Science.gov

Sample records for involving bone dura

  1. An eosinophilic variant granulomatosis with polyangiitis involving the dura, bilateral orbits, and mastoids

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakami, Hasan; Al-Arfaj, Abdurhman S.; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed; Khalil, Najma A.

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) formerly called Wegener’s granulomatosis is a chronic necrotizing granulomatous inflammatory disease with systemic vasculitis involving the upper and lower respiratory tract, and kidneys. The typical histopathology is that of necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with palisading histiocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes. We report a case of a 57-year-old lady presenting with left eye swelling, left ear pain and discharge, but with no pulmonary or renal symptoms. Investigations revealed positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and proteinase 3 antibodies. The CT and MRI showed meningeal thickening and bilateral structural changes of the orbits and mastoids. Lacrimal gland biopsy showed non necrotizing granulation with an eosinophilic infiltration. She was diagnosed with eosinophilic variant of GPA of the eyes and mastoid bones bilaterally extending to dura and sparing the lungs and kidneys. She responded to corticosteroids and rituximab. PMID:27279517

  2. The reaction of the dura to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in repair of skull defects.

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, K; Urist, M R

    1982-01-01

    Trephine defects in the adult rat skull 0.8 cm in diameter, which do not spontaneously heal, were filled with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) fraction. The defects healed not only by bony ingrowth from the trephine rim, but also by proliferation of pervascular mesenchymal-type cells (pericytes) of the dura mater. Under the influence of BMP, dural pericytes differentiated into chondroid and woven bone. Between three and four weeks postimplantation, sinusoids formed and the woven bone remodelled into lamellar bone. Concurrently, blood-borne bone marrow cells colonized the bone deposits, and the diploe were restored. Demonstrating that it is soluble in interstitial fluid, and diffusible across a nucleopore membrane (which isolated the bony margins of the skull), BMP induced new bone formation in the underlying dura and complete repair of the defect. The response of the dura to the BMP fraction produced more new bone than the response to allogeneic bone matrix. The BMP-induced repair was dose dependent; the quantity of new bone was proportional to the dose of the implanted BMP. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b. Fig. 1c. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:7092346

  3. Dumbbell-shaped intradiploic epidermoid cyst involving the dura mater and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Shinya; Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Yazaki, Takahito; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2008-02-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with an epidermoid cyst extending to the cerebellum manifesting as headaches and pain in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intradiploic part with ring enhancement and an intracerebellar part. Intraoperative inspection revealed erosion of the occipital bone and defective dura mater. The tumor was located both epidurally and subdurally and the cyst consisted of pearly white keratin. The tumor was totally removed and the patient was discharged with no neurological deficit. The intradiploic part of the tumor formed the body and the intracerebellar part was caused by inflammatory reaction, which resulted in the atypical enhancement of the intradiploic part.

  4. [Bone involvement in endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Ribot, C; Trémollières, F; Pouillès, J M

    1994-06-04

    Progress in bone densitometry, particularly biphotonic absoptiometry, has made it possible to better identify the effects of endocrinopathies on bone. Both cortical and trabecular bone structures can be evaluated quantitatively and topographically revealing important information on the pathophysiology of bone loss. Sex hormones play a major role in the regulation of bone mineralization and hypogonadism, whatever the origin, can lead to deleterious effects. Bone loss is known to be significative in high performance female athletes with amenorrhoea; long-term consequences are not yet determined, but stress fractures have been reported in up to 50%. Other hypogonadisms leading to bone demineralization include anorexia nervosa, chronic intake of gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogues and anti-oestrogens, and hyperprolactinism. Hyperthyroidism leads to a negative calcium balance and demineralization with remodelling, predominantly in cortical bone. In hypothyroid states a 10% bone loss is observed in vertebrae. In both cases, bone densitometry should be performed in order to evaluate the effect of treatment. The deleterious effect of spontaneous or iatrogenic hypercortisism is well known, leading to spontaneous wedge fractures of the vertebrae due to predominating trabecular bone loss. The mechanism of action of corticosteroids on bone metabolism is complex, but the major effect is an inhibition of osteoblast maturation. Recovery may be possible, but no large long-term series have yet been reported. Hyperparathyroidism and acromegaly also affect bone mineralization. The information provided by bone densitometry is essential to properly manage patients with endocrinopathies affecting bone mineralization.

  5. Implantation of Thickened Artificial Bone for Reduction of Dead Space and Prevention of Infection Between Implant and Dura in Secondary Reconstruction of the Skull.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Mine; Narita, Keigo; Kurita, Masakazu; Iwashina, Yuki; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2017-02-15

    For the treatment of skull defect compensation after neurosurgery, a customized artificial bone is often employed owing to its toughness and the relative ease of producing cosmetically good result. However, implants are vulnerable to infection and removal of implant is sometimes necessary. Several other treatment options such as autologous bone graft or free flap are likely to be considered for the secondary reconstruction to avoid reinfection; however, reimplantation of artificial bone is beneficial for the patients, being not concerned with donor site morbidity. The authors consider one of risk factors of infection of artificial bone as dead space between the implant and dura. To attain reduction of the dead space, we have employed thickened artificial bone.Between 2010 and 2014, 6 patients underwent implantation of thickened artificial bone for the secondary reconstruction.First, the infected artificial material was removed with proper debridement. More than 3 months after the closure of the infected wound, tissue expander was inserted beneath the surrounding scalp to ensure the coverage of subsequently implanted artificial bone without skin tension. The thickened artificial bone was designed from the computed tomography findings so as not to leave any dead space between the implant and dura. After optimal expansion of the scalp, the artificial bone was implanted.Postoperative courses were uneventful and the appearance of the cranial vault was satisfactory in all patients.The authors consider the use of the thickened artificial bone is easier and more suitable for patients having a skull defect, particularly in secondary reconstruction.

  6. Functional adaptation to loading of a single bone is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones.

    PubMed

    Sample, Susannah J; Behan, Mary; Smith, Lesley; Oldenhoff, William E; Markel, Mark D; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Hao, Zhengling; Miletic, Vjekoslav; Muir, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Regulation of load-induced bone formation is considered a local phenomenon controlled by osteocytes, although it has also been hypothesized that functional adaptation may be neuronally regulated. The aim of this study was to examine bone formation in multiple bones, in response to loading of a single bone, and to determine whether adaptation may be neuronally regulated. Load-induced responses in the left and right ulnas and humeri were determined after loading of the right ulna in male Sprague-Dawley rats (69 +/- 16 days of age). After a single period of loading at -760-, -2000-, or -3750-microepsilon initial peak strain, rats were given calcein to label new bone formation. Bone formation and bone neuropeptide concentrations were determined at 10 days. In one group, temporary neuronal blocking was achieved by perineural anesthesia of the brachial plexus with bupivicaine during loading. We found right ulna loading induces adaptive responses in other bones in both thoracic limbs compared with Sham controls and that neuronal blocking during loading abrogated bone formation in the loaded ulna and other thoracic limb bones. Skeletal adaptation was more evident in distal long bones compared with proximal long bones. We also found that the single period of loading modulated bone neuropeptide concentrations persistently for 10 days. We conclude that functional adaptation to loading of a single bone in young rapidly growing rats is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones. Persistent changes in bone neuropeptide concentrations after a single loading period suggest that plasticity exists in the innervation of bone.

  7. Benign fibrous histiocytoma: A rare case involving jaw bone.

    PubMed

    Shoor, Hitesh; Pai, Keerthilatha M; Shergill, Ankur Kaur; Kamath, Abhay Taranath

    2015-09-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a soft tissue neoplasm which occurs mostly on the skin of extremities. BFH rarely occurs in bone and may affect femur, tibia, and pelvic bone. Jaw bone involvement is very unusual with only 11 cases reported till date. This report describes a case of BFH occurring in a 30-year-old female patient affecting left mandibular posterior region. Computed tomography revealed a well-defined expansile lytic lesion in the posterior mandible. Gross examination of the tumor revealed an admixture of fibroblasts and histiocytes in a fascicular and storiform pattern. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CD68.

  8. Benign fibrous histiocytoma: A rare case involving jaw bone

    PubMed Central

    Shoor, Hitesh; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Shergill, Ankur Kaur; Kamath, Abhay Taranath

    2015-01-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a soft tissue neoplasm which occurs mostly on the skin of extremities. BFH rarely occurs in bone and may affect femur, tibia, and pelvic bone. Jaw bone involvement is very unusual with only 11 cases reported till date. This report describes a case of BFH occurring in a 30-year-old female patient affecting left mandibular posterior region. Computed tomography revealed a well-defined expansile lytic lesion in the posterior mandible. Gross examination of the tumor revealed an admixture of fibroblasts and histiocytes in a fascicular and storiform pattern. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CD68. PMID:26604585

  9. Autophagy in osteoblasts is involved in mineralization and bone homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nollet, Marie; Santucci-Darmanin, Sabine; Breuil, Véronique; Al-Sahlanee, Rasha; Cros, Chantal; Topi, Majlinda; Momier, David; Samson, Michel; Pagnotta, Sophie; Cailleteau, Laurence; Battaglia, Séverine; Farlay, Delphine; Dacquin, Romain; Barois, Nicolas; Jurdic, Pierre; Boivin, Georges; Heymann, Dominique; Lafont, Frank; Lu, Shi Shou; Dempster, David W; Carle, Georges F; Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Bone remodeling is a tightly controlled mechanism in which osteoblasts (OB), the cells responsible for bone formation, osteoclasts (OC), the cells specialized for bone resorption, and osteocytes, the multifunctional mechanosensing cells embedded in the bone matrix, are the main actors. Increased oxidative stress in OB, the cells producing and mineralizing bone matrix, has been associated with osteoporosis development but the role of autophagy in OB has not yet been addressed. This is the goal of the present study. We first show that the autophagic process is induced in OB during mineralization. Then, using knockdown of autophagy-essential genes and OB-specific autophagy-deficient mice, we demonstrate that autophagy deficiency reduces mineralization capacity. Moreover, our data suggest that autophagic vacuoles could be used as vehicles in OB to secrete apatite crystals. In addition, autophagy-deficient OB exhibit increased oxidative stress and secretion of the receptor activator of NFKB1 (TNFSF11/RANKL), favoring generation of OC, the cells specialized in bone resorption. In vivo, we observed a 50% reduction in trabecular bone mass in OB-specific autophagy-deficient mice. Taken together, our results show for the first time that autophagy in OB is involved both in the mineralization process and in bone homeostasis. These findings are of importance for mineralized tissues which extend from corals to vertebrates and uncover new therapeutic targets for calcified tissue-related metabolic pathologies. PMID:25484092

  10. Low-grade follicular lymphoma in the dura: rare mimic of meningioma.

    PubMed

    Low, Irene; Allen, Jonathan

    2006-12-01

    Lymphomas rarely present as a localized mass within the dura. We report a case of a 72-year-old woman, normally fit and well, who presented with a sudden episode of grand mal seizure. Imaging studies showed an extra-axial mass arising from the dura, with radiologic features characteristic of a meningioma. The mass was surgically excised, and the histologic features were of a grade 1 follicular lymphoma. Analysis using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated t(14:18) translocation. A bone marrow aspirate showed focal infiltration of lumbar vertebra by low-grade follicular lymphoma. Intracranial meningeal involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphoma usually occurs in the form of diffuse leptomeningeal spread. It is seen in high-grade lymphomas, often in association with widespread systemic disease. The majority of cases of dural lymphomas reported in the literature have been primary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)-type lymphomas. Most of these presented as localized dural masses mimicking meningiomas. Low-grade follicular lymphoma, either primary or secondarily involving the dura, appears to be an exceedingly rare occurrence.

  11. Systemic mastocytosis presenting with gastrointestinal, bone and skin involvement.

    PubMed

    Rosignuolo, Maria; Muscianese, Marta; Pranteda, Guglielmo

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is often the first imaging study performed in patient with abdominal pain or vague symptoms related to the gastrointestinal tract. To this end, it has been demonstrated that transabdominal sonography achieves good to excellent results in potential bowel disorders; especially, if ultrasonography findings are framed in the context of clinical information. Systemic mastocytosis is not a common disease and it usually involves skin, gastrointestinal tract and bone. It results from a clonal neoplastic proliferation of abnormal mast cells and clinically it can ranges from 'asymptomatic' with normal life expectancy to 'highly aggressive'. Symptoms are caused by the release of mast cells mediators, such as histamine, and by the increase bulk of mast cells in the tissue. We present herein a case of systemic mastocytosis presenting with abdominal symptomatology due to thickened colonic involvement showed by US associated with bone and skin involvement.

  12. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: typical patterns of bone involvement in whole-body bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Gunsel; Averill, Lauren W

    2014-08-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disease of unknown etiology. It affects children and adolescents predominantly and occurs mostly in the female population. It is characterized by the insidious onset of pain and swelling, with a fluctuating clinical course of relapses and remissions. Typically, several bones are affected, either synchronously or metachronously, and bilateral involvement is common. CRMO most commonly affects the metaphysis of long bones, especially the tibia, femur, and clavicle. The spine, pelvis, ribs, sternum, and mandible may also be affected. Although lesions are mostly multiple, patients may present with a single symptomatic focus. Radiographic findings may be negative early in the course of the disease. Bone scintigraphy is useful in determining the presence of abnormality and the extent of disease. The imaging and clinical features of CRMO overlap with those of infectious osteomyelitis, bone malignancy, and inflammatory arthritis. Nonetheless, CRMO can be confidently diagnosed with the recognition of typical imaging patterns in the appropriate clinical setting. This article reviews imaging findings with special emphasis on bone scintigraphy and specific disease sites.

  13. Systemic Mastocytosis: Predominantly Involving the Bone, A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mallya, Ketan P; Belurkar, Sushma; Kurian, Annamma; Rao, Laxmi; Singhania, Bikash

    2013-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a rare clonal disorder of mast cells that can range from chronic smouldering type to aggressive mast cell leukaemia. It presents with non–specific symptoms like urticaria pigmentosa, unexplained flushing, hypotension and abdominal cramps, which may lead to a misdiagnosis, if there is no high index of clinical suspicion. This is a case report of a 52–year–old lady, with systemic mastocytosis, who presented with severe chronic back ache and no other clinical features. X – ray revealed lytic lesions in the lumbar vertebrae and bone marrow aspiration and a trephine biopsy examination showed infiltration by mast cells, with a positivity for Toluidine blue stain and CD 117. She was also noted to have peripheral eosinophilia, which is frequently encountered with this condition. She was diagnosed to have chronic indolent systemic mastocytosis which involved the bone predominantly. PMID:24298498

  14. A rare presentation of sarcoidosis with nasal bone involvement

    PubMed Central

    Uslu, Selen; Korkmaz, Hakan; Çetinkol, Yeliz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous inflammatory disease that is induced by infectious or noninfectious environmental antigens in a genetically susceptible host. Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are two diseases with similar clinical and pathologic findings. The link between these two diseases has been extensively studied. Objective: Herein we describe a case of sarcoidosis associated with tuberculosis, treated for tuberculosis, and, 1 year, later presented with a nasal dorsal lump and skin lesions on the extremities. Methods: Case report with clinical description. Results: Our patient had a history of skin and cervical lymphadenopathy symptoms 1 year earlier and was treated with antituberculosis drugs in an outer medical center. Therapy had cured cervical lymphadenopathies, with no improvement in skin lesions. On appearance of the nasal dorsal lump, she presented to our outpatient clinic. We retrieved the previous specimens of the patient, which revealed coexistence of necrotizing granulomas with non-necrotizing granulomas, which was strongly indicative of the coexistence of tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. Radiologic, histopathologic, and microbiologic investigation revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis with nasal, cutaneous, and pulmonary involvement. Treatment with prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine resulted in dramatic improvement of nasal bone, pulmonary, and skin lesions within 2 weeks. Conclusion: The clinical presentation of sarcoidosis can be complex, and the differential diagnosis from tuberculosis can be challenging. Atypical clinical pictures also can cause delays in diagnosis and proper management. In patients with granulomatous lesions that are unresponsive to antituberculosis therapy, physicians must be alerted to the possibility of coexistent sarcoidosis. PMID:27103561

  15. Functional adaptation of long bone extremities involves the localized ``tuning'' of the cortical bone composition; evidence from Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Kevin; Kerns, Jemma G.; Birch, Helen L.; Gikas, Panagiotis D.; Parker, Anthony W.; Matousek, Pavel; Goodship, Allen E.

    2014-11-01

    In long bones, the functional adaptation of shape and structure occurs along the whole length of the organ. This study explores the hypothesis that adaptation of bone composition is also site-specific and that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of bone (and, thus, its mechanical properties) varies along the organ's length. Raman spectroscopy was used to map the chemical composition of long bones along their entire length in fine spatial resolution (1 mm), and then biochemical analysis was used to measure the mineral, collagen, water, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content where site-specific differences were seen. The results show that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of the bone material in human tibiae varies by <5% along the mid-shaft but decreases by >10% toward the flared extremities of the bone. Comparisons with long bones from other large animals (horses, sheep, and deer) gave similar results with bone material composition changing across tens of centimeters. The composition of the bone apatite also varied with the phosphate-to-carbonate ratio decreasing toward the ends of the tibia. The data highlight the complexity of adaptive changes and raise interesting questions about the biochemical control mechanisms involved. In addition to their biological interest, the data provide timely information to researchers developing Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive tool for measuring bone composition in vivo (particularly with regard to sampling and measurement protocol).

  16. Occurrence of tumours metastatic to bones and multicentric tumours with skeletal involvement in dogs.

    PubMed

    Trost, M E; Inkelmann, M A; Galiza, G J N; Silva, T M; Kommers, G D

    2014-01-01

    The skeletons of 110 dogs with malignant tumours of different origins were examined by necropsy examination over a 3-year period to identify bone metastases. Twenty-one cases of metastatic or multicentric tumours with bone involvement were recorded. In general, more female dogs presented with bony metastases; however, when the dogs with mammary tumours were omitted, the gender distribution of the cases was approximately equivalent. The mammary gland was the primary site of most of the metastatic bone lesions, followed by the musculoskeletal system and the respiratory system. The majority (77%) of metastases were grossly visible and present in multiple bones. However, in 23% of the cases, the metastases could be diagnosed only at the microscopical level. The vertebrae and the humerus were the most frequently affected bones regardless of the primary site and the histogenesis of the tumours. The results of this study revealed a high prevalence of bone metastases and/or bone involvement in dogs with multicentric tumours.

  17. Chondroblastoma of the temporal bone: consistent middle fossa involvement.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, S H; Levine, J M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the presentation and clinical course of two patients with temporal bone chondroblastoma, and to review the literature on temporal bone chondroblastoma to identify characteristic clinical and radiological presentations, and optimal treatment regimens. MEDLINE literature searches covering the period from 1966 to January 1998, in all languages, were performed as well as a review of the bibliographies of the identified studies. Strict inclusion criteria were upheld, In total 18 studies had patients whose data could be analyzed. From the 18 studies, 34 patients were identified, but only 21 cases met the inclusion criteria. Demographic, clinical presentation, radiological, operative and treatment parameters were analyzed in this cohort of patients. Ninety-five percent of patients were found to have invasion of the middle cranial fossa and 76% were found to have erosion into the superior aspect of the external auditory canal by temporal bone chondroblastoma. The characteristic growth pattern of temporal bone chondroblastoma may result from embryonal or cartilagenous rests entrapped in the tympanosquamous suture line in the middle fossa floor. Temporal bone chondroblastoma represents a pathology that does not arise from, or have a growth pattern resembling other pathologies in the temporal bone.

  18. Focal bone involvement in inflammatory arthritis: the role of IL17.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Maurizio; Viapiana, Ombretta; Adami, Silvano; Idolazzi, Luca; Fracassi, Elena; Gatti, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA, such as psoriatic arthritis, PsA, and ankylosing spondylitis, AS) are characterized by an imbalance between osteoclast (OC) bone resorption and osteoblast (OB) bone formation. The two conditions present substantial differences in bone involvement, which is probably related to the different expression of IL17 and TNFα, two cytokines that strongly promote osteoclastogenesis and focal bone erosions. TNFα is the major inflammatory cytokine in RA. It acts by both triggering OC bone erosion via the RANK-RANKL system, and suppressing OB bone formation through the overexpression of DKK1, a powerful inhibitor of the WNT bone anabolic signaling pathway. Differing from TNFα, IL17 promotes also osteogenesis, particularly at inflamed sites undergoing mechanical stress, such as entheses. Therefore, in RA, where overexpression of TNFα is higher than IL17, OC bone resorption largely prevails upon bone formation. In PsA and AS, the prevailing inflammatory cytokine is IL17, which promotes also osteogenesis. Given the prevalent involvement of entheses poor of OC, excess bone formation may even prevail over excess bone resorption. The results of clinical trials support the different pathophysiology of bone involvement in chronic arthritis. Inflammation control through anti-TNFα agents has not resulted in incomparable effects on radiographic progression and excess bone formation in both AS and PsA. Clinical trials investigating IL17 inhibitors, such as secukinumab, in patients with psoriatic disease are underway. The preliminary results on inflammation and symptoms appear positive, while long-term studies are required to demonstrate an effect on excess bone formation.

  19. ALK Positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Extensive Bone Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Lipi, Lipika; Goel, Shalini; Misra, Ruchira

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) represents approximately 2% of all Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that commonly involves nodal as well as a wide variety of extra nodal sites, as skin, soft tissue, bones and lungs, although primary or secondary involvement of bone is rare. Herein, we report a case of 14-year-old female child presented as extensive bony involvement with a clinical diagnosis of bone tumour/ small round cell tumour, which was proved to be ALK positive ALCL on histopathological examination. PMID:25738071

  20. Vertebral sarcoidosis: demonstration of bone involvement by computerized axial tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dinerstein, S.L.; Kovarsky, J.

    1984-08-01

    A report is given of a rare case of vertebral sarcoidosis with negative conventional spinal x-ray films, yet with typical cystic lesions of the spine found incidentally during abdominal computerized axial tomography (CAT). The patient was a 28-year-old black man, who was admitted for evaluation of a 1 1/2-year history of diffuse myalgias, intermittent fever to 102 F orally, bilateral hilar adenopathy, and leukopenia. A technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed diffuse areas of increased uptake over the sternum, entire vertebral column, and pelvis. Conventional x-ray films of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and an AP view of the pelvis were all normal. Chest x-ray film revealed only bilateral hilar adenopathy. During the course of an extensive negative evaluation for infection, an abdominal CAT scan was done, showing multiple, small, sclerotic-rimmed cysts at multiple levels of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine. Bone marrow biopsy revealed only changes consistent with anemia of chronic disease. Mediastinal lymph node biopsy revealed noncaseating granulomas. A tentative diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made, and treatment with prednisone, isoniazid and rifampin was begun. Within two weeks of initiation of prednisone therapy, the patient was symptom-free. A repeat technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed only a small residual area of mildly increased uptake over the upper thoracic vertebrae.

  1. Primary hyperparathyroidism presenting with acute pancreatitis and asymptomatic bone involvement

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Aasem

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 15-year-old female patient presented to the emergency room with vomiting and abdominal pain. She had two similar attacks in the previous three months both of them were diagnosed as pancreatitis in two different hospitals. On admission, her serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels were very high. CT scan revealed left inferior parathyroid adenoma. Investigations to rule out possible multiple endocrine neoplasia were all negative. The patient was managed by intravenous fluids and furosemide to lower her serum calcium level. Then, left inferior parathyroidectomy was done. Postoperatively, the patient had hungry bone syndrome with severe hypocalcaemia and was managed by intravenous calcium infusion for five days in the intensive care unit. Later, she was kept on oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation. She became symptom-free and her serum calcium improved gradually. PMID:26604950

  2. 21 CFR 882.5910 - Dura substitute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dura substitute. 882.5910 Section 882.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... surrounding the brain). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  3. 21 CFR 882.5910 - Dura substitute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dura substitute. 882.5910 Section 882.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... surrounding the brain). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  4. 21 CFR 882.5910 - Dura substitute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dura substitute. 882.5910 Section 882.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... surrounding the brain). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  5. 21 CFR 882.5910 - Dura substitute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dura substitute. 882.5910 Section 882.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... surrounding the brain). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  6. 21 CFR 882.5910 - Dura substitute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dura substitute. 882.5910 Section 882.5910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... surrounding the brain). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  7. Tanshinol Rescues the Impaired Bone Formation Elicited by Glucocorticoid Involved in KLF15 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yajun; Su, Yanjie; Wang, Dongtao; Chen, Yahui; Liu, Yuyu; Luo, Shiying; Wu, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Decreased bone formation is responsible for the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid- (GC-) induced osteoporosis (GIO), while the mechanism remains to be elucidated. The aim was to investigate how natural antioxidant tanshinol attenuates oxidative stress and rescues impaired bone formation elicited by GC in Sprague-Dawley rats and in C2C12 cells and/or MC3T3-E1 cells. The results showed that tanshinol prevented bone loss and decreased biomechanical characteristics and suppressed reduction of biomarkers related to osteogenesis in GIO rats. Further study revealed that tanshinol reversed decrease of transcription activity of Osterix-luc and rescued impairment of osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation involved in induction of KLF15 mRNA. Meanwhile, tanshinol diminished inhibition of protein expression of β-catenin and Tcf4 and transcription activity of Tcf4-luc induced by GC, especially under conditions of KLF siRNA in vitro. Additionally, tanshinol attenuated increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, phosphorylation of p66Shc expression, TUNEL-positive cells, and caspase-3 activity elicited by KLF15 under conditions of GC. Taken together, the present findings suggest that tanshinol attenuated the decrease of bone formation and bone mass and bone quality elicited by GC involved in KLF15/Wnt signaling transduction and counteracted GC-evoked oxidative stress and subsequent cell apoptosis involved in KLF15/p66Shc pathway cascade. PMID:27051474

  8. [Classic and aggressive Kaposi sarcoma with bone involvement].

    PubMed

    Sbiyaa, Mouhcine; El Alaoui, Adil; El Bardai, Mohammed; Mezzani, Amine; Lahrach, Kamal; Marzouki, Amine; Boutayeb, Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Classic Kaposi sarcoma is a multifocal rare tumor originating from vascular endothelial cells with progressive evolution and little malignant predisposition. Although Kaposi sarcoma with extensive visceral involvement is sometimes observed among HIV-positive patients, tumor dissemination to visceral lymph nodes in classic SK remains very rare. We report a rare case of aggressive classic Kaposi sarcoma of the hand with a rapid and destructive development.

  9. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving a femur bone and bilateral adrenal glands alone with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Iwahara, Yoshihito; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Naruse, Keishi; Komatsu, Yukihisa

    2017-01-31

    Primary bone lymphoma and primary adrenal lymphoma are rare clinicopathological entities of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We present the first case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with the involvement of a single bone and both adrenal glands alone with adrenal insufficiency. As primary extranodal NHL may have other unusual extranodal lesions, which may present unexplained clinical findings, patients with primary extranodal NHL require careful systemic examination, even when lymphadenopathy is absent.

  10. Plasmablastic lymphoma exclusively involving bones mimicking osteosarcoma in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Azmal Kabir; Im, Hyung-Jun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: It has been known that plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a neoplasm of immunocompromised patients occurring in soft tissue of oral cavity or in the vicinity whereas bone is an unlikely site to harbor PBL. However, its occurrence is increasingly being reported in immunocompetent individuals in either osseous or extra-oral sites. To our best knowledge, F-18 FDG PET/CT findings of PBL involving bones in an immunocompetent patient have not been reported, yet . Case summary: We report a case of PBL involving multiple bones in an immunocompetent patient. Features of different imaging modalities including F-18 Fluoro-deoxy glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were correlated well as findings of osteosarcoma in mandible with metastatic lesions. However, the histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of bone tissues from 2 separate biopsy sites revealed features of PBL. Conclusion: awareness to F-18 FDG PET/CT findings of PBL involving bones in an immunocompetent patient may prevent misdiagnosis. PMID:27428232

  11. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Andrew; Babikir, Osman Mahdi; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-10-29

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer.

  12. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Andrew; Mahdi Babikir, Osman; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:25355743

  13. The frequency and clinical significance of bone involvement in outer canthus dermoid cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Sathananthan, N; Moseley, I F; Rose, G E; Wright, J E

    1993-01-01

    Periorbital dermoid cysts should be removed because they commonly leak their irritant contents into the surrounding tissues. The underlying bone may, however, be involved in patients with dermoid cysts at the outer canthus. Computed tomography studies of 70 patients (43 men and 27 women, aged 30 months to 63 years, mean 29 years) with proved dermoid cysts of this type were reviewed. The lesion was always unilateral; 34 were on the left. The bone of the lateral wall and superotemporal angle of the orbit showed the following abnormalities, often in combination: pressure erosion in 61 cases and an otherwise abnormal shape, probably developmental, in 55; the dermoid cyst entered a tunnel or canal through the lateral wall in 24; a blind pit or crater in 15; and a cleft in 20; many patients also showed abnormal bone texture. These findings are extremely important for planning adequate surgery, and indicate that bony involvement is much more frequent than previously appreciated. Images PMID:8110674

  14. Molecular evidence-based use of bone resorption-targeted therapy in prostate cancer patients at high risk for bone involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Karamanolakis, Dimitrios; Bogdanos, John; Sourla, Antigone; Milathianakis, Constantine; Tsintavis, Athanassios; Lembessis, Peter; Tenta, Roxane; Tiblalexi, Despina; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve median survival of patients with prostate cancer that has metastasized to bone, we need to better understand the early events of the metastatic process in skeleton and develop molecular tools capable of detecting the early tumor cell dissemination into bones (micrometastasis stage). However, the initial phase of tumor cell dissemination into the bone marrow is promptly followed by the migration of tumor cells into bone matrix, which is a crucial step that signals the transformation of micrometastasis to macrometastasis stage and clinically evident metastasis. The migration of cancer cells into bone matrix requires the activation of local bone resorption. Such an event contributes to tumor cell hiding/ escaping from high immunologic surveillance of bone marrow cells. Within bone matrix, tumor cells are establishing plethoric cell-cell interactions with bone marrow-residing cells, ensuring their survival and growth. Recently, RT-PCR detections of tumor marker transcripts, such as PSA and PSMA mRNA performed in RNA extracts of peripheral blood nucleated cells and bone marrow biopsy, have enabled the stratification of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer being of high risk for extraprostatic disease and bone involvement. Therefore, it is conceivable that bisphosphonate blockade of bone resorption can inhibit the migration of tumor cells into bone matrix during the early phase of disease dissemination into bone marrow (micrometastasis stage). Consequently, assessment of the efficacy and efficiency of bisphosphonates to arrest the evolution of bone lesions in this particular clinical setting of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and positive molecular staging status (high risk for bone involvement) is warranted. PMID:12520083

  15. Ollier's Disease of the Iliac Bone with Sacroiliac Joint Involvement in an Adolescent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Koutsouradis, Panagiotis; Skarpidi, Evangelia; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J.

    2016-01-01

    Ollier's disease of the hip bone involving the sacroiliac joint has not yet been reported in the English-language literature in both the mature and immature skeletons. The authors present such a unique case in an adolescent girl that posed a significant diagnostic challenge secondary to the rarity of the lesion and atypical clinical picture. PMID:27957379

  16. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, He; Otani, Atsushi; Oishi, Akio; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2010-01-08

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a {sup 137}Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that

  17. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Is Involved in Impaired Bone Repair Associated with Diabetes in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Li; Kawao, Naoyuki; Tamura, Yukinori; Okumoto, Katsumi; Okada, Kiyotaka; Yano, Masato; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that fracture healing is impaired in diabetes; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the impaired bone repair process by using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic female wild-type (PAI-1+/+) and PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1−/−) mice. Bone repair and the number of alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-positive cells at the site of a femoral bone damage were comparable in PAI-1+/+ and PAI-1−/− mice without STZ treatment. Although the bone repair process was delayed by STZ treatment in PAI-1+/+ mice, this delayed bone repair was blunted in PAI-1−/− mice. The reduction in the number of ALP-positive cells at the site of bone damage induced by STZ treatment was attenuated in PAI-1−/− mice compared to PAI-1+/+ mice. On the other hand, PAI-1 deficiency increased the levels of ALP and type I collagen mRNA in female mice with or without STZ treatment, and the levels of Osterix and osteocalcin mRNA, suppressed by diabetic state in PAI-1+/+ mice, were partially protected in PAI-1−/− mice. PAI-1 deficiency did not affect formation of the cartilage matrix and the levels of types II and X collagen and aggrecan mRNA suppressed by STZ treatment, although PAI-1 deficiency increased the expression of chondrogenic markers in mice without STZ treatment. The present study indicates that PAI-1 is involved in the impaired bone repair process induced by the diabetic state in part through a decrease in the number of ALP-positive cells. PMID:24651693

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is involved in impaired bone repair associated with diabetes in female mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li; Kawao, Naoyuki; Tamura, Yukinori; Okumoto, Katsumi; Okada, Kiyotaka; Yano, Masato; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that fracture healing is impaired in diabetes; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the impaired bone repair process by using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic female wild-type (PAI-1+/+) and PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1-/-) mice. Bone repair and the number of alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-positive cells at the site of a femoral bone damage were comparable in PAI-1+/+ and PAI-1-/- mice without STZ treatment. Although the bone repair process was delayed by STZ treatment in PAI-1+/+ mice, this delayed bone repair was blunted in PAI-1-/- mice. The reduction in the number of ALP-positive cells at the site of bone damage induced by STZ treatment was attenuated in PAI-1-/- mice compared to PAI-1+/+ mice. On the other hand, PAI-1 deficiency increased the levels of ALP and type I collagen mRNA in female mice with or without STZ treatment, and the levels of Osterix and osteocalcin mRNA, suppressed by diabetic state in PAI-1+/+ mice, were partially protected in PAI-1-/- mice. PAI-1 deficiency did not affect formation of the cartilage matrix and the levels of types II and X collagen and aggrecan mRNA suppressed by STZ treatment, although PAI-1 deficiency increased the expression of chondrogenic markers in mice without STZ treatment. The present study indicates that PAI-1 is involved in the impaired bone repair process induced by the diabetic state in part through a decrease in the number of ALP-positive cells.

  19. Involvement of 3D osteoblast migration and bone apatite during in vitro early osteocytogenesis.

    PubMed

    Robin, Marc; Almeida, Claudia; Azaïs, Thierry; Haye, Bernard; Illoul, Corinne; Lesieur, Julie; Giraud-Guille, Marie-Madeleine; Nassif, Nadine; Hélary, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    The transition from osteoblast to osteocyte is described to occur through passive entrapment mechanism (self-buried, or embedded by neighboring cells). Here, we provide evidence of a new pathway where osteoblasts are "more" active than generally assumed. We demonstrate that osteoblasts possess the ability to migrate and differentiate into early osteocytes inside dense collagen matrices. This step involves MMP-13 simultaneously with IBSP and DMP1 expression. We also show that osteoblast migration is enhanced by the presence of apatite bone mineral. To reach this conclusion, we used an in vitro hybrid model based on both the structural characteristics of the osteoid tissue (including its density, texture and three-dimensional order), and the use of bone-like apatite. This finding highlights the mutual dynamic influence of osteoblast cell and bone extra cellular matrix. Such interactivity extends the role of physicochemical effects in bone morphogenesis complementing the widely studied molecular signals. This result represents a conceptual advancement in the fundamental understanding of bone formation.

