 24 and 48 h after LPS but corresponded to the resolution phase of activation. Morphological alterations in astrocytes were undetected after LPS. Additionally, glial cytokine expression did not correlate with morphology after four repeated LPS injections. In fact, repeated LPS challenge was associated with immune and behavioral tolerance and a less inflammatory microglial profile compared with acute LPS challenge. Overall, induction of glial cytokine expression was sequential, aligned with active sickness behavior, and preceded increased Iba-1 or GFAP immunoreactivity after LPS challenge.

  3. Cortical activity prior to, and during, observation and execution of sequential finger movements.

    PubMed

    Calmels, Claire; Holmes, Paul; Jarry, Gilbert; Lévèque, Jean-Michel; Hars, Magaly; Stam, Cornelis J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide further evidence for the existence of a mirror neuron system in humans using electroencephalography during the observation and execution of non-object-related movements. Event-related desynchronization and synchronization (ERD/ERS) were used to characterize brain activity prior to, and during, observation and execution of a finger movement in four frequency bands (7-10 Hz, 10-13 Hz, 13-20 Hz, and 20-30 Hz). Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded from 19 electrode sites in eight participants. In all the frequency bands and electrode sites, results revealed that there was no significant differences in EEG cortical activity between the observation condition and the execution conditions. Comparison of the two stages of the movement (i.e., pre-movement and movement) in the observation and execution conditions showed, in most cases, that pre-movement ERD values were less than movement ERD values. Whilst there was not an identical match of EEG cortical indices, this study provides further support for the existence of a mirror neuron system in humans. The incomplete congruence may be explained by the different behaviors, the nature of the task and factors in the observed action coded by the mirror system. PMID:17136468

  4. Engaging in activities involving information technology: dimensions, modes, and flow.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Henry; Sharafi, Parvaneh; Hedman, Leif R

    2004-01-01

    An engagement mode involves a subject (e.g., a user of information technology, or IT) who is engaged in an activity with an object in a certain manner (the mode). The purpose of this study is to develop a general model of engagement modes that may be used for understanding how IT-related activities are shaped by properties of the user and the IT object. A questionnaire involving items on IT engagement and the experience of flow was administered to 300 participants. The results supported an engagement mode (EM) model involving 5 different engagement modes (enjoying/acceptance, ambition/curiosity, avoidance/hesitation, frustration/ anxiety, and efficiency/productivity) characterized on 3 dimensions (evaluation of object, locus of control between subject and object, and intrinsic or extrinsic focus of motivation). The flow experience follows from a balance between enjoying/ acceptance and efficiency/productivity propelled by ambition/curiosity. The EM model could provide a platform for considering how IT users, IT applications, and IT environments should work together to yield both enjoyment and efficiency. Actual or potential applications of this research include designing IT training programs on different levels of specificity. PMID:15359681

  5. Sequential signaling cascade of IL-6 and PGC-1α is involved in high glucose-induced podocyte loss and growth arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Il; Park, Soo Hyun

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •The pathophysiological role of IL-6 in high glucose-induced podocyte loss. •The novel role of PGC-1α in the development of diabetic nephropathy. •Signaling of IL-6 and PGC-1α in high glucose-induced dysfunction of podocyte. -- Abstract: Podocyte loss, which is mediated by podocyte apoptosis, is implicated in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the involvement of interleukin (IL)-6 in high glucose-induced apoptosis of rat podocytes. We also examined the pathophysiological role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) in this system. High glucose treatment induced not only podocyte apoptosis but also podocyte growth arrest. High glucose treatment also increased IL-6 secretion and activated IL-6 signaling. The high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis was blocked by IL-6 neutralizing antibody. IL-6 treatment or overexpression induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest, and IL-6 siRNA transfection blocked high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. Furthermore, high glucose or IL-6 treatment increased PGC-1α expression, and PGC-1α overexpression also induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. PGC-1α siRNA transfection blocked high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. Collectively, these findings showed that high glucose promoted apoptosis and cell growth arrest in podocytes via IL-6 signaling. In addition, PGC-1α is involved in podocyte apoptosis and cell growth arrest. Therefore, blocking IL-6 and its downstream mediators such as IL6Rα, gp130 and PGC-1α may attenuate the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Sequential activation and distinct functions for distal and proximal modules within the IgH 3′ regulatory region

    PubMed Central

    Garot, Armand; Marquet, Marie; Saintamand, Alexis; Bender, Sébastien; Le Noir, Sandrine; Rouaud, Pauline; Carrion, Claire; Oruc, Zéliha; Bébin, Anne-Gaëlle; Moreau, Jeanne; Lebrigand, Kevin; Denizot, Yves; Alt, Frederick W.; Cogné, Michel; Pinaud, Eric

    2016-01-01

    As a master regulator of functional Ig heavy chain (IgH) expression, the IgH 3′ regulatory region (3′RR) controls multiple transcription events at various stages of B-cell ontogeny, from newly formed B cells until the ultimate plasma cell stage. The IgH 3′RR plays a pivotal role in early B-cell receptor expression, germ-line transcription preceding class switch recombination, interactions between targeted switch (S) regions, variable region transcription before somatic hypermutation, and antibody heavy chain production, but the functional ranking of its different elements is still inaccurate, especially that of its evolutionarily conserved quasi-palindromic structure. By comparing relevant previous knockout (KO) mouse models (3′RR KO and hs3b-4 KO) to a novel mutant devoid of the 3′RR quasi-palindromic region (3′PAL KO), we pinpointed common features and differences that specify two distinct regulatory entities acting sequentially during B-cell ontogeny. Independently of exogenous antigens, the 3′RR distal part, including hs4, fine-tuned B-cell receptor expression in newly formed and naïve B-cell subsets. At mature stages, the 3′RR portion including the quasi-palindrome dictated antigen-dependent locus remodeling (global somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination to major isotypes) in activated B cells and antibody production in plasma cells. PMID:26831080

  7. Cis-Golgi cisternal assembly and biosynthetic activation occur sequentially in plants and algae

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Bryon S.; Kang, Byung-Ho; Gerl, Mathias J.; Gergely, Zachary R.; McMichael, Colleen M.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The cisternal progression/maturation model of Golgi trafficking predicts that cis-Golgi cisternae are formed de novo on the cis-side of the Golgi. Here we describe structural and functional intermediates of the cis cisterna assembly process in high-pressure frozen algae (Scherffelia dubia, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and plants (Arabidopsis thaliana, Dionaea muscipula; Venus Flytrap) as determined by electron microscopy, electron tomography and immuno-electron microscopy techniques. Our findings are as follows: (1) The cis-most (C1) Golgi cisternae are generated de novo from cisterna initiators produced by the fusion of 3–5 COPII vesicles in contact with a C2 cis cisterna. (2) COPII vesicles fuel the growth of the initiators, which then merge into a coherent C1 cisterna. (3) When a C1 cisterna nucleates its first cisterna initiator it becomes a C2 cisterna. (4) C2-Cn cis cisternae grow through COPII vesicle fusion. (5) ER-resident proteins are recycled from cis cisternae to the ER via COPIa-type vesicles. (6) In S. dubia the C2 cisternae are capable of mediating the self-assembly of scale protein complexes. (7) In plants, ~90% of native α-mannosidase I localizes to medial Golgi cisternae. (8) Biochemical activation of cis cisternae appears to coincide with their conversion to medial cisternae via recycling of medial cisterna enzymes. We propose how the different cis cisterna assembly intermediates of plants and algae may actually be related to those present in the ERGIC and in the pre-cis Golgi cisterna layer in mammalian cells. PMID:23369235

  8. Cis-Golgi cisternal assembly and biosynthetic activation occur sequentially in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Bryon S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Gerl, Mathias J; Gergely, Zachary R; McMichael, Colleen M; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Staehelin, L Andrew

    2013-05-01

    The cisternal progression/maturation model of Golgi trafficking predicts that cis-Golgi cisternae are formed de novo on the cis-side of the Golgi. Here we describe structural and functional intermediates of the cis cisterna assembly process in high-pressure frozen algae (Scherffelia dubia, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and plants (Arabidopsis thaliana, Dionaea muscipula; Venus flytrap) as determined by electron microscopy, electron tomography and immuno-electron microscopy techniques. Our findings are as follows: (i) The cis-most (C1) Golgi cisternae are generated de novo from cisterna initiators produced by the fusion of 3-5 COPII vesicles in contact with a C2 cis cisterna. (ii) COPII vesicles fuel the growth of the initiators, which then merge into a coherent C1 cisterna. (iii) When a C1 cisterna nucleates its first cisterna initiator it becomes a C2 cisterna. (iv) C2-Cn cis cisternae grow through COPII vesicle fusion. (v) ER-resident proteins are recycled from cis cisternae to the ER via COPIa-type vesicles. (vi) In S. dubia the C2 cisternae are capable of mediating the self-assembly of scale protein complexes. (vii) In plants, ∼90% of native α-mannosidase I localizes to medial Golgi cisternae. (viii) Biochemical activation of cis cisternae appears to coincide with their conversion to medial cisternae via recycling of medial cisterna enzymes. We propose how the different cis cisterna assembly intermediates of plants and algae may actually be related to those present in the ERGIC and in the pre-cis Golgi cisterna layer in mammalian cells.

  9. Potentiation of antidepressant-like activity with lithium: mechanism involved.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Franck; Bourin, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last decade, many augmentation strategies have been developed to increase the activity of antidepressant drugs or to reduce their long onset of action by acting on different targets. One of the first augmentation strategy used in psychiatric disorders is coadministration of lithium and antidepressant drugs. However, the underlaying mechanism of action involved in the potentiatory effect of lithium is still unclear and many hypotheses have been suggested such as activity on BDNF, ACTH, thyroid hormones and serotonin neurotransmission. All these systems being embedded in each other, we focused on the 5-HT neurotransmission-increase induced by lithium treatment. Based on neurobiochemical and behavioral results we tried to better understand its mechanism of action and we concluded that effect of lithium on 5-HT neurotransmission could be linked to a partial agonist activity on 5-HT1B autoreceptors, or to a modulatory activity on these receptors, located in the cortical area in the case of a short term treatment, or in the hippocampus in the case of a long term treatment. We also suggested that the anti-manic effect of lithium was linked to this activity on 5-HT1B receptors, occurring this time on 5-HT1B postsynaptic (heteroreceptors on dopaminergic pathways) receptors levels.

  10. Evidence for sequential and increasing activation of replication origins along replication timing gradients in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Guillaume; Rappailles, Aurélien; Baker, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Long; Arneodo, Alain; Goldar, Arach; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Audit, Benjamin; Hyrien, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Genome-wide replication timing studies have suggested that mammalian chromosomes consist of megabase-scale domains of coordinated origin firing separated by large originless transition regions. Here, we report a quantitative genome-wide analysis of DNA replication kinetics in several human cell types that contradicts this view. DNA combing in HeLa cells sorted into four temporal compartments of S phase shows that replication origins are spaced at 40 kb intervals and fire as small clusters whose synchrony increases during S phase and that replication fork velocity (mean 0.7 kb/min, maximum 2.0 kb/min) remains constant and narrowly distributed through S phase. However, multi-scale analysis of a genome-wide replication timing profile shows a broad distribution of replication timing gradients with practically no regions larger than 100 kb replicating at less than 2 kb/min. Therefore, HeLa cells lack large regions of unidirectional fork progression. Temporal transition regions are replicated by sequential activation of origins at a rate that increases during S phase and replication timing gradients are set by the delay and the spacing between successive origin firings rather than by the velocity of single forks. Activation of internal origins in a specific temporal transition region is directly demonstrated by DNA combing of the IGH locus in HeLa cells. Analysis of published origin maps in HeLa cells and published replication timing and DNA combing data in several other cell types corroborate these findings, with the interesting exception of embryonic stem cells where regions of unidirectional fork progression seem more abundant. These results can be explained if origins fire independently of each other but under the control of long-range chromatin structure, or if replication forks progressing from early origins stimulate initiation in nearby unreplicated DNA. These findings shed a new light on the replication timing program of mammalian genomes and provide a general

  11. Modern Sequential Analysis and Its Applications to Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartroff, Jay; Finkelman, Matthew; Lai, Tze Leung

    2008-01-01

    After a brief review of recent advances in sequential analysis involving sequential generalized likelihood ratio tests, we discuss their use in psychometric testing and extend the asymptotic optimality theory of these sequential tests to the case of sequentially generated experiments, of particular interest in computerized adaptive testing. We…

  12. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  13. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  14. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, J. Matthew; Titiz, Ali S.; Hernan, Amanda E.; Scott, Rod C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  15. Sequential treatment with betulinic acid followed by 5-fluorouracil shows synergistic cytotoxic activity in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Jian; Liu, Jun-Bao; Dou, Yu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Betulinic acid selectively inhibits the growth of ovarian carcinoma cell lines without affecting the normal cells. In the present study, the effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and betulinic acid (BA) combination on ovarian carcinoma cells was studied. The results demonstrated that ovarian carcinoma cells on concurrent or 5-FU followed by BA treatment show increased Sub-G1 cell population, increased rate of cell apoptosis and morphological changes in mitochondrial membrane. In OVCAR 432 cells treatment with sequential combination of 5-FU and BA increased the Sub-G1 cell population to 51.3% and growth inhibition rate of > 72%. However, exposure to BA before 5-FU treatment caused a decrease in rate of inhibition to < 35%. Treatment with combination of 5 μM of 5-FU and 1 μM of BA for 48 h, led to an induction of apoptosis in 79.7% and induced morphological changes in OVCAR 432 cells. The Western blot results showed high concentration of cytochrome c in the cell cytosol after 24 h of 5-FU and BA combination treatment. Treatment of BA-responsive RMS-13 cells with 5-FU and BA combination resulted in inhibition of GLI1, GLI2, PTCH1, and IGF2 genes. In addition, we found a significant reduction in hedgehog activity of RMS-13 cells after 5-FU and BA combination treatment by means of a hedgehog-responsive reporter assay. Therefore, 5-FU and BA combination can be a promising regimen for the treatment of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:25755712

  16. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  17. Hydrogen peroxide is involved in collagen-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, P; Pulcinelli, F M; Lenti, L; Gazzaniga, P P; Violi, F

    1998-01-15

    In this study, we investigated whether (1) collagen-induced platelet aggregation is associated with a burst of H2O2, (2) this oxidant species is involved in the activation of platelets, and (3) the pathways of platelet activation are stimulated by H2O2. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation was associated with production of H2O2, which was abolished by catalase, an enzyme that destroys H2O2. H2O2 production was not observed when ADP or thrombin were used as agonists. Catalase inhibited dose-dependently thromboxane A2 production, release of arachidonic acid from platelet membrane, and Inositol 1,4,5P3 (IP3) formation. In aspirin-treated platelets stimulated with high concentrations of collagen, catalase inhibited platelet aggregation, calcium mobilization, and IP3 production. This study suggests that collagen-induced platelet aggregation is associated with a burst of H2O2 that acts as a second messenger by stimulating the arachidonic acid metabolism and phospholipase C pathway.

  18. Head Start Parent Involvement Activities: Measuring the Effect of School Based Parent Involvement Activities on Parent Efficacy in Early Childhood Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadri, Khadijat O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this position paper was to examine the impact of school based parent involvement activities on parent efficacy. Methodology: The paper explores research studies into school based activities on long term parent efficacy. Conclusions: Most schools are involving parents in school-based activities in a variety of ways but the…

  19. Model-based choices involve prospective neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Bradley B.; Duncan, Katherine D.; Simon, Dylan A.; Shohamy, Daphna; Daw, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Decisions may arise via “model-free” repetition of previously reinforced actions, or by “model-based” evaluation, which is widely thought to follow from prospective anticipation of action consequences using a learned map or model. While choices and neural correlates of decision variables sometimes reflect knowledge of their consequences, it remains unclear whether this actually arises from prospective evaluation. Using functional MRI and a sequential reward-learning task in which paths contained decodable object categories, we found that humans’ model-based choices were associated with neural signatures of future paths observed at decision time, suggesting a prospective mechanism for choice. Prospection also covaried with the degree of model-based influences on neural correlates of decision variables, and was inversely related to prediction error signals thought to underlie model-free learning. These results dissociate separate mechanisms underlying model-based and model-free evaluation and support the hypothesis that model-based influences on choices and neural decision variables result from prospection. PMID:25799041

  20. Involving Hispanic Parents in Educational Activities through Collaborative Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Alicia Salinas

    1997-01-01

    A literature review of effective strategies for involving Hispanic families explores some basic misunderstandings; discusses logistical, attitudinal, and expectations barriers to involving Hispanic parents, particularly those who are migrants or immigrants; and presents strategies that resulted in successful experiences with these parents.…

  1. Cues to Parent Involvement in Drug Prevention and School Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ellen J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Guided by the Health Belief Model, focus groups identified strategies to promote parent involvement with their children's substance abuse education. Low-income parents and school personnel identified cues to action and necessary requirements (child care, transportation, incentives) as important in promoting parent involvement. Children's…

  2. Organized Activity Involvement among Rural Youth: Gender Differences in Associations between Activity Type and Developmental Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Kaitlyn A.; Oosterhoff, Benjamin; Metzger, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined associations between organized activity involvement, academic achievement, and problem behavior in a sample of youth from a non-agricultural based rural community (M[subscript age] = 15.26, Age range = 11-19 years, N = 456). Analyses examined whether associations varied as a function of adolescent gender and age.…

  3. Sequential steps of macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy are involved in the irreversible process of posterior silk gland histolysis during metamorphosis of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Hajime; Yabu, Takeshi; Sudayama, Makoto; Mano, Nobuhiro; Arai, Naoto; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Hosono, Kuniaki

    2016-04-15

    To elucidate the degradation process of the posterior silk gland during metamorphosis of the silkworm ITALIC! Bombyx mori, tissues collected on the 6th day after entering the 5th instar (V6), prior to spinning (PS), during spinning (SP) and after cocoon formation (CO) were used to analyze macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent ubiquitin proteasome. Immediately after entering metamorphosis stage PS, the levels of ATP and phosphorylated p70S6 kinase protein decreased spontaneously and continued to decline at SP, followed by a notable restoration at CO. In contrast, phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) showed increases at SP and CO. Most of the Atg8 protein was converted to form II at all stages. The levels of ubiquitinated proteins were high at SP and CO, and low at PS. The proteasome activity was high at V6 and PS but low at SP and CO. In the isolated lysosome fractions, levels of Hsc70/Hsp70 protein began to increase at PS and continued to rise at SP and CO. The lysosomal cathepsin B/L activity showed a dramatic increase at CO. Our results clearly demonstrate that macroautophagy occurs before entering the metamorphosis stage and strongly suggest that the CMA pathway may play an important role in the histolysis of the posterior silk gland during metamorphosis.

  4. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or... PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or...

  5. Antithrombin Regulates Matriptase Activity Involved in Plasmin Generation, Syndecan Shedding, and HGF Activation in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Xu, Zhenghong; Baksh, Adrienne N. H.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Swanson, Richard; Olson, Steve T.; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Johnson, Michael D.; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Matriptase, a membrane-associated serine protease, plays an essential role in epidermal barrier function through activation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease prostasin. The matriptase-prostasin proteolytic cascade is tightly regulated by hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 such that matriptase autoactivation and prostasin activation occur simultaneously and are followed immediately by the inhibition of both enzymes by HAI-1. However, the mechanisms whereby matriptase acts on extracellular substrates remain elusive. Here we report that some active matriptase can escape HAI-1 inhibition by being rapidly shed from the cell surface. In the pericellular environment, shed active matriptase is able to activate hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), accelerate plasminogen activation, and shed syndecan 1. The amount of active matriptase shed is inversely correlated with the amount of antithrombin (AT) bound to the surface of the keratinocytes. Binding of AT to the surface of keratinocytes is dependent on a functional heparin binding site, Lys-125, and that the N-glycosylation site Asn-135 be unglycosylated. This suggests that β-AT, and not α-AT, is responsible for regulation of pericellular matriptase activity in keratinocytes. Keratinocytes appear to rely on AT to regulate the level of pericellular active matriptase much more than breast and prostate epithelial cells in which AT regulation of matriptase activity occurs at much lower levels than keratinocytes. These results suggest that keratinocytes employ two distinct serine protease inhibitors to control the activation and processing of two different sets of matriptase substrates leading to different biological events: 1) HAI-1 for prostasin activation/inhibition, and 2) AT for the pericellular proteolysis involved in HGF activation, accelerating plasminogen activation, and shedding of syndecans. PMID:23675430

  6. 101 Activities for Building More Effective School-Community Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Dorothy; Mattox, Beverly

    This booklet contains a collection of more than 100 activities designed to promote school-home and school-community relations. Activities are organized into seven categories: (1) communicating word from home to school, (2) people to people, (3) educational events, (4) volunteers--hands on in the classroom, (5) utilizing community resources, (6)…

  7. Radiation protection in radiologic technology: Apathy versus active involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, K.H.

    1982-11-01

    The lack of active participation in radiation protection is a serious problem in Radiologic Technology today. Underlying the problem is professional apathy. An overview of the historical changes, as well as various recent developments in radiology, accentuate the importance of necessary changes in technologists' attitudes and activities. 22 references.

  8. Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Structured extracurricular activity participation has been linked to self-esteem and other indicators of positive youth development. This article describes the theoretical basis for this relationship, centering on extracurricular activities as a location for identity development. A summary of the empirical evidence points to the importance of…

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ regulates genes involved in insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling and lipid metabolism during adipogenesis through functionally distinct enhancer classes.

    PubMed

    Oger, Frédérik; Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Gheeraert, Céline; Avner, Stéphane; Durand, Emmanuelle; Froguel, Philippe; Salbert, Gilles; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2014-01-10

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is a transcription factor whose expression is induced during adipogenesis and that is required for the acquisition and control of mature adipocyte functions. Indeed, PPAR induces the expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis and storage through enhancers activated during adipocyte differentiation. Here, we show that PPAR also binds to enhancers already active in preadipocytes as evidenced by an active chromatin state including lower DNA methylation levels despite higher CpG content. These constitutive enhancers are linked to genes involved in the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway that are transcriptionally induced during adipogenesis but to a lower extent than lipid metabolism genes, because of stronger basal expression levels in preadipocytes. This is consistent with the sequential involvement of hormonal sensitivity and lipid handling during adipocyte maturation and correlates with the chromatin structure dynamics at constitutive and activated enhancers. Interestingly, constitutive enhancers are evolutionary conserved and can be activated in other tissues, in contrast to enhancers controlling lipid handling genes whose activation is more restricted to adipocytes. Thus, PPAR utilizes both broadly active and cell type-specific enhancers to modulate the dynamic range of activation of genes involved in the adipogenic process.

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Regulates Genes Involved in Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor Signaling and Lipid Metabolism during Adipogenesis through Functionally Distinct Enhancer Classes*

    PubMed Central

    Oger, Frédérik; Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Gheeraert, Céline; Avner, Stéphane; Durand, Emmanuelle; Froguel, Philippe; Salbert, Gilles; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is a transcription factor whose expression is induced during adipogenesis and that is required for the acquisition and control of mature adipocyte functions. Indeed, PPARγ induces the expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis and storage through enhancers activated during adipocyte differentiation. Here, we show that PPARγ also binds to enhancers already active in preadipocytes as evidenced by an active chromatin state including lower DNA methylation levels despite higher CpG content. These constitutive enhancers are linked to genes involved in the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway that are transcriptionally induced during adipogenesis but to a lower extent than lipid metabolism genes, because of stronger basal expression levels in preadipocytes. This is consistent with the sequential involvement of hormonal sensitivity and lipid handling during adipocyte maturation and correlates with the chromatin structure dynamics at constitutive and activated enhancers. Interestingly, constitutive enhancers are evolutionary conserved and can be activated in other tissues, in contrast to enhancers controlling lipid handling genes whose activation is more restricted to adipocytes. Thus, PPARγ utilizes both broadly active and cell type-specific enhancers to modulate the dynamic range of activation of genes involved in the adipogenic process. PMID:24288131

  11. Decoding sequential finger movements from preparatory activity in higher-order motor regions: a functional magnetic resonance imaging multi-voxel pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Nambu, Isao; Hagura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Satoshi; Wada, Yasuhiro; Kawato, Mitsuo; Naito, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    Performing a complex sequential finger movement requires the temporally well-ordered organization of individual finger movements. Previous behavioural studies have suggested that the brain prepares a whole sequence of movements as a single set, rather than the movements of individual fingers. However, direct neuroimaging support for this hypothesis is lacking and, assuming it to be true, it remains unclear which brain regions represent the information of a prepared sequence. Here, we measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging while 14 right-handed healthy participants performed two types of well-learned sequential finger movements with their right hands. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis, we examined whether the types of the forthcoming sequence could be predicted from the preparatory activities of nine regions of interest, which included the motor, somatosensory and posterior parietal regions in each hemisphere, bilateral visual cortices, cerebellum and basal ganglia. We found that, during preparation, the activity of the contralateral motor regions could predict which of the two sequences would be executed. Further detailed analysis revealed that the contralateral dorsal premotor cortex and supplementary motor area were the key areas that contributed to the prediction consistently across participants. These contrasted with results from execution-related brain activity where a performed sequence was successfully predicted from the activities in the broad cortical sensory-motor network, including the bilateral motor, parietal and ipsilateral somatosensory cortices. Our study supports the hypothesis that temporary well-organized sequences of movements are represented as a set in the brain, and that preparatory activity in higher-order motor regions represents information about upcoming motor actions.

  12. Artificial masculinization in tilapia involves androgen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-10-01

    Estrogens have a pivotal role in natural female sexual differentiation of tilapia while lack of steroids results in testicular development. Despite the fact that androgens do not participate in natural sex differentiation, synthetic androgens, mainly 17-α-methyltestosterone (MT) are effective in the production of all-male fish in aquaculture. The sex inversion potency of synthetic androgens may arise from their androgenic activity or else as inhibitors of aromatase activity. The current study is an attempt to differentiate between the two alleged activities in order to evaluate their contribution to the sex inversion process and aid the search for novel sex inversion agents. In the present study, MT inhibited aromatase activity, when applied in vitro as did the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In comparison, exposure to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, was considerably more effective. Androgenic activity of MT was evaluated by exposure of Sciaenochromis fryeri fry to the substance and testing for the appearance of blue color. Flutamide, an androgen antagonist, administered concomitantly with MT, reduced the appearance of the blue color and the sex inversion potency of MT in a dose-dependent manner. In tilapia, administration of MT, fadrozole or DHT resulted in efficient sex inversion while flutamide reduced the sex inversion potency of all three compounds. In the case of MT and DHT the decrease in sex inversion efficiency caused by flutamide is most likely due to the direct blocking of the androgen binding to its cognate receptor. The negative effect of flutamide on the efficiency of the fadrozole treatment may indicate that the masculinizing activity of fadrozole may be attributed to excess, un-aromatized, androgens accumulated in the differentiating gonad. The present study shows that when androgen receptors are blocked, there is a reduction in the efficiency of sex inversion treatments. Our results suggest that in contrast to

  13. Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Majlesi, Ali Reza; Ekström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment-including collaborating partners-to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways.

  14. Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Majlesi, Ali Reza; Ekström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment-including collaborating partners-to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways. PMID:27531451

  15. Social Work with Religious Volunteers: Activating and Sustaining Community Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Diana R.; Myers, Dennis M.; Wolfer, Terry A.

    2008-01-01

    Social workers in diverse community practice settings recruit and work with volunteers from religious congregations. This article reports findings from two surveys: 7,405 congregants in 35 Protestant congregations, including 2,570 who were actively volunteering, and a follow-up survey of 946 volunteers. It compares characteristics of congregation…

  16. Getting Students Involved: Classroom Activities Which Promote Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, G. Ronald; And Others

    Three essays concerning second language classroom activities that promote learning of communication skills are presented. In "From Manipulation to Communication" (Renate A. Schulz), the importance of establishing minimal communicative objectives for classroom instruction skills is discussed, specifying situations in which students have to…

  17. Plasmin is involved in inflammation via protease-activated receptor-1 activation in human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Naoto; Hashizume, Hideki; Nakao, Sumi; Matsushima, Kiyoshi; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2008-05-15

    Plasmin is a proteolytic enzyme produced from plasminogen by plasminogen activators. We investigated the function of plasmin in human dental pulp fibroblast-like cells. Plasmin induced an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of mRNA for protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) was detected, and the PAR-1 activating peptide SFLLRN induced an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in the cells. The plasmin-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was inhibited in the presence of the PAR-1 antagonist SCH79797. Plasmin stimulated the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and prostaglandin E(2) release, which are involved in inflammation. These effects of plasmin on expression of IL-8 mRNA and prostaglandin E(2) release were inhibited in the presence of the PAR-1 antagonist SCH79797. These results suggest that plasmin activates PAR-1 and is involved in inflammation in human dental pulp. PMID:18384756

  18. Effects of Sequential Applications of Bassa 50EC (Fenobucarb) and Vitashield 40EC (Chlorpyrifos ethyl) on Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Climbing Perch (Anabas testudineus) Cultured in Rice Fields in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Berg, Håkan; Laureus, Jenny; Cong, Nguyen Van; Tedengren, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This study assesses the effects of sequential applications of the insecticides Bassa 50EC (fenobucarb-F) and Vitashield 40EC (chlorpyrifos ethyl-CPF), sprayed at concentrations used by rice farmers in the Mekong Delta, on the brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in climbing perch fingerlings. After spraying the pesticides on the rice fields, the water concentrations of both insecticides decreased below the detection levels within 3 days. The sequential applications caused significant inhibition on the brain AChE activity in the exposed fish. The inhibition by F was quicker, but less prolonged, than for CPF. The inhibition levels caused by the sequential applications were lower than those caused by only CPF and by a mixture of CPF and F. The results indicate that sequential applications of pesticides could have a negative impact on aquatic organisms and fish yields, with implication for the aquatic biodiversity, local people's livelihood and the aquaculture industry in the Mekong Delta. PMID:27075585

  19. Newly synthesized proteoglycans secreted by sequentially derived populations of cells from new-born rat calvaria: effects of transforming growth factor-beta and matrigenin activity.

    PubMed

    Chopra, R K; Li, Z M; Vickery, S; Anastassiades, T

    1990-10-01

    Three populations (1, 3 and 6) of bone cells, derived from rat calvaria by sequential enzymatic digestion, were cultured with [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulfate, in the presence or absence of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) or bone-derived matrigenin activity. Population 6 synthesized a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (PG) and responded to the addition of the factors by increased rates of synthesis of hyaluronic acid (HA) and PG and an increase in the size of the HA. Comparisons of populations 1, 3 and 6 showed an ordered, spontaneous increase in HA and PG synthesis. However, the addition of matrigenin activity resulted in a much greater stimulation of PG, but not HA, synthesis in population 1 compared to population 6, suggesting a cellular organization in the calvarium whose net effect would be to direct PG synthesis towards the periphery of the tissue.

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for sequential metabolism: effect of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphism on clopidogrel and clopidogrel active metabolite pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Djebli, Nassim; Fabre, David; Boulenc, Xavier; Fabre, Gérard; Sultan, Eric; Hurbin, Fabrice

    2015-04-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that needs to be converted to its active metabolite (clopi-H4) in two sequential cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent steps. In the present study, a dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in Simcyp for clopidogrel and clopi-H4 using a specific sequential metabolite module in four populations with phenotypically different CYP2C19 activity (poor, intermediate, extensive, and ultrarapid metabolizers) receiving a loading dose of 300 mg followed by a maintenance dose of 75 mg. This model was validated using several approaches. First, a comparison of predicted-to-observed area under the curve (AUC)0-24 obtained from a randomized crossover study conducted in four balanced CYP2C19-phenotype metabolizer groups was performed using a visual predictive check method. Second, the interindividual and intertrial variability (on the basis of AUC0-24 comparisons) between the predicted trials and the observed trial of individuals, for each phenotypic group, were compared. Finally, a further validation, on the basis of drug-drug-interaction prediction, was performed by comparing observed values of clopidogrel and clopi-H4 with or without dronedarone (moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor) coadministration using a previously developed and validated physiologically based PBPK dronedarone model. The PBPK model was well validated for both clopidogrel and its active metabolite clopi-H4, in each CYP2C19-phenotypic group, whatever the treatment period (300-mg loading dose and 75-mg last maintenance dose). This is the first study proposing a full dynamic PBPK model able to accurately predict simultaneously the pharmacokinetics of the parent drug and of its primary and secondary metabolites in populations with genetically different activity for a metabolizing enzyme.

  1. Antibacterial activity of Thai herbal extracts on acne involved microorganism.

    PubMed

    Niyomkam, P; Kaewbumrung, S; Kaewnpparat, S; Panichayupakaranant, P

    2010-04-01

    Ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of 18 Thai medicinal plants were investigated for their antibacterial activity against Propionibacterium acnes, Stapylococcus aureus, and S. epidermidis. Thirteen plant extracts were capable of inhibiting the growth of P. acnes and S. epidermidis, while 14 plant extracts exhibited an inhibitory effect on S. aureus. Based on the broth dilution method, the ethyl acetate extract of Alpinia galanga (L.) Wild. (Zingiberaceae) rhizome showed the strongest antibacterial effect against P. acnes, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 156.0 and 312.0 microg/mL, respectively. On the basis of bioassay-guided purification, the ethyl acetate extract was isolated to afford the antibacterial active compound, which was identified as 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (1'-ACA). 1'-ACA had a strong inhibitory effect on P. acnes with MIC and MBC values of 62.0 and 250.0 microg/mL, respectively. Thus, 1'-ACA was used as an indicative marker for standardization of A. galanga extract using high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that A. galanga extract could be an interesting agent for further studies on an alternative treatment of acne.

  2. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  3. Organized activity involvement, depressive symptoms, and social adjustment in adolescents: ethnicity and socioeconomic status as moderators.

    PubMed

    Randall, Edin T; Bohnert, Amy M

    2009-10-01

    The current cross-sectional study investigated the links between various dimensions of organized activity involvement and depressive symptoms, loneliness, and peer victimization in an ethnically and economically diverse sample of adolescents (N = 152; 58% female). Results indicate that adolescents who were involved in organized activities for more years also reported lower levels of loneliness. There was evidence of diminishing returns when adolescents were very highly involved in organized activities; those who were either under- or over-involved reported the highest levels of depressive symptoms. Conversely, findings indicate that adolescents who participated in a narrow or wide range of activity contexts reported the lowest levels of depressive symptoms. In addition, results suggested that the relation between organized activity involvement and adjustment differs among adolescents from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. Findings from the current study also underscore the importance of considering multiple indices of activity involvement when assessing its association with adjustment.

  4. Activity of capryloyl collagenic acid against bacteria involved in acne.

    PubMed

    Fourniat, J; Bourlioux, P

    1989-12-01

    Synopsis Capryloyl collagenic acid (Lipacide C8Co) has similar bacteriostatic activity in vitro to that of benzoyl peroxide towards the bacteria found in acne lesions (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes) (MIC between 1 and 4 mg ml(-1) for C8Co, and between 0.5 and 5 mg ml(-1) for benzoyl peroxide). The presence of Emulgine M8 did not affect the bacteriostatic activity of C8Co. A 4% w/v solution of C8Co (incorporating Emulgine M8) fulfilled the criteria for an antiseptic preparation as laid down by the French Pharmacopoeia (10th Edition), and had a spectrum 5 bactericidal activity according to the French Standard AFNOR NF T 72-151. The excellent cutaneous tolerance of capryloyl collagenic acid would indicate that an aqueous solution might be of value for topical treatment of the bacterial component of acne. Résumé Activité antibactérienne de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique vis à vis des bactéries impliquées dans l'etiologie de l'acné L'acide capryloyl-collagénique (Lipacide C8Co) et le peroxyde de benzoyle présentent une activité bactériostatique in-vitroéquivalente vis à vis des espèces bactériennes retrouvées au niveau des lésions acnéiques (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis et Propionibacterium acnes) (CMI comprise entre 1 et 4 mg ml(-1) pour le lipoaminoacide, et 0,5 et 5 mg ml(-1) pour le peroxyde de benzoyle). La mise en solution aqueuse de l'acide capryloyl-collagénique en présence d'Emulgine M8 ne modifie pas son activité bactériostatique. Une telle solution, à 4% m/V d'acide capryloyl-collagénique et 5% m/V d'Emulgine M8, satisfait à l'essai d'activité des préparations antiseptiques décrit à la Pharmacopée Française (Xème Ed.) (concentration minimale antiseptique: 10% v/V, pour un temps de contact de 5 min à 32 degrees C entre les germes tests et la solution diluée en eau distillée), et posséde une activité bactéricide antiseptique spectre 5 conforme à la norme AFNOR NF T

  5. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  6. Longitudinal Modeling of Adolescents' Activity Involvement, Problem Peer Associations, and Youth Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Aaron; Dawes, Nickki; Mermelstein, Robin; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal associations among different types of organized activity involvement, problem peer associations, and cigarette smoking were examined in a sample of 1,040 adolescents (mean age = 15.62 at baseline, 16.89 at 15-month assessment, 17.59 at 24 months) enriched for smoking experimentation (83% had tried smoking). A structural equation model tested longitudinal paths between three categories of involvement (team sports, school clubs and activities, and religious activities, measured at baseline and 15 months), problem peer associations (baseline and 15 months), and cigarette smoking behavior (baseline and 24 months). Multi-group analyses indicated pathways differed by type of activity and adolescent gender. Boys’ baseline team sports and religious involvement predicted lower levels of smoking at 24 months via continued activity involvement at 15 months. Girls’ involvement in school clubs and activities and religious activities indirectly predicted lower levels of smoking at 24 months via reduced exposure to problem peers at 15 months. PMID:21603061

  7. Commitment and Differentiation of Osteoclast Precursor Cells by the Sequential Expression of C-Fms and Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κb (Rank) Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Fumio; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Ohneda, Osamu; Inada, Tomohisa; Sudo, Tetsuo; Brasel, Kenneth; Miyata, Takashi; Anderson, Dirk M.; Suda, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Osteoclasts are terminally differentiated cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. However, how their precursor cells diverge from macrophagic lineages is not known. We have identified early and late stages of osteoclastogenesis, in which precursor cells sequentially express c-Fms followed by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK), and have demonstrated that RANK expression in early-stage of precursor cells (c-Fms+RANK−) was stimulated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Although M-CSF and RANKL (ligand) induced commitment of late-stage precursor cells (c-Fms+RANK+) into osteoclasts, even late-stage precursors have the potential to differentiate into macrophages without RANKL. Pretreatment of precursors with M-CSF and delayed addition of RANKL showed that timing of RANK expression and subsequent binding of RANKL are critical for osteoclastogenesis. Thus, the RANK–RANKL system determines the osteoclast differentiation of bipotential precursors in the default pathway of macrophagic differentiation. PMID:10601350

  8. Predicting involvement in prison gang activity: street gang membership, social and psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jane L; Alleyne, Emma; Mozova, Katarina; James, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether street gang membership, psychological factors, and social factors such as preprison experiences could predict young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Data were collected via individual interviews with 188 young offenders held in a Young Offenders Institution in the United Kingdom. Results showed that psychological factors such as the value individuals attached to social status, a social dominance orientation, and antiauthority attitudes were important in predicting young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Further important predictors included preimprisonment events such as levels of threat, levels of individual delinquency, and levels of involvement in group crime. Longer current sentences also predicted involvement in prison gang activity. However, street gang membership was not an important predictor of involvement in prison gang activity. These findings have implications for identifying prisoners involved in prison gang activity and for considering the role of psychological factors and group processes in gang research.

  9. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more regions of active chromatin: Connection to a stochastic paradigm for sequential gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marlene; Mauro, James A; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis- and proliferation-effector genes are substantially regulated by the same transactivators, with E2F-1 and Oct-1 being notable examples. The larger proliferation-effector genes have more binding sites for the transactivators that regulate both sets of genes, and proliferation-effector genes have more regions of active chromatin, i.e, DNase I hypersensitive and histone 3, lysine-4 trimethylation sites. Thus, the size differences between the 2 classes of genes suggest a transcriptional regulation paradigm whereby the accumulation of transcription factors that regulate both sets of genes, merely as an aspect of stochastic behavior, accumulate first on the larger proliferation-effector gene "traps," and then accumulate on the apoptosis effector genes, thereby effecting sequential activation of the 2 different gene sets. As IRF-1 and p53 levels increase, tumor suppressor proteins are first activated, followed by the activation of apoptosis-effector genes, for example during S-phase pausing for DNA repair. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more IRF-1 and p53 binding sites, thereby likewise suggesting a paradigm for transcription sequencing based on stochastic interactions of transcription factors with different gene classes. In this report, using the ENCODE database, we determined that tumor suppressor genes have a greater number of open chromatin regions and histone 3 lysine-4 trimethylation sites, consistent with the idea that a larger gene size can facilitate earlier transcriptional activation via the inclusion of more transactivator binding sites.

  10. Cdc42p and Rho1p are sequentially activated and mechanistically linked to vacuole membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Michael R.; Jones, Lynden; Eitzen, Gary

    2010-03-26

    Small monomeric GTPases act as molecular switches, regulating many biological functions via activation of membrane localized signaling cascades. Activation of their switch function is controlled by GTP binding and hydrolysis. Two Rho GTPases, Cdc42p and Rho1p, are localized to the yeast vacuole where they regulate membrane fusion. Here, we define a method to directly examine vacuole membrane Cdc42p and Rho1p activation based on their affinity to probes derived from effectors. Cdc42p and Rho1p showed unique temporal activation which aligned with distinct subreactions of in vitro vacuole fusion. Cdc42p was rapidly activated in an ATP-independent manner while Rho1p activation was kinetically slower and required ATP. Inhibitors that are known to block vacuole membrane fusion were examined for their effect on Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Rdi1p, which inhibits the dissociation of GDP from Rho proteins, blocked both Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Ligands of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} specifically inhibited Rho1p activation while pre-incubation with U73122, which targets Plc1p function, increased Rho1p activation. These results define unique activation mechanisms for Cdc42p and Rho1p, which may be linked to the vacuole membrane fusion mechanism.

  11. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. 13.5 Section 13.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS General § 13.5 Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. (a) The...

  12. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. 13.5 Section 13.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS General § 13.5 Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. (a) The...

  13. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. 13.5 Section 13.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS General § 13.5 Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. (a) The Administrator will refer cases of...

  14. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1215.24 Section 1215.24 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct....

  15. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1215.24 Section 1215.24 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct....

  16. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1215.24 Section 1215.24 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct....

  17. Similar Neural Correlates for Language and Sequential Learning: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Morten H.; Conway, Christopher M.; Onnis, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the time course and distribution of brain activity while adults performed (1) a sequential learning task involving complex structured sequences and (2) a language processing task. The same positive ERP deflection, the P600 effect, typically linked to difficult or ungrammatical syntactic…

  18. Osteomyelitis of the head and neck: sequential radionuclide scanning in diagnosis and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, M.; Kaufman, R.A.; Baum, S.

    1985-01-01

    Sequential technetium and gallium scans of the head and neck were used to confirm the diagnosis of osteomyelitis and as an important therapeutic aid to delineate the transformation of active osteomyelitis to inactive osteomyelitis in 11 cases involving sites in the head and neck. Illustrative cases are presented of frontal sinus and cervical spine osteomyelitis and laryngeal osteochondritis.

  19. Specific epitopes of domains II and III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin involved in the sequential interaction with cadherin and aminopeptidase-N receptors in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Isabel; Arenas, Iván; Benitez, Itzel; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Becerril, Baltazar; Grande, Ricardo; Almagro, Juan Carlos; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2006-11-10

    The Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are specific to different insects. In Manduca sexta cadherin (Bt-R1) and aminopeptidase-N (APN) proteins are recognized as Cry1A receptors. Previous work showed that Cry1Ab binds to Bt-R1 promoting the formation of a pre-pore oligomer that binds to APN leading to membrane insertion. In this work we characterized the binding epitopes involved in the sequential interaction of Cry1Ab with Bt-R1 and APN. A Cry1Ab immune M13 phage repertoire was constructed using antibody gene transcripts of bone marrow or spleen from a rabbit immunized with Cry1Ab. We identified antibodies that recognize domain II loop 3 (scFvL3-3) or beta16-beta22 (scFvM22) in domain III. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and toxin overlay binding competition assays in the presence of scFvL3-3, scFvM22, or synthetic peptides showed that domain II loop 3 is an important epitope for interaction with Bt-R1 receptor, whereas domain III beta16 is involved in the interaction with APN. Both scFvL3-3 and scFvM22 lowered the toxicity of Cry1Ab to M. sexta larvae indicating that interaction with both receptors is important for in vivo toxicity. scFvL3-3 and anti-loop2 scFv (scFv73) promoted the formation of the pre-pore oligomer in contrast to scFvM22. In addition, scFvL3-3 and scFv73 preferentially recognized the monomeric toxin rather than the pre-pore suggesting a conformational change in domain II loops upon oligomerization. These results indicate for the first time that both receptor molecules participate in Cry1Ab toxin action in vivo: first the monomeric toxin binds to Bt-R1 through loops 2 and 3 of domain II promoting the formation of the pre-pore inducing some structural changes, then the pre-pore interacts with APN through beta-16 of domain III promoting membrane insertion and cell death.