  20. Stafne's bone cavity: An unusual case with involvement of the buccal and lingual mandibular plates.

    PubMed

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-02-01

    Lingual mandibular bone defects, also known as Stafne bone cavity (SC), are unilateral asymptomatic radiolucencies, generally seen in the mandibular angle, below the inferior alveolar canal. Although panoramic radiographies normally offer enough information to make a correct diagnosis, additional studies are often required, especially in atypical cases. The present report describes an atypical presentation of a Stafne's bone cavity in a 78 years-old male patient. In this particular case, an asymptomatic and radiolucid lesion was observed during a routine dental examination. The computed tomography (CT) showed an involvement of both lingual and buccal mandibular plates producing a tunnel-like lesion. No history of mandibular trauma or surgery was refered. An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis. Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report.

  1. [Occult involvement of bone marrow in Hodgkin's disease: detection with magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Sanz, L; Cervantes, F; Mercader, J M; Rozman, M; Rozman, C; Montserrat, E

    1996-06-22

    Although bone marrow biopsy is considered the best procedure to detect bone marrow involvement by Hodgkin's disease (HD), in recent years several studies have emphasized the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We present the case of a patient with HD apparently localized in a laterocervical lymph node, who also referred disestasiae at a region corresponding to D10 metamera. Bone marrow biopsy, vertebral TC and 67-Ga scintigraphy were all normal. However, a node of 1 cm in diameter was detected by MRI in the tenth dorsal vertebra. Because of the topographic coincidence between the patient's symptomatology and the MRI findings, the HD was considered to be in advanced stage and CMOPP/ABV chemotherapy was administered, this resulting in a rapid improvement of symptoms and disappearance of the MRI abnormalities. Since in the present case, the MRI determined a change in disease stage and treatment, the role of MRI as a complementary exploration of bone marrow biopsy to detect marrow involvement by HD is reviewed.

  2. CXCL2 synthesized by oral squamous cell carcinoma is involved in cancer-associated bone destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Oue, Erika; Lee, Ji-Won; Sakamoto, Kei; Iimura, Tadahiro; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Kayamori, Kou; Michi, Yasuyuki; Yamashiro, Masashi; Harada, Kiyoshi; Amagasa, Teruo; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oral cancer cells synthesize CXCL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CXCL2 synthesized by oral cancer is involved in osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CXCL2-neutralizing antibody inhibited osteoclastogenesis induced by oral cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We first report the role of CXCL2 in cancer-associated bone destruction. -- Abstract: To explore the mechanism of bone destruction associated with oral cancer, we identified factors that stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Two clonal cell lines, HSC3-C13 and HSC3-C17, were isolated from the maternal oral cancer cell line, HSC3. The conditioned medium from HSC3-C13 cells showed the highest induction of Rankl expression in the mouse stromal cell lines ST2 and UAMS-32 as compared to that in maternal HSC3 cells and HSC3-C17 cells, which showed similar activity. The conditioned medium from HSC3-C13 cells significantly increased the number of osteoclasts in a co-culture with mouse bone marrow cells and UAMS-32 cells. Xenograft tumors generated from these clonal cell lines into the periosteal region of the parietal bone in athymic mice showed that HSC3-C13 cells caused extensive bone destruction and a significant increase in osteoclast numbers as compared to HSC3-C17 cells. Gene expression was compared between HSC3-C13 and HSC3-C17 cells by using microarray analysis, which showed that CXCL2 gene was highly expressed in HSC3-C13 cells as compared to HSC3-C17 cells. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the localization of CXCL2 in human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The increase in osteoclast numbers induced by the HSC3-C13-conditioned medium was dose-dependently inhibited by addition of anti-human CXCL2-neutralizing antibody in a co-culture system. Recombinant CXCL2 increased the expression of Rankl in UAMS-32 cells. These results indicate that CXCL2 is involved in bone destruction induced by oral cancer. This is the first

  3. 21 CFR 882.5975 - Human dura mater.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human dura mater. 882.5975 Section 882.5975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5975 Human dura mater....

  4. 21 CFR 882.5975 - Human dura mater.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human dura mater. 882.5975 Section 882.5975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5975 Human dura mater....

  5. 21 CFR 882.5975 - Human dura mater.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human dura mater. 882.5975 Section 882.5975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5975 Human dura mater....

  6. 21 CFR 882.5975 - Human dura mater.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human dura mater. 882.5975 Section 882.5975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5975 Human dura mater....

  7. 21 CFR 882.5975 - Human dura mater.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human dura mater. 882.5975 Section 882.5975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5975 Human dura mater....

  8. Gastric MALT lymphoma presenting as Waldenström's macroglobulinemia without bone marrow involvement.

    PubMed

    Salle, Valéry; Smail, Amar; Joly, Jean-Paul; Capiod, Jean-Claude; Gontier, Marie-Francine; Duhaut, Pierre; Ducroix, Jean-Pierre

    2007-07-01

    We report a case of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma with macroglobulinemia in a 59-year-old man who presented with melena. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed irregular thickening of the wall of the stomach, and endoscopic examination disclosed enlarged and inflammatory folds of the fundus. Histopathologic examination of gastric samples showed mucosal infiltration by small lymphocytes, which were positive for CD20 and negative for CD10 and CD23, confirming the diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma. Serum electrophoresis detected a monoclonal peak and immunoelectrophoresis revealed an immunoglobulin M kappa component. Bone marrow aspirate and biopsy results were normal. The patient received chemotherapy. After treatment, he was in complete remission, and the serum monoclonal component had disappeared. Our observation is uncommon because of important macroglobulinemia occurring in gastric MALT lymphoma without bone marrow involvement.

  9. CXCR3: latest evidence for the involvement of chemokine signaling in bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Genhua; Gao, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that chemokines participate in the generation and maintenance of bone cancer pain (BCP). Recent work in Exp Neurol by Guan et al. (2015) demonstrated the involvement of spinal chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its downstream PI3K/Akt and Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathways in BCP. This work provides new evidence to support that chemokines participate in central sensitization in BCP condition. Reviewed evidence suggests that few chemokines have been proved to be related to cancer pain. The underlying relationship between CXCR3 signaling and BCP condition requires further study.

  10. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Is Involved in Streptozotocin-Induced Bone Loss in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yukinori; Kawao, Naoyuki; Okada, Kiyotaka; Yano, Masato; Okumoto, Katsumi; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In diabetic patients, the risk of fracture is high because of impaired bone formation. However, the details of the mechanisms in the development of diabetic osteoporosis remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetic osteoporosis by using PAI-1–deficient mice. Quantitative computed tomography analysis showed that PAI-1 deficiency protected against streptozotocin-induced bone loss in female mice but not in male mice. PAI-1 deficiency blunted the changes in the levels of Runx2, osterix, and alkaline phosphatase in tibia as well as serum osteocalcin levels suppressed by the diabetic state in female mice only. Furthermore, the osteoclast levels in tibia, suppressed in diabetes, were also blunted by PAI-1 deficiency in female mice. Streptozotocin markedly elevated the levels of PAI-1 mRNA in liver in female mice only. In vitro study demonstrated that treatment with active PAI-1 suppressed the levels of osteogenic genes and mineralization in primary osteoblasts from female mouse calvaria. In conclusion, the current study indicates that PAI-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetic osteoporosis in females. The expression of PAI-1 in the liver and the sensitivity of bone cells to PAI-1 may be an underlying mechanism. PMID:23715621

  11. Electronic dura mater for long-term multimodal neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Musienko, Pavel; Hirsch, Arthur; Barraud, Quentin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jérôme; Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Asboth, Léonie; Torres, Rafael Fajardo; Vachicouras, Nicolas; Liu, Qihan; Pavlova, Natalia; Duis, Simone; Larmagnac, Alexandre; Vörös, Janos; Micera, Silvestro; Suo, Zhigang; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical mismatch between soft neural tissues and stiff neural implants hinders the long-term performance of implantable neuroprostheses. Here, we designed and fabricated soft neural implants with the shape and elasticity of dura mater, the protective membrane of the brain and spinal cord. The electronic dura mater, which we call e-dura, embeds interconnects, electrodes, and chemotrodes that sustain millions of mechanical stretch cycles, electrical stimulation pulses, and chemical injections. These integrated modalities enable multiple neuroprosthetic applications. The soft implants extracted cortical states in freely behaving animals for brain-machine interface and delivered electrochemical spinal neuromodulation that restored locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury.

  12. High Frequency of Bone Marrow Involvement in Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianchao; Ding, Wenshuang; Gao, Limin; Yao, Wenqing; Chen, Min; Zhao, Sha; Liu, Weiping; Zhang, Wenyan

    2017-04-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Thirteen cases of IVLBCL with a median age of 56 years were analyzed retrospectively. Nonspecific symptoms such as fever and hepatosplenomegaly were the most common manifestations, and the bone marrow was usually involved in 8/13 (61.5%) cases. All tumors expressed CD20, and 12/13 (92.3%) of the tumors exhibited a nongerminal center phenotype by Hans algorithm. CD5 was expressed in 3/12 (25%) of the tumors. MYC was negative in all cases, and BCL2 was positive in 10/12 (83.3%) cases. Cytogenetic analysis revealed 5 cases that did not have rearrangements in either the MYC or the BCL2 gene. No association with Epstein-Barr virus was found. Seven of 11 patients received chemotherapy. The median survival time was 6 months. Patients with hemophagocytic syndrome had poor prognoses. Our study demonstrates that IVLBCL has a poor clinical outcome with a high frequency of bone marrow involvement and that the MYC gene may not play an important role in the poor prognosis of IVLBCL.

  13. Glucose and mannitol diffusion in human dura mater.

    PubMed

    Bashkatov, Alexey N; Genina, Elina A; Sinichkin, Yuri P; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I; Lakodina, Nina A; Tuchin, Valery V

    2003-11-01

    An in vitro experimental study of the control of the human dura mater optical properties at administration of aqueous solutions of glucose and mannitol has been presented. The significant increase of the dura mater optical transmittance under action of immersion liquids has been demonstrated. Diffusion coefficients of glucose and mannitol in the human dura mater tissue at 20 degrees C have been estimated as (1.63 +/- 0.29) x 10(-6)cm(2)/s and as (1.31 +/- 0.41) x 10(-6) cm(2)/s, respectively. Experiments show that administration of immersion liquids allows for the effective control of tissue optical characteristics that make dura mater more transparent, thereby increasing the ability of light penetration through the tissue.

  14. Retrospective study of sonographic findings in bone involvement associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: preliminary results of a case series*

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Lorenzato, Mario Muller

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at investigating bone involvement secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendonitis at ultrasonography. Materials and Methods Retrospective study of a case series. The authors reviewed shoulder ultrasonography reports of 141 patients diagnosed with rotator cuff calcific tendonitis, collected from the computer-based data records of their institution over a four-year period. Imaging findings were retrospectively and consensually analyzed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists looking for bone involvement associated with calcific tendonitis. Only the cases confirmed by computed tomography were considered for descriptive analysis. Results Sonographic findings of calcific tendinopathy with bone involvement were observed in 7/141 (~ 5%) patients (mean age, 50.9 years; age range, 42-58 years; 42% female). Cortical bone erosion adjacent to tendon calcification was the most common finding, observed in 7/7 cases. Signs of intraosseous migration were found in 3/7 cases, and subcortical cysts in 2/7 cases. The findings were confirmed by computed tomography. Calcifications associated with bone abnormalities showed no acoustic shadowing at ultrasonography, favoring the hypothesis of resorption phase of the disease. Conclusion Preliminary results of the present study suggest that ultrasonography can identify bone abnormalities secondary to rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, particularly the presence of cortical bone erosion. PMID:26811551

  15. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear bone malformations with posterior labyrinth involvement: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Palomeque Vera, Juan Miguel; Platero Sánchez-Escribano, María; Gómez Hervás, Javier; Fernández Prada, María; González Ramírez, Amanda Rocío; Sainz Quevedo, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Inner ear bone malformations are one cause of profound sensorineural hearing loss. This investigation focused on those affecting the posterior labyrinth, especially enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, which is associated with fluctuating and progressive hearing loss. The objectives of this study were to analyze the behavior of the electrical stimulation, auditory functionality and linguistic development in patients with inner ear malformations involving the posterior labyrinth. The study included ten patients undergoing cochlear implantation (cases: five with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, two with vestibular aqueduct stenosis/aplasia, and three with semicircular canal disorders). Post-implantation, data were gathered on the electrical stimulation threshold and maximum comfort levels and on the number of functioning electrodes. Evaluation of Auditory Responses to Speech (EARS) subtests were used to assess auditory functionality and language acquisition at 6, 12, and 24 months post-implantation. Results were compared with findings in a control group of 28 cochlear implantation patients without these malformations. No significant differences were found between case and control groups in electrical stimulation parameters; auditory functionality subtest scores were lower in cases than controls, although the difference was only statistically significant for some subtests. In conclusion, cochlear implantation patients with posterior labyrinth bone malformations and profound hearing loss, including those with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, showed no significant difference in electrical stimulation threshold with controls. Although some auditory functionality test results were lower in cases than in controls, cochlear implantation appears to be beneficial for all patients with these malformations.

  16. Latexin is involved in bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadouchi, Ichiro; Sakamoto, Kei; Tangjiao, Liu; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hoshino, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2009-01-16

    Latexin is the only known carboxypeptidase A inhibitor in mammals. We previously demonstrated that BMP-2 significantly induced latexin expression in Runx2-deficient mesenchymal cells (RD-C6 cells), during chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we investigated latexin expression in the skeleton and its role in chondrocyte differentiation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that proliferating and prehypertrophic chondrocytes expressed latexin during skeletogenesis and bone fracture repair. In the early phase of bone fracture, latexin mRNA expression was dramatically upregulated. BMP-2 upregulated the expression of the mRNAs of latexin, Col2a1, and the gene encoding aggrecan (Agc1) in a micromass culture of C3H10T1/2 cells. Overexpression of latexin additively stimulated the BMP-2-induced expression of the mRNAs of Col2a, Agc1, and Col10a1. BMP-2 treatment upregulated Sox9 expression, and Sox9 stimulated the promoter activity of latexin. These results indicate that latexin is involved in BMP-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation and plays an important role in skeletogenesis and skeletal regeneration.

  17. Insights into reference point indentation involving human cortical bone: sensitivity to tissue anisotropy and mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Coulmier, Aurélie; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-09-01

    Reference point indentation (RPI) is a microindentation technique involving 20 cycles of loading in "force-control" that can directly assess a patient׳s bone tissue properties. Even though preliminary clinical studies indicate a capability for fracture discrimination, little is known about what mechanical behavior the various RPI properties characterize and how these properties relate to traditional mechanical properties of bone. To address this, the present study investigated the sensitivity of RPI properties to anatomical location and tissue organization as well as examined to what extent RPI measurements explain the intrinsic mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Multiple indents with a target force of 10N were done in 2 orthogonal directions (longitudinal and transverse) per quadrant (anterior, medial, posterior, and lateral) of the femoral mid-shaft acquired from 26 donors (25-101 years old). Additional RPI measurements were acquired for 3 orthogonal directions (medial only). Independent of age, most RPI properties did not vary among these locations, but they did exhibit transverse isotropy such that resistance to indentation is greater in the longitudinal (axial) direction than in the transverse direction (radial or circumferential). Next, beam specimens (~2mm×5mm×40mm) were extracted from the medial cortex of femoral mid-shafts, acquired from 34 donors (21-99 years old). After monotonically loading the specimens in three-point bending to failure, RPI properties were acquired from an adjacent region outside the span. Indent direction was orthogonal to the bending axis. A significant inverse relationship was found between resistance to indentation and the apparent-level mechanical properties. Indentation distance increase (IDI) and a linear combination of IDI and the loading slope, averaged over cycles 3 through 20, provided the best explanation of the variance in ultimate stress (r(2)=0.25, p=0.003) and toughness (r(2)=0.35, p=0.004), respectively

  18. Successful conservative management of symptomatic bilateral dorsal patellar defects presenting with cartilage involvement and bone marrow edema: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Kwee, Thomas C; Sonneveld, Heleen; Nix, Maarten

    2016-05-01

    The dorsal patellar defect is a relatively rare entity that involves the superolateral quadrant of the patella. It is usually considered to represent a delayed ossification process, although its exact origin remains unclear. Because of its usually innocuous nature and clinical course, invasive interventions are generally deemed unnecessary, although curretage has been successfully performed on symptomatic cases. This case report presents a rather unusual case of symptomatic bilateral dorsal patellar defects with cartilage involvement and widespread surrounding bone marrow edema as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both cartilage involvement and bone marrow edema should be considered part of the spectrum of associated MRI findings that can be encountered in this entity. Furthermore, the presented case shows that symptomatic dorsal patellar defects can be treated conservatively with success and that (decrease of) pain symptoms are likely related to (decrease of) bone marrow edema.

  19. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  20. Cytologic Interpretation of Melanotic Neuroectodermal Tumour of Infancy Involving Cranial Bones: Clue to Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Priyadarshini; Behera, Susmita; Dhal, Ipsita; Surabhi

    2015-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) is a rare, benign but locally aggressive neoplasm of infants commonly affecting the maxilla. It can also involve other areas like skull, mandible, brain and epididymis. The tumour comprise of dual populations of cells like small, basophilic neuroblast like cells and large pigment laden epithelial cells arranged in tubular and pseudoglandular pattern. The proportion of two components varies and therefore the diagnosis can be difficult in absence of the large cells. We describe the cytologic, histologic and immunohistochemical findings in a case of MNTI involving left side orbit with frontal, temporal and parietal bones. The cytologic interpretation could be made due to the suggestive clinical and radiologic findings and detection of large epithelial pigmented cells on thorough searching. The neuroblast like cells was positive for Neuron specific enolase, large cells for HMB-45 and Pan CK. Both the cellular components were negative for desmin. This case report is presented due to its rarity and also to aid the surgical pathologists in diagnosis where the findings are not too straight forward. PMID:26500916

  1. Involvement of the Nonneuronal Cholinergic System in Bone Remodeling in Rat Midpalatal Suture after Rapid Maxillary Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jie; Wang, Lue; Miao, Cong; Ge, Lihua; Tian, Zhenchuan; Wang, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Few studies sought to analyze the expression and function of the nonneuronal acetylcholine system in bone remodeling in vivo due to the lack of suitable models. We established a rat maxilla expansion model in which the midline palatine suture of the rat was rapidly expanded under mechanical force application, inducing tissue remodeling and new bone formation, which could be a suitable model to investigate the role of the nonneuronal acetylcholine system in bone remodeling in vivo. During the expansion, the expression pattern changes of the nonneuronal cholinergic system components and the mRNA levels of OPG/RANKL were detected by immunohistochemistry or real-time PCR. The value of the RANKL/OPG ratio significantly increased after 1 day of expansion, indicating dominant bone resorption induced by the mechanical stimulation; however after 3 days of expansion, the value of the RANKL/OPG ratio significantly decreased, suggesting a dominant role of the subsequent bone formation process. Increasing expression of Ach was detected after 3 days of expansion which indicated that ACh might play a role in bone formation. The mRNA expression levels of other components also showed observable changes during the expansion which confirmed the involvement of the nonneuronal cholinergic system in the process of bone remodeling in vivo. Further researches are still needed to figure out the detailed functions of the nonneuronal cholinergic system and its components. PMID:27478838

  2. Erythropoietin is involved in the angiogenic potential of bone marrow macrophages in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    De Luisi, Annunziata; Binetti, Laura; Ria, Roberto; Ruggieri, Simona; Berardi, Simona; Catacchio, Ivana; Racanelli, Vito; Pavone, Vincenzo; Rossini, Bernardo; Vacca, Angelo; Ribatti, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is the crucial cytokine regulator of red blood cell production, and recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) is widely used in clinical practice for the treatment of anemia, primarily in kidney disease and in cancer. Increasing evidence suggests several biological roles for Epo and its receptor, Epo-R, unrelated to erythropoiesis, including angiogenesis. Epo-R has been found expressed in various non-haematopoietic cells and tissues, and in cancer cells. Here, we detected the expression of Epo-R in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMAs) from multiple myeloma (MM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients and assessed whether Epo/Epo-R axis plays a role in MM macrophage-mediated angiogenesis. We found that Epo-R is over-expressed in BMMAs from MM patients with active disease compared to MGUS patients. The treatment of BMMAs with rHuEpo significantly increased the expression and secretion of key pro-angiogenic mediators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1/CCL-2), through activation of JAK2/STAT5 and PI3 K/Akt pathways. In addition, the conditioned media harvested from rHuEpo-treated BMMAs enhanced bone marrow-derived endothelial cell migration and capillary morphogenesis in vitro, and induced angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane of chick embryos in vivo. Furthermore, we found an increase in the circulating levels of several pro-angiogenic cytokines in serum of MM patients with anemia under treatment with Epo. Our findings highlight the direct effect of rHuEpo on macrophage-mediated production of pro-angiogenic factors, suggesting that Epo/Epo-R pathway may be involved in the regulation of angiogenic response occurring in MM.

  3. 11C-Methionine-PET in Multiple Myeloma: Correlation with Clinical Parameters and Bone Marrow Involvement.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Knop, Stefan; Schreder, Martin; Rudelius, Martina; Knott, Markus; Jörg, Gerhard; Samnick, Samuel; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K; Einsele, Hermann; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an essentially incurable hematologic malignancy originating from clonal plasma cells. This study evaluated the usefulness of the radiotracers (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-2`-deoxy-2`-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for staging and re-staging in MM. 43 patients with MM underwent both MET- and FDG-PET/CT for staging or re-staging within 3±2 days. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with the degree of bone marrow (BM) involvement and standard clinical parameters of disease activity. Additionally, BM samples were stained for L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression in 15 patients. MET-PET detected focal lesions (FL) in 39/43 subjects (90.7%), whereas 10 patients were missed in FDG-PET/CT (detection rate, 33/43; 76.7%; p<0.05). MET depicted more FL in 28/43 patients (65.1%; p<0.001), whereas in the remainder (34.9%, n=15) both tracers yielded comparable results. LAT1 was highly expressed on the cell surface of myeloma cells. Both FDG and MET uptake correlated significantly with biopsy-proven BM involvement (p<0.001), with MET demonstrating a stronger correlation (SUVmean, r=0.9 vs r=0.6; SUVmax, r=0.88 vs r=0.58). Abnormal beta-2-microglobulin and free light chain levels correlated with the presence of focal intramedullary lesions detected in MET- or FDG-PET/CT (MET, p=0.006 and p=0.01, respectively; FDG, p=0.02 and p=0.01). MET appears to be superior to FDG for staging and re-staging of both intra- and extramedullary MM lesions. Tracer uptake correlates with BM involvement, β2m and FLC levels and appears to be a more accurate marker of tumor burden and disease activity.

  4. 11C-Methionine-PET in Multiple Myeloma: Correlation with Clinical Parameters and Bone Marrow Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Knop, Stefan; Schreder, Martin; Rudelius, Martina; Knott, Markus; Jörg, Gerhard; Samnick, Samuel; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Einsele, Hermann; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an essentially incurable hematologic malignancy originating from clonal plasma cells. This study evaluated the usefulness of the radiotracers 11C-methionine (MET) and 18F-2`-deoxy-2`-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for staging and re-staging in MM. 43 patients with MM underwent both MET- and FDG-PET/CT for staging or re-staging within 3±2 days. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with the degree of bone marrow (BM) involvement and standard clinical parameters of disease activity. Additionally, BM samples were stained for L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression in 15 patients. MET-PET detected focal lesions (FL) in 39/43 subjects (90.7%), whereas 10 patients were missed in FDG-PET/CT (detection rate, 33/43; 76.7%; p<0.05). MET depicted more FL in 28/43 patients (65.1%; p<0.001), whereas in the remainder (34.9%, n=15) both tracers yielded comparable results. LAT1 was highly expressed on the cell surface of myeloma cells. Both FDG and MET uptake correlated significantly with biopsy-proven BM involvement (p<0.001), with MET demonstrating a stronger correlation (SUVmean, r=0.9 vs r=0.6; SUVmax, r=0.88 vs r=0.58). Abnormal beta-2-microglobulin and free light chain levels correlated with the presence of focal intramedullary lesions detected in MET- or FDG-PET/CT (MET, p=0.006 and p=0.01, respectively; FDG, p=0.02 and p=0.01). MET appears to be superior to FDG for staging and re-staging of both intra- and extramedullary MM lesions. Tracer uptake correlates with BM involvement, β2m and FLC levels and appears to be a more accurate marker of tumor burden and disease activity. PMID:26877783

  5. Involvement of acidic microenvironment in the pathophysiology of cancer-associated bone pain.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hata, Kenji; Nakanishi, Masako; Nagae, Maho; Nagayama, Tomotaka; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Hiraga, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Bone pain is one of the most common complications in cancer patients with bone metastases. Although the mechanism of cancer-associated bone pain is poorly understood, clinical observations that inhibitors of osteoclasts such as bisphosphonates (BPs) efficiently reduce bone pain suggest a potential role of osteoclasts, which play a central role in the development and progression of bone metastasis. Osteoclasts dissolve bone minerals by releasing protons through the a3 isoform of the vacuolar-H(+)-ATPase, creating acidic microenvironments. In addition, cancer cells, inflammatory cells and immune cells that reside in bone metastases also produce acidic conditions by releasing protons. It has been well-known that acidic conditions due to proton release cause pain. Our study showed that the sensory nociceptive neurons innervate bone and these neurons express acid-sensing nociceptors such as the acid-sensing ion channels and transient receptor potential channel-vanilloid subfamily members. Acid signals received by these nociceptors subsequently activate intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors in sensory neurons. The understanding of the nociceptive events following proton release and subsequent creation of acidic microenvironments leads us to design novel molecular-based approaches for reducing bone pain associated with cancer and inflammation.

  6. Can acetazolamide be used to treat diseases involving increased bone mineral density?

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Juan David; Luis-Yanes, María Isabel; Inglés-Torres, Esther; Arango-Sancho, Pedro; Cabrera-Sevilla, José Eugenio; Duque-Fernández, María Rosario; Gil-Sánchez, Salvador; García-Nieto, Víctor Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sclerosing bone dysplasias are a series of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases characterized by functional failure of the osteoclasts in bone resorption, leading to an excessive amount of bone mineral density (BMD) which could have serious clinical consequences. We treated three children affected with seriously high levels of BMD with acetazolamide, with the intention of inducing metabolic acidosis, thus increasing bone resorption and reducing BMD. All our patients tolerated and followed the treatment well and the clinical response was satisfactory in all cases. PMID:27904825

  7. Serotonin Is Involved in Autoimmune Arthritis through Th17 Immunity and Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Chabbi-Achengli, Yasmine; Coman, Tereza; Collet, Corinne; Callebert, Jacques; Corcelli, Michelangelo; Lin, Hilène; Rignault, Rachel; Dy, Michel; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Côté, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that results in a disabling and painful condition as it progresses to destruction of the articular cartilage and ankylosis of the joints. Although the cause of the disease is still unknown, evidence argues that autoimmunity plays an important part. There are increasing but contradictory views regarding serotonin being associated with activation of immunoinflammatory pathways and the onset of autoimmune reactions. We studied serotonin's involvement during collagen-induced arthritis in wild-type and Tph1(-/-) mice, which have markedly reduced peripheral serotonin levels. In wild-type mice, induction of arthritis triggered a robust increase in serotonin content in the paws combined with less inflammation. In Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a marked increase in the clinical and pathologic arthritis scores was noticed. Specifically, in Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a significant increase in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption was observed with an increase in IL-17 levels in the paws and in Th17 lymphocytes in the draining lymph nodes, whereas T-regulatory cells were dampened. Ex vivo serotonin and agonists of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors restored IL-17 secretion from splenocytes and Th17 cell differentiation in Tph1(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that serotonin plays a fundamental role in arthritis through the regulation of the Th17/T-regulatory cell balance and osteoclastogenesis.

  8. PET/CT Scanner and Bone Marrow Biopsy in Detection of Bone Marrow Involvement in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    El Karak, Fadi; Bou-Orm, Ibrahim R.; Ghosn, Marwan; Kattan, Joseph; Farhat, Fadi; Ibrahim, Toni; Jreige, Mario; El Cheikh, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of bone marrow involvement (BMI) is paramount in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. PET/CT scanner (PET) is now a routine examination for the staging of DLBCL with prognostic and therapeutic implications. This study evaluates the role of PET for detecting marrow involvement compared to bone marrow biopsy (BMB). This monocentric study included 54 patients diagnosed with DLBCL between 2009 and 2013 and who had FDG PET/CT in a pre-treatment setting. A correlation analysis of the detection of BMI by PET and BMB was performed. A prognostic evaluation of BMI by BMB and/or PET/CT and correlation with an overall 2-year survival were analyzed. PET was more sensitive for the detection of BMI than BMB (92.3% vs. 38.5%). It can be considered a discriminatory Pre-BMB test with a negative predictive value of 97.6%. In addition, BMI by PET had a prognostic value with strong correlation with progression-free survival (PFS) (HR = 3.81; p = 0.013) and overall survival (OS) (HR = 4.12; p = 0.03) while the BMB had not. PET shows superior performance to the BMB for the detection of marrow involvement in DLBCL. It may be considered as the first line examination of bone marrow instead of the biopsy. PMID:28099514

  9. Is Serum Serotonin Involved in the Bone Loss of Young Females with Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed

    Maïmoun, L; Guillaume, S; Lefebvre, P; Philibert, P; Bertet, H; Picot, M-C; Courtet, P; Mariano-Goulart, D; Renard, E; Sultan, C

    2016-03-01

    Recent experimental data suggest that circulating serotonin interacts with bone metabolism, although this is less clear in humans. This study investigated whether serum serotonin interferes with bone metabolism in young women with anorexia nervosa (AN), a clinical model of energy deprivation. Serum serotonin, markers of bone turnover [osteocalcin (OC), procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP), type I-C telopeptide breakdown products (CTX)], leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its binding protein (IGFBP-3) were assessed. Whole body, spine, hip, and radius areal bone mineral density BMD (aBMD) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 21 patients with AN and 19 age-matched controls. Serum serotonin, leptin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3, OC, PINP, and aBMD at all sites, radius excepted, were significantly reduced in AN whereas CTX and sOB-R were increased compared with controls. Serum serotonin levels were positively correlated with weight, body mass index, whole body fat mass, leptin, and IGF-1, and negatively with CTX for the entire population. Low serum serotonin levels are observed in patients with AN. Although no direct link between low serum serotonin levels and bone mass was identified in these patients, the negative relationship between serotonin and markers of bone resorption found in all population nevertheless suggests the implication of serotonin in bone metabolism. Impact of low serum serotonin on bone in AN warrants further studies.

  10. Sirt1 is involved in decreased bone formation in aged apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Xu, Xiao-ya; Qiu, Zhao-hui; Gao, Jian-jun; Wei, Zhan-ying; Zhen, Li; Zhang, Xiao-li; Ye, Zhi-bing

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays an important role in the transport and metabolism of lipids. Recent studies show that bone mass is increased in young apoE−/− mice. In this study we investigated the bone phenotype and metabolism in aged apoE−/− mice. Methods: Femurs and tibias were collected from 18- and 72-week-old apoE−/− mice and their age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates, and examined using micro-CT and histological analysis. Serum levels of total cholesterol, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and bone turnover markers were measured. Cultured bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from tibias and femurs of 18-week-old apoE−/− mice were used in experiments in vitro. The expression levels of Sirt1 and Runx2 in bone tissue and BMSCs were measured using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: Compared with age-matched WT littermates, young apoE−/− mice exhibited high bone mass with increased bone formation, accompanied by higher serum levels of bone turnover markers OCN and TRAP5b, and higher expression levels of Sirt1, Runx2, ALP and OCN in bone tissue. In contrast, aged apoE−/− mice showed reduced bone formation and lower bone mass relative to age-matched WT mice, accompanied by lower serum OCN levels, and markedly reduced expression levels of Sirt1, Runx2, ALP and OCN in bone tissue. After BMSCs were exposed to ox-LDL (20 μg/mL), the expression of Sirt1 and Runx2 proteins was significantly increased at 12 h, and then decreased at 72 h. Treatment with the Sirt1 inhibitor EX527 (10 μmol/L) suppressed the expression of Runx2, ALP and OCN in BMSCs. Conclusion: In contrast to young apoE−/− mice, aged apoE−/− mice showe lower bone mass than age-matched WT mice. Long-lasting exposure to ox-LDL decreases the expression of Sirt1 and Runx2 in BMSCs, which may explain the decreased bone formation in aged apoE−/− mice. PMID:26592520

  11. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-06-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3-5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively.

  12. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-01-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3–5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively. PMID:15932504

  13. Involvement of RVM-expressed P2X7 receptor in bone cancer pain: mechanism of descending facilitation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhang Xiang; Lu, Zhi Jie; Ma, Wei Qing; Wu, Fei Xiang; Zhang, Yu Qiu; Yu, Wei-Feng; Zhao, Zhi Qi

    2014-04-01

    Patients with bone cancer commonly experience bone pain that is severe, intolerable, and difficult to manage. The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) plays an important role in the development of chronic pain via descending facilitation of spinal nociception. The compelling evidence shows that glial P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is involved in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain syndromes. The present study explored the mechanism of glial activation and P2X7R expression underlying the induction of bone cancer pain. The results demonstrated that microglia and astrocytes in the RVM were markedly activated in bone cancer rats, and the expression of P2X7R was significantly upregulated. Injection of Brilliant Blue G (BBG), an inhibitor of P2X7R, into the RVM significantly alleviated pain behaviors of cancer rats, which was supported by intra-RVM injection of RNA interference targeting the P2X7R in the RVM. It is suggested that activation of microglia-expressed P2X7R in the RVM contributes to bone cancer pain. Given that 5-HT in the RVM is involved in modulating spinal nociception, changes in 5-HT and Fos expression were addressed in the spinal cord. Inhibition of P2X7R by BBG or small-interference RNA targeting P2X7 in the RVM markedly reduced 5-HT level and Fos expression in the spinal cord. The data clearly suggest that the activation of microglial P2X7R in the RVM contributes to the development of bone cancer pain via upregulation of spinal 5HT levels by the descending pain facilitatory system.

  14. Stafne’s bone cavity: An unusual case with involvement of the buccal and lingual mandibular plates

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    Lingual mandibular bone defects, also known as Stafne bone cavity (SC), are unilateral asymptomatic radiolucencies, generally seen in the mandibular angle, below the inferior alveolar canal. Although panoramic radiographies normally offer enough information to make a correct diagnosis, additional studies are often required, especially in atypical cases. The present report describes an atypical presentation of a Stafne’s bone cavity in a 78 years-old male patient. In this particular case, an asymptomatic and radiolucid lesion was observed during a routine dental examination. The computed tomography (CT) showed an involvement of both lingual and buccal mandibular plates producing a tunnel-like lesion. No history of mandibular trauma or surgery was refered. An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis. Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report. PMID:24596643

  15. Involvement of spinal monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in cancer-induced bone pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ji-Hua; Zheng, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Li-Na; Ji, Fu-Hai

    2012-05-23

    In this study, we examined the involvement of chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in the spinal cord of a rat model of cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP). In this model, CIBP was established by an intramedullary injection of Walker 256 cells into the tibia of rats. We observed a significant increase in expression levels of MCP-1 and its receptor CCR2 in the spinal cord of CIBP rats. Furthermore, the intrathecal administration of an anti-MCP-1 neutralizing antibody attenuated the mechanical allodynia established in CIBP rats. Likewise, an intrathecal injection of exogenous recombinant MCP-1 induced a striking mechanical allodynia in naïve rats. These results suggest that increases in spinal MCP-1 and CCR2 expression are involved in the development of mechanical allodynia associated with bone cancer rats.

  16. ON LOVE AND MELANCHOLIA IN MARGUERITE DURAS'S AUTOFICTION.

    PubMed

    Simoglou, Vassiliki N

    2015-07-01

    In the Durassian melancholic atmosphere, past and present, fantasy and reality come together as one. This paper addresses the themes of love and destruction in Marguerite Duras's life that pervade her oeuvre, allowing us to discern a melancholic structure within her autofiction. Writing down her melancholia--the impossible mourning of a loved object--Duras captures nothingness and loss--in order not to die of love. In a constant exchange with her readers, she searches for herself and delivers herself to her readers. This renewable creative process of writing enables her to engage in an ongoing experience of identity reconstruction, in a way similar to the patient in psychoanalysis re-creating his/her life's fiction.

  17. PDGF in bone formation and regeneration: new insights into a novel mechanism involving MSCs.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arnold I; Correa, Diego

    2011-12-01

    With the identification of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as pericytes, the details of bone formation, regeneration, and repair take on new meaning. Growth factors and other signaling molecules together with MSCs play important roles in these bone fabrication processes. However, the interaction of these cellular healing components is not completely understood. The formation of new vasculature is critical to regeneration and repair as both the driver and orientor of new bone formation. In this context, MSCs are proposed to be largely derived from pericytes associated with the vasculature. A comprehensive perspective is presented in which signaling molecules such as PDGF take on new significance in the vasculature-pericyte-MSC-osteoblast dynamics. Current data suggest that PDGF could function as a central connector between the cellular components and contributors of the osteoblast differentiation program. The inference is that PDGF could function at sites of injury to mobilize the pericytes from their abluminal location, stimulate mitotic expansion of these cells and help organize them. In this way, PDGF both contributes to the osteogenic lineage and helps to stabilize newly forming vessels that act to drive the multistep, multicomponent cascade of new bone formation. This thesis explains how PDGF functions as a powerful therapeutic agent for bone formation and repair.

  18. Involvement of Zn Depletion in Cd-Induced Toxicity on Prenatal Bone Formation in Rat.

    PubMed

    Boughammoura, Sana; Chemek, Marouane; Mimouna, Safa Ben; Banni, Mohamed; Messaoudi, Imed

    2017-03-06

    This study explored the potential toxicity of Cd on the Zn bone depletion in prenatal bone formation. Female rats received either tap water, Cd, Zn, or Cd + Zn in their drinking water during gestation, and some markers of bone formation were studied in their fetuses removed at the 20th day of pregnancy (GD20). Cd exposure induced maternal hypozincemia and Zn depletion in the femur of the fetuses. A striking inhibition of bone formation in fetuses, expressed by decreases in femur length, width, and area, by the shortening of diaphysis, and by a decrease in length and area of distal and proximal proliferative zones, was observed in fetuses from Cd-exposed mothers. At the molecular level, Cd caused upregulation of MT-1 and ZIP2 genes and significantly depressed the expression of the ZnT5, colα1, osteocalcin, and ALP genes in the femur. Interestingly, Zn treatment ameliorated the Cd-induced maternal hypozincemia and femoral changes and partially restored the normal histomorphometry of the femur. These results suggest that the observed toxic effects of Cd are, at least in part, mediated by the disruption of maternal Zn metabolism during pregnancy leading to Zn depletion and thus to perturbation of prenatal bone formation.

  19. The dura causes spinal cord compression after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, Samira; Werndle, Melissa C; Lopez de Heredia, Luis; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2016-10-01

    MR scans from 65 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury were analysed; on admission 95% had evidence of cord compression - in 26% due to the dura, and in the remaining 74% due to extradural factors. Compression due to dural factors resolved with a half-life of 5.5 days. These findings suggest that bony decompression alone may not relieve spinal cord compression in the quarter of patients in whom dural factors are significant.

  20. Methyl Jasmonate-Induced Lipidomic and Biochemical Alterations in the Intertidal Macroalga Gracilaria dura (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Puja; Reddy, C.R.K.; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    The role of exogenously added methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a lipid-derived signaling compound, in inducing oxidative stress in the marine red macroalga Gracilaria dura was investigated. MeJA at a concentration of 1–100 µM was a strong stimulant of reactive oxygen species (H2O2, HO· and O2·−) (P < 0.05) causing considerable oxidative stress in G. dura. This further led to lipid peroxidation and degradation of the pigments Chl a and phycocyanin, with a concomitant increase in phycoerythrin. The MeJA-induced oxidative burst also led to the induction of a fatty acid oxidation cascade, resulting in the synthesis of hydroxy-oxylipins and the up-regulation of the 13-lipoxygenase pathway. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomic analysis revealed that monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (a chloroplastic glycerolipid) and phosphatidylcholine (extrachloroplastidic phopholipid) were the most affected lipid classes. The degradation of 18:3-fatty acid-containing monogalactosyldiacylglycerol inferred that it provided fatty acyl chains for the biosynthesis of 13-hydroperoxylinolenic acid, which was further directed towards either the jasmonate pathway or other alternative pathways of the fatty acid oxidation cascade, analogous to higher plants. Also, G. dura modulated the lipid acyl chains in such a way that no significant change was observed in the fatty acid profile of the treated thalli as compared with those of the control, except for C16:0, C16:1 (n-9), C20:3 (n-6) and C20:4 (n-6) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MeJA caused the accumulation of phenolic compounds and the up-regulation of enzymes involved in secondary metabolism such as polyphenol oxidase, shikimate dehydrogenase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, indicating a shift towards secondary metabolism as a defense strategy to combat the induced oxidative stress. PMID:26276825

  1. Methyl Jasmonate-Induced Lipidomic and Biochemical Alterations in the Intertidal Macroalga Gracilaria dura (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Puja; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-10-01

    The role of exogenously added methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a lipid-derived signaling compound, in inducing oxidative stress in the marine red macroalga Gracilaria dura was investigated. MeJA at a concentration of 1-100 µM was a strong stimulant of reactive oxygen species (H(2)O(2), HO· and O(2) (·-)) (P < 0.05) causing considerable oxidative stress in G. dura. This further led to lipid peroxidation and degradation of the pigments Chl a and phycocyanin, with a concomitant increase in phycoerythrin. The MeJA-induced oxidative burst also led to the induction of a fatty acid oxidation cascade, resulting in the synthesis of hydroxy-oxylipins and the up-regulation of the 13-lipoxygenase pathway. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomic analysis revealed that monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (a chloroplastic glycerolipid) and phosphatidylcholine (extrachloroplastidic phopholipid) were the most affected lipid classes. The degradation of 18:3-fatty acid-containing monogalactosyldiacylglycerol inferred that it provided fatty acyl chains for the biosynthesis of 13-hydroperoxylinolenic acid, which was further directed towards either the jasmonate pathway or other alternative pathways of the fatty acid oxidation cascade, analogous to higher plants. Also, G. dura modulated the lipid acyl chains in such a way that no significant change was observed in the fatty acid profile of the treated thalli as compared with those of the control, except for C16:0, C16:1 (n-9), C20:3 (n-6) and C20:4 (n-6) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MeJA caused the accumulation of phenolic compounds and the up-regulation of enzymes involved in secondary metabolism such as polyphenol oxidase, shikimate dehydrogenase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, indicating a shift towards secondary metabolism as a defense strategy to combat the induced oxidative stress.

  2. Evaluation of [18F]-FDG-Based Hybrid Imaging Combinations for Assessment of Bone Marrow Involvement in Lymphoma at Initial Staging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the value of different hybrid imaging combinations for the detection of focal and diffuse bone marrow infiltration in lymphoma. Patients with histologically proven lymphoma, who underwent both [18F]-FDG-PET/CT and whole-body MRI (including T1- and diffusion-weighted [DWI] sequences) within seven days, and a subsequent bone marrow biopsy, were retrospectively included. Three hybrid imaging combinations were evaluated: (1) [18F]-FDG-PET/CT; (2) [18F]-FDG-PET/T1; and (3) [18F]-FDG-PET/DWI. The presence of focal or diffuse bone marrow infiltration was assessed by two rater teams. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of overall, focal, and diffuse bone marrow involvement were compared between the three hybrid imaging combinations. Overall, lymphomatous bone marrow involvement was found in 16/60 patients (focal, 8; diffuse, 8). Overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 81.3%, 95.5%, and 91.7% for [18F]-FDG-PET/CT; 81.3%, 97.7%, and 93.3% for [18F]-FDG-PET/T1; and 81.3%, 95.5%, and 91.7% for [18F]-FDG-PET/DWI. No statistically significant differences between the three imaging combinations were observed, based on overall bone marrow involvement, focal involvement, or diffuse involvement. The sensitivity of all three imaging combinations for detecting diffuse bone marrow involvement was only moderate (62.5% for all three combinations). Although the combination of [18F]-FDG-PET and T1-weighted MRI generally showed the best diagnostic performance for the detection of bone marrow involvement in lymphoma, it was not significantly superior to the two other hybrid imaging combinations. Since the sensitivity of all imaging combinations for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement was only moderate, bone marrow biopsy cannot be replaced by imaging as yet. PMID:27723817

  3. Erdheim-Chester disease: a case report with pulmonary, kidney involvement and bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Mounach, Aziza; Nouijai, Abderrzak; Achemlal, Lahsen; El Maghraoui, Abdellah; Bezza, Ahmed

    2010-03-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman who was admitted in 2002 for exploration of diffuse bone pain. She had medical history of pulmonary tuberculosis. Her current symptoms had started 9 months earlier and consisted of bone pain, affecting the legs. She had asthenia and weight loss. At admission, physical examination showed bilateral and symmetrical long bone pain, especially the knees and the ankles. Physical exam was normal elsewhere. Laboratory tests showed inflammation, with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 90 mm/h and C-reactive protein 8 mg/l. Protein electrophoresis, red and white blood cell count, renal, and liver function tests were normal. Serum calcium, phosphorus, and urinary calcium were normal. Radiographs showed multiple mixed bone lesions with sclerotic and lytic areas of the femora, tibiae, humerus. Chest radiographs and thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan showed pulmonary fibrosis. Biopsy of the tibial area displayed foamy lipid-laden histiocytes, confirming the diagnosis of Erdheim-Chester disease. Patient was treated with prednisolone plus cyclophosphamide. Her clinical condition improved remarkably during 4 years, but she developed acute renal failure leading to death.

  4. Atypical Clival Chordoma in an Adolescent without Imaging Evidence of Bone Involvement

    PubMed Central

    HASHIM, Hilwati; ROSMAN, Azmin Kass; ABDUL AZIZ, Aida; ROQIAH, Abdul Kadir; BAKAR, Nor Salmah

    2014-01-01

    Clival chordoma is a rare primary bone tumour that arises from the remnant of the notochord and typically occurs in older adults. Upon imaging, the tumour can be seen arising from the clivus and causes clival destruction. This usually provides insight for a diagnosis. Here we present a case of a non-enhancing, pre-pontine mass that was hypointense on T1W and hyperintense on T2W in an adolescent. No clival bone erosion was observed. Based on the age group, imaging findings, and lack of clival erosion, a provisional diagnosis of epidermoid cyst was made and the tumour was resected. This patient was eventually diagnosed with a clival chordoma based on histopathological examination. PMID:25977639

  5. Azithromycin in DuraSite® for the treatment of blepharitis

    PubMed Central

    Luchs, Jodi

    2010-01-01

    Blepharitis is a common inflammatory disease of the eyelid. Posterior blepharitis affects the posterior lamella of the eyelid and involves inflammation of the meibomian glands, whereas anterior blepharitis affects the anterior lamella of the eyelid and the eyelashes; either version can be inflammatory or infectious in nature. Each of these conditions can incite or propagate the other; anterior blepharitis, if not treated, can lead to meibomian gland disease, and vice versa. Blepharitis is typically chronic, and can be associated with a variety of systemic diseases such as dermatitis, as well as ocular diseases such as dry eye, conjunctivitis, or keratitis. The standard treatment regimen historically consists of lid hygiene with warm compresses and eyelid scrubs, although these treatment modalities may have limited efficacy for many patients, especially those with more severe disease. Adjunctive treatment includes systemic and topical antibiotics, topical corticosteroids, and tear replacement therapy. Topical antibiotics are recommended to decrease the bacterial load, and topical corticosteroids may help in cases of severe inflammation. Azithromycin ophthalmic solution 1% in DuraSite® (AzaSite®; Inspire Pharmaceuticals, Durham, North Carolina, USA) has been proposed as a novel treatment for posterior blepharitis, based on its well-known anti-infective profile, its anti-inflammatory properties, its excellent tissue penetration, and its regulatory approval for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis. This review focuses on an off-label indication for topical azithromycin 1% in DuraSite for the treatment of blepharitis. PMID:20689782

  6. Fibrin Sealants in Dura Sealing: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrin sealants are widely used in neurosurgery to seal the suture line, provide watertight closure, and prevent cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the current efficacy and safety literature of fibrin sealants in dura sealing and the prevention/treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Methods A comprehensive electronic literature search was run in the following databases: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Resister of Controlled Trials, clinicaltrials.gov, MEDLINE/PubMed, and EMBASE. Titles and abstracts of potential articles of interest were reviewed independently by 3 of the authors. Results A total of 1006 database records and additional records were identified. After screening for duplicates and relevance, a total of 78 articles were assessed by the investigators for eligibility. Thirty-eight were excluded and the full-text of 40 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. Seven of these included only safety data and were included in the safety assessment. The remaining 33 articles included findings from 32 studies that enrolled a total of 2935 patients who were exposed to fibrin sealant. Among these 33 studies there were only 3 randomized controlled trials, with the remaining being prospective cohort analysis, case controlled studies, prospective or retrospective case series. One randomized controlled trial, with 89 patients exposed to fibrin sealant, found a greater rate of intraoperative watertight dura closure in the fibrin sealant group than the control group (92.1% versus 38.0%, p<0.001); however, post-operative cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in more fibrin sealant than control patients (6.7% versus 2.0%, p>0.05). Other clinical trials evaluated the effect of fibrin sealant in the postoperative prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. These were generally lower level evidence studies (ie, not prospective, randomized, controlled trials) that were not designed or

  7. Growth Arrest Line Mimicking Lymphoma Involvement: The Findings of (99m)Tc-MDP Bone SPECT/CT and Serial Bone Scan in a Child with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chanwoo; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Yun Young; Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Young-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Growth arrest lines appear as dense sclerotic lines parallel to the growth plate of long bones on radiography. We describe the case of a 9-year-old female with growth arrest lines initially masquerading as lymphoma involvement on (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy who had been treated with chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma about 3 years previously. Subsequent regional bone SPECT/CT clearly diagnosed the growth arrest lines, and retrograde review of previous bone scintigraphy demonstrated line migration in this patient. Growth arrest lines should be considered a possible diagnosis on bone scintigraphy, especially in the surveillance of children who have experienced severe childhood infections, malnutrition, immobilization, or treatment with immunosuppressive or chemotherapeutic drugs that may inhibit bone growth.

  8. Detection of bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Gheysens, Olivier; Thielemans, Sanne; Morscio, Julie; Boeckx, Nancy; Goffin, Karolien E; Deroose, Christophe M; Sagaert, Xavier; Wlodarska, Iwona; Verhoef, Gregor; Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Detecting bone marrow involvement (BMI) in lymphoma is important as it adversely affects stage. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) remains the standard to detect BMI but is prone to sampling error. We retrospectively investigated whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) could identify BMI in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with sufficient accuracy in comparison with staging BMB. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with PTLD who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and BMB within one month were evaluated. Based on our criteria, six patients (24%) were considered positive for BMI on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to one by BMB. Although we cannot completely exclude false positive results on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, our data indicate a significantly higher sensitivity of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to BMB (100% vs 17%) but similar specificity. These data confirm the high diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detecting BMI, but prospective studies are needed to determine whether (18)F-FDG-PET/CT could indeed replace staging BMB in PTLD.

  9. Involvement of the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus tubingensis in osteomyelitis of the maxillary bone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspergillus tubingensis is a black Aspergillus belonging to the Aspergillus section Nigri, which includes species that morphologically resemble Aspergillus niger. Recent developments in species determination have resulted in clinical isolates presumed to be Aspergillus niger being reclassified as Aspergillus tubingensis by sequencing. We present a report of a patient with an osteomyelitis of the maxillary bone with a probable invasive Aspergillus tubingensis infection. Case presentation We describe an immune compromised patient suffering from osteomyelitis of the maxillary bone after tooth extraction. The osteomyelitis probably resulted in dentogenic pansinusitis presenting as an acute ethmoiditis. Histologic examination of biopsy samples showed osteomyelitis, and inflammation of the surrounding connective tissue. Cultures of the alveolar wound grew Aspergillus tubingensis. The patient was treated with liposomal amphoterocin B, which was changed to oral treatment with voriconazole based on susceptibility testing (MIC for voriconazole was 1 μg/ml). Conclusion This case shows that Aspergillus tubingensis may have the potential to cause severe invasive infections in immunocompromised hosts. A larger proportion of Aspergillus tubingensis isolates are less susceptible to azoles compared to Aspergillus niger. Therefore, correct species identification and susceptibility testing is crucial for the choice of anti-fungal treatment, screening of azole resistance, and characterization of the pathogenic potential of the various species within Aspergillus section Nigri. PMID:23374883

  10. Cavernous hemangioma of the dura mater mimicking meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Ricci, Alessandro; Marzi, Sara; Dehcordi, Soheila Raysi; Galzio, Renato Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cavernomas are benign lesions that most commonly occur intra-parenchymally, but occasionally they have been described as arising from the dura mater. Extra-axial cavernous angiomas (or hemangiomas) account for 0.4–2% of all intracranial vascular malformations, and they usually occur in the middle cranial fossa, associated with the cavernous sinus. Other possible localizations (e.g. tentorium, convexity, anterior cranial fossa, cerebellopontine angle, Meckel's cave, sella turcica and internal auditory meatus) are rare, and they account only for 0.2–0.5%. Case Description: We report a case of a 30-year-old female presenting with a 2 years history of headache unresponsive to drug therapy. The magnetic resonance imaging showed a dural-based lesion in the left frontal region; the lesion size was: 1.5 cm × 3.5 cm. The appearance suggested a convexity meningioma. A left frontal craniotomy was performed, and the histopathological diagnosis deposed for a cavernous hemangioma of the dura mater. The follow-up at 1-year was good without any neurologic deficit. Conclusions: Dural-based cavernous hemangiomas of the convexity are uncommon lesions. Up to now, only 13 cases have been described in the literature. The authors have discussed clinical aspects, radiological features, surgical treatment, and operative findings. PMID:26421218

  11. Polydatin Protects Bone Marrow Stem Cells against Oxidative Injury: Involvement of Nrf 2/ARE Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meihui; Hou, Yu; Lin, Dingkun

    2016-01-01

    Polydatin, a glucoside of resveratrol, has been reported to possess potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of polydatin in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) death caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), imitating the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. In our study, MTT results showed that polydatin effectively prevented the decrease of cell viability caused by H2O2. Hochest 33258, Annexin V-PI, and Western blot assay showed H2O2-induced apoptosis in BMSCs, which was attenuated by polydatin. Further studies indicated that polydatin significantly protects BMSCs against apoptosis due to its antioxidative effects and the regulation of Nrf 2/ARE pathway. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments. PMID:27022401

  12. Radiofrequency ablation versus 125I-seed brachytherapy for painful metastases involving the bone

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dechao; Wu, Gang; Ren, Jianzhuang; Han, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to demonstrate and compare the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and 125I-seed brachytherapy for painful bone metastases after failure of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). From June 2013 to October 2015, 79 patients with moderate-to-severe pain caused by metastatic bone lesions who underwent either RFA (n = 41) or 125I-seed brachytherapy (n = 38) were enrolled. Pain in patients was measured using the brief pain inventory (BPI) before treatment, 1 week after treatment, and 3 months after treatment. Response rates were assessed by measuring the changes in pain and incorporation of changes in the analgesic requirements. At baseline, 1 week, and 3 months, the mean worst pain scores of BPI were 7.8, 5.4, and 2.7, respectively, for the RFA group and 7.7, 6.1, and 2.8, respectively, for the brachytherapy group. At 1 week, the complete and partial response rates were 12% and 59%, respectively, in the RFA group compared with 3% and 45%, respectively, in the brachytherapy group. At 3 months, the complete and partial response rates were 23% and 58%, respectively, in the RFA group compared with 24% and 52% in the brachytherapy group (p = 0.95). The response rates in the RFA group were significantly higher than those in the brachytherapy group at 1 week (p = 0.32), but comparable at 3 weeks (p = 0.95). Both groups had low rates of complications and no treatment-related mortality. In conclusion, the short-term curative efficiency of RFA was better than that of brachytherapy, but the log-term efficiency of both treatments was equal. PMID:27636995

  13. The involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanisms of damaging cadmium action in bone tissue: A study in a rat model of moderate and relatively high human exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Brzoska, Malgorzata M. Rogalska, Joanna; Kupraszewicz, Elzbieta

    2011-02-01

    It was investigated whether cadmium (Cd) may induce oxidative stress in the bone tissue in vivo and in this way contribute to skeleton damage. Total antioxidative status (TAS), antioxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase), total oxidative status (TOS), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), lipid peroxides (LPO), total thiol groups (TSH) and protein carbonyl groups (PC) as well as Cd in the bone tissue at the distal femoral epiphysis and femoral diaphysis of the male rats that received drinking water containing 0, 5, or 50 mg Cd/l for 6 months were measured. Cd, depending on the level of exposure and bone location, decreased the bone antioxidative capacity and enhanced its oxidative status resulting in oxidative stress and oxidative protein and/or lipid modification. The treatment with 5 and 50 mg Cd/l decreased TAS and activities of antioxidative enzymes as well as increased TOS and concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and PC at the distal femur. Moreover, at the higher exposure, the concentration of LPO increased and that of TSH decreased. The Cd-induced changes in the oxidative/antioxidative balance of the femoral diaphysis, abundant in cortical bone, were less advanced than at the distal femur, where trabecular bone predominates. The results provide evidence that, even moderate, exposure to Cd induces oxidative stress and oxidative modifications in the bone tissue. Numerous correlations noted between the indices of oxidative/antioxidative bone status, and Cd accumulation in the bone tissue as well as indices of bone turnover and bone mineral status, recently reported by us (Toxicology 2007, 237, 89-103) in these rats, allow for the hypothesis that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanisms of damaging Cd action in the skeleton. The paper is the first report from an in vivo study indicating that Cd may affect bone tissue through disorders in its oxidative/antioxidative balance resulting in oxidative stress.

  14. [Venous sinuses of the dura mater of the bird brain].

    PubMed

    Krasnikov, Iu A

    1988-04-01

    By means of corrosive, injection and tracheoscopy methods venous formations of the brain have been studied in 19 species of birds--endemical for Far East--from 12 orders. Four types of the venous sinuses structure have been distinguished in the dura mater: the first type of the structure is specific for birds that live an inactive and quiet life (blue rock pigeon, Ussuric pheasant, Tetrastes bonasia, domestic hen). The second type of the sinus structure occurs in birds, that sharply change the speed and height of their flight (Otus bakkamoena). The most manifested changes in the sinus structure are noted in waterfowl and diving birds, that spend much time in flight, in dendrocolaptidae and in day predaceous birds; in them the longitudinal sinus forms a rhombus.

  15. Intentional reim plantation of a tooth with severe periodontal involvement using enamel matrix derivative in combination with guided tissue regeneration and bone grafting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Kenji; Sato, Shuichi; Suzuki, Kuniharu; Ito, Koichi

    2008-02-01

    This case involved the intentional reimplantation of a tooth with severe periodontal involvement using regenerative therapies. The maxillary left central incisor was intentionally extracted, enamel matrix derivative (EMD) was applied, and the tooth was repositioned accurately. The bone defect was filled with a xenograft and a demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft, and a guided tissue regeneration membrane was adapted over the site. After 5 years, a reduction in probing depth and a gain in clinical attachment were observed. Conventional radiographs and cone-beam computerized tomographs showed hard tissue improvement. Favorable clinical results were obtained with reimplantation with applied EMD, combined with regenerative therapies, for treating a tooth with severe periodontal involvement.

  16. A Defining Time for Physical Education Futures? Exploring the Legacy of Fritz Duras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the legacy of Dr Fritz Duras in order to address the issue of whether the implementation of a new curriculum for health and physical education in Australia represents a defining time for the subject. Dr Duras was Director of the first physical education teacher education course at the University of Melbourne during an earlier…

  17. Galectin-9 is Involved in Immunosuppression Mediated by Human Bone Marrow-derived Clonal Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Na; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Yi, TacGhee; Song, Sun U

    2015-10-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunomodulatory properties and can suppress exaggerated pro-inflammatory immune responses. Although the exact mechanisms remain unclear, a variety of soluble factors are known to contribute to MSC-mediated immunosuppression. However, functional redundancy in the immunosuppressive properties of MSCs indicates that other uncharacterized factors could be involved. Galectin-9, a member of the β-galactoside binding galectin family, has emerged as an important regulator of innate and adaptive immunity. We examined whether galectin-9 contributes to MSC-mediated immunosuppression. Galectin-9 was strongly induced and secreted from human MSCs upon stimulation with pro-inflammatory cytokines. An in vitro immunosuppression assay using a knockdown approach revealed that galectin-9-deficient MSCs do not exert immunosuppressive activity. We also provided evidence that galectin-9 may contribute to MSC-mediated immunosuppression by binding to its receptor, TIM-3, expressed on activated lymphocytes, leading to apoptotic cell death of activated lymphocytes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that galectin-9 is involved in MSC-mediated immunosuppression and represents a potential therapeutic factor for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  18. Involvement of Spinal CCR5/PKCγ Signaling Pathway in the Maintenance of Cancer-Induced Bone Pain.

    PubMed

    Hang, Li-Hua; Li, Shu-Na; Dan, Xiang; Shu, Wei-Wei; Luo, Hong; Shao, Dong-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is a challenging medical problem that considerably influences cancer patients' quality of life. Currently, few treatments have been developed to conquer CIBP because of a poor understanding of the potential mechanisms. Our previous work has proved that spinal RANTES (a major ligand for CCR5) was involved in the maintenance of CIBP. In this study, we attempted to investigate whether spinal CCR5 and its downstream PKCγ pathway is involved in the maintenance of CIBP. Inoculation of Walker 256 cells into the tibia could induce a marked mechanical allodynia with concomitant upregulation of spinal CCR5 and p-PKCγ expression from day 6 to day 15 after inoculation. Spinal CCR5 was prominently expressed in microglia, and mechanical allodynia was attenuated by intrathecal injection of DAPTA (a specific antagonist of CCR5) with downregulation of spinal CCR5 and p-PKCγ expression levels at day 15 in inoculated rats. Pre-intrathecal injection of RANTES could reverse the anti-allodynia effects of DAPTA. Intrathecal administration of GF109203X (an inhibitor of PKC) could alleviate mechanical allodynia as well as decrease of spinal p-PKCγ expression level, but no influence on spinal CCR5 level. Our findings suggest that CCR5/PKCγ signaling pathway in microglia may contribute to the maintenance of CIBP in rats.

  19. Contrasting roles of leukemia inhibitory factor in murine bone development and remodeling involve region-specific changes in vascularization.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Ingrid J; McGregor, Narelle E; Pompolo, Sueli; Walker, Emma C; Sims, Natalie A

    2012-03-01

    We describe here distinct functions of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in bone development/growth and adult skeletal homeostasis. In the growth plate and developing neonate bones, LIF deficiency enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels, enlarged blood vessel formation, and increased the formation of "giant" osteoclasts/chondroclasts that rapidly destroyed the mineralized regions of the growth plate and developing neonatal bone. Below this region, osteoblasts formed large quantities of woven bone. In contrast, in adult bone undergoing remodeling osteoclast formation was unaffected by LIF deficiency, whereas osteoblast formation and function were both significantly impaired, resulting in osteopenia. Consistent with LIF promoting osteoblast commitment, enhanced marrow adipocyte formation was also observed in adult LIF null mice, and adipocytic differentiation of murine stromal cells was delayed by LIF treatment. LIF, therefore, controls vascular size and osteoclast differentiation during the transition of cartilage to bone, whereas an anatomically separate LIF-dependent pathway regulates osteoblast and adipocyte commitment in bone remodeling.

  20. Involvement of urokinase receptor in the cross-talk between human hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Salvati, Annamaria; Serio, Bianca; Pesapane, Ada; Ricci, Patrizia; Gorrasi, Anna; Santi, Anna Li; Hoyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Ragno, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) and can be induced to mobilize into the circulation for transplantation. Homing and lodgement into BM of transplanted HSCs are the first critical steps in their engraftment and involve multiple interactions between HSCs and the BM microenvironment. uPAR is a three domain receptor (DIDIIDIII) which binds urokinase, vitronectin, integrins. uPAR can be cleaved and shed from the cell surface generating full-length and cleaved soluble forms (suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR). DIIDIII-suPAR can bind fMLF receptors through the SRSRY sequence (residues 88-92). We previously reported the involvement of soluble uPAR in HSC mobilization. We now investigate its possible role in HSC homing and engraftment. We show similar levels of circulating full-length suPAR in healthy donors and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients before and after the pre-transplant conditioning regimen. By contrast, levels of circulating DIIDIII-suPAR in AML patients are higher as compared to controls and significantly decrease after the conditioning. We found that suPAR and uPAR84-95, a uPAR-derived peptide which mimics active DIIDIII-suPAR, induce a significant increase in Long Term Culture (LTC)-Initiating Cells (ICs) and in the release of clonogenic progenitors from LTCs of CD34+ HSCs. Further, suPAR increases adhesion and survival of CD34+ KG1 AML cells, whereas uPAR84-95 increases their proliferation. Thus, circulating DIIDIII-suPAR, strongly increased in HSC mobilization, is indeed down-regulated by pre-transplant conditioning, probably to favour HSC homing. BM full-length suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR may be involved in HSC lodgement within the BM by contributing to a suitable microenvironment. PMID:27517491

  1. Two-color flow cytometry with a CD19 gate for the evaluation of bone marrow involvement of B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kawano-Yamamoto, Chizuru; Muroi, Kazuo; Izumi, Thoru; Saito, Ken; Ozawa, Keiya

    2002-11-01

    The usefulness of two-color flow cytometry with a CD19 gate (CD19-FCM) for detecting clonal B-cells in the bone marrow was evaluated. Since kappa and lambda ratios analyzed in the bone marrow from healthy adults were within the range of 0.5-3.0, outside of this range was regarded as the existence of clonal B-cells. Mixing experiments in vitro showed that 10% or more of clonal B-cells contaminating normal bone marrow cells could be detected using CD19-FCM. Ninety-nine bone marrow samples from 60 patients with B-cell lymphoma were simultaneously analyzed using CD19-FCM and histologic examination of both bone marrow aspiration and core needle biopsy samples. The agreement of results obtained by both examinations was 82% (81/99). Discrepant results were found in 18 samples of 10 patients. All except one sample were positive for CD19-FCM analysis but negative for histologic examination and the conversion of CD19-FCM-positivity to CD19-FCM-negativity was associated with chemotherapy. These results suggest that CD19-FCM is useful for the evaluation of bone marrow involvement of B-cell lymphoma.

  2. Longitudinal bone growth is impaired by direct involvement of caffeine with chondrocyte differentiation in the growth plate.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeonhae; Choi, Yuri; Kim, Jisook; Bae, Jaeman; Roh, Jaesook

    2017-01-01

    We showed previously that caffeine adversely affects longitudinal bone growth and disrupts the histomorphometry of the growth plate during the pubertal growth spurt. However, little attention has been paid to the direct effects of caffeine on chondrocytes. Here, we investigated the direct effects of caffeine on chondrocytes of the growth plate in vivo and in vitro using a rapidly growing young rat model, and determined whether they were related to the adenosine receptor signaling pathway. A total of 15 male rats (21 days old) were divided randomly into three groups: a control group and two groups fed caffeine via gavage with 120 and 180 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) for 4 weeks. After sacrifice, the tibia processed for the analysis of the long bone growth and proliferation of chondrocytes using tetracycline and BrdU incorporation, respectively. Caffeine-fed animals showed decreases in matrix mineralization and proliferation rate of growth plate chondrocytes compared with the control. To evaluate whether caffeine directly affects chondrocyte proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation, primary rat chondrocytes were isolated from the growth plates and cultured in either the presence or absence of caffeine at concentrations of 0.1-1 mm, followed by determination of the cellular proliferation or expression profiles of cellular differentiation markers. Caffeine caused significant decreases in extracellular matrix production, mineralization, and alkaline phosphatase activity, accompanied with decreases in gene expression of the cartilage-specific matrix proteins such as aggrecan, type II collagen and type X. Our results clearly demonstrate that caffeine is capable of interfering with cartilage induction by directly inhibiting the synthetic activity and orderly expression of marker genes relevant to chondrocyte maturation. In addition, we found that the adenosine type 1 receptor signaling pathway may be partly involved in the detrimental effects of caffeine on

  3. Neurogenically mediated leakage of plasma protein occurs from blood vessels in dura mater but not brain

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, S.; Saito, K.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1987-12-01

    Utilizing /sup 125/I-BSA administered intravenously, a simple, reliable, and sensitive method was established for the detection of plasma protein extravasation in the dura of rats and guinea pigs following chemical, electrical, or immunological stimulation. Extravasated /sup 125/I-BSA or Evans blue was noted in the dura and conjunctiva but not in the temporalis muscle of saline-perfused rats following intravenous capsaicin, 1 mumol/kg. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was mediated by unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers since leakage did not develop in adult animals in whom these fibers were destroyed by capsaicin pretreatment (50 mg/kg) as neonates. An ipsilateral increase in Evans blue and /sup 125/I-BSA was found in the dura, eyelids, lips and gingival mucosa, and snout following electrical stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion. This increase was also C-fiber dependent. Among those peptides contained in perivascular afferent fibers and administered intravenously, substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, caused a dose-dependent extravasation in the dura and conjunctiva of rats. Neonatal capsaicin pretreatment did not attenuate SP- nor NKA-induced effects in the dura and actually increased extravasation in the conjunctiva. Intravenous administration of 5-HT or bradykinin to normal adult rats or adult rats pretreated as neonates with capsaicin increased levels of /sup 125/I-BSA in both the dura and the conjunctiva. Histamine and prostaglandin E2, on the other hand, caused protein leakage in the conjunctiva but not in the dura of rats; however, histamine did induce extravasation in the dura of guinea pigs.