  20. Sequential growth of deformation bands in carbonate grainstones in the hangingwall of an active growth fault: Implications for deformation mechanisms in different tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotevatn, Atle; Thorsheim, Elin; Bastesen, Eivind; Fossmark, Heidi S. S.; Torabi, Anita; Sælen, Gunnar

    2016-09-01

    Deformation bands in porous sandstones have been extensively studied for four decades, whereas comparatively less is known about deformation bands in porous carbonate rocks, particularly in extensional settings. Here, we investigate porous grainstones of the Globigerina Limestone Formation in Malta, which contain several types of deformation bands in the hangingwall of the Maghlaq Fault: (i) bed-parallel pure compaction bands (PCB); (ii) pressure solution-dominated compactive shear bands (SCSB) and iii) cataclasis-dominated compactive shear bands (CCSB). Geometric and kinematic analyses show that the bands formed sequentially in the hangingwall of the evolving Maghlaq growth fault. PCBs formed first due to fault-controlled subsidence and vertical loading; a (semi-)tectonic control on PCB formation is thus documented for the first time in an extensional setting. Pressure solution (dominating SCSBs) and cataclasis (dominating CCSBs) appear to have operated separately, and not in concert. Our findings therefore suggest that, in some carbonate rocks, cataclasis within deformation bands may develop irrespective of whether pressure solution processes are involved. We suggest this may be related to stress state, and that whereas pressure solution is a significant facilitator of grain size reduction in contractional settings, grain size reduction within deformation bands in extensional settings is less dependent on pressure solution processes.

  1. Early Inflammatory Responses Following Cell Grafting in the CNS Trigger Activation of the Subventricular Zone: A Proposed Model of Sequential Cellular Events.

    PubMed

    Praet, Jelle; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Le Blon, Debbie; Hoornaert, Chloé; Goossens, Herman; Hens, Niel; Van der Linden, Annemie; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    While multiple rodent preclinical studies, and to a lesser extent human clinical trials, claim the feasibility, safety, and potential clinical benefit of cell grafting in the central nervous system (CNS), currently only little convincing knowledge exists regarding the actual fate of the grafted cells and their effect on the surrounding environment (or vice versa). Our preceding studies already indicated that only a minor fraction of the initially grafted cell population survives the grafting process, while the surviving cell population becomes invaded by highly activated microglia/macrophages and surrounded by reactive astrogliosis. In the current study, we further elaborate on early cellular and inflammatory events following syngeneic grafting of eGFP(+) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) in the CNS of immunocompetent mice. Based on obtained quantitative histological data, we here propose a detailed mathematically derived working model that sequentially comprises hypoxia-induced apoptosis of grafted mEFs, neutrophil invasion, neoangiogenesis, microglia/macrophage recruitment, astrogliosis, and eventually survival of a limited number of grafted mEFs. Simultaneously, we observed that the cellular events following mEF grafting activates the subventricular zone neural stem and progenitor cell compartment. This proposed model therefore further contributes to our understanding of cell graft-induced cellular responses and will eventually allow for successful manipulation of this intervention.

  2. Adaptive sequential controller

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Xing, Jian; Butler, Nicholas G.; Rodriguez, Alonso

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  3. Lordosis facilitation by leptin in ovariectomized, estrogen-primed rats requires simultaneous or sequential activation of several protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    García-Juárez, Marcos; Beyer, Carlos; Gómora-Arrati, Porfirio; Domínguez-Ordoñez, Raymundo; Lima-Hernández, Francisco J; Eguibar, José R; Galicia-Aguas, Yadira L; Etgen, Anne M; González-Flores, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the Janus kinase 2, Src tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinase interact to regulate lordosis behavior induced by leptin in ovariectomized, estrogen-primed rats. The role of protein kinase A and protein kinase C in lordosis facilitation by leptin was also assessed. In experiment 1, the intracerebroventricular administration of leptin to ovariectomized, estradiol-primed rats significantly stimulated lordosis behavior at 1, 2 and 4 h post-injection tests. In experiment 2, the Janus kinase 2 inhibitor AG490, the Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD98059 were administered into the right lateral ventricle before leptin. The lordosis quotient and the lordosis score induced by leptin were significantly decreased by each of these kinase inhibitors. In experiment 3, we examined the effects of RpcAMPS and bisindolylmaleimide, protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors on the lordosis elicited by leptin administration. Lordosis behavior induced by leptin was significantly decreased by both the protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors at 1 h post-leptin injection. The results confirm that multiple intracellular pathways participate in the expression of lordosis behavior in estrogen-primed rats elicited by leptin.

  4. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a... establish and maintain procedures for the protection of human subjects. The definitions in 34 CFR 97.102... approved by the IRB. (34 CFR 97.103(f).) No covered research involving human subjects shall be...

  5. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a... establish and maintain procedures for the protection of human subjects. The definitions in 34 CFR 97.102... approved by the IRB. (34 CFR 97.103(f).) No covered research involving human subjects shall be...

  6. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a... establish and maintain procedures for the protection of human subjects. The definitions in 34 CFR 97.102... approved by the IRB. (34 CFR 97.103(f).) No covered research involving human subjects shall be...

  7. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... children, the exemption at 34 CFR 97.101(b)(2) (i.e., research involving the use of educational tests....101(b)(2) continues to apply, unmodified by 34 CFR 97.401(b), to— (i) Educational tests; and (ii... 34 CFR part 97: Notice About Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a)...

  8. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... children, the exemption at 34 CFR 97.101(b)(2) (i.e., research involving the use of educational tests....101(b)(2) continues to apply, unmodified by 34 CFR 97.401(b), to— (i) Educational tests; and (ii... 34 CFR part 97: Notice About Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a)...

  9. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... That office has the responsibility for investigating or referring the matter, where appropriate, to the... activities which should be referred are matters involving fraud, anti-trust violations, embezzlement,...

  10. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... That office has the responsibility for investigating or referring the matter, where appropriate, to the... activities which should be referred are matters involving fraud, anti-trust violations, embezzlement,...

  11. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Yamada, Naoko; Heo, Jinmoo; Han, Areum

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1) the experience of psychological benefits, 2) the creation of social support, and 3) the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging.

  12. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Yamada, Naoko; Heo, Jinmoo; Han, Areum

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1) the experience of psychological benefits, 2) the creation of social support, and 3) the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging. PMID:25059979

  13. Sequential Activities of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase, PKB/Akt, and Rab7 during Macropinosome Formation in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Rupper, Adam; Lee, Kyung; Knecht, David; Cardelli, James

    2001-01-01

    Macropinocytosis plays an important role in the internalization of antigens by dendritic cells and is the route of entry for many bacterial pathogens; however, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation or maturation of macropinosomes. Like dendritic cells, Dictyostelium amoebae are active in macropinocytosis, and various proteins have been identified that contribute to this process. As described here, microscopic analysis of null mutants have revealed that the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases, PIK1 and PIK2, and the downstream effector protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) are important in regulating completion of macropinocytosis. Although actin-rich membrane protrusions form in these cell lines, they recede without forming macropinosomes. Imaging of cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the pleckstrin homology domain (PH) of PKB (GFP-PHPKB) indicates that D3 phosphoinositides are enriched in the forming macropinocytic cup and remain associated with newly formed macropinosomes for <1 minute. A fusion protein, consisting of GFP fused to an F-actin binding domain, overlaps with GFP-PHPKB in the timing of association with forming macropinosomes. Although macropinocytosis is reduced in cells expressing dominant negative Rab7, microscopic imaging studies reveal that GFP-Rab7 associates only with formed macropinosomes at approximately the time that F-actin and D3 phosphoinositide levels decrease. These results support a model in which F-actin modulating proteins and vesicle trafficking proteins coordinately regulate the formation and maturation of macropinosomes. PMID:11553719

  14. Progressive loss of RacGAP1/ogre activity has sequential effects on cytokinesis and zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Warga, Rachel M; Wicklund, April; Webster, Sarah E; Kane, Donald A

    2016-10-15

    RacGAP1 is one of the two components of the centralspindlin complex essential for orchestrating cytokinesis in all animal cells. We report here that the early arrest mutant ogre is a maternal and zygotic loss of function mutation in the zebrafish homolog of racgap1. Like the other model organisms in which racgap1 is mutated, cells in the mutant stop dividing. In vivo cell recordings reveal that gradual loss of wild-type RacGAP1 leads progressively from a failure of abscission, then to cleavage furrow ingression, and finally complete absence of furrow formation. Despite the lack of cytokinesis, gross patterning occurs overtly normally in ogre mutants and cells continue to cycle slowly, some even attaining four or eight nuclei. Many multinucleate cells differentiate and survive, but the majority of cells enter apoptosis that we demonstrate is due to cumulative rounds of defective cytokinesis. Investigation of the cells that differentiate in the mutant indicate that RacGAP1 is also needed for long-term survival of motoneurons and the cytoskeletal organization of sensory axons. We conclude that while RacGAP1 function is crucial for cytokinesis and its activity at different levels controls different aspects of cytokinesis, these defects have occluded other critical roles of this interesting protein.

  15. Sequential activation of alpha-actin genes during avian cardiogenesis: vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin gene transcripts mark the onset of cardiomyocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The expression of cytoplasmic beta-actin and cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle alpha-actins during early avian cardiogenesis was analyzed by in situ hybridization with mRNA-specific single-stranded DNA probes. The cytoplasmic beta-actin gene was ubiquitously expressed in the early chicken embryo. In contrast, the alpha-actin genes were sequentially activated in avian cardiac tissue during the early stages of heart tube formation. The accumulation of large quantities of smooth muscle alpha-actin transcripts in epimyocardial cells preceded the expression of the sarcomeric alpha-actin genes. The accumulation of skeletal alpha-actin mRNAs in the developing heart lagged behind that of cardiac alpha-actin by several embryonic stages. At Hamburger- Hamilton stage 12, the smooth muscle alpha-actin gene was selectively down-regulated in the heart such that only the conus, which subsequently participates in the formation of the vascular trunks, continued to express this gene. This modulation in smooth muscle alpha- actin gene expression correlated with the beginning of coexpression of sarcomeric alpha-actin transcripts in the epimyocardium and the onset of circulation in the embryo. The specific expression of the vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin gene marks the onset of differentiation of cardiac cells and represents the first demonstration of coexpression of both smooth muscle and striated alpha-actin genes within myogenic cells. PMID:3204121

  16. Synergistic effects on dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steel investigated by single and sequential hydrogen/helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiping; Luo, Fengfeng; Yu, Yanxia; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Shen, Zhenyu; Guo, Liping; Ren, Yaoyao; Suo, Jinping

    2016-10-01

    Single-beam and sequential-beam irradiations were performed to investigate the H/He synergistic effect on dislocation loops in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. The irradiations were carried out with 10 keV H+, 18 keV He+ and 160 keV Ar+, alone and in combination at 723 K. He+ single-beam irradiation induced much larger dislocation loops than that induced by both H+ and Ar+ single-beam irradiation. H+ post-irradiation after He+ irradiation further increased the size of dislocation loops, whilst He+ post-irradiation or Ar+ post-irradiation following H+ irradiation only slightly increased the size of dislocation loops. The experiment results indicate that pre-implanted H+ can drastically inhibit the growth while post-implanted H+ can significantly enhance the growth of dislocation loops induced by He+ irradiation. The mechanisms behind the complex synergistic phenomena between H and He and the different roles that H and He played in the growth of dislocation loops are discussed.

  17. Sequential truncation of the lactose permease over a three-amino acid sequence near the carboxyl terminus leads to progressive loss of activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, E.; Hardy, D.; Pastore, J.C.; Kaback, H.R. )

    1991-04-15

    Previous experiments are consistent with the notion that residues 396-401 (...SVFTLS...) at the carboxyl terminus of the last putative transmembrane helix of the lactose (lac) permease of Escherichia coli are important for protection against proteolytic degradation and suggest that this region of the permease may be necessary for proper folding. Stop codons (TAA) have now been substituted sequentially for amino acid codons 396-401 in the lacY gene, and the termination mutants were expressed from the plasmid pT7-5. With respect to transport, permease truncated at residue 396-or 397 is completely defective, while molecules truncated at residues 398, 399, 400, and 401, respectively, exhibit 15-25%, 30-40%, 40-45%, and 70-100% of wild-type activity. As judged by pulse-chase experiments with ({sup 35}S)methionine, wild-type permease or permease truncated at residue 401 is stable, while permease molecules truncated at position 400, 399, 398, 397, or 396 are degraded at increasingly rapid rates. The findings indicate that either the last turn of putative helix XII or the region immediately distal to helix XII is important for proper folding and protection against proteolytic degradation.

  18. Rapid automated assay of anti-oxidation/radical-scavenging activity of natural substances by sequential injection technique (SIA) using spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Polásek, Miroslav; Skála, Petr; Opletal, Lubomír; Jahodár, Ludek

    2004-07-01

    A PC-controlled sequential injection analysis (SIA) system equipped with a spectrophotometric diode-array detector is used for rapid monitoring and evaluation of antioxidation/radical scavenging activity of biological samples. The automated method is based on the known reaction of stable 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) with antioxidants in organic or aqueous-organic media resulting in bleaching of DPPH due to its "quenching" by the interaction with the analytes. The decrease of the absorbance of DPPH (compared to blank experiment carried out with water-ethanol 1:1 instead of the test solution) measured at 525 nm is related to concentration of an antioxidant in the test solution. With the optimised SIA procedure it is possible to detect down to micromolar concentrations of model antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, caffeic acid, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and rutin and to evaluate the concentration of these antioxidants in the micromolar to millimolar range. The sample throughput is 45 h(-1). Thanks to its rapidity and sensitivity, the proposed SIA method is suitable for performing routine screening tests for the presence of various antioxidants in large series of lyophilised herbal or mushroom extracts (the amount of sample needed for the analysis is several milligrams).

  19. Sequential activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system in the progression of hypertensive nephropathy in Goldblatt rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Gyun; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Se-Yun; Lee, Arah; Moon, Ju Young; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Lim, Sung Jig; Sohn, Il Suk; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2016-07-01

    The intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has an important role in generating and maintaining hypertension in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) rats. This study evaluated how various intrarenal RAS components contributed to hypertension not only in the maintenance period (5w; 5 wk after operation) but also earlier (2w; 2 wk after operation). We inserted a 2.5-mm clip into the left renal artery of Sprague-Dawley rats and euthanized them at 2w and 5w following the operation. Systolic blood pressure increased within 1 wk after the operation, and left ventricular hypertrophy occurred in 2K1C rats. At 2w, juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) and collecting duct (CD) renin increased in clipped kidney (CK) of 2K1C rats. The tubular angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) was not changed, but peritubular ACE2 decreased in nonclipped kidney (NCK) and CK of 2K1C rats. At 5w, ACE and CD renin were enhanced, and ACE2 was still lessened in both kidneys of 2K1C rats. However, plasma renin activity (PRA) was not different from that in sham rats. In proximal tubules of CK, the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was not suppressed, but the Mas receptor (MasR) was reduced; thus the AT1R/MasR ratio was elevated. Although hypoxic change in CK could not be excluded, the JGA renin of CK and CD renin in both kidneys was highly expressed independent of time. Peritubular ACE2 changed in the earlier period, and uninhibited AT1R in proximal tubules of CK was presented in the maintenance period. In 2K1C rats, attenuated ACE2 seems to contribute to initiating hypertension while upregulated ACE in combination with unsuppressed AT1R may have a key role in maintaining hypertension.

  20. Structural evidence for enhancement of sequential vitamin D3 hydroxylation activities by directed evolution of cytochrome P450 vitamin D3 hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Yasutake, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Yoshikazu; Nishioka, Taiki; Cheon, Woo-Kwang; Arisawa, Akira; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2010-10-01

    Vitamin D(3) hydroxylase (Vdh) isolated from actinomycete Pseudonocardia autotrophica is a cytochrome P450 (CYP) responsible for the biocatalytic conversion of vitamin D(3) (VD(3)) to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1α,25(OH)(2)VD(3)) by P. autotrophica. Although its biological function is unclear, Vdh is capable of catalyzing the two-step hydroxylation of VD(3), i.e. the conversion of VD(3) to 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25(OH)VD(3)) and then of 25(OH)VD(3) to 1α,25(OH)(2)VD(3), a hormonal form of VD(3). Here we describe the crystal structures of wild-type Vdh (Vdh-WT) in the substrate-free form and of the highly active quadruple mutant (Vdh-K1) generated by directed evolution in the substrate-free, VD(3)-bound, and 25(OH)VD(3)-bound forms. Vdh-WT exhibits an open conformation with the distal heme pocket exposed to the solvent both in the presence and absence of a substrate, whereas Vdh-K1 exhibits a closed conformation in both the substrate-free and substrate-bound forms. The results suggest that the conformational equilibrium was largely shifted toward the closed conformation by four amino acid substitutions scattered throughout the molecule. The substrate-bound structure of Vdh-K1 accommodates both VD(3) and 25(OH)VD(3) but in an anti-parallel orientation. The occurrence of the two secosteroid binding modes accounts for the regioselective sequential VD(3) hydroxylation activities. Moreover, these structures determined before and after directed evolution, together with biochemical and spectroscopic data, provide insights into how directed evolution has worked for significant enhancement of both the VD(3) 25-hydroxylase and 25(OH)VD(3) 1α-hydroxylase activities.

  1. Glutamate activation of Oct-2 in cultured chick Bergmann glia cells: involvement of NFkappaB.

    PubMed

    Méndez, J Alfredo; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2005-07-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is critically involved in gene expression regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels. Its activity through ionotropic as well as metabotropic receptors modifies the protein repertoire in neurons and glial cells. In avian cerebellar Bergmann glia cells, glutamate receptors trigger a diverse array of signaling cascades that include activity-dependent transcription factors such as the activator protein-1, the cAMP response-element binding protein, and Oct-2. We analyze the upstream regulatory elements involved in Oct-2 activation. Our results demonstrate that Ca2+ influx, protein kinase C, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Src, and nuclear factor (NF)kappaB are involved in this signaling pathway. Our findings link alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor activation to a negative phase of chkbp gene regulation, controlled by NFkappaB.

  2. Sequential digital elevation models of active lava flows from ground-based stereo time-lapse imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a framework for deriving sequences of digital elevation models (DEMs) for the analysis of active lava flows using oblique stereo-pair time-lapse imagery. A photo-based technique was favoured over laser-based alternatives due to low equipment cost, high portability and capability for network expansion, with images of advancing flows captured by digital SLR cameras over durations of up to several hours. However, under typical field scale scenarios, relative camera orientations cannot be rigidly maintained (e.g. through the use of a stereo bar), preventing the use of standard stereo time-lapse processing software. Thus, we trial semi-automated DEM-sequence workflows capable of handling the small camera motions, variable image quality and restricted photogrammetric control that result from the practicalities of data collection at remote and hazardous sites. The image processing workflows implemented either link separate close-range photogrammetry and traditional stereo-matching software, or are integrated in a single software package based on structure-from-motion (SfM). We apply these techniques in contrasting case studies from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii and Mount Etna, Sicily, which differ in scale, duration and image texture. On Kilauea, the advance direction of thin fluid lava lobes was difficult to forecast, preventing good distribution of control. Consequently, volume changes calculated through the different workflows differed by ∼10% for DEMs (over ∼30 m2) that were captured once a minute for 37 min. On Mt. Etna, more predictable advance (∼3 m h-1 for ∼3 h) of a thicker, more viscous lava allowed robust control to be deployed and volumetric change results were generally within 5% (over ∼500 m2). Overall, the integrated SfM software was more straightforward to use and, under favourable conditions, produced results comparable to those from the close-range photogrammetry pipeline. However, under conditions with limited options for photogrammetric

  3. Getting Involved: Exploring Latino GBT Volunteerism and Activism in AIDS and LGBT Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Kuhns, Lisa M.; Vázquez, Raquel; Benjamin, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the community involvement (e.g., volunteerism, activism) of Latino gay and bisexual men and transgender persons (GBT) in two areas: AIDS/GLBT and other general causes. Drawing from volunteering and identity theories, we explore: Who is likely to get involved? What factors affect variation in the levels of involvement? Where do Latino GBT participate and what do they do? Data come from a cross-sectional sample (N=643) of Latino GBT in Chicago and San Francisco. We find high levels of involvement, but primarily focused on AIDS/GLBT. Involvement appears to be driven by income, early involvement, role modeling, and childhood stigmatization of gender nonconformity. PMID:26451081

  4. Novel mechanisms for activated protein C cytoprotective activities involving noncanonical activation of protease-activated receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Laurent; Mosnier, Laurent O

    2013-08-01

    The direct cytoprotective activities of activated protein C (APC) on cells convey therapeutic, relevant, beneficial effects in injury and disease models in vivo and require the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Thrombin also activates PAR1, but its effects on cells contrast APC's cytoprotective effects. To gain insights into mechanisms for these contrasting cellular effects, protease activated receptor 3 (PAR3) activation by APC and thrombin was studied. APC cleaved PAR3 on transfected and endothelial cells in the presence of EPCR. Remarkably, APC cleaved a synthetic PAR3 N-terminal peptide at Arg41, whereas thrombin cleaved at Lys38. On cells, APC failed to cleave R41Q-PAR3, whereas K38Q-PAR3 was still cleaved by APC but not by thrombin. PAR3 tethered-ligand peptides beginning at amino acid 42, but not those beginning at amino acid 39, conveyed endothelial barrier-protective effects. In vivo, the APC-derived PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide, but not the thrombin-derived PAR3 peptide, blunted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular permeability. These data indicate that PAR3 cleavage by APC at Arg41 can initiate distinctive APC-like cytoprotective effects. These novel insights help explain the differentiation of APC's cytoprotective versus thrombin's proinflammatory effects on cells and suggest a unique contributory role for PAR3 in the complex mechanisms underlying APC cytoprotective effects. PMID:23788139

  5. Understanding Threshold Effects of Organized Activity Involvement in Adolescents: Sex and Family Income as Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Edin T.; Bohnert, Amy M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the curvilinear links between involvement in organized activities (OA) and sport activities specifically and various indicators of psychological and social development. Participants included 150 9th and 10th graders (57% females) from an urban, selective-enrollment high school. Eligibility for admission is based on city…

  6. Sequential inductive learning

    SciTech Connect

    Gratch, J.

    1996-12-31

    This article advocates a new model for inductive learning. Called sequential induction, it helps bridge classical fixed-sample learning techniques (which are efficient but difficult to formally characterize), and worst-case approaches (which provide strong statistical guarantees but are too inefficient for practical use). Learning proceeds as a sequence of decisions which are informed by training data. By analyzing induction at the level of these decisions, and by utilizing the only enough data to make each decision, sequential induction provides statistical guarantees but with substantially less data than worst-case methods require. The sequential inductive model is also useful as a method for determining a sufficient sample size for inductive learning and as such, is relevant to learning problems where the preponderance of data or the cost of gathering data precludes the use of traditional methods.

  7. Sequential elution process

    DOEpatents

    Kingsley, I.S.

    1987-01-06

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for the separation of complex mixtures of carbonaceous material by sequential elution with successively stronger solvents. In the process, a column containing glass beads is maintained in a fluidized state by a rapidly flowing stream of a weak solvent, and the sample is injected into this flowing stream such that a portion of the sample is dissolved therein and the remainder of the sample is precipitated therein and collected as a uniform deposit on the glass beads. Successively stronger solvents are then passed through the column to sequentially elute less soluble materials. 1 fig.

  8. Behavioural and neurophysiological disruption of corticobulbar motor systems and their effects on sequential pharyngeal swallowing.

    PubMed

    Al-Toubi, Aamir; Daniels, Stephanie K; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee; Corey, David M; Doeltgen, Sebastian H

    2016-10-15

    Primary motor networks are known to be involved in the control of voluntary oral movements as well as the modulation of pharyngeal movements during experimentally controlled single swallows performed on command. The role of these networks in the more typical task of sequential swallowing remains unexplored. This study evaluated the hypothesis that experimental disruption of motor cortical activation would reduce the rate and regularity of repeatedly performed volitional or volitionally initiated motor tasks controlled by corticospinal (finger tapping) and corticobulbar (eyebrow movement, jaw opening, volitional sequential swallowing) motor systems, but would not influence a more reflexive corticobulbar task (reflexive sequential swallowing to pharyngeal water infusion). This premise was investigated in 24 healthy participants using two techniques: a dual task paradigm and a transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm. Disruption effects were quantified by changes in rate and regularity of performance for each tested motor task. In summary, volitional motor tasks controlled by corticospinal motor networks (finger tapping) are more susceptible to behavioural and neurophysiological disruption than tasks controlled by cortiobulbar motor networks containing a reflexive component (both volitional and experimentally initiated consecutive swallowing). Purely volitional motor tasks controlled by the corticobulbar motor system (eyebrow raising or jaw opening) were affected in similar ways as the volitional corticospinal motor tasks. In summary, tasks involving sequential pharyngeal swallowing - whether volitionally or experimentally initiated - are largely robust against disruption of primary cortical motor networks, supporting a key role of medullary CPGs in the motor control of sequential pharyngeal swallowing. PMID:27378508

  9. Behavioural and neurophysiological disruption of corticobulbar motor systems and their effects on sequential pharyngeal swallowing.

    PubMed

    Al-Toubi, Aamir; Daniels, Stephanie K; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee; Corey, David M; Doeltgen, Sebastian H

    2016-10-15

    Primary motor networks are known to be involved in the control of voluntary oral movements as well as the modulation of pharyngeal movements during experimentally controlled single swallows performed on command. The role of these networks in the more typical task of sequential swallowing remains unexplored. This study evaluated the hypothesis that experimental disruption of motor cortical activation would reduce the rate and regularity of repeatedly performed volitional or volitionally initiated motor tasks controlled by corticospinal (finger tapping) and corticobulbar (eyebrow movement, jaw opening, volitional sequential swallowing) motor systems, but would not influence a more reflexive corticobulbar task (reflexive sequential swallowing to pharyngeal water infusion). This premise was investigated in 24 healthy participants using two techniques: a dual task paradigm and a transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm. Disruption effects were quantified by changes in rate and regularity of performance for each tested motor task. In summary, volitional motor tasks controlled by corticospinal motor networks (finger tapping) are more susceptible to behavioural and neurophysiological disruption than tasks controlled by cortiobulbar motor networks containing a reflexive component (both volitional and experimentally initiated consecutive swallowing). Purely volitional motor tasks controlled by the corticobulbar motor system (eyebrow raising or jaw opening) were affected in similar ways as the volitional corticospinal motor tasks. In summary, tasks involving sequential pharyngeal swallowing - whether volitionally or experimentally initiated - are largely robust against disruption of primary cortical motor networks, supporting a key role of medullary CPGs in the motor control of sequential pharyngeal swallowing.

  10. Involvement of Ral GTPase in v-Src-induced phospholipase D activation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Luo, J Q; Urano, T; Frankel, P; Lu, Z; Foster, D A; Feig, L A

    1995-11-23

    An early response to the tyrosine kinase activity of v-Src is an increase in phospholipase D (PLD) activity, which leads to the generation of biologically active lipid second messengers, including phosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol. We have recently demonstrated that v-Src-induced PLD activity is mediated by Ras, although Ras involvement was indirect, requiring a cytosolic factor for PLD activation. Ras interacts with and activates Ral-GDS, the exchange factor responsible for the activation of Ral GTPases. Here we report that this newly identified Ras/Ral signalling pathway mediates PLD activation by v-Src. PLD activity could be precipitated from v-Src-transformed cell lysates with immobilized RalA protein and with an anti-Ral antibody. A mutation to the region of RalA analogous to the 'effector domain' of Ras did not reduce the ability of RalA to complex with PLD, although deletion of a Ral-specific amino-terminal region did. Overexpression of RalA potentiated PLD activation by v-Src, and expression of dominant negative RalA mutants inhibited both v-Src- and v-Ras-induced PLD activity. Thus RalA is involved in the tyrosine kinase activation of PLD through its unique N terminus, and that PLD is a downstream target of a Ras/Ral GTPase cascade.

  11. Activities involving aeronautical, space science, and technology support for minority institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report addressed the activities with which the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity (ICBO) was involved over the past 12 months. ICBO was involved in the design and development of a CARES Student Tracking System Software (CARES). Cares is intended to provide an effective means of maintaining relevant current and historical information on NASA-funded students through a range of educational program initiatives. ICBP was extensively involved in the formation of a minority university consortium amd implementation of collaborative research activities by the consortium as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth/Earth Observing System. ICBO was involved in the formation of an HBCU/MI Consortium to facilitate technology transfer efforts to the small and minority business community in their respective regions.

  12. Adaptive sequential testing for multiple comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Liu, Lingyun; Mehta, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Markov process theory-based adaptive sequential testing procedure for multiple comparisons. The procedure can be used for confirmative trials involving multi-comparisons, including dose selection or population enrichment. Dose or subpopulation selection and sample size modification can be made at any interim analysis. Type I error control is exact. PMID:24926848

  13. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  14. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  15. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories-episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities. PMID:26520084

  16. Neutrophil priming occurs in a sequential manner and can be visualized in living animals by monitoring IL-1β promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Matsushima, Hironori; Ohtola, Jennifer A.; Geng, Shuo; Lu, Ran; Takashima, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Rapid enhancement of phagocyte functionality is a hallmark of neutrophil priming. GeneChip analyses unveiled elevated CD54, dectin-2, and IL-1β mRNA expression by neutrophils isolated from inflammatory sites. In fact, CD54 and dectin-2 protein expression was detected on neutrophils recovered from skin, peritoneal and lung inflammation lesions, but not on those in bone marrow or peripheral blood. Neutrophils elevated CD54 and dectin-2 mRNA during migration in Boyden chambers and acquired CD54 and dectin-2 surface expression after subsequent exposure to GM-CSF. Neutrophils purified from IL-1β promoter-driven DsRed transgenic mice acquired DsRed signals during cell migration or exposure to GM-CSF. CD54 and dectin-2 were expressed by DsRed+ (but not DsRed–) neutrophils in GM-CSF-supplemented culture, and neutrophils recovered from inflammatory sites exhibited strong DsRed signals. The dynamic process of neutrophil priming was then studied in chemically induced inflammatory skin lesions by monitoring DsRed expression under confocal microscopy. A majority (>80%) of Ly6G+ neutrophils expressed DsRed, and those DsRed+/Ly6G+ cells exhibited crawling motion with a higher velocity compared to the DsRed–/Ly6G+ counterpart. This is the first report showing motile behaviors of primed neutrophils in living animals. We propose that neutrophil priming occurs in a sequential manner with rapid enhancement of phagocyte functionality followed by CD54 and dectin-2 mRNA and protein expression, IL-1β promoter activation, and accelerated motility. Not only do these findings provide a new conceptual framework for our understanding of the process of neutrophil priming, they also unveil new insights into the pathophysiology of many inflammatory disorders characterized by neutrophil infiltration. PMID:25527787

  17. A Bayesian Theory of Sequential Causal Learning and Abstract Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Two key research issues in the field of causal learning are how people acquire causal knowledge when observing data that are presented sequentially, and the level of abstraction at which learning takes place. Does sequential causal learning solely involve the acquisition of specific cause-effect links, or do learners also acquire knowledge about…

  18. Addressing Three Common Issues in Research on Youth Activities: An Integrative Approach for Operationalizing and Analyzing Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Youth activity involvement has been operationalized and analyzed using a wide range of approaches. Researchers face the challenges of distinguishing between the effects of involvement versus noninvolvement and intensity of involvement in a particular activity, accounting simultaneously for cumulative effects of involvement, and addressing multiple…

  19. Curcumin-induced recovery from hepatic injury involves induction of apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, S; Sudhakaran, P R

    2008-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) undergo activation and transdifferentiation to myofibroblast like cells in liver injury, leading to liver fibrosis. During recovery from injury, activated HSCs may either revert back to quiescent state or undergo apoptosis or both. In the present study, we have examined whether recovery from hepatic injury involves apoptosis of activated HSCs and tested whether curcumin (the yellow pigment from Curcuma longa Linn.) promotes recovery from hepatic injury by inducing apoptosis of these cells. Hepatic injury was induced by CCl4 and apoptosis was studied in HSCs isolated from liver by MTT assay, DNA fragmentation, and DAPI and annexin staining. Hepatic recovery was assessed by measuring hepatic marker activities, such as serum GOT, GPT and protein. Hepatic recovery occurred within 4 weeks after inducing injury in untreated control, whereas curcumin treatment caused hepatic recovery within 2 weeks, as evidenced by the reduction of hepatic marker activities to near normal levels. HSCs isolated from liver of animals treated with curcumin showed maximum apoptotic marker activities in 2nd week, whereas in HSCs from untreated control recovering from injury, maximum apoptosis was observed in 4th week. Induction of apoptosis in vivo during hepatic recovery was also suggested by increase in caspase-3 activity. Treatment of isolated HSCs in culture with curcumin caused apoptosis during later stages confirming that curcumin induced apoptosis of activated HSCs and not in unactivated quiescent HSCs. These results suggested that hepatoprotective effect of curcumin causing recovery from injury involved apoptosis of activated HSCs. PMID:19069843

  20. Carbohydrate in the mouth enhances activation of brain circuitry involved in motor performance and sensory perception.

    PubMed

    Turner, Clare E; Byblow, Winston D; Stinear, Cathy M; Gant, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    The presence of carbohydrate in the human mouth has been associated with the facilitation of motor output and improvements in physical performance. Oral receptors have been identified as a potential mode of afferent transduction for this novel form of nutrient signalling that is distinct from taste. In the current study oral exposure to carbohydrate was combined with a motor task in a neuroimaging environment to identify areas of the brain involved in this phenomenon. A mouth-rinsing protocol was conducted whilst carbohydrate (CHO) and taste-matched placebo (PLA) solutions were delivered and recovered from the mouths of 10 healthy volunteers within a double-blind, counterbalanced design. This protocol eliminates post-oral factors and controls for the perceptual qualities of solutions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was used to identify cortical areas responsive to oral carbohydrate during rest and activity phases of a hand-grip motor task. Mean blood-oxygen-level dependent signal change experienced in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was larger for CHO compared with PLA during the motor task when contrasted with a control condition. Areas of activation associated with CHO exclusively were observed over the primary taste cortex and regions involved in visual perception. Regions in the limbic system associated with reward were also significantly more active with CHO. This is the first demonstration that oral carbohydrate signalling can increase activation within the primary sensorimotor cortex during physical activity and enhance activation of neural networks involved in sensory perception.

  1. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  2. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a... establish and maintain procedures for the protection of human subjects. The definitions in 34 CFR 97.102... that is not exempt under 34 CFR 97.101(b) and 97.401(b). (b) If ED determines that proposed...

  3. Student Activism -- and Involvement in the Educational Program. Federation AdHoc Committee Report, January, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Federation of District Boards of Education, Trenton.

    This report notes that (1) activism is preferable to apathy, (2) larger problems loom for schools that fail to involve parents and community, (3) board member and administrator rigidity can cause conflict, and (4) black and Spanish-speaking students have special problems. Recommendations for school administrators and teachers emphasize sincerity…

  4. Structural Model of Employee Involvement in Skill Development Activity: The Role of Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Todd J.; Lippstreu, Michael; Judge, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    We extend prior research on involvement in employee development activity by including prominent individual difference constructs that have been previously ignored in this area of research. These include two important personality characteristics (conscientiousness and openness to experience), mental ability and goal orientation constructs. We…

  5. Involving Parents of Young Children in Science, Math and Literacy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerholm, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a collaborative parent-involvement project for inner-city Hispanic primary students sponsored by the Chicago Community Trust. A university professor, two graduate assistants, the principal, and the school community representative designed a summer program featuring hospitality and support activities, free books, and hands-on science and…

  6. Idle Hands and Empty Pockets?: Youth Involvement in Extracurricular Activities, Social Capital, and Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Amanda M.; Gager, Constance T.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Survey of Adults and Youth, the authors examine the effect of economic status on youths' involvement in both school- and nonschool-related extracurricular activities. Specifically, they assess the association between four alternative measures of economic status--recipiency of food stamps, Aid to Families with Dependent…

  7. 78 FR 57818 - Commission Participation and Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... the development of voluntary standards (43 FR 19216 (May 4, 1978)). Acknowledging the contribution... Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities. 54 FR 6646 (Feb. 14, 1989). In 2006, the Commission amended several provisions of part 1031. 71 FR 38754 (July 10, 2006). Among other things, the...

  8. Beyond Participation: The Association between School Extracurricular Activities and Involvement in Violence across Generations of Immigration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study…

  9. Longitudinal Modeling of Adolescents' Activity Involvement, Problem Peer Associations, and Youth Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Aaron; Dawes, Nickki; Mermelstein, Robin; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal associations among different types of organized activity involvement, problem peer associations, and cigarette smoking were examined in a sample of 1040 adolescents (mean age = 15.62 at baseline, 16.89 at 15-month assessment, 17.59 at 24 months) enriched for smoking experimentation (83% had tried smoking). A structural equation model…

  10. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1177.4 Section 1177.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION §...

  11. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1177.4 Section 1177.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION §...

  12. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” (34 CFR 97.102(d)). If an activity follows a... children, the exemption at 34 CFR 97.101(b)(2) (i.e., research involving the use of educational tests... Sciences confidentiality statute, 20 U.S.C. 9573, are exempt under 34 CFR 97.101(b)(3)(ii). (d) Children...

  13. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” (34 CFR 97.102(d)). If an activity follows a... children, the exemption at 34 CFR 97.101(b)(2) (i.e., research involving the use of educational tests... Sciences confidentiality statute, 20 U.S.C. 9573, are exempt under 34 CFR 97.101(b)(3)(ii). (d) Children...

  14. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  15. INVOLVEMENT OF MICRORNAS IN EMBRYONIC GENOME ACTIVATION AS SHOWN BY DICER EXPRESSION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most maternal transcripts including many housekeeping genes are degraded at or around embryonic genome activation as evidenced by our initial studies. This degradation appears to be global but highly regulated. MicroRNAs are naturally occurring small (19-24bp) RNAs that are shown to be involved in m...

  16. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1177.4 Section 1177.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION §...

  17. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1177.4 Section 1177.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION §...

  18. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1177.4 Section 1177.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION §...

  19. An Emergent Language Program Framework: Actively Involving Learners in Needs Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, William; Storer, Graeme

    1992-01-01

    Relates the experience of the staff of an aquaculture outreach program in Northeast Thailand in implementing an English for special purposes program. By actively involving learners in both the needs analysis and program design, teachers were able to adapt the program content to the requirements of the students. (15 references) (JL)

  20. Involving Your Child or Teen with ASD in Integrated Community Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Participating in outside activities and community-based endeavors can be tricky for people with special needs, like Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Families meet more than a few obstacles attempting to integrate their children or teens who have special needs like ASD. Most typical children are highly involved in sports, clubs and camps. If a…

  1. Transferrin Binding to Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Activated by Phytohemagglutinin Involves a Specific Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Robert M.; Werner, Phillip; Arnaud, Philippe; Galbraith, Gillian M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Immunohistological studies have indicated that membrane sites binding transferrin are present upon activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we have investigated transferrin uptake in human lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), by quantitative radiobinding and immunofluorescence in parallel. In stimulated lymphocytes, binding was maximal after a 30-min incubation, being greatest at 37°C, and greater at 22°C than at 4°C. Although some shedding and endocytosis of transferrin occurred at 22° and 37°C, these factors, and resulting synthesis of new sites, did not affect measurement of binding which was found to be saturable, reversible, and specific for transferrin (Ka 0.5-2.5 × 108 M−1). Binding was greater after a 48-h exposure to PHA than after 24 h, and was maximal at 66 h. Sequential Scatchard analysis revealed no significant elevation in affinity of interaction. However, although the total number of receptors increased, the proportion of cells in which binding of ligand was detected immunohistologically increased in parallel, and after appropriate correction, the cellular density of receptors remained relatively constant throughout (60,000-80,000 sites/cell). Increments in binding during the culture period were thus due predominantly to expansion of a population of cells bearing receptors. Similar differences in binding were apparent upon comparison of cells cultured in different doses of PHA, and in unstimulated cells binding was negligible. Transferrin receptors appear, therefore, to be readily detectable only upon lymphocytes that have been activated. Images PMID:6253523

  2. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy and Enjoyment Keep the Socially Vulnerable Physically Active in Community-Based Physical Activity Programs: A Sequential Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Herens, Marion; Bakker, Evert Jan; van Ophem, Johan; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Koelen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is most commonly found in socially vulnerable groups. Dutch policies target these groups through community-based health-enhancing physical activity (CBHEPA) programs. As robust evidence on the effectiveness of this approach is limited, this study investigated whether CBHEPA programs contribute to an increase in and the maintenance of physical activity in socially vulnerable groups. In four successive cohorts, starting at a six-month interval, 268 participants from 19 groups were monitored for twelve months in seven CBHEPA programs. Data collection was based on repeated questionnaires. Socio-economic indicators, program participation and coping ability were measured at baseline. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and on-going program participation were measured three times. Self-efficacy and enjoyment were measured at baseline and at twelve months. Statistical analyses were based on a quasi-RCT design (independent t-tests), a comparison of participants and dropouts (Mann-Whitney test), and multilevel modelling to assess change in individual physical activity, including group level characteristics. Participants of CBHEPA programs are socially vulnerable in terms of low education (48.6%), low income (52.4%), non-Dutch origin (64.6%) and health-related quality of life outcomes. Physical activity levels were not below the Dutch average. No increase in physical activity levels over time was observed. The multilevel models showed significant positive associations between health-related quality of life, self-efficacy and enjoyment, and leisure-time physical activity over time. Short CBHEPA programs (10–13 weeks) with multiple trainers and gender-homogeneous groups were associated with lower physical activity levels over time. At twelve months, dropouts' leisure-time physical activity levels were significantly lower compared to continuing participants, as were health-related quality of life, self-efficacy and enjoyment outcomes. BMI and

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy and Enjoyment Keep the Socially Vulnerable Physically Active in Community-Based Physical Activity Programs: A Sequential Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Herens, Marion; Bakker, Evert Jan; van Ophem, Johan; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Koelen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is most commonly found in socially vulnerable groups. Dutch policies target these groups through community-based health-enhancing physical activity (CBHEPA) programs. As robust evidence on the effectiveness of this approach is limited, this study investigated whether CBHEPA programs contribute to an increase in and the maintenance of physical activity in socially vulnerable groups. In four successive cohorts, starting at a six-month interval, 268 participants from 19 groups were monitored for twelve months in seven CBHEPA programs. Data collection was based on repeated questionnaires. Socio-economic indicators, program participation and coping ability were measured at baseline. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and on-going program participation were measured three times. Self-efficacy and enjoyment were measured at baseline and at twelve months. Statistical analyses were based on a quasi-RCT design (independent t-tests), a comparison of participants and dropouts (Mann-Whitney test), and multilevel modelling to assess change in individual physical activity, including group level characteristics. Participants of CBHEPA programs are socially vulnerable in terms of low education (48.6%), low income (52.4%), non-Dutch origin (64.6%) and health-related quality of life outcomes. Physical activity levels were not below the Dutch average. No increase in physical activity levels over time was observed. The multilevel models showed significant positive associations between health-related quality of life, self-efficacy and enjoyment, and leisure-time physical activity over time. Short CBHEPA programs (10-13 weeks) with multiple trainers and gender-homogeneous groups were associated with lower physical activity levels over time. At twelve months, dropouts' leisure-time physical activity levels were significantly lower compared to continuing participants, as were health-related quality of life, self-efficacy and enjoyment outcomes. BMI and

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy and Enjoyment Keep the Socially Vulnerable Physically Active in Community-Based Physical Activity Programs: A Sequential Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Herens, Marion; Bakker, Evert Jan; van Ophem, Johan; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Koelen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is most commonly found in socially vulnerable groups. Dutch policies target these groups through community-based health-enhancing physical activity (CBHEPA) programs. As robust evidence on the effectiveness of this approach is limited, this study investigated whether CBHEPA programs contribute to an increase in and the maintenance of physical activity in socially vulnerable groups. In four successive cohorts, starting at a six-month interval, 268 participants from 19 groups were monitored for twelve months in seven CBHEPA programs. Data collection was based on repeated questionnaires. Socio-economic indicators, program participation and coping ability were measured at baseline. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and on-going program participation were measured three times. Self-efficacy and enjoyment were measured at baseline and at twelve months. Statistical analyses were based on a quasi-RCT design (independent t-tests), a comparison of participants and dropouts (Mann-Whitney test), and multilevel modelling to assess change in individual physical activity, including group level characteristics. Participants of CBHEPA programs are socially vulnerable in terms of low education (48.6%), low income (52.4%), non-Dutch origin (64.6%) and health-related quality of life outcomes. Physical activity levels were not below the Dutch average. No increase in physical activity levels over time was observed. The multilevel models showed significant positive associations between health-related quality of life, self-efficacy and enjoyment, and leisure-time physical activity over time. Short CBHEPA programs (10-13 weeks) with multiple trainers and gender-homogeneous groups were associated with lower physical activity levels over time. At twelve months, dropouts' leisure-time physical activity levels were significantly lower compared to continuing participants, as were health-related quality of life, self-efficacy and enjoyment outcomes. BMI and

  6. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  7. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  8. Labdane diterpenes protect against anoxia/reperfusion injury in cardiomyocytes: involvement of AKT activation

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado, I; Fernández-Velasco, M; Boscá, L; de las Heras, B

    2011-01-01

    Several labdane diterpenes exert anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective actions; therefore, we have investigated whether these molecules protect cardiomyocytes in an anoxia/reperfusion (A/R) model, establishing the molecular mechanisms involved in the process. The cardioprotective activity of three diterpenes (T1, T2 and T3) was studied in the H9c2 cell line and in isolated rat cardiomyocyte subjected to A/R injury. In both cases, treatment with diterpenes T1 and T2 protected from A/R-induced apoptosis, as deduced by a decrease in the percentage of apoptotic and caspase-3 active positive cells, a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and an increase in the expression of antiapoptotic proteins. Analysis of cell survival signaling pathways showed that diterpenes T1 and T2 added after A/R increased phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK 1/2 levels. These cardioprotective effects were lost when AKT activity was pharmacologically inhibited. Moreover, the labdane-induced cardioprotection involves activation of AMPK, suggesting a role for energy homeostasis in their mechanism of action. Labdane diterpenes (T1 and T2) also exerted cardioprotective effects against A/R-induced injury in isolated cardiomyocytes and the mechanisms involved activation of specific survival signals (PI3K/AKT pathways, ERK1/2 and AMPK) and inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:22071634

  9. Embedding a Recovery Orientation into Neuroscience Research: Involving People with a Lived Experience in Research Activity.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Anthony; Brophy, Lisa; Castle, David; Harvey, Carol; Robertson, Joanne; Corlett, Philip; Davidson, Larry; Everall, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the importance and value of involving people with a lived experience of mental ill health and recovery in neuroscience research activity. In this era of recovery oriented service delivery, involving people with the lived experience of mental illness in neuroscience research extends beyond their participation as "subjects". The recovery paradigm reconceptualises people with the lived experience of mental ill health as experts by experience. To support this contribution, local policies and procedures, recovery-oriented training for neuroscience researchers, and dialogue about the practical applications of neuroscience research, are required.

  10. Isolation of genes (nif/hup cosmids) involved in hydrogenase and nitrogenase activities in Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Hom, S S; Graham, L A; Maier, R J

    1985-03-01

    Recombinant cosmids containing a Rhizobium japonicum gene involved in both hydrogenase (Hup) and nitrogenase (Nif) activities were isolated. An R. japonicum gene bank utilizing broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1 was conjugated into Hup- Nif- R. japonicum strain SR139. Transconjugants containing the nif/hup cosmid were identified by their resistance to tetracycline (Tcr) and ability to grow chemoautotrophically (Aut+) with hydrogen. All Tcr Aut+ transconjugants possessed high levels of H2 uptake activity, as determined amperometrically. Moreover, all Hup+ transconjugants tested possessed the ability to reduce acetylene (Nif+) in soybean nodules. Cosmid DNAs from 19 Hup+ transconjugants were transferred to Escherichia coli by transformation. When the cosmids were restricted with EcoRI, 15 of the 19 cosmids had a restriction pattern with 13.2-, 4.0-, 3.0-, and 2.5-kilobase DNA fragments. Six E. coli transformants containing the nif/hup cosmids were conjugated with strain SR139. All strain SR139 transconjugants were Hup+ Nif+. Moreover, one nif/hup cosmid was transferred to 15 other R. japonicum Hup- mutants. Hup+ transconjugants of six of the Hup- mutants appeared at a frequency of 1.0, whereas the transconjugants of the other nine mutants remained Hup-. These results indicate that the nif/hup gene cosmids contain a gene involved in both nitrogenase and hydrogenase activities and at least one and perhaps other hup genes which are exclusively involved in H2 uptake activity.

  11. Difficulty with daily activities involving the lower extremities in people with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Poole, Janet L; Brandenstein, Jane

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent of lower extremity impairments in motion and strength in people with systemic sclerosis and the relationships of the impairments to limitations in activities of daily living primarily involving the lower extremities. Participants were 69 persons with SSc who received evaluations of lower extremity joint motion (Keitel function test), strength (timed-stands test), and basic mobility (timed up and go test) and completed a demographic questionnaire regarding symptoms in the lower extremities. Activity limitations were measured by the Rheumatoid and Arthritis Outcome Score (RAOS) which examines functional ability, pain, and quality of life. The participants had difficulty with items requiring external rotation of the hips and lower extremity strength. There were moderate correlations between the impairment measures of joint motion, strength, mobility, and activity limitations. Fair correlations were found between the skin scores and the RAOS sections except for pain. The results of this study show that lower extremity involvement is present in persons with SSc. The findings, regarding strength, mobility, and joint motion are related to the ability to perform everyday activities involving the lower extremities, suggest that these areas should be targeted for intervention in persons with SSc.

  12. Barriers to involvement in physical activities of persons with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Shor, Ron; Shalev, Anat

    2016-03-01

    Participating in physical activities could be essential for reducing the multiple risk factors for health problems that persons with severe mental illness (SMI) may suffer. However, people with SMI are significantly less active than the general population. To develop knowledge about factors related to the perceived barriers hindering this population's participation in physical activities and the benefits this participation would have, a study was conducted in Israel with 86 people with mental illness living in community mental health facilities prior to their participation in a health promotion program. A mixed method was implemented and included: a scale designed to measure participants' perceptions of the barriers to and benefits of involvement in physical activities; instruments focusing on bio-psycho-social factors that may affect the level of barriers experienced; and personal interviews. The findings revealed high ranking for accessibility barriers hindering the participation in physical activities. Bio-psycho-social factors stemming from the participants' mental health, such as level of depression, were correlated with higher ranking of accessibility barriers. Bio-psycho-social factors reflecting positive mental health and health, such as positive appraisal of body weight, were correlated with lower ranking of accessibility barriers. Other barriers may include organizational and broader systemic barriers in the mental health facilities where the participants reside. These findings illuminate the need to consider the unique challenges that persons with mental illness may face in any attempt to advance their involvement in physical activity.

  13. Differential involvement of amygdala and cortical NMDA receptors activation upon encoding in odor fear memory.

    PubMed

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guillaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the BLA and olfactory cortex at discrete moments of an odor fear conditioning session. We showed that NMDA receptors in BLA are critically involved in odor fear acquisition during the first association but not during the next ones. In the cortex, NMDA receptor activation at encoding is not necessary for recent odor fear memory while its role in remote memory storage needs further investigation.

  14. Differential involvement of amygdala and cortical NMDA receptors activation upon encoding in odor fear memory.

    PubMed

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guillaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the BLA and olfactory cortex at discrete moments of an odor fear conditioning session. We showed that NMDA receptors in BLA are critically involved in odor fear acquisition during the first association but not during the next ones. In the cortex, NMDA receptor activation at encoding is not necessary for recent odor fear memory while its role in remote memory storage needs further investigation. PMID:25403452

  15. Understanding affluent adolescent adjustment: The interplay of parental perfectionism, perceived parental pressure, and organized activity involvement.

    PubMed

    Randall, Edin T; Bohnert, Amy M; Travers, Lea V

    2015-06-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relations between affluent adolescent adjustment and culturally salient factors within parent-child relationship and extracurricular domain. Bootstrapping techniques evaluated mediated effects among parental perfectionism, perceived parental pressure, intensity of organized activity (OA) involvement, and adolescent adjustment (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms, life satisfaction) within a sample of 10th graders and their parents (n = 88 parent-child pairs) from four high schools in affluent communities. Findings indicated that adolescents with more perfectionistic parents perceived more parental pressure and experienced poorer adjustment. Results also demonstrated that affluent adolescents who perceived more parental pressure were more intensely involved in OAs, but that higher OA intensity was linked to better adjustment. Findings highlight the importance of considering parental perfectionism when understanding adolescent behaviors and psychological outcomes, confirm the negative direct effects of parental pressure on adjustment, and corroborate prior research dispelling that highly intense OA involvement is linked to adolescent maladjustment. PMID:25828548

  16. Differential involvement of amygdala and cortical NMDA receptors activation upon encoding in odor fear memory

    PubMed Central

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the BLA and olfactory cortex at discrete moments of an odor fear conditioning session. We showed that NMDA receptors in BLA are critically involved in odor fear acquisition during the first association but not during the next ones. In the cortex, NMDA receptor activation at encoding is not necessary for recent odor fear memory while its role in remote memory storage needs further investigation. PMID:25403452

  17. Staying in or moving away from structured activities: Explanations involving parents and peers.

    PubMed

    Persson, Andreas; Kerr, Margaret; Stattin, Håkan

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent participation in structured activities, meaning those with adult leaders, regular meetings, and skill-building activities, is related to good adjustment. Participation in unstructured, unsupervised, peer-oriented activities is related to poor adjustment. Structured activity participation is high in early adolescence and then declines, raising the question of why youths leave structured activities. The authors examined explanations involving parents and peers. They used longitudinal data from 861 youths (ages 13-17 years). Results showed that, compared with youths who stayed in structured activities, those who switched to hanging out on the streets were less likely to have peers in structured activities and had less positive feelings about the home context and more negative interactions with parents. In addition, delinquency predicted switching to hanging out in the streets and never joining structured activities in the first place. The results concerning parents support a theoretical explanation of how parents might unintentionally affect youths' leisure choices. Furthermore, the authors found some indications that positive feelings at home might protect youths who switch from structured activities to hanging out on the streets from increases in delinquency.

  18. Involving postgraduate's students in undergraduate small group teaching promotes active learning in both

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ruchi; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Vyas, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lecture is a common traditional method for teaching, but it may not stimulate higher order thinking and students may also be hesitant to express and interact. The postgraduate (PG) students are less involved with undergraduate (UG) teaching. Team based small group active learning method can contribute to better learning experience. Aim: To-promote active learning skills among the UG students using small group teaching methods involving PG students as facilitators to impart hands-on supervised training in teaching and managerial skills. Methodology: After Institutional approval under faculty supervision 92 UGs and 8 PGs participated in 6 small group sessions utilizing the jigsaw technique. Feedback was collected from both. Observations: Undergraduate Feedback (Percentage of Students Agreed): Learning in small groups was a good experience as it helped in better understanding of the subject (72%), students explored multiple reading resources (79%), they were actively involved in self-learning (88%), students reported initial apprehension of performance (71%), identified their learning gaps (86%), team enhanced their learning process (71%), informal learning in place of lecture was a welcome change (86%), it improved their communication skills (82%), small group learning can be useful for future self-learning (75%). Postgraduate Feedback: Majority performed facilitation for first time, perceived their performance as good (75%), it was helpful in self-learning (100%), felt confident of managing students in small groups (100%), as facilitator they improved their teaching skills, found it more useful and better identified own learning gaps (87.5%). Conclusions: Learning in small groups adopting team based approach involving both UGs and PGs promoted active learning in both and enhanced the teaching skills of the PGs. PMID:26380201

  19. Activity and recovery cycles of National Rugby League matches involving higher and lower ranked teams.

    PubMed

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of ladder position on ball-in-play and recovery periods in elite National Rugby League (NRL) competitive matches. Video recordings of 192 NRL matches and 18 NRL finals matches played over 2 competitive seasons were coded for activity and recovery cycles. Time when the ball was continuously in play was considered activity, whereas any stoppages during the match (e.g., for scrums, penalties, line drop outs, tries, and video referee decisions) were considered recovery. In comparison to matches involving lower standard teams, there was a greater proportion (effect size [ES] = 0.37-0.67) of long duration (>91 seconds) and a smaller proportion (ES = 0.49-0.68) of short duration (<45 seconds) ball-in-play periods when Top 4 teams were competing against other Top 4 teams. No meaningful differences were found between teams of different ladder positions for the proportion of short (ES = 0.04-0.16) and long (ES = 0.06-0.28) recovery periods. In comparison to fixture matches involving the top 4 teams, finals matches had a smaller proportion (ES = 0.56) of long duration activity periods, and a greater proportion (ES = 0.54) of short duration activity periods. Only small differences were found between finals matches and matches involving the Top 4 teams for the proportion of short (ES = 0.42) and long (ES = 0.41) recovery periods. These findings suggest that the competitive advantage of the best NRL teams is closely linked to their ability to maintain a higher playing intensity than less successful teams. Furthermore, long ball-in-play periods in high-standard fixture matches (i.e., involving the top 4 teams) ensure that players are adequately prepared for the ball-in-play demands of finals matches.

  20. Physical, Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Mediators of Activity Involvement and Health in Later Life.

    PubMed

    Matz-Costa, Christina; Carr, Dawn C; McNamara, Tay K; James, Jacquelyn Boone

    2016-10-01

    The current study tests the indirect effect of activity-related physical activity, cognitive activity, social interaction, and emotional exchange on the relationship between activity involvement and health (physical and emotional) in later life. Longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study (N = 5,442) were used to estimate a series of linear regression models. We found significant indirect effects for social interaction and benefit to others (emotional exchange) on emotional health (depressive symptoms) and indirect effects for use of body and benefit to others (physical) on physical health (frailty). The most potent indirect effect associated with emotional and physical health was experienced by those engaged in all four domains (use of body, use of mind, social interaction, and benefit to others). While effect sizes are small and results should be interpreted with caution, findings shed light on ways in which public health interventions aimed toward increasing role engagement in later life could be improved.

  1. Physical, Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Mediators of Activity Involvement and Health in Later Life.

    PubMed

    Matz-Costa, Christina; Carr, Dawn C; McNamara, Tay K; James, Jacquelyn Boone

    2016-10-01

    The current study tests the indirect effect of activity-related physical activity, cognitive activity, social interaction, and emotional exchange on the relationship between activity involvement and health (physical and emotional) in later life. Longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study (N = 5,442) were used to estimate a series of linear regression models. We found significant indirect effects for social interaction and benefit to others (emotional exchange) on emotional health (depressive symptoms) and indirect effects for use of body and benefit to others (physical) on physical health (frailty). The most potent indirect effect associated with emotional and physical health was experienced by those engaged in all four domains (use of body, use of mind, social interaction, and benefit to others). While effect sizes are small and results should be interpreted with caution, findings shed light on ways in which public health interventions aimed toward increasing role engagement in later life could be improved. PMID:26429863

  2. Insulin and dexamethasone stimulation of cardiac lipoprotein lipase activity involves the actin-based cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ewart, H S; Severson, D L

    1999-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in cultured ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult rat hearts was stimulated by the combination of insulin (100 nM) and dexamethasone (100 nM) during an overnight (16 h) incubation. Wortmannin (100 nM), rapamycin (30 ng/ml) or PD98059 (50 microM) did not prevent this stimulation, suggesting that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p70 S6 kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are not involved in transducing the hormonal signal. In contrast, cytochalasin D (2 microM) completely abolished the stimulatory effect of insulin and dexamethasone on both heparin-releasable LPL and total cellular LPL activities. The potential role of the actin cytoskeleton in the stimulation of LPL activity by insulin and dexamethasone appears to be distal to the initial signalling events since cytochalasin D is still effective in preventing the stimulation when added 2 h after the hormones. PMID:10333493

  3. Genes Upregulated in Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during Mild Freezing and Subsequent Thawing Suggest Sequential Activation of Multiple Response Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Daniel Z

    2015-01-01

    Exposing fully cold-acclimated wheat plants to a mild freeze-thaw cycle of -3 °C for 24h followed by +3 °C for 24 or 48 h results in dramatically improved tolerance of subsequent exposure to sub-freezing temperatures. Gene enrichment analysis of crown tissue from plants collected before or after the -3 °C freeze or after thawing at +3 °C for 24 or 48 h revealed that many biological processes and molecular functions were activated during the freeze-thaw cycle in an increasing cascade of responses such that over 150 processes or functions were significantly enhanced by the end of the 48 h, post-freeze thaw. Nearly 2,000 individual genes were upregulated more than 2-fold over the 72 h course of freezing and thawing, but more than 70% of these genes were upregulated during only one of the time periods examined, suggesting a series of genes and gene functions were involved in activation of the processes that led to enhanced freezing tolerance. This series of functions appeared to include extensive cell signaling, activation of stress response mechanisms and the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, extensive modification of secondary metabolites, and physical restructuring of cell membranes. By identifying plant lines that are especially able to activate these multiple mechanisms it may be possible to develop lines with enhanced winterhardiness.

  4. Sequential Reaction Channels of Metastable C{sup 4+}{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Duenser, B.; Echt, O.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.

    1997-11-01

    We employ a two-sector-field mass spectrometer to identify sequential, unimolecular dissociation channels of C{sup 4+}{sub 60} . In addition to sequential {open_quotes}monomer evaporations{close_quotes} (loss of two C{sub 2} units), we observe two novel sequential channels which involve fissionlike events: loss of C{sup +}{sub 2} followed by evaporation, and sequential loss of two C{sup +}{sub 2} units. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. The spectrum of enzymes involved in activation of 2-aminoanthracene varies with the metabolic system applied.

    PubMed

    Veres, Zsuzsa; Török, Géza; Tóth, Eva; Vereczkey, László; Jemnitz, Katalin

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the involvement of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) in the metabolic activation of 2-aminoanthracene (2AA) by use of metabolic systems such as liver S9 or hepatocytes from untreated and beta-naphthoflavone (BNF)- or phenobarbital (PB)-treated rats. Metabolic activation was determined in the Salmonella reverse mutation assay (Ames test). Unexpectedly, both enzyme inducers, BNF and PB, significantly decreased the mutagenicity of 2AA activated by S9 fractions. 2AA mutagenicity was detected in the presence of cytochrome P450 inhibitors such as alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), clotrimazole and N-benzylimidazole to study the contribution of CYP isoenzymes to the activation process. ANF significantly decreased the activation of 2AA by S9 from untreated rats. In contrast, ANF significantly increased the metabolic activation of 2AA by S9 from BNF- and PB-treated rats. The enhanced mutagenicity was not altered by co-incubation with clotrimazole and ANF. Pre-incubation of 2AA in the presence of N-benzylimidazole significantly increased the activation of 2AA by S9 from BNF- and PB-treated rats, which suggests that CYPs play minor role in 2AA metabolic activation by rat liver S9 fractions. In contrast with the results described above, BNF treatment of rats significantly enhanced the activation of 2AA by hepatocytes. ANF attenuated the extent of this activation suggesting that different enzymes play a major role in the activation processes in these metabolic systems. Our results indicate that identification of mutagenic hazard by use of the Ames test may depend on the metabolic system applied.

  6. Beyond participation: the association between school extracurricular activities and involvement in violence across generations of immigration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D

    2012-03-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study explores how the relationship between extracurricular activities and youth violence varies by type of extracurricular activity profile (sports alone, non-sports alone, and a combination of sports and non-sports) and by generations of immigration (first, second, and third-plus). The sample is composed of 9.3% (n = 1,233) first-generation youth, 15.7% (n = 2,080) second generation, and 74.9% (n = 9,923) third-plus generation. The results reveal that adolescents from the third-plus generation (i.e., non-immigrant youth) who participate in non-sports alone or sports plus non-sports have lower odds of involvement in violence than adolescents from the same generation who do not participate in extracurricular activities. However, for first- and second-generation adolescents, participation in extracurricular activities is associated with higher rather than lower odds of violence compared to their non-participating counterparts. These findings challenge the viewpoint that participation in mainstream extracurricular activities as afforded by US schools is equally beneficial for all youth. They also call for additional research that explores why immigrant youth are less likely than non-immigrant youth to gain violence-reducing benefits when they participate in extracurricular activities.

  7. Involvement of cannabinoid receptor-1 activation in mitochondrial depolarizing effect of lipopolysaccharide in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Barbonetti, A; Vassallo, M R C; Costanzo, M; Battista, N; Maccarrone, M; Francavilla, S; Francavilla, F

    2014-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria frequently involved in urogenital tract infections release the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS); its receptor, toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), has been recently identified in human spermatozoa, and its direct activation has been suggested in mediating adverse effects of LPS on human spermatozoa. However, the underlying signal transduction remains to be clarified. In other cell types, LPS induces the generation of endocannabinoids, which are involved in mediating endotoxin effects. In human spermatozoa, which exhibit a completely functional endocannabinoid system, the activation of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) inhibited sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In this study, we tested the hypothesis of a contribution of CB1 activation by sperm-generated endocannabinoids in the adverse effects exerted by LPS on human spermatozoa. The exposure of motile sperm suspensions to E. coli LPS produced a significant decrease in sperm ΔΨm, assessed at flow cytometry with JC-1, similar to that induced by Metanandamide (Met-AEA), a non-hydrolyzable analogue of the endocannabinoid AEA. The LPS-induced inhibition of ΔΨm was prevented by the selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716. However, the inhibition of ΔΨm induced by either LPS or Met-AEA did not affect sperm motility. Consistent with this finding, the CB1-mediated inhibition of ΔΨm was neither associated to mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species as evaluated by flow cytometry with MytoSox Red nor to apoptosis pathway activation as evaluated with cytoflorimetric assay for activated caspase-9 and caspase-3. Any oxidative genomic damage was also ruled out with the cytoflorimetric quantification of the oxidized base adduct 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. In conclusion, E. coli LPS inhibited sperm ΔΨm through the activation of CB1, but this effect was not accompanied to the activation of mitochondrial dysfunction-related apoptotic/oxidative mechanisms, which could

  8. The spectrum of nasal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus and its association with the disease activity.

    PubMed

    Kusyairi, K A; Gendeh, B S; Sakthiswary, R; Shaharir, S S; Haizlene, A H; Yusof, K H

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of nasal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its association with the disease activity of SLE based on the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). This was a cross-sectional and observational study involving 73 stable SLE patients. All subjects were evaluated for the SLEDAI scores and had nasal endoscopic examination. The most commonly reported symptom was nasal congestion (31.5%) followed by nasal itchiness (26.0%), runny nose (20.5%) and nasal dryness (19.2%). Almost half (42.9%) of the subjects had nasal mucosal abnormalities, which included mucositis, crusting, ulceration, bifid middle turbinate, septal spur, Jacobson's organ, deviated nasal septum, bilateral inferior turbinate hypertrophy, everted uncinate process, nasopharynx cleft and torus palatinus. The median SLEDAI score for subjects with nasal symptoms was significantly higher than subjects without nasal symptoms (p < 0.05). Similarly, subjects with moderate to high activity (SLEDAI scores of 6-19) had a significantly higher frequency of both nasal symptoms and nasal mucosal abnormalities (p < 0.05) compared to subjects with no to mild activity (SLEDAI scores of 0-5).

  9. Ellagic acid: Pharmacological activities and molecular mechanisms involved in liver protection.

    PubMed

    García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Zazueta, Cecilia

    2015-07-01

    Traditional drugs or therapies rarely have effects on regression of chronic liver diseases, which result in many cases from sustained oxidative stress. In recent years, ellagic acid (EA) has gained attention due to its multiple biological activities and several molecular targets. This is the first review focused on the pharmacological properties and on the molecular mechanisms activated by EA in terms of liver protection. EA possesses antioxidant, antihepatotoxic, antisteatosic, anticholestatic, antifibrogenic, antihepatocarcinogenic and antiviral properties that improves the hepatic architectural and functions against toxic and pathological conditions. The molecular mechanisms that EA activates include the scavenging of free radicals, regulation of phase I and II enzymes, modulation of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines synthesis, the regulation of biochemical pathways involved in the synthesis and degradation of lipids as well as the maintenance of essential trace elements levels. EA also inhibits hepatic stellate cells and mast cells activation, the proliferation of transformed cells, as well as viral replication by increasing antioxidant response, induction of apoptosis, downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle and angiogenesis, and stimulation of cellular immune response. Despite the enormous therapeutic potential of EA as an innovative pharmacological strategy, the number of phase I and II trials in patients is scarce, precluding its clinical application. In these sense, the use of new delivery systems that enhances EA bioavailability would improve the results already obtained. Also it remains to be determined if treatment with urolithins instead of EA would represent a better strategy in hepatic disease treatment.

  10. Involvement of matrix metalloproteinase activity in hormone-induced mammary tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Simian, Marina; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lanari, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Proteolytic activity and remodeling of the extracellular matrix are important players in tumor progression. However, to date the role of the extracellular matrix in tumor regression remains unresolved. To address this, we used a progesterone-dependent in vivo mouse mammary tumor line, C4-HD, which regresses in response to hormone therapy. Within the first 72 hours of treatment, massive apoptosis was accompanied by changes in the staining patterns of laminin and collagens I, III, and IV. We thus hypothesized that an increase in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity could be involved in this process. This indeed was the case as the activities of MMP-2, -9, and -3 increased in regressing tumors, coinciding with the peak of apoptosis. Moreover, cell-cell interactions were disrupted during early hours of regression with E-cadherin levels reduced and fragmentation products detected during regression. Analysis of beta-catenin revealed that although total levels within the tissue did not change, this molecule switched from being involved in cell-cell adhesion in the growing tumor to being expressed in the reactive stroma during regression. Our data provide a novel role for proteolytic activity in tumor regression and question the underlying principle for using MMP inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:16400029

  11. CD4 ligands inhibit the formation of multifunctional transduction complexes involved in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Jabado, N; Pallier, A; Le Deist, F; Bernard, F; Fischer, A; Hivroz, C

    1997-01-01

    Ligands binding to the CD4 molecule can inhibit TCR-mediated T cell activation. We have previously reported that transcription factors regulating the expression of the IL-2 gene, NF-AT, NF-kappaB, and AP-1, are targets of this inhibitory effect in an in vitro model using peripheral human CD4+ T cells activated by a CD3 mAb. Two T cell activation pathways involved in the regulation of these transcription factors, calcium flux and the p21ras pathway, were investigated as potential targets. Binding of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp160/gp120 or a CD4 mAb to the CD4+ T cells, prior to TCR/CD3 activation, inhibited the intracellular calcium elevation. This event strongly suggested an inhibition of PLCgamma1 activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma1, induced by CD3 activation, was not affected, but its association with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, including a 62-kDa protein, was disrupted. This PLCgamma1-associated p62 was found to be immunoreactive to p62-Sam68 Abs. The activation-induced phosphorylation of two p21ras effectors, Raf-1 and Erk2, was inhibited by the CD4 ligands, indirectly pointing to inhibition of the p21ras activation pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that TCR activation of normal CD4+ T cells induced the formation of p120GAP and PLCgamma1-containing complexes. These complexes also contain other unidentified proteins. CD4 ligand binding induced a defective formation of these transduction complexes. This may result in inefficient signaling, partially accounting for the inhibitory effects of the CD4 ligands on both p21ras and calcium-activation pathways.

  12. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year's experience of a multi-disciplinary group's activity.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Maccari, Uberto; Madioni, Chiara; Venezia, Duccio; La Magra, Lidia Calogera

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients' clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma). It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice.

  13. Activated alveolar macrophage and lymphocyte alveolitis in extrathoracic sarcoidosis without radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaert, B.; Ramon, P.; Fournier, E.C.; Prin, L.; Tonnel, A.B.; Voisin, C.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular characteristics of BAL were investigated in 18 patients with proved extrathoracic sarcoidosis (that is, sarcoidosis that affected the skin, eyes, parotid glands, stomach, nose, kidneys, or meninges) without clinical or radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement. Computed tomography of the thorax was performed on five patients: four patients were normal, and one had enlarged lymph nodes (these enlargements were not detectable on the patient's chest roentgenogram). The results of pulmonary function tests were normal in all patients. The total BAL cell count did not differ significantly between controls and patients. Abnormal percentages of alveolar lymphocytes (from 18 to 87%) were noted in 15 out of 18 patients. SACE levels were normal in 15 patients. No pulmonary gallium uptake was detected. The chemiluminescence of AM's, whether spontaneous or PMA induced, was increased in five out of seven patients. The percentages of T3+ lymphocytes in sarcoidosis patients did not significantly differ from those in controls. The T4+:T8+ ratio was normal in four patients and slightly increased in one. Follow-up of patients showed that alveolar lymphocytosis is as lasting as extrathoracic involvement. Our data demonstrate increased percentages of lymphocytes and activated AM's in the BAL of patients with extrathoracic sarcoidosis. This may be due to the initial involvement of the respiratory tract in extrathoracic sarcoidosis or to the diffusion of activated macrophages and lymphocytes from an extrathoracic site into the lung.

  14. Anticancer Activities of Pterostilbene-Isothiocyanate Conjugate in Breast Cancer Cells: Involvement of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Kumar; Sharan, Shruti; Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Chakraborty, Ajanta; Roy, Partha

    2014-01-01

    Trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4′-hydroxystilbene (PTER), a natural dimethylated analog of resveratrol, preferentially induces certain cancer cells to undergo apoptosis and could thus have a role in cancer chemoprevention. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-dependent transcription factor whose activation results in growth arrest and/or apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Here we investigated the potential of PTER-isothiocyanate (ITC) conjugate, a novel class of hybrid compound (PTER-ITC) synthesized by appending an ITC moiety to the PTER backbone, to induce apoptotic cell death in hormone-dependent (MCF-7) and -independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines and to elucidate PPARγ involvement in PTER-ITC action. Our results showed that when pre-treated with PPARγ antagonists or PPARγ siRNA, both breast cancer cell lines suppressed PTER-ITC-induced apoptosis, as determined by annexin V/propidium iodide staining and cleaved caspase-9 expression. Furthermore, PTER-ITC significantly increased PPARγ mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner and modulated expression of PPARγ-related genes in both breast cancer cell lines. This increase in PPARγ activity was prevented by a PPARγ-specific inhibitor, in support of our hypothesis that PTER-ITC can act as a PPARγ activator. PTER-ITC-mediated upregulation of PPARγ was counteracted by co-incubation with p38 MAPK or JNK inhibitors, suggesting involvement of these pathways in PTER-ITC action. Molecular docking analysis further suggested that PTER-ITC interacted with 5 polar and 8 non-polar residues within the PPARγ ligand-binding pocket, which are reported to be critical for its activity. Collectively, our observations suggest potential applications for PTER-ITC in breast cancer prevention and treatment through modulation of the PPARγ activation pathway. PMID:25119466

  15. Anticancer activities of pterostilbene-isothiocyanate conjugate in breast cancer cells: involvement of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Nikhil, Kumar; Sharan, Shruti; Singh, Abhimanyu K; Chakraborty, Ajanta; Roy, Partha

    2014-01-01

    Trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxystilbene (PTER), a natural dimethylated analog of resveratrol, preferentially induces certain cancer cells to undergo apoptosis and could thus have a role in cancer chemoprevention. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-dependent transcription factor whose activation results in growth arrest and/or apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Here we investigated the potential of PTER-isothiocyanate (ITC) conjugate, a novel class of hybrid compound (PTER-ITC) synthesized by appending an ITC moiety to the PTER backbone, to induce apoptotic cell death in hormone-dependent (MCF-7) and -independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines and to elucidate PPARγ involvement in PTER-ITC action. Our results showed that when pre-treated with PPARγ antagonists or PPARγ siRNA, both breast cancer cell lines suppressed PTER-ITC-induced apoptosis, as determined by annexin V/propidium iodide staining and cleaved caspase-9 expression. Furthermore, PTER-ITC significantly increased PPARγ mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner and modulated expression of PPARγ-related genes in both breast cancer cell lines. This increase in PPARγ activity was prevented by a PPARγ-specific inhibitor, in support of our hypothesis that PTER-ITC can act as a PPARγ activator. PTER-ITC-mediated upregulation of PPARγ was counteracted by co-incubation with p38 MAPK or JNK inhibitors, suggesting involvement of these pathways in PTER-ITC action. Molecular docking analysis further suggested that PTER-ITC interacted with 5 polar and 8 non-polar residues within the PPARγ ligand-binding pocket, which are reported to be critical for its activity. Collectively, our observations suggest potential applications for PTER-ITC in breast cancer prevention and treatment through modulation of the PPARγ activation pathway. PMID:25119466

  16. Secretion of a lysophospholipase D activity by adipocytes: involvement in lysophosphatidic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gesta, Stéphane; Simon, Marie-Françoise; Rey, Astrid; Sibrac, David; Girard, Alexia; Lafontan, Max; Valet, Philippe; Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to depict the metabolic pathways involved in extra-cellular production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) by adipocytes. LPA was followed by quantifying the accumulation of LPA in the incubation medium (conditioned medium: CM) of 3T3F442A adipocytes, or human adipose tissue explants, using a radioenzymatic assay. Surprisingly, after separation from the cells, the amount of LPA present in CM could significantly be increased by further incubation at 37°C. This suggested the presence of a LPA-synthesizing activity (LPA-SA) in CM. LPA-SA appeared as a soluble activity which was inhibited by divalent ion chelators: EDTA and phenanthrolin. The effect of EDTA was preferentially reverted by CoCl2, as described for a lysophospholipase D- (lyso-PLD) activity previously identified in rat plasma. LPA concentration could also be increased by treatment with a bacterial PLD, demonstrating the presence of PLD-sensitive LPA-precursors (mainly lysophosphatidylcholine) in adipocyte CM. LPA-SA could be increased by addition of exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylglycerol, or lyso-platelet activating factor, demonstrating that LPA-SA resulted from the action of a lyso-PLD. LPA-SA was not inhibited, but rather activated, by primary alcohol (ethanol and 1-butanol), suggesting that adipocyte lyso-PLD was not a classical PLD. Finally, LPA-SA was found to be weaker in CM of undifferentiated adipocyte (preadipocytes) as compared to CM of differentiated adipocytes. In conclusion, our results reveal the existence of a secreted lyso-PLD activity regulated during adipocyte-differentiation and involved in extra-cellular production of synthesis of LPA by adipocytes. PMID:12032165

  17. Joint Associations of Residential Density and Neighborhood Involvement With Physical Activity Among a Multiethnic Sample of Urban Adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki; Schulz, Amy J; Zenk, Shannon N; Israel, Barbara A; Wineman, Jean; Marans, Robert W; Rowe, Zachary

    2015-08-01

    Regular physical activity is associated with improvements in overall health. Although resident involvement in neighborhood social activities is positively associated with physical activity, neighborhood design features, including residential density, have varied associations with physical activity. Using data from a multiethnic sample of 696 adults in Detroit, Michigan, multilevel models were used to examine joint effects of residential density and resident involvement in neighborhood activities in relation to physical activity. We found a marginally significant negative interaction of higher residential density and resident neighborhood involvement. Higher residential density was negatively associated with physical activity, and resident neighborhood involvement was positively associated with physical activity. Our findings suggest that future work incorporate additional neighborhood and individual-level characteristics to understand the complexity of the association between the neighborhood environment, resident social engagement in the neighborhood, and physical activity.

  18. The structure of sequential effects.

    PubMed

    Gökaydin, Dinis; Navarro, Daniel J; Ma-Wyatt, Anna; Perfors, Amy

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of research into sequential effects, extending more than one hundred years. The pattern of sequential effects varies widely with both experimental conditions as well as for different individuals performing the same experiment. Yet this great diversity of results is poorly understood, particularly with respect to individual variation, which save for some passing mentions has largely gone unreported in the literature. Here we seek to understand the way in which sequential effects vary by identifying the causes underlying the differences observed in sequential effects. In order to achieve this goal we perform principal component analysis on a dataset of 158 individual results from participants performing different experiments with the aim of identifying hidden variables responsible for sequential effects. We find a latent structure consisting of 3 components related to sequential effects-2 main and 1 minor. A relationship between the 2 main components and the separate processing of stimuli and of responses is proposed on the basis of previous empirical evidence. It is further speculated that the minor component of sequential effects arises as the consequence of processing delays. Independently of the explanation for the latent variables encountered, this work provides a unified descriptive model for a wide range of different types of sequential effects previously identified in the literature. In addition to explaining individual differences themselves, it is demonstrated how the latent structure uncovered here is useful in understanding the classical problem of the dependence of sequential effects on the interval between successive stimuli. PMID:26523425

  19. Serotonergic involvement in methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity: a detailed pharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Steed, Emily; Jones, Caitlin A; McCreary, Andrew C

    2011-06-20

    The mechanism by which the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) increases locomotor activity may be attributable to indirect activation of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) receptors. In the present study, the ability of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine, 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonists WAY100635, GR127935, M100907 and SB242084, and the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists WAY163909 and Ro 60-0175 or the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) to alter METH-induced hyperactivity was analysed. Further, for comparative purposes, the involvement of the DA D(1) and D(2) receptor antagonists SCH23390 and haloperidol, D(2) partial agonists terguride, (-)3PPP and aripiprazole and finally clozapine were assessed. Doses of pCPA that attenuated 5-HT levels reduced METH activity. The 5-HT(1B) antagonist GR127935 had no effect on METH-induced locomotor activity but blocked that induced by MDMA. The 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY100635 reduced activity but this did not reach significance. In contrast, M100907 (minimal effective dose; MED=0.125 mg/kg), WAY163909 (MED=3mg/kg), Ro 60-0175 (MED=3mg/kg), haloperidol (MED=0.1mg/kg), clozapine (MED=5mg/kg), aripiprazole (MED=1mg/kg), (-)3PPP (MED=3mg/kg), terguride (MED=0.2mg/kg) and SCH23390 (MED=0.001325 mg/kg) attenuated METH-induced locomotor activity. Administration of 20mg/kg fluvoxamine attenuated, while SB242084 (MED=0.25mg/kg) potentiated METH-induced activity. These results contribute significantly to the understanding of the mechanism of action of this psychostimulant and suggest for the first time, that METH-induced locomotor stimulation is modulated by 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors, but demonstrate that 5-HT(1B) receptors are not directly involved. The involvement of the dopaminergic system was also demonstrated.

  20. Maturation of suprathreshold auditory nerve activity involves cochlear CGRP-receptor complex formation.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Ian M; Bussey-Gaborski, Rhiannon; Holt, Joseph C; Jordan, Paivi M; Luebke, Anne E

    2016-07-01

    In adult animals, the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is contained in cochlear efferent fibers projecting out to the cochlea, and contributes to increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity in the adult auditory nerve. Similarly, CGRP applied to the lateral-line organ (hair cell organ) increases afferent nerve activity in adult frogs (post-metamorphic day 30), yet this increase is developmentally delayed from post-metamorphic day 4-30. In this study, we discovered that there was also a developmental delay in increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity auditory nerve between juvenile and adult mice similar to what had been observed previously in frog. Moreover, juvenile mice with a targeted deletion of the αCGRP gene [CGRP null (-/-)] did not show a similar developmental increase in nerve activity, suggesting CGRP signaling is involved. This developmental delay is not due to a delay in CGRP expression, but instead is due to a delay in receptor formation. We observed that the increase in sound-evoked nerve activity is correlated with increased formation of cochlear CGRP receptors, which require three complexed proteins (CLR, RAMP1, RCP) to be functional. CGRP receptor formation in the cochlea was incomplete at 1 month of age (juvenile), but complete by 3 months (adult), which corresponded to the onset of suprathreshold enhancement of sound-evoked activity in wild-type animals. Taken together, these data support a model for cochlear function that is enhanced by maturation of CGRP receptor complexes. PMID:27440744

  1. Tissue factor trafficking in fibroblasts: involvement of protease-activated receptor–mediated cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Samir K.; Pendurthi, Usha R.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the cellular receptor for clotting factor VIIa (FVIIa), and the formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces triggers the activation of the coagulation cascade and the cell signaling. Our recent studies have shown that a majority of TF resides in various intracellular compartments, predominantly in the Golgi, and that FVIIa binding to cell surface TF induces TF endocytosis and mobilizes the Golgi TF pool to translocate it to the cell surface. This present study is aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in TF endocytosis and its mobilization from the Golgi. Activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and PAR2 by specific peptide agonists and proteases, independent of FVIIa, mobilized TF from the Golgi store and increased the cell surface expression of TF. Blocking PAR2 activation, but not PAR1, with neutralizing antibodies fully attenuated the FVIIa-induced TF mobilization. Consistent with these data, silencing the PAR2 receptor, and not PAR1, abrogated the FVIIa-mediated TF mobilization. In contrast to their effect on TF mobilization, PAR1 and PAR2 activation, in the absence of FVIIa, had no effect on TF endocytosis. However, PAR2 activation is found to be critical for the FVIIa-induced TF endocytosis. Overall the data herein provide novel insights into the role of PARs in regulating cell surface TF expression. PMID:17384202

  2. Possible involvement of thrombin/protease-activated receptor 1 system in the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yasushi; Osuga, Yutaka; Hirata, Tetsuya; Yoshino, Osamu; Koga, Kaori; Harada, Miyuki; Morimoto, Chieko; Nose, Emi; Yano, Tetsu; Tsutsumi, Osamu; Taketani, Yuji

    2005-06-01

    Endometriosis is known to be associated with local inflammatory reactions. Given the emerging concept of thrombin and its specific receptor, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), as important players in inflammation and cell proliferation, we investigated whether thrombin and PAR1 might be involved in the pathophysiology of the disease, using a primary cell culture system of endometriotic tissues. PAR1 mRNA was expressed in primary endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs). Thrombin and SFLLRN (Ser-Phe-Leu-Leu-Arg-Asp), a PAR1 agonist peptide, increased the mRNA expression of IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the protein secretion of IL-8 nd MCP-1 in ESCs. The addition of thrombin inhibitor d-phenylalanyl-l-prolyl-l arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK) together with thrombin inhibited the thrombin-induced secretion of IL-8 and MCP-1. Thrombin, but not SFLLRN, activated matrix metalloproteinase-2 in ESCs, and the effect was inhibited by PPACK. Thrombin and SFLLRN increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive ratio of ESCs, indicating their cell proliferation-stimulating effects. The thrombin-induced increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive ratio was diminished by PPACK. These findings imply that the thrombin system might be involved in the pathophysiology of endometriosis, stimulating inflammatory responses of endometriotic cells and their mitogenic activity. PMID:15755869

  3. Decreasing Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Activity During Sequential Risk-Taking: An fMRI Investigation of the Balloon Analog Risk Task

    PubMed Central

    Schonberg, Tom; Fox, Craig R.; Mumford, Jeanette A.; Congdon, Eliza; Trepel, Christopher; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    Functional imaging studies examining the neural correlates of risk have mainly relied on paradigms involving exposure to simple chance gambles and an economic definition of risk as variance in the probability distribution over possible outcomes. However, there is little evidence that choices made during gambling tasks predict naturalistic risk-taking behaviors such as drug use, extreme sports, or even equity investing. To better understand the neural basis of naturalistic risk-taking, we scanned participants using fMRI while they completed the Balloon Analog Risk Task, an experimental measure that includes an active decision/choice component and that has been found to correlate with a number of naturalistic risk-taking behaviors. In the task, as in many naturalistic settings, escalating risk-taking occurs under uncertainty and might be experienced either as the accumulation of greater potential rewards, or as exposure to increasing possible losses (and decreasing expected value). We found that areas previously linked to risk and risk-taking (bilateral anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) were activated as participants continued to inflate balloons. Interestingly, we found that ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) activity decreased as participants further expanded balloons. In light of previous findings implicating the vmPFC in value calculation, this result suggests that escalating risk-taking in the task might be perceived as exposure to increasing possible losses (and decreasing expected value) rather than the increasing potential total reward relative to the starting point of the trial. A better understanding of how neural activity changes with risk-taking behavior in the task offers insight into the potential neural mechanisms driving naturalistic risk-taking. PMID:22675289

  4. Zebrafish reporter lines reveal in vivo signaling pathway activities involved in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Marco; Rampazzo, Elena; Casari, Alessandro; Battilana, Giusy; Persano, Luca; Moro, Enrico; Liu, Shu; Leach, Steve D; Tiso, Natascia; Argenton, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, one of the worst malignancies of the exocrine pancreas, is a solid tumor with increasing incidence and mortality in industrialized countries. This condition is usually driven by oncogenic KRAS point mutations and evolves into a highly aggressive metastatic carcinoma due to secondary gene mutations and unbalanced expression of genes involved in the specific signaling pathways. To examine in vivo the effects of KRAS(G12D) during pancreatic cancer progression and time correlation with cancer signaling pathway activities, we have generated a zebrafish model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in which eGFP-KRAS(G12D) expression was specifically driven to the pancreatic tissue by using the GAL4/UAS conditional expression system. Outcrossing the inducible oncogenic KRAS(G12D) line with transgenic zebrafish reporters, harboring specific signaling responsive elements of transcriptional effectors, we were able to follow TGFβ, Notch, Bmp and Shh activities during tumor development. Zebrafish transgenic lines expressing eGFP-KRAS(G12D) showed normal exocrine pancreas development until 3 weeks post fertilization (wpf). From 4 to 24 wpf we observed several degrees of acinar lesions, characterized by an increase in mesenchymal cells and mixed acinar/ductal features, followed by progressive bowel and liver infiltrations and, finally, highly aggressive carcinoma. Moreover, live imaging analysis of the exocrine pancreatic tissue revealed an increasing number of KRAS-positive cells and progressive activation of TGFβ and Notch pathways. Increase in TGFβ, following KRAS(G12D) activation, was confirmed in a concomitant model of medulloblastoma (MDB). Notch and Shh signaling activities during tumor onset were different between MDB and pancreatic adenocarcinoma, indicating a tissue-specific regulation of cell signaling pathways. Moreover, our results show that a living model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma joined with cell signaling reporters is a suitable tool for

  5. Involvement of Microglia Activation in the Lead Induced Long-Term Potentiation Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Shen, Xue-Feng; Che, Hong-Lei; Guo, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Chen, Jing-Yuan; Luo, Wen-Jing

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Lead (Pb), a known neurotoxicant, can impair spatial learning and memory probably via impairing the hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as hippocampal neuronal injury. Activation of hippocampal microglia also impairs spatial learning and memory. Thus, we raised the hypothesis that activation of microglia is involved in the Pb exposure induced hippocampal LTP impairment and neuronal injury. To test this hypothesis and clarify its underlying mechanisms, we investigated the Pb-exposure on the microglia activation, cytokine release, hippocampal LTP level as well as neuronal injury in in vivo or in vitro model. The changes of these parameters were also observed after pretreatment with minocycline, a microglia activation inhibitor. Long-term low dose Pb exposure (100 ppm for 8 weeks) caused significant reduction of LTP in acute slice preparations, meanwhile, such treatment also significantly increased hippocampal microglia activation as well as neuronal injury. In vitro Pb-exposure also induced significantly increase of microglia activation, up-regulate the release of cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in microglia culture alone as well as neuronal injury in the co-culture with hippocampal neurons. Inhibiting the microglia activation with minocycline significantly reversed the above-mentioned Pb-exposure induced changes. Our results showed that Pb can cause microglia activation, which can up-regulate the level of IL-1β, TNF-α and iNOS, these proinflammatory factors may cause hippocampal neuronal injury as well as LTP deficits. PMID:22952811

  6. Getting involved in international development activities: UK initiatives and hidden benefits.

    PubMed

    Cheeseborough, Jackie; Godbolt, Shane; Grant, Maria J

    2015-03-01

    Jackie Cheeseborough and Shane Godbolt describe the role that UK health information professionals have in global health and in supporting colleagues from developing countries to continue to develop as a provision. They give an overview of a range of organisations working to improve access to health information in developing countries and in particular Sub-Saharan Africa including Book Aid International, HIFA, INASP, ITOCA, Phi, TALC, THET and Research4Life. Even in a recession, many UK health librarians are choosing to get involved in international development activities in low-resource countries by volunteering, and discovering hidden benefits for their own organisations, and their own continuing professional development.