  4. Effectiveness, tolerability and safety of azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® for acute bacterial conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Susannah; Sheikh, Aziz

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Bacterial eye infections are commonly treated with topical antibiotics, despite limited evidence of effectiveness. Azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® is a new formulation of azithromycin in a gel polymer designed for use in acute bacterial conjunctivitis. Methods: We conducted systematic searches of the Cochrane Database of Clinical Trials, PubMed and Google Scholar to find randomized controlled trials of “azithromycin DuraSite®”. These searches of published literature were supplemented with searches for unpublished trials and trials in progress. Results: We found six reports of randomized controlled trials investigating the role of azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® for the management of acute bacterial conjunctivitis. The quality of these trials was judged to be moderate to high. These trials assessed effectiveness, tolerability and safety outcomes, but we found no trials looking at cost-effectiveness. DuraSite® is a relatively stable formulation and so azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® has a simpler dosing schedule than other available topical antibiotics. It appears to be similar to other topical antibiotics in its effectiveness, but minor side effects are quite common. Conclusion: Acute bacterial conjunctivitis is a relatively mild, typically self-limiting, infection. Antibiotics should seldom be required. If, however, a decision to prescribe antibiotics is made, azithromycin 1% in DuraSite® is likely to be broadly comparable in its effectiveness to most other antibiotics used to treat acute bacterial conjunctivitis. Further research is needed to determine its cost-effectiveness. PMID:20517467

  5. Myeloma cell expression of 10 candidate genes for osteolytic bone disease. Only overexpression of DKK1 correlates with clinical bone involvement at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Haaber, Jacob; Abildgaard, Niels; Knudsen, Lene Meldgaard; Dahl, Inger Marie; Lodahl, Marianne; Thomassen, Mads; Kerndrup, Gitte Birk; Rasmussen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Osteolytic bone disease (OBD) in multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by interactions between MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment and is characterized by increased osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation. Recently, the role of osteoblast inhibition has come into focus, especially the possible role of overexpression of DKK1, an inhibitor of the Wnt signalling pathway. Further, CKS2, PSME2 and DHFR have also been reported as candidate genes for OBD. We studied the gene expression by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of TNFSF11 (RANKL), TNFSF11A (RANK), TNFRSF11B (OPG), CCL3 (MIP1A), CCL4 (MIP1B), PTHR1 (PTHrp), DKK1, CKS2, PSME2 and DHFR in purified, immunophenotypic FACS-sorted plasma cells from 171 newly diagnosed MM patients, 20 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and 12 controls. The gene expressions of the analysed genes were correlated with radiographically assessed OBD. Only overexpression of DKK1 was correlated to the degree of OBD. Myeloma cells did not express TNFSF11A, TNFSF11, or TNFRSF11B, and very rarely expressed CCL3 and PTHR11. CCL4, CKS2, PSME2 and DHFR were variably expressed, but the expression of these genes showed no correlation with OBD. In contrast, loss of PSME2 expression in MM plasma cells was significantly correlated with OBD.

  6. Issues in diagnosis of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms involving the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Report on the Bone Marrow Workshop of the XVIIth meeting of the European Association for Haematopathology and the Society for Hematopathology.

    PubMed

    Porwit, Anna; Fend, Falko; Kremer, Marcus; Orazi, Attilio; Safali, Mükerrem; van der Walt, Jon

    2016-09-01

    Small B cell lymphoid neoplasms are the most common lymphoproliferative disorders involving peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). The Bone Marrow Workshop (BMW) organized by the European Bone Marrow Working Group (EBMWG) of the European Association for Haematopathology (EAHP) during the XVIIth EAHP Meeting in Istanbul, October 2014, was dedicated to discussion of cases illustrating how the recent advances in immunophenotyping, molecular techniques and cytogenetics provide better understanding and classification of these entities. Submitted cases were grouped into following categories: (i) cases illustrating diagnostic difficulties in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); (ii) cases of BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms other than CLL; (iii) transformation of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms in the BM; and (iv) multiclonality and composite lymphomas in the BM. This report summarizes presented cases and conclusions of the BMW and provides practical recommendations for classification of the BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms based on the current state of knowledge.

  7. Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates β-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and serous DKK1 level was much higher in bone metastatic NSCLC compared to non-bone metastatic NSCLC. We also found that conditioned medium from DKK1 over-expressing lung cancer cells inhibited the differentiation of osteoblast, determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin secretion, whereas the conditioned medium from DKK1 silencing lung cancer cells exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, DKK1 reduced the level of β-catenin and RUNX2, as well as inhibiting the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Taken together, these results suggested that lung cancer-produced DKK1 may be an important mechanistic link between NSCLC and bone metastases, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to treat bone metastase of NSCLC.

  8. A new extended supracricoid laryngectomy technique for tongue base and hyoid bone involvement: crico-glosso-mandibulopexy technique.

    PubMed

    Hafız, Günter; Başaran, Bora; Ulusan, Murat; Comoğlu, Senol

    2014-01-01

    In the conventional supracricoid laryngectomy technique, tumors extending beyond the lingual surface of the epiglottis with tongue base invasion are contraindicated due to the requirement of the hyoid bone resection. The loss of the hyoid bone causes intractable aspiration and renders the cricoidal pexy process impossible. Therefore, surgeons tend to treat such tumors with total or subtotal laryngectomies or organ preservation protocols. In this article, a new supracricoid partial laryngectomy technique for tumors requiring resection of the hyoid bone and the base of the tongue was described.

  9. Characterization of Staphylococcus caprae Clinical Isolates Involved in Human Bone and Joint Infections, Compared with Goat Mastitis Isolates.

    PubMed

    d'Ersu, J; Aubin, G G; Mercier, P; Nicollet, P; Bémer, P; Corvec, S

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus caprae is an emerging microorganism in human bone and joint infections (BJI). The aim of this study is to describe the features of S. caprae isolates involved in BJI (H for human) compared with those of isolates recovered in goat mastitis (A for animal). Fourteen isolates of each origin were included. Identifications were performed using a Vitek 2 GP ID card, tuf gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) Vitek MS. Molecular typing was carried out using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DiversiLab technology. The crystal violet method was used to determine biofilm-forming ability. Virulence factors were searched by PCR. Vitek MS technology provides an accurate identification for the two types of isolates compared to that of gold-standard sequencing (sensitivity, 96.4%), whereas the Vitek 2 GP ID card was more effective for H isolates. Molecular typing methods revealed two distinct lineages corresponding to the origin despite few overlaps: H and A. In our experimental conditions, no significant difference was observed in biofilm production ability between H and A isolates. Nine isolates (5 H isolates and 4 A isolates) behaved as weak producers while one A isolate was a strong producer. Concerning virulence factors, the autolysin atlC and the serine aspartate adhesin (sdrZ) genes were detected in 24 isolates (86%), whereas the lipase gene was always detected, except in one H isolate (96%). The ica operon was present in 23 isolates (82%). Fibrinogen-binding (fbe) or collagen-binding (cna) genes were not detected by using primers designed for Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis, even in low stringency conditions. Although S. caprae probably remains underestimated in human infections, further studies are needed to better understand the evolution and the adaptation of this species to its host.

  10. Characterization of Staphylococcus caprae Clinical Isolates Involved in Human Bone and Joint Infections, Compared with Goat Mastitis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    d'Ersu, J.; Aubin, G. G.; Mercier, P.; Nicollet, P.; Bémer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus caprae is an emerging microorganism in human bone and joint infections (BJI). The aim of this study is to describe the features of S. caprae isolates involved in BJI (H for human) compared with those of isolates recovered in goat mastitis (A for animal). Fourteen isolates of each origin were included. Identifications were performed using a Vitek 2 GP ID card, tuf gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) Vitek MS. Molecular typing was carried out using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DiversiLab technology. The crystal violet method was used to determine biofilm-forming ability. Virulence factors were searched by PCR. Vitek MS technology provides an accurate identification for the two types of isolates compared to that of gold-standard sequencing (sensitivity, 96.4%), whereas the Vitek 2 GP ID card was more effective for H isolates. Molecular typing methods revealed two distinct lineages corresponding to the origin despite few overlaps: H and A. In our experimental conditions, no significant difference was observed in biofilm production ability between H and A isolates. Nine isolates (5 H isolates and 4 A isolates) behaved as weak producers while one A isolate was a strong producer. Concerning virulence factors, the autolysin atlC and the serine aspartate adhesin (sdrZ) genes were detected in 24 isolates (86%), whereas the lipase gene was always detected, except in one H isolate (96%). The ica operon was present in 23 isolates (82%). Fibrinogen-binding (fbe) or collagen-binding (cna) genes were not detected by using primers designed for Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis, even in low stringency conditions. Although S. caprae probably remains underestimated in human infections, further studies are needed to better understand the evolution and the adaptation of this species to its host. PMID:26511738

  11. Assessment of bone marrow involvement in patients with lymphoma: report on a consensus meeting of the Korean Society of Hematology Lymphoma Working Party

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong; Park, Byung Bae; Jeong, Ji Yun; Kim, Wook Youn; Jang, Seongsoo; Shin, Bong Kyung; Lee, Dong Soon; Han, Jae Ho; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Insun; Chi, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    In September 2011, the Korean Society of Hematology Lymphoma Working Party held a nationwide conference to establish a consensus for assessing bone marrow (BM) involvement in patients with lymphoma. At this conference, many clinicians, hematopathologists, and diagnostic hematologists discussed various topics for a uniform consensus in the evaluation process to determine whether the BM is involved. Now that the discussion has matured sufficiently to be published, we herein describe the consensus reached and limitations in current methods for assessing BM involvement in patients with lymphoma. PMID:27809449

  12. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Tomizawa, Hitoshi

    1995-04-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2. BST-2 is expressed not only on certain bone marrow stromal cell lines but also on various normal tissues, although its expression pattern is different from that of another bone marrow stromal cell surface molecule, BST-1. BST-2 surface expression on fibroblast cell lines facilitated the stromal cell-dependent growth of a murine bone marrow-derived pre-B-cell line, DW34. The results suggest that BST-2 may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Involvement of Renin-Angiotensin System in Damage of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Captopril on Bone of Normal Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Xin; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, on bone metabolism and histology, and the action of captopril on the components of the skeletal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and bradykinin receptor in normal male mice. The mice were orally administered captopril (10 mg/kg) for 4 weeks with vehicle-treated mice as normal control. The histology of trabecular bone at the distal femoral end was determined by hematoxylin & eosin, Safranin O and Masson-Trichrome staining. The captopril-treated mice showed a decreased level of testosterone (p<0.05) and procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (p<0.05) in serum as compared to those in the control group. Captopril has detrimental effects on trabecular bone as demonstrated by the loss of cancellous bone mass and network connections as well as changes to the chondrocytes zone. The expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (p<0.05), renin receptor (p<0.01), angiotensin II (p<0.05) and bradykinin receptor 2 (p<0.05) was significantly up-regulated following the captopril treatment. Thus, the potential underlying mechanism of the damage of captopril on bone can be attributed the increased activity of local bone RAS and the activation of bradykinin receptor.

  14. Intravital Imaging of a Massive Lymphocyte Response in the Cortical Dura of Mice after Peripheral Infection by Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Jonathan A.; Myburgh, Elmarie; Ritchie, Ryan; Hamilton, Alana; Rodgers, Jean; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Barrett, Michael P.; Brewer, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral infection by Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan responsible for sleeping sickness, activates lymphocytes, and, at later stages, causes meningoencephalitis. We have videoed the cortical meninges and superficial parenchyma of C56BL/6 reporter mice infected with T.b.brucei. By use of a two-photon microscope to image through the thinned skull, the integrity of the tissues was maintained. We observed a 47-fold increase in CD2+ T cells in the meninges by 12 days post infection (dpi). CD11c+ dendritic cells also increased, and extravascular trypanosomes, made visible either by expression of a fluorescent protein, or by intravenous injection of furamidine, appeared. The likelihood that invasion will spread from the meninges to the parenchyma will depend strongly on whether the trypanosomes are below the arachnoid membrane, or above it, in the dura. Making use of optical signals from the skull bone, blood vessels and dural cells, we conclude that up to 40 dpi, the extravascular trypanosomes were essentially confined to the dura, as were the great majority of the T cells. Inhibition of T cell activation by intraperitoneal injection of abatacept reduced the numbers of meningeal T cells at 12 dpi and their mean speed fell from 11.64 ± 0.34 μm/min (mean ± SEM) to 5.2 ± 1.2 μm/min (p = 0.007). The T cells occasionally made contact lasting tens of minutes with dendritic cells, indicative of antigen presentation. The population and motility of the trypanosomes tended to decline after about 30 dpi. We suggest that the lymphocyte infiltration of the meninges may later contribute to encephalitis, but have no evidence that the dural trypanosomes invade the parenchyma. PMID:25881126

  15. Gain of the human dura in vivo and its effects on invasive brain signal feature detection.

    PubMed

    Torres Valderrama, Aldemar; Oostenveld, Robert; Vansteensel, Mariska J; Huiskamp, Geertjan M; Ramsey, Nicolas Franciscus

    2010-03-30

    Invasive brain signal recordings generally rely on bioelectrodes implanted on the cortex underneath the dura. Subdural recordings have strong advantages in terms of bandwidth, spatial resolution and signal quality. However, subdural electrodes also have the drawback of compromising the long-term stability of such implants and heighten the risk of infection. Epidurally implanted electrodes might provide a viable alternative to subdural electrodes, offering a compromise between signal quality and invasiveness. Determining the feasibility of epidural electrode implantation for e.g., clinical research, brain-computer interfacing (BCI) and cognitive experiments, requires the characterization of the electrical properties of the dura, and its effect on signal feature detection. In this paper we report measurements of brain signal attenuation by the human dura in vivo. In addition, we use signal detection theory to study how the presence of the dura between the sources and the recording electrodes affects signal power features in motor BCI experiments. For noise levels typical of clinical brain signal recording equipment, we observed no detrimental effects on signal feature detection due to the dura. Subdural recordings were found to be more robust with respect to increased instrumentation noise level as compared to their epidural counterpart nonetheless. Our findings suggest that epidural electrode implantation is a viable alternative to subdural implants from the feature detection viewpoint.

  16. Modified three-dimensional skull base model with artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, and venous sinuses for training in skull base surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Oyama, Kazutaka; Ueno, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Honma, Keiichirou

    2008-12-01

    Experience with dissection of the cavernous sinus and the temporal bone is essential for training in skull base surgery, but the opportunities for cadaver dissection are very limited. A modification of a commercially available prototype three-dimensional (3D) skull base model, made by a selective laser sintering method and incorporating surface details and inner bony structures such as the inner ear structures and air cells, is proposed to include artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, venous sinuses, and the internal carotid artery for such surgical training. The transpetrosal approach and epidural cavernous sinus surgery (Dolenc's technique) were performed on this modified model using a high speed drill or ultrasonic bone curette under an operating microscope. The model could be dissected in almost the same way as a real cadaver. The modified 3D skull base model provides a good educational tool for training in skull base surgery.

  17. Evaluation of the predisposing factors and involved outcome of surgical treatment in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw cases including bone biopsies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the statistical relevance of whether the systemic predisposing factors affect the prognosis of surgical treatment of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). All cases had undergone bone biopsies to determine the characteristics of the mechanisms of BRONJ by optical microscopy. Materials and Methods The data included 54 BRONJ cases who underwent surgery and in whom bone biopsies were performed. The results of surgery were evaluated and the results were classified into 3 categories: normal recovery, delayed recovery, and recurrence after surgery. The medical history, such as diabetes mellitus, medication of steroids, malignancies on other sites was investigated for an evaluation of the systemic predisposing factors in relation to the prognosis. The three factors involved with the medication of bisphosphonate (BP) were the medication route, medication period, and drug holiday of BP before surgery. The serum C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide (CTX) value and presence of microorganism colony in bone biopsy specimens were also checked. Statistical analysis was then carried out to determine the relationship between these factors and the results of surgery. Results The group of patients suffering from diabetes and on steroids tended to show poorer results after surgery. Parenteral medication of BP made the patients have a poorer prognosis after surgery than oral medication. In contrast, the medication period and drug holiday of BP before surgery did not have significance with the results of surgery nor did the serum CTX value and presence of microorganism colony. Necrotic bone specimens in this study typically showed disappearing new bone formation around the osteocytic lacunae and destroyed Howship's lacunae. Conclusion Although many variables exist, this study could in part, predict the prognosis of surgical treatment of BRONJ by taking the patient's medical history. PMID:27595086

  18. Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in the NF-κB Signalling Pathway Are Associated with Bone Mineral Density, Geometry and Turnover in Men

    PubMed Central

    Roshandel, Delnaz; Thomson, Wendy; Pye, Stephen R.; Boonen, Steven; Borghs, Herman; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within two genes involved in the NF-κB cascade (GPR177 and MAP3K14) and bone mineral density (BMD) assessed at different skeletal sites, radial geometric parameters and bone turnover. Methods Ten GPR177 SNPs previously associated with BMD with genome-wide significance and twelve tag SNPs (r2≥0.8) within MAP3K14 (±10 kb) were genotyped in 2359 men aged 40–79 years recruited from 8 centres for participation in the European Male Aging Study (EMAS). Measurement of bone turnover markers (PINP and CTX-I) in the serum and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) at the calcaneus were performed in all centres. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), at the lumbar spine and hip, and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), at the distal and midshaft radius, were performed in a subsample (2 centres). Linear regression was used to test for association between the SNPs and bone measures under an additive genetic model adjusting for study centre. Results We validated the associations between SNPs in GPR177 and BMDa previously reported and also observed evidence of pleiotrophic effects on density and geometry. Rs2772300 in GPR177 was associated with increased total hip and LS BMDa, increased total and cortical vBMD at the radius and increased cortical area, thickness and stress strain index. We also found evidence of association with BMDa, vBMD, geometric parameters and CTX-I for SNPs in MAP3K14. None of the GPR177 and MAP3K14 SNPs were associated with calcaneal estimated BMD measured by QUS. Conclusion Our findings suggest that SNPs in GPR177 and MAP3K14 involved in the NF-κB signalling pathway influence bone mineral density, geometry and turnover in a population-based cohort of middle aged and elderly men. This adds to the understanding of the role of genetic variation in this pathway in determining bone health. PMID:22132199

  19. Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data Package—DuraLith

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-15

    This data package developed for the DuraLith wasteform includes information available in the open literature and from data obtained from testing currently underway. DuraLith is an alkali-activated geopolymer waste form developed by the Vitreous State Laboratory at The Catholic University of America (VSL-CUA) for encapsulating liquid radioactive waste. A DuraLith waste form developed for treating Hanford secondary waste liquids is prepared by alkali-activation of a mixture of ground blast furnace slag and metakaolinite with sand used as a filler material. Based on optimization tests, solid waste loading of {approx}7.5% and {approx}14.7 % has been achieved using the Hanford secondary waste S1 and S4 simulants, respectively. The Na loading in both cases is equivalent to {approx}6 M. Some of the critical parameters for the DuraLith process include, hydrogen generation and heat evolution during activator solution preparation using the waste simulant, heat evolution during and after mixing the activator solution with the dry ingredients, and a working window of {approx}20 minutes to complete the pouring of the DuraLith mixture into molds. Results of the most recent testing indicated that the working window can be extended to {approx}30 minutes if 75 wt% of the binder components, namely, blast furnace slag and metakaolin are replaced by Class F fly ash. A preliminary DuraLith process flow sheet developed by VSL-CUA for processing Hanford secondary waste indicated that 10 to 22 waste monoliths (each 48 ft3 in volume) can be produced per day. There are no current pilot-scale or full-scale DuraLith plants under construction or in operation; therefore, the cost of DuraLith production is unknown. The results of the non-regulatory leach tests, EPA Draft 1313 and 1316, Waste Simulant S1-optimized DuraLith specimens indicated that the concentrations of RCRA metals (Ag, Cd, Cr, Hg, and Pb) in the leachates were well below the Universal Treatment Standard limits in 40 CFR 268

  20. Bone Langerhans cell histiocytosis with pulmonary involvement in an adult non-smoker: A case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Feng, Shicheng

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease of unknown cause, which encompasses a set of disorders of multiple organs with various clinical presentations that share the common characteristic of sizeable Langerhans cell infiltration. The clinical spectrum of LCH ranges from solitary bone lesions to involvement of other organs. lung involvement in LCH may be part of a multisystem disease, which almost exclusively occurs in adult smokers, while it is overlooked or misdiagnosed in the majority of non-smokers. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest is crucial for diagnosis; however, the treatment and prognosis of this disease have not been clearly determined. We herein present the case of a non-smoking adult patient who presented with lower limb pain and was diagnosed via biopsy with lch with multisystem involvement, including the bone and lungs. Lytic lesions in the corpus of the sacroiliac joint, sacrum, acetabulum and femoral head by a soft tissue mass were observed on diagnostic CT. In addition, chest HRCT revealed multiple cysts in the bilateral lungs, predominantly in the upper lobes. The final diagnosis of LCH was confirmed by histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining for CD1a and S-100. Corticosteroid treatment alleviated lower limb pain and improved the patient's quality of life; thus, corticosteroids may be considered as a potential treatment option for patients with LCH. PMID:28123731

  1. 76 FR 36993 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Clarification of Classification for Human Dura Mater...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 (formerly Docket No. 1997N-0484P) Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Clarification of Classification for Human Dura Mater; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment. SUMMARY: The Food...

  2. Bone Marrow Cells in Murine Colitis: Multi-Signal Analysis Confirms Pericryptal Myofibroblast Engraftment without Epithelial Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Yin; Jeffery, Rosemary; Hutchinson, Gillian; Alison, Malcolm R.; Poulsom, Richard; Wright, Nicholas A.; Otto, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to epithelial tissues in the inflamed gut remains controversial. Recent reports have suggested that cell fusion between bone marrow-derived cells and the intestinal epithelium takes place in inflammatory conditions. Methods In attempts to confirm this, we have undertaken gender mis-matched bone marrow (BM) transplants from male Swiss Webster (SWR) mice to B and T cell-deficient female Rag2 KO mice which, 4 weeks later, were given 5% dextran sodium sulphate in drinking water to induce acute colitis. A further BM-treated group of animals with a graft versus host-like condition was also studied. We developed a new method to combine up to three brightfield or fluorescent lectin- or immuno-histochemical signals with fluorescent in situ hybridisation for the Y and X chromosomes to enable us unequivocally to identify BM-derived male cells which presented as different cell types in the gastrointestinal tract. Principal Findings In rolled preparations of whole intestines we scanned around 1.5 million crypts at many tissue levels. In no instance did we see a Y chromosome-positive cell in the epithelial compartment, which was not also CD45-positive. We saw no evidence of cell fusion, based on combined X and Y chromosome analysis. Levels of CD45-positive stromal and lymphoid cells and pericryptal myfibroblasts (positive for α-smooth muscle actin) increased with time up to a plateau, which resembled the level seen in untreated control grafted animals. We saw very few Y chromosome-positive endothelial cells in intestinal stromal vessels. Conclusions We conclude that whole BM transplantation does not result in intestinal epithelial engraftment in this model. Our new methods can usefully assist in multi-signal analyses of cell phenotypes following BM transplant and in models of chimaerism and regenerative medicine. PMID:22022515

  3. Massive bone marrow involvement in an end stage renal failure case with erythropoietin-resistant anemia and primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Taşlı, Funda; Özkök, Güliz; Ok, Ebru Sevinç; Soyer, Nur; Mollamehmetoğlu, Hülya; Vardar, Enver

    2013-09-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Type 1 PH is the most common form and develops due to a defect in a liver specific enzyme the alanine aminotransferase enzyme. As a result of the enzyme deficiency, there is an overproduction of oxalate and excessive urinary excretion. Recurrent urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis are the most important findings of the disorder and often at the beginning end-stage renal disease develops. This report presents a case backed up by literature of a patient with end stage renal failure and erythropoietin-resistant anaemia whose bone marrow biopsy showed crystal deposition which received delayed diagnosis of oxalosis.

  4. Bone proteins PHEX and DMP1 regulate fibroblastic growth factor Fgf23 expression in osteocytes through a common pathway involving FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aline; Liu, Shiguang; David, Valentin; Li, Hua; Karydis, Anastasios; Feng, Jian Q.; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblastic growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating phosphaturic hormone. Inactivating mutations of the endopeptidase PHEX or the SIBLING protein DMP1 result in equivalent intrinsic bone mineralization defects and increased Fgf23 expression in osteocytes. The mechanisms whereby PHEX and DMP1 regulate Fgf23 expression are unknown. We examined the possibility that PHEX and DMP1 regulate Fgf23 through a common pathway by analyzing the phenotype of compound Phex and Dmp1 mutant mice (Hyp/Dmp1−/−). Compared to single-mutant littermates, compound-mutant Hyp/Dmp1−/− mice displayed nonadditive elevations of serum FGF23 (1912 ± 183, 1715 ± 178, and 1799 ± 181 pg/ml), hypophosphatemia (Pi: 6.0 ± 0.3, 5.8 ± 0.2, and 5.4 ± 0.1 mg/dl), and severity of rickets/osteomalacia (bone mineral density: −36, −36, and −30%). Microarray analysis of long bones identified gene expression profiles implicating common activation of the FGFR pathway in all the mutant groups. Furthermore, inhibiting FGFR signaling using SU5402 in Hyp- and Dmp1−/−-derived bone marrow stromal cells prevented the increase in Fgf23 mRNA expression (129- and 124-fold increase in Hyp and Dmp1−/− vs. 1.3-fold in Hyp+SU5402 and 2.5-fold in Dmp1−/−+SU5402, P<0.05). For all analyses, samples collected from nonmutant wild-type littermates served as controls. These findings indicate that PHEX and DMP1 control a common pathway regulating bone mineralization and FGF23 production, the latter involving activation of the FGFR signaling in osteocytes.—Martin, A., Liu, S., David, V., Li, H., Karydis, A., Feng, J. Q., Quarles, L. D. Bone proteins PHEX and DMP1 regulate fibroblastic growth factor Fgf23 expression in osteocytes through a common pathway. PMID:21507898

  5. Hypoxia induced E-cadherin involving regulators of Hippo pathway due to HIF-1α stabilization/nuclear translocation in bone metastasis from breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Drago, Lorenzo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2015-01-15

    The present study deals with the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of E-cadherin expression under hypoxia, because the adjustment of the amount of E-cadherin due to physical stimuli of the microenvironment might influence the colonization of metastasis to skeleton. We analyzed the effect of 1% oxygen tension, that is similar to that encountered in the bone marrow by metastatic cells spreading from breast carcinoma. The purpose was to evaluate the hypoxia-orchestrated control of E-cadherin transactivation via hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), and the involvement of Hippo pathway members, as regulators of transcription factors. To give a translational significance to the study, we took into consideration human pair-matched ductal breast carcinoma and bone metastasis: E-cadherin and Wwox were expressed in bone metastasis but not in breast carcinoma, while HIF-1α and TAZ seemed localized principally in nuclei of metastasis and were found in all cell compartments of breast carcinoma. A close examination of the regulatory mechanisms underlying E-cadherin expression in bone metastasis was done in 1833 clone derived from MDA-MB231 cells. Hypoxia induced E-cadherin only in 1833 clone, but not in parental cells, through HIF-1 and PPARγ activities, while Wwox decreased. Since Wwox was highly expressed in bone metastasis, the effect of ectopic Wwox was evaluated, and we showed E-cadherin transactivation and enhanced invasiveness in WWOX transfected 1833 cells. Also, hypoxia was additive with ectopic Wwox remarkably enhancing HIF-1α nuclear shuttle and accumulation due to the lengthening of the half-life of HIF-1α protein; under this experimental condition HIF-1α appeared as a slower migrated band compared with control, in agreement with the phosphorylation state. The in vitro data strongly supported the almost exclusive presence of HIF-1α in nuclei of human-bone metastasis. Thus, we identified

  6. Routine immunofluorescent and histochemical analysis of bone marrow involvement of lymphoma/leukaemia: the use of cryostat sections.

    PubMed Central

    Chilosi, M.; Pizzolo, G.; Fiore-Donati, L.; Bofill, M.; Janossy, G.

    1983-01-01

    Enzyme histochemical and immunohistological (immuno-fluorescence and -peroxidase) techniques have been routinely used for investigating over 70 normal and pathological bone marrow samples. This recently standardized diagnostic procedure is very quick and can be performed in a few hours. In 6 cases the clinical diagnosis of leukaemia/lymphoma has become apparent only after the immunohistological analysis of the bone marrow. In 6 other cases the information about the staging of B cell malignancies was superior in the frozen biopsies to the paraffin embedded preparations. Amongst many other features the monoclonality of B CLL/lymphomas, the special features of B CLL infiltrates (RFA-1+, Leu-1+, HLA-DR+, SmIg+), follicular lymphoma deposits (containing follicular dendritic cells) and non-T, non-B acute lymphoblastic leukaemic blasts (terminal transferase+, HLA-DR+) as well as the sometimes conspicuous presence of infiltrating normal T cells could be clearly and reproducibly demonstrated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:6360192

  7. Cell membrane damage is involved in the impaired survival of bone marrow stem cells by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Cui, Yuqi; Tan, Tao; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Hao, Hong; Liu, Lingjuan; Zhang, Jia; He, Guanglong; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Lei, Minxiang; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-12-01

    Cell therapy with bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) remains a viable option for tissue repair and regeneration. A major challenge for cell therapy is the limited cell survival after implantation. This study was to investigate the effect of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL, naturally present in human blood) on BMSC injury and the effect of MG53, a tissue repair protein, for the improvement of stem cell survival. Rat bone marrow multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) were treated with ox-LDL, which caused significant cell death as reflected by the increased LDH release to the media. Exposure of MAPCs to ox-LDL led to entry of fluorescent dye FM1-43 measured under confocal microscope, suggesting damage to the plasma membrane. Ox-LDL also generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. While antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely blocked ROS production from ox-LDL, it failed to prevent ox-LDL-induced cell death. When MAPCs were treated with the recombinant human MG53 protein (rhMG53) ox-LDL induced LDH release and FM1-43 dye entry were significantly reduced. In the presence of rhMG53, the MAPCs showed enhanced cell survival and proliferation. Our data suggest that membrane damage induced by ox-LDL contributed to the impaired survival of MAPCs. rhMG53 treatment protected MAPCs against membrane damage and enhanced their survival which might represent a novel means for improving efficacy for stem cell-based therapy for treatment of diseases, especially in setting of hyperlipidemia.

  8. Bone graft

    MedlinePlus

    Autograft - bone; Allograft - bone; Fracture - bone graft; Surgery - bone graft; Autologous bone graft ... Fuse joints to prevent movement Repair broken bones (fractures) that have bone loss Repair injured bone that ...

  9. Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy D. Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Kirsch, David G.; Suit, Herman D.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Yoon, Sam S.; Gebhardt, Marc C.; Mankin, Henry J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

  10. Plasmodium durae Herman from the introduced common peafowl in northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Laird, M

    1978-02-01

    Plasmodium (Giovannolaia) durae Herman was originally described from Kenya, the type host being the common turkey, Meleagris gallopavo Linnaeus. There are no field records of this association outside of Africa, where the parasite, herein reported from another introduced and domesticated bird (the common peafowl, Pavo cristatus Linnaeus), was recently listed from 2 native Phasianidae of the genus Francolinus. The justification for the present identification is submitted against background data concerning malaria parasites from turkeys and other Galliformes in Africa and elsewhere, and restraint is urged in describing yet more "new species" of avian Plasmodium belonging to morphologically close taxa within Novyella and Giovannolaia. A near relative of P. durae, Plasmodium dissanaikei de Jong, is transferred from the former subgenus to the latter one.

  11. Histological examination of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene artificial dura mater at 14 years after craniotomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Aikawa, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Narita, Sumito; Yoshida, Hidenori; Etou, Housei; Sakamoto, Kimiya; Kazekawa, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) porous material (GORE(®) PRECLUDE(®) Dura Substitute) does not degenerate or deteriorate in vivo, and is currently used as artificial dura mater. This material does not adhere well to the surrounding tissues, but cerebrospinal fluid leakage along the suture line has been observed in several cases. We describe a case of craniotomy for tumor resection performed 14 years after dural repair with ePTFE sheet. Histological examination of the ePTFE sheet revealed that the sheet was structurally intact, with no evidence of tissue adhesion or cellular infiltration. However, collagen deposition was observed around the suture thread. When the suture thread was removed the collagen was also removed, and the original needle hole appeared again. No significant changes were observed in the features of the ePTFE sheet even 14 years postoperatively. The formation of fibrous tissue around the needle hole was important in preventing cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

  12. Evidence for CGRP re-uptake in rat dura mater encephali

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Amrutkar, Dipak Vasantrao; Mataji, Aydin; Salmasi, Hassan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Sheykhzade, Majid; Messlinger, Karl; Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is widely distributed in the trigeminovascular system and released from sensory fibres of the cranial dura mater upon noxious stimulation. Such release may be a mechanism underlying migraine headache. Based on data from guinea pig basilar artery preparations, we have here studied CGRP release and uptake in an organ preparation of the hemisected rat skull. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH CGRP release from the cranial dura was quantified by a commercial enzyme-linked immunoassay. CGRP was depleted using repetitive challenges of capsaicin. After incubating the tissue with CGRP for 20 min and extensive washing, another capsaicin challenge was performed. Immunohistochemistry was used to visualize CGRP immunofluorescence in dural nerve fibres. KEY RESULTS Capsaicin-induced CGRP release was attenuated by the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type I antagonist capsazepine or by Ca2+-free solutions. After the CGRP-depleted preparation had been exposed to exogenous CGRP, capsaicin-induced CGRP release was increased compared to the challenge just prior to incubation. CGRP uptake was not influenced by Ca2+-free solutions. Olcegepant and CGRP8–37 (CGRP receptor antagonists) did not affect uptake of CGRP. However, a monoclonal CGRP-binding antibody decreased CGRP uptake significantly. Release of CGRP after incubation was attenuated by Ca2+-free solutions and by capsazepine. Immunohistochemical assays indicated a weak trend towards CGRP uptake in rat dura mater. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS We have presented evidence for CGRP uptake in nerves and its re-release in rat dura mater. This may have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine. PMID:20804493

  13. Absorbable or nonabsorbable suture materials for closure of the dura mater?

    PubMed

    Vällfors, B; Hansson, H A; Svensson, J

    1981-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine which suture material would give the best results for closure of the dura mater. Because there is no need for the suture to remain longer than until healing has occurred and as remaining foreign material will predispose to foreign body reactions and infection, it was considered important to test new absorbable materials like polyglactin 910 (Vicryl) and polyglycolic acid (Dexon) for closure of the dura mater. The reactions from these materials were compared to those of silk and polyester (Ethibond) in dogs 60 days after the suture of dural incisions. The quality of healing with respect to the smoothness of the subdural surface, the presence of adhesions between sutures and the brain surface, the degree of absorption of the material, and reactions around the sutures were evaluated. Vicryl gave the best results, providing a smooth subdural surface without adhesions. It was almost totally absorbed when healing was completed, in contrast to Dexon and the other materials. The cellular reaction around Vicryl was slight. Silk, Ethibond, and Dexon protruded from the subdural surface and adhesions to the arachnoid were common. When the dura mater was removed, these adhesions tore off the leptomeninges with their vascular supply to the cortex. The results of these experiments seem to justify the recommendation of Vicryl for suturing of the dura mater. Such an absorbable material decreases the risk of foreign body reactions, and infections will be more easily combated because of the absence of foreign material. The lack of subdural adhesions is an advantage if reoperation is necessary.