  7. BimL involvement in Bax activation during UV irradiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Miaojuan; Xing, Da . E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn; Chen, Tongsheng; Zhang, Lan

    2007-06-29

    Bax, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, localizes largely in the cytoplasm but translocates to mitochondria and undergoes oligomerization to induce the release of apoptogenic factors in response to apoptotic stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of Bax activation is not fully understood. We show here the role of BimL in Bax activation during UV irradiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, GFP-BimL plasmid was constructed. The dynamic interaction between BimL and Bax during UV irradiation-induced apoptosis was observed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. Our experimental results showed that BimL translocation to mitochondria occurred before Bax translocation, and that BimL activated Bax indirectly. Moreover, inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation blocked BimL translocation, delayed and attenuated Bax translocation and subsequent apoptosis. These results demonstrate that BimL is involved in UV irradiation-induced apoptosis by indirectly activating Bax.

  8. GABA neurotransmission in the cerebellar interposed nuclei: involvement in classically conditioned eyeblinks and neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Aksenov, D; Serdyukova, N; Irwin, K; Bracha, V

    2004-02-01

    The cerebellar interposed nuclei (IN) are an essential part of circuits that control classically conditioned eyeblinks in the rabbit. The function of the IN is under the control of GABAergic projections from Purkinje cells of the cerebellar cortex. The exact involvement of cerebellar cortical input into the IN during eyeblink expression is not clear. While it is known that the application of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA(A)) agonists and antagonists affects the performance of classically conditioned eyeblinks, the effects of these drugs on IN neurons in vivo are not known. The purpose of the present study was to measure the effects of muscimol and picrotoxin on the expression of conditioned eyeblinks and the activity of IN cells simultaneously. Injections of muscimol abolished conditioned responses and either silenced or diminished the activity of IN cells. Two injections were administered in each picrotoxin experiment. The first injection of picrotoxin slightly modified the timing and amplitude of the eyeblink, produced mild tonic eyelid closure, increased tonic activity of IN cells, and reduced the amplitude of the neural responses. The second injection of picrotoxin abolished conditioned responses, further increased tonic eyelid closure, dramatically elevated the tonic activity of IN cells, and in most cases, abolished neuronal responses. These results demonstrate that both GABA(A)-mediated inactivation and tonic up-regulation of IN cells can interrupt the expression of conditioned eyeblinks and that this behavioral effect is accompanied by the suppression of the neuronal activity correlates of the conditioned stimulus and response.

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKY(Y115E) phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  11. Possible involvement of 12-lipoxygenase activation in glucose-deprivation/reload-treated neurons.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kazuki; Kakuda, Taichi; Higashi, Youichirou; Fujimoto, Sadaki

    2007-12-18

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) activation was involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, extensive poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation and neuronal death induced by glucose-deprivation, followed by glucose-reload (GD/R). The decrease of neuronal viability and accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) induced by GD/R were prevented 3-aminobenzamide, a representative PARP inhibitor, demonstrating this treatment protocol caused the same oxidative stress with the previously reported one. The PARP activation, ROS generation and decrease of neuron viability induced by GD/R treatment were almost completely abolished by an extracellular zinc chelator, CaEDTA. p47(phox), a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase was translocated the membrane fraction by GD/R, indicating its activation, but it did not generate detectable ROS. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase with apocynin and AEBSF further decreased the decreased neuron viability induced by GD/R. On the other hand, AA861, a 12-LOX inhibitor, prevented ROS generation and decrease of neuron viability caused by GD/R. Interestingly, an antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine rescued the neurons from GD/R-induced oxidative stress, implying effectiveness of antioxidant administration. These findings suggested that activation of 12-LOX, but not NADPH oxidase, following to zinc release might play an important role in ROS generation and decrease of viability in GD/R-treated neurons.

  12. The benefits of in-group contact through physical activity involvement for health and well-being among Korean immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Heo, Jinmoo; Kim, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study is designed to examine the benefits of physical activity involvement with members of the same ethnic group. For this study, Korean immigrants who were members of Korean physical activity clubs such as badminton and tennis were selected as participants. Using a constructive grounded theory methodology, three themes were identified as benefits of physical activity involvement: (1) the experience of psychological well-being, (2) the creation of a unique cultural world, and (3) the facilitation of physical activity involvement. The findings of this study suggest that Korean immigrant participants gained various social, cultural, and psychological benefits by engaging in activities with other Korean immigrants. PMID:24875239

  13. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active.

    PubMed

    Schönitzer, Veronika; Eichner, Norbert; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Weiss, Ingrid M

    2011-12-01

    Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report the heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA(-) cell lines are shown.

  14. DNA methylation, riboswitches, and transcription factor activity: fundamental mechanisms of gene-nutrient interactions involving vitamins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Janet; Vieira, Amandio

    2006-12-01

    Nutrient-gene interactions occur with a variety of nutrients including some minerals, vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acids and other lipids. Fundamental molecular mechanisms that underlie many of the effects of nutrients on gene expression are presented herein. Two of the mechanisms described influence gene transcription: DNA methylation and transcription factor activation. Another mechanism, riboswitching, can regulate gene expression at different levels, for example, at the mRNA translation level. The first two mechanisms are widely distributed across animal phyla. Riboswitches are documented primarily in more primitive organisms, but may prove to be of wider relevance. Riboswitches are known for several vitamins; those involving thiamine are presented here. The role of folates and retinoids in DNA methylation and transcriptional factor (nuclear retinoid receptor) activities, respectively, is presented in the context of cell proliferation and differentiation, and related physiological or pathological effects during embryogenesis and cancer.

  15. NRF2 activation is involved in ozonated human serum upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Bocci, Velio; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Gardi, Concetta; Virgili, Fabio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2013-02-15

    During the last decade, it has been shown that the activation of NRF2 and the binding to electrophile-responsive element (EpREs), stimulates the expression of a great number of genes responsible for the synthesis of phase I and phase II proteins, including antioxidants enzymes and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This critical cell response occurs in cardiovascular, degenerative and chronic infective diseases aggravated by a chronic oxidative stress. In our previous reports we have shown that ozonated plasma is able to up-regulate HO-1 expression in endothelial cells. In the present work we investigated a candidate mechanism involved in this process. After treatment with increasing doses of ozonated serum (20, 40 and 80 μg/mL O{sub 3} per mL of serum), a clear dose dependent activation of NRF2 and the subsequent induction of HO-1 and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1) was observed. This effect was also present when cells were treated with serum and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or serum and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE). Moreover, the treatment with ozonated serum was associated with a dose-dependent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 MAP kinases (p38), not directly involved in NRF2 activation. These data, provide a new insight on the mechanism responsible for the induction of HO-1 expression by ozonated serum in the endothelium, and have a practical importance as an expedient approach to the treatment of patients with both effective orthodox drugs and ozonated autohemotherapy, targeted to the restoration of redox homeostasis. - Highlights: ► Endothelial HO1 is upregulated by ozonated plasma ► This activation is induced by NRF2 and it is ERK independent. ► 4HNE and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are the main molecules involved in this process. ► Ozonated plasma induced a hormetic effect ► Combination of orthodox medicine and ozonated plasma can be a useful treatment.

  16. Is interaction of amyloid β-peptides with metals involved in cognitive activity?

    PubMed

    Tamano, Haruna; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Metal ions, i.e., Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), are released from neuron terminals in the hippocampus, which plays important roles in spatial and declarative memory, and may serve as a signal factor. Synaptic homeostasis of metal ions is critical for cognitive activity in the hippocampus. Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a causative candidate for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Aβ-induced synapse dysfunction is easy to emerge along with normal aging and leads to the cognitive decline and memory loss in the pre-dementia stage of AD. Because Aβ interacts with Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), it is likely that these metal ions are involved in the Aβ-induced modification of the synaptic function. There is evidence to indicate that the inhibition of the interaction of Aβ with Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) may ameliorate the pathophysiology of AD. Interaction of extracellular Zn(2+) with Aβ in the hippocampus is involved in transiently Aβ-induced cognition deficits, while the interaction of extracellular Cu(2+) reduces bioavailability of intracellular Cu(2+), followed by an increase in oxidative stress, which may lead to cognitive deficits. It is likely that Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) play as a key-mediating factor in pathophysiology of the synaptic dysfunction in which Aβ is involved. Based on the idea that understating Aβ-induced changes in synaptic plasticity is important to prevent AD, the present paper summarizes the interaction of Aβ with metal ions in cognition. PMID:25959547

  17. Cissus sicyoides: Pharmacological Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antidiarrheal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Beserra, Fernando Pereira; de Cássia Santos, Raquel; Périco, Larissa Lucena; Rodrigues, Vinicius Peixoto; de Almeida Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Pupo, André Sampaio; da Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal actions of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the leaves of Cissus sicyoides (HECS). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by oral administration of HECS against acute model of edema induced by xylene, and the mechanisms of action were analysed by involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The antidiarrheal effect of HECS was observed and we analyzed the motility and accumulation of intestinal fluid. We also analyzed the antidiarrheal mechanisms of action of HECS by evaluating the role of the opioid receptor, α2 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2. The oral administration of HECS inhibited the edema induced by xylene and AA and was also able to significantly decrease the levels of PGE2. The extract also exhibited significant anti-diarrheal activity by reducing motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. This extract significantly reduced intestinal transit stimulated by muscarinic agonist and intestinal secretion induced by PGE2. Our data demonstrate that the mechanism of action involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of HECS is related to PGE2. The antidiarrheal effect of this extract may be mediated by inhibition of contraction by acting on the intestinal smooth muscle and/or intestinal transit. PMID:26805827

  18. Involvement of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (medullary dorsal horn) in craniofacial nociceptive reflex activity.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C M; Chiang, C Y; Yu, X M; Sessle, B J

    1999-05-01

    We have previously shown that an increase in electromyographic (EMG) activity of digastric (DIG) and masseter (MASS) muscles can be reflexly evoked by injection into the rat's temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region of the small-fibre excitant and inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO). Since the trigeminal (V) subnucleus caudalis (Vc, i.e. medullary dorsal horn) has traditionally been viewed as an essential brainstem relay site of nociceptive information from craniofacial tissues, an EMG study was carried out in 45 anaesthetized rats to determine if Vc is involved in the MO-evoked increases in jaw muscle EMG activity. The effects of histologically confirmed surgical or chemical lesions of Vc on this evoked EMG activity were tested in different groups of rats. MO injection into the left TMJ region of intact rats evoked bilateral increases in EMG activity of DIG and MASS which could be significantly reduced by surgical transection of the left caudal brainstem at the obex level; MO injection into the right TMJ region in these same rats still readily evoked increases in EMG activity. A sagittal section medial to Vc or transection at the level of the second cervical spinal segment did not produce any significant reduction in the reflexly evoked EMG activity. Neurones in Vc, as opposed to fibres of passage, appear to be important for the MO-evoked EMG activity, since injection into Vc of the neurotoxic chemical ibotenic acid significantly reduced the mustard oil-evoked EMG activity. The Vc also appears to play a role in the activation of contralateral V motoneurons, as evidenced by the activation of the contralateral DIG and MASS muscles by the injection of MO into the left TMJ region of intact rats and by the reduction of this evoked EMG activity in the contralateral DIG and MASS of rats with a surgical transection or ibotenic acid lesion of the left Vc. These findings suggest that Vc may be a critical element in the neural pathways underlying the reflex responses evoked

  19. Characterization of senescence-associated protease activities involved in the efficient protein remobilization during leaf senescence of winter oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Poret, Marine; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Avice, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is a crop plant characterized by a poor nitrogen (N) use efficiency that is mainly due to low N remobilization efficiency during the sequential leaf senescence of the vegetative stage. As a high leaf N remobilization efficiency was strongly linked to a high remobilization of proteins during leaf senescence of rapeseed, our objective was to identify senescence-associated protease activities implicated in the protein degradation. To reach this goal, leaf senescence processes and protease activities were investigated in a mature leaf becoming senescent in plants subjected to ample or low nitrate supply. The characterization of protease activities was performed by using in vitro analysis of RuBisCO degradation with or without inhibitors of specific protease classes followed by a protease activity profiling using activity-dependent probes. As expected, the mature leaf became senescent regardless of the nitrate treatment, and nitrate limitation enhanced the senescence processes associated with an enhanced degradation of soluble proteins. The characterization of protease activities revealed that: (i) aspartic proteases and the proteasome were active during senescence regardless of nitrate supply, and (ii) the activities of serine proteases and particularly cysteine proteases (Papain-like Cys proteases and vacuolar processing enzymes) increased when protein remobilization associated with senescence was accelerated by nitrate limitation. Short statement: Serine and particularly cysteine proteases (both PLCPs and VPEs) seem to play a crucial role in the efficient protein remobilization when leaf senescence of oilseed rape was accelerated by nitrate limitation. PMID:26993244

  20. Multi-Attribute Sequential Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, J. Neil; Connolly, Terry

    2007-01-01

    This article describes empirical and theoretical results from two multi-attribute sequential search tasks. In both tasks, the DM sequentially encounters options described by two attributes and must pay to learn the values of the attributes. In the "continuous" version of the task the DM learns the precise numerical value of an attribute when she…

  1. Feedback in sequential machine realizations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, C. A.; Coates, C. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described for determining the realizability of a sequential machine with trigger or set-reset flip-flop memory elements when the feedback of the machine is given by a Boolean function. Feedbacks in several types of sequential machines with different memory elements are compared, showing the memory specifications allowing the realization of such machines.

  2. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution....

  3. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution....

  4. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution....

  5. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution....

  6. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution....

  7. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  8. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  9. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  10. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  11. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  12. Developmental changes in brain activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds in children.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Thyreau, Benjamin; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-08-01

    Older children are more successful at producing unfamiliar, non-native speech sounds than younger children during the initial stages of learning. To reveal the neuronal underpinning of the age-related increase in the accuracy of non-native speech production, we examined the developmental changes in activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Healthy right-handed children (aged 6-18 years) were scanned while performing an overt repetition task and a perceptual task involving aurally presented non-native and native syllables. Productions of non-native speech sounds were recorded and evaluated by native speakers. The mouth regions in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas were activated more significantly during the repetition task relative to the perceptual task. The hemodynamic response in the left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (IFG pOp) specific to non-native speech sound production (defined by prior hypothesis) increased with age. Additionally, the accuracy of non-native speech sound production increased with age. These results provide the first evidence of developmental changes in the neural processes underlying the production of novel speech sounds. Our data further suggest that the recruitment of the left IFG pOp during the production of novel speech sounds was possibly enhanced due to the maturation of the neuronal circuits needed for speech motor planning. This, in turn, would lead to improvement in the ability to immediately imitate non-native speech.

  13. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  14. An update on renal involvement in hemophagocytic syndrome (macrophage activation syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Esmaili, Haydarali; Mostafidi, Elmira; Mehramuz, Bahareh; Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Mohajel-Shoja, Mohammadali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is mainly characterized by massive infiltration of bone marrow by activated macrophages and often presents with pancytopenia. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is also present with thrombocytopenia and renal involvement. Both conditions could coexist with each other and complicate the condition. Evidence Acquisition: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science with keywords relevant to; Hemophagocytic syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, interferon-gamma and thrombotic microangiopathy, have been searched. Results: Viral infection, rheumatologic disease and malignancies are the main underlying causes for secondary HPS. calcineurin inhibitors and viral infections are also the main underlying causes of TMA in transplant recipients. In this review, we discussed a 39-year-old male who presented with pancytopenia and renal allograft dysfunction. With the diagnosis of HPS induced TMA his renal condition and pancytopenia improved after receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis therapy. Conclusions: HPS is an increasingly recognized disorder in the realm of different medical specialties. Renal involvement complicates the clinical picture of the disease, and this condition even is more complex in renal transplant recipients. We should consider the possibility of HPS in any renal transplant recipient with pancytopenia and allograft dysfunction. The combination of HPS with TMA future increases the complexity of the situation. PMID:27047804

  15. Shrinkage activates a nonselective conductance: involvement of a Walker-motif protein and PKC.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D J; Tien, X Y; Xie, W; Brasitus, T A; Kaetzel, M A; Dedman, J R

    1996-01-01

    The ability of all cells to maintain their volume during an osmotic challenge is dependent on the regulated movement of salt and water across the plasma membrane. We demonstrate the phosphorylation-dependent gating of a nonselective conductance in Caco-2 cells during cellular shrinkage. Intracellular application of exogenous purified rat brain protein kinase C (PKC) resulted in the activation of a current similar to that activated during shrinkage with a Na(+)-to-Cl- permeability ratio of approximately 1.7:1. To prevent possible PKC- and/or shrinkage-dependent activation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which is expressed at high levels in Caco-2 cells, a functional anti-peptide antibody, anti-CFTR505-511, was introduced into the cells via the patch pipette. Anti-CFTR505-511, which is directed against the Walker motif in the first nucleotide binding fold of CFTR, prevented the PKC/shrink-age current activation. The peptide CFTR505-511 also induced current inhibition, suggesting the possible involvement of a regulatory element in close proximity to the channel that shares sequence homology with the first nucleotide binding fold of CFTR and whose binding to the channel is required for channel gating. PMID:8772443

  16. Dura-evoked neck muscle activity involves purinergic and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongyuan; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-12-16

    We have previously demonstrated that noxious stimulation of craniofacial tissues including the frontal dura reflexly evokes significant increases in neck muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether purinergic receptor mechanisms may be involved in these EMG effects, and whether N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor processes modulate the purinergic mechanisms. Application of the P2X1, P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (but not vehicle) to the dural surface evoked a significant (P<0.05) increase in ipsilateral neck EMG activity that could be suppressed by dural or intrathecal application of the selective P2X1, P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonist 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) ATP (TNP-ATP) but not by vehicle; the intrathecal application of 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, an NMDA receptor antagonist, also significantly reduced the neck EMG activity evoked by dural application of α,β-methylene ATP. These data suggest that purinergic receptor mechanisms contribute to the increased neck activity that can be reflexly evoked by noxious stimulation of the frontal dura, and that NMDA as well as purinergic receptor mechanisms in the medulla may modulate these purinergic-related effects. PMID:26559728

  17. Effects of negative air ions on activity of neural substrates involved in autonomic regulation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoko; Yanagita, Shinya; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kato, Yumi; Kubota, Natsuko; Ryushi, Tomoo; Kita, Ichiro

    2008-07-01

    The neural mechanism by which negative air ions (NAI) mediate the regulation of autonomic nervous system activity is still unknown. We examined the effects of NAI on physiological responses, such as blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) as well as neuronal activity, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), nucleus ambiguus (NA), and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) with c-Fos immunohistochemistry in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats. In addition, we performed cervical vagotomy to reveal the afferent pathway involved in mediating the effects of NAI on autonomic regulation. NAI significantly decreased BP and HR, and increased HF power of the HRV spectrum. Significant decreases in c-Fos positive nuclei in the PVN and LC, and enhancement of c-Fos expression in the NA and NTS were induced by NAI. After vagotomy, these physiological and neuronal responses to NAI were not observed. These findings suggest that NAI can modulate autonomic regulation through inhibition of neuronal activity in PVN and LC as well as activation of NA neurons, and that these effects of NAI might be mediated via the vagus nerves.

  18. A novel enzyme activity involving the demethylation of specific partially methylated oligogalacturonides.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Martin A K; Benen, Jacques A E

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the enzymic digestion of pectic substrates using different polygalacturonase (PG) preparations have revealed evidence for a previously unreported enzyme activity carried out by a contaminating enzyme in one of the preparations. This observed activity involves the demethylation of specific oligogalacturonides, namely 2-methyltrigalacturonic acid and 2,3-dimethyltetragalacturonic acid. However, no large-scale demethylation of highly methylated polymeric substrates is found, demonstrating that the enzyme responsible is not a conventional pectin methylesterase (PME). Furthermore, it has been shown that a commercial sample of fungal PME from Aspergillus niger demethylates all of the oligogalacturonides present as primary products of endo-PG digestion, in contrast with the activity observed here. On the basis of the known methyl ester distribution of the endo-PG-generated fragments and knowledge of which of these oligogalacturonides are demethylated, it is concluded that the observed activity can be explained by the existence of an exo-acting methylesterase that attacks the non-reducing end of the oligogalacturonide molecules. PMID:12097140

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shimaa E; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Wiik-Nielsen, Jannicke; Gamil, Amr A A; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L) over a period 4-24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp.

  20. Nerolidol exhibits antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity: involvement of the GABAergic system and proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fonsêca, Diogo V; Salgado, Paula R R; de Carvalho, Fabíola L; Salvadori, Mirian Graciela S S; Penha, Antônia Rosângela S; Leite, Fagner C; Borges, Clóvis José S; Piuvezam, Marcia R; Pordeus, Liana Clébia de Morais; Sousa, Damião P; Almeida, Reinaldo N

    2016-02-01

    Nerolidol, an acyclic sesquiterpene found as a major constituent of several essential oils, has several pharmacological activities, but its action in pain processes has never been studied. The purpose of our research was to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of nerolidol, as well as possible mechanisms of action, in experimental mouse models of pain. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing test, the formalin test, and the hot-plate test. The nerolidol-treated group showed lesser acetic acid-induced abdominal contractions than the control group in all of the three doses tested (200, 300, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.). The formalin test doses of 300 and 400 mg/kg p.o. inhibited licking time, in both the first phase and the second phase. In the hot-plate test, nerolidol did not alter latency at any of the observed time points. Motor coordination, evaluated through the rotarod test, was not hindered in animals treated with nerolidol. Regarding the mechanism of action, the antinociceptive activity of nerolidol is related to the GABAergic system, and not to the opioidergic or ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Treatment with nerolidol reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema. In the model of carrageenan-induced peritonitis, nerolidol decreased the influx of polymorphonuclear cells and also reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in peritoneal lavage. Nerolidol reduced production of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) in LPS-stimulated, peritoneal macrophages. Thus, these results showed that nerolidol has antinociceptive activity with possible involvement of the GABAergic system, and anti-inflammatory activity, attributed to the suppression of TNF-α and IL-1β proinflammatory cytokines.

  1. Joint Associations of Residential Density and Neighborhood Involvement with Physical Activity among a Multiethnic Sample of Urban Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki; Schulz, Amy J.; Zenk, Shannon N.; Israel, Barbara A.; Wineman, Jean; Marans, Robert W.; Rowe, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is associated with improvements in overall health. Although resident involvement in neighborhood social activities is positively associated with physical activity, neighborhood design features, including residential density, have varied associations with physical activity. Using data from a multiethnic sample of 696…

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator involvement in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis: aggravation and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Gur-Wahnon, Devorah; Mizrachi, Tehila; Wald-Altman, Shane; Al-Roof Higazi, Abd; Brenner, Talma

    2014-08-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a component of the PA/plasmin system, is elevated in inflammatory areas and plays a role in inflammatory neurological disorders. In the present study we explored the involvement of tPA and the potential immunomodulatory activity of tPA in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Mice deficient in tPA (tPA(-/-)) present with a markedly more severe disease than wild type EAMG mice. In an attempt to treat EAMG with an 18aa peptide derived from the PA system inhibitor (PAI-1), designed to tether out the endogenous inhibitor, a significant suppression of disease severity was demonstrated. The more severe disease in tPA(-/-) mice was accompanied by a higher level of anti-AChR antibodies and increased expression of B-cell markers. In view of the essential role of B-cell activating factor (BAFF) in B-cell maturation, the expression of BAFF family components was tested. An increase in BAFF and BAFF receptor was observed in EAMG tPA(-/-) mice, whereas BCMA expression was reduced, consistent with the increased level of pathogenic antibodies and the more severe disease. Given the importance of T regulatory cells (Tregs) in EAMG, they were evaluated and their number was reduced in tPA(-/-) mice, in which EAMG was aggravated, whereas following PAI-1dp treatment, Tregs were replenished and the disease was ameliorated. The results show the involvement of tPA in EAMG, implying a protective role for tPA in EAMG pathogenesis. The amelioration of EAMG by PAI-1dp treatment suggests that the PA system may be considered a potential site for therapeutic intervention in neuroimmune diseases.

  3. Activation dependent expression of MMPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells involves protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Saja, K; Chatterjee, Urmimala; Chatterjee, B P; Sudhakaran, P R

    2007-02-01

    Monocyte/Macrophages are integral cellular components of inflammation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by these cells play a crucial role in every aspect of inflammation. Results of the investigations on activation dependent upregulation of MMPs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture using different lectins as an in vitro model system to mimic inflammatory monocytes are presented. Under normal physiological conditions the monocytes produced only very low amount of MMPs in an indomethacin insensitive PG/cAMP independent manner. Zymographic analysis and ELISA showed that treatment of monocyte with lectins like concanavalin A (ConA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) caused upregulation of MMPs and the maximum effect was produced by ALA. ALA significantly upregulated MMP-9 in a concentration and time dependent manner. Immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR confirmed ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 production. Inhibition of ALA effect by indomethacin and reversal of the indomethacin effect by Bt(2)cAMP indicated involvement of cAMP dependent signaling pathway. Further support for the prostaglandin mediated effect was obtained by the upregulation of cyclooxygenase by ALA. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the expression of MMP-9 indicating that ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 is mediated through PKA pathway. Increase in MMP production and increase in cyclooxygenase activity and inhibition of the effect of ALA on MMP production by indomethacin suggested that the ALA activated monocytes in culture can be used as an in vitro model system to study the intracellular signaling process involved in the mediation of inflammatory response.

  4. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  5. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  6. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  7. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  8. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael

    2011-06-23

    Plants utilize light as a source of information via families of photoreceptors such as the red/far-red absorbing phytochromes (PHY) and the blue/UVA absorbing cryptochromes (CRY). The main goal of the Neff lab is to use molecular-genetic mutant screens to elucidate signaling components downstream of these photoreceptors. Activation-tagging mutagenesis led to the identification of two putative transcription factors that may be involved in both photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling pathways. sob1-D (suppressor of phyB-dominant) mutant phenotypes are caused by the over-expression of a Dof transcription factor previously named OBP3. Our previous studies indicate that OBP3 is a negative regulator of light-mediated cotyledon expansion and may be involved in modulating responsiveness to the growth-regulating hormone auxin. The sob2-D mutant uncovers a role for LEP, a putative AP2/EREBP-like transcription factor, in seed germination, hypocotyl elongation and responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid. Based on photobiological and genetic analysis of OBP3-knockdown and LEP-null mutations, we hypothesize that these transcription factors are involved in both light-mediated seedling development and hormone signaling. To examine the role that these genes play in photomorphogenesis we will: 1) Further explore the genetic role of OBP3 in cotyledon/leaf expansion and other photomorphogenic processes as well as examine potential physical interactions between OBP3 and CRY1 or other signaling components that genetically interact with this transcription factor 2) Test the hypothesis that OBP3 is genetically involved in auxin signaling and root development as well as examine the affects of this hormone and light on OBP3 protein accumulation. 3) Test the hypothesis that LEP is involved in seed germination, seedling photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling. Together these experiments will lead to a greater understanding of the complexity of interactions between photoreceptors and DNA

  9. Stability models for sequential storage.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Emil M; Shum, Sam C

    2011-03-01

    Some drugs are intended for sequential storage under two different storage conditions. If the data for each condition are analyzed separately, predicting assay and other responses after T1 months at one condition followed by T2 months at the other condition is non-trivial for several reasons. First, the two analyses will give different intercept terms. What should one do about that? Second, how would one calculate the confidence limits for combined storage? Third, what if prior storage at one condition affects the slope at the other condition? This paper proposes a simple ANCOVA model containing two slope terms, one for each storage condition. When multiple batches and/or packages are involved, it is easily generalized to two sets of slope terms. Confidence limits are straightforward and can be calculated using existing commercial software. With properly designed data, one can test whether prior storage at one condition affects the slope at the other condition. If no such effect is significant, very useful extrapolations can be made. Temperature excursions, model reduction and curvilinear dependencies are discussed.

  10. Bakuchiol Is a Phenolic Isoprenoid with Novel Enantiomer-selective Anti-influenza A Virus Activity Involving Nrf2 Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Masaki; Arakaki, Yumie; Esumi, Tomoyuki; Kohnomi, Shuntaro; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Etsuhisa; Konishi, Shiro; Kido, Hiroshi; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Influenza represents a substantial threat to human health and requires novel therapeutic approaches. Bakuchiol is a phenolic isoprenoid compound present in Babchi (Psoralea corylifolia L.) seeds. We examined the anti-influenza viral activity of synthetic bakuchiol using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. We found that the naturally occurring form, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol, and its enantiomer, (−)-(R)-bakuchiol, inhibited influenza A viral infection and growth and reduced the expression of viral mRNAs and proteins in these cells. Furthermore, these compounds markedly reduced the mRNA expression of the host cell influenza A virus-induced immune response genes, interferon-β and myxovirus-resistant protein 1. Interestingly, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol had greater efficacy than (−)-(R)-bakuchiol, indicating that chirality influenced anti-influenza virus activity. In vitro studies indicated that bakuchiol did not strongly inhibit the activities of influenza surface proteins or the M2 ion channel, expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Analysis of luciferase reporter assay data unexpectedly indicated that bakuchiol may induce some host cell factor(s) that inhibited firefly and Renilla luciferases. Next generation sequencing and KeyMolnet analysis of influenza A virus-infected and non-infected cells exposed to bakuchiol revealed activation of transcriptional regulation by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf), and an Nrf2 reporter assay showed that (+)-(S)-bakuchiol activated Nrf2. Additionally, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol up-regulated the mRNA levels of two Nrf2-induced genes, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 and glutathione S-transferase A3. These findings demonstrated that bakuchiol had enantiomer-selective anti-influenza viral activity involving a novel effect on the host cell oxidative stress response. PMID:26446794

  11. Solid-state chemistry of molecular metal oxide clusters. Multiple, sequential C-H activation processes in the hydrogenation of coordinated cyclooctene. Lattice mobility of small organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Siedle, A.R.; Newmark, R.A.; Sahyun, M.R.V.; Lyon, P.A.; Hunt, S.L.; Skarjune, R.P. )

    1989-10-25

    Reaction of solid ((Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Ir(C{sub 8}H{sub 12})){sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} with D{sub 2} gas produces cyclooctane containing up to 16 deuterium atoms. The c-C{sub 8}D{sub n}H{sub 16-n} isotopomer distribution is analyzed by Poisson statistics and interpreted in terms of C-H activation involving Ir-D-C-H exchange in an intermediate species containing coordinated cyclooctene. The results are compared with those from D{sub 2} reduction of ((Ph{sub 3}P){sub 2}Ir(C{sub 8}H{sub 12}))(PF{sub 6}) in the solid state and in acetone solution, in which cases, an additional exchange process operates. Solid-state {sup 2}H NMR shows that, even at low temperatures, small organic molecules such as cyclooctane and benzene undergo nearly isotropic motion.

  12. Improving the active involvement of stakeholders and the public in flood risk management - tools of an involvement strategy and case study results from Austria, Germany and Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhauer, M.; Greiving, S.; Flex, F.; Scheibel, M.; Stickler, T.; Sereinig, N.; Koboltschnig, G.; Malvati, P.; Vitale, V.; Grifoni, P.; Firus, K.

    2012-09-01

    The EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC aims at an active involvement of interested parties in the setting up of flood risk management plans and thus calls for more governance-related decision-making. This requirement has two perspectives. On the one hand, there is (1) the question of how decision-makers can improve the quality of their governance process. On the other hand, there is (2) the question of how the public shall be appropriately informed and involved. These questions were the centre of the ERA-Net CRUE-funded project IMRA (integrative flood risk governance approach for improvement of risk awareness) that aimed at an optimisation of the flood risk management process by increasing procedural efficiency with an explicit involvement strategy. To reach this goal, the IMRA project partners developed two new approaches that were implemented in three case study areas for the first time in flood risk management: 1. risk governance assessment tool: An indicator-based benchmarking and monitoring tool was used to evaluate the performance of a flood risk management system in regard to ideal risk governance principles; 2. social milieu approach: The concept of social milieus was used to gain a picture of the people living in the case study regions to learn more about their lifestyles, attitudes and values and to use this knowledge to plan custom-made information and participation activities for the broad public. This paper presents basic elements and the application of two innovative approaches as a part of an "involvement strategy" that aims at the active involvement of all interested parties (stakeholders) for assessing, reviewing and updating flood risk management plans, as formulated in the EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC.

  13. A quantitative account of the activation steps involved in phototransduction in amphibian photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, T D; Pugh, E N

    1992-01-01

    1. We have undertaken a theoretical analysis of the steps contributing to the phototransduction cascade in vertebrate photoreceptors. We have explicitly considered only the activation steps, i.e. we have not dealt with the inactivation reactions. 2. From the theoretical analysis we conclude that a single photoisomerization leads to activation of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) with a time course which approximates a delayed ramp; the delay is contributed by several short first-order delay stages. 3. We derive a method for extracting the time course of PDE activation from the measured electrical response, and we apply this method to recordings of the photoresponse from salamander rods. The results confirm the prediction that the time course of PDE activation is a delayed ramp, with slope proportional to light intensity; the initial delay is about 10-20 ms. 4. We derive approximate analytical solutions for the electrical response of the photoreceptor to light, both for bright flashes (isotropic conditions) and for single photons (involving longitudinal diffusion of cyclic GMP in the outer segment). The response to a brief flash is predicted to follow a delayed Gaussian function of time, i.e. after an initial short delay the response should begin rising in proportion to t2. Further, the response-intensity relation is predicted to obey an exponential saturation. 5. These predictions are compared with experiment, and it is shown that the rising phase of the flash response is accurately described over a very wide range of intensities. We conclude that the model provides a comprehensive description of the activation steps of phototransduction at a molecular level. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1326052

  14. atRA-induced apoptosis of mouse embryonic palate mesenchymal cells involves activation of MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: yuzengli@263.net; Xing Ying . E-mail: xingy@zzu.edu.cn

    2006-08-15

    Our previous studies have shown that atRA treatment resulted in cell-cycle block and growth inhibition in mouse embryonic palatal mesenchymal (MEPM). In the current study, gestation day (GD) 13 MEPM cells were used to test the hypothesis that the growth inhibition by atRA is due to apoptosis. The effects of atRA on apoptosis were assessed by performing MTT assay, Cell Death Detection ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Data analysis confirmed that atRA treatment induced apoptosis-like cell death, as shown by decreased cell viability and increased fragmented DNA and sub-G1 fraction. atRA-induced apoptosis was associated with upregulation of bcl-2, translocation of bax protein to the mitochondria from the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and cytochrome c release into cytosol. atRA-induced apoptosis was abrogated by z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 specific inhibitor, and z-VAD-fmk, a general caspase inhibitor, suggesting that the atRA-induced cell death of MEPM cells occurs through the cytochrome c- and caspase-3-dependent pathways. In addition, atRA treatment caused a strong and sustained activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38), as well as an early but transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Importantly, atRA-induced DNA fragmentation and capase-3 activation were prevented by pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and the p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190), but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitor (U0126). From these results, we suggest that mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways is involved in the atRA-induced apoptosis of MEPM cells.

  15. Bacillus subtilis polynucleotide phosphorylase 3'-to-5' DNase activity is involved in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Paula P; Carrasco, Begoña; Sanchez, Humberto; Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H; Alonso, Juan C

    2009-07-01

    In the presence of Mn(2+), an activity in a preparation of purified Bacillus subtilis RecN degrades single-stranded (ss) DNA with a 3' --> 5' polarity. This activity is not associated with RecN itself, because RecN purified from cells lacking polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) does not show the exonuclease activity. We show here that, in the presence of Mn(2+) and low-level inorganic phosphate (P(i)), PNPase degrades ssDNA. The limited end-processing of DNA is regulated by ATP and is inactive in the presence of Mg(2+) or high-level P(i). In contrast, the RNase activity of PNPase requires Mg(2+) and P(i), suggesting that PNPase degradation of RNA and ssDNA occur by mutually exclusive mechanisms. A null pnpA mutation (DeltapnpA) is not epistatic with Delta recA, but is epistatic with DeltarecN and Delta ku, which by themselves are non-epistatic. The addA5, Delta recO, Delta recQ (Delta recJ), Delta recU and Delta recG mutations (representative of different epistatic groups), in the context of DeltapnpA, demonstrate gain- or loss-of-function by inactivation of repair-by-recombination, depending on acute or chronic exposure to the damaging agent and the nature of the DNA lesion. Our data suggest that PNPase is involved in various nucleic acid metabolic pathways, and its limited ssDNA exonuclease activity plays an important role in RecA-dependent and RecA-independent repair pathways. PMID:19433509

  16. RNA silencing of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease enhances mitochondrial function and synaptic activity.

    PubMed

    Manczak, Maria; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2013-12-01

    An age-dependent increase in mRNA levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), the microtubule-associated protein Tau, and voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) genes are reported to be toxic to neurons affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying toxic nature of these genes is not completely understood. The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of RNA silencing of APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes in AD pathogenesis. Using human neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cells, we first silenced RNA for APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes, and then performed real-time RT-PCR analysis to measure mRNA levels of 34 genes that are involved in AD pathogenesis. Using biochemical assays, we also assessed mitochondrial function by measuring levels of H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP production, and GTPase enzymatic activity. We found that increased mRNA expression of synaptic function and mitochondrial fission genes, and reduced levels of mitochondrial fusion genes in RNA silenced the SHSY5Y cells for APP, Tau and VDAC1 genes relative to the control SHSY5Y cells. In addition, RNA-silenced APP, Tau, and VDAC1 genes in SHSY5Y cells showed reduced levels of H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, fission-linked GTPase activity, and increased cytochrome oxidase activity and ATP production. These findings suggest that a reduction of human APP, Tau, and VDAC1 may enhance synaptic activity, may improve mitochondrial maintenance and function, and may protect against toxicities of AD-related genes. Thus, these findings also suggest that the reduction of APP, Tau, and VDAC1 mRNA expressions may have therapeutic value for patients with AD.

  17. Influenza A Virus Panhandle Structure Is Directly Involved in RIG-I Activation and Interferon Induction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, GuanQun; Park, Hong-Su; Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is an important innate immune sensor that recognizes viral RNA in the cytoplasm. Its nonself recognition largely depends on the unique RNA structures imposed by viral RNA. The panhandle structure residing in the influenza A virus (IAV) genome, whose primary function is to serve as the viral promoter for transcription and replication, has been proposed to be a RIG-I agonist. However, this has never been proved experimentally. Here, we employed multiple approaches to determine if the IAV panhandle structure is directly involved in RIG-I activation and type I interferon (IFN) induction. First, in porcine alveolar macrophages, we demonstrated that the viral genomic coding region is dispensable for RIG-I-dependent IFN induction. Second, using in vitro-synthesized hairpin RNA, we showed that the IAV panhandle structure could directly bind to RIG-I and stimulate IFN production. Furthermore, we investigated the contributions of the wobble base pairs, mismatch, and unpaired nucleotides within the wild-type panhandle structure to RIG-I activation. Elimination of these destabilizing elements within the panhandle structure promoted RIG-I activation and IFN induction. Given the function of the panhandle structure as the viral promoter, we further monitored the promoter activity of these panhandle variants and found that viral replication was moderately affected, whereas viral transcription was impaired dramatically. In all, our results indicate that the IAV panhandle promoter region adopts a nucleotide composition that is optimal for balanced viral RNA synthesis and suboptimal for RIG-I activation. IMPORTANCE The IAV genomic panhandle structure has been proposed to be an RIG-I agonist due to its partial complementarity; however, this has not been experimentally confirmed. Here, we provide direct evidence that the IAV panhandle structure is competent in, and sufficient for, RIG-I activation and IFN induction. By constructing

  18. Evidence for ACD5 ceramide kinase activity involvement in Arabidopsis response to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Chavarria, Heidy; Rézé, Nathalie; Sotta, Bruno; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Guillas, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Although sphingolipids emerged as important signals for plant response to low temperature, investigations have been limited so far to the function of long-chain base intermediates. The formation and function of ceramide phosphates (Cer-Ps) in chilled Arabidopsis were explored. Cer-Ps were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) following in vivo metabolic radiolabelling. Ceramide kinase activity, gene expression and growth phenotype were determined in unstressed and cold-stressed wild type (WT) and Arabidopsis ceramide kinase mutant acd5. A rapid and transient formation of Cer-P occurs in cold-stressed WT Arabidopsis plantlets and cultured cells, which is strongly impaired in acd5 mutant. Although concomitant, Cer-P formation is independent of long-chain base phosphate (LCB-P) formation. No variation of ceramide kinase activity was measured in vitro in WT plantlets upon cold stress but the activity in acd5 mutant was further reduced by cold stress. At the seedling stage, acd5 response to cold was similar to that of WT. Nevertheless, acd5 seed germination was hypersensitive to cold and abscisic acid (ABA), and ABA-dependent gene expression was modified in acd5 seeds when germinated at low temperature. Our data involve for the first time Cer-P and ACD5 in low temperature response and further underline the complexity of sphingolipid signalling operating during cold stress.

  19. Flagellin-induced NADPH oxidase 4 activation is involved in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinoh; Seo, Misun; Kim, Su Kyung; Bae, Yun Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that bacterial infection-mediated inflammation facilitates development of atherosclerosis by activating toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling system. We reasoned that NADPH oxidases (Nox), required for TLR-mediated inflammatory response, are involved in atherogenesis. Here, we show that the activation of Nox4 through TLR5 regulates the inflammation of the endothelium and in atherogenesis. Flagellin-induced interaction between the COOH region of Nox4 and the TIR domain of TLR5 led to H2O2 generation, which in turn promoted the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-8, as well as the expression of ICAM-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Knockdown of the Nox4 in HAECs resulted in attenuated expressions of IL-8 and ICAM-1 leading to a reduction in the adhesion and trans-endothelial migration of monocytes. Challenge of recombinant FliC (rFliC) to the ApoE KO mice with high-fat diet (HFD) resulted in significantly increased atherosclerotic plaque sizes compared to the saline-injected mice. However, an injection of rFliC into the Nox4ApoE DKO mice with HFDs failed to generate atherosclerotic plaque, suggesting that Nox4 deficiency resulted in significant protections against rFliC-mediated atherogenesis. We conclude that TLR5-dependent Nox4 activation and subsequent H2O2 generation play critical roles for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27146088

  20. Flagellin-induced NADPH oxidase 4 activation is involved in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinoh; Seo, Misun; Kim, Su Kyung; Bae, Yun Soo

    2016-05-05

    It is widely accepted that bacterial infection-mediated inflammation facilitates development of atherosclerosis by activating toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling system. We reasoned that NADPH oxidases (Nox), required for TLR-mediated inflammatory response, are involved in atherogenesis. Here, we show that the activation of Nox4 through TLR5 regulates the inflammation of the endothelium and in atherogenesis. Flagellin-induced interaction between the COOH region of Nox4 and the TIR domain of TLR5 led to H2O2 generation, which in turn promoted the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-8, as well as the expression of ICAM-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Knockdown of the Nox4 in HAECs resulted in attenuated expressions of IL-8 and ICAM-1 leading to a reduction in the adhesion and trans-endothelial migration of monocytes. Challenge of recombinant FliC (rFliC) to the ApoE KO mice with high-fat diet (HFD) resulted in significantly increased atherosclerotic plaque sizes compared to the saline-injected mice. However, an injection of rFliC into the Nox4ApoE DKO mice with HFDs failed to generate atherosclerotic plaque, suggesting that Nox4 deficiency resulted in significant protections against rFliC-mediated atherogenesis. We conclude that TLR5-dependent Nox4 activation and subsequent H2O2 generation play critical roles for the development of atherosclerosis.

  1. Activation of PPAR{gamma} is not involved in butyrate-induced epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, S.; Waechtershaeuser, A.; Loitsch, S.; Knethen, A. von; Bruene, B.; Stein, J. . E-mail: j.stein@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2005-10-15

    Histone deacetylase-inhibitors affect growth and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells by inducing expression of several transcription factors, e.g. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) or vitamin D receptor (VDR). While activation of VDR by butyrate mainly seems to be responsible for cellular differentiation, the activation of PPAR{gamma} in intestinal cells remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PPAR{gamma} in butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition and differentiation induction in Caco-2 cells. Treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands ciglitazone and BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl) enhanced butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas cell differentiation was unaffected after treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands rosiglitazone and MCC-555. Experiments were further performed in dominant-negative PPAR{gamma} mutant cells leading to an increase in cell growth whereas butyrate-induced cell differentiation was again unaffected. The present study clearly demonstrated that PPAR{gamma} is involved in butyrate-induced inhibition of cell growth, but seems not to play an essential role in butyrate-induced cell differentiation.

  2. Analysis of Chlamydia caviae entry sites and involvement of Cdc42 and Rac activity.

    PubMed

    Subtil, Agathe; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Balañá, María Eugenia; Dautry-Varsat, Alice

    2004-08-01

    In epithelial cells, endocytic activity is mostly dedicated to nutrient and macromolecule uptake. To invade these cells, Chlamydiaceae, like other pathogens, have evolved strategies that utilise the existing endocytic machineries and signalling pathways, but little is known about the host cell molecules involved. In this report, we show that within five minutes of infection of HeLa cells by Chlamydia caviae GPIC strain several events take place in the immediate vicinity of invasive bacteria: GM1-containing microdomains cluster, tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins accumulate, and intense actin polymerization occurs. We show that actin polymerization is controlled by the small GTPases Cdc42 and Rac, which become activated upon infection. Expression of dominant negative forms of these GTPases inhibits C. caviae entry and leads to abnormal actin polymerization. In contrast, the small GTPase Rho does not seem essential for bacterial entry. Finally, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity is also required for internalization of C. caviae, probably downstream of the other molecular events reported here. We present the first scheme of the events occurring at the sites of invasion of epithelial cells by a member of the Chlamydiaceae family.

  3. Neuropeptide Y effects on murine natural killer activity: changes with ageing and cAMP involvement.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, M; Del Río, M; Víctor, V M; Medina, S

    2001-09-15

    Changes in the bidirectional interaction between the nervous and the immune systems have been proposed as a cause of ageing. Neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), could show different effects on immune function with age. In the present work, we have studied the in vitro action of a wide range of NPY concentrations, i.e. from 10(-13) to 10(-7) M, on natural killer (NK) activity, a function which decreases with age. Spleen, axillary nodes, thymus and peritoneum leukocytes from mice of different ages: young (12+/-2 weeks), adult (24+/-2 weeks), mature (50+/-2 weeks) and old (72+/-2 weeks) were used. Stimulation by NPY of NK activity was observed in adult and mature animals in axillary nodes and thymus, and an inhibition in the spleen from young mice. The specificity of the NPY effect on cytotoxic activity was confirmed using a C-terminal fragment of NPY. Furthermore, cAMP levels in leukocytes were found to be decreased by NPY in adult mice, suggesting an involvement of this messenger system in the NK modulation by this neuropeptide.

  4. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenitzer, Veronika; Eichner, Norbert; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Weiss, Ingrid M.

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dictyostelium produces the 264 kDa myosin chitin synthase of bivalve mollusc Atrina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin synthase activity releases chitin, partly associated with the cell surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membrane extracts of transgenic slime molds produce radiolabeled chitin in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin producing Dictyostelium cells can be characterized by atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model system enables us to study initial processes of chitin biomineralization. -- Abstract: Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report the heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA{sup -} cell lines are shown.

  5. Potent Cardioprotective Effect of the 4-Anilinoquinazoline Derivative PD153035: Involvement of Mitochondrial KATP Channel Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Silvana A.; Cerqueira, Fernanda M.; Caldeira da Silva, Camille C.; Rittner, Roberto; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Vercesi, Anibal E.; Franchini, Kleber G.; Castilho, Roger F.

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of the 4-anilinoquinazoline derivative PD153035 on cardiac ischemia/reperfusion and mitochondrial function. Methodology/Principal Findings Perfused rat hearts and cardiac HL-1 cells were used to determine cardioprotective effects of PD153035. Isolated rat heart mitochondria were studied to uncover mechanisms of cardioprotection. Nanomolar doses of PD153035 strongly protect against heart and cardiomyocyte damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion and cyanide/aglycemia. PD153035 did not alter oxidative phosphorylation, nor directly prevent Ca2+ induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition. The protective effect of PD153035 on HL-1 cells was also independent of AKT phosphorylation state. Interestingly, PD153035 activated K+ transport in isolated mitochondria, in a manner prevented by ATP and 5-hydroxydecanoate, inhibitors of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channels (mitoKATP). 5-Hydroxydecanoate also inhibited the cardioprotective effect of PD153035 in cardiac HL-1 cells, demonstrating that this protection is dependent on mitoKATP activation. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that PD153035 is a potent cardioprotective compound and acts in a mechanism involving mitoKATP activation. PMID:20498724

  6. STAT3 activation by cytokines utilizing gp130 and related transducers involves a secondary modification requiring an H7-sensitive kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, T G; Zhong, Z; Wen, Z; Darnell, J E; Stahl, N; Yancopoulos, G D

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor, oncostatin M, leukemia-inhibitory factor, and interleukin 6 are related cytokines that initiate signaling by homodimerizing the signal-transducing receptor component gp130 or by heterodimerizing gp130 with a gp130-related receptor component. Receptor dimerization in turn activates receptor-associated kinases of the Jak/Tyk family, resulting in the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of several intracellular proteins, including those of two members of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family--STAT1 and STAT3. Here we show that all cytokines that utilize gp130 sequentially induce two distinct forms of STAT3 in all responding cells examined, with the two forms apparently differing because of a time-dependent secondary serine/threonine phosphorylation involving an H7-sensitive kinase. While both STAT3 forms bind DNA and translocate to the nucleus, the striking time-dependent progression from one form to the other implies other important functional differences between the two forms. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, which utilizes a receptor highly related to gp130, also induces these two forms of STAT3. In contrast to a number of other cytokines and growth factors, all cytokines using gp130 and related signal transducers consistently and preferentially induce the two forms of STAT3 as compared with STAT1; this characteristic STAT activation pattern is seen regardless of which Jak/Tyk kinases are used in a particular response, consistent with the notion that the receptor components themselves are the primary determinants of which STATs are activated. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7624343

  7. Occupational Styrene Exposure Induces Stress-Responsive Genes Involved in Cytoprotective and Cytotoxic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Strafella, Elisabetta; Bracci, Massimo; Staffolani, Sara; Manzella, Nicola; Giantomasi, Daniele; Valentino, Matteo; Amati, Monica; Tomasetti, Marco; Santarelli, Lory

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of a panel of genes involved in toxicology in response to styrene exposure at levels below the occupational standard setting. Methods Workers in a fiber glass boat industry were evaluated for a panel of stress- and toxicity-related genes and associated with biochemical parameters related to hepatic injury. Urinary styrene metabolites (MA+PGA) of subjects and environmental sampling data collected for air at workplace were used to estimate styrene exposure. Results Expression array analysis revealed massive upregulation of genes encoding stress-responsive proteins (HSPA1L, EGR1, IL-6, IL-1β, TNSF10 and TNFα) in the styrene-exposed group; the levels of cytokines released were further confirmed in serum. The exposed workers were then stratified by styrene exposure levels. EGR1 gene upregulation paralleled the expression and transcriptional protein levels of IL-6, TNSF10 and TNFα in styrene exposed workers, even at low level. The activation of the EGR1 pathway observed at low-styrene exposure was associated with a slight increase of hepatic markers found in highly exposed subjects, even though they were within normal range. The ALT and AST levels were not affected by alcohol consumption, and positively correlated with urinary styrene metabolites as evaluated by multiple regression analysis. Conclusion The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα are the primary mediators of processes involved in the hepatic injury response and regeneration. Here, we show that styrene induced stress responsive genes involved in cytoprotection and cytotoxicity at low-exposure, that proceed to a mild subclinical hepatic toxicity at high-styrene exposure. PMID:24086524

  8. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  9. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W.; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI+] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI+]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI+] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  10. Implicit trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces activate brain centers involved in reward.

    PubMed

    Platek, Steven M; Krill, Austen L; Wilson, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of Hamilton's (Hamilton, W. D. (1964). The genetical evolution of social behavior I, II. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 7, 17-52) theory of inclusive fitness, self-facial resemblance is hypothesized as a mechanism for self-referent phenotypic matching by which humans can detect kin. To understand the mechanisms underlying pro-sociality toward self-resembling faces, we investigated the neural correlates of implicit trustworthiness ratings for self-resembling faces. Here we show that idiosyncratic trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces predict brain activation in the ventral inferior, middle and medial frontal gyri, substrates involved in reward processing. These findings demonstrate that neural reward centers are implicated in evaluating implicit pro-social behaviors toward self-resembling faces. These findings suggest that humans have evolved to use neurocomputational architecture dedicated to face processing and reward evaluation for the differentiation of kin, which drives implicit idiosyncratic affectively regulated social interactions.

  11. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu Hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI(+)] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI(+)]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI(+)] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  12. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María J; Alquézar, Berta; Alós, Enriqueta; Medina, Víctor; Carmona, Lourdes; Bruno, Mark; Al-Babili, Salim; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly β-citraurin (3-hydroxy-β-apo-8'-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and Mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of β-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in β-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7',8' double bond in zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin, confirming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7',8' double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration.

  13. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María J.; Alquézar, Berta; Al-Babili, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly β-citraurin (3-hydroxy-β-apo-8′-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of β-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in β-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7′,8′ double bond in zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin, confirming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7′,8′ double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. PMID:24006419

  14. Active efflux and diffusion are involved in transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell-to-cell signals.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J P; Van Delden, C; Iglewski, B H

    1999-02-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria communicate by N-acyl homoserine lactone signals called autoinducers (AIs). In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cell-to-cell signaling controls expression of extracellular virulence factors, the type II secretion apparatus, a stationary-phase sigma factor (sigmas), and biofilm differentiation. The fact that a similar signal, N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone, freely diffuses through Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli cells has led to the assumption that all AIs are freely diffusible. In this work, transport of the two P. aeruginosa AIs, N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) (formerly called PAI-1) and N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) (formerly called PAI-2), was studied by using tritium-labeled signals. When [3H]C4-HSL was added to cell suspensions of P. aeruginosa, the cellular concentration reached a steady state in less than 30 s and was nearly equal to the external concentration, as expected for a freely diffusible compound. In contrast, [3H]3OC12-HSL required about 5 min to reach a steady state, and the cellular concentration was 3 times higher than the external level. Addition of inhibitors of the cytoplasmic membrane proton gradient, such as azide, led to a strong increase in cellular accumulation of [3H]3OC12-HSL, suggesting the involvement of active efflux. A defined mutant lacking the mexA-mexB-oprM-encoded active-efflux pump accumulated [3H]3OC12-HSL to levels similar to those in the azide-treated wild-type cells. Efflux experiments confirmed these observations. Our results show that in contrast to the case for C4-HSL, P. aeruginosa cells are not freely permeable to 3OC12-HSL. Instead, the mexA-mexB-oprM-encoded efflux pump is involved in active efflux of 3OC12-HSL. Apparently the length and/or degree of substitution of the N-acyl side chain determines whether an AI is freely diffusible or is subject to active efflux by P. aeruginosa.

  15. Distinct roles for dorsal CA3 and CA1 in memory for sequential nonspatial events.

    PubMed

    Farovik, Anja; Dupont, Laura M; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dorsal hippocampal areas CA3 and CA1 are both involved in representing sequences of events that compose unique episodes. However, it is uncertain whether the contribution of CA3 is restricted to spatial information, and it is unclear whether CA1 encodes order per se or contributes by an active maintenance of memories of sequential events. Here, we developed a new behavioral task that examines memory for the order of sequential nonspatial events presented as trial-unique odor pairings. When the interval between odors within a studied pair was brief (3 sec), bilateral dorsal CA3 lesions severely disrupted memory for their order, whereas dorsal CA1 lesions did not affect performance. However, when the inter-item interval was extended to 10 sec, CA1 lesions, as well as CA3 lesions, severely disrupted performance. These findings suggest that the role of CA3 in sequence memory is not limited to spatial information, but rather appears to be a fundamental property of CA3 function. In contrast, CA1 becomes involved when memories for events must be held or sequenced over long intervals. Thus, CA3 and CA1 are both involved in memory for sequential nonspatial events that compose unique experiences, and these areas play different roles that are distinguished by the duration of time that must be bridged between key events.

  16. Fine mapping of sequential neutralization epitopes on the subunit protein VP8 of human rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Yoo, Dongwan; Mine, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    The epitopes of the HRV (human rotavirus), especially those involved in virus neutralization, have not been determined in their entirety, and would have significant implications for HRV vaccine development. In the present study, we report on the epitope mapping and identification of sequential neutralization epitopes, on the Wa strain HRV subunit protein VP8, using synthetic overlapping peptides. Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant Wa VP8 were produced previously in chicken, and purified from egg yolk, which showed neutralizing activity against HRV in vitro. Overlapping VP8 peptide fragments were synthesized and probed with the anti-VP8 antibodies, revealing five sequential epitopes on VP8. Further analysis suggested that three of the five epitopes detected, M1-L10, I55-D66 and L223-P234, were involved in virus neutralization, indicating that sequential epitopes may also be important for the HRV neutralization. The interactions of the antibodies with the five epitopes were characterized by an examination of the critical amino acids involved in antibody binding. Epitopes comprised primarily of hydrophobic amino acid residues, followed by polar and charged residues. The more critical amino acids appeared to be located near the centre of the epitopes, with proline, isoleucine, serine, glutamine and arginine playing an important role in the binding of antibody to the VP8 epitopes. PMID:12901721

  17. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23965842

  18. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs.

  19. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator in stress responsivity during acute cocaine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Maiya, Rajani; Norris, Erin H; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2010-11-01

    There is evidence that increased release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) contributes to stress responsivity during cocaine withdrawal (WD). Recent studies suggest that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the CeA is a downstream effector protein for CRF after acute "binge" cocaine administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if tPA modulates cocaine WD-induced stress responsivity. Wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA - / - ) mice were subjected to chronic (14 days) "binge" cocaine (45 mg/kg per day) or its acute (1 day) WD. Extracellular tPA activity, CRF mRNA levels, and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured in tPA - / -  and WT mice. Extracellular tPA activity was reduced by 50% in the CeA and medial amygdala of WT mice after chronic cocaine and returned to basal levels after acute WD. Unlike WT mice, tPA - / -  mice did not display elevated amygdalar CRF mRNA levels during cocaine WD. In comparison to WT mice, tPA - / -  mice showed a blunted plasma CORT response during acute WD. These results demonstrate that tPA activity in the amygdala (Amy) is altered by chronic cocaine exposure, and further suggest an involvement of tPA in modulating amygdalar CRF stress responsive system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to acute cocaine WD.

  20. Involvement of ER stress and activation of apoptotic pathways in fisetin induced cytotoxicity in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Syed, Deeba N; Lall, Rahul K; Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Haidar, Omar; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    The prognosis of malignant melanoma remains poor in spite of recent advances in therapeutic strategies for the deadly disease. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid is currently being investigated for its growth inhibitory properties in various cancer models. We previously showed that fisetin inhibited melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Here, we evaluated the molecular basis of fisetin induced cytotoxicity in metastatic human melanoma cells. Fisetin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in highly aggressive A375 and 451Lu human melanoma cells, as revealed by up-regulation of ER stress markers including IRE1α, XBP1s, ATF4 and GRP78. Time course analysis indicated that the ER stress was associated with activation of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Fisetin treated 2-D melanoma cultures displayed autophagic response concomitant with induction of apoptosis. Prolonged treatment (16days) with fisetin in a 3-D reconstituted melanoma model resulted in inhibition of melanoma progression with significant apoptosis, as evidenced by increased staining of cleaved Caspase-3 in the treated constructs. However, no difference in the expression of autophagic marker LC-3 was noted between treated and control groups. Fisetin treatment to 2-D melanoma cultures resulted in phosphorylation and activation of the multifunctional AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including autophagy and apoptosis. Silencing of AMPK failed to prevent cell death indicating that fisetin induced cytotoxicity is mediated through both AMPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Taken together, our studies confirm apoptosis as the primary mechanism through which fisetin inhibits melanoma cell growth and that activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways contributes to fisetin induced cytotoxicity.

  1. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator in stress responsivity during acute cocaine withdrawal in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Maiya, Rajani; Norris, Erin H.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Strickland, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that increased release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) contributes to stress responsivity during cocaine withdrawal (WD). Recent studies suggest that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the CeA is a downstream effector protein for CRF after acute “binge” cocaine administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if tPA modulates cocaine WD-induced stress responsivity. Wild-type (WT) and tPA-deficient (tPA −/−) mice were subjected to chronic (14 days) “binge” cocaine (45 mg/kg per day) or its acute (1 day) WD. Extracellular tPA activity, CRF mRNA levels, and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels were measured in tPA −/− and WT mice. Extracellular tPA activity was reduced by 50% in the CeA and medial amygdala of WT mice after chronic cocaine and returned to basal levels after acute WD. Unlike WT mice, tPA −/− mice did not display elevated amygdalar CRF mRNA levels during cocaine WD. In comparison to WT mice, tPA −/− mice showed a blunted plasma CORT response during acute WD. These results demonstrate that tPA activity in the amygdala (Amy) is altered by chronic cocaine exposure, and further suggest an involvement of tPA in modulating amygdalar CRF stress responsive system and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis in response to acute cocaine WD. PMID:20666641

  2. Constrained sequential lamination: Nonconvex optimization and material microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fago, Matt

    A practical algorithm has been developed to construct, through sequential lamination, the partial relaxation of multiwell energy densities such as those characteristic of shape memory alloys. The resulting microstructures are in static and configurational equilibrium, and admit arbitrary deformations. The laminate topology evolves during deformation through branching and pruning operations, while a continuity constraint provides a simple model of metastability and hysteresis. In cases with strict separation of length scales, the method may be integrated into a finite element calculation at the subgrid level. This capability is demonstrated with a calculation of the indentation of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy by a spherical indenter. In verification tests the algorithm attained the analytic solution in the computation of three benchmark problems. In the fourth case, the four-well problem (of, e.g., Tartar), results indicate that the method for microstructural evolution imposes an energy barrier for branching, hindering microstructural development in some cases. Although this effect is undesirable for purely mathematical problems, it is reflective of the activation energies and metastabilities present in applications involving natural processes. The method was further used to model Shield's tension test experiment, with initial calculations generating reasonable transformation strains and microstructures that compared well with the sequential laminates obtained experimentally.

  3. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. I. Kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Masia-Perez, J; Garcia-Molina, F; García-Moreno, M; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinases zymogens involving a uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous activation route and a reversible inhibition step, the time course equation of the zymogen, inhibitor and activated enzyme concentrations have been derived. Likewise, expressions for the time required for any reaction progress and the corresponding mean activation rates as well as the half-life of the global zymogen activation have been derived. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed.

  4. Evolution of phosphorus complexation and mineralogy during (hydro)thermal treatments of activated and anaerobically digested sludge: Insights from sequential extraction and P K-edge XANES.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rixiang; Tang, Yuanzhi

    2016-09-01

    (Hydro)thermal treatments of sewage sludge is a promising option that can simultaneously target safe waste disposal, energy recovery, and nutrient recovery/recycling. The speciation of phosphorus (P) in sludge is of great relevance to P reclamation/recycling and soil application of sludge-derived products, thus it is critical to understand the effects of different treatment techniques and conditions on P speciation. This study systematically characterized P speciation (i.e. complexation and mineral forms) in chars derived from pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of municipal sewage sludges. Combined sequential extraction and P K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis revealed the dependence of P transformation on treatment conditions and metal composition in the feedstocks. Pyrolysis of sludges decreased the relative abundance of phytic acid while increased the abundance of Al-associated P. HTC thoroughly homogenized and exposed P for interaction with various metals/minerals, with the final P speciation closely related to the composition/speciation of metals and their affinities to P. Results from this study revealed the mechanisms of P transformation during (hydro)thermal treatments of sewage sludges, and might be applicable to other biosolids. It also provided fundamental knowledge basis for the design and selection of waste management strategies for better P (re)cycling and reclamation.

  5. Evolution of phosphorus complexation and mineralogy during (hydro)thermal treatments of activated and anaerobically digested sludge: Insights from sequential extraction and P K-edge XANES.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rixiang; Tang, Yuanzhi

    2016-09-01

    (Hydro)thermal treatments of sewage sludge is a promising option that can simultaneously target safe waste disposal, energy recovery, and nutrient recovery/recycling. The speciation of phosphorus (P) in sludge is of great relevance to P reclamation/recycling and soil application of sludge-derived products, thus it is critical to understand the effects of different treatment techniques and conditions on P speciation. This study systematically characterized P speciation (i.e. complexation and mineral forms) in chars derived from pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of municipal sewage sludges. Combined sequential extraction and P K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis revealed the dependence of P transformation on treatment conditions and metal composition in the feedstocks. Pyrolysis of sludges decreased the relative abundance of phytic acid while increased the abundance of Al-associated P. HTC thoroughly homogenized and exposed P for interaction with various metals/minerals, with the final P speciation closely related to the composition/speciation of metals and their affinities to P. Results from this study revealed the mechanisms of P transformation during (hydro)thermal treatments of sewage sludges, and might be applicable to other biosolids. It also provided fundamental knowledge basis for the design and selection of waste management strategies for better P (re)cycling and reclamation. PMID:27232988

  6. Identification of furin pro-region determinants involved in folding and activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Lyne; Charest, Gabriel; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The pro-region of the subtilisin-like convertase furin acts early in the biosynthetic pathway as an intramolecular chaperone to enable proper folding of the zymogen, and later on as an inhibitor to constrain the activity of the enzyme until it reaches the trans -Golgi network. To identify residues that are important for pro-region function, we initially identified amino acids that are conserved among the pro-regions of various mammalian convertases. Site-directed mutagenesis of 17 selected amino acids within the 89-residue pro-region and biosynthetic labelling revealed that I60A-furin and H66A-furin were rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner, while W34A-furin and F67A-furin did not show any autocatalytic activation. Intriguingly, the latter mutants proteolytically cleaved pro-von Willebrand factor precursor to the mature polypeptide, suggesting that the mutations permitted proper folding, but did not allow the pro-region to exercise its role in inhibiting the enzyme. Homology modelling of furin's pro-region revealed that residues Ile-60 and His-66 might be crucial in forming the binding interface with the catalytic domain, while residues Trp-34 and Phe-67 might be involved in maintaining a hydrophobic core within the pro-region itself. These results provide structural insights into the dual role of furin's pro-region. PMID:14741044

  7. Involvement of BimL activation in apoptosis induced by lysosomal photodamage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Xianwang; Li, Hui

    2008-12-01

    Lysosomal photosensitizers have been used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Combination of such photosensitizers and light causes lysosomal photodamage, inducing cell death. The lysosomal disruption can lead to apoptosis but its signaling pathways remain to be elucidated. In this study, we selected N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6), an effective photosensitizer which preferentially accumulates in lysosomes, to study the mechanism of apoptosis caused by lysosomal photodamage. Apoptosis in living human lung adenocarcinoma cells treated by NPe6-PDT was studied using real-time single-cell analysis. Confocal imaging of cells transfected with BimL-GFP demonstrated that BimL translocated to mitochondria after NPe6-PDT treatment for about 150 min, and then sequestered into clusters associated with the mitochondira within 30 min. The activation of BimL proved to be an important event in the apoptotic machinery, as demonstrated by the significant protection of cell death in samples suppressed the expression level of endogenous BimL. This study demonstrates that BimL activation was involved in the cell death induced by PDT with lysosomal photosensitizer.

  8. Genes Involved in Interleukin-1 Receptor Type II Activities Are Associated With Asthmatic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Madore, Anne-Marie; Vaillancourt, Vanessa T.; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Sarnowski, Chloé; Monier, Florent; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Demenais, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a key role in inflammation and immunity and its decoy receptor, IL-1R2, has been implicated in transcriptomic and genetic studies of asthma. Methods Two large asthma family collections, the French-Canadian Saguenay—Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) study and the French Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), were used to investigate the association of SNPs in 10 genes that modulate IL-1R2 activities with asthma, allergic asthma, and atopy. Gene-gene interactions were also tested. Results One SNP in BACE2 was associated with allergic asthma in the SLSJ study and replicated in the EGEA study before statistical correction for multiple testing. Additionally, two SNPs in the MMP2 gene were replicated in both studies prior to statistical correction and reached significance in the combined analysis. Moreover, three gene-gene interactions also survived statistical correction in the combined analyses (BACE1-IL1RAP in asthma and allergic asthma and IL1R1-IL1RAP in atopy). Conclusions Our results highlight the relevance of genes involved in the IL-1R2 activity in the context of asthma and asthma-related traits. PMID:27334786

  9. Trichoderma mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is involved in induction of plant systemic resistance.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, Ada; Harel, Michal; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Chet, Ilan; Mukherjee, Prasun K

    2005-10-01

    The role of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) TmkA in inducing systemic resistance in cucumber against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. lacrymans was investigated by using tmkA loss-of-function mutants of Trichoderma virens. In an assay where Trichoderma spores were germinated in proximity to cucumber roots, the mutants were able to colonize the plant roots as effectively as the wild-type strain but failed to induce full systemic resistance against the leaf pathogen. Interactions with the plant roots enhanced the level of tmkA transcript in T. virens and its homologue in Trichoderma asperellum. At the protein level, we could detect the activation of two forms reacting to the phospho-p44/42 MAPK antibody. Biocontrol experiments demonstrated that the tmkA mutants retain their biocontrol potential against Rhizoctonia solani in soil but are not effective against Sclerotium rolfsii in reducing disease incidence. Our results show that, unlike in many plant-pathogen interactions, Trichoderma TmkA MAPK is not involved in limited root colonization. Trichoderma, however, needs MAPK signaling in order to induce full systemic resistance in the plant.

  10. Involvement of JNK and Caspase Activation in Hoiamide A-Induced Neurotoxicity in Neocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Li, Xichun; Zou, Xiaohan; Greenwood, Michael; Gerwick, William H.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    The frequent occurrence of Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula) blooms has been associated with adverse effects on human health. Hoiamide A is a structurally unique cyclic depsipeptide isolated from an assemblage of the marine cyanobacteria M. producens and Phormidium gracile. We examined the influence of hoiamide A on neurite outgrowth in neocortical neurons and found that it suppressed neurite outgrowth with an IC50 value of 4.89 nM. Further study demonstrated that hoiamide A stimulated lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux, nuclear condensation and caspase-3 activity with EC50 values of 3.66, 2.55 and 4.33 nM, respectively. These data indicated that hoiamide A triggered a unique neuronal death profile that involves both necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. The similar potencies and similar time-response relationships between LDH efflux and caspase-3 activation/nuclear condensation suggested that both necrosis and apoptosis may derive from interaction with a common molecular target. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK completely inhibited hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, hoiamide A stimulated JNK phosphorylation, and a JNK inhibitor attenuated hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Collectively, these data demonstrate that hoiamide A-induced neuronal death requires both JNK and caspase signaling pathways. The potent neurotoxicity and unique neuronal cell death profile of hoiamide A represents a novel neurotoxic chemotype from marine cyanobacteria. PMID:25675001

  11. Involvement of both PKS and NRPS in antibacterial activity in Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Du, Liangcheng; Liu, Fengquan; Xu, Feifei; Hu, Baishi; Venturi, Vittorio; Qian, Guoliang

    2014-01-01

    Polyketides and nonribosomal peptides represent two large families of natural products (NPs) with diverse structures and important functions. They are synthesized by polyketide synthase (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), respectively. Lysobacter enzymogenes is emerging as a novel biocontrol agent against pathogens of crop plants and a new source of bioactive NPs, such as antibacterial antibiotic WAP-8294A2 and antifungal antibiotic HSAF. Genome survey of strain OH11, a Chinese L. enzymogenes isolate, detected four novel PKS, NRPS or hybrid gene clusters, designed as cluster A to D. We further individually mutated five genes (PKS or NRPS) located in these four gene clusters, and showed that a PKS gene in cluster A and an NRPS gene in cluster D were involved in the antibacterial activity via a WAP-8294A2 dependent way. The data also showed that none of the five genes was associated with antifungal activity and the regulation of HSAF biosynthesis. Our results reveal the unusual regulatory role of these PKS and NRPS genes that were discovered from genome mining in L. enzymogenes. PMID:24801439

  12. HSP27 Alleviates Cardiac Aging in Mice via a Mechanism Involving Antioxidation and Mitophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shenglan; Wang, Yana; Zhang, Xiaojin; Kong, Qiuyue; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-01-01

    Aging-induced cardiac dysfunction is a prominent feature of cardiac aging. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) protects cardiac function against ischemia or chemical challenge. We hypothesized that HSP27 attenuates cardiac aging. Transgenic (Tg) mice with cardiac-specific expression of the HSP27 gene and wild-type (WT) littermates were employed in the experiments. Echocardiography revealed a significant decline in the cardiac function of old WT mice compared with young WT mice. In striking contrast, the aging-induced impairment of cardiac function was attenuated in old Tg mice compared with old WT mice. Levels of cardiac aging markers were lower in old Tg mouse hearts than in old WT mouse hearts. Less interstitial fibrosis and lower contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins were detected in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Furthermore, old Tg hearts demonstrated lower accumulation of LC3-II and p62 than old WT hearts. Levels of Atg13, Vps34, and Rab7 were also higher in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Additionally, old Tg hearts had higher levels of PINK1 and Parkin than old WT hearts, suggesting that mitophagy was activated in old Tg hearts. Taken together, HSP27 alleviated cardiac aging and this action involved antioxidation and mitophagy activation. PMID:27110324

  13. Are serotonergic neurons involved in the control of anxiety and in the anxiolytic activity of benzodiazepines?

    PubMed

    Thiebot, M H

    1986-05-01

    Several studies have shown that, like benzodiazepines (BZP), treatments able to reduce or block the activity of CNS serotonergic (5-HT) neurons released punished behavior. Therefore, 5-HT mechanisms have been tentatively implicated in the anti-punishment (anxiolytic?) activity of BZP. Numerous data, however, are not in keeping with this hypothesis. Since not responding enables the animals to avoid punishment but also delays the receipt of food-reward, one of these factors could be an alteration of waiting capacities. Indeed, we have shown that diazepam released behavioral suppression in conflict schedules only when the duration of the punished periods exceeded 1 minute. Moreover, in rats allowed to choose in a T-maze between immediate-but-small vs. delayed-but-large reward, BZP significantly decreased the frequency with which the delayed reward was chosen, with 5-HT uptake blockers producing opposite effects. Therefore, one can hypothesize that BZP render the animals less prone than controls to tolerate delay of reward and that 5-HT mechanisms may be involved in this phenomenon. An altered tolerance to delay of reward should be taken into account when interpreting the BZP-induced release of behavioral inhibition in classical conflict procedures. PMID:2873593

  14. Calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, kinases, and transcriptional corepressors involved in T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun O.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The second messenger calcium plays an essential role in mediating the TCR signaling pathway leading to cytokine production and T cell clonal expansion. The immunosuppressive drugs cyclosproin A (CsA) and FK506 have served both as therapeutic agents and as molecular probes for unraveling the protein phosphatase calcineurin as a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the transmission of calcium signal from the cytosol into the nucleus to reprogram gene expression. The use of mouse knockout models has helped to verify and further elucidate the functions of different isoforms of calcineurin in both helper T cell activation and thymocyte development. In addition to calcineurin, three other classes of calmodulin-binding proteins have also been shown to play important roles in calcium signaling in T cells. Thus, Cabin1 and class II HDACs have been found to constitute a novel calcium-signaling module in conjunction with the transcription factor myocyte enhance factor family and the transcriptional coactivator p300 to suppress and activate cytokine gene transcription in a calcium-dependent manner. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) II and IV were also shown to play negative and positive regulatory functions, respectively, in TCR-mediated cytokine production. The crosstalks among these and other signal transducers in T cells form an extensive non-linear signaling network that dictates the final outcome of the TCR signaling pathway. PMID:19290928

  15. Involvement of specific calmodulin isoforms in salicylic acid-independent activation of plant disease resistance responses.

    PubMed

    Heo, W D; Lee, S H; Kim, M C; Kim, J C; Chung, W S; Chun, H J; Lee, K J; Park, C Y; Park, H C; Choi, J Y; Cho, M J

    1999-01-19

    The Ca2+ signal is essential for the activation of plant defense responses, but downstream components of the signaling pathway are still poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that specific calmodulin (CaM) isoforms are activated by infection or pathogen-derived elicitors and participate in Ca2+-mediated induction of plant disease resistance responses. Soybean CaM (SCaM)-4 and SCaM-5 genes, which encode for divergent CaM isoforms, were induced within 30 min by a fungal elicitor or pathogen, whereas other SCaM genes encoding highly conserved CaM isoforms did not show such response. This pathogen-triggered induction of these genes specifically depended on the increase of intracellular Ca2+ level. Constitutive expression of SCaM-4 and SCaM-5 in transgenic tobacco plants triggered spontaneous induction of lesions and induces an array of systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-associated genes. Surprisingly, these transgenic plants have normal levels of endogenous salicylic acid (SA). Furthermore, coexpression of nahG gene did not block the induction of SAR-associated genes in these transgenic plants, indicating that SA is not involved in the SAR gene induction mediated by SCaM-4 or SCaM-5. The transgenic plants exhibit enhanced resistance to a wide spectrum of virulent and avirulent pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and virus. These results suggest that specific CaM isoforms are components of a SA-independent signal transduction chain leading to disease resistance.

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.495 - If a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what action must a Federal agency take before... demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what action must a Federal agency take before... with their law enforcement organization if a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may...

  17. 18 CFR 707.6 - Early involvement in private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal action. 707.6 Section 707.6..., State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal action. (a) Section 1501.2(d) of the... approval or action to which NEPA applies. Such activities for which early involvement is...

  18. 18 CFR 707.6 - Early involvement in private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal action. 707.6 Section 707.6..., State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal action. (a) Section 1501.2(d) of the... approval or action to which NEPA applies. Such activities for which early involvement is...

  19. 18 CFR 707.6 - Early involvement in private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... private, State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal action. 707.6 Section 707.6..., State, local, and other non-Federal activities requiring Federal action. (a) Section 1501.2(d) of the... approval or action to which NEPA applies. Such activities for which early involvement is...

  20. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors in cancer: mechanisms involved in anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors (PIs) based on evidences reported in the published literature. Methods: We extensively reviewed the literature concerning nelfinavir (NFV) as an off target anti-cancer drug and other PIs. A classification of PIs based on anti-cancer mode of action was proposed. Controversies regarding nelfinavir mode of action were also addressed. Conclusions: The two main mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity are endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response pathway and Akt inhibition. However there are many other effects, partially dependent and independent of those mentioned, that may be useful in cancer treatment, including MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibition, down-regulation of CDK-2, VEGF, bFGF, NF-kB, STAT-3, HIF-1 alfa, IGF, EGFR, survivin, BCRP, androgen receptor, proteasome, fatty acid synthase (FAS), decrease in cellular ATP concentration and upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5, Bax, increased radiosensitivity, and autophagy. The end result of all these effects is slower growth, decreased angiogenesis, decreased invasion and increased apoptosis, which means reduced proliferation and increased cancer cells death. PIs may be classified according to their anticancer activity at clinically achievable doses, in AKT inhibitors, ER stressors and Akt inhibitors/ER stressors. Beyond the phase I trials that have been recently completed, adequately powered and well-designed clinical trials are needed in the various cancer type settings, and specific trials where NFV is tested in association with other known anti-cancer pharmaceuticals should be sought, in order to find an appropriate place for NFV in cancer treatment. The analysis of controversies on the molecular mechanisms of NFV hints to the possibility that NFV works in a different way in tumor cells and in hepatocytes and adipocytes. PMID:26097685

  1. Contrasting early visual cortical activation states causally involved in visual imagery and short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Vecchi, Tomaso; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Silvanto, Juha

    2009-10-01

    Whether visual imagery and visual short-term memory (STM) share the same neural resources, and the extent to which the early visual cortex (V1/V2) is involved in these processes, has been the subject of much debate. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in two separate experiments to contrast the neural states associated with visual imagery and visual STM in the early visual cortex. In Experiment 1, we investigated V1/V2 activation states at the end of the retention phase in a visual imagery and a visual STM task. V1/V2 TMS facilitated performance in both tasks; the finding that imagery and STM interacted with TMS in the same way suggests that the two processes have similar effects on early visual cortical excitability. In Experiment 2, we investigated V1/V2 activation states at the beginning of the retention phase. V1/V2 TMS impaired performance in the visual STM task, whereas it had no effect on the imagery task. Taken together, our findings show that the late phases of the early visual cortical activation state associated with visual imagery and visual STM are similar; differences between the two processes are apparent in the early phases of the tasks. Our results also suggest that the causal role of the early visual cortex in visual STM includes both the initial translation of the visual input into working memory and the subsequent maintenance of the mental representation. Finally, our findings indicate that visual STM sensory recruitment in working memory might act via excitability modulation of V1/V2 neurons.

  2. Involvement of IL-1 in the Maintenance of Masseter Muscle Activity and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Ko; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Koide, Masashi; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Hattori, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Makoto; Sugawara, Shunji; Kanzaki, Makoto; Endo, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise reportedly stimulates IL-1 production within working skeletal muscles, but its physiological significance remains unknown due to the existence of two distinct IL-1 isoforms, IL-1α and IL-1β. The regulatory complexities of these two isoforms, in terms of which cells in muscles produce them and their distinct/redundant biological actions, have yet to be elucidated. Taking advantage of our masticatory behavior (Restrained/Gnawing) model, we herein show that IL-1α/1β-double-knockout (IL-1-KO) mice exhibit compromised masseter muscle (MM) activity which is at least partially attributable to abnormalities of glucose handling (rapid glycogen depletion along with impaired glucose uptake) and dysfunction of IL-6 upregulation in working MMs. In wild-type mice, masticatory behavior clearly increased IL-1β mRNA expression but no incremental protein abundance was detectable in whole MM homogenates, whereas immunohistochemical staining analysis revealed that both IL-1α- and IL-1β-immunopositive cells were recruited around blood vessels in the perimysium of MMs after masticatory behavior. In addition to the aforementioned phenotype of IL-1-KO mice, we found the IL-6 mRNA and protein levels in MMs after masticatory behavior to be significantly lower in IL-1-KO than in WT. Thus, our findings confirm that the locally-increased IL-1 elicited by masticatory behavior, although present small in amounts, contributes to supporting MM activity by maintaining normal glucose homeostasis in these muscles. Our data also underscore the importance of IL-1-mediated local interplay between autocrine myokines including IL-6 and paracrine cytokines in active skeletal muscles. This interplay is directly involved in MM performance and fatigability, perhaps mediated through maintaining muscular glucose homeostasis. PMID:26599867

  3. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  4. Augment railgun and sequential discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Proprietary R&D efforts toward the creation of tactical weapon systems-applicable railguns are presented. Attention is given to measures taken for projectile velocity maximization and sequential-discharge operation, and to an augmenting railgun which has demonstrated a 66-percent efficiency improvement over the two-rail baseline railgun system. This device is characterized by strong interaction between capacitor bank submodules during sequential discharge.

  5. Multienzyme kinetics and sequential metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wienkers, Larry C; Rock, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are the catalysts of biological systems and are extremely efficient. A typical enzyme accelerates the rate of a reaction by factors of at least a million compared to the rate of the same reaction in the absence of the enzyme. In contrast to traditional catalytic enzymes, the family of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are catalytically promiscuous, and thus they possess remarkable versatility in substrates. The great diversity of reactions catalyzed by CYP enzymes appears to be based on two unique properties of these heme proteins, the ability of their iron to exist under multiple oxidation states with different reactivities and a flexible active site that can accommodate a wide variety of substrates. Herein is a discussion of two distinct types of kinetics observed with CYP enzymes. The first example is of CYP complex kinetic profiles when multiple CYP enzymes form the sample product. The second is sequential metabolism, in other words, the formation of multiple products from one CYP enzyme. Given the degree of CYP enzyme promiscuity, it is hardly surprising that there is also a high degree of complex kinetic profiles generated during the catalytic cycle.