  14. Banked Fascia Lata in Sellar Dura Reconstruction after Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fiorindi, Alessandro; Gioffrè, Giorgio; Boaro, Alessandro; Billeci, Domenico; Frascaroli, Daniele; Sonego, Massimo; Longatti, Pierluigi

    2015-08-01

    Objectives Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is an undesirable complication of transsphenoidal skull base surgery. The issue of the most appropriate sellar dura repair remains unresolved, although a multilayer technique using autologous fascia lata is widely used. We describe the novel application of a homologous banked fascia lata graft as an alternative to an autologous one in the reconstruction of sellar dura defects in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. Design The clinical records of patients who underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery at our department from June 2012, when we started using homologous fascia lata, up to July 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The data concerning diagnosis, reconstruction technique, and surgical outcome were analyzed. Results We treated 16 patients successfully with banked fascia lata. Twelve patients presented intraoperative CSF leakage, and four patients were treated for postoperative rhinoliquorrhea. Banked fascia lata was used in a single-to-multilayer technique, depending on the anatomical features of the defect and of the sellar floor. No complications or failures in sella reconstruction occurred. Conclusion A banked fascia lata graft proved reliable and safe in providing an effective sellar dura reconstruction. Used in a multilayer strategy, it should be considered a viable alternative to an autologous fascia lata graft.

  15. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  16. Bone scan in metabolic bone diseases. Review.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazek, Saeid; Szumowski, Piotr; Rogowski, Franciszek; Kociura-Sawicka, Agnieszka; Mojsak, Małgorzata; Szorc, Małgorzata

    2012-08-25

    Metabolic bone disease encompasses a number of disorders that tend to present a generalized involvement of the whole skeleton. The disorders are mostly related to increased bone turnover and increased uptake of radiolabelled diphosphonate. Skeletal uptake of 99mTc-labelled diphosphonate depends primarily upon osteoblastic activity, and to a lesser extent, skeletal vascularity. A bone scan image therefore presents a functional display of total skeletal metabolism and has valuable role to play in the assessment of patients with metabolic bone disorders. However, the bone scan appearances in metabolic bone disease are often non-specific, and their recognition depends on increased tracer uptake throughout the whole skeleton. It is the presence of local lesions, as in metastatic disease, that makes a bone scan appearance obviously abnormal. In the early stages, there will be difficulty in evaluating the bone scans from many patients with metabolic bone disease. However, in the more severe cases scan appearances can be quite striking and virtually diagnostic.

  17. Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor with Extensive Bone Marrow Involvement at Diagnosis: Evaluation of Response and Hematological Toxicity Profile of PRRT with (177)Lu-DOTATATE.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Ranade, Rohit; Thapa, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response and hematological toxicity in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with lutetium ((177)Lu)-DOTA-octreotate (DOTATATE) in metastatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) with extensive bone marrow metastasis at the initial diagnosis. A retrospective evaluation was undertaken for this purpose: Patients with NET with extensive diffuse bone marrow involvement at diagnosis who had received at least three cycles of PRRT with (177)Lu-DOTATATE were considered for the analysis. The selected patients were analyzed for the following: (i) Patient and lesional characteristics, (ii) associated metastatic burden, (iii) hematological parameters at diagnosis and during the course of therapy, (iv) response to PRRT (using a 3-parameter assessment: Symptomatic including Karnofsky/Lansky performance score, biochemical finding, and scan finding), (v) dual tracer imaging features [with somatostatin receptor imaging (SRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT)]. Based on the visual grading, tracer uptake in somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-positive bone marrow lesions were graded by a 4-point scale into four categories (0-III) in comparison with the hepatic uptake on the scan: 0 - no uptake; I - clear focus but less than liver uptake; II - equal to liver uptake; and III - higher than liver uptake]. Hematological toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0 score. A total of five patients (age range: 26-62 years; three males and two females) with diffuse bone marrow involvement at the diagnosis was encountered following analysis of the entire patient population of 250 patients. Based on the site of the primary, three had thoracic NET (two patients bronchial carcinoid and one pulmonary NET) and two gastroenteropancreatic NET (one in the duodenum and one patient of unknown primary with liver metastasis). Associated sites

  18. Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor with Extensive Bone Marrow Involvement at Diagnosis: Evaluation of Response and Hematological Toxicity Profile of PRRT with 177Lu-DOTATATE

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip; Ranade, Rohit; Thapa, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response and hematological toxicity in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with lutetium (177Lu)-DOTA-octreotate (DOTATATE) in metastatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) with extensive bone marrow metastasis at the initial diagnosis. A retrospective evaluation was undertaken for this purpose: Patients with NET with extensive diffuse bone marrow involvement at diagnosis who had received at least three cycles of PRRT with 177Lu-DOTATATE were considered for the analysis. The selected patients were analyzed for the following: (i) Patient and lesional characteristics, (ii) associated metastatic burden, (iii) hematological parameters at diagnosis and during the course of therapy, (iv) response to PRRT (using a 3-parameter assessment: Symptomatic including Karnofsky/Lansky performance score, biochemical finding, and scan finding), (v) dual tracer imaging features [with somatostatin receptor imaging (SRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT)]. Based on the visual grading, tracer uptake in somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-positive bone marrow lesions were graded by a 4-point scale into four categories (0-III) in comparison with the hepatic uptake on the scan: 0 - no uptake; I - clear focus but less than liver uptake; II - equal to liver uptake; and III - higher than liver uptake]. Hematological toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0 score. A total of five patients (age range: 26-62 years; three males and two females) with diffuse bone marrow involvement at the diagnosis was encountered following analysis of the entire patient population of 250 patients. Based on the site of the primary, three had thoracic NET (two patients bronchial carcinoid and one pulmonary NET) and two gastroenteropancreatic NET (one in the duodenum and one patient of unknown primary with liver metastasis). Associated sites of

  19. Dura-arachnoid lesions produced by 22 gauge Quincke spinal needles during a lumbar puncture

    PubMed Central

    Reina, M; Lopez, A; Badorrey, V; De Andres, J A; Martin, S

    2004-01-01

    Aims: The dural and arachnoid hole caused by lumbar puncture needles is a determining factor in triggering headaches. The aim of this study is to assess the dimensions and morphological features of the dura mater and arachnoids when they are punctured by a 22 gauge Quincke needle having its bevel either in the parallel or in the transverse position. Methods: Fifty punctures were made with 22 gauge Quincke needles in the dural sac of four fresh cadavers using an "in vitro" model especially designed for this purpose. The punctures were performed by needles with bevels parallel or perpendicular to the spinal axis and studied under scanning electron microscopy. Results: Thirty five of the 50 punctures done by Quincke needles (19 in the external surface and 16 in the internal) were used for evaluation. When the needle was inserted with its bevel parallel to the axis of the dural sac (17 of 35), the size of the dura-arachnoid lesion was 0.032 mm2 in the epidural surface and 0.037 mm2 in the subarachnoid surface of the dural sac. When the needle's bevel was perpendicular to the axis (18 of 35) the measurement of the lesion size was 0.042 mm2 for the external surface and 0.033 mm2 for the internal. There were no statistical significant differences between these results. Conclusions: It is believed that the reported lower frequency of postdural puncture headache when the needle is inserted parallel to the cord axis should be explained by some other factors besides the size of the dura-arachnoid injury. PMID:15146008

  20. DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W. L.; Lutz, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2011-07-21

    The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

  1. Initial report of bridge to recovery in a patient with DuraHeart LVAD.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Daisuke; Toda, Koichi; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Nishi, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Saito, Tetsuya; Shibasaki, Ikuko; Sakata, Yasushi; Ohtani, Tomohito; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2013-09-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) provide acceptable clinical results, but the long waiting period for heart transplantation leads to diverse complications. LVAD support can cause reverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling that results in the improvement of LV function and allows LVAD removal. We present a case of successful removal of a DuraHeart LVAD because of sufficient recovery of LV function. Before LVAD removal, we conducted an "LVAD weaning test" by decreasing pump speed and performing an additional normal saline infusion test. We consider that the LVAD weaning test can be used in place of the "pulsatile LVAD off test."

  2. [Imaging of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Thariat, Juliette; Nouri, Yasir; Foti, Pauline; Hericord, Olivier; Stolear, Sandy; Coco, Lucia; Hauger, Olivier; Huwart, Laurent; Boileau, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    Bone metastases are detected at initial diagnosis of cancer in 25% of cases and bone metastases are common in the course of a majority of cancer types. The spine and proximal long bones are the most affected sites. Knowledge of the basic radiological semiology is important to make the proper diagnosis of metastasis(s) bone(s), especially in situations in which the clinical context is not suggestive of metastases (such as cases where bone metastases are inaugural or cases of peripheral solitary metastasis). Tumor aggressiveness can be assessed at the level of the cortical bone and periosteum. Lodwick criteria are useful for the diagnosis of malignancy and tumor aggressiveness at initial diagnosis on plain radiographs, which are very important in the context of bone metastases. A CT scanner is required to confirm the malignancy of a bone lesion. MRI is complementary to the scanner including for the assessment of bone marrow involvement and tumor extensions.

  3. Genetic regulation of bone mass: from bone density to bone strength.

    PubMed

    Langman, Craig B

    2005-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease characterized in adults by diminished bone density. Bone is an organ that evolves and grows throughout life, and establishing optimal bone density in childhood and adolescence serves to buffer bone loss later in life. Bone density, a measurable entity, is the clinical substitute for bone strength, or the ability to defend against fracture. Chronic diseases may adversely affect optimal peak bone density. Bone density is under genetic control, as revealed by three lines of investigations. These include (1) the finding of quantitative trait loci for bone density, (2) the finding that specific mutations in genes that are important in the development of osteoblast or osteoclast lineages alter bone density, and (3) the linkeage of known polymorphisms for genes involved in mineral homeostasis to bone density and/or fracture. Future therapeutics for improving peak bone density or delaying bone loss later in life may take advantage of the genetic nature of bone density development.

  4. DuraHeart magnetically levitated centrifugal left ventricular assist system for advanced heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Morshuis, Michiel; Schoenbrodt, Michael; Nojiri, Chisato; Roefe, Daniela; Schulte-Eistrup, Sebastian; Boergermann, Jochen; Gummert, Jan F; Arusoglu, Latif

    2010-03-01

    The implantable left ventricular assist system (LVAS) using pulsatile pump technology has become an established therapeutic option for advanced heart failure patients. However, there have been technological limitations in some older designs, including a high incidence of infection and mechanical failures associated with moving parts, and the large size of both implantable pump and percutaneous cable. A smaller rotary blood pump emerged as a possible alternative to a large pulsatile pump to overcome some of these limitations. The technological advancement that defines the third-generation LVAS was the elimination of all mechanical contacts between the impeller and the drive mechanism. The DuraHeart LVAS is the world's first third-generation implantable LVAS to obtain market approval (CE-mark), which combines a centrifugal pump and active magnetic levitation. The initial clinical experience with the DuraHeart LVAS in Europe demonstrated that it provided significantly improved survival (85% at 6 months and 79% at 1 year), reduced adverse event rates and long-term device reliability (freedom from device replacement at 2 years: 96 +/- 3%) over pulsatile LVAS.

  5. Use of equine pericardium sheet (LYOMESH®) as dura mater substitute in endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Luigi M.; Solari, Domenico; Somma, Teresa; Di Somma, Alberto; Chiaramonte, Carmela; Cappabianca, Paolo

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the use of equine pericardium sheet (Lyomesh ® ) as dural substitute for sellar reconstruction after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery for the removal of pituitary adenomas. Methods We reviewed data of patients that underwent surgery by means of an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for the removal of pituitary adenomas over a 12-months period, starting in May 2012, i.e. when we adopted Lyomesh ® (Audio Technologies, Piacenza, Italy) an equine pericardium sheet, as dura mater substitute. Results: During the 12-months period evaluated, we performed an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal operation for a variety of pituitary lesions on 102 consecutive patients. Among these, in 12 patients (9.4%) harboring a pituitary adenoma, the implant of the pericardium sheet was used. Four patients (33.3%) presented a small intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak; in these cases the Lyomesh ® was placed intradurally with fibrin glue and, thereafter, several layers were positioned in extradural space. In 8 other subjects without any evidence of CSF leak, the dural substitute was placed intradurally and fibrin glue was injected intradurally to hold the material in place. Conclusions: Even if based on a relatively small patient series, our experience demonstrated that the use of equine pericardium sheet (Lyomesh ® ) as dura mater substitute in transsphenoidal surgery is safe and biocompatible, as compared with other dural substitutes. PMID:24251248

  6. Draft genome sequence of an elite Dura palm and whole-genome patterns of DNA variation in oil palm

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jingjing; Lee, May; Bai, Bin; Sun, Yanwei; Qu, Jing; Rahmadsyah; Alfiko, Yuzer; Lim, Chin Huat; Suwanto, Antonius; Sugiharti, Maria; Wong, Limsoon; Ye, Jian; Chua, Nam-Hai; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Oil palm is the world’s leading source of vegetable oil and fat. Dura, Pisifera and Tenera are three forms of oil palm. The genome sequence of Pisifera is available whereas the Dura form has not been sequenced yet. We sequenced the genome of one elite Dura palm, and re-sequenced 17 palm genomes. The assemble genome sequence of the elite Dura tree contained 10,971 scaffolds and was 1.701 Gb in length, covering 94.49% of the oil palm genome. 36,105 genes were predicted. Re-sequencing of 17 additional palm trees identified 18.1 million SNPs. We found high genetic variation among palms from different geographical regions, but lower variation among Southeast Asian Dura and Pisifera palms. We mapped 10,000 SNPs on the linkage map of oil palm. In addition, high linkage disequilibrium (LD) was detected in the oil palms used in breeding populations of Southeast Asia, suggesting that LD mapping is likely to be practical in this important oil crop. Our data provide a valuable resource for accelerating genetic improvement and studying the mechanism underlying phenotypic variations of important oil palm traits. PMID:27426468

  7. Draft genome sequence of an elite Dura palm and whole-genome patterns of DNA variation in oil palm.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jingjing; Lee, May; Bai, Bin; Sun, Yanwei; Qu, Jing; Rahmadsyah; Alfiko, Yuzer; Lim, Chin Huat; Suwanto, Antonius; Sugiharti, Maria; Wong, Limsoon; Ye, Jian; Chua, Nam-Hai; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-12-01

    Oil palm is the world's leading source of vegetable oil and fat. Dura, Pisifera and Tenera are three forms of oil palm. The genome sequence of Pisifera is available whereas the Dura form has not been sequenced yet. We sequenced the genome of one elite Dura palm, and re-sequenced 17 palm genomes. The assemble genome sequence of the elite Dura tree contained 10,971 scaffolds and was 1.701 Gb in length, covering 94.49% of the oil palm genome. 36,105 genes were predicted. Re-sequencing of 17 additional palm trees identified 18.1 million SNPs. We found high genetic variation among palms from different geographical regions, but lower variation among Southeast Asian Dura and Pisifera palms. We mapped 10,000 SNPs on the linkage map of oil palm. In addition, high linkage disequilibrium (LD) was detected in the oil palms used in breeding populations of Southeast Asia, suggesting that LD mapping is likely to be practical in this important oil crop. Our data provide a valuable resource for accelerating genetic improvement and studying the mechanism underlying phenotypic variations of important oil palm traits.

  8. Involvement of PI3K and ROCK signaling pathways in migration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Na; Shang, De-Shu; Sun, Wei; Li, Bo; Xu, Xin; Fang, Wen-Gang; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Cao, Liu; Chen, Yu-Hua

    2013-06-04

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) represent an important and easily available source of stem cells for potential therapeutic use in neurological diseases. The entry of circulating cells into the central nervous system by intravenous administration requires, firstly, the passage of the cells across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, little is known of the details of MSC transmigration across the BBB. In the present study, we employed an in vitro BBB model constructed using a human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer to study the mechanism underlying MSC transendothelial migration. Transmigration assays, transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) flux assays showed that MSC could transmigrate through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers by a paracellular pathway. Cell fractionation and immunofluorescence assays confirmed the disruption of tight junctions. Inhibition assays showed that a Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y27632) effectively promoted MSC transendothelial migration; conversely, a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) blocked MSC transendothelial migration. Interestingly, adenovirus-mediated interference with ROCK in MSC significantly increased MSC transendothelial migration, and overexpression of a PI3K dominant negative mutant in MSC cells could block transendothelial migration. Our findings provide clear evidence that the PI3K and ROCK pathways are involved in MSC migration through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers. The information yielded by this study may be helpful in constructing gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells that are able to penetrate the BBB effectively for cell therapy.

  9. Protease analysis by neoepitope approach reveals the activation of MMP-9 is achieved proteolytically in a test tissue cartilage model involved in bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunice R; Lamplugh, Lisa; Kluczyk, Beata; Mort, John S; Leblond, Charles Philippe

    2006-09-01

    A principle of regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity has been introduced as the cysteine-switch mechanism of activation (Springman et al. 1990). According to this mechanism, a critical Cys residue found in the auto-inhibitory propeptide domain of latent proenzyme is important to determine whether or not activation is turned on or off. The mechanism further allows for multiple modes of activation. To determine whether or not activation is accomplished proteolytically within a rat test cartilage model, protease analysis by the neoepitope approach, which relies upon a set of antibodies, was applied. One is used to identify the MMP-9 proenzyme bearing the critical cysteine residue, the other to identify any enzyme present bearing a new NH2-terminus 89FQTFD. This is indicative of MMP-9 lacking the cysteine switch. The antibody set has been applied to frozen tissue sections and analyzed by light and electron microscopic methods. Results reveal that activation of the MMP-9 protease involves limited proteolysis resulting in propeptide domain release. Here we report the observed changes of protease form to indigenous cells and extracellular matrix, thereby making it possible to uncover the features of MMP-9 activation within a specified set of tissue circumstances where a cartilage model is transformed into definitive bone. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials.

  10. Experimental animal models of myocardial damage in regenerative medicine studies involving adult bone marrow derived stem cells: ethical and methodological implications.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, Michele M; Acquistapace, Giulia; Toffetti, Laura; Magrini, Fabio; Paliotti, Roberta

    2009-06-01

    Cardiac performance after myocardial infarction is compromised by ventricular remodeling, which represents a major cause of late infarct-related chronic heart failure and death. In recent years, the scientists' interest has focused on the hypothesis that the administration of bone marrow progenitors, following myocardial infarction, could ameliorate left ventricular remodeling by continuing to differentiate along the haematopoietic lineage. This approach has been developed minding to the consolidated use of transfusions to restore lost or depleted blood components and, therefore, as an enriched dose of various progenitors, generally autologous, injected peripherally or directly in the infarcted area. Since the safety of this therapy was not yet established, for ethical reasons pioneering researchers involved in these studies used animal models as surrogate of the human biologic system. Herein this hypothesis of therapy resulted in an increased use of living animals and in the reappraisal of models of myocardial damage with limited discussion on the theoretical basis of animal models applied to cell-based therapies. Recently, the European Union and its commission for surveillance of laboratory animals advanced a new proposal to restrict the use of living animals. This review will focus on the history of models utilization in biomedicine, with particular attention to animal models, and delineate an operative comparison between the two best known models of myocardial injury, namely coronary ligation and cryodamage, in the perspective of adult stem cell research applied to cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

  11. Characterization of the Effects of the Human Dura on Macro- and Micro-Electrocorticographic Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, David T.; Zellmer, Erik; Gaona, Charles M.; Sharma, Mohit; Szrama, Nicholas; Hacker, Carl; Freudenburg, Zachary V.; Daitch, Amy; Moran, Daniel W.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electrocorticography (ECoG) electrodes implanted on the surface of the brain have recently emerged as a potential signal platform for brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. While clinical ECoG electrodes are currently implanted beneath the dura, epidural electrodes could reduce the invasiveness and the potential impact of a surgical site infection. Subdural electrodes, on the other hand, while slightly more invasive, may have better signals for BCI application. Because of this balance between risk and benefit between the two electrode positions, the effect of the dura on signal quality must be determined in order to define the optimal implementation for an ECoG BCI system. Approach This study utilized simultaneously acquired baseline recordings from epidural and subdural ECoG electrodes while patients rested. Both macro-scale (2 mm diameter electrodes with 1 cm inter-electrode distance, 1 patient) and micro-scale (75 μm diameter electrodes with 1 mm inter-electrode distance, 4 patients) ECoG electrodes were tested. Signal characteristics were evaluated to determine differences in the spectral amplitude and noise floor. Furthermore, the experimental results were compared to theoretical effects produced by placing epidural and subdural ECoG contacts of different sizes within a finite element model. Main Results The analysis demonstrated that for micro-scale electrodes, subdural contacts have significantly higher spectral amplitudes and reach the noise floor at a higher frequency than epidural contacts. For macro-scale electrodes, while there are statistical differences, these differences are small in amplitude and likely do not represent differences relevant to the ability of the signals to be used in a BCI system. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate an important trade-off that should be considered in developing a chronic BCI system. While implanting electrodes under the dura is more invasive, it is associated with increased signal quality when recording

  12. Characterization of the effects of the human dura on macro- and micro-electrocorticographic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, David T.; Zellmer, Erik; Gaona, Charles M.; Sharma, Mohit; Szrama, Nicholas; Hacker, Carl; Freudenburg, Zachary V.; Daitch, Amy; Moran, Daniel W.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) electrodes implanted on the surface of the brain have recently emerged as a potential signal platform for brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. While clinical ECoG electrodes are currently implanted beneath the dura, epidural electrodes could reduce the invasiveness and the potential impact of a surgical site infection. Subdural electrodes, on the other hand, while slightly more invasive, may have better signals for BCI application. Because of this balance between risk and benefit between the two electrode positions, the effect of the dura on signal quality must be determined in order to define the optimal implementation for an ECoG BCI system. Approach. This study utilized simultaneously acquired baseline recordings from epidural and subdural ECoG electrodes while patients rested. Both macro-scale (2 mm diameter electrodes with 1 cm inter-electrode distance, one patient) and micro-scale (75 µm diameter electrodes with 1 mm inter-electrode distance, four patients) ECoG electrodes were tested. Signal characteristics were evaluated to determine differences in the spectral amplitude and noise floor. Furthermore, the experimental results were compared to theoretical effects produced by placing epidural and subdural ECoG contacts of different sizes within a finite element model. Main results. The analysis demonstrated that for micro-scale electrodes, subdural contacts have significantly higher spectral amplitudes and reach the noise floor at a higher frequency than epidural contacts. For macro-scale electrodes, while there are statistical differences, these differences are small in amplitude and likely do not represent differences relevant to the ability of the signals to be used in a BCI system. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate an important trade-off that should be considered in developing a chronic BCI system. While implanting electrodes under the dura is more invasive, it is associated with increased signal quality when

  13. High total metabolic tumor volume in PET/CT predicts worse prognosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients with bone marrow involvement in rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Song, Moo-Kon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Lim, Sung-Nam; Shin, Seunghyeon; Pak, Kyoung June; Kwon, Seong Young; Shim, Hye Kyung; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, In-Suk; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Geun; Oh, So-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow involvement (BMI) in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was naively regarded as an adverse clinical factor. However, it has been unknown which factor would separate clinical outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. Recently, metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was suggested to predict prognosis in several lymphoma types. Therefore, we investigated whether MTV would separate the outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. MTV on PET/CT was defined as an initial tumor burden as target lesion ≥ standard uptake value, 2.5 in 107 patients with BMI. Intramedullary (IM) MTV was defined as extent of BMI and total MTV was as whole tumor burden. 260.5 cm(3) and 601.2 cm(3) were ideal cut-off values for dividing high and low MTV status in the IM and total lymphoma lesions in Receiver Operating Curve analysis. High risk NCCN-IPI (p<0.001, p<0.001), bulky disease (p=0.011, p=0.005), concordant subtype (p=0.025, p=0.029), high IM MTV status (p<0.001, p<0.001), high total MTV status (p<0.001, p<0.001), and ≥ 2CAs in BM (p=0.037, p=0.033) were significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) than other groups. In multivariate analysis, high risk NCCN-IPI (PFS, p=0.006; OS, p=0.013), concordant subtype (PFS, p=0.005; OS, p=0.007), and high total MTV status (PFS, p<0.001; OS, p<0.001) had independent clinical impacts. MTV had prognostic significances for survivals in DLBCL with BMI.

  14. Bone Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  15. Bone Cancer: Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are there different types of primary bone cancer? Yes. Cancer can begin in any type of bone tissue. Bones are made up ... follow-up treatment necessary? What does it involve? Yes. Bone cancer ... and should report any unusual symptoms right away. Follow-up varies for ...

  16. A sewing needle in contact with the cervical dura mater and vertebral artery

    PubMed Central

    Fumihiro, Arizumi; Shinichi, Inoue; Toshiya, Tachibana; Keishi, Maruo; Shinichi, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Although cervical foreign bodies have been previously reported, the report of a needle in the cervical spinal cord is rare. Herein, we report a rare case of a sewing needle in contact with the cervical dura mater and vertebral artery. Patients concerns: A 47-year-old man presented with discomfort in the posterior region of his neck. Approximately 2 years before admission, he suffered a stiff neck and had stabbed the posterior region of his neck with a sewing needle. The sewing needle had deeply entered his neck, and he left it alone because it could not be identified or removed. On examination, the patient had a full range of neck motion, but was experiencing discomfort. Cervical spine radiographs revealed a metal foreign body oriented from between the C2 and C3 spinous processes to the anterior cervical spine. Diagnosis: Computed tomography (CT) myelogram and CT angiogram revealed that the sewing needle was penetrating into the foramen transversarium and was in contact with the cervical dura mater and the right vertebral artery. Interventions: The sewing needle was removed under general anesthesia. Outcomes: Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred immediately after removal of the needle. Symptoms of discomfort disappeared without any complications. Lessons: This is the first report of a sewing needle that entered the cervical spinal canal while avoiding the cervical spine and the vertebral artery. Although no symptoms occurred for nearly 2 years, surgical removal of a foreign body near the cervical spinal cord and vertebral artery should be performed as soon as possible, before the occurrence of symptoms. PMID:28033295

  17. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  18. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers from the marine organisms Lendenfeldia dendyi and Sinularia dura with anti-MRSa activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the marine sponge Lendenfeldia dendyi and the soft coral Sinularia dura resulted in the isolation of five polybrominated diphenyl ethers (1-5). The structures of the isolated compounds were determined using spectroscopic methods(lD and 2D NMR) and HRMS analyses. The ...

  19. 76 FR 6839 - ActiveCore Technologies, Inc., Battery Technologies, Inc., China Media1 Corp., Dura Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ActiveCore Technologies, Inc., Battery Technologies, Inc., China Media1 Corp., Dura Products... concerning the securities of Battery Technologies, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports...

  20. 3D-Printed Atsttrin-Incorporated Alginate/Hydroxyapatite Scaffold Promotes Bone Defect Regeneration with TNF/TNFR Signaling Involvement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Xia, Qingqing; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wen, Feiqiu; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang; Heng, Boon Chin; He, Yong; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2015-08-05

    High expression levels of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α within bone defects can decelerate and impair bone regeneration. However, there are few available bone scaffolds with anti-inflammatory function. The progranulin (PGRN)-derived engineered protein, Atsttrin, is known to exert antagonistic effects on the TNF-α function. Hence, this study investigates whether 3D-printed Atsttrin-incorporated alginate(Alg)/hydroxyapatite(nHAp) scaffolds can facilitate bone healing through affecting the TNF/TNFR signaling. A 3D bioprinting system is used to fabricate Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp composite scaffolds, and the Atsttrin release from this scaffold is characterized, followed by evaluation of its efficacy on bone regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. The 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold exhibits a precisely defined structure, can sustain Atsttrin release for at least 5 days, has negligible cytotoxicity, and supports cell adhesion. Atsttrin can also attenuate the suppressive effects of TNF-α on BMP-2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. The 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold significantly reduces the number of TNF-α positive cells within wound sites, 7 days after post-calvarial defect surgery. Additionally, histological staining and X-ray scanning results also show that the 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold enhances the regeneration of mice calvarial bone defects. These findings thus demonstrate that the precise structure and anti-inflammatory properties of 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffolds may promote bone defect repair.

  1. Activity of botulinum toxin type A in cranial dura: implications for treatment of migraine and other headaches

    PubMed Central

    Filipović, Boris; Matak, Ivica; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) is approved for chronic migraine treatment, its mechanism of action is still unknown. Dural neurogenic inflammation (DNI) commonly used to investigate migraine pathophysiology can be evoked by trigeminal pain. Here, we investigated the reactivity of cranial dura to trigeminal pain and the mechanism of BoNT/A action on DNI. Experimental Approach Because temporomandibular disorders are highly comorbid with migraine, we employed a rat model of inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant, followed by treatment with BoNT/A injections or sumatriptan p.o. DNI was assessed by Evans blue‐plasma protein extravasation, cell histology and RIA for CGRP. BoNT/A enzymatic activity in dura was assessed by immunohistochemistry for cleaved synaptosomal‐associated protein 25 (SNAP‐25). Key Results BoNT/A and sumatriptan reduced the mechanical allodynia and DNI, evoked by complete Freund's adjuvant. BoNT/A prevented inflammatory cell infiltration and inhibited the increase of CGRP levels in dura. After peripheral application, BoNT/A‐cleaved SNAP‐25 colocalized with CGRP in intracranial dural nerve endings. Injection of the axonal transport blocker colchicine into the trigeminal ganglion prevented the formation of cleaved SNAP‐25 in dura. Conclusions and Implications Pericranially injected BoNT/A was taken up by local sensory nerve endings, axonally transported to the trigeminal ganglion and transcytosed to dural afferents. Colocalization of cleaved SNAP‐25 and the migraine mediator CGRP in dura suggests that BoNT/A may prevent DNI by suppressing transmission by CGRP. This might explain the effects of BoNT/A in temporomandibular joint inflammation and in migraine and some other headaches. PMID:26493010

  2. Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones, ... home. What to Do: For a Suspected Broken Bone: Do not move a child whose injury involves ...

  3. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma.

  4. Bone allografts: What they can offer and what they cannot.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cornu, O; Druez, V; Barbier, O

    2007-05-01

    Bone allografts can be used in any kind of surgery involving bone from minor defects to major bone loss after tumour resection. This review describes the various types of bone grafts and the current knowledge on bone allografts, from procurement and preparation to implantation. The surgical conditions for optimising the incorporation of bone are outlined, and surgeon expectations from a bone allograft discussed.

  5. The insulin-sensitive glucose transporter (GLUT4) is involved in early bone growth in control and diabetic mice, but is regulated through the insulin-like growth factor I receptor.

    PubMed

    Maor, G; Karnieli, E

    1999-04-01

    Children with uncontrolled type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus are characterized by a slow growth rate, which improves upon adequate therapy. While skeletal growth is an energy-consuming process involving high glucose utilization, the role of glucose transporters (GLUT) and their regulation in the bone formation process are not yet fully understood. Thus, we studied both in vivo and in vitro early endochondral bone formation in control and streptozotocin-induced young diabetic mice. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry techniques, we demonstrated the novel existence of the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter (GLUT4), as well as GLUT1, in juvenile-derived murine mandibular condyles and in the humeral growth plate-two models for endochondral bone formation. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I receptors (IGF-I-R), but not insulin receptors (IR), were shown to have cellular distribution similar to GLUT4, being more abundant in mature chondrocytes. Further, in the skeletal growth centers of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, GLUT4, IGF-I, and IGF-I and insulin receptor levels, but not GLUT1 were markedly reduced. The decrease in GLUT4 and in IGF-I and insulin receptors was associated with severe histological changes in the mandibular condyles and humeral growth plate. Insulin therapy restored IR levels to normalcy, whereas IGF-I-R and GLUT4 levels were only partially recovered. Thus, GLUT4 and IGF-I-R have a potential role in early bone growth in mice. Further, during early bone growth GLUT4 may be regulated through the IGF-I receptor rather than via the insulin receptor. We propose that skeletal growth retardation in type I diabetes may be associated with reduced expression of the GLUT4 and IGF-I receptor in the bone growth center.

  6. Engineering-Scale Demonstration of DuraLith and Ceramicrete Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Pires, Richard P.; Bickford, Jody; Foote, Martin W.

    2011-09-23

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from the Hanford Waste Immobilization and Treatment Plant, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing on four candidate waste forms. Two of the candidate waste forms have not been developed to scale as the more mature waste forms. This work describes engineering-scale demonstrations conducted on Ceramicrete and DuraLith candidate waste forms. Both candidate waste forms were successfully demonstrated at an engineering scale. A preliminary conceptual design could be prepared for full-scale production of the candidate waste forms. However, both waste forms are still too immature to support a detailed design. Formulations for each candidate waste form need to be developed so that the material has a longer working time after mixing the liquid and solid constituents together. Formulations optimized based on previous lab studies did not have sufficient working time to support large-scale testing. The engineering-scale testing was successfully completed using modified formulations. Further lab development and parametric studies are needed to optimize formulations with adequate working time and assess the effects of changes in raw materials and process parameters on the final product performance. Studies on effects of mixing intensity on the initial set time of the waste forms are also needed.

  7. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  8. The effects of azacitidine on the response and prognosis of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia involving a bone marrow erythroblast frequency of >50.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tomoyuki; Hagihara, Masao; Hua, Jian; Inoue, Morihiro

    2017-02-01

    We reviewed the cases of 68 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, n=61) or acute erythroleukemia (AEL, n=7) according to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2008 criteria and had previously been treated with azacitidine, a hypomethylating agent. Fifteen MDS patients had bone marrow erythroblast frequencies of ≥50%, and 6 out of the 7 AEL patients were reclassified as MDS (refractory anemia with excess blasts [RAEB]-1: 1, RAEB-2: 5) according to the revised WHO 2016 criteria. There was no difference between the overall response ratio (41%), as determined by a hematological improvement in at least one of 3 lineages, of these erythroid rich patients and that of the control group, which comprised 46 MDS patients with bone marrow erythroblast frequencies of <50%. Three MDS patients that exhibited erythroid predominance achieved complete remission. The overall survival period (median: 15 months) of the erythroblast-predominant group was not inferior to that of the control group (median: 16 months). These results indicate that azacitidine is a promising treatment option for MDS/AEL irrespective of the numbers of erythroid cells in the patient's bone marrow.

  9. Effect of quorum sensing signals produced by seaweed-associated bacteria on carpospore liberation from Gracilaria dura.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravindra Pal; Baghel, Ravi S; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    Epiphytic and endophytic bacteria associated with green macroalgae Ulva (U. fasciata and U. lactuca) and red macroalgae Gracilaria (G. corticata and G. dura) have been identified from three different seasons to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing (QS) molecules on carpospores liberation from Gracilaria dura. The bacterial isolates belonging to the orders Bacillales, Pseudomonadales, Alteromonadales, and Vibrionales were present in all seasons, whereas Actinomycetales and Enterobacteriales were confined to pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. Among all the Gram-negative bacteria, seven isolates were found to produce different types of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Interestingly, Shewanella algae produced five types of AHL: C4-HSL, HC4-HSL, C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL, and 3-oxo-C12-HSL. Subsequently, the AHLs producing bacterial isolates were screened for carpospore liberation from G. dura and these isolates were found to positively induce carpospore liberation over the control. Also, observed that carpospore liberation increased significantly in C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the total protein of the C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps showed two specific peptide bands of different molecular weights (50 kDa and 60 kDa) as compared to the control, confirming their indirect effect on carpospore liberation.

  10. Effect of quorum sensing signals produced by seaweed-associated bacteria on carpospore liberation from Gracilaria dura

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravindra Pal; Baghel, Ravi S.; Reddy, C. R. K.; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    Epiphytic and endophytic bacteria associated with green macroalgae Ulva (U. fasciata and U. lactuca) and red macroalgae Gracilaria (G. corticata and G. dura) have been identified from three different seasons to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing (QS) molecules on carpospores liberation from Gracilaria dura. The bacterial isolates belonging to the orders Bacillales, Pseudomonadales, Alteromonadales, and Vibrionales were present in all seasons, whereas Actinomycetales and Enterobacteriales were confined to pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. Among all the Gram-negative bacteria, seven isolates were found to produce different types of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Interestingly, Shewanella algae produced five types of AHL: C4-HSL, HC4-HSL, C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL, and 3-oxo-C12-HSL. Subsequently, the AHLs producing bacterial isolates were screened for carpospore liberation from G. dura and these isolates were found to positively induce carpospore liberation over the control. Also, observed that carpospore liberation increased significantly in C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the total protein of the C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps showed two specific peptide bands of different molecular weights (50 kDa and 60 kDa) as compared to the control, confirming their indirect effect on carpospore liberation. PMID:25788899

  11. Malignant lymphoma of bone.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Hans Roland; Müller, Peter Ernst; Hiller, Erhard; Maier, Markus; Baur, Andrea; Jansson, Volkmar; Refior, Hans Jürgen

    2002-02-01

    Malignant lymphoma of bone is rare. In many cases, its diagnosis is delayed because of unspecific clinical signs and equivocal radiographs. Therapy in general is multimodal, including surgery and radio- and chemotherapy. Our objective was to demonstrate the clinical and radiological aspects of the lesion to optimize diagnostic approaches and to evaluate treatment and prognostic factors. Thirty-six patients with malignant lymphoma of bone who were surgically treated over a 15-year-period were retrospectively reviewed. Seventeen of them showed a singular bone non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) which was classified as primary lymphoma of the bone (PLB). In 13 cases, dissemination of the disease with multiple bone or visceral involvement was apparent (dNHL). Six patients suffered from bone involvement due to Hodgkin's disease (HD). Surgical treatment was indicated for diagnostic reasons or complications due to the disease. Radiation and chemotherapy were part of the oncological treatment. The patients' mean age was 57 years. The main symptom in malignant bone lymphoma in 33 patients was pain, with an average duration of 8 months. In the secondary cases, bone involvement appeared on average 57 months after the initial diagnosis. An osteolytic pattern was seen in 58% of the lesions. Soft-tissue involvement was seen in 71% of cases (PLB 80%, dNHL 73%, HD 40%) and was the primary diagnostic sign associated with this disease. The 5-year survival rate was 61% (PLB 88%, dNHL 38%, HD 50%). Multiple vs solitary bone involvement was the most significant factor in the prognosis. Extraskeletal involvement significantly decreased survival. No correlation was found between gender, age, location, or histological subtypes and survival. Bone involvement in NHL appears late in the extraskeletal disease. The clinical appearance is nonspecific, and the delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis is often long. One of the major radiologic signs is the existence of a soft-tissue tumor

  12. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12

    all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

  13. Transient Receptor Potential Channel and Interleukin-17A Involvement in LTTL Gel Inhibition of Bone Cancer Pain in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juyong; Zhang, Ruixin; Dong, Changsheng; Jiao, Lijing; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zhengtao; Lao, Lixing

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain management is a challenge for which Chinese herbal medicine might be useful. To study the spinal mechanisms of the Chinese medicated gel Long-Teng-Tong-Luo (LTTL), a 7-herb compound, on bone cancer pain, a bone cancer pain model was made by inoculating the tibias of female rats with Walker 256 cells. LTTL gel or inert gel, 0.5 g/cm(2)/d, was applied to the skin of tumor-bearing tibias for 21 days beginning a day after the inoculation. Mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation was measured. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were immunostained and counted, and lumbar spinal cord interleukin-17A (IL-17A) was measured with real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TRP antagonists and interleukin (IL)-17A antibodies were intrathecally administered to determine their effects on bone cancer pain. The gel significantly (P < .05) alleviated cancer-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and inhibited cancer-enhanced expression of IL-17A in spinal astrocytes and the TRP subfamily members V1, A1, and V4 in lumbar DRG. Intrathecal TRP antagonists at 10 µg significantly (P < .05) attenuated mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and IL-17A expression, indicating that TRP channels facilitate spinal IL-17 expression and cancer pain. IL-17A antibodies inhibited cancer pain, suggesting that IL-17A promotes such pain. The data show that LTTL gel inhibits cancer pain, and this might be accounted for by the decrease in expression of DRG TRP channels and spinal astrocyte IL-17A.

  14. Partial physeal growth arrest treated by bridge resection and artificial dura substitute interposition.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshio; Naito, Masatoshi; Fujii, Toshio; Akiyoshi, Yuichiro; Yoshimura, Ichiro; Takamura, Kazuyuki

    2006-01-01

    We treated four cases of partial physeal growth arrest by resecting the bone bridge and interposing an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane, which has minimal tissue response. We evaluated three cases with sufficiently long follow-up. No apparent recurrence of the bone bridge and no limb length discrepancy occurred in any of the cases. No remodeling after the operation occurred. In one case, which underwent this operation and corrective osteotomy of the proximal tibia, slight recurrence of the varus deformity occurred which was detected only by radiographs, and did not compromise the alignment of the leg. There were no complications.

  15. Bone health in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman-Levin, N; Hochberg, Z; Latzer, Y

    2014-03-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) put adolescents and young adults at risk for impaired bone health. Low bone mineral density (BMD) with ED is caused by failure to accrue peak bone mass in adolescence and bone loss in young adulthood. Although ED patients diagnosed with bone loss may be asymptomatic, some suffer bone pains and have increased incidence of fractures. Adolescents with ED are prone to increased prevalence of stress fractures, kyphoscoliosis and height loss. The clinical picture of the various EDs involves endocrinopathies that contribute to impaired bone health. Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by low bone turnover, with relatively higher osteoclastic (bone resorptive) than osteoblastic (bone formation) activity. Bone loss in AN occurs in both the trabecular and cortical bones, although the former is more vulnerable. Bone loss in AN has been shown to be influenced by malnutrition and low weight, reduced fat mass, oestrogen and androgen deficiency, glucocorticoid excess, impaired growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis, and more. Bone loss in AN may not be completely reversible despite recovery from the illness. Treatment modalities involving hormonal therapies have limited effectiveness, whereas increased caloric intake, weight gain and resumption of menses are essential to improved BMD.

  16. Bone development

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Agnes D.; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the vertebrate skeleton reflects its evolutionary history. Cartilage formation came before biomineralization and a head skeleton evolved before the formation of axial and appendicular skeletal structures. This review describes the processes that result in endochondral and intramembranous ossification, the important roles of growth and transcription factors, and the consequences of mutations in some of the genes involved. Following a summary of the origin of cartilage, muscle, and tendon cell lineages in the axial skeleton, we discuss the role of muscle forces in the formation of skeletal architecture and assembly of musculoskeletal functional units. Finally, ontogenetic patterning of bones in response to mechanical loading is reviewed. PMID:26453494

  17. Idiopathic spinal cord herniation with duplicated dura mater and dorsal subarachnoid septum. Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Norio; Higashino, Kousaku; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is a rare condition and its pathogenesis remains unclear. The purpose of this case report is to present an ISCH case with dorsal subarachnoid septum suggesting the pathogenesis of ISCH being adhesions from preexisting inflammation. Methods Single case report. Results A 60-year-old woman presented with Brown-Séquard syndrome below the level of T6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the thoracic spinal cord was displaced ventrally, and the dorsal subarachnoid space was enlarged and had a septum between the spinal cord and dura mater. Intraoperatively, the dorsal dura mater was seen to be adherent and the subarachnoid septum was identified after durotomy. The inner layer defect of the duplicated dura mater was found in the ventral dura mater, through which the spinal cord had herniated. After releasing the septum, the adhesions around the dura mater, and the hiatus, the spinal cord was reduced. Conclusions The present case indicates that adhesions around the dura mater can be the pathogenesis of ISCH. PMID:25694934

  18. Operative surgical nuances of modified extradural temporopolar approach with mini-peeling of dura propria based on cadaveric anatomical study of lateral cavernous structures

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Toyooka, Terushige; Fujii, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Mori, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extradural temporopolar approach (ETA) has been modified as less invasive manner and named as trans-superior orbital fissure (SOF) approach with mini-peeling technique. The present study discusses the operative nuances of this modified technique on the basis of cadaveric study of lateral cavernous structures. Methods: In five consecutive cadaveric specimens, we performed an extradural anterior clinoidectomy with mini-peeling of the dura propria to expose the anterior clinoid process entirely. We also investigated the histological characteristics of the lateral cavernous sinus (CS) between the dura propria and periosteal dura at the SOF, foramen rotundum (FR), and foramen ovale (FO) levels, and of each trigeminal nerve division. Results: Coronal histological examination of the lateral wall of the CS showed invagination of the dura propria and periosteal dura into the SOF. In contrast, no such invagination was observed at the levels of the FR and FO. This finding supports the technical rationale of the only skeletonization of the SOF for peeling of the dura propria but not FR. In addition, our modified ETA method needs only minimal dural incision between the SOF and FR where no cranial nerves are present. Conclusion: Our technical modification of ETA may be recommended for surgical treatment of paraclinoid lesions to reduce the risk of intraoperative neurovascular injury. PMID:27500005

  19. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  20. [Fibrous dysplasia of bone].

    PubMed

    Orcel, Philippe; Chapurlat, Roland

    2007-10-31

    Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a congenital non hereditary benign bone disease, where normal bone is replaced by a fibrous-like tissue with immature osteogenesis. Prevalence is difficult to estimate, due to frequent asymptomatic lesions. Bone lesions are mono- or polyostotic and may be associated with bone pain and fragility, leading to fractures. In some patients or bone sites, they are hypertrophic, responsible for neurological complications. Imaging and, when necessary, histology are the cornerstones of the diagnosis. A common molecular defect, i.e. activating mutations of the GNAS gene, encoding the a subunit of the Gs protein in target cells, is responsible for bone cell alterations as well as for the involvement of other cells/tissues bearing the same molecular defect (melanocytes, endocrine cells). These mutations affect only somatic cells and are therefore not hereditary: antenatal diagnosis is not appropriate for this disease and genetic counselling is not very useful, except for reassuring the patients. The conventional therapeutic approach is essentially symptomatic (pain killers) and orthopaedic (prevention and treatment of bone complications). Recent publications have focused attention on pamidronate, which rapidly relieves bone pain in most patients, and progressively increases bone mineralization in osteolytic areas in about half of the patients. Tubular phosphate wasting is common and should be treated with phosphate supplement and calcitriol. The prognosis should improve with therapeutic advances, but this remains to be properly evaluated.

  1. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  2. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  3. Bone Metastasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... metastasis, surgeons can stabilize the bone using metal plates, screws and nails (orthopedic fixation). Orthopedic fixation can ... that can't be easily reinforced with metal plates or screws, such as pelvic bones and bones ...

  4. Tamoxifen regulation of bone growth and endocrine function in the ovariectomized rat: discrimination of responses involving estrogen receptor α/estrogen receptor β, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, or estrogen-related receptor γ using fulvestrant (ICI 182780).

    PubMed

    Fitts, James M; Klein, Robert M; Powers, C Andrew

    2011-07-01

    Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator, but it is also a deactivating ligand for estrogen-related receptor-γ (ERRγ) and a full agonist for the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Fulvestrant is a selective ER down-regulator that lacks agonist effects on ERα/ERβ, is inactive on ERRγ, but acts as a full agonist on GPER. Fulvestrant effects on tamoxifen actions on uterine and somatic growth, bone, the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis, and pituitary prolactin were analyzed to pharmacologically discriminate tamoxifen effects that may be mediated by ERα/ERβ versus ERRγ versus GPER. Ovariectomized rats received tamoxifen (0.6 mg/kg/daily) plus fulvestrant at 0, 3, 6, or 12 mg/kg/daily for 5 weeks; controls received vehicle or 6 mg/kg fulvestrant daily. Tamoxifen effects to increase uterine weight, decrease serum IGF-I, increase pituitary prolactin, and increase bone mineral density could be fully blocked by fulvestrant, indicating mediation by ERα/ERβ. Tamoxifen effects to decrease pituitary GH, tibia length, and body weight were only partially blocked by fulvestrant, indicating involvement of mechanisms unrelated to ERα/ERβ. Fulvestrant did not inhibit tamoxifen actions to reduce total pituitary protein, again indicating effects not mediated by ERα/ERβ. Tamoxifen actions to reduce serum GH were mimicked rather than inhibited by fulvestrant, pharmacological features consistent with GPER involvement. However, fulvestrant alone increased IGF-I and also blocked tamoxifen-evoked IGF-I decreases; thus fulvestrant effects on serum GH might reflect increased IGF-I feedback inhibition. Fulvestrant alone had no effect on the other parameters. The findings indicate that mechanisms unrelated to ERα/ERβ contribute to tamoxifen effects on body weight, bone growth, and pituitary function.

  5. Bone and bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Patricia M

    2009-01-01

    Children with cancer are exposed to multiple influences that may adversely affect bone health. Some treatments have direct deleterious effects on bone whilst others may have indirect effects mediated through various endocrine abnormalities. Most clinical outcome studies have concentrated on survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). There is now good evidence that earlier treatment protocols that included cranial irradiation with doses of 24 Gy or greater may result in growth hormone deficiency and low bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Under current protocols, BMD decreases during intensive chemotherapy and fracture risk increases. Although total body BMD may eventually return to normal after completion of chemotherapy, lumbar spine trabecular BMD may remain low for many years. The implications for long-term fracture risk are unknown. Risk factors for low BMD include high dose methotrexate, higher cumulative doses of glucocorticoids, male gender and low physical activity. BMD outcome in non-ALL childhood cancers has been less well studied but there is evidence that survivors of childhood brain or bone tumours, and survivors of bone marrow transplants for childhood malignancy, all have a high risk of long-term osteopenia. Long-term follow-up is required, with appropriate treatment of any endocrine abnormalities identified.

  6. Biological Effects of Clinically Relevant CoCr Nanoparticles in the Dura Mater: An Organ Culture Study

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Iraklis; Abberton, Thomas; Fuller, Martin; Tipper, Joanne L.; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Medical interventions for the treatment of spinal disc degeneration include total disc replacement and fusion devices. There are, however, concerns regarding the generation of wear particles by these devices, the majority of which are in the nanometre sized range with the potential to cause adverse biological effects in the surrounding tissues. The aims of this study were to develop an organ culture model of the porcine dura mater and to investigate the biological effects of CoCr nanoparticles in this model. A range of histological techniques were used to analyse the structure of the tissue in the organ culture. The biological effects of the CoCr wear particles and the subsequent structural changes were assessed using tissue viability assays, cytokine assays, histology, immunohistochemistry, and TEM imaging. The physiological structure of the dura mater remained unchanged during the seven days of in vitro culture. There was no significant loss of cell viability. After exposure of the organ culture to CoCr nanoparticles, there was significant loosening of the epithelial layer, as well as the underlying collagen matrix. TEM imaging confirmed these structural alterations. These structural alterations were attributed to the production of MMP-1, -3, -9, -13, and TIMP-1. ELISA analysis revealed that there was significant release of cytokines including IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, ECP and also the matrix protein, tenascin-C. This study suggested that CoCr nanoparticles did not cause cytotoxicity in the dura mater but they caused significant alterations to its structural integrity that could lead to significant secondary effects due to nanoparticle penetration, such as inflammation to the local neural tissue.

  7. Post-mortem imaging of the infant and perinatal dura mater and superior sagittal sinus using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, Emma C; Malcomson, Roger D G; Joseph, Shiju; Adnan, Asif; Adlam, David; Rutty, Guy N

    2017-04-07

    Infants and young children are likely to present with subdural haemorrhage (SDH) if they are the victims of abusive head trauma. In these cases, the most accepted theory for the source of bleeding is the bridging veins traversing from the surface of the brain to the dura mater. However, some have suggested that SDH may result from leakage of blood from a dural vascular plexus. As post-mortem examination of the bridging veins and dura is challenging, and imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance and computed tomography do not have the resolution capabilities to image small blood vessels, we have trialled the use of intravascular and benchtop optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems for imaging from within the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and through the dura during five infant/perinatal autopsies. Numerous vessel-like structures were identified using both OCT systems. Measurements taken with the intravascular rotational system indicate that the approximate median diameters of blood vessels entering anterior and posterior segments of the SSS were 110 μm (range 70 to 670 μm, n = 21) and 125 μm (range 70 to 740 μm, n = 23), respectively. For blood vessels close to the wall of the SSS, the median diameters for anterior and posterior segments of the SSS were 80 μm (range 40 to 170 μm, n = 25) and 90 μm (range 30 to 150 μm), respectively. Detailed characterisation of the dural vasculature is important to aid understanding of the source of SDH. High resolution 3-dimensional reconstructions of the infant dural vasculature may be possible with further development of OCT systems.

  8. Laser bonding with ICG-infused chitosan patches: preliminary experiences in suine dura mater and vocal folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Ratto, Fulvio; Pini, Roberto; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Giannoni, Luca; Fortuna, Damiano; Di Cicco, Emiliano; Corbara, Sylwia; Dallari, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Laser bonding is a promising minimally invasive approach, emerging as a valid alternative to conventional suturing techniques. It shows widely demonstrated advantages in wound treatment: immediate closuring effect, minimal inflammatory response and scar formation, reduced healing time. This laser based technique can overcome the difficulties in working through narrow surgical corridors (e.g. the modern "key-hole" surgery as well as the endoscopy setting) or in thin tissues that are impossible to treat with staples and/or stitches. We recently proposed the use of chitosan matrices, stained with conventional chromophores, to be used in laser bonding of vascular tissue. In this work we propose the same procedure to perform laser bonding of vocal folds and dura mater repair. Laser bonding of vocal folds is proposed to avoid the development of adhesions (synechiae), after conventional or CO2 laser surgery. Laser bonding application in neurosurgery is proposed for the treatment of dural defects being the Cerebro Spinal Fluid leaks still a major issue. Vocal folds and dura mater were harvested from 9-months old porks and used in the experimental sessions within 4 hours after sacrifice. In vocal folds treatment, an IdocyanineGreen-infused chitosan patch was applied onto the anterior commissure, while the dura mater was previously incised and then bonded. A diode laser emitting at 810 nm, equipped with a 600 μm diameter optical fiber was used to weld the patch onto the tissue, by delivering single laser spots to induce local patch/tissue adhesion. The result is an immediate adhesion of the patch to the tissue. Standard histology was performed, in order to study the induced photothermal effect at the bonding sites. This preliminary experimental activity shows the advantages of the proposed technique in respect to standard surgery: simplification of the procedure; decreased foreign-body reaction; reduced inflammatory response; reduced operating times and better handling in

  9. Endoscopically and Fluoroscopically Assisted Curettage and Bone Grafting of the Navicular Bone Cyst.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Simple bone cyst is a common tumorlike lesion of the bone and can involve the bones of the foot. It is usually asymptomatic but can also present with pain or pathologic fracture. The purpose of this technical note is to describe the uni-osseous portal approach of endoscopic curettage and bone grafting of simple bone cyst of the navicular bone. The single-portal approach reduces the risk of iatrogenic fracture of the navicular bone. This is indicated for painful bone cyst of the navicular bone resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated in multiple septated cysts, the presence of pathologic fracture, or the presence of aggressive cystic lesions.

  10. Resistance of leukemia cells to cytarabine chemotherapy is mediated by bone marrow stroma, involves cell-surface equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 removal and correlates with patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Macanas-Pirard, Patricia; Broekhuizen, Richard; González, Alfonso; Oyanadel, Claudia; Ernst, Daniel; García, Patricia; Montecinos, Viviana P; Court, Felipe; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Ramirez, Pablo; Nervi, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    The interaction between acute myeloid leukemia cells (AML) with the bone marrow stroma cells (BMSCs) determines a protective environment that favors tumor development and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We showed that BMSCs secrete soluble factors that protect AML cells from Ara-C induced cytotoxicity. This leukemia chemoresistance is associated with a decrease in the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1) activity by inducing removal of ENT1 from the cell surface. Reduction of cell proliferation was also observed with activation of AKT and mTOR-dependent cell survival pathways, which may also contribute to the tumor chemoprotection. Analysis of primary BMSC cultures has demonstrated that AML patients with stroma capable to confer Ara-C resistance in vitro compared to AML patients without this stroma capacity were associated with a worse prognosis. The two year overall survival rate was 0% versus 80% respectively (p=0.0001). This is the first report of a chemoprotection mechanism based on the removal of a drug transporter from the cell surface and most importantly the first time that a stroma phenotype has correlated with prognostic outcome in cancer.

  11. Up-regulation of immunomodulatory effects of mouse bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells by tetrahydrocannabinol pre-treatment involving cannabinoid receptor CB2

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Junran; Xiao, Dongju; Xu, Yun; Zhao, Jinning; Jiang, Li; Hu, Xuming; Zhang, Yaping; Yu, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is commonly and closely correlated with inflammation. Both cannabinoid signaling and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to reduce inflammatory pain. Although cannabinoid signaling is essential for mesenchymal stem cell survival and differentiation, little is known about its role in modulatory effect of MSCs on inflammation and pain sensitivity. Here we showed that mouse bone-marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) expressed both cannabinoid receptor type 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2). CB2 expression level in BM-MSCs increased with their maturation. In addition, we found that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) activated CB2 receptor and ERK signaling, consequently enhancing the modulation of MSCs on inflammation-associated cytokine release from lipopolysaccharides-stimulated microglia. Consistent with in vitro data, THC pretreatment enhanced the immunomodulatory effects of BM-MSC on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury model, by decreasing the release of pro-inflammation cytokines. Our study revealed the crucial role of THC in promoting the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs and proposed a new strategy to alleviate pain based on stem cells therapy. PMID:26824325

  12. Two distinct mechanisms mediate the involvement of bone marrow cells in islet remodeling: neogenesis of insulin-producing cells and support of islet recovery.

    PubMed

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Sadikov, Tamila; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that small-sized bone marrow cells (BMCs) isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate and contribute to regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we assess some of the characteristics of these cells compared to elutriated hematopoietic progenitors (R/O) and whole BMCs in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced chemical diabetes. The GFP(bright)CD45(+) progeny of whole BMCs and R/O progenitors progressively infiltrate the pancreas with evolution of donor chimerism; are found at islet perimeter, vascular, and ductal walls; and have a modest impact on islet recovery from injury. In contrast, Fr25lin(-) cells incorporate in the islets, convert to GFP(dim)CD45(-)PDX-1(+) phenotypes, produce proinsulin, and secrete insulin with significant contribution to stabilization of glucose homeostasis. The elutriated Fr25lin(-) cells express low levels of CD45 and are negative for SCA-1 and c-kit, as removal of cells expressing these markers did not impair conversion to produce insulin. BMCs mediate two synergistic mechanisms that contribute to islet recovery from injury: support of islet remodeling by hematopoietic cells and neogenesis of insulin-producing cells from stem cells.

  13. [Vitamin K and bone quality].

    PubMed

    Hara, Kuniko; Akiyama, Yasuhiro

    2007-11-01

    Meta-analysis involving previous clinical studies showed that VK(2) decreased the incidence of fracture. In particular, the results based on the data on bone mineral density and fracture suggested that VK(2) improves bone quality. Preclinical studies regarding bone quality reported that VK(2) improved the trabecular microarchitecture (connectivity and width) in an ovariectomized model, and that VK(2) increased the bone strength without influencing the bone mineral content in a model fed a low-Mg diet and a vitamin C deficiency model, increasing the collagen level and proline hydroxylation. Thus, improvement in bone quality via actions on the bone geometry and collagen level/quality may be involved in a VK(2)-related decrease in the incidence of new fracture in clinical studies.

  14. Lipoma involving the skull. Case report.

    PubMed

    Tomabechi, M; Sako, K; Daita, G; Yonemasu, Y

    1992-02-01

    The case of an intraosseous lipoma involving the left frontal bone is reported. Lipomas of the bone are rare; only three cases of lipomas involving the skull have previously been reported. The differential diagnosis includes a healing bone infarction or fracture, meningioma, hemangioma, and fibrous dysplasia. Diagnosis prior to surgery is difficult.

  15. Bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amir, Lisa R; Everts, Vincent; Bronckers, Antonius L J J

    2009-07-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate in response to injury. During distraction osteogenesis, the renewal of bone is enhanced by gradual stretching of the soft connective tissues in the gap area between two separated bone segments. This procedure has received much clinical attention as a way to correct congenital growth retardation of bone tissue or to generate bone to fill skeletal defects. The process of bone regeneration involves a complex system of biological changes whereby mechanical stress is converted into a cascade of signals that activate cellular behavior resulting in (enhanced) formation of bone. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in understanding the bone regeneration process during distraction osteogenesis. The mechanical and biological factors that are important for the success of the distraction treatment have been partially characterized and are discussed in this review.

  16. Bone and cancer: the osteoncology

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Toni; Mercatali, Laura; Amadori, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Summary In recent years clinicians have witnessed a radical change in the relationship between bone and cancer, with in particular an increase in bone metastases incidence due to an improvement of patients survival. Bone metastases are responsible for the high morbidity in cancer patients with a strong clinical impact. For all these reasons, efforts have been directed to this important field with the foundation of the osteoncology, a new scientific and clinical branch involved in the management of patients with bone cancer disease, including primary bone tumors and bone metastases. Another innovative and important osteoncology topic is the Cancer Treatment Induced Bone Loss (CTIBL) that is mainly caused by antitumoral treatment with bone resorption induction. The diagnostic and therapeutic options are described briefly in order to highlight the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in this new field. PMID:24133529

  17. [Cytokines in bone diseases. Wnt signal and excessive bone formation].

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Takayuki

    2010-10-01

    Wnt signal has been known to play various roles in many organ from the beginning of embryogensis. Its role in bone metabolism has also been investigated and established. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) is one of the important molecules in wnt signal pathway whose point mutations are related to both bone loss and excessive bone formation. Wnt signal is involved in the action of sclerostin which was found as a gene for osteosclerosis, one of the diseases of excessive bone formation. Wnt signal is keeping the position as an important research target for normal and pathological bone formation.

  18. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  19. Bone involvement and abcess formation by neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma mimicking skeletal infection in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Mira, José A; Fernández-Alonso, Jorge; Macías, Juan; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel A; Pereda, Teresa; Pineda, Juan A

    2003-07-01

    Neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare pathological entity without distinct clinical behavior. Twelve cases of neutrophil-rich CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) have been reported, three of them were HIV-infected patients. All these reports stressed the presence of neutrophil infiltration as a new morphologic feature of CD30+ ALCL. Only one case of cutaneous involvement presented with microabscess formation. We describe a case of neutrophil-rich CD30+ ALCL in an AIDS patient with a clinical picture determined by the massive neutrophil infiltration of the tumor without necrosis nor local infection, but with the formation of abscesses.

  20. Residual (ghost) sockets in bisphosphonate use--evidence of poor healing and slow bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Kishore; Bouquot, J

    2009-01-01

    Patients taking bisphosphonate drug therapy have demonstrated extremely poor alveolar bone healing after relatively minor oral surgical procedures. It would seem logical that extraction sockets could remain visible radiographically for an extended period after surgery, even in cases with soft tissue healing. This article chronicles the case of a patient who had been taking zoledronic acid chronically for metastatic cancer and who demonstrated numerous residual sockets (also known as ghost sockets), with lamina dura outlines that were visible radiographically.

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yongtao; Xiang Lixin; Shao Jianzhong

    2007-10-26

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multi-functional growth factors belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. It has been demonstrated that BMPs had been involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and apoptosis. However, their hallmark ability is that play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites. In this review, we mainly concentrate on BMP structure, function, molecular signaling and potential medical application.

  2. Vascularized bone grafts for the treatment of carpal bone pathology.

    PubMed

    Derby, Brian M; Murray, Peter M; Shin, Alexander Y; Bueno, Reuben A; Mathoulin, Christophe L; Ade, Tim; Neumeister, Michael W

    2013-03-01

    Primary bone healing fails to occur in 5-15 % of scaphoid bones that undergo fracture fixation. Untreated, occult fractures result in nonunion up to 12 % of the time. Conventional bone grafting is the accepted management in the treatment algorithm of scaphoid nonunion if the proximal pole is vascularized. Osteonecrosis of the proximal scaphoid pole intuitively suggests a need for transfer of the vascularized bone to the nonunion site. Scaphoid nonunion treatment aims to prevent biological and mechanical subsidence of the involved bone, destabilization of the carpus, and early degenerative changes associated with scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse. Pedicled distal radius and free vascularized bone grafts (VBGs) offer hand surgeons an alternative treatment option in the management of carpal bone nonunion. VBGs are also indicated in the treatment of avascular necrosis of the scaphoid (Preiser's disease), lunate (Kienböck's disease), and capitate. Relative contraindications to pedicled dorsal radius vascularized bone grafting include humpback deformity, carpal instability, or collapse. The free medial femoral condyle bone graft has offered a novel treatment option for the humpback deformity to restore geometry of the carpus, otherwise not provided by pedicled grafts. In general, VBGs are contraindicated in the setting of a carpal bone without an intact cartilaginous shell, in advanced carpal collapse with degenerative changes, and in attempts to salvage small or collapsed bone fragments. Wrist salvage procedures are generally accepted as the more definitive treatment option under such circumstances. This manuscript offers a current review of the techniques and outcomes of VBGs to the carpal bones.

  3. Function of osteocytes in bone.

    PubMed

    Aarden, E M; Burger, E H; Nijweide, P J

    1994-07-01

    Although the structural design of cellular bone (i.e., bone containing osteocytes that are regularly spaced throughout the bone matrix) dates back to the first occurrence of bone as a tissue in evolution, and although osteocytes represent the most abundant cell type of bone, we know as yet little about the role of the osteocyte in bone metabolism. Osteocytes descend from osteoblasts. They are formed by the incorporation of osteoblasts into the bone matrix. Osteocytes remain in contact with each other and with cells on the bone surface via gap junction-coupled cell processes passing through the matrix via small channels, the canaliculi, that connect the cell body-containing lacunae with each other and with the outside world. During differentiation from osteoblasts to mature osteocyte the cells lose a large part of their cell organelles. Their cell processes are packed with microfilaments. In this review we discuss the various theories on osteocyte function that have taken in consideration these special features of osteocytes. These are 1) osteocytes are actively involved in bone turnover; 2) the osteocyte network is through its large cell-matrix contact surface involved in ion exchange; and 3) osteocytes are the mechanosensory cells of bone and play a pivotal role in functional adaptation of bone. In our opinion, especially the last theory offers an exciting concept for which some biomechanical, biochemical, and cell biological evidence is already available and which fully warrants further investigations.

  4. Impact of holmium fibre laser radiation (λ = 2.1 μm) on the spinal cord dura mater and adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatova, S. A.; Kamynin, V. A.; Ryabova, A. V.; Loshchenov, V. B.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Kurkov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of holmium fibre laser radiation on the samples of biologic tissues (dura mater of spinal cord and adipose tissue with interlayers of muscle) is studied. The experimental results are evaluated by the size of carbonisation and coagulation necrosis zones. The experiment shows that in the case of irradiation of the spinal cord dura mater samples the size of carbonisation and coagulation necrosis zones is insignificant. In the adipose tissue the carbonisation zone is also insignificant, but the region of cellular structure disturbance is large. In the muscle tissue the situation is opposite. The cw laser operation provides clinically acceptable degree of destruction in tissue samples with a minimal carbonisation zone.

  5. Protective Effects of Estradiol on Ethanol-induced Bone Loss Involves Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Osteoblasts and Downstream Activation of the ERK/STAT3/RANKL Signaling Cascade

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone loss occurs following chronic ethanol (EtOH) consumption in males and cycling females in part as a result of increased bone resorption. We have demonstrated in vivo that estradiol treatment can reverse this effect. Using osteoclast precursors from bone marrow and osteoblast/pre-osteoclast co-cu...

  6. Bone Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mayo Clinic Staff A bone scan is a nuclear imaging test that helps diagnose and track several ... you're nursing. A bone scan is a nuclear imaging procedure. In nuclear imaging, tiny amounts of ...

  7. Bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Matthew J W

    2002-09-01

    Bone grafts are used in musculoskeletal surgery to restore structural integrity and enhance osteogenic potential. The demand for bone graft for skeletal reconstruction in bone tumor, revision arthroplasty, and trauma surgery, couple with recent advances in understanding and application of the biology of bone transplantation, has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of bone-grafting procedures performed over the last decade. It is estimated that 1.5 million bone-grafting procedures are currently performed worldwide each year, compared to a fraction of that number 20 years ago. Major developments also have resulted in the harvesting, storage, and use of bone grafts and production of graft derivatives, substitutes, and bone-inducing agents.