  6. Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Home Activities with Their Children: Psychosocial Factors and the Role of Parental Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallo, Rebecca; Treyvaud, Karli; Cooklin, Amanda; Wade, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Parent involvement in play, learning, and everyday home activities is important for promoting children's cognitive and language development. The aims of the study were to (a) examine differences between mothers' and fathers' self-reported involvement with their children, (b) explore the relationship between child, parent and family factors, and…

  7. Carbon Nanotubes as Electrically Active Nanoreactors for Multi-Step Inorganic Synthesis: Sequential Transformations of Molecules to Nanoclusters and Nanoclusters to Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Botos, Akos; Biskupek, Johannes; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Rance, Graham A; Stoppiello, Craig T; Sloan, Jeremy; Liu, Zheng; Suenaga, Kazutomo; Kaiser, Ute; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-07-01

    In organic synthesis, the composition and structure of products are predetermined by the reaction conditions; however, the synthesis of well-defined inorganic nanostructures often presents a significant challenge yielding nonstoichiometric or polymorphic products. In this study, confinement in the nanoscale cavities of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) provides a new approach for multistep inorganic synthesis where sequential chemical transformations take place within the same nanotube. In the first step, SWNTs donate electrons to reactant iodine molecules (I2), transforming them to iodide anions (I(-)). These then react with metal hexacarbonyls (M(CO)6, M = Mo or W) in the next step, yielding anionic nanoclusters [M6I14](2-), the size and composition of which are strictly dictated by the nanotube cavity, as demonstrated by aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Atoms in the nanoclusters [M6I14](2-) are arranged in a perfect octahedral geometry and can engage in further chemical reactions within the nanotube, either reacting with each other leading to a new polymeric phase of molybdenum iodide [Mo6I12]n or with hydrogen sulfide gas giving rise to nanoribbons of molybdenum/tungsten disulfide [MS2]n in the third step of the synthesis. Electron microscopy measurements demonstrate that the products of the multistep inorganic transformations are precisely controlled by the SWNT nanoreactor with complementary Raman spectroscopy revealing the remarkable property of SWNTs to act as a reservoir of electrons during the chemical transformation. The electron transfer from the host nanotube to the reacting guest molecules is essential for stabilizing the anionic metal iodide nanoclusters and for their further transformation to metal disulfide nanoribbons synthesized in the nanotubes in high yield.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes as Electrically Active Nanoreactors for Multi-Step Inorganic Synthesis: Sequential Transformations of Molecules to Nanoclusters and Nanoclusters to Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Botos, Akos; Biskupek, Johannes; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Rance, Graham A; Stoppiello, Craig T; Sloan, Jeremy; Liu, Zheng; Suenaga, Kazutomo; Kaiser, Ute; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-07-01

    In organic synthesis, the composition and structure of products are predetermined by the reaction conditions; however, the synthesis of well-defined inorganic nanostructures often presents a significant challenge yielding nonstoichiometric or polymorphic products. In this study, confinement in the nanoscale cavities of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) provides a new approach for multistep inorganic synthesis where sequential chemical transformations take place within the same nanotube. In the first step, SWNTs donate electrons to reactant iodine molecules (I2), transforming them to iodide anions (I(-)). These then react with metal hexacarbonyls (M(CO)6, M = Mo or W) in the next step, yielding anionic nanoclusters [M6I14](2-), the size and composition of which are strictly dictated by the nanotube cavity, as demonstrated by aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Atoms in the nanoclusters [M6I14](2-) are arranged in a perfect octahedral geometry and can engage in further chemical reactions within the nanotube, either reacting with each other leading to a new polymeric phase of molybdenum iodide [Mo6I12]n or with hydrogen sulfide gas giving rise to nanoribbons of molybdenum/tungsten disulfide [MS2]n in the third step of the synthesis. Electron microscopy measurements demonstrate that the products of the multistep inorganic transformations are precisely controlled by the SWNT nanoreactor with complementary Raman spectroscopy revealing the remarkable property of SWNTs to act as a reservoir of electrons during the chemical transformation. The electron transfer from the host nanotube to the reacting guest molecules is essential for stabilizing the anionic metal iodide nanoclusters and for their further transformation to metal disulfide nanoribbons synthesized in the nanotubes in high yield. PMID:27258384

  9. Cocaine-mediated microglial activation involves the ER stress-autophagy axis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Liao, Ke; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Yang, Lu; Cai, Yu; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine abuse leads to neuroinflammation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration associated with advanced HIV-1 infection. Autophagy plays important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the possible functional link between cocaine and autophagy has not been explored before. Herein, we demonstrate that cocaine exposure induced autophagy in both BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells as demonstrated by a dose- and time-dependent induction of autophagy-signature proteins such as BECN1/Beclin 1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B. These findings were validated wherein cocaine treatment of BV-2 cells resulted in increased formation of puncta in cells expressing either endogenous MAP1LC3B or overexpressing GFP-MAP1LC3B. Specificity of cocaine-induced autophagy was confirmed by treating cells with inhibitors of autophagy (3-MA and wortmannin). Intriguingly, cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of 2 ER stress pathways (EIF2AK3- and ERN1-dependent), as evidenced by the ability of the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal to ameliorate cocaine-induced autophagy. In vivo validation of these findings demonstrated increased expression of BECN1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B-II proteins in cocaine-treated mouse brains compared to untreated animals. Increased autophagy contributes to cocaine-mediated activation of microglia since pretreatment of cells with wortmannin resulted in decreased expression and release of inflammatory factors (TNF, IL1B, IL6, and CCL2) in microglial cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that cocaine exposure results in induction of autophagy that is closely linked with neuroinflammation. Targeting autophagic proteins could thus be considered as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cocaine-related neuroinflammation diseases.

  10. Cocaine-mediated microglial activation involves the ER stress-autophagy axis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Liao, Ke; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Yang, Lu; Cai, Yu; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine abuse leads to neuroinflammation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration associated with advanced HIV-1 infection. Autophagy plays important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the possible functional link between cocaine and autophagy has not been explored before. Herein, we demonstrate that cocaine exposure induced autophagy in both BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells as demonstrated by a dose- and time-dependent induction of autophagy-signature proteins such as BECN1/Beclin 1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B. These findings were validated wherein cocaine treatment of BV-2 cells resulted in increased formation of puncta in cells expressing either endogenous MAP1LC3B or overexpressing GFP-MAP1LC3B. Specificity of cocaine-induced autophagy was confirmed by treating cells with inhibitors of autophagy (3-MA and wortmannin). Intriguingly, cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of 2 ER stress pathways (EIF2AK3- and ERN1-dependent), as evidenced by the ability of the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal to ameliorate cocaine-induced autophagy. In vivo validation of these findings demonstrated increased expression of BECN1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B-II proteins in cocaine-treated mouse brains compared to untreated animals. Increased autophagy contributes to cocaine-mediated activation of microglia since pretreatment of cells with wortmannin resulted in decreased expression and release of inflammatory factors (TNF, IL1B, IL6, and CCL2) in microglial cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that cocaine exposure results in induction of autophagy that is closely linked with neuroinflammation. Targeting autophagic proteins could thus be considered as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cocaine-related neuroinflammation diseases. PMID:26043790

  11. PRESS40: a project for involving students in active seismic risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaba, Carla; Contessi, Elisa; Rosa Girardi, Maria

    2016-04-01

    To memorialize the anniversary of the 1976 Friuli earthquake, the Istituto Statale di Istruzione Superiore "Magrini Marchetti" in Gemona del Friuli (NE Italy), with the collaboration of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS), has promoted the PRESS40 Project (Prevenzione Sismica nella Scuola a 40 anni dal terremoto del Friuli, that in English sounds like "Seismic Prevention at School 40 years later the Friuli earthquake"). The project has developed in the 2015-2016 school year, starting from the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake, and it aims to disseminate historical memory, seismic culture and awareness of seismic safety in the young generations, too often unconscious of past experiences, as recent seismic hazard perception tests have demonstrated. The basic idea of the PRESS40 Project is to involve the students in experimental activities to be active part of the seismic mitigation process. The Project is divided into two main parts, the first one in which students learn-receive knowledge from researchers, and the second one in which they teach-bring knowledge to younger students. In the first part of the project, 75 students of the "Magrini Marchetti" school acquired new geophysical data, covering the 23 municipalities from which they come from. These municipalities represent a wide area affected by the 1976 Friuli earthquake. In each locality a significant site was examined, represented by a school area. At least, 127 measurements of ambient noise have been acquired. Data processing and interpretation of all the results are still going on, under the supervision of OGS researchers.The second part of the project is planned for the early spring, when the students will present the results of geophysical survey to the younger ones of the monitored schools and to the citizens in occasion of events to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake.

  12. Lack of Involvement of CEP Adducts in TLR Activation and in Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gounarides, John; Cobb, Jennifer S.; Zhou, Jing; Cook, Frank; Yang, Xuemei; Yin, Hong; Meredith, Erik; Rao, Chang; Huang, Qian; Xu, YongYao; Anderson, Karen; De Erkenez, Andrea; Liao, Sha-Mei; Crowley, Maura; Buchanan, Natasha; Poor, Stephen; Qiu, Yubin; Fassbender, Elizabeth; Shen, Siyuan; Woolfenden, Amber; Jensen, Amy; Cepeda, Rosemarie; Etemad-Gilbertson, Bijan; Giza, Shelby; Mogi, Muneto; Jaffee, Bruce; Azarian, Sassan

    2014-01-01

    Proteins that are post-translationally adducted with 2-(ω-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) have been proposed to play a pathogenic role in age-related macular degeneration, by inducing angiogenesis in a Toll Like Receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. We have investigated the involvement of CEP adducts in angiogenesis and TLR activation, to assess the therapeutic potential of inhibiting CEP adducts and TLR2 for ocular angiogenesis. As tool reagents, several CEP-adducted proteins and peptides were synthetically generated by published methodology and adduction was confirmed by NMR and LC-MS/MS analyses. Structural studies showed significant changes in secondary structure in CEP-adducted proteins but not the untreated proteins. Similar structural changes were also observed in the treated unadducted proteins, which were treated by the same adduction method except for one critical step required to form the CEP group. Thus some structural changes were unrelated to CEP groups and were artificially induced by the synthesis method. In biological studies, the CEP-adducted proteins and peptides failed to activate TLR2 in cell-based assays and in an in vivo TLR2-mediated retinal leukocyte infiltration model. Neither CEP adducts nor TLR agonists were able to induce angiogenesis in a tube formation assay. In vivo, treatment of animals with CEP-adducted protein had no effect on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. Furthermore, in vivo inactivation of TLR2 by deficiency in Myeloid Differentiation factor 88 (Myd88) had no effect on abrasion-induced corneal neovascularization. Thus the CEP-TLR2 axis, which is implicated in other wound angiogenesis models, does not appear to play a pathological role in a corneal wound angiogenesis model. Collectively, our data do not support the mechanism of action of CEP adducts in TLR2-mediated angiogenesis proposed by others. PMID:25343517

  13. Cocaine-mediated microglial activation involves the ER stress-autophagy axis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Liao, Ke; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Yang, Lu; Cai, Yu; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine abuse leads to neuroinflammation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration associated with advanced HIV-1 infection. Autophagy plays important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the possible functional link between cocaine and autophagy has not been explored before. Herein, we demonstrate that cocaine exposure induced autophagy in both BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells as demonstrated by a dose- and time-dependent induction of autophagy-signature proteins such as BECN1/Beclin 1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B. These findings were validated wherein cocaine treatment of BV-2 cells resulted in increased formation of puncta in cells expressing either endogenous MAP1LC3B or overexpressing GFP-MAP1LC3B. Specificity of cocaine-induced autophagy was confirmed by treating cells with inhibitors of autophagy (3-MA and wortmannin). Intriguingly, cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of 2 ER stress pathways (EIF2AK3- and ERN1-dependent), as evidenced by the ability of the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal to ameliorate cocaine-induced autophagy. In vivo validation of these findings demonstrated increased expression of BECN1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B-II proteins in cocaine-treated mouse brains compared to untreated animals. Increased autophagy contributes to cocaine-mediated activation of microglia since pretreatment of cells with wortmannin resulted in decreased expression and release of inflammatory factors (TNF, IL1B, IL6, and CCL2) in microglial cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that cocaine exposure results in induction of autophagy that is closely linked with neuroinflammation. Targeting autophagic proteins could thus be considered as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cocaine-related neuroinflammation diseases. PMID:26043790

  14. Involvement of Trichoderma Trichothecenes in the Biocontrol Activity and Induction of Plant Defense-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, M. G.; Cardoza, R. E.; Alexander, N. J.; McCormick, S. P.; Hermosa, R.; Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma species produce trichothecenes, most notably trichodermin and harzianum A (HA), by a biosynthetic pathway in which several of the involved proteins have significant differences in functionality compared to their Fusarium orthologues. In addition, the genes encoding these proteins show a genomic organization differing from that of the Fusarium tri clusters. Here we describe the isolation of Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 transformants which have a disrupted or silenced tri4 gene, a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that oxygenates trichodiene to give rise to isotrichodiol, and the effect of tri4 gene disruption and silencing on the expression of other tri genes. Our results indicate that the tri4 gene disruption resulted in a reduced antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani and also in a reduced ability to induce the expression of tomato plant defense-related genes belonging to the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonate (JA) pathways against B. cinerea, in comparison to the wild-type strain, indicating that HA plays an important function in the sensitization of Trichoderma-pretreated plants against this fungal pathogen. Additionally, the effect of the interaction of T. arundinaceum with B. cinerea or R. solani and with tomato seedlings on the expressions of the tri genes was studied. PMID:22562989

  15. Activation of neutral sphingomyelinase is involved in acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Cogolludo, Angel; Moreno, Laura; Frazziano, Giovanna; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Menendez, Carmen; Castañeda, Javier; González, Constancio; Villamor, Eduardo; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Aims The mechanisms involved in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) are not yet fully defined. The aim of the study was to determine the role of protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ) and neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) in HPV. Methods and results Ceramide content was measured by immunocytochemistry and voltage-gated potassium channel (KV) currents were recorded by the patch clamp technique in isolated rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Contractile responses were analysed in rat pulmonary arteries mounted in a wire myograph. Pulmonary pressure was recorded in anesthetized open-chest rats. Protein and mRNA expression were measured by western blot and RT–PCR, respectively. We found that hypoxia increased ceramide content in PASMC which was abrogated by inhibition of nSMase, but not acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase). The hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictor response in isolated pulmonary arteries and the inhibition of KV currents were strongly reduced by inhibition of PKCζ or nSMase but not aSMase. The nSMase inhibitor GW4869 prevented HPV in vivo. The vasoconstrictor response to hypoxia was mimicked by exogenous addition of bacterial Smase and ceramide. nSMase2 mRNA expression was ∼10-fold higher in pulmonary compared with mesenteric arteries. In mesenteric arteries, hypoxia failed to increase ceramide but exogenous SMase induced a contractile response. Conclusion nSMase-derived ceramide production and the activation of PKCζ are early and necessary events in the signalling cascade of acute HPV. PMID:19088082

  16. Involvement of plant endogenous ABA in Bacillus megaterium PGPR activity in tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are naturally occurring soil bacteria which benefit plants by improving plant productivity and immunity. The mechanisms involved in these processes include the regulation of plant hormone levels such as ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA). The aim of the present study was to determine whether the activity of Bacillus megaterium PGPR is affected by the endogenous ABA content of the host plant. The ABA-deficient tomato mutants flacca and sitiens and their near-isogenic wild-type parental lines were used. Growth, stomatal conductance, shoot hormone concentration, competition assay for colonization of tomato root tips, and root expression of plant genes expected to be modulated by ABA and PGPR were examined. Results Contrary to the wild-type plants in which PGPR stimulated growth rates, PGPR caused growth inhibition in ABA-deficient mutant plants. PGPR also triggered an over accumulation of ethylene in ABA-deficient plants which correlated with a higher expression of the pathogenesis-related gene Sl-PR1b. Conclusions Positive correlation between over-accumulation of ethylene and a higher expression of Sl-PR1b in ABA-deficient mutant plants could indicate that maintenance of normal plant endogenous ABA content may be essential for the growth promoting action of B. megaterium by keeping low levels of ethylene production. PMID:24460926

  17. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-06-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (responsive to desiccation 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles' heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  18. The antidepressant activity of inositol in the forced swim test involves 5-HT(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Einat, H; Clenet, F; Shaldubina, A; Belmaker, R H; Bourin, M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of inositol as an antidepressant was previously demonstrated in both animal models of depression-like behavior and in clinical trials. Unlike most antidepressant drugs, inositol does not have a clear target in the synapse and was not demonstrated to alter monoamine levels in the brain. The present study attempted to draw a psychopharmacological profile of inositol's behavioral effects by exploring the interactions between the drug and specific receptor agonists and antagonists in the forced swim test. Rats received inositol treatment (or control) in combination with the serotonergic metabolism inhibitor PCPA or with the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4. Results indicated that PCPA but not DSP-4 abolished the ability of inositol to cause a reduction in immobility time in the forced swim test. In mice, the specific 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) antagonist ritanserin, but not the 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(1B)/beta adrenergic antagonist pindolol, abolished inositol's effect in the forced swim test. The 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) agonist DOI and the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not have any significant effects on inositol's activity. The present data indicates that the antidepressant effect of inositol may involve 5-HT(2) receptors. It is thus possible that the effects of reuptake antidepressant drugs and the effects of inositol may have a common final pathway.

  19. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles’ heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  20. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    PubMed Central

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  1. Neutrophil activation induced by the lectin KM+ involves binding to CXCR2.

    PubMed

    Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Moreno, Andréa N; Marques, Fabiana; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2006-01-01

    The lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia, also known as artocarpin, induces neutrophil migration by haptotaxis. The interactions of KM+ with both neutrophils and the extracellular matrix depend on the lectin's ability to recognize mannose-containing glycans. In the present study, we characterized the binding of KM+ to human neutrophils and the responses stimulated by this binding. Exposure to KM+ results in cell polarization, formation of a lamellipodium, and induction of deep ruffles on the cell surface. By fluorescence microscopy, we observed that KM+ is distributed homogeneously over the cell surface. KM+/ligand complexes are rapidly internalized, reaching maximum intracellular concentrations at 120 min, and decreasing thereafter. Furthermore, KM+ binding to the surface of human neutrophils is inhibited by the specific sugars, d-mannose or mannotriose. KM+-induced neutrophil migration is inhibited by pertussis toxin as well as by inhibition of CXCR2 activity. These results suggest that the KM+ ligand on the neutrophil surface is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The results also suggest that neutrophil migration induced by KM+ involves binding to CXCR2.

  2. Sequential Syndrome Decoding of Convolutional Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    The algebraic structure of convolutional codes are reviewed and sequential syndrome decoding is applied to those codes. These concepts are then used to realize by example actual sequential decoding, using the stack algorithm. The Fano metric for use in sequential decoding is modified so that it can be utilized to sequentially find the minimum weight error sequence.

  3. A Bayesian Theory of Sequential Causal Learning and Abstract Transfer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan L

    2016-03-01

    Two key research issues in the field of causal learning are how people acquire causal knowledge when observing data that are presented sequentially, and the level of abstraction at which learning takes place. Does sequential causal learning solely involve the acquisition of specific cause-effect links, or do learners also acquire knowledge about abstract causal constraints? Recent empirical studies have revealed that experience with one set of causal cues can dramatically alter subsequent learning and performance with entirely different cues, suggesting that learning involves abstract transfer, and such transfer effects involve sequential presentation of distinct sets of causal cues. It has been demonstrated that pre-training (or even post-training) can modulate classic causal learning phenomena such as forward and backward blocking. To account for these effects, we propose a Bayesian theory of sequential causal learning. The theory assumes that humans are able to consider and use several alternative causal generative models, each instantiating a different causal integration rule. Model selection is used to decide which integration rule to use in a given learning environment in order to infer causal knowledge from sequential data. Detailed computer simulations demonstrate that humans rely on the abstract characteristics of outcome variables (e.g., binary vs. continuous) to select a causal integration rule, which in turn alters causal learning in a variety of blocking and overshadowing paradigms. When the nature of the outcome variable is ambiguous, humans select the model that yields the best fit with the recent environment, and then apply it to subsequent learning tasks. Based on sequential patterns of cue-outcome co-occurrence, the theory can account for a range of phenomena in sequential causal learning, including various blocking effects, primacy effects in some experimental conditions, and apparently abstract transfer of causal knowledge.

  4. Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

  5. Understanding the Meaning African-American Men Give to Their Student Leadership Involvement and Engagement Activities in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Karl A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to explore and gain a deeper understanding of the lived experiences and perceptions of African-American (A-A) men who are persisting in college and who demonstrate participation in co-curricular activities defined as student leadership involvement and engagement activities (SLIEA). The…

  6. Enzyme activity alteration by cadmium administration to rats: the possibility of iron involvement in lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Casalino, E; Sblano, C; Landriscina, C

    1997-10-15

    The specific activities of D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) are reduced in the liver and kidney of rats intoxicated with 2.5 mg Cd/kg body wt and sacrificed after 24 h; conversely ketone-body concentration is strongly increased in both of these organs and blood. In the same animals a great stimulation of antioxidant enzymes glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase occurs. The prooxidant state induced by cadmium in liver mitochondria and microsomes is unaffected by superoxide dismutase, catalase, or mannitol, whereas it is completely blocked by vitamin E thus excluding the involvement of reactive oxygen species in this process. The mechanism by which cadmium induces lipid peroxidation has been investigated by measuring the effect of this metal on liposomes. Ninety-minute treatment of liposomes with CdCl2 does not induce any lipid peroxidation. In contrast, Fe2+ ions under the same conditions cause strong liposome peroxidation. It has also been observed that cadmium promotes a time-dependent iron release from biological membranes. When lipid peroxidation is induced by a low concentration (5 microM) of FeCl2, in place of CdCl2, the characteristics of this process and the sensitivity to the various antioxidants used are similar to those observed with Cd. From these results we conclude that the prooxidative effect of cadmium is an indirect one since it is mediated by iron. With regard to the inhibitory effect on BDH and GDH following cadmium intoxication, it does not appear to be imputable to lipid peroxidation since in vitro investigations indicate that the presence of vitamin E does not remove the inhibition at all. PMID:9343363

  7. Mothers' and fathers' involvement with school-age children's care and academic activities in Navajo Indian families.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ziarat; Anziano, Michael C

    2008-04-01

    This exploratory study examined mothers' and fathers' reports of time involvement in their school-age children's care and academic activities. The study also explored the relationship between parents' socioeconomic status (SES) variables (age, education, income, work hours, and length of marriage) and their relative involvement with children. Mother and father dyads from 34 two-parent Navajo (Diné) Indian families with a second- or third-grade child participated in the study. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed that mothers invested significantly more time in children's care on demand and academic activities than fathers, but the differences in maternal and paternal perceptions of time involvement in routine care were not significant. The gender of the child did not influence the amount of time parents invested in children's care and academic activities. Mothers' involvement with children was not related to any of the SES variables. Fathers' involvement was significantly associated with work hours and length of marriage, and work hours produced significant interaction with fathers' involvement with children. Findings are discussed in light of gender role differences in parental involvement with children within Navajo families. PMID:18426283

  8. Dexamethasone enhances necrosis-like neuronal death in ischemic rat hippocampus involving μ-calpain activation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2014-11-01

    Transient forebrain ischemia (TFI) leads to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell death which is aggravated by glucocorticoids (GC). It is unknown how GC affect apoptosis and necrosis in cerebral ischemia. We therefore investigated the co-localization of activated caspase-3 (casp-3) with apoptosis- and necrosis-like cell death morphologies in CA1 of rats treated with dexamethasone prior to TFI (DPTI). In addition, apoptosis- (casp-9, casp-3, casp-3-cleaved PARP and cleaved α-spectrin 145/150 and 120kDa) and necrosis-related (calpain-specific casp-9 cleavage, μ-calpain upregulation and cleaved α-spectrin 145/150kDa) cell death mechanisms were investigated by Western blot analysis. DPTI expedited CA1 neuronal death from day 4 to day 1 and increased the magnitude of CA1 neuronal death from 66.2% to 91.3% at day 7. Furthermore, DPTI decreased the overall (days 1-7) percentage of dying neurons displaying apoptosis-like morphology from 4.7% to 0.3% and, conversely, increased the percentage of neurons with necrosis-like morphology from 95.3% to 99.7%. In animals subjected to TFI without dexamethasone (ischemia-only), 7.4% of all dying CA1 neurons were casp-3-immunoreactive (IR), of which 3.1% co-localized with apoptosis-like and 4.3% with necrosis-like changes. By contrast, DPTI decreased the percentage of dying neurons with casp-3 IR to 1.4%, of which 0.3% co-localized with apoptosis-like changes and 1.1% with necrosis-like changes. Western blot analysis from DPTI animals showed a significant elevation of μ-calpain, a calpain-produced necrosis-related casp-9 fragment (25kDa) and cleavage of α-spectrin into 145/150kDa fragments at day 4, whereas in ischemia-only animals a significant increase of casp-3-cleaved PARP, cleavage of α-spectrin into 145/150 and 120kDa fragments was detected at day 7. We conclude that DPTI, in addition to augmenting and expediting CA1 neuronal death, causes a shift from apoptosis-like cell death to necrosis involving μ-calpain activation.

  9. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2015-05-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool and 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as 'low' or 'middle' had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as 'high' were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music. PMID:25431978

  10. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2015-05-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool and 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as 'low' or 'middle' had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as 'high' were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music.

  11. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L.; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool, 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as “low” or “middle” had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as “high” were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music. PMID:25431978

  12. Language Non-Selective Activation of Orthography during Spoken Word Processing in Hindi-English Sequential Bilinguals: An Eye Tracking Visual World Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Niharika

    2014-01-01

    Previous psycholinguistic studies have shown that bilinguals activate lexical items of both the languages during auditory and visual word processing. In this study we examined if Hindi-English bilinguals activate the orthographic forms of phonological neighbors of translation equivalents of the non target language while listening to words either…

  13. Involving Parents of Young Children in Science, Math and Literacy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerholm, Elizabeth; And Others

    A summer parent involvement project was set up in a Chicago inner city public school in a Hispanic neighborhood. The eight-session program was intended to help parents: (1) become involved with the school program by becoming comfortable with the school setting; (2) enjoy reading and writing and replicate these experiences with their children; (3)…

  14. Differential Involvement of Amygdala and Cortical NMDA Receptors Activation upon Encoding in Odor Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guilaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the…

  15. A bit serial sequential circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    Normally a sequential circuit with n state variables consists of n unique hardware realizations, one for each state variable. All variables are processed in parallel. This paper introduces a new sequential circuit architecture that allows the state variables to be realized in a serial manner using only one next state logic circuit. The action of processing the state variables in a serial manner has never been addressed before. This paper presents a general design procedure for circuit construction and initialization. Utilizing pass transistors to form the combinational next state forming logic in synchronous sequential machines, a bit serial state machine can be realized with a single NMOS pass transistor network connected to shift registers. The bit serial state machine occupies less area than other realizations which perform parallel operations. Moreover, the logical circuit of the bit serial state machine can be modified by simply changing the circuit input matrix to develop an adaptive state machine.

  16. The Theory of Active Involvement: Processes Underlying Interventions that Engage Adolescents in Message Planning and/or Production

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of increased risk-taking and recent intervention strategies have included adolescents planning or producing anti-risk messages for their peers. Although these projects may generate enthusiasm, we know little about message planning or production as a strategy for changing adolescent decision-making and behavior. The paper articulates the Theory of Active Involvement (TAI) to describe and explain the processes through which these active involvement interventions influence adolescents. TAI is based on social cognitive theory’s notion of self-regulation and examines multiple perspective-taking and activating the self-reflection processes. The theory specifically describes the process of cognitive changes experienced by participants in active involvement interventions. The sequence is conceptualized as starting when engagement with the intervention (arousal and involvement) produces skill and knowledge gains (immediate outcomes) that lead to reflection (perceived discrepancy) and then other cognitions (expectancies, norms, intentions), with the ultimate outcome being behavior change. Engaging the target audience in a process of self-reflection is conceptualized as the crucial ingredient for meaningful and sustainable change in cognitions and behavior. This paper provides valuable insight into how active involvement strategies function and how to best design these interventions, particularly those targeting adolescents. PMID:23980581

  17. The theory of active involvement: processes underlying interventions that engage adolescents in message planning and/or production.

    PubMed

    Greene, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of increased risk taking, and recent intervention strategies have included adolescents planning or producing antirisk messages for their peers. Although these projects may generate enthusiasm, we know little about message planning or production as a strategy for changing adolescent decision-making and behavior. This article articulates the Theory of Active Involvement (TAI) to describe and explain the processes through which these active involvement interventions influence adolescents. TAI is based on social cognitive theory's notion of self-regulation and examines multiple perspective taking and activating the self-reflection processes. The theory specifically describes the process of cognitive changes experienced by participants in active involvement interventions. The sequence is conceptualized as starting when engagement with the intervention (arousal and involvement) produces skill and knowledge gains (immediate outcomes) that lead to reflection (perceived discrepancy) and then other cognitions (expectancies, norms, intentions), with the ultimate outcome being behavior change. Engaging the target audience in a process of self-reflection is conceptualized as the crucial ingredient for meaningful and sustainable change in cognitions and behavior. This article provides valuable insight into how active involvement strategies function and how to best design these interventions, particularly those targeting adolescents.

  18. The sequential hypothesis of the function of sleep.

    PubMed

    Giuditta, A; Ambrosini, M V; Montagnese, P; Mandile, P; Cotugno, M; Grassi Zucconi, G; Vescia, S

    1995-01-01

    In addition to modulatory roles concerning bodily functions, sleep is assumed to play a main processing role with regard to newly acquired neural information. Elaboration of memory traces acquired during the waking period is assumed to require two sequential steps taking place during slow wave sleep (SWS) and eventually during paradoxical sleep (PS). This view is suggested by several considerations, not the least of which concerns the natural sequence of appearance of SWS and PS in the adult animal. While the involvement of PS in memory processing is well documented, the involvement of SWS is supported by the results of baseline and post-trial EEG analyses carried out in rats trained for a two-way active avoidance task or a spatial habituation task. Together with control analyses, these data indicate that the marked increase in the average duration of post-trial SWS episodes does not reflect the outcome of non-specific contingent factors, such as sleep loss or stress, but is related to memory processing events. Several considerations have furthermore led to the proposal that, during SWS, after a preliminary selection step, the first processing operation consists in the weakening of non-adaptative memory traces. The remaining memory traces would then be stored again under a better configuration during the ensuing PS episode. This view is in agreement with several relevant features of sleep, including the EEG waveforms prevailing during SWS and PS, as well as the ontogenetic sequence of appearance of SWS and PS. Some theoretical considerations on the role of sleep are also in agreement with the sequential hypothesis. More recent data indicate that the learning capacity of rats is correlated with several baseline EEG features of sleep and wakefulness. They include the average duration of PS episodes and of SWS episodes followed by wakefulness (longer in fast learning rats), and the waking EEG power spectrum of fast learning rats whose output is more balanced in the

  19. On some classes of sequential spiking neural p systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyi; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Luo, Bin; Pan, Linqiang

    2014-05-01

    Spiking neural P systems (SN P systems) are a class of distributed parallel computing devices inspired by the way neurons communicate by means of spikes; neurons work in parallel in the sense that each neuron that can fire should fire, but the work in each neuron is sequential in the sense that at most one rule can be applied at each computation step. In this work, with biological inspiration, we consider SN P systems with the restriction that at each step, one of the neurons (i.e., sequential mode) or all neurons (i.e., pseudo-sequential mode) with the maximum (or minimum) number of spikes among the neurons that are active (can spike) will fire. If an active neuron has more than one enabled rule, it nondeterministically chooses one of the enabled rules to be applied, and the chosen rule is applied in an exhaustive manner (a kind of local parallelism): the rule is used as many times as possible. This strategy makes the system sequential or pseudo-sequential from the global view of the whole network and locally parallel at the level of neurons. We obtain four types of SN P systems: maximum/minimum spike number induced sequential/pseudo-sequential SN P systems with exhaustive use of rules. We prove that SN P systems of these four types are all Turing universal as number-generating computation devices. These results illustrate that the restriction of sequentiality may have little effect on the computation power of SN P systems. PMID:24555456

  20. Personal involvement is related to increased search motivation and associated with activity in left BA44-a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Michael; Rumpel, Franziska; Sadrieh, Abdolkarim; Reimann, Martin; Denke, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies explore consumer perception of brands in a more or less passive way. This may still be representative for many situations or decisions we make each day. Nevertheless, sometimes we often actively search for and use information to make informed and reasoned choices, thus implying a rational and thinking consumer. Researchers suggested describing this distinction as low relative to high involvement consumer behavior. Although the involvement concept has been widely used to explain consumer behavior, behavioral and neural correlates of this concept are poorly understood. The current study aims to describe a behavioral measure that is associated with high involvement, the length of search behavior. A second aim of this study was to explore brain activations associated with involvement by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We presented participants information cues for different products and told them that they had to answer questions with respect to these products at the end of the experiment. Participants were free to stop the information search if they think they gathered enough information or to continue with collecting information. Behavioral results confirmed our hypothesis of a relationship between searching behavior and personal involvement by demonstrating that the length of search correlated significantly with the degree of personal involvement of the participants. fMRI data revealed that personal involvement was associated with activation in BA44. Since this brain region is known to be involved in semantic memory, the results of this pilot study suggest that high involvement consumer behavior may be linked to cognitive load and attention towards a product.

  1. 16 CFR 1031.5 - Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... standard so that future Commission investigation can indicate the involvement of such products in accidents... standards will be subjected to a testing and certification (including self-certification) procedure,...

  2. An ordered sequential mechanism for Factor IX and Factor IXa binding to platelet receptors in the assembly of the Factor X-activating complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Walsh, Peter N

    2005-08-15

    To define the contributions of the Omega-loop of the Gla (gamma-carboxyglutamic acid) domain and the EGF2 (second epidermal growth factor) domain of FIXa (Factor IXa) in the assembly of the FX-activating complex on activated platelets and phospholipid membranes, three recombinant FIXa chimeras were prepared with corresponding residues from the homologous coagulation protein, FVII: (i) Gly4-Gln11 (FIXa7Omegaloop), (ii) Cys88-Cys124 (FIXa7EGF2), and (iii) both Gly4-Gln11 and Cys88-Cys124 (FIXa7Omegaloop7EGF2). All three chimeras were similar to wild-type FIXa, as assessed by SDS/PAGE, active-site titration, content of Gla residues, activation rates by FXIa and rates of FXa generation in solution. Titrations of FX or FVIIIa on SFLLRN peptide-activated platelets and on phospholipid vesicles in the presence of FVIIIa revealed normal substrate and cofactor binding to all chimeras. In kinetic assays in the presence of phospholipid vesicles and FVIIIa, compared with wild-type FIXa K(d, app) approximately 4 nM, the FIX7Omegaloop chimera showed a 1.6-fold increase in K(d, app), the FIX7EGF2 chimera had a 7.4-fold increase in K(d, app), and the FIX7Omegaloop7EGF2 chimera showed a 21-fold increase in K(d, app). In kinetic assays and equilibrium platelet-binding assays with activated platelets and FVIIIa, compared with wild-type FIXa (V(max) approximately 5 nM min(-1); K(d, app) approximately 0.5 nM; B(max) approximately 550 sites/platelet; K(d) approximately 0.5 nM), the FIX7Omegaloop chimera displayed 2-fold decreases in V(max) and B(max) and 2-fold increases in K(d, app) and K(d). The FIX7EGF2 chimera displayed 2-fold decreases in V(max) and B(max) and 10-fold increases in K(d, app) and K(d). The FIX7Omegaloop7EGF2 chimera showed non-saturable curves and severely impaired rates of FXa generation, and non-saturable, non-specific, low-level binding to activated platelets. Thus both the Gla domain Omega-loop (Gly4-Gln11) and the EGF2 domain (Cys88-Cys124) are required to

  3. Caffeine in hot drinks elicits cephalic phase responses involving cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Michael K; Whitehouse, Julie M; Shine, Gillian; Whitton, Peter A; Towell, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    Caffeine stimulates both oropharyngeal and gut bitter taste receptors (hTAS2Rs) and so has the potential to elicit reflex autonomic responses. Coffee containing 130 mg caffeine has been reported to increase heart rate for 30 min post-ingestion. Whereas added-caffeine, in doses of 25 to 200 mg, ingested with decaffeinated coffee/tea decreases heart rate 10 to 30 min post-ingestion. This study aimed to clarify caffeine's chemosensory impact. Double-espresso coffees were compared to a placebo-control capsule in a double-blind between-measures design. Coffees tested were regular coffee (130 mg caffeine) and decaffeinated coffee with added-caffeine (0, 67 and 134 mg). Cardiovascular measures from three post-ingestion phases: 1) 0 to 5; 2) 10 to 15; and 3) 25 to 30 min; were compared to pre-ingestion measures. Participants comprised 11 women in the control group and 10 women in the test group. Decaffeinated coffee elicited no changes. Decaffeinated coffee with 67 mg caffeine: decreased dp/dt in Phase 1. Decaffeinated coffee with 134 mg caffeine: increased heart rate in Phases 1 and 2; decreased spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in Phase 1; and increased diastolic pressure in Phases 2 and 3. Regular coffee: increased heart rate in Phases 1 and 2; decreased dp/dt in all phases; and decreased systolic pressure in Phase 1. Caffeine is the substance in regular coffee which elicits chemosensory autonomic reflex responses, which involves heart activity and the baroreflex. Compared to the caffeine in regular coffee, added-caffeine elicits somewhat different chemosensory responses including a more pronounced pressor effect and resetting of the baroreflex. Caffeine in commonly consumed amounts, as well as modulating body processes by blocking adenosine receptors, can elicit reflex autonomic responses during the ingestion of caffeinated drinks. It is plausible that caffeine stimulates hTAS2Rs, during the ingestion of coffee, eliciting cephalic phase responses. These cephalic phase

  4. Caffeine in hot drinks elicits cephalic phase responses involving cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Michael K; Whitehouse, Julie M; Shine, Gillian; Whitton, Peter A; Towell, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    Caffeine stimulates both oropharyngeal and gut bitter taste receptors (hTAS2Rs) and so has the potential to elicit reflex autonomic responses. Coffee containing 130 mg caffeine has been reported to increase heart rate for 30 min post-ingestion. Whereas added-caffeine, in doses of 25 to 200 mg, ingested with decaffeinated coffee/tea decreases heart rate 10 to 30 min post-ingestion. This study aimed to clarify caffeine's chemosensory impact. Double-espresso coffees were compared to a placebo-control capsule in a double-blind between-measures design. Coffees tested were regular coffee (130 mg caffeine) and decaffeinated coffee with added-caffeine (0, 67 and 134 mg). Cardiovascular measures from three post-ingestion phases: 1) 0 to 5; 2) 10 to 15; and 3) 25 to 30 min; were compared to pre-ingestion measures. Participants comprised 11 women in the control group and 10 women in the test group. Decaffeinated coffee elicited no changes. Decaffeinated coffee with 67 mg caffeine: decreased dp/dt in Phase 1. Decaffeinated coffee with 134 mg caffeine: increased heart rate in Phases 1 and 2; decreased spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in Phase 1; and increased diastolic pressure in Phases 2 and 3. Regular coffee: increased heart rate in Phases 1 and 2; decreased dp/dt in all phases; and decreased systolic pressure in Phase 1. Caffeine is the substance in regular coffee which elicits chemosensory autonomic reflex responses, which involves heart activity and the baroreflex. Compared to the caffeine in regular coffee, added-caffeine elicits somewhat different chemosensory responses including a more pronounced pressor effect and resetting of the baroreflex. Caffeine in commonly consumed amounts, as well as modulating body processes by blocking adenosine receptors, can elicit reflex autonomic responses during the ingestion of caffeinated drinks. It is plausible that caffeine stimulates hTAS2Rs, during the ingestion of coffee, eliciting cephalic phase responses. These cephalic phase

  5. Multiple-Category Classification Using a Sequential Probability Ratio Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spray, Judith A.

    Sequential probability ratio testing (PRT), which usually is applied in situations requiring a decision between two simple hypotheses or a single decision point, is extended to include situations involving k decision points and [(k + 1)-choose-2] sets of simultaneous, simple hypotheses, where k>1. The multiple-decision point or multiple-category…

  6. Time Data Sequential Processor /TDSP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. E.; Pavlovitch, T.; Roth, R. Y.; Sturms, F. M., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Time Data Sequential Processor /TDSP/ computer program provides preflight predictions for lunar trajectories from injection to impact, and for planetary escape trajectories for up to 100 hours from launch. One of the major options TDSP performs is the determination of tracking station view periods.

  7. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to previous research on sequential ratings of student performance, this study found that professional essay raters of a large-scale standardized testing program produced ratings that were drawn toward previous ratings, creating an assimilation effect. Longer intervals between the two adjacent ratings and higher degree of agreement with…

  8. Sequential triangulation of orbital photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, M.; Junkins, J. L.; Turner, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of structuring the satellite photogrammetric triangulation as an iterative Extended Kalman estimation algorithm is demonstrated. Comparative numerical results of the sequential against batch estimation algorithm are presented. Difficulty of accurately modeling of the attitude motion is overcome by utilizing the on-board angular rate measurements. Solutions of the differential equations and the evaluation of state transition matrix are carried out numerically.

  9. Manifestations of sequential electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Thurnauer, M.C.; Tang, J.

    1996-05-01

    An essential feature of efficient photo-initiated charge separation is sequential electron transfer. Charge separation is initiated by photoexcitation of an electron donor followed by rapid electron transfer steps from the excited donor through a series of electron acceptors, so that, after one or two successive steps, charge separation is stabilized by the physical separation between the oxidized donor and reduced acceptor. The prime example of this process is the sequential electron transfer that takes place in the purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction center, resulting in the charge separation between P{sup +} and Q{sub A}{sup -} across a biological membrane. We have developed magnetic resonance tools to monitor sequential electron transfer. We are applying these techniques to study charge separation in natural photo-synthetic systems in order to gain insights into the features of the reaction center proteins that promote efficient charge separation. As we establish what some of these factors are, we are beginning to design artificial photosynthetic systems that undergo photoinduced sequential electron transfer steps.

  10. Structure-function analyses involving palindromic analogs of tritrypticin suggest autonomy of anti-endotoxin and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kanwal J; Sarkar, Pampi; Nagpal, Sushma; Khan, Tarique; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2008-03-01

    Neutralization of invading pathogens by gene-encoded peptide antibiotics has been suggested to manifest in a variety of different modes. Some of these modes require internalization of the peptide through a pathway that involves LPS-mediated uptake of the peptide antibiotics. Many proline/tryptophan-rich cationic peptides for which this mode has been invoked do, indeed, show LPS (endotoxin) binding. If the mechanism of antibiotic action involves the LPS-mediated pathway, a positive correlation ought to manifest between the binding to LPS, its neutralization, and the bacterial killing. No such correlation was evident based on our studies involving minimal active analogs of tritrypticin. The anti-endotoxin activities of these analogs appear not to relate directly to their antibiotic potential. The two palindromic analogs of tritrypticin, NT7 (RRFPWWW) and CT7 (WWWPFRR), showed comparable antibacterial activities. However, while NT7 exhibited anti-endotoxin activity, CT7 did not. The LPS binding of two tritrypticin analogs correlated with their corresponding structures, but the antibacterial activities did not. Further structure-function analysis indicated specific structural implications of the antibacterial activity at the molecular level. Studies involving designed analogs of NT7 incorporating either rigid or flexible linkers between the specifically distanced hydrophobic and cationic clusters modulate the LPS binding. On the other hand, not knowing the target receptor for antibacterial activity is a drawback since the precise epitope for antibacterial activity is not definable. It is apparent that the anti-endotoxin and antibacterial activities represent two independent functions of tritrypticin, consistent with the emerging multifunctionality in the nature of cathelicidins.