  8. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  9. Bone Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The danger of disuse osteoporosis under weightless condition in space led to extensive research into measurements of bone stiffness and mass by the Biomedical Research Division of Ames and Stanford University. Through its Technology Utilization Program, NASA funded an advanced SOBSA, a microprocessor-controlled bone probe system. SOBSA determines bone stiffness by measuring responses to an electromagnetic shaker. With this information, a physician can identify bone disease, measure deterioration and prescribe necessary therapy. The system is now undergoing further testing.

  10. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent injury to the bone. You may also be at risk if you are having hemodialysis. Symptoms of bone infections include Pain in the infected area Chills and ...

  11. Protein kinase signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of the rat alpha1(I) collagen gene by transforming growth factor beta1 and bone morphogenetic protein 2 in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Palcy, S; Goltzman, D

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) family members are known for their important role in bone physiology. TGFbeta(1) and, to a smaller extent, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) have been reported to regulate the gene expression of different osteoblast markers in vitro. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in these actions. Here we report that BMP-2, like TGFbeta(1), up-regulated alpha1(I) collagen mRNA expression in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. This was mediated through an increase in the transcriptional rate of the gene rather than through the stabilization of alpha1(I) collagen mRNA, and required new protein synthesis. In addition, TGFbeta(1)- and BMP-2-induced increases in alpha1(I) collagen mRNA levels were both dependent on protein kinase C and protein tyrosine kinase activities. Furthermore, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) [MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (MEK-1/ERK)] pathway participated in the up-regulation of alpha1(I) collagen gene expression by TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2. In response to either TGFbeta(1) or BMP-2, the stimulation of alpha1(I) collagen mRNA levels was paralleled by an early increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase protein activity. Moreover, the effects of both TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2 on alpha1(I) collagen gene expression were markedly decreased in transfected ROS 17/2.8 cells expressing a dominant-negative MEK-1. Our findings therefore show that TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2, which signal through discrete cell-surface receptors, are able to trigger analogous, if not identical, protein-phosphorylation-transducing cascades leading to comparable actions on the transcription of the alpha1(I) collagen gene in osteoblastic cells. PMID:10493907

  12. Intraosseous Metastasizing of Pineoblastoma into the Anterior Skull Base, Calvarial Bones, and Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Nikitin, Konstantin V; Konovalov, Alexander N; Pitskhelauri, David I; Shishkina, Liudmila V; Golanov, Andrey V.; Cherekaev, Vasily A; Kobiakov, Grigory L; Absalyamova, Oksana V; Lasunin, Nikolay; Antipina, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Pineoblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS), which arises from the parenchyma of the pineal gland. It is characterized by aggressive clinical behavior and frequent metastases along the craniospinal axis. Extraneural metastases may occur due to surgical seeding of tumor cells beyond the dura and/or hematogenous spread, ventriculoperitoneal shunting, or through Batson’s plexus. To our knowledge, only six documented cases of intraosseous metastases of pineoblastoma are described in the literature. A 23-year-old female patient presented with clinical and radiological symptoms of a pineal tumor causing secondary hydrocephalus. After initial surgical treatment, chemotherapy, and local radiotherapy with craniospinal irradiation, she developed multiple metastases affecting the anterior skull base, intracranial meninges, frontal bone, and finally, the entire vertebral column. The patient received surgical treatment for the anterior skull base metastasis, repeated irradiation of the neuraxis, radiosurgical and radiotherapeutic procedures, and chemotherapy. The patient survived 57 months after the primary disease manifestation and died of multiple metastases. This presented case is the first known description of metastasis of pineoblastoma in the anterior cranial base. Multiple intracranial metastases were suppressed using CyberKnife radiation treatment and chemotherapy until massive involvement of spinal column occurred. Interestingly, no signs of brain radiation necrosis after repeated radiation treatments were observed, and the patient developed only moderate neurocognitive decline. PMID:26858918

  13. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grech, P.; Martin, T.J.; Barrington, N.A.; Ell, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods.

  14. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health.

  15. Current and emerging basic science concepts in bone biology: implications in craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, Adam J; Mesa, John; Buchman, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing research in bone biology has brought cutting-edge technologies into everyday use in craniofacial surgery. Nonetheless, when osseous defects of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton are encountered, autogenous bone grafting remains the criterion standard for reconstruction. Accordingly, the core principles of bone graft physiology continue to be of paramount importance. Bone grafts, however, are not a panacea; donor site morbidity and operative risk are among the limitations of autologous bone graft harvest. Bone graft survival is impaired when irradiation, contamination, and impaired vascularity are encountered. Although the dura can induce calvarial ossification in children younger than 2 years, the repair of critical-size defects in the pediatric population may be hindered by inadequate bone graft donor volume. The novel and emerging field of bone tissue engineering holds great promise as a limitless source of autogenous bone. Three core constituents of bone tissue engineering have been established: scaffolds, signals, and cells. Blood supply is the sine qua non of these components, which are used both individually and concertedly in regenerative craniofacial surgery. The discerning craniofacial surgeon must determine the proper use for these bone graft alternatives, while understanding their concomitant risks. This article presents a review of contemporary and emerging concepts in bone biology and their implications in craniofacial surgery. Current practices, areas of controversy, and near-term future applications are emphasized.

  16. Bone poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Cowin, S C

    1999-03-01

    Poroelasticity is a well-developed theory for the interaction of fluid and solid phases of a fluid-saturated porous medium. It is widely used in geomechanics and has been applied to bone by many authors in the last 30 years. The purpose of this work is, first, to review the literature related to the application of poroelasticity to the interstitial bone fluid and, second, to describe the specific physical and modeling considerations that establish poroelasticity as an effective and useful model for deformation-driven bone fluid movement in bone tissue. The application of poroelasticity to bone differs from its application to soft tissues in two important ways. First, the deformations of bone are small while those of soft tissues are generally large. Second, the bulk modulus of the mineralized bone matrix is about six times stiffer than that of the fluid in the pores while the bulk moduli of the soft tissue matrix and the pore water are almost the same. Poroelasticity and electrokinetics can be used to explain strain-generated potentials in wet bone. It is noted that strain-generated potentials can be used as an effective tool in the experimental study of local bone fluid flow, and that the knowledge of this technique will contribute to the answers of a number of questions concerning bone mineralization, osteocyte nutrition and the bone mechanosensory system.

  17. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R. G.; Veldhuijzen, J. P.; Van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2003-10-01

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone. The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely the flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Earlier studies have shown that the disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, is associated with the loss of bone in astronauts, and has catabolic effects on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found earlier that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGEZ production. Therefore it is possible that the

  18. Use of serial bone scans in assessing response of bone metastases to systemic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, D.L.; Hougen, C.; Zweibel, W.; Schlise, S.; Pruitt, B.; Ershler, W.; Davis, T.E.; Harberg, J.; Cohen, A.I.

    1981-02-15

    The accuracy levels of serial radioisotope bone scans and conventional bone radiographs in assessing the response of bone metastases to systemic therapy were compared in 34 women with metastatic breast cancer. Each patient had measurable or evaluable nonosseous metastases, which were assessed independently of skeletal disease. The bone scan was found to be more accurate and sensitive indicator of the status of bone metastases than the radiograph. The bone scan correlated well with response of soft tissue or visceral disease, while the results of repeated bone radiographs were frequently misleading. With use of a digital model, it was possible to accurately measure the area of skeletal involvement of the bone scan, and from this derive quantitative criteria for response in bone metastases analogous to response criteria currently in use for soft tissue and visceral disease. It is suggested that serial quantitative bone scans be done, in preference to radiographs, to assess the response of bone metastases to systemic therapy.

  19. Stimulation of rat cranial dura mater with potassium chloride causes CGRP release into the cerebrospinal fluid and increases medullary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Dux, Mária; Will, Christine; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Fischer, Michael J M; Messlinger, Karl

    2017-02-10

    Primary headaches may be accompanied by increased intracranial blood flow induced by the release of the potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from activated meningeal afferents. We aimed to record meningeal and medullary blood flow simultaneously and to localize the sites of CGRP release in rodent preparations in vivo and ex vivo. Blood flow in the exposed rat parietal dura mater and the medulla oblongata was recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry, while the dura was stimulated by topical application of 60mM potassium chloride (KCl). Samples of jugular venous plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the cisterna magna were analysed for CGRP concentrations using an enzyme immunoassay. In a hemisected rat skull preparation lined with dura mater the CGRP releasing effect of KCl superfusion was examined. Superfusion of the dura mater with KCl decreased meningeal blood flow unless alpha-adrenoceptors were blocked by phentolamine, whereas the medullary blood flow was increased. The same treatment caused increased CGRP concentrations in jugular plasma and CSF and induced significant CGRP release in the hemisected rat skull preparation. Anaesthesia of the trigeminal ganglion by injection of lidocaine reduced increases in medullary blood flow and CGRP concentration in the CSF upon meningeal KCl application. CGRP release evoked by depolarisation of meningeal afferents is accompanied by increased blood flow in the medulla oblongata but not the dura mater. This discrepancy can be explained by the smooth muscle depolarising effect of KCl and the activation of sympathetic vasoconstrictor mechanisms. The medullary blood flow response is most likely mediated by CGRP released from activated central terminals of trigeminal afferents. Increased blood supply of the medulla oblongata and CGRP release into the CSF may also occur in headaches accompanying vigorous activation of meningeal afferents.

  20. Roles of leptin in bone metabolism and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu Xu; Yang, Tianfu

    2015-09-01

    Adipose tissue has been more accepted as an active contributor to whole body homeostasis, rather than just a fat depot, since leptin, a 16 kDa protein, was discovered as the product of the obese gene in 1994. With more and more studies conducted on this hormone, it has been shown that there is a close relationship between adipose tissue and bone, which have important effects on each other. Bone is the source of many hormones, such as osteocalcin, that can affect energy metabolism and then the anabolism or catabolism of fat tissue. In contrast, the adipose tissue synthesizes and releases a series of adipokines, which are involved in bone metabolism through direct or indirect effects on bone formation and resorption. Interestingly, leptin, one of the most important cytokines derived from fat tissue, seems to account for the largest part of effects on bone, through direct or indirect involvement in bone remodeling and by playing a significant role in many bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis, bone tumors and even fractures. In this review, we will discuss the progress in leptin research, particularly focusing on the roles of leptin in bone diseases.

  1. Microgravity and Bone Cell Mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R.; Veldhuijzen, J.; van Loon, J.

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone.The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction.Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, has catabolic effects on the skeleton of astronauts, and on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGE2 production. Therefore it is possible that the mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under near weightlessness conditions

  2. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Repair Necrotic Pancreatic Tissue and Promote Angiogenesis by Secreting Cellular Growth Factors Involved in the SDF-1α/CXCR4 Axis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Daohai; Gong, Jian; He, Zhigang; Hua, Jie; Lin, Shengping; Xu, Chenglei; Meng, Hongbo; Song, Zhenshun

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), a common acute abdominal disease, 10%–20% of which can evolve into severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), is of significant morbidity and mortality. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been reported to have a potential therapeutic role on SAP, but the specific mechanism is unclear. Therefore, we conducted this experiment to shed light on the probable mechanism. We validated that SDF-1α significantly stimulated the expressions of VEGF, ANG-1, HGF, TGF-β, and CXCR4 in BMSCs, which were inhibited by its receptor agonist, AMD3100. The capacities of proliferation, migration, and repair of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were enhanced by BMSCs supernatant. Meanwhile, BMSCs supernatant could also promote angiogenesis, especially after the stimulation with SDF-1α. In vivo, the migration of BMSCs was regulated by SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis. Moreover, transplanted BMSCs could significantly alleviate SAP, reduce the systematic inflammation (TNF-α↓, IL-1β↓, IL-6↓, IL-4↑, IL-10↑, and TGF-β↑), and promote tissue repair and angiogenesis (VEGF↑, ANG-1↑, HGF↑, TGF-β↑, and CD31↑), compared with the SAP and anti-CXCR4 groups. Taken together, the results showed that BMSCs ameliorated SAP and the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis was involved in the repair and regeneration process. PMID:25810724

  3. Management of Bone Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina J; Basu-Mallick, Atrayee; Abraham, John A

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of bone sarcoma requires careful planning and involvement of an experienced multidisciplinary team. Significant advancements in systemic therapy, radiation, and surgery in recent years have contributed to improved functional and survival outcomes for patients with these difficult tumors, and emerging technologies hold promise for further advancement.

  4. Are Bones Alive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caravita, Silvia; Falchetti, Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the classification of living things. Our study deals with a different problem: the attribution of life to one component of a living organism, specifically the bones. The task involves not only specifying what we mean by "alive", but also requires "informed thinking" leading to an understanding of…

  5. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  6. Bone cutting.

    PubMed

    Giraud, J Y; Villemin, S; Darmana, R; Cahuzac, J P; Autefage, A; Morucci, J P

    1991-02-01

    Bone cutting has always been a problem for surgeons because bone is a hard living material, and many osteotomes are still very crude tools. Technical improvement of these surgical tools has first been their motorization. Studies of the bone cutting process have indicated better features for conventional tools. Several non-conventional osteotomes, particularly ultrasonic osteotomes are described. Some studies on the possible use of lasers for bone cutting are also reported. Use of a pressurised water jet is also briefly examined. Despite their advantages, non-conventional tools still require improvement if they are to be used by surgeons.

  7. Visualizing the root-PDL-bone interface using high-resolution microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalstra, Michel; Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    The root/periodontal ligament/bone (RPB) interface is important for a correct understanding of the load transfer mechanism of masticatory forces and orthodontic loads. It is the aim of this study to assess the three-dimensional structure of the RPB interface using high-resolution microtomography. A human posterior jaw segment, obtained at autopsy from a 22-year old male donor was first scanned using a tomograph at the HASYLAB/DESY synchrotron facility (Hamburg, Germany) at 31μm resolution. Afterwards the first molar and its surrounding bone were removed with a 10mm hollow core drill. From this cylindrical sample smaller samples were drilled out in the buccolingual direction with a 1.5mm hollow core drill. These samples were scanned at 4μm resolution. The scans of the entire segment showed alveolar bone with a thin lamina dura, supported by an intricate trabecular network. Although featuring numerous openings between the PDL and the bone marrow on the other side to allow blood vessels to transverse, the lamina dura seems smooth at this resolution. First at high resolution, however, it becomes evident that it is irregular with bony spiculae and pitted surfaces. Therefore the stresses in the bone during physiological or orthodontic loading are much higher than expected from a smooth continuous alveolus.

  8. Boning up on autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Irving M; Layfield, Robert; Lotz, Martin; Settembre, Carmine; Whitehouse, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, the major function of bone is to provide stable sites for muscle attachment and affording protection of vital organs, especially the heart and lungs (ribs) and spinal cord (vertebrae and intervertebral discs). However, bone has a considerable number of other functions: serving as a store for mineral ions, providing a site for blood cell synthesis and participating in a complex system-wide endocrine system. Not surprisingly, bone and cartilage cell homeostasis is tightly controlled, as is the maintenance of tissue structure and mass. While a great deal of new information is accruing concerning skeletal cell homeostasis, one relatively new observation is that the cells of bone (osteoclasts osteoblasts and osteocytes) and cartilage (chondrocytes) exhibit autophagy. The focus of this review is to examine the significance of this process in terms of the functional demands of the skeleton in health and during growth and to provide evidence that dysregulation of the autophagic response is involved in the pathogenesis of diseases of bone (Paget disease of bone) and cartilage (osteoarthritis and the mucopolysaccharidoses). Delineation of molecular changes in the autophagic process is uncovering new approaches for the treatment of diseases that affect the axial and appendicular skeleton. PMID:24225636

  9. B Vitamins, Homocysteine and Bone Health

    PubMed Central

    Fratoni, Valentina; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition is one of the most important modifiable factors involved in the development and maintenance of good bone health. Calcium and Vitamin D have confirmed and established roles in the maintenance of proper bone health. However, other nutritional factors could also be implicated. This review will explore the emerging evidence of the supporting role of certain B Vitamins as modifiable factors associated with bone health. Individuals with high levels of homocysteine (hcy) exhibit reduced bone mineral density (BMD), alteration in microarchitecture and increased bone fragility. The pathophysiology caused by high serum homocysteine is not completely clear regarding fractures, but it may involve factors, such as bone mineral density, bone turnover, bone blood flow and collagen cross-linking. It is uncertain whether supplementation with B Vitamins, such as folate, Vitamin B1, and Vitamin B6, could decrease hip fracture incidence, but the results of further clinical trials should be awaited before a conclusion is drawn. PMID:25830943

  10. Temporal Bone Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Vrionis, Fotios D.; Robertson, Jon H.; Gardner, Gale; Heilman, Carl B.

    1999-01-01

    Meningiomas involving the temporal bone may originate from arachnoid cell nests present within the temporal bone (intratemporal), but more frequently originate from arachnoid cell nests of the posterior or middle cranial fossa with secondary invasion of the TB (extratemporal). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 13 patients with meningiomas involving the temporal bone who underwent surgery. Tumors of the posterior fossa with only temporal bone hyperostosis, but without invasion, were excluded. Patients presented primarily with otologic symptoms and signs. The tumors originated in the temporal bone (5/13), jugular foramen (4/13), petroclival region (2/13), the asterion (1/13) or the internal auditory meatus (1/13). All of the intratemporal meningiomas had the radiological appearance of en-plaque menigiomas. The tumor extended into the middle ear (11/13), eustachian tube (5/13), and/or the labyrinth (3/13). A gross total resection was achieved in 11 patients and a subtotal resection in 2 patients. The lower cranial nerves were infiltrated by tumor in 4 patients, and were sacrificed. At a mean follow-up of approximately 6 years, 12 patients are currently alive and doing well and 1 died from tumor progression. Six patients showed tumor recurrence and were reoperated on (5/6) or followed conservatively (1/6). Surgical treatment of temporal bone meningiomas is associated with high recurrence rate due to indiscreet tumor margins. Combined surgical approaches (temporal craniotomy and mastoidectomy) by neurosurgical and otological teams are recommended for meningiomas originating in the temporal bone. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3p134-aFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171128

  11. De Novo Osteogenic Sarcoma of Mastoid Bone

    PubMed Central

    Işikdogan, Abdurrahman; Erekul, Selim; Pamir, Ali

    2002-01-01

    The most common primary malignant tumor of the bone is osteosarcoma. Primary involvement of the craniofacial bones in osteosarcoma is relatively rare. The mandible and the maxillae are the most commonly affected bones of the head. Here, we report a rare case of de novo high-grade osteogenic sarcoma of the mastoid region of the temporal bone and discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic properties. PMID:18521333

  12. Your Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder blade or scapula (say: SKA-pyuh-luh), a large triangular bone on the upper back corner of each side of the ribcage. The arm is made up of three bones: the humerus (say: HYOO-muh-rus), which is above your elbow, and the radius (say: RAY-dee-us) and ulna (say: UL- ...

  13. Talking Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  14. Evidence that the compound action potential (CAP) from the auditory nerve is a stationary potential generated across dura mater.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel J; Patuzzi, Robert B

    2010-08-01

    We have investigated the generation of the compound action potential (CAP) from the auditory nerve of guinea pigs. Responses to acoustic tone-bursts were recorded from the round window (RW), throughout the cochlear fluids, from the surface of the cochlear nucleus, from the central end of the auditory nerve after removal of the cochlear nucleus, from the scalp vertex, and from the contralateral ear. Responses were compared before, during and after experimental manipulations including pharmacological blockade of the auditory nerve, section of the auditory nerve, section of the efferent nerves, removal of the cochlear nucleus, and focal cooling of the cochlear nerve and/or cochlear nucleus. Regardless of the waveform changes occurring with these manipulations, the responses were similar in waveform but inverted polarity across the internal auditory meatus. The CAP waveforms were very similar before and after removal of the cochlear nucleus, apart from transient changes that could last many minutes. This suggests that the main CAP components are generated entirely by the eighth nerve. Based on previous studies and a clear understanding of the generation of extracellular potentials, we suggest that the early components in the responses recorded from the round window, from the cochlear fluids, from the surface of the cochlear nucleus, or from the scalp are a far-field or stationary potential, generated when the circulating action currents associated with each auditory neurone encounters a high extracellular resistance as it passes through the dura mater.

  15. DuraLith geopolymer waste form for Hanford secondary waste: correlating setting behavior to hydration heat evolution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Gong, Weiliang; Syltebo, Larry; Lutze, Werner; Pegg, Ian L

    2014-08-15

    The binary furnace slag-metakaolin DuraLith geopolymer waste form, which has been considered as one of the candidate waste forms for immobilization of certain Hanford secondary wastes (HSW) from the vitrification of nuclear wastes at the Hanford Site, Washington, was extended to a ternary fly ash-furnace slag-metakaolin system to improve workability, reduce hydration heat, and evaluate high HSW waste loading. A concentrated HSW simulant, consisting of more than 20 chemicals with a sodium concentration of 5 mol/L, was employed to prepare the alkaline activating solution. Fly ash was incorporated at up to 60 wt% into the binder materials, whereas metakaolin was kept constant at 26 wt%. The fresh waste form pastes were subjected to isothermal calorimetry and setting time measurement, and the cured samples were further characterized by compressive strength and TCLP leach tests. This study has firstly established quantitative linear relationships between both initial and final setting times and hydration heat, which were never discovered in scientific literature for any cementitious waste form or geopolymeric material. The successful establishment of the correlations between setting times and hydration heat may make it possible to efficiently design and optimize cementitious waste forms and industrial wastes based geopolymers using limited testing results.

  16. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Paget's Disease of Bone What is Paget's Disease of Bone? Click for more information Enlarged and Misshapen Bones Paget's disease of bone causes affected bones to ...

  17. Impact of holmium fibre laser radiation (λ = 2.1 μm) on the spinal cord dura mater and adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Filatova, S A; Kamynin, V A; Ryabova, A V; Loshchenov, V B; Tsvetkov, V B; Kurkov, A S; Zelenkov, P V; Zolotovskii, I O

    2015-08-31

    The impact of holmium fibre laser radiation on the samples of biologic tissues (dura mater of spinal cord and adipose tissue with interlayers of muscle) is studied. The experimental results are evaluated by the size of carbonisation and coagulation necrosis zones. The experiment shows that in the case of irradiation of the spinal cord dura mater samples the size of carbonisation and coagulation necrosis zones is insignificant. In the adipose tissue the carbonisation zone is also insignificant, but the region of cellular structure disturbance is large. In the muscle tissue the situation is opposite. The cw laser operation provides clinically acceptable degree of destruction in tissue samples with a minimal carbonisation zone. (laser applications in medicine)

  18. Suppressed bone remodeling in black bears conserves energy and bone mass during hibernation.

    PubMed

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Buckendahl, Patricia; Carpenter, Caren; Henriksen, Kim; Vaughan, Michael; Donahue, Seth

    2015-07-01

    Decreased physical activity in mammals increases bone turnover and uncouples bone formation from bone resorption, leading to hypercalcemia, hypercalcuria, bone loss and increased fracture risk. Black bears, however, are physically inactive for up to 6 months annually during hibernation without losing cortical or trabecular bone mass. Bears have been shown to preserve trabecular bone volume and architectural parameters and cortical bone strength, porosity and geometrical properties during hibernation. The mechanisms that prevent disuse osteoporosis in bears are unclear as previous studies using histological and serum markers of bone remodeling show conflicting results. However, previous studies used serum markers of bone remodeling that are known to accumulate with decreased renal function, which bears have during hibernation. Therefore, we measured serum bone remodeling markers (BSALP and TRACP) that do not accumulate with decreased renal function, in addition to the concentrations of serum calcium and hormones involved in regulating bone remodeling in hibernating and active bears. Bone resorption and formation markers were decreased during hibernation compared with when bears were physically active, and these findings were supported by histomorphometric analyses of bone biopsies. The serum concentration of cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a hormone known to reduce bone resorption, was 15-fold higher during hibernation. Serum calcium concentration was unchanged between hibernation and non-hibernation seasons. Suppressed and balanced bone resorption and formation in hibernating bears contributes to energy conservation, eucalcemia and the preservation of bone mass and strength, allowing bears to survive prolonged periods of extreme environmental conditions, nutritional deprivation and anuria.

  19. Mechanisms influencing bone metabolism in chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Daci, E; van Cromphaut, S; Bouillon, R

    2002-01-01

    Bone is permanently renewed by the coordinated actions of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts, which model and remodel bone structure during growth and adult life. The origin of osteoblastic cells (osteoblasts, osteocytes and bone-lining cells) differs from that of osteoclasts, but both cell groups communicate with each other using cytokines and cell-cell contact as to optimally maintain bone homeostasis. This communication in many ways uses the same players as the communication between cells in the immune system. During acute life-threatening illness massive bone resorption is the rule, while bone formation is suppressed. During chronic illness, the balance between bone formation and bone resorption also shifts, frequently resulting in decreased bone mass and density. Several factors may contribute to the osteopenia that accompanies chronic illness, the most important being undernutrition and low body weight, inflammatory cytokines, disorders of the neuroendocrine axis (growth hormone/IGF-1 disturbances, thyroid and gonadal deficiency), immobilization, and the long-term use of glucocorticoids. Their combined effects not only influence the generation and activity of all bone cells involved, but probably also regulate their life span by apoptotic mechanisms. Osteopenia or even osteoporosis and bone fragility, and before puberty also decreased linear growth and lower peak bone mass are therefore frequent consequences of chronic illnesses.

  20. Bone densitometry.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kwang J

    2011-05-01

    Conventional radiographic methods allow physicians to visualize bone structure. However, they do not offer information on the bone mineral density (BMD), which can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Bone densitometry, by contrast, helps to detect bone mineral loss at an early stage because it provides accurate quantitative measurement of BMD. With an emphasis on quantification, shorter scanning time and precision, scientists have been developing BMD measurement devices that use absorption technique. They first developed single-energy absorptiometry (single-photon absorptiometry) by using I-125, which could measure BMD of peripheral bones. Single-photon absorptiometry was replaced by dual-energy absorptiometry (dual photon absorptiometry [DPA]) that used gadolinium-153. DPA had greater accuracy in measuring the BMD of central skeletal bones. Single-energy x-ray absorptiometry was also developed but it had limitations in measuring central skeletal BMD. In the mid-1980s, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was introduced and widely accepted for the early detection, treatment, and follow-up study of osteoporosis. There are several reasons for the popularity. DXA can measure BMD of posteroanterior spine and hip in a much shorter time than DPA while being capable of measuring BMD of peripheral bones. Other advantages include very low radiation doses to the patients, high image resolution, precision, and stable calibration of the instruments. In recent years, DXA has also been applied to lateral spine for the density of trabecular bone, to the whole body for the measurement of total body bone density and for the body composition, and to the spine for the vertebral fracture assessment. Still, posteroanterior spine and hip scans remain the most common applications of DXA because data on the normal range of BMD of the skeletal sites for different age, sex, and ethnic groups are compiled and made available with the devices, which gives the physician

  1. Granulomatous inflammation of dura mater--a rare side effect after application of hemostatic and insulation materials in case of two-stage operation of huge meningioma.

    PubMed

    Andrychowski, Jarosław; Czernicki, Zbigniew; Taraszewska, Anna; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Przytuła, Ewa; Zębala, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Haemostatic and isolating materials may cause local reactions as a foreign body. The case presented here of intracranial granulomatous lesion pertains to a patient operated in two stages due to a huge meningioma. During the first operation the tumour was partially removed. Because of persistent intraoperative haemorrhage haemostatic flakes of Oxycel and Spongostan were applied locally. In order to cover the lack of the dura, an insulation material--Tachosil was used. Histological examination of the tumour specimens confirmed the preoperative diagnosis of benign meningioma, mainly of the angiomatous subtype. The second stage of operation was performed after 3 months and the meningioma was completely removed, as well as dura mater and meningioma attachment with its oncological margin. The resected dura mater was thickened and histologically showed intensive granulomatous infiltrations and foreign body reactions most likely to Oxycel. Clinically no local and general infection and improper healing was observed after the first and the second treatment stage, but an allergic skin lesions and increased eosinophils in peripheral blood smear were noted. It was stated that systemic allergic reaction and granulomatous inflammation of dura mater were an uncommon response to the applied haemostatics and/or insulation material used during the first operation. This report show that haemostatic and isolating agents, generally used in neurosurgical procedure, may rarely cause local granulomatous processes considered as delayed hypersensitivity and the foreign body reactions. Therefore, they may hinder morphological assessment of the tissues during re-exploration and must be differentiate with the other infectious and non-infectious granulomatous processes.

  2. The biology of bone lengthening.

    PubMed

    Hvid, Ivan; Horn, Joachim; Huhnstock, Stefan; Steen, Harald

    2016-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis biologically resembles fracture healing with distinctive characteristics notably in the distraction phase of osteogenesis. In the latency phase of bone lengthening, like in the inflammatory phase of fracture repair, interleukines are released and act with growth factors released from platelets in the local haematoma, leading to attraction, proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts and other differentiated mesenchymal cells. These in turn produce matrix, collagen fibers and growth factors. A callus containing cells, collagen fibers, osteoid and cartilage matrix is formed. Provided stable fixation, distraction will trigger intramembranous bone formation. As distraction proceeds, the distraction gap develops five distinctive zones with unmineralized bone in the middle, remodelling bone peripherally, and mineralizing bone in between. During consolidation, the high concentration of anabolic growth factors in the regenerate diminishes with time as remodelling takes over to form mature cortical and cancellous bone. Systemic disease, congenital bone deficiencies, medications and substance abuse can influence the quality and quantity of regenerate bone, usually in a negative way. The regenerate bone can be manipulated when needed by using injection of mesenchymal stem cells and platelets, growth factors (BMP-2 and -7), and systemic medications (bisphosphonates and parathyroid hormone). Growth factors and systemic anabolic and antiresorptive drugs are prescribed on special indications, while distraction osteogenesis is not an authorized indication. To some extent, however, these compounds can be used off-label. Use in children presents special problems since growth factors and specific anabolic medications may involve a risk of inducing cancer.

  3. Bone Disease and Idiopathic Hypercalciuria

    PubMed Central

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    Observational and epidemiological studies alike have demonstrated that idiopathic hypercalciuric (IH) stone-forming patients typically demonstrate bone mineral density scores significantly less than those observed for age- and gender-matched normal subjects or those for non-hypercalciuric stone-forming patients. Most of these studies have relied on changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and have not explored the mechanism(s) involved. There have been a small number of studies that have relied on dynamic bone histomorphometry to ascertain the nature of the bone defect in IH patients. When performed, these studies have clearly demonstrated increased bone resorption and high bone turnover in patients with fasting hypercalciuria while suppressed bone formation indices are the most consistent finding in patients with the absorptive variant of IH. The causes of this apparent difference in bone remodeling between the two variants of IH is still uncertain. Available evidence suggests that potential mechanisms may be dependent in large part to genetic, metabolic, and nutritional causes of hypercalciuria and bone loss in patients with IH. PMID:18359394

  4. Evidence for novel age-dependent network structures as a putative primo vascular network in the dura mater of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Kang, Dai-In; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Hoon-Gi; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Lee, Ki Bog

    2015-01-01

    With chromium-hematoxylin staining, we found evidence for the existence of novel age-dependent network structures in the dura mater of rat brains. Under stereomicroscopy, we noticed that chromium-hematoxylin-stained threadlike structures, which were barely observable in 1-week-old rats, were networked in specific areas of the brain, for example, the lateral lobes and the cerebella, in 4-week-old rats. In 7-week-old rats, those structures were found to have become larger and better networked. With phase contrast microscopy, we found that in 1-week-old rats, chromium-hematoxylin-stained granules were scattered in the same areas of the brain in which the network structures would later be observed in the 4- and 7-week-old rats. Such age-dependent network structures were examined by using optical and transmission electron microscopy, and the following results were obtained. The scattered granules fused into networks with increasing age. Cross-sections of the age-dependent network structures demonstrated heavily-stained basophilic substructures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the basophilic substructures to be clusters with high electron densities consisting of nanosized particles. We report these data as evidence for the existence of age-dependent network structures in the dura mater, we discuss their putative functions of age-dependent network structures beyond the general concept of the dura mater as a supporting matrix. PMID:26330833

  5. Evidence for novel age-dependent network structures as a putative primo vascular network in the dura mater of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Kang, Dai-In; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Hoon-Gi; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Lee, Ki Bog

    2015-07-01

    With chromium-hematoxylin staining, we found evidence for the existence of novel age-dependent network structures in the dura mater of rat brains. Under stereomicroscopy, we noticed that chromium-hematoxylin-stained threadlike structures, which were barely observable in 1-week-old rats, were networked in specific areas of the brain, for example, the lateral lobes and the cerebella, in 4-week-old rats. In 7-week-old rats, those structures were found to have become larger and better networked. With phase contrast microscopy, we found that in 1-week-old rats, chromium-hematoxylin-stained granules were scattered in the same areas of the brain in which the network structures would later be observed in the 4- and 7-week-old rats. Such age-dependent network structures were examined by using optical and transmission electron microscopy, and the following results were obtained. The scattered granules fused into networks with increasing age. Cross-sections of the age-dependent network structures demonstrated heavily-stained basophilic substructures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the basophilic substructures to be clusters with high electron densities consisting of nanosized particles. We report these data as evidence for the existence of age-dependent network structures in the dura mater, we discuss their putative functions of age-dependent network structures beyond the general concept of the dura mater as a supporting matrix.

  6. Histopathological study of the outer membrane of the dura mater in chronic sub dural hematoma: Its clinical and radiological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Bokka, Sriharsha; Trivedi, Adarsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A chronic subdural hematoma is an old clot of blood on the surface of the brain between dura and arachnoid membranes. These liquefied clots most often occur in patients aged 60 and older with brain atrophy. When the brain shrinks inside the skull over time, minor head trauma can cause tearing of blood vessels over the brain surface, resulting in a slow accumulation of blood over several days to weeks. Aim of the Study: To evaluate the role of membrane in hematoma evaluation and to correlate its histopathology with clinic-radiological aspects of the condition and overall prognosis of patients. Material and Methods: The study incorporated all cases of chronic SDH admitted to the Neurosurgery department of JLN Hospital and Research Centre, Bhilai, between November 2011 and November 2013. All such cases were analyzed clinically, radiologically like site, size, thickness in computed tomography, the attenuation value, midline shift and histopathological features were recorded. Criteria for Inclusion: All cases of chronic subdural haematoma irrespective of age and sex were incorporated into the study. Criteria for Exclusion: All cases of acute subdural haematoma and cases of chronic sub dural hematoma which were managed conservatively irrespective of age and sex were excluded from the study Results: In our series of cases, the most common histopathological type of membrane was the inflammatory membrane (Type II) seen in 42.30% of cases followed by hemorrhagic inflammatory membrane (Type III) seen in 34.62% of cases while scar inflammatory type of membrane (Type IV) was seen in 23.08% of cases. No case with noninflammatory type (Type I) was encountered. PMID:26889276

  7. Interpreting Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weymouth, Patricia P.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an activity which introduces students to the nature and challenges of paleoanthropology. In the exercise, students identify diagrammed bones and make interpretations about the creature. Presents questions and tasks employed in the lesson. (ML)

  8. Bone and bone marrow: the same organ.

    PubMed

    Del Fattore, Andrea; Capannolo, Marta; Rucci, Nadia

    2010-11-01

    Interplays between bone and bone marrow are not limited to merely anatomic and histological connections, but include a tight functional correlation. Bone marrow resides within the medullary cavity of the bones and the process of hematopoiesis is regulated, at least in part, by bone cells. Moreover, osteoclasts and osteoblasts derive from precursors of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin, respectively, both residing within the bone marrow. Alterations in one of these components typically cause impairment in the other, so diseases of the bone marrow compartment often affect the bone and vice versa. All these findings could make us to speculate that bone and bone marrow are not two separate districts, but can be considered as the two elements of the same unique functional unit, the bone-bone marrow organ. Here we will describe histological and functional interplays between bone and bone marrow, and will illustrate some diseases in which this tight correlation is evident.