  11. The Effect of Direct Selection and Circular Scanning on Visual Sequential Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizuko, Mark; Esser, Joan

    1991-01-01

    This study, involving 20 normally developing 4-year olds, found no visual sequential recall differences between direct selection and scanning in task performance. However, subjects correctly recalled fewer sequential symbols represented by Blissymbols than by Picsyms, and recalled significantly fewer three-symbol sequences than two-symbol…

  12. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy; Baldwin, Julie; Carnoske, Cheryl; Nickelson, Jan; Troped, Philip; Steinman, Lesley; Pluto, Delores; Litt, Jill; Evenson, Kelly; Terpstra, Jennifer; Brownson, Ross; Schmid, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background: Increasing physical activity in youth is a recommended approach to curbing the childhood obesity epidemic. One way to help increase children's daily activity is to promote active transportation to and from school (ATS). Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to explore parental perception of, and participation in, ATS initiatives.…

  13. Flavonoid interactions during digestion, absorption, distribution and metabolism: a sequential structure-activity/property relationship-based approach in the study of bioavailability and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gerard Bryan; Smagghe, Guy; Grootaert, Charlotte; Zotti, Moises; Raes, Katleen; Van Camp, John

    2015-05-01

    Flavonoids are a group of polyphenols that provide health-promoting benefits upon consumption. However, poor bioavailability has been a major hurdle in their use as drugs or nutraceuticals. Low bioavailability has been associated with flavonoid interactions at various stages of the digestion, absorption and distribution process, which is strongly affected by their molecular structure. In this review, we use structure-activity/property relationship to discuss various flavonoid interactions with food matrices, digestive enzymes, intestinal transporters and blood proteins. This approach reveals specific bioactive properties of flavonoids in the gastrointestinal tract as well as various barriers for their bioavailability. In the last part of this review, we use these insights to determine the effect of different structural characteristics on the overall bioavailability of flavonoids. Such information is crucial when flavonoid or flavonoid derivatives are used as active ingredients in foods or drugs. PMID:25633078

  14. A fail-safe mechanism in the septal ring assembly pathway generated by the sequential recruitment of cell separation amidases and their activators.

    PubMed

    Peters, Nick T; Dinh, Thuy; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2011-09-01

    During cytokinesis in Escherichia coli, the peptidoglycan (PG) layer produced by the divisome must be split to promote cell separation. Septal PG splitting is mediated by the amidases: AmiA, AmiB, and AmiC. To efficiently hydrolyze PG, the amidases must be activated by LytM domain factors. EnvC specifically activates AmiA and AmiB, while NlpD specifically activates AmiC. Here, we used an exportable, superfolding variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to demonstrate that AmiB, like its paralog AmiC, is recruited to the division site by an N-terminal targeting domain. The results of colocalization experiments indicate that EnvC is recruited to the division site well before its cognate amidase AmiB. Moreover, we show that EnvC and AmiB have differential FtsN requirements for their localization. EnvC accumulates at division sites independently of this essential division protein, whereas AmiB localization is FtsN dependent. Interestingly, we also report that AmiB and EnvC are recruited to division sites independently of one another. The same is also true for AmiC and NlpD. However, unlike EnvC, we find that NlpD shares an FtsN-dependent localization with its cognate amidase. Importantly, when septal PG synthesis is blocked by cephalexin, both EnvC and NlpD are recruited to septal rings, whereas the amidases fail to localize. Our results thus suggest that the order in which cell separation amidases and their activators localize to the septal ring relative to other components serves as a fail-safe mechanism to ensure that septal PG synthesis precedes the expected burst of PG hydrolysis at the division site, accompanied by amidase recruitment.

  15. Cystic acne improved by photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid and sequential combination of intense pulsed light and blue light activation.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid (Levulan Kerastick, Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) and activation by intense pulsed light in an initial treatment and blue light in 3 subsequent treatments has resulted in significant improvement in severity of acne, reduction in the number of lesions, improvement in skin texture, and smoothing of scar edges in an Asian patient with severe (class 4) facial cystic acne and scarring. PMID:16302560

  16. In vitro and vivo antioxidant activities of daylily flowers and the involvement of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Que, Fei; Mao, Linchun; Zheng, Xiaojie

    2007-01-01

    Daylily (Hemerocallis fulva Linn.) flowers were hot air-dried and freeze-dried after harvest. Antioxidant properties of water and ethanol extracts prepared from these dried flowers were evaluated in terms of total antioxidant activity, reducing capacity, and metal chelating activity. Extracts from daylily flowers exhibited strong antioxidant activity. Ethanol was more efficiency to extract antioxidants than water, and freeze-drying preserved higher activities than air-drying. Rutin, (+)-catechin, and gallic acid were identified in the extracts by HPLC, and were highly related to the antioxidant activities. The antioxidant activity was further evaluated by feeding mice with ethanol extract from freeze-dried daylily flowers for 60 days. The results demonstrated that the extract at dosage of 40-225 mg/100 g significantly increased the activity of SOD (superoxide dismutase) and reduced the lipid peroxidation in both blood and liver of rat. PMID:17392104

  17. Assessment of in vitro cyto/genotoxicity of sequentially treated electroplating effluent on the human hepatocarcinoma HuH-7 cell line.

    PubMed

    Naik, Umesh Chandra; Das, Mihir Tanay; Sauran, Swati; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-03-01

    The present study compares in vitro toxicity of electroplating effluent after the batch treatment process with that obtained after the sequential treatment process. Activated charcoal prepared from sugarcane bagasse through chemical carbonization, and tolerant indigenous bacteria, Bacillus sp. strain IST105, were used individually and sequentially for the treatment of electroplating effluent. The sequential treatment involving activated charcoal followed by bacterial treatment removed 99% of Cr(VI) compared with the batch processes, which removed 40% (charcoal) and 75% (bacteria), respectively. Post-treatment in vitro cyto/genotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT test and the comet assay in human HuH-7 hepatocarcinoma cells. The sequentially treated sample showed an increase in LC50 value with a 6-fold decrease in comet-assay DNA migration compared with that of untreated samples. A significant decrease in DNA migration and an increase in LC50 value of treated effluent proved the higher effectiveness of the sequential treatment process over the individual batch processes.

  18. Regioselective Sequential Modification of Chitosan via Azide-Alkyne Click Reaction: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antimicrobial Activity of Chitosan Derivatives and Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Atif; Katas, Haliza; Samsudin, Siti Noradila; Zin, Noraziah Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the attention of researchers has been drawn toward the synthesis of chitosan derivatives and their nanoparticles with enhanced antimicrobial activities. In this study, chitosan derivatives with different azides and alkyne groups were synthesized using click chemistry, and these were further transformed into nanoparticles by using the ionotropic gelation method. A series of chitosan derivatives was successfully synthesized by regioselective modification of chitosan via an azide-alkyne click reaction. The amino moieties of chitosan were protected during derivatization by pthaloylation and subsequently unblocked at the end to restore their functionality. Nanoparticles of synthesized derivatives were fabricated by ionic gelation to form complexes of polyanionic penta-sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and cationic chitosan derivatives. Particle size analysis showed that nanoparticle size ranged from 181.03 ± 12.73 nm to 236.50 ± 14.32 nm and had narrow polydispersity index and positive surface charge. The derivatives and corresponding nanoparticles were evaluated in vitro for antibacterial and antifungal activities against three gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and three fungal strains, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all derivatives ranged from 31.3 to 250 µg/mL for bacteria and 188 to1500 µg/mL for fungi and was lower than that of native chitosan. The nanoparticles with MIC ranging from 1.56 to 25 µg/mLfor bacteria and 94 to 750 µg/mL for fungi exhibited higher activity than the chitosan derivatives. Chitosan O-(1-methylbenzene) triazolyl carbamate and chitosan O-(1-methyl phenyl sulfide) triazolyl carbamate were the most active against the tested bacterial and fungal strains. The hemolytic assay on erythrocytes and cell viability test on two different cell lines (Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells V79 and Human hepatic cell line WRL68) demonstrated the safety; suggesting that these derivatives could be used in future

  19. Unique Residues Involved in Activation of the Multitasking Protease/Chaperone HtrA from Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Wilhelmina M.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Lott, William B.; Stansfield, Scott H.; Timms, Peter

    2011-01-01

    DegP, a member of the HtrA family of proteins, conducts critical bacterial protein quality control by both chaperone and proteolysis activities. The regulatory mechanisms controlling these two distinct activities, however, are unknown. DegP activation is known to involve a unique mechanism of allosteric binding, conformational changes and oligomer formation. We have uncovered a novel role for the residues at the PDZ1:protease interface in oligomer formation specifically for chaperone substrates of Chlamydia trachomatis HtrA (DegP homolog). We have demonstrated that CtHtrA proteolysis could be activated by allosteric binding and oligomer formation. The PDZ1 activator cleft was required for the activation and oligomer formation. However, unique to CtHtrA was the critical role for residues at the PDZ1:protease interface in oligomer formation when the activator was an in vitro chaperone substrate. Furthermore, a potential in vivo chaperone substrate, the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) from Chlamydia, was able to activate CtHtrA and induce oligomer formation. Therefore, we have revealed novel residues involved in the activation of CtHtrA which are likely to have important in vivo implications for outer membrane protein assembly. PMID:21931748

  20. Unique residues involved in activation of the multitasking protease/chaperone HtrA from Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Huston, Wilhelmina M; Tyndall, Joel D A; Lott, William B; Stansfield, Scott H; Timms, Peter

    2011-01-01

    DegP, a member of the HtrA family of proteins, conducts critical bacterial protein quality control by both chaperone and proteolysis activities. The regulatory mechanisms controlling these two distinct activities, however, are unknown. DegP activation is known to involve a unique mechanism of allosteric binding, conformational changes and oligomer formation. We have uncovered a novel role for the residues at the PDZ1:protease interface in oligomer formation specifically for chaperone substrates of Chlamydia trachomatis HtrA (DegP homolog). We have demonstrated that CtHtrA proteolysis could be activated by allosteric binding and oligomer formation. The PDZ1 activator cleft was required for the activation and oligomer formation. However, unique to CtHtrA was the critical role for residues at the PDZ1:protease interface in oligomer formation when the activator was an in vitro chaperone substrate. Furthermore, a potential in vivo chaperone substrate, the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) from Chlamydia, was able to activate CtHtrA and induce oligomer formation. Therefore, we have revealed novel residues involved in the activation of CtHtrA which are likely to have important in vivo implications for outer membrane protein assembly.

  1. AMPK is involved in mediation of erythropoietin influence on metabolic activity and reactive oxygen species production in white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Di, Lijun; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-09-01

    Erythropoietin, discovered for its indispensable role during erythropoiesis, has been used in therapy for selected red blood cell disorders in erythropoietin-deficient patients. The biological activities of erythropoietin have been found in animal models to extend to non-erythroid tissues due to the expression of erythropoietin receptor. We previously demonstrated that erythropoietin promotes metabolic activity and white adipocytes browning to increase mitochondrial function and energy expenditure via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and Sirtuin1. Here we report that AMP-activated protein kinase was activated by erythropoietin possibly via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase in adipocytes as well as in white adipose tissue from diet induced obese mice. Erythropoietin increased cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide via increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity, possibly leading to Sirtuin1 activation. AMP-activated protein kinase knock down reduced erythropoietin mediated increase in cellular oxidative function including the increased oxygen consumption rate, fatty acid utilization and induction of key metabolic genes. Under hypoxia, adipocytes were found to generate more reactive oxygen species, and erythropoietin reduced the reactive oxygen species and increased antioxidant gene expression, suggesting that erythropoietin may provide protection from oxidative stress in adipocytes. Erythropoietin also reversed increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by hypoxia via increased AMP-activated protein kinase. Additionally, AMP-activated protein kinase is found to be involved in erythropoietin stimulated increase in oxygen consumption rate, fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial gene expression. AMP-activated protein kinase knock down impaired erythropoietin stimulated increases in antioxidant gene expression. Collectively, our findings identify the AMP-activated protein kinase involvement in erythropoietin signaling in

  2. Do a Little Dance: The Impact on Students when Librarians Get Involved in Extracurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasperek, Sheila; Johnson, Amber; Fotta, Katie; Craig, Francis

    2007-01-01

    One hundred fifty-two undergraduate students at Mansfield University of Pennsylvania were surveyed to determine if the involvement of their liaison librarian in theater productions and orchestra had an effect on their relationship with the library. The study shows positive and statistically significant results for students who participated in…

  3. Examining Parent Involvement Activities in Two Immigrant-Impacted Schools: A Comparative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez, Amalia

    2012-01-01

    K-12 schools with large immigrant populations face a myriad of challenges, including low academic achievement and high dropout rates of Latino students. Parental involvement is a practical strategy in positively influencing student outcomes along the K-12 continuum. To this end, it is essential that immigrant impacted schools work together with…

  4. Undergraduate Involvement in Extracurricular Activities and Leadership Development in College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Elizabeth A.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe experiences of undergraduate extracurricular involvement that result in increased leadership development. Senior students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University completed an online questionnaire about their extracurricular experiences. Leadership development…

  5. Strategies for Effective Faculty Involvement in Online Activities Aimed at Promoting Critical Thinking and Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul Razzak, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Highly-traditional education systems that mainly offer what is known as "direct instruction" usually result in graduates with a surface approach to learning rather than a deep one. What is meant by deep-learning is learning that involves critical analysis, the linking of ideas and concepts, creative problem solving, and application…

  6. Neural networks involved in adolescent reward processing: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Merav H; Jedd, Kelly; Luciana, Monica

    2015-11-15

    Behavioral responses to, and the neural processing of, rewards change dramatically during adolescence and may contribute to observed increases in risk-taking during this developmental period. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies suggest differences between adolescents and adults in neural activation during reward processing, but findings are contradictory, and effects have been found in non-predicted directions. The current study uses an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach for quantitative meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies to: (1) confirm the network of brain regions involved in adolescents' reward processing, (2) identify regions involved in specific stages (anticipation, outcome) and valence (positive, negative) of reward processing, and (3) identify differences in activation likelihood between adolescent and adult reward-related brain activation. Results reveal a subcortical network of brain regions involved in adolescent reward processing similar to that found in adults with major hubs including the ventral and dorsal striatum, insula, and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Contrast analyses find that adolescents exhibit greater likelihood of activation in the insula while processing anticipation relative to outcome and greater likelihood of activation in the putamen and amygdala during outcome relative to anticipation. While processing positive compared to negative valence, adolescents show increased likelihood for activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and ventral striatum. Contrasting adolescent reward processing with the existing ALE of adult reward processing reveals increased likelihood for activation in limbic, frontolimbic, and striatal regions in adolescents compared with adults. Unlike adolescents, adults also activate executive control regions of the frontal and parietal lobes. These findings support hypothesized elevations in motivated activity during adolescence. PMID:26254587

  7. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the signal-transduction pathways of the soya bean oxidative burst.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A T; Kim, J; Low, P S

    2001-01-01

    The oxidative burst constitutes one of the most rapid defence responses characterized in the Plant Kingdom. We have observed that four distinct elicitors of the soya bean oxidative burst activate kinases of masses approximately 44 kDa and approximately 47 kDa. Evidence that these kinases regulate production of reactive oxygen species include: (i) their rapid activation by oxidative burst elicitors, (ii) their tight temporal correlation between activation/deactivation of the kinases and activation/deactivation of the oxidative burst, (iii) the identical pharmacological profile of kinase activation and oxidant production for 13 commonly used inhibitors, and (iv) the autologous activation of both kinases and oxidant production by calyculin A and cantharidin, two phosphatase inhibitors. Immunological and biochemical studies reveal that the activated 44 kDa and 47 kDa kinases are mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members. The kinases prefer myelin basic protein as a substrate, and they phosphorylate primarily on threonine residues. The kinases are themselves phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, and this phosphorylation is required for activity. Finally, both kinases are recognized by an antibody against activated MAP kinase immediately after (but not before) cell stimulation by elicitors. Based on these and other observations, a preliminary sequence of signalling steps linking elicitor stimulation, kinase activation and Ca(2+) entry, to initiation of oxidant production, is proposed. PMID:11311144

  8. Melanosis in Penaeus monodon: Involvement of the Laccase-like Activity of Hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bris, Cédric Le; Cudennec, Benoit; Dhulster, Pascal; Drider, Djamel; Duflos, Guillaume; Grard, Thierry

    2016-01-27

    In shrimp, the development of postmortem melanosis resulting from phenoloxidase activities leads to important economic losses. Phenoloxidase enzymes include catechol oxidases, laccases, and tyrosinases, but hemocyanin is also capable of phenoloxidase activities. These activities have been explored in Penaeus monodon, using different substrates. Results highlighted that tyrosinase-specific substrates were little oxidized, whereas hydroquinone (laccase-specific substrate) was more highly oxidized than l-DOPA (nonspecific substrate) in the pereopods and pleopods. Global phenoloxidase activity, assayed with l-DOPA, did not appear thermally stable over time and probably resulted from phenoloxidase enzymes. Conversely, the laccase-like activity assayed with hydroquinone was thermally stable over time, reflecting the thermal stability of hemocyanin. Independently of the anatomical compartment, the temperature, or the substrate, the highest activities were assayed in the cuticular compartments. This study demonstrates the complexity of phenoloxidase activities in P. monodon, and the importance of considering all the activities, including laccase-like activities such as that of hemocyanin. PMID:26671070

  9. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  10. Parental Involvement in School Activities and Reading Literacy: Findings and Implications from PIRLS 2011 Data. Policy Brief No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Klemencic, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This policy brief presents evidence demonstrating a positive association between parental involvement in school activities and student performance in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2011. This association, which was evident in most of the 54 education systems analyzed, indicates that students enrolled in schools with…

  11. Expectations of Rock Music Consumption for Entertainment and Information Relative to the Active Involvement of the User.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouner, Donna; Noyes, Amy

    Before examining potentially negative effects of rock music on adolescents, it is necessary to demonstrate links between adolescent motivations for consuming rock music and active involvement relative to that use and also to consider how much rock listeners rely on rock music as a source for information about values, beliefs, and social…

  12. Children's Well-Being and Involvement in Physically Active Outdoors Play in a Norwegian Kindergarten: Playful Sharing of Physical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjørgen, Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the conditions of children's level of well-being and their involvement in physically active play during kindergarten outdoors time. Observations of three to five year olds from one kindergarten in central Norway were conducted. The researcher followed the children around the kindergarten's outdoors playground and…

  13. 78 FR 66970 - In the Matter of Michael J. Buhrman; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing... COMMISSION In the Matter of Michael J. Buhrman; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities (Effective Immediately) I. Michael J. Buhrman was formerly employed as a senior reactor operator (SRO) at...

  14. 77 FR 39270 - In the Matter of Mr. Timothy Goold; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139; August 28... COMMISSION In the Matter of Mr. Timothy Goold; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities I Mr... NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. Mr. Goold provided a written...

  15. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF... the application of § 764.2(e) of this part to activities involving items subject to the EAR that may... Arrangement's Web site (www.wassenaar.org) at the Control Lists web page. Note 1 to paragraph (b)(1)(i):...

  16. Ideas Exchange: Should Students Be Granted a Waiver from Physical Education if They Are Involved in Other Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipe, Roberta; Belka, David; Kamla, Jim; Christenson, Robert S.; Magnotta, John; Lorenzi, David G.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the opinions/ideas of professionals who were asked this question: "Should students be granted a waiver from physical education if they are involved in other activities?" These professionals share the pros and cons of the waiver question.

  17. 7 CFR 799.7 - Early involvement in private and state and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Early involvement in private and state and local activities requiring Federal approval. 799.7 Section 799.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  18. 7 CFR 799.7 - Early involvement in private and state and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Early involvement in private and state and local activities requiring Federal approval. 799.7 Section 799.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  19. 7 CFR 799.7 - Early involvement in private and state and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Early involvement in private and state and local activities requiring Federal approval. 799.7 Section 799.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  20. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  1. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  2. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  3. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  4. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  5. High Inorganic Triphosphatase Activities in Bacteria and Mammalian Cells: Identification of the Enzymes Involved

    PubMed Central

    Lakaye, Bernard; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Scholer, Georges; Fillet, Marianne; Elias, Benjamin; Derochette, Jean-Michel; Crommen, Jacques; Wins, Pierre; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2012-01-01

    Background We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase) from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. Methodology/Principal Findings Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPPi) is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPPi but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. Conclusions and General Significance We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPPi in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPPi, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca2+, thereby interfering with Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22984449

  6. Amino-acid residues involved in the expression of the activity of Escherichia coli TolC.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Morisada, Naoyuki; Miyano, Masaya; Tsuge, Hideaki; Shinoda, Sumio; Takahashi, Eizo; Okamoto, Keinosuke

    2004-01-01

    The Escherichia coli TolC, composed of 471 amino-acid residues, functions as a channel tunnel in the transport of various molecules across the outer membrane. We found previously that Leu-412, the 60th amino-acid residue from the carboxy terminal end, was crucial to the transport activity of TolC. Leu-412 is located in a domain which protrudes from the main body of TolC into the periplasm. Subsequent study indicated that the hydrophobicity generated by Leu-412 played an important role in the activity of TolC (H. Yamanaka, T. Nomura, N. Morisada, S. Shinoda, and K. Okamoto, Microb. Pathog. 33: 81-89, 2002). We predicted that other hydrophobic amino-acid residues around Leu-412 were also involved in the expression of the activity of TolC. To test this possibility, we substituted several hydrophobic residues around Leu-412, (Leu-3, Val-6, Leu-212, Leu-213, Leu-223, and Leu-224), with serine and examined the activity of these mutant TolCs. The result showed that Leu-3 is involved in the activity of TolC, but the other residues are not. The involvement of Leu-3 was confirmed by the residue deletion experiment. A subsequent point-mutational analysis of the residue showed that a hydrophobic side chain is required at position 3 for TolC to express its activity. As the distance between the alpha-carbons of Leu-3 and Leu-412 is just 7.45 angstroms, hydrophobic interaction between the two leucine residues might be involved in the activity of TolC. PMID:15502403

  7. Family and Community Involvement in the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipriani, Kristin; Richardson, Cheryl; Roberts, Georgi

    2012-01-01

    Engaging families and communities in physical activities for the benefit of children is an extension of the role of a physical education instructor. Although it is possible for a physical educator to generate ideas that encourage families and communities to move, a certified director of physical activity (C-DPA) would be better trained to…

  8. Involvement of Cot activity in the proliferation of ALCL lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Margarita; Manso, Rebeca; Bernaldez, Flavia; Lopez, Pilar; Martin-Duce, Antonio; Alemany, Susana

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} We show here that ALCL lymphoma cell lines present high levels of Cot (MAP3K8). {yields} We show that Cot mediates the constitutive Erk1/2 activation in SUDHL-1 cells. {yields} Inhibition of Cot activity reduces the number of cell divisions in SUDHL-1 cells. {yields} Cot controls the activation state of p70 S6K and JunB expression in SUDHL-1 cells. -- Abstract: Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cells overexpress CD30 on their cell surface, show increased levels of activated Erk1/2 and of JunB; participating JunB in the proliferative capacity of these lymphomas. Here, we show that ALCL lymphoma cells also present high expression levels of the proto-oncogenic Cot (MAP3K8). Using pharmacological drugs as well as the RNA interference technique we show that Cot protein is responsible for the constitutive Erk1/2 activation in the ALCL lymphoma cells, SUDHL-1. Besides, inhibition of Cot activity reduces the number of cell divisions which is achieved, at least in part, by the control that Cot exercises on the activation state of p70 S6K and on the expression levels of JunB. Since Cot represents an alternative mode, independently of RAF, to activate Erk1/2, all these data strongly suggest that molecular targeting of Cot may be a potential new specific strategy for ALCL lymphomas therapy, without the fully disturbance of the Erk1/2 function.

  9. Optical Topography of Evoked Brain Activity during Mental Tasks Involving Whole Number Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Students start to memorize arithmetic facts from early elementary school mathematics activities. Their fluency or lack of fluency with these facts could affect their efforts as they carry out mental calculations as adults. This study investigated participants' levels of brain activation and possible reasons for these levels as they solved…

  10. Developmental Benefits of Extracurricular Involvement: Do Peer Characteristics Mediate the Link between Activities and Youth Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredricks, Jennifer A.; Eccles, Jacquelynn S.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we test: (a) the relation between school-based extracurricular participation and indicators of positive and negative development across a range of activity contexts, and (b) a mediation model linking activity participation, prosocial peers, and development. Extensive survey information was collected from a predominately White…

  11. Activities for Involvement: In-Service Ideas for Attitudinal Change and Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Kent

    Based on a program developed at Augustana College, South Dakota, the booklet--one-fourth of which consists of appendixes--presents activities designed to be used in workshops aimed at creating positive attitudes toward handicapped children among regular classroom teachers. Among the activities are those which simulate the reactions and feelings of…

  12. Community College Involvement in Contract Training and Other Economic Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Robert; And Others

    In 1989-90, a national survey was conducted to assess the scope and nature of contract training and other economic development activities at community colleges and technical institutes. The survey was sent to a random sample of 246 community colleges, requesting information on the colleges' workforce and economic development activities in 1988-89.…

  13. Discovering the Thermodynamics of Simultaneous Equilibria: An Entropy Analysis Activity Involving Consecutive Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    An activity is presented in which the thermodynamics of simultaneous, consecutive equilibria are explored. The activity is appropriate for second-year high school or AP chemistry. Students discover that a reactant-favored (entropy-diminishing or endergonic) reaction can be caused to happen if it is coupled with a product-favored reaction of…

  14. A qualitative study of the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support: recommended practices for success

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S; Erickson, Jessica L; Wasserman, Joe; Bunce, Arwen; Stanescu, Ana; St Hilaire, Daniel; Panzenhagen, Morgan; Gebhardt, Eric; McMullen, Carmit; Middleton, Blackford; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support (CDS) at leading sites. Materials and methods We conducted ethnographic observations at seven diverse sites with a history of excellence in CDS using the Rapid Assessment Process and analyzed the data using a series of card sorts, informed by Linstone's Multiple Perspectives Model. Results We identified 18 activities and grouped them into four areas. Area 1: Fostering relationships across the organization, with activities (a) training and support, (b) visibility/presence on the floor, (c) liaising between people, (d) administration and leadership, (e) project management, (f) cheerleading/buy-in/sponsorship, (g) preparing for CDS implementation. Area 2: Assembling the system with activities (a) providing technical support, (b) CDS content development, (c) purchasing products from vendors (d) knowledge management, (e) system integration. Area 3: Using CDS to achieve the organization's goals with activities (a) reporting, (b) requirements-gathering/specifications, (c) monitoring CDS, (d) linking CDS to goals, (e) managing data. Area 4: Participation in external policy and standards activities (this area consists of only a single activity). We also identified a set of recommendations associated with these 18 activities. Discussion All 18 activities we identified were performed at all sites, although the way they were organized into roles differed substantially. We consider these activities critical to the success of a CDS program. Conclusions A series of activities are performed by sites strong in CDS, and sites adopting CDS should ensure they incorporate these activities into their efforts. PMID:23999670

  15. Proinflammatory actions of visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) involve regulation of insulin signaling pathway and Nampt enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Claire; Holzenberger, Martin; Mladenovic, Zvezdana; Salvat, Colette; Pecchi, Emilie; Berenbaum, Francis; Gosset, Marjolaine

    2012-04-27

    Visfatin (also termed pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) or nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)) is a pleiotropic mediator acting on many inflammatory processes including osteoarthritis. Visfatin exhibits both an intracellular enzymatic activity (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, Nampt) leading to NAD synthesis and a cytokine function via the binding to its hypothetical receptor. We recently reported the role of visfatin in prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) synthesis in chondrocytes. Here, our aim was to characterize the signaling pathways involved in this response in exploring both the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway and Nampt activity. IR was expressed in human and murine chondrocytes, and visfatin triggered Akt phosphorylation in murine chondrocytes. Blocking IR expression with siRNA or activity using the hydroxy-2-naphthalenyl methyl phosphonic acid tris acetoxymethyl ester (HNMPA-(AM)(3)) inhibitor diminished visfatin-induced PGE(2) release in chondrocytes. Moreover, visfatin-induced IGF-1R(-/-) chondrocytes released higher concentration of PGE(2) than IGF-1R(+/+) cells, a finding confirmed with an antibody that blocked IGF-1R. Using RT-PCR, we found that visfatin did not regulate IR expression and that an increased insulin release was also unlikely to be involved because insulin was unable to increase PGE(2) release. Inhibition of Nampt activity using the APO866 inhibitor gradually decreased PGE(2) release, whereas the addition of exogenous nicotinamide increased it. We conclude that the proinflammatory actions of visfatin in chondrocytes involve regulation of IR signaling pathways, possibly through the control of Nampt enzymatic activity.

  16. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  17. Nonequilibrium structure in sequential assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander V.; Craven, Galen T.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-11-01

    The assembly of monomeric constituents into molecular superstructures through sequential-arrival processes has been simulated and theoretically characterized. When the energetic interactions allow for complete overlap of the particles, the model is equivalent to that of the sequential absorption of soft particles on a surface. In the present work, we consider more general cases by including arbitrary aggregating geometries and varying prescriptions of the connectivity network. The resulting theory accounts for the evolution and final-state configurations through a system of equations governing structural generation. We find that particle geometries differ significantly from those in equilibrium. In particular, variations of structural rigidity and morphology tune particle energetics and result in significant variation in the nonequilibrium distributions of the assembly in comparison to the corresponding equilibrium case.

  18. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies.

  19. Aesthetic activities and aesthetic attitudes: influences of education, background and personality on interest and involvement in the arts.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C; Furnham, A

    2006-11-01

    There have been few studies of why some people are frequently involved in aesthetic activities such as going to the theatre, reading or playing musical instruments, whereas others are less involved. This study assesses the broad roles of education, personality and demographic factors such as social class, age and sex. More aesthetic activity was associated with music and art education, whereas science education had a substantial negative relationship with aesthetic activity, both directly and also indirectly via reduced art education. More aesthetic activity was particularly related to higher scores on the personality factor of openness, and also to lower scores on agreeableness and conscientiousness. Higher parental social class was also associated with more aesthetic activity, as also was lower age. Sex had no relationship to aesthetic activity, as neither did masculinity-femininity. Positive aesthetic attitudes were also related moderately to aesthetic activity, but were particularly strongly related to openness to experience, and somewhat less to extraversion. Class, age and sex had no direct relationship to aesthetic attitudes.

  20. Histochemical location of key enzyme activities involved in receptivity and self-incompatibility in the olive tree (Olea europaea L.).

    PubMed

    Serrano, Irene; Olmedilla, Adela

    2012-12-01

    Stigma-surface and style enzymes are important for pollen reception, selection and germination. This report deals with the histochemical location of the activity of four basic types of enzyme involved in these processes in the olive (Olea europaea L.). The detection of peroxidase, esterase and acid-phosphatase activities at the surface of the stigma provided evidence of early receptivity in olive pistils. The stigma maintained its receptivity until the arrival of pollen. Acid-phosphatase activity appeared in the style at the moment of anthesis and continued until the fertilization of the ovule. RNase activity was detected in the extracellular matrix of the styles of flowers just before pollination and became especially evident in pistils after self-pollination. This activity gradually decreased until it practically disappeared in more advanced stages. RNase activity was also detected in pollen tubes growing in pollinated pistils and appeared after in vitro germination in the presence of self-incompatible pistils. These findings suggest that RNases may well be involved in intraspecific pollen rejection in olive flowers. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that evidence of enzyme activity in stigma receptivity and pollen selection has been described in this species.

  1. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  2. Platelet Activation by Low Concentrations of Intact Oxidized LDL Particles Involves the PAF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Chen, Xi; Salomon, Robert G.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial depolarization aids platelet activation. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) contains the medium length oxidatively truncated phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl-lysoPAF (HAz-LPAF) that disrupts mitochondrial function in nucleated cells, so oxLDL may augment platelet activation. Methods and Results Flow cytometry showed intact oxLDL particles synergized with sub-threshold amounts of soluble agonists to increase intracellular Ca++, and initiate platelet aggregation and surface expression of activated gpIIb/IIIa and P-selectin. oxLDL also induced aggregation and increased intracellular Ca++ in FURA2-labeled cells by itself at low, although not higher, concentrations. HAz-LPAF, alone and in combination with sub-stimulatory amounts of thrombin, rapidly increased cytoplasmic Ca++ and initiated aggregation. HAz-LPAF depolarized mitochondria in intact platelets, but this required concentrations beyond those that directly activated platelets. An unexpectedly large series of chemically pure truncated phospholipids generated by oxidative fragmentation of arachidonoyl-, docosahexaneoyl-, or linoleoyl alkyl phospholipids were platelet agonists. The PAF receptor, thought to effectively recognize only phospholipids with very short sn-2 residues, was essential for platelet activation because PAF receptor agonists blocked signaling by all these medium length phospholipids and oxLDL. Conclusions Intact oxLDL particles activate platelets through the PAF receptor, and the PAF receptor responds to a far wider range of oxidized phospholipids in oxLDL than anticipated. PMID:19112165

  3. Blocking for Sequential Political Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    In typical political experiments, researchers randomize a set of households, precincts, or individuals to treatments all at once, and characteristics of all units are known at the time of randomization. However, in many other experiments, subjects “trickle in” to be randomized to treatment conditions, usually via complete randomization. To take advantage of the rich background data that researchers often have (but underutilize) in these experiments, we develop methods that use continuous covariates to assign treatments sequentially. We build on biased coin and minimization procedures for discrete covariates and demonstrate that our methods outperform complete randomization, producing better covariate balance in simulated data. We then describe how we selected and deployed a sequential blocking method in a clinical trial and demonstrate the advantages of our having done so. Further, we show how that method would have performed in two larger sequential political trials. Finally, we compare causal effect estimates from differences in means, augmented inverse propensity weighted estimators, and randomization test inversion. PMID:24143061

  4. A wireless sequentially actuated microvalve system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung-Ki; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Seo, Soonmin; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2013-04-01

    A wireless microvalve system was fabricated based on induction heating for flow control in microfluidics by sequential valve opening. In this approach, we used paraffin wax as a flow plug, which can be changed from solid to liquid with adjacent heating elements operated by induction heating. Programmable opening of valves was devised by using different thermal responses of metal discs to a magnetic field. Copper and nickel discs with a diameter of 2.5 mm and various thicknesses (50, 100 and 200 µm) were prepared as heating elements by a laser cutting method, and they were integrated in the microfluidic channel as part of the microvalve. A calorimetric test was used to measure the thermal properties of the discs in terms of kinds of metal and disc thickness. Sequential openings of the microvalves were performed using the difference in the thermal response of 100 µm thick copper disc and 50 µm thick nickel disc for short-interval openings and 200 µm thick copper disc and 100-µm-thick nickel disc for long-interval openings. The thermal effect on fluid samples as a result of induction heating of the discs was studied by investigating lysozyme denaturation. More heat was generated in heating elements made of copper than in those made of nickel, implying differences in the thermal response of heating elements made of copper and nickel. Also, the thickness of the heating elements affected the thermal response in the elements. Valve openings for short intervals of 1-5 s and long intervals of 15-23 s were achieved by using two sets of heating elements. There was no significant change in lysozyme activity by increasing the temperature of the heating discs. This study demonstrates that a wireless sequentially actuated microvalve system can provide programmed valve opening, portability, ease of fabrication and operation, disposability, and low cost.

  5. A spectroscopic method to determine the activity of the restriction endonuclease EcoRV that involves a single reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Quiñones, Edwin

    2016-03-15

    A one-step protocol is presented to determine the activity of EcoRV as a model of restriction enzymes. The protocol involved a molecular beacon as DNA substrate, with the target sequence recognized by EcoRV in the stem. EcoRV cleaved the stem forming two fragments, one of which contained the fluorophore and quencher, initially bound by 3 bp. This shorter fragment rapidly dissociated at 37 °C, causing an increase of fluorescence intensity that was used to gauge the reaction kinetics. The reaction can be described using the Michaelis-Menten mechanism, and the kinetic parameters obtained were compared with literature values involving other protocols.

  6. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on ADP-induced thrombus formation and platelet activation involves mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Li, Quan; Liu, Yu-Ying; Sun, Kai; Fan, Jing-Yu; Wang, Chuan-She; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA), one of the active constituents of Radix Salvia miltiorrhizae, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, few studies have assessed the ability of CA to inhibit platelet mediated thrombus generation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the antithrombotic effect of CA in mouse cerebral arterioles and venules using intravital microscopy. The antiplatelet activity of CA in ADP stimulated mouse platelets in vitro was also examined in attempt to explore the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that CA (1.25–5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited thrombus formation in vivo. In vitro, CA (25–100 μM) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, ATP release, Ca2+ mobilization, and integrin αIIbβ3 activation. Additionally, CA attenuated p38, ERK, and JNK activation, and enhanced cAMP levels. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the inhibition of CA on platelet-mediated thrombosis in vivo, which is, at least partly, mediated by interference in phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK leading to elevation of cAMP and down-regulation of P-selectin expression and αIIbβ3 activation. These results suggest that CA may have potential for the treatment of aberrant platelet activation-related diseases. PMID:26345207

  7. Telmisartan prevention of LPS-induced microglia activation involves M2 microglia polarization via CaMKKβ-dependent AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Xu, Yazhou; Wang, Yurong; Wang, Yunjie; He, Ling; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Zhangjian; Liao, Hong; Li, Jia; Saavedra, Juan M; Zhang, Luyong; Pang, Tao

    2015-11-01

    Brain inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of many psychiatric and neurological diseases. During brain inflammation, microglia cells are activated, producing neurotoxic molecules and neurotrophic factors depending on their pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes. It has been demonstrated that Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) ameliorate brain inflammation and reduce M1 microglia activation. The ARB telmisartan suppresses glutamate-induced upregulation of inflammatory genes in cultured primary neurons. We wished to clarify whether telmisartan, in addition, prevents microglia activation through polarization to an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. We found that telmisartan promoted M2 polarization and reduced M1 polarization in LPS-stimulated BV2 and primary microglia cells, effects partially dependent on PPARγ activation. The promoting effects of telmisartan on M2 polarization, were attenuated by an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor or AMPK knockdown, indicating that AMPK activation participates on telmisartan effects. Moreover, in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells, telmisartan enhancement of M2 gene expression was prevented by the inhibitor STO-609 and siRNA of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ), an upstream kinase of AMPK. Furthermore, telmisartan enhanced brain AMPK activation and M2 gene expression in a mouse model of LPS-induced neuroinflammation. In addition, telmisartan reduced the LPS-induced sickness behavior in this in vivo model, and this effect was prevented by prior administration of an AMPK inhibitor. Our results indicate that telmisartan can be considered as a novel AMPK activator, suppressing microglia activation by promoting M2 polarization. Telmisartan may provide a novel, safe therapeutic approach to treat brain disorders associated with enhanced inflammation.

  8. Possible dopaminergic stimulation of locus coeruleus alpha1-adrenoceptors involved in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David; Dunn, Adrian J; Weinshenker, David; Stone, Eric A

    2008-07-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors of the locus coeruleus (LC) have been implicated in behavioral activation in novel surroundings, but the endogenous agonist that activates these receptors has not been established. In addition to the canonical activation of alpha(1)-receptors by norepinephrine (NE), there is evidence that dopamine (DA) may also activate certain brain alpha(1)-receptors. This study examined the contribution of DA to exploratory activity in a novel cage by determining the effect of infusion of various dopaminergic and adrenergic drugs into the mouse LC. It was found that the D2/D3 agonist, quinpirole, which selectively blocks the release of CNS DA, produced a dose-dependent and virtually complete abolition of exploration and all movement in the novel cage test. The quinpirole-induced inactivity was significantly attenuated by coinfusion of DA but not by the D1 agonist, SKF38390. Furthermore, the DA attenuation of quinpirole inactivity was blocked by coinfusion of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. LC infusions of either quinpirole or terazosin also produced profound inactivity in DA-beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE, indicating that their behavioral effects were not due to an alteration of the release or action of LC NE. Measurement of endogenous DA, NE, and 5HT and their metabolites in the LC during exposure to the novel cage indicated an increase in the turnover of DA and NE but not 5HT. These results indicate that DA is a candidate as an endogenous agonist for behaviorally activating LC alpha(1)-receptors and may play a role in the activation of this nucleus by novel surroundings. PMID:18435418

  9. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with adverse effects on brain functions, including sensation, language, emotions and/or cognition. Therapies for improving outcomes following TBI are limited. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI may suggest novel treatment strategies to facilitate recovery and improve treatment outcome. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 is a neuronal protein kinase activated via interaction with its cofactor p35 that regulates numerous neuronal functions, including synaptic remodeling and cognition. However, conversion of p35 to p25 via Ca(2+) -dependent activation of calpain results in an aberrantly active Cdk5/p25 complex that is associated with neuronal damage and cell death. Here, we show that mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model, exhibit increased p25 levels and consistently elevated Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in hippocampal lysates. Moreover, CCI-induced neuroinflammation as indicated by increased astrocytic activation and number of reactive microglia. Brain-wide conditional Cdk5 knockout mice (Cdk5 cKO) subjected to CCI exhibited significantly reduced edema, ventricular dilation, and injury area. Finally, neurophysiological recordings revealed that CCI attenuated excitatory post-synaptic potential field responses in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway 24 h after injury. This neurophysiological deficit was attenuated in Cdk5 cKO mice. Thus, TBI induces increased levels of p25 generation and aberrant Cdk5 activity, which contributes to pathophysiological processes underlying TBI progression. Hence, selectively preventing aberrant Cdk5 activity may be an effective acute strategy to improve recovery from TBI. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases astrogliosis and microglial activation

  10. The relationship between active ghrelin levels and human obesity involves alterations in resting energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, Paolo; Verti, Barbara; Savia, Giulio; Walker, Gillian E; Guzzaloni, Gabriele; Tagliaferri, Mariantonella; Di Blasio, Annamaria; Liuzzi, Antonio

    2004-02-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that exerts a stimulatory effect on appetite and fat accumulation. Ser(3) octanoylation is regarded as a prerequisite for ghrelin biological activity, although des-octanoylated forms may retain biological functions in vitro. Circulating ghrelin levels are usually low in obesity and in states of positive energy balance. Hence, the aim of our study was to analyze plasma active and serum total ghrelin levels in 20 obese (ages, 22-42 yr; body mass index, 41.3 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)) and 20 lean subjects (ages, 22-43 yr; body mass index, 22.4 +/- 0.6 kg/m(2)) as well as their relationship to measures of glucose homeostasis, body fat, and resting energy expenditure (REE). The measured/predicted REE percentage ratio was calculated to subdivide groups into those with positive (> or = 100% ) and negative (<100%) ratio values. In obese patients, plasma active (180 +/- 18 vs. 411 +/- 57 pg/ml; P < 0.001) and serum total ghrelin levels (3650 +/- 408 vs. 5263 +/- 643 pg/ml; P < 0.05) were significantly lower when compared with lean subjects. Hence, ghrelin activity, defined as the proportion of active over total ghrelin levels, was similarly reduced in the obese state (6.1 +/- 0.9% vs. 8.4 +/- 1%; P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between active and total ghrelin (r = 0.62; P < 0.001), and between total ghrelin and insulin (r = -0.53; P < 0.001) or insulin resistance using the homeostatis model of assessment-insulin resistance (r = -0.49; P < 0.001) approach. Significantly higher active ghrelin levels (214 +/- 22 vs. 159 +/- 30 pg/ml; P < 0.05) and ghrelin activity (8 +/- 1.7% vs. 4.9 +/- 0.9%; P < 0.05) were observed in patients with positive compared with negative measured/predicted REE ratio values. Our study shows that obesity is associated with an impairment of the entire ghrelin system. The observation that ghrelin is further decreased in cases of abnormal energy profit adds new evidence to the relationship between ghrelin activity and

  11. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with adverse effects on brain functions, including sensation, language, emotions and/or cognition. Therapies for improving outcomes following TBI are limited. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI may suggest novel treatment strategies to facilitate recovery and improve treatment outcome. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 is a neuronal protein kinase activated via interaction with its cofactor p35 that regulates numerous neuronal functions, including synaptic remodeling and cognition. However, conversion of p35 to p25 via Ca(2+) -dependent activation of calpain results in an aberrantly active Cdk5/p25 complex that is associated with neuronal damage and cell death. Here, we show that mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model, exhibit increased p25 levels and consistently elevated Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in hippocampal lysates. Moreover, CCI-induced neuroinflammation as indicated by increased astrocytic activation and number of reactive microglia. Brain-wide conditional Cdk5 knockout mice (Cdk5 cKO) subjected to CCI exhibited significantly reduced edema, ventricular dilation, and injury area. Finally, neurophysiological recordings revealed that CCI attenuated excitatory post-synaptic potential field responses in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway 24 h after injury. This neurophysiological deficit was attenuated in Cdk5 cKO mice. Thus, TBI induces increased levels of p25 generation and aberrant Cdk5 activity, which contributes to pathophysiological processes underlying TBI progression. Hence, selectively preventing aberrant Cdk5 activity may be an effective acute strategy to improve recovery from TBI. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases astrogliosis and microglial activation

  12. Involvement of human internal globus pallidus in the early modulation of cortical error-related activity.

    PubMed

    Herrojo Ruiz, María; Huebl, Julius; Schönecker, Thomas; Kupsch, Andreas; Yarrow, Kielan; Krauss, Joachim K; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-06-01

    The detection and assessment of errors are a prerequisite to adapt behavior and improve future performance. Error monitoring is afforded by the interplay between cortical and subcortical neural systems. Ample evidence has pointed to a specific cortical error-related evoked potential, the error-related negativity (ERN), during the detection and evaluation of response errors. Recent models of reinforcement learning implicate the basal ganglia (BG) in early error detection following the learning of stimulus-response associations and in the modulation of the cortical ERN. To investigate the influence of the human BG motor output activity on the cortical ERN during response errors, we recorded local field potentials from the sensorimotor area of the internal globus pallidus and scalp electroencephalogram representing activity from the posterior medial frontal cortex in patients with idiopathic dystonia (hands not affected) during a flanker task. In error trials, a specific pallidal error-related potential arose 60 ms prior to the cortical ERN. The error-related changes in pallidal activity-characterized by theta oscillations-were predictive of the cortical error-related activity as assessed by Granger causality analysis. Our findings show an early modulation of error-related activity in the human pallidum, suggesting that pallidal output influences the cortex at an early stage of error detection.