  9. Cutaneous scar at anterior hair line in mother and child with associated frontal bone defect in child.

    PubMed

    Stratis, J P; Ramer, J C; Manders, E K; Lehman, R A; Ladda, R L

    1992-09-15

    A large frontal bone defect underlying a "V" shaped scar was noted in a newborn male whose mother had an identical "V" shaped scar at the same location in the anterior hairline. Both had hypertelorism and short palpebral fissures. The mother had no radiographic evidence of skull defect and neither mother nor child had other cutaneous or skeletal anomalies. Cranioplasty was performed on the child using the remaining frontal bones with an excellent cosmetic result. Biopsy performed at operation documented scar tissue extending through the dermis and underlain by thickened dura. Mother and child appear to have a variant form of aplasia cutis congenita, an autosomal dominant trait with wide variation in expression.

  10. Development, identification and validation of CAPS marker for SHELL trait which governs dura, pisifera and tenera fruit forms in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    PubMed Central

    Babu, B. Kalyana; Mathur, R. K.; Kumar, P. Naveen; Ramajayam, D.; Ravichandran, G.; Venu, M. V. B.; Babu, S. Sparjan

    2017-01-01

    The oil palm fruit forms (dura, pisifera and tenera) governed by the shell thickness gene (Sh) plays a major role in identification of fruit type and also influences palm oil yield. Identification of desired fruit type is a major asset to the breeders and oil palm workers for applications in breeding, seed certification and to reduce time, space and money spent on identification of fruit form. In the present study, we developed Sh gene specific primer pairs and bulk segregant analysis was done using 300 genomic and 8 genic SSR markers. We identified one cleaved amplified polymorphic site (CAPS) marker for differentiation of oil palm fruit type which produced two alleles (280 and 250bp) in dura genotypes, three alleles in tenera genotypes (550, 280, and 250bp) and one allele in pisifera genotypes (550bp). The shell allele sequencing results showed that two SNPs were present, of which SNP2 contributed for variation of fruit forms. The nucleotide ‘A’ was present in only dura genotypes, where as ‘T’ was present only in pisifera genotypes, which in turn led to the change of amino acid lysine to aspargine. The identified CAPS marker was validated on 300 dura, 25 pisifera and 80 tenera genotypes, 80 dura/ pisifera cross progenies and 60 lines of tenera/ tenera cross progeny. Association mapping of marker data with phenotypic data of eight oil yield related traits resulted in identification of seven significant QTLs by GLM approach, four by MLM approach at a significant threshold (P) level of 0.001. Significant QTLs were identified for fruit to bunch and oil to bunch traits, which explained R2 of 12.9% and 11.5% respectively. The CAPS marker used in the present study facilitate selection and timely distribution of desirable high yielding tenera sprouts to the farmers instead of waiting for 4–5 years. This saves a lot of land, time and money which will be a major breakthrough to the oil palm community. PMID:28192462

  11. [Bone and Men's Health. Androgen replacement therapy and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sumito

    2010-02-01

    During aging process in men, decline of androgen level is involved in symptoms of hypogonadism, and recent findings suggest that sex hormones are crucial for skeletal development and maintenance of bone mineral properties. In practice, androgen replacement therapy has not been established for bone-related symptoms in late onset hypogonadisim or male osteoporosis. Whereas recent evidences suggest that bone mineral properties are improved by androgen replacement therapy in aging male, further studies including large clinical trials are necessary to assess long-term benefits and risks by the therapy.

  12. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and display the bone density measurements on a computer monitor. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... passed over the area, generating images on a computer monitor. You must hold very still and may be ...

  13. Involvement of the bone morphogenetic protein system in endothelin- and aldosterone-induced cell proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells isolated from human patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryutaro; Otsuka, Fumio; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Yamashita, Misuzu; Otani, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Masaya; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Kusano, Kengo F; Ito, Hiroshi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2010-05-01

    Recent genetic studies have uncovered a link between familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and germline mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein type-II receptor (BMPRII). The pathology of PAH is characterized by remodeling of the pulmonary arteries due to pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) hyperproliferation. Although increased endothelial injury and impaired suppression of PASMC proliferation are both critical for the cellular pathogenesis of PAH, a detailed molecular mechanism underlying PAH has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the roles of the BMP system and other vasoactive factors associated with PAH (including endothelin (ET), angiotensin II (Ang II) and aldosterone) in the mitotic actions of PASMCs isolated from idiopathic and secondary PAH lungs. ET1 and aldosterone stimulated PASMC proliferation of idiopathic PAH more effectively than secondary PAH, whereas Ang II and ET3 failed to activate mitosis in either of the PASMC cell type. The effects of ET1 and aldosterone were blocked by bosentan, an ET type-A/B receptor (ETA/BR) antagonist, and eplerenone, a selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blocker, respectively. Among the BMP ligands examined, BMP-2 and BMP-7, but not BMP-4 or BMP-6, significantly increased cell mitosis in both PASMC cell types. Notably, ET1- and aldosterone-induced mitosis and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation were significantly increased in the presence of BMP-2 and BMP-7 in PASMCs isolated from idiopathic PAH, although additive effects were not observed in PASMCs isolated from secondary PAH. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1)/ERK2 signaling suppressed basal-, ET1- and aldosterone-induced PASMC mitosis more potently than that of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibition. Given the fact that BMP-2 and BMP-7 upregulated ETA/BR and MR expression and that BMP-2 decreased 11betaHSD2 (11beta

  14. Relationship between alveolar bone measured by /sup 125/I absorptiometry with analysis of standardized radiographs: 2. Bjorn technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ortman, L.F.; McHenry, K.; Hausmann, E.

    1982-05-01

    The Bjorn technique is widely used in periodontal studies as a standardized measure of alveolar bone. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using /sup 125/I absorptiometry to measure bone mass. The purpose of this study was to compare /sup 125/I absorptiometry with the Bjorn technique in detecting small sequential losses of alveolary bone. Four periodontal-like defects of incrementally increasing size were produced in alveolar bone in the posterior segment of the maxilla of a human skull. An attempt was made to sequentially reduce the amount of bone in 10% increments until no bone remained, a through and through defect. The bone remaining at each step was measured using /sup 125/I absorptiometry. At each site the /sup 125/I absorptiometry measurements were made at the same location by fixing the photon source to a prefabricated precision-made occlusal splint. This site was just beneath the crest and midway between the borders of two adjacent teeth. Bone loss was also determined by the Bjorn technique. Standardized intraoral films were taken using a custom-fitted acrylic clutch, and bone measurements were made from the root apex to coronal height of the lamina dura. A comparison of the data indicates that: (1) in early bone loss, less than 30%, the Bjorn technique underestimates the amount of loss, and (2) in advanced bone loss, more than 60% the Bjorn technique overestimates it.

  15. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  16. Osteogenic differentiation of dura mater stem cells cultured in vitro on three-dimensional porous scaffolds of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) fabricated via co-extrusion and gas foaming.

    PubMed

    Petrie Aronin, C E; Cooper, J A; Sefcik, L S; Tholpady, S S; Ogle, R C; Botchwey, E A

    2008-09-01

    A novel scaffold fabrication method utilizing both polymer blend extrusion and gas foaming techniques to control pore size distribution is presented. Seventy-five per cent of all pores produced using polymer blend extrusion alone were less than 50microm. Introducing a gas technique provided better control of pore size distribution, expanding the range from 0-50 to 0-350microm. Varying sintering time, annealing temperature and foaming pressure also helped to reduce the percentage of pore sizes below 50microm. Scaffolds chosen for in vitro cellular studies had a pore size distribution of 0-300microm, average pore size 66+/-17microm, 0.54+/-0.02% porosity and 98% interconnectivity, measured by micro-computed tomography (microCT) analysis. The ability of the scaffolds to support osteogenic differentiation for subsequent cranial defect repair was evaluated by static and dynamic (0.035+/-0.006ms(-1) terminal velocity) cultivation with dura mater stem cells (DSCs). In vitro studies showed minimal increases in proliferation over 28 days in culture in osteogenic media. Alkaline phosphatase expression remained constant throughout the study. Moderate increases in matrix deposition, as assessed by histochemical staining and microCT analysis, occurred at later time points, days 21 and 28. Although constructs cultured dynamically showed greater mineralization than static conditions, these trends were not significant. It remains unclear whether bioreactor culture of DSCs is advantageous for bone tissue engineering applications. However, these studies show that polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds alone, without the addition of other co-polymers or ceramics, support long-term attachment and mineralization of DSCs throughout the entire porous scaffold.

  17. Bone Disease in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Eda, Homare; Santo, Loredana; David Roodman, G; Raje, Noopur

    2016-01-01

    Bone involvement represented by osteolytic bone disease (OBD) or osteopenia is one of the pathognomonic and defining characteristics of multiple myeloma (MM). Nearly 90 % of patients with MM develop osteolytic bone lesions, frequently complicated by skeletal-related events (SRE) such as severe bone pain, pathological fractures, vertebral collapse, hypercalcemia, and spinal cord compression. All of these not only result in a negative impact on quality of life but also adversely impact overall survival. OBD is a consequence of increased osteoclast (OC) activation along with osteoblast (OB) inhibition, resulting in altered bone remodeling. OC number and activity are increased in MM via cytokine deregulation within the bone marrow (BM) milieu, whereas negative regulators of OB differentiation suppress bone formation. Inhibition of osteolysis and stimulation of OB differentiation leads to reduced tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, novel agents targeting OBD are promising therapeutic strategies not only for the treatment of MM OBD but also for the treatment of MM. Several novel agents in addition to bisphosphonates are currently under investigation for their positive effect on bone remodeling via OC inhibition or OB stimulation. Future studies will look to combine or sequence all of these agents with the goal of not only alleviating morbidity from MM OBD but also capitalizing on the resultant antitumor activity.

  18. Bone and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vai, Silvia; Bianchi, Maria Luisa; Moroni, Isabella; Mastella, Chiara; Broggi, Francesca; Morandi, Lucia; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Bussolino, Chiara; Baranello, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease, leading to progressive denervation atrophy in the involved skeletal muscles. Bone status has been poorly studied. We assessed bone metabolism, bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures in 30 children (age range 15-171 months) affected by SMA types 2 and 3. Eighteen children (60%) had higher than normal levels of CTx (bone resorption marker); 25-OH vitamin D was in the lower range of normal (below 20 ng/ml in 9 children and below 12 ng/ml in 2). Lumbar spine BMAD (bone mineral apparent density) Z-score was below -1.5 in 50% of children. According to clinical records, four children had sustained four peripheral fractures; on spine X-rays, we observed 9 previously undiagnosed vertebral fractures in 7 children. There was a significant inverse regression between PTH and 25-OH D levels, and a significant regression between BMC and BMAD values and the scores of motor-functional tests. Even if this study could not establish the pathogenesis of bone derangements in SMA, its main findings - reduced bone density, low 25OH vitamin D levels, increased bone resorption markers and asymptomatic vertebral fractures also in very young patients - strongly suggest that even young subjects affected by SMA should be considered at risk of osteopenia and even osteoporosis and fractures.

  19. [Bone disease in Gaucher's disease].

    PubMed

    Roca Espiau, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    The exposition aims, is to review the pathophysiological mechanisms of bone marrow involvement and the patterns of marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. We have reviewed the different methods of assessment of bone marrow infiltration and its temporal development. Qualitative methods include simple radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and radioisotope. The simple radiography is the basic element, but its sensitivity is limited and only allows for assessing changes and trabecular bone remodeling MRI allows us to appreciate the bone marrow infiltration, detection of complications and response to therapy. Radioisotopes can contribute to the differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis and bone crises. Among the quantitative methods are the QCSI (quantitative chemical shift imaging) and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), as well as new quantitative techniques of CT, MRI and ultrasound densitometry. The QCSI performed an assessment of fat content of bone marrow in the spine. DEXA quantifies bone density by measuring the attenuation coefficient. The semiquantitative methods have various "scores" to establish criteria for generalized bone disease endpoints of disease progression and response to therapy.

  20. Study of photoacoustic measurement of bone health based on clinically relevant models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Ken; Cao, Meng; Cheng, Qian; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) technique involving both ultrasound and light has been explored for potential application in the assessment of bone health. The optical and ultrasound penetration in bone have been studied. The feasibility of conducting 3D PA imaging of bone, and performing quantitative evaluation of bone microstructures by using photoacoustic spectrum analysis (PASA) has also been investigated. The findings from the experiments demonstrate that PA measurement could offer information of bone mineral density and bone microstructure, both relevant to bone health.

  1. Pharmacologic management of bone-related complications and bone metastases in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Denise A

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk for bone loss and skeletal-related events, including bone metastases, in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Both the disease itself and its therapeutic treatments can negatively impact bone, resulting in decreases in bone mineral density and increases in bone loss. These negative effects on the bone can significantly impact morbidity and mortality. Effective management and minimization of bone-related complications in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remain essential. This review discusses the current understanding of molecular and biological mechanisms involved in bone turnover and metastases, increased risk for bone-related complications from breast cancer and breast cancer therapy, and current and emerging treatment strategies for managing bone metastases and bone turnover in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. PMID:27217795

  2. Retention of bone strength by feeding of milk and dairy products in ovariectomized rats: involvement of changes in serum levels of 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 and FGF23.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Rieko; Haraikawa, Mayu; Sogabe, Natsuko; Sugimoto, Aoi; Kawamura, Yuka; Takasugi, Satoshi; Nagata, Masashi; Nakane, Ayako; Yamaguchi, Akira; Iimura, Tadahiro; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2013-06-01

    The current study compared the effects of milk, yogurt or whey on the bone strength, body composition and serum biomarkers. Forty 12-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX), and another nine rats received a sham operation (Sham-Cont). After a 1-week recovery period, the OVX rats were divided into four dietary groups: OVX-control group (OVX-Cont), 17% skimmed milk powder diet group (OVX-Milk), 17% powdered fermented milk diet group (OVX-Yogurt) and 12% whey powder and 6% whey protein extract diet group (OVX-Whey) (n=10 in each group). The protein, nitrogen, fat, calcium and phosphorus contents of the experimental diets were adjusted to be similar to the control diet (AIN-93M). Eighty-four days after the beginning of the experimental diet, the total bone mineral density and bone mineral contents of lumbar vertebrae were significantly higher in the OVX-Milk and OVX-Whey groups than in the OVX-Cont group. Furthermore, the level of 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1alpha, 25(OH)2D3] was significantly lower, while the serum level of FGF23 was significantly higher in the OVX-Milk, OVX-Yogurt and OVX-Whey groups than in the OVX-Cont group. These findings suggest that milk and the dairy products could improve bone metabolism in a postmenopausal animal model at least partly through changing the balance between 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 and FGF23.

  3. Broken Bones (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones Print A A ... bone fragments in place. When Will a Broken Bone Heal? Fractures heal at different rates, depending upon ...

  4. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... the cut, then pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  5. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  6. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... amputation. This is called limb-salvage or limb-sparing surgery . In going over treatment options, it is ... 2016 Treating Bone Cancer Surgery for Bone Cancer Radiation Therapy for Bone Cancer Chemotherapy for Bone Cancer Targeted ...

  7. Facts about Broken Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Kids > Broken Bones Print A A ... sticking through the skin . What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  8. Giant Petrous Bone Cholesteatoma: Combined Microscopic Surgery and an Adjuvant Endoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Savastano, Ersilia; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Re, Massimo; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Petrous bone cholesteatomas (PBCs) are epidermoid cysts, which have developed in the petrous portion of the temporal bone and may be congenital or acquired. Cholesteatomas arising in this region have a tendency to invade bone and functional structures and the middle and posterior fossae reaching an extensive size. Traditionally, surgery of a giant PBC contemplates lateral transtemporal or middle fossa microscopic surgery; however, in recent years, endoscopic surgical techniques (primary or complementary endoscopic approach) are starting to receive a greater consensus for middle ear and mastoid surgeries. We report the rare case of an 83-year-old Caucasian male affected by a giant cholesteatoma that eroded the labyrinth and the posterior fossa dura and extended to the infralabyrinthine region, going beyond the theca and reaching the first cervical vertebra. The giant cholesteatoma was managed through a combined approach (microscopic and, subsequently, complementary endoscopic approach). In this case report, we illustrate some advantages of this surgical choice.

  9. Giant Petrous Bone Cholesteatoma: Combined Microscopic Surgery and an Adjuvant Endoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Iannella, Giannicola; Savastano, Ersilia; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Re, Massimo; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Petrous bone cholesteatomas (PBCs) are epidermoid cysts, which have developed in the petrous portion of the temporal bone and may be congenital or acquired. Cholesteatomas arising in this region have a tendency to invade bone and functional structures and the middle and posterior fossae reaching an extensive size. Traditionally, surgery of a giant PBC contemplates lateral transtemporal or middle fossa microscopic surgery; however, in recent years, endoscopic surgical techniques (primary or complementary endoscopic approach) are starting to receive a greater consensus for middle ear and mastoid surgeries. We report the rare case of an 83-year-old Caucasian male affected by a giant cholesteatoma that eroded the labyrinth and the posterior fossa dura and extended to the infralabyrinthine region, going beyond the theca and reaching the first cervical vertebra. The giant cholesteatoma was managed through a combined approach (microscopic and, subsequently, complementary endoscopic approach). In this case report, we illustrate some advantages of this surgical choice. PMID:26937334

  10. MiRNAs in bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin T; Xiao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which mainly inhibit protein expression by targeting the 3'UTR (untranslated region) of mRNAs, are known to play various roles in the pathogenesis of many different types of diseases. Specifically, in bone diseases, recent emphasis has been placed on the involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation and proliferation of bone and cartilage cells, particularly with regards to how these mechanisms contribute to bone homeostasis. In this review, we summarize miRNAs that are important in the differentiation and proliferation of bone cells, and specific miRNAs associated with bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review also provides the perspective that miRNA studies will identify not only new mechanisms in basic bone research, but also potential novel diagnostic biomarkers and drug targets for bone diseases.

  11. [Alternate method for closure of oro-antral fistulas. Plastic covering of jaw opening with lyophilized Dura and alcoholic solution of Prolamin].

    PubMed

    Kinner, U; Frenkel, G

    1990-11-01

    The operative closure of an oroantral fistula due to tooth extractions by the method of Rehrmann consists of various disadvantages, e.g. postoperative pain, swelling, flattening of the vestibulum and scar-tissue. Two alternative methods to close fresh oroantral fistulas without surgical intervention are described. By the use of prolamin occlusion gel or lyophilized dura these disadvantages can be avoided. Both techniques were successfully attempted on patients. The rate of failure is on both counts under 4%. Some indications limits must be strictly regarded. Both methods are really a good alternative to the usual operative procedure of Rehrmann and can easily be applied even on patients of great risk.

  12. [Overview: derangement of bone metabolism in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2009-09-01

    Since it is well known that insulin actions have direct and indirect effects on bone metabolism, bone metabolism and bone fragility in patients with diabetes mellitus is a clinically important issue to be addressed. As in glucose metabolism, an involvement of insulin deficiency and insulin resistance should be discussed independently in bone metabolism. Impaired bone formation is primarily involved in bone loss in patients with type 1 diabetes who are lack in insulin secretion. In contrast, bone fragility due to poor bone quality is a major problem in patients with type 2 diabetes who are resistant to insulin actions. Through clinical investigations, it has been established that elderly women with diabetes are at high risk in fracture. Taken together, one should be aware of bone integrity in patients with diabetes, especially in elderly women.

  13. Carbon nanotubes with high bone-tissue compatibility and bone-formation acceleration effects.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuki; Aoki, Kaoru; Narita, Nobuyo; Murakami, Narumichi; Nakamura, Isao; Nakamura, Koichi; Ishigaki, Norio; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Taruta, Seiichi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Saito, Naoto

    2008-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used in various fields as composites with other substances or alone to develop highly functional materials. CNTs hold great interest with respect to biomaterials, particularly those to be positioned in contact with bone such as prostheses for arthroplasty, plates or screws for fracture fixation, drug delivery systems, and scaffolding for bone regeneration. Accordingly, bone-tissue compatibility of CNTs and CNT influence on bone formation are important issues, but the effects of CNTs on bone have not been delineated. Here, it is found that multi-walled CNTs adjoining bone induce little local inflammatory reaction, show high bone-tissue compatibility, permit bone repair, become integrated into new bone, and accelerate bone formation stimulated by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). This study provides an initial investigational basis for CNTs in biomaterials that are used adjacent to bone, including uses to promote bone regeneration. These findings should encourage development of clinical treatment modalities involving CNTs.

  14. Study of a new bone-targeting titanium implant-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangning; Zhang, Ye; Li, Shaobing; Wang, Yayu; Sun, Ting; Li, Zejian; Cai, Lizhao; Wang, Xiaogang; Zhou, Lei; Lai, Renfa

    New strategies involving bone-targeting titanium (Ti) implant-bone interface are required to enhance bone regeneration and osseointegration for orthopedic and dental implants, especially in osteoporotic subjects. In this study, a new dual-controlled, local, bone-targeting delivery system was successfully constructed by loading tetracycline-grafted simvastatin (SV)-loaded polymeric micelles in titania nanotube (TNT) arrays, and a bone-targeting Ti implant-bone interface was also successfully constructed by implanting the delivery system in vivo. The biological effects were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that Ti surfaces with TNT-bone-targeting micelles could promote cytoskeletal spreading, early adhesion, alkaline phosphatase activity, and extracellular osteocalcin concentrations of rat osteoblasts, with concomitant enhanced protein expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. A single-wall bone-defect implant model was established in normal and ovariectomized rats as postmenopausal osteoporosis models. Microcomputed tomography imaging and BMP-2 expression in vivo demonstrated that the implant with a TNT-targeting micelle surface was able to promote bone regeneration and osseointegration in both animal models. Therefore, beneficial biological effects were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that the bone-targeting effects of micelles greatly enhance the bioavailability of SV on the implant-bone interface, and the provision of SV-loaded targeting micelles alone exhibits the potential for extensive application in improving local bone regeneration and osseointegration, especially in osteoporotic subjects.

  15. Study of a new bone-targeting titanium implant–bone interface

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangning; Zhang, Ye; Li, Shaobing; Wang, Yayu; Sun, Ting; Li, Zejian; Cai, Lizhao; Wang, Xiaogang; Zhou, Lei; Lai, Renfa

    2016-01-01

    New strategies involving bone-targeting titanium (Ti) implant–bone interface are required to enhance bone regeneration and osseointegration for orthopedic and dental implants, especially in osteoporotic subjects. In this study, a new dual-controlled, local, bone-targeting delivery system was successfully constructed by loading tetracycline-grafted simvastatin (SV)-loaded polymeric micelles in titania nanotube (TNT) arrays, and a bone-targeting Ti implant–bone interface was also successfully constructed by implanting the delivery system in vivo. The biological effects were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that Ti surfaces with TNT–bone-targeting micelles could promote cytoskeletal spreading, early adhesion, alkaline phosphatase activity, and extracellular osteocalcin concentrations of rat osteoblasts, with concomitant enhanced protein expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. A single-wall bone-defect implant model was established in normal and ovariectomized rats as postmenopausal osteoporosis models. Microcomputed tomography imaging and BMP-2 expression in vivo demonstrated that the implant with a TNT-targeting micelle surface was able to promote bone regeneration and osseointegration in both animal models. Therefore, beneficial biological effects were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that the bone-targeting effects of micelles greatly enhance the bioavailability of SV on the implant–bone interface, and the provision of SV-loaded targeting micelles alone exhibits the potential for extensive application in improving local bone regeneration and osseointegration, especially in osteoporotic subjects. PMID:27932879

  16. Influences of dietary vitamin D restriction on bone strength, body composition and muscle in rats fed a high-fat diet: involvement of mRNA expression of MyoD in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Oku, Yuno; Tanabe, Rieko; Nakaoka, Kanae; Yamada, Asako; Noda, Seiko; Hoshino, Ayumi; Haraikawa, Mayu; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with a greater risk of osteoporosis and also influences skeletal muscle functions, differentiation and development. The present study investigated the influences of vitamin D restriction on the body composition, bone and skeletal muscle in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley strain male rats (11weeks old) were divided into four groups and fed experimental diets: a basic control diet (Cont.), a basic control diet with vitamin D restriction (DR), a high-fat diet (F) and a high-fat diet with vitamin D restriction (FDR). At 28days after starting the experimental diets, the visceral fat mass was significantly increased in the F group compared with Cont. group, and the muscle mass tended to decrease in the DR group compared with Cont. group. The total volume of the femur was significantly lower in the DR group compared with Cont. group, and the bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur was significantly lower in the FDR group compared with F group. MyoD is one of the muscle-specific transcription factors. The levels of mRNA expression of MyoD of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles from the DR group were reduced markedly compared with those from the Cont. group. In conclusion, our findings revealed the influences of a vitamin D-restricted high-fat diet on the bone strength, body composition and muscle. Further studies on vitamin D insufficiency in the regulation of muscle as well as fat and bone metabolism would provide valuable data for the prevention of lifestyle-related disorders, including osteoporosis and sarcopenia.

  17. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  18. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 or P2X2/3 is involved in the pain-like behavior under a high bone turnover state in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Kumiko; Iba, Kousuke; Abe, Yasuhisa; Dohke, Takayuki; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Matsumura, Tadaki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated that pathological changes leading to increased bone resorption by osteoclast activation are related to the induction of pain-like behavior in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In addition, bisphosphonate and the antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), an acid-sensing nociceptor, improved the threshold value of pain-like behaviors accompanying an improvement in the acidic environment in the bone tissue based on osteoclast inactivation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of (i) an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+) -ATPase, known as an proton pump, (ii) an antagonist of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 3, as another acid-sensing nociceptor, and (iii) the P2X2/3 receptor, as an ATP-ligand nociceptor, on pain-like behavior in OVX mice. This inhibitor and antagonists were found to improve the threshold value of pain-like behavior in OVX mice. These results indicated that the skeletal pain accompanying osteoporosis is possibly associated with the acidic microenvironment and increased ATP level caused by osteoclast activation under a high bone turnover state.

  19. Pathophysiological Mechanism of Bone Loss in Type 2 Diabetes Involves Inverse Regulation of Osteoblast Function by PGC-1α and Skeletal Muscle Atrogenes: AdipoR1 as a Potential Target for Reversing Diabetes-Induced Osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Parvez; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Joharapurkar, Amit Arvind; Yadav, Manisha; Shree, Sonal; Kumar, Harish; Gurjar, Anagha; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Tiwari, Mahesh Chandra; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Kumar, Sudhir; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Sharan, Anupam; Jain, Mukul Rameshchandra; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Godbole, Madan Madhav; Gayen, Jiaur Rahaman; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased fracture risk and delayed fracture healing; the underlying mechanism, however, remains poorly understood. We systematically investigated skeletal pathology in leptin receptor-deficient diabetic mice on a C57BLKS background (db). Compared with wild type (wt), db mice displayed reduced peak bone mass and age-related trabecular and cortical bone loss. Poor skeletal outcome in db mice contributed high-glucose- and nonesterified fatty acid-induced osteoblast apoptosis that was associated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) downregulation and upregulation of skeletal muscle atrogenes in osteoblasts. Osteoblast depletion of the atrogene muscle ring finger protein-1 (MuRF1) protected against gluco- and lipotoxicity-induced apoptosis. Osteoblast-specific PGC-1α upregulation by 6-C-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(2S,3S)-(+)-5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxydihydroflavonol (GTDF), an adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) agonist, as well as metformin in db mice that lacked AdipoR1 expression in muscle but not bone restored osteopenia to wt levels without improving diabetes. Both GTDF and metformin protected against gluco- and lipotoxicity-induced osteoblast apoptosis, and depletion of PGC-1α abolished this protection. Although AdipoR1 but not AdipoR2 depletion abolished protection by GTDF, metformin action was not blocked by AdipoR depletion. We conclude that PGC-1α upregulation in osteoblasts could reverse type 2 diabetes-associated deterioration in skeletal health.

  20. Hyponatremia and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Negri, Armando Luis; Ayus, Juan Carlos

    2016-09-24

    Hip fractures represent a serious health risk in the elderly, causing substantial morbidity and mortality. There is now a considerable volume of literature suggesting that chronic hyponatremia increases the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for both falls and fractures in the elderly. Hyponatremia appears to contribute to falls and fractures by two mechanisms. First, it produces mild cognitive impairment, resulting in unsteady gait and falls; this is probably due to the loss of glutamate (a neurotransmitter involved in gait function) as an osmolyte during brain adaptation to chronic hyponatremia. Second, hyponatremia directly contributes to osteoporosis and increased bone fragility by inducing increased bone resorption to mobilize sodium stores in bone. Low extracellular sodium directly stimulates osteoclastogenesis and bone resorptive activity through decreased cellular uptake of ascorbic acid and the induction of oxidative stress; these effects occur in a sodium level-dependent manner. Hyponatremic patients have elevated circulating arginine-vasopressin (AVP) levels, and AVP acting on two receptors expressed in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, Avpr1α and Avpr2, can increase bone resorption and decrease osteoblastogenesis. Should we be screening for low serum sodium in patients with osteoporosis or assessing bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with hyponatremia? The answers to these questions have not been established. Definitive answers will require randomized controlled studies that allocate elderly individuals with mild hyponatremia to receive either active treatment or no treatment for hyponatremia, to determine whether correction of hyponatremia prevents gait disturbances and changes in BMD, thereby reducing the risk of fractures. Until such studies are conducted, physicians caring for elderly patients must be aware of the association between hyponatremia and bone disorders. As serum sodium is a readily available, simple, and affordable biochemical measurement

  1. Bone remodeling as a spatial evolutionary game.

    PubMed

    Ryser, Marc D; Murgas, Kevin A

    2017-04-07

    Bone remodeling is a complex process involving cell-cell interactions, biochemical signaling and mechanical stimuli. Early models of the biological aspects of remodeling were non-spatial and focused on the local dynamics at a fixed location in the bone. Several spatial extensions of these models have been proposed, but they generally suffer from two limitations: first, they are not amenable to analysis and are computationally expensive, and second, they neglect the role played by bone-embedded osteocytes. To address these issues, we developed a novel model of spatial remodeling based on the principles of evolutionary game theory. The analytically tractable framework describes the spatial interactions between zones of bone resorption, bone formation and quiescent bone, and explicitly accounts for regulation of remodeling by bone-embedded, mechanotransducing osteocytes. Using tools from the theory of interacting particle systems we systematically classified the different dynamic regimes of the spatial model and identified regions of parameter space that allow for global coexistence of resorption, formation and quiescence, as observed in physiological remodeling. In coexistence scenarios, three-dimensional simulations revealed the emergence of sponge-like bone clusters. Comparison between spatial and non-spatial dynamics revealed substantial differences and suggested a stabilizing role of space. Our findings emphasize the importance of accounting for spatial structure and bone-embedded osteocytes when modeling the process of bone remodeling. Thanks to the lattice-based framework, the proposed model can easily be coupled to a mechanical model of bone loading.

  2. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of bone formation in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-07-01

    Spondyloarthritis comprise a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases characterized by its association to HLA-B27 and the presence of arthritis and enthesitis. The pathogenesis involves both an inflammatory process and new bone formation, which eventually lead to ankylosis of the spine. To date, the intrinsic mechanisms of the pathogenic process have not been fully elucidated, and our progress is remarkable in the identification of therapeutic targets to achieve the control of the inflammatory process, yet our ability to inhibit the excessive bone formation is still insufficient. The study of new bone formation in spondyloarthritis has been mostly conducted in animal models of the disease and only few experiments have been done using human biopsies. The deregulation and overexpression of molecules involved in the osteogenesis process have been observed in bone cells, mesenchymal cells, and fibroblasts. The signaling associated to the excessive bone formation is congruent with those involved in the physiological processes of bone remodeling. Bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnt pathways have been found deregulated in this disease; however, the cause for uncontrolled stimulation remains unknown. Mechanical stress appears to play an important role in the pathological osteogenesis process; nevertheless, the association of other important factors, such as the presence of HLA-B27 and environmental factors, remains uncertain. The present review summarizes the experimental findings that describe the signaling pathways involved in the new bone formation process in spondyloarthritis in animal models and in human biopsies. The role of mechanical stress as the trigger of these pathways is also reviewed.

  4. Cancer of the external auditory canal and temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Kuhel, W I; Hume, C R; Selesnick, S H

    1996-10-01

    Malignant tumors involving the structures of the temporal bone represent formidable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for clinicians involved in the treatment of otologic disease. This article offers a perspective on the current understanding of the biology of malignancies involving the external auditory canal, middle ear space, and temporal bone, and reviews the often confusing and contradictory literature on this topic.

  5. Follicle-stimulating hormone increases bone mass in female mice.

    PubMed

    Allan, Charles M; Kalak, Robert; Dunstan, Colin R; McTavish, Kirsten J; Zhou, Hong; Handelsman, David J; Seibel, Markus J

    2010-12-28

    Elevated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activity is proposed to directly cause bone loss independent of estradiol deficiency in aging women. Using transgenic female mice expressing human FSH (TgFSH), we now reveal that TgFSH dose-dependently increased bone mass, markedly elevating tibial and vertebral trabecular bone volume. Furthermore, TgFSH stimulated a striking accrual of bone mass in hypogonadal mice lacking endogenous FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH) function, showing that FSH-induced bone mass occurred independently of background LH or estradiol levels. Higher TgFSH levels increased osteoblast surfaces in trabecular bone and stimulated de novo bone formation, filling marrow spaces with woven rather than lamellar bone, reflective of a strong anabolic stimulus. Trabecular bone volume correlated positively with ovarian-derived serum inhibin A or testosterone levels in TgFSH mice, and ovariectomy abolished TgFSH-induced bone formation, proving that FSH effects on bone require an ovary-dependent pathway. No detectable FSH receptor mRNA in mouse bone or cultured osteoblasts or osteoclasts indicated that FSH did not directly stimulate bone. Therefore, contrary to proposed FSH-induced bone loss, our findings demonstrate that FSH has dose-dependent anabolic effects on bone via an ovary-dependent mechanism, which is independent of LH activity, and does not involve direct FSH actions on bone cells.

  6. Micro-CT evaluation of bone defects: applications to osteolytic bone