  13. Identification of signal transduction pathways involved in the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation.

    PubMed

    Topalov, Nikolai N; Kotova, Yana N; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2012-04-01

    Platelets are formed elements of blood. Upon activation, they externalize phosphatidylserine, thus accelerating membrane-dependent reactions of blood coagulation. Activated platelets form two subpopulations, only one of which expresses phosphatidylserine. This study aimed to identify signalling pathways responsible for this segregation. Gel-filtered platelets, intact or loaded with calcium-sensitive dyes, were activated and labelled with annexin V and antibodies, followed by flow cytometric analysis. Calcium Green and Fura Red dyes were compared, and only the latter was able to detect calcium level differences in the platelet subpopulations. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets produced by thrombin had stably high intracellular calcium level; addition of convulxin increased and stabilized calcium level in the phosphatidylserine-negative subpopulation. PAR1 agonist SFLLRN also induced calcium rise and subpopulation formation, but the resulting platelets were not coated with alpha-granule proteins. Adenylatecyclase activator forskolin inhibited phosphatidylserine-positive platelets formation several-fold, while its inhibitor SQ22536 had no effect. This suggests that adenylatecyclase inactivation is necessary, but not rate-limiting, for subpopulation segregation. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (U0126) and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (Monafram(®)) was without effect, whereas inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (wortmannin) and Src tyrosine kinase (PP2) decreased the procoagulant subpopulation threefold. These data identify the principal signalling pathways controlling platelet heterogeneity. PMID:23379894

  14. Evidence of active transport involvement in morphine transport via MDCKII and MDCK-PGP cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, S O; Sattari, M R; Routledge, P A

    2010-07-01

    Several transporters appear to be important in transporting various drugs. Many patients, who receive morphine as analgesic medication, also receive other medications with potency of changing morphine transport by affecting P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and oatp2 transport system. This could influence morphine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The aim of present study was to elucidate the transport mechanisms involved in transporting morphine via MDCKII and MDCK-PGP cells. Morphine permeability was examined in the presence of various compounds with ability in inhibiting different transport systems including: digoxin, probenecid and d- glucose. The effect of morphine concentration changes on its transport was also examined. Morphine concentration was measured using HPLC with electrochemical detector. Morphine permeability via a MDCK II cells was greater than sucrose permeability, and reduced when a P-GP expressed cell line was used. Its permeability was increased significantly in the presence of a strong P-GP inhibitor. Morphine permeability decreased significantly in the presence of digoxin but not in the presence of d-glucose or probenecid. These results showed that morphine was a P-GP substrate, and digoxin related transporters such as oatp2 were involved in its transport. Morphine was not substrate for glucose or probenecid-sensitive transporters. PMID:21589798

  15. Evidence of active transport involvement in morphine transport via MDCKII and MDCK-PGP cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mashayekhi, S.O.; Sattari, M.R.; Routledge, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Several transporters appear to be important in transporting various drugs. Many patients, who receive morphine as analgesic medication, also receive other medications with potency of changing morphine transport by affecting P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and oatp2 transport system. This could influence morphine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The aim of present study was to elucidate the transport mechanisms involved in transporting morphine via MDCKII and MDCK-PGP cells. Morphine permeability was examined in the presence of various compounds with ability in inhibiting different transport systems including: digoxin, probenecid and d- glucose. The effect of morphine concentration changes on its transport was also examined. Morphine concentration was measured using HPLC with electrochemical detector. Morphine permeability via a MDCK II cells was greater than sucrose permeability, and reduced when a P-GP expressed cell line was used. Its permeability was increased significantly in the presence of a strong P-GP inhibitor. Morphine permeability decreased significantly in the presence of digoxin but not in the presence of d-glucose or probenecid. These results showed that morphine was a P-GP substrate, and digoxin related transporters such as oatp2 were involved in its transport. Morphine was not substrate for glucose or probenecid-sensitive transporters. PMID:21589798

  16. Teacher management behaviors and pupil task involvement during small group laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Warren

    A major concern of many beginning and experienced teachers is that of classroom management and control. This article describes recent research into defining classroom management procedures that are used by high school science teachers and their relationship to pupil ontaskness. The classroom is conceptualized as a manipulable behavioral system. This construct arises directly from Barker's (1968) ecological psychology, the classroom and its occupants being conceptualized as a behavior setting. The behaviors of the teacher and the pupils are an integral part of the unit (behavior setting), which in turn coerces certain behaviors from its participants. Thus settings, and, in particular, subsettings, are seen as more important determiners of social behavior than the personality of individual teacher or pupil. The methodology employed in this research has involved the extensive use of video in naturalistic science classrooms. Tapes of both teacher and pupil behaviors were continuously and independently recorded. Intensive analysis using electronic recording instruments interfaced with the computer has allowed the collection and sophisticated analysis of the observational data. Data relating to teacher management behavior in small group settings have been analyzed and the relationships to pupil task involvement have been explored.

  17. Involvement of active oxygen in lipid peroxide radical reaction of epidermal homogenate following ultraviolet light exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, J.; Ogura, R.; Sugiyama, M.; Hidaka, T.; Kohno, M. )

    1991-07-01

    To elucidate the radical mechanism of lipid peroxidation induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, an electron spin resonance (ESR) study was made on epidermal homogenate prepared from albino rat skin. The exposure of the homogenate to UV light resulted in an increase in lipid peroxide content, which was proportional to the time of UV exposure. Using ESR spin trapping (dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide, DMPO), the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals (L.) was measured following UV exposure (DMPO-L.:aN = 15.5 G, aH = 22.7 G), as was the spectrum of DMPO-hydroxyl radical (DMPO-OH, aN = aH = 15.5 G). In the presence of superoxide dismutase, the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals was found to be reduced remarkably. Therefore, it was shown that the generation of the lipid radicals partially involves superoxide anion radicals, in addition to hydroxyl radicals. In the ESR free-radical experiment, an ESR signal appeared at g = 2.0064 when the ESR tube filled with homogenate was exposed to UV light at -150 degrees C. The temperature-dependent change in the ESR free radical signal of homogenate exposed to UV light was observed at temperatures varying from -150 degrees C to room temperature. By using degassed samples, it was confirmed that oxygen is involved in the formation of the lipid peroxide radicals (LOO.) from the lipid radicals (L.).

  18. Adaptive sequential methods for detecting network intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjia; Walker, Ernest

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose new sequential methods for detecting port-scan attackers which routinely perform random "portscans" of IP addresses to find vulnerable servers to compromise. In addition to rigorously control the probability of falsely implicating benign remote hosts as malicious, our method performs significantly faster than other current solutions. Moreover, our method guarantees that the maximum amount of observational time is bounded. In contrast to the previous most effective method, Threshold Random Walk Algorithm, which is explicit and analytical in nature, our proposed algorithm involve parameters to be determined by numerical methods. We have introduced computational techniques such as iterative minimax optimization for quick determination of the parameters of the new detection algorithm. A framework of multi-valued decision for detecting portscanners and DoS attacks is also proposed.

  19. Developing Science Communication in Africa: Undergraduate and Graduate Students should be Trained and Actively Involved in Outreach Activity Development and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Karikari, Thomas K; Yawson, Nat Ato; Quansah, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in scientific research output from Africa, public understanding of science in many parts of the continent remains low. Science communication there is faced with challenges such as (i) lack of interest among some scientists, (ii) low availability of training programs for scientists, (iii) low literacy rates among the public, and (iv) multiplicity of languages. To address these challenges, new ways of training and motivating scientists to dialogue with non-scientists are essential. Developing communication skills early in researchers' scientific career would be a good way to enhance their public engagement abilities. Therefore, a potentially effective means to develop science communication in Africa would be to actively involve trainee scientists (i.e., undergraduate and graduate students) in outreach activity development and delivery. These students are often enthusiastic about science, eager to develop their teaching and communication skills, and can be good mentors to younger students. Involving them in all aspects of outreach activity is, therefore, likely to be a productive implementation strategy. However, science communication training specifically for students and the involvement of these students in outreach activity design and delivery are lacking in Africa. Here, we argue that improving the training and involvement of budding scientists in science communication activities would be a good way to bridge the wide gap between scientists and the African public. PMID:27385932

  20. Developing Science Communication in Africa: Undergraduate and Graduate Students should be Trained and Actively Involved in Outreach Activity Development and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Karikari, Thomas K.; Yawson, Nat Ato; Quansah, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in scientific research output from Africa, public understanding of science in many parts of the continent remains low. Science communication there is faced with challenges such as (i) lack of interest among some scientists, (ii) low availability of training programs for scientists, (iii) low literacy rates among the public, and (iv) multiplicity of languages. To address these challenges, new ways of training and motivating scientists to dialogue with non-scientists are essential. Developing communication skills early in researchers’ scientific career would be a good way to enhance their public engagement abilities. Therefore, a potentially effective means to develop science communication in Africa would be to actively involve trainee scientists (i.e., undergraduate and graduate students) in outreach activity development and delivery. These students are often enthusiastic about science, eager to develop their teaching and communication skills, and can be good mentors to younger students. Involving them in all aspects of outreach activity is, therefore, likely to be a productive implementation strategy. However, science communication training specifically for students and the involvement of these students in outreach activity design and delivery are lacking in Africa. Here, we argue that improving the training and involvement of budding scientists in science communication activities would be a good way to bridge the wide gap between scientists and the African public. PMID:27385932

  1. The upstream activator CTF/NF1 and RNA polymerase II share a common element involved in transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Lis, J T; Xiao, H; Greenblatt, J; Friesen, J D

    1994-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II consists of tandem repeats of a heptapeptide with the consensus YSPTSPS. It has been shown that the heptapeptide repeat interacts directly with the general transcription factor TFIID. We report here that the CTD activates transcription when fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. More importantly, we find that the proline-rich transcriptional activation domain of the CCAAT-box-binding factor CTF/NF1 contains a sequence with striking similarity to the heptapeptide repeats of the CTD. We show that this CTD-like motif is essential for the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain of CTF/NF1. Deletion of and point mutations in this CTD-like motif abolish the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain, while natural CTD repeats from RNA polymerase II are fully functional in place of the CTD-like motif. We further show that the proline-rich activation domain of CTF/NF1 interacts directly with the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP), and that a mutation in the CTD-like motif that abolishes transcriptional activation reduces the affinity of the proline-rich domain for TBP. These results demonstrate that a class of proline-rich activator proteins and RNA polymerase II possess a common structural and functional component which can interact with the same target in the general transcription machinery. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanisms of transcriptional activation in eucaryotes. Images PMID:8029001

  2. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation. PMID:12062184

  3. Specificity of MAP kinase signaling in yeast differentiation involves transient versus sustained MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, W; Flatauer, L J; Bardwell, A J; Bardwell, L

    2001-09-01

    Signals transmitted by common components often elicit distinct (yet appropriate) outcomes. In yeast, two developmental options-mating and invasive growth-are both regulated by the same MAP kinase cascade. Specificity has been thought to result from specialized roles for the two MAP kinases, Kss1 and Fus3, and because Fus3 prevents Kss1 from gaining access to the mating pathway. Kss1 has been thought to participate in mating only when Fus3 is absent. Instead, we show that Kss1 is rapidly phosphorylated and potently activated by mating pheromone in wild-type cells, and that this is required for normal pheromone-induced gene expression. Signal identity is apparently maintained because active Fus3 limits the extent of Kss1 activation, thereby preventing inappropriate signal crossover. PMID:11583629

  4. Involvement of a membrane potassium channel in heparan sulphate-induced activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-Dong; Fan, Li; Tian, Fu-Zhou; Fan, Kai-Hua; Yu, Bo-Tao; Jin, Wei-Hua; Tan, Yong-Hong; Cheng, Long

    2014-03-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) -mediated systemic inflammatory response syndrome accompanied by multiple organ failure, is one of the most common causes of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Recent reports have revealed that heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycan, a component of extracellular matrices, potentiates the activation of intracellular pro-inflammatory responses via TLR4, contributing to the aggravation of acute pancreatitis. However, little is known about the participants in the HS/TLR4-mediated inflammatory cascades. Our previous work provided a clue that a membrane potassium channel (MaxiK) is responsible for HS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, in this report we attempted to reveal the roles of MaxiK in the activation of macrophages stimulated by HS. Our results showed that incubation of RAW264.7 cells with HS up-regulated MaxiK and TLR4 expression levels. HS could also activate MaxiK channels to promote the efflux of potassium ions from cells, as measured by the elevated activity of caspase-1, whereas this was significantly abolished by treatment with paxilline, a specific blocker of the MaxiK channel. Moreover, it was found that paxilline substantially inhibited HS-induced activation of several different transcription factors in macrophages, including nuclear factor-κB, p38 and interferon regulatory factor-3, followed by decreased production of tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-β. Taken together, our investigation provides evidence that the HS/TLR4-mediated intracellular inflammatory cascade depends on the activation of MaxiK, which may offer an important opportunity for a new approach in therapeutic strategies of severe acute pancreatitis.

  5. Involving the public in general practice in an urban district: levels and type of activity and perceptions of obstacles.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian

    2000-07-01

    This paper reports on a study of the level and type of activity used to involve the public in general practice in a city district in the north of England. The association of these activities with features of the general practice organisation and environment were studied. Service providers' perceptions of obstacles were also studied. Data were collected in a survey of all general practice organisations in the district using a postal questionnaire completed by a practice manager. Interviews were conducted with health service managers responsible for primary care development in the district. The study showed that the district had a good track record for innovation in primary care development and in giving emphasis to developing public involvement. However, it also showed that it was difficult to translate policy rhetoric into practical initiatives at the general practice level without evidence of models of best practice, and with limited resources. The survey had a high response of over 84%. It showed that levels of activity were low across the district and only a small minority of general practice teams had undertaken a range of activities to involve the public. The socio-economic environment did not appear to be a factor, but small practices (one or two partners and/or practice population under 3000) were much less likely to develop activities. Pressures of existing workload, lack of resources and public apathy were given as among the main obstacles by survey respondents. The study indicates the challenges faced by Primary Care Groups in developing strands of public involvement. Primary care teams need a clear strategic framework, models of best practice, and adequate resources to manage, change and develop initiatives.

  6. Phospholipase A{sub 2} is involved in the mechanism of activation of neutrophils by polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Tithof, P.K.; Schiamberg, E.; Ganey, P.E.; Peters-Golden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Aroclor 1242, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), activates neutrophils to produce superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by a mechanism that involves phospholipase C-dependent hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides; however, subsequent signal transduction mechanisms are unknown. This study determines whether phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachidonic acid is involved in PCB-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production. O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production was measured in vitro in glycogen-elicited, rat neutrophils in the presence and absence of the inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2}: quinacrine, 4-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), and manoalide. All three agents significantly decreased the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} detected during stimulation of neutrophils with Aroclor 1242. Similar inhibition occurred when neutrophils were activated with the classical stimuli, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate. The effects of BPB and manoalide were not a result of cytotoxicity or other nonspecific effects. Significant release of {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid preceded O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production in neutrophils stimulated with Aroclor 1242 or fMLP. Manoalide, at a concentration that abolished O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, also inhibited the release of {sup 3}H-arachidonate. Aspirin, zileuton, or WEB 2086 did not affect Aroclor 1242-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, suggesting that eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor are not needed for neutrophil activation by PCBs. Activation of phos-pholipase A{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production do not appear to involve the Ah receptor. These data suggest that Aroclor 1242 stimulates neutrophils to produce O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} by a mechanism that involves phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachiodonic acid. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Macrophages migrate in an activation-dependent manner to chemokines involved in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In neuroinflammatory diseases, macrophages can play a dual role in the process of tissue damage, depending on their activation status (M1 / M2). M1 macrophages are considered to exert damaging effects to neurons, whereas M2 macrophages are reported to aid regeneration and repair of neurons. Their migration within the central nervous system may be of critical importance in the final outcome of neurodegeneration in neuroinflammatory diseases e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). To provide insight into this process, we examined the migratory capacity of human monocyte-derived M1 and M2 polarised macrophages towards chemoattractants, relevant for neuroinflammatory diseases like MS. Methods Primary cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages were exposed to interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evoke proinflammatory (M1) activation or IL-4 to evoke anti-inflammatory (M2) activation. In a TAXIScan assay, migration of M0, M1 and M2 towards chemoattractants was measured and quantified. Furthermore the adhesion capacity and the expression levels of integrins as well as chemokine receptors of M0, M1 and M2 were assessed. Alterations in cell morphology were analysed using fluorescent labelling of the cytoskeleton. Results Significant differences were observed between M1 and M2 macrophages in the migration towards chemoattractants. We show that M2 macrophages migrated over longer distances towards CCL2, CCL5, CXCL10, CXCL12 and C1q compared to non-activated (M0) and M1 macrophages. No differences were observed in the adhesion of M0, M1 and M2 macrophages to multiple matrix components, nor in the expression of integrins and chemokine receptors. Significant changes were observed in the cytoskeleton organization upon stimulation with CCL2, M0, M1 and M2 macrophages adopt a spherical morphology and the cytoskeleton is rapidly rearranged. M0 and M2 macrophages are able to form filopodia, whereas M1 macrophages only adapt a spherical morphology. Conclusions

  8. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W.; Burnham, W. McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy. PMID:27273072

  9. Novel Antiplatelet Activity of Minocycline Involves Inhibition of MLK3-p38 Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Axis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joseph W.; Singh, Meera V.; Singh, Vir B.; Jones, Letitia D.; Davidson, Gregory A.; Ture, Sara; Morrell, Craig N.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play an essential role in hemostasis and wound healing by facilitating thrombus formation at sites of injury. Platelets also mediate inflammation and contain several pro-inflammatory molecules including cytokines and chemokines that mediate leukocyte recruitment and activation. Not surprisingly, platelet dysfunction is known to contribute to several inflammatory disorders. Antiplatelet therapies, such as aspirin, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonists, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) inhibitors, and anticoagulants such as warfarin, dampen platelet activity at the risk of unwarranted bleeding. Thus, the development of drugs that reduce platelet-mediated inflammation without interfering with thrombus formation is of importance to combat platelet-associated disorders. We have shown here for the first time that the tetracycline antibiotic, minocycline, administered to HIV-infected individuals reduces plasma levels of soluble CD40L and platelet factor 4 levels, host molecules predominately released by platelets. Minocycline reduced the activation of isolated platelets in the presence of the potent platelet activator, thrombin, as measured by ELISA and flow cytometry. Platelet degranulation was reduced upon exposure to minocycline as shown by mepacrine retention and flow cytometry. However, minocycline had no effect on spreading, aggregation, GPIIb/IIIa activation, or in vivo thrombus formation. Lastly, immunoblot analysis suggests that the antiplatelet activity of minocycline is likely mediated by inhibition of mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3)-p38 MAPK signaling axis and loss of p38 activity. Our findings provide a better understanding of platelet biology and a novel repurposing of an established antibiotic, minocycline, to specifically reduce platelet granule release without affecting thrombosis, which may yield insights in generating novel, specific antiplatelet therapies. PMID:27270236

  10. The Development of Spatial Skills through Interventions Involving Block Building Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Beth M.; Andrews, Nicole; Schindler, Holly; Kersh, Joanne E.; Samper, Alexandra; Copley, Juanita

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of block-building interventions to develop spatial-reasoning skills in kindergartners. Two intervention conditions and a control condition were included to determine, first, whether the block building activities themselves benefited children's spatial skills, and secondly, whether a story context further improved…

  11. Activity Involvement among Suicidal and Nonsuicidal High-Risk and Typical Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, James J.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2001-01-01

    Compared weekly activities among four groups of high risk and typical high school students: potential dropouts at suicide risk; typical youth at suicide risk; potential dropouts not at suicide risk; and typical youth not at suicide risk. Of the 1,286 participants, 39.4% of high risk and 30.1% of typical high school students screened in at suicide…

  12. How Curriculum Leaders Can Involve the Right Brain in Active Reading and Writing Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinatra, Richard; Stahl-Gemake, Josephine

    Curriculum leaders, program specialists, and teachers can intentionally arouse the activation of one hemisphere of the brain over the other through the use of right brain strategies in language learning. While most functions of the left hemisphere are concerned with convergent production (getting the right answer), functions of the right…

  13. Sustainability and Science Learning: Perceptions from 8th Grade Students Involved with a Role Playing Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Sofia; Baptista, Mónica; Freire, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Raising awareness about sustainability is an urgent need and as such education for sustainability has gained relevancy for the last decades. It is acknowledged that science education can work as an important context for educating for sustainability. The goal of the present paper is to describe a role-playing activity about the construction of a…

  14. The Effect of the New Copyright Law on the Interlibrary Loan Activity Involving Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuben, John

    Since 1954 when Congress authorized the Copyright Office to prepare a series of studies to serve as background for revision hearings, copyright has been one of the major issues in librarianship. Although the impact that the New Copyright Law will have on interlibrary loan activity is yet to be determined, there is a need to know whether present…

  15. Enjoyment Fosters Engagement: The Key to Involving Middle School Students in Physical Education and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pharez, Emily S.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the challenges faced by a middle school teacher who inherited a recreation-based physical education program in which students had been accustomed to choosing what they wanted to do. Stressing the importance of implementing a standards-based program in which students of all skill levels and activity preferences were able to…

  16. Fantasy Activity and the Televiewing Event: Considerations for an Information Processing Construct of Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindlof, Thomas R.

    The similarities between television viewing and fantasy activity (daydreaming, reverie, mind-wandering, internal dialogue) more than warrant the building of a theoretical construct, especially in the context of recent empirical research on television viewing consequences. A construct of the television viewing process, based on cognitive theories…

  17. PsbS interactions involved in the activation of energy dissipation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Correa-Galvis, Viviana; Poschmann, Gereon; Melzer, Michael; Stühler, Kai; Jahns, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The non-photochemical quenching of light energy as heat (NPQ) is an important photoprotective mechanism that is activated in plants when light absorption exceeds the capacity of light utilization in photosynthesis. The PsbS protein plays a central role in this process and is supposed to activate NPQ through specific, light-regulated interactions with photosystem (PS) II antenna proteins. However, NPQ-specific interaction partners of PsbS in the thylakoid membrane are still unknown. Here, we have determined the localization and protein interactions of PsbS in thylakoid membranes in the NPQ-inactive (dark) and NPQ-active (light) states. Our results corroborate a localization of PsbS in PSII supercomplexes and support the model that the light activation of NPQ is based on the monomerization of dimeric PsbS and a light-induced enhanced interaction of PsbS with Lhcb1, the major component of trimeric light-harvesting complexes in PSII.

  18. Physical Activity Based Professional Development for Teachers: The Importance of Whole School Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Jude; Ferkins, Lesley; Handcock, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to investigate teachers' perceptions of a physical activity-related professional development intervention. Design: Interview-based qualitative approach founded on the interpretive paradigm. Setting: Purposive selection of one high-rated independent, and one low-rated public primary school from Auckland, New Zealand.…

  19. Families and School Personnel Involved in a Literacy and Physical Activity Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, James A.; Richardson, Maurine V.; Sacks, Mary Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    A traditional part of American education has been to include the families in the educational process of their children. The needs and complexities of today's families and classrooms have never been greater. Programs and activities used with families, and school interactions 10 to 15 years ago are not effective for today's complex families and…

  20. 77 FR 30332 - Mr. James Chaisson; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... radiographic exposure device at the Elk Street location. The NRC has concluded that this statement lacks... information to the NRC. Consequently, I lack the requisite reasonable assurance that licensed activities can.... In the notification, Mr. Chaisson shall include a statement of his commitment to compliance with...

  1. School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem: A Growth-Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.; Hagewen, Kellie J.

    2011-01-01

    Research on adolescent self-esteem indicates that adolescence is a time in which individuals experience important changes in their physical, cognitive, and social identities. Prior research suggests that there is a positive relationship between an adolescent's participation in structured extracurricular activities and well-being in a variety of…

  2. Department of Energy interest and involvement in nuclear plant license renewal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D. ); Harrison, D.L. . Office of LWR Safety and Technology)

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of nuclear license renewal to the nation's energy strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a plant lifetime improvement program during 1985 to determine the feasibility of the license renewal option for US nuclear plants. Initial activities of the DOE program focused on determining whether there were technical and economic obstacles that might preclude or limit the successful implementation of the license renewal option. To make this determination, DOE cosponsored with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pilot-plant efforts by Virginia Electric Power and Northern States Power. Both pilot-plant efforts concluded that life extension is technically and economically feasible. In parallel with the pilot-plant activities, DOE performed national economic studies that demonstrated the economic desirability of life extension. Having demonstrated the feasibility of life extension, DOE, in conjunction with EPRI, selected two lead plants to demonstrate the license renewal process. These lead plants are Yankee Atomic's Yankee Rowe facility and Northern States Power's Monticello facility. DOE also initiated activities to develop the technical and regulatory bases to support the license renewal process in the United States. DOE has recently identified nuclear plant license renewal to be an important element of its National Energy Strategy. This paper summarizes the significant results, conclusions, and ongoing activities of the DOE effort. 18 refs.

  3. Marketing Informal Education Institutions in Israel: The Centrality of Customers' Active Involvement in Service Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2004-01-01

    The current paper outlines a unique marketing perspective that prevails in some informal education institutions in Israel parallel with "traditional modes of marketing", such as promotion, public relations and the like. Based on a case study research in five community centres, a service development based on active participation of the potential…

  4. Regrouping: Organized Activity Involvement and Social Adjustment across the Transition to High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnert, Amy M.; Aikins, Julie Wargo; Arola, Nicole T.

    2013-01-01

    Although organized activities (OAs) have been established as important contexts of development, limited work has examined the role of OAs across the high school transition in buffering adolescents' social adjustment by providing opportunities for visibility and peer affiliation. The transition to high school is characterized by numerous…

  5. In vitro activity of aminosterols against yeasts involved in blood stream infections.

    PubMed

    Alhanout, Kamel; Djouhri, Lamia; Vidal, Nicolas; Brunel, Jean Michel; Piarroux, Renaud; Ranque, Stéphane

    2011-02-01

    Squalamine and other aminosterols have demonstrated interesting antimicrobial activities against clinical bacterial isolates and a limited number of reference yeast strains. We aimed to test whether squalamine and a synthetic aminosterol derivative (ASD) display any in vitro activity comparable to currently available systemic antifungals, an acceptable safety index, as well as to provide insights into their mechanism of action. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of squalamine, ASD and available antifungals were determined against 21 yeast isolates that were recovered from cases of fungemia. Remarkably, homogeneous MICs ranging from 8-16 mg/L and from 1-2 mg/L were noted for squalamine and ASD, respectively, as opposes the heterogeneous in vitro activity of available systemic antifungals. Aminosterols induced haemolysis, a surrogate for toxic effects to mammalian cells, at concentrations high above their MICs. In time-kill studies, killing was as fast with ASD as with amphotericin B. Both aminosterols induced a time-dependent disruption of yeast membrane, as evidenced by gradual increase of ATP efflux. In conclusion, our preliminary data indicate that aminosterols have the potential to be further developed as antifungals. Additional work is warranted to assess their toxicity and activity in experimental models. PMID:20662632

  6. Prevalence of disabled people involved in Spanish Civil Guard's police activity.

    PubMed

    González, José L; Cendra, Jacobo; Manzanero, Antonio L

    2013-11-01

    Improving interventions with victims and offenders with disabilities requires analysis of the degree of prevalence of crimes in which these people are involved. For this purpose, data regarding interventions made by the Spanish Civil Guard between 2008 and 2010, in which 2099 people had some kind of disability, have been collected and analyzed, with particular regard to criminal offenses (felonies and/or misdemeanors). In this study, the relationship between the types of disability a person has and other variables like their connection to the incident, their gender, age, the relationship between victim and perpetrator, and the time and place of the events were all taken into consideration. The results show that most of the victims with disabilities served by the Spanish Civil Guard were male. The interventions were mainly aid and rescues. Criminal offenses were only 20% of the events.

  7. Mechanosensitive channels are activated by stress in the actin stress fibres, and could be involved in gravity sensing in plants.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, H; Furuichi, T; Nakano, M; Toyota, M; Hayakawa, K; Sokabe, M; Iida, H

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are expressed in a variety of cells. The molecular and biophysical mechanism involved in the regulation of MS channel activities is a central interest in basic biology. MS channels are thought to play crucial roles in gravity sensing in plant cells. To date, two mechanisms have been proposed for MS channel activation. One is that tension development in the lipid bilayer directly activates MS channels. The second mechanism proposes that the cytoskeleton is involved in the channel activation, because MS channel activities are modulated by pharmacological treatments that affect the cytoskeleton. We tested whether tension in the cytoskeleton activates MS channels. Mammalian endothelial cells were microinjected with phalloidin-conjugated beads, which bound to stress fibres, and a traction force to the actin cytoskeleton was applied by dragging the beads with optical tweezers. MS channels were activated when the force was applied, demonstrating that a sub-pN force to the actin filaments activates a single MS channel. Plants may use a similar molecular mechanism in gravity sensing, since the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration increase induced by changes in the gravity vector was attenuated by potential MS channel inhibitors, and by actin-disrupting drugs. These results support the idea that the tension increase in actin filaments by gravity-dependent sedimentation of amyloplasts activates MS Ca(2+) -permeable channels, which can be the molecular mechanism of a Ca(2+) concentration increase through gravistimulation. We review recent progress in the study of tension sensing by actin filaments and MS channels using advanced biophysical methods, and discuss their possible roles in gravisensing.

  8. Bone mineral density of 704 amateur sportsmen involved in different physical activities.

    PubMed

    Morel, J; Combe, B; Francisco, J; Bernard, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the relation between sports and bone mass. Seven hundred and four men with no history of chronic disease were questioned on their adolescent and adult sporting activities. Their total body (TB) and regional (head, spine, arms and legs) bone mineral density (BMD) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. BMD measurements and ratios of regional BMD to TB BMD were compared using a multiple regression analysis. Probands (mean age 30 years) were engaged in 14 sports activities: rugby, soccer, other team sports, endurance running, fighting sports, bodybuilding, multiple weightbearing activities, swimming, swimming with flippers, biking, rowing, climbing, triathlon and multiple mixed activities. They stated that they were practising a physical activity at the amateur level: 7.1 h/week between the ages of 11 and 18 years and 9 h/week between age 18 years and the day of the interview (no significant difference between physical activities). Rowers and swimmers had low TB BMD (1.22 and 1.17 g/cm2) and low leg BMD (1.37 and 1.31 g/cm2). Participants in rugby, soccer, other team sports and fighting sports had a high TB BMD (1.27-1.35 g/cm2) and high leg BMD (1.41-1.5 g/cm2). For head BMD, there was no stastistical difference among the different groups. Constructed ratios pointed out the site-specific adaptation of the skeleton: soccer player and runners had a higher leg ratio; bodybuilders, fighters, climbers and swimmers had a higher arm ratio; rugby players had a higher spine ratio. Head ratio was higher in non-weightbearing sports (rowing, swimming) than in weightbearing sports (rugby, team sports, soccer, fighting sports and bodybuilding). Thus the BMD and ratio differences among the 14 disciplines seem to be site-specific and related to the supposedly high and unusual strains created at certain sites during sport training by muscle stress and gravitational forces. Head ratio is closely related to the type of practice; its value

  9. Comparison of sequential drug release in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sundararaj, Sharath C; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Rabek, Cheryl L; Dziubla, Thomas D; Thomas, Mark V; Puleo, David A

    2016-10-01

    Development of drug-delivery devices typically involves characterizing in vitro release performance with the inherent assumption that this will closely approximate in vivo performance. Yet, as delivery devices become more complex, for instance with a sequential drug release pattern, it is important to confirm that in vivo properties correlate with the expected "programming" achieved in vitro. In this work, a systematic comparison between in vitro and in vivo biomaterial erosion and sequential release was performed for a multilayered association polymer system comprising cellulose acetate phthalate and Pluronic F-127. After assessing the materials during incubation in phosphate-buffered saline, devices were implanted supracalvarially in rats. Devices with two different doses and with different erosion rates were harvested at increasing times post-implantation, and the in vivo thickness loss, mass loss, and the drug release profiles were compared with their in vitro counterparts. The sequential release of four different drugs observed in vitro was successfully translated to in vivo conditions. Results suggest, however, that the total erosion time of the devices was longer and that release rates of the four drugs were different, with drugs initially released more quickly and then more slowly in vivo. Many comparative studies of in vitro and in vivo drug release from biodegradable polymers involved a single drug, whereas this research demonstrated that sequential release of four drugs can be maintained following implantation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1302-1310, 2016.

  10. Killing of Staphylococci by θ-Defensins Involves Membrane Impairment and Activation of Autolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Miriam; Stockem, Marina; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Schlag, Martin; Götz, Friedrich; Tran, Dat Q.; Schaal, Justin B.; Ouellette, André J.; Selsted, Michael E.; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    θ-Defensins are cyclic antimicrobial peptides expressed in leukocytes of Old world monkeys. To get insight into their antibacterial mode of action, we studied the activity of RTDs (rhesus macaque θ-defensins) against staphylococci. We found that in contrast to other defensins, RTDs do not interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis, but rather induce bacterial lysis in staphylococci by interaction with the bacterial membrane and/or release of cell wall lytic enzymes. Potassium efflux experiments and membrane potential measurements revealed that the membrane impairment by RTDs strongly depends on the energization of the membrane. In addition, RTD treatment caused the release of Atl-derived cell wall lytic enzymes probably by interaction with membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. Thus, the premature and uncontrolled activity of these enzymes contributes strongly to the overall killing by θ-defensins. Interestingly, a similar mode of action has been described for Pep5, an antimicrobial peptide of bacterial origin. PMID:25632351

  11. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-08-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  12. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  13. Insulin activates glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (de novo phosphatidic acid synthesis) through a phospholipid-derived mediator. Apparent involvement of Gi alpha and activation of a phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Vila, M C; Milligan, G; Standaert, M L; Farese, R V

    1990-09-18

    We studied the mechanism whereby insulin activates de novo phosphatidic acid synthesis in BC3H-1 myocytes. Insulin rapidly activated glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT) in intact and cell-free preparations of myocytes in a dose-related manner. The apparent Km of the enzyme was decreased by treatment with insulin, whereas the Vmax was unaffected. No activation was found by ACTH, insulin-like growth factor-I, angiotensin II, or phenylephrine, but epidermal growth factor, which, like insulin, is known to activate de novo phosphatidic acid synthesis in intact myocytes, also stimulated G3PAT activity. In homogenates or membrane fractions, the effect of insulin on G3PAT was fully mimicked by nonspecific or phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C (PLC). An antiserum raised against PI-glycan-PLC completely blocked the effect of insulin on G3PAT. Although the above findings suggested involvement of a PLC in insulin-induced activation of G3PAT, neither diacylglycerol nor protein kinase C activation appeared to be involved. On the other hand, insulin stimulated the release of a cytosolic factor, which activated membrane-associated G3PAT. This cytosolic factor had a molecular weight of less than 5K as determined by Sephadex G-25 chromatography. NaF, a phosphatase inhibitor, blocked the activation of G3PAT by insulin, suggesting involvement of a phosphatase. Insulin-induced activation of G3PAT was also blocked by pretreatment of intact myocytes with pertussis toxin and by prior addition, to homogenates, of an antiserum that recognizes the C-terminal decapeptide of Gi alpha.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity Involves Mitochondrial Injury with Impaired Tubular Mitochondrial Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ellezian, Lena; Brown, Dan; Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Parikh, Samir M.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Stillman, Isaac E.; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used antineoplastic agent. However, its major limitation is dose-dependent nephrotoxicity whose precise mechanism is poorly understood. Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction in tubular epithelium contributes to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Here the authors extend those findings by describing the role of an important electron transport chain enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Immunohistochemistry for COX 1 protein demonstrated that, in response to cisplatin, expression was mostly maintained in focally damaged tubular epithelium. In contrast, COX enzyme activity in proximal tubules (by light microscopy) was decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of the cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla showed decreased mitochondrial mass, disruption of cristae, and extensive mitochondrial swelling in proximal tubular epithelium. Functional electron microscopy showed that COX enzyme activity was decreased in the remaining mitochondria in the proximal tubules but maintained in distal tubules. In summary, cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with structural and functional damage to the mitochondria. More broadly, using functional electron microscopy to measure mitochondrial enzyme activity may generate mechanistic insights across a spectrum of renal disorders. PMID:22511597

  15. Cisplatin nephrotoxicity involves mitochondrial injury with impaired tubular mitochondrial enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K; Ellezian, Lena; Brown, Dan; Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Parikh, Samir M; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Stillman, Isaac E; Pacher, Pál

    2012-07-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used antineoplastic agent. However, its major limitation is dose-dependent nephrotoxicity whose precise mechanism is poorly understood. Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction in tubular epithelium contributes to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Here the authors extend those findings by describing the role of an important electron transport chain enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Immunohistochemistry for COX 1 protein demonstrated that, in response to cisplatin, expression was mostly maintained in focally damaged tubular epithelium. In contrast, COX enzyme activity in proximal tubules (by light microscopy) was decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of the cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla showed decreased mitochondrial mass, disruption of cristae, and extensive mitochondrial swelling in proximal tubular epithelium. Functional electron microscopy showed that COX enzyme activity was decreased in the remaining mitochondria in the proximal tubules but maintained in distal tubules. In summary, cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with structural and functional damage to the mitochondria. More broadly, using functional electron microscopy to measure mitochondrial enzyme activity may generate mechanistic insights across a spectrum of renal disorders. PMID:22511597

  16. Estrogen receptor-mediated transcription involves the activation of multiple kinase pathways in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sara; Rainville, Jennifer; Zhao, Xing; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Pfaff, Donald; Vasudevan, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    While many physiological effects of estrogens (E) are due to regulation of gene transcription by liganded estrogen receptors (ERs), several effects are also mediated, at least in part, by rapid non-genomic actions of E. Though the relative importance of rapid versus genomic effects in the central nervous system is controversial, we showed previously that membrane-limited effects of E, initiated by an estradiol bovine serum albumin conjugate (E2-BSA), could potentiate transcriptional effects of 17β-estradiol from an estrogen response element (ERE)-reporter in neuroblastoma cells. Here, using specific inhibitors and activators in a pharmacological approach, we show that activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase (PI3K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, dependent on a Gαq coupled receptor signaling are important in this transcriptional potentiation. We further demonstrate, using ERα phospho-deficient mutants, that E2-BSA mediated phosphorylation of ERα is one mechanism to potentiate transcription from an ERE reporter construct. This study provides a possible mechanism by which signaling from the membrane is coupled to transcription in the nucleus, providing an integrated view of hormone signaling in the brain.

  17. Production of lysophosphatidic acid in blister fluid: involvement of a lysophospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Gres, Sandra; Fanguin, Madie; Cariven, Clotilde; Fauvel, Josette; Perret, Bertrand; Chap, Hugues; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien

    2005-09-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is present in abundance in serum resulting from platelet activation and is also found in other biological fluids. LPA controls numerous cellular responses and plays a role in specific functions such as wound healing, especially in the skin. Nevertheless, its presence in the skin has never been investigated. Since re-epithelialization occurs after blister rupture, we tested the presence of endogenous LPA in blister fluid and investigated a possible mechanism for its biosynthesis and biological functions. Using a radioenzymatic assay, LPA was detected in 33 blister fluids originating from 24 bullous dermatoses, and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In parallel, blister fluids contained a lysophospholipase D (LPLD) activity but no detectable phospholipase A2 activity. The expressions of the LPLD autotaxin (ATX) and of LPA1-receptor (LPA1-R) were greatly increased in blister skin when compared with normal skin. Finally, LPA was found to have a positive effect on the migration of cultured keratinocytes. These results show that LPA is present in blister fluid synthesized by the LPLD ATX. Due to its ability to enhance keratinocyte migration, LPA in blister fluid could, via the LPA1-R, play an important role in re-epithelialization occurring after blister rupture.

  18. Endogenous nitric oxide accumulation is involved in the antifungal activity of Shikonin against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zebin; Yan, Yu; Dong, Huaihuai; Zhu, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yuanying; Cao, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the antifungal activity of Shikonin (SK) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and to clarify the underlying mechanism. The results showed that the NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and L-arginine could enhance the antifungal activity of SK, whereas the NO production inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) attenuated antifungal action. Using the fluorescent dye 3-amino,4-aminomethyl-2′, 7-difluorescein, diacetate (DAF-FM DA), we found that the accumulation of NO in C. albicans was increased markedly by SK in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, the results of real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the transcription level of YHB1 in C. albicans was greatly increased upon incubation of SK. Consistently, the YHB1-null mutant (yhb1Δ/Δ) exhibited a higher susceptibility to SK than wild-type cells. In addition, although the transcription level of CTA4 in C. albicans was not significantly changed when exposed to SK, the CTA4-null mutant (cta4Δ/Δ) was more susceptible to SK. Collectively, SK is the agent found to execute its antifungal activity directly via endogenous NO accumulation, and NO-mediated damage is related to the suppression of YHB1 and the function of CTA4. PMID:27530748

  19. Novel DNA mismatch repair activity involving YB-1 in human mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Mason, Penelope A.; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Weissman, Lior; Tian, Jingyan; Guay, David; Lebel, Michel; Stevnsner, Tinna V.; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is essential for proper cellular function. The accumulation of damage and mutations in the mtDNA leads to diseases, cancer, and aging. Mammalian mitochondria have proficient base excision repair, but the existence of other DNA repair pathways is still unclear. Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), which corrects base mismatches and small loops, are associated with DNA microsatellite instability, accumulation of mutations, and cancer. MMR proteins have been identified in yeast and coral mitochondria; however, MMR proteins and function have not yet been detected in human mitochondria. Here we show that human mitochondria have a robust mismatch-repair activity, which is distinct from nuclear MMR. Key nuclear MMR factors were not detected in mitochondria, and similar mismatch-binding activity was observed in mitochondrial extracts from cells lacking MSH2, suggesting distinctive pathways for nuclear and mitochondrial MMR. We identified the repair factor YB-1 as a key candidate for a mitochondrial mismatch-binding protein. This protein localizes to mitochondria in human cells, and contributes significantly to the mismatch-binding and mismatch-repair activity detected in HeLa mitochondrial extracts, which are significantly decreased when the intracellular levels of YB-1 are diminished. Moreover, YB-1 depletion in cells increases mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis. Our results show that human mitochondria contain a functional MMR repair pathway in which YB-1 participates, likely in the mismatch binding and recognition steps. PMID:19272840

  20. Involvement of intracellular labile zinc in suppression of DEVD-caspase activity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, L H; Ratnaike, R N; Zalewski, P D

    2000-02-01

    Age-related tissue Zn deficiency may contribute to neuronal and glial cell death by apoptosis in Alzheimer's dementia. To investigate this, we studied the effects of increasing or decreasing the levels of intracellular labile Zn on apoptosis of human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C cells in vitro. BE(2)-C cells were primed for 18 h with butyrate (1 mM) before addition of staurosporine (1 microM), an effector enzyme of apoptosis, for a further 3 h to induce DEVD-caspase activity. An increase in intracellular Zn using Zn ionophore pyrithione suppressed DEVD-caspase activity, while a decrease in intracellular Zn induced by Zn chelator TPEN mimicked staurosporine by activating DEVD-caspase in butyrate-primed cells. The distribution of intracellular Zn in the cells was demonstrated with the UV-excitable Zn-specific fluorophore Zinquin. Confocal images showed distinct cytoplasmic and cytoskeletal fluorescence. We propose that Zn decreases the level of apoptosis in neuronal cells exposed to toxins, possibly by stabilizing their cytoskeleton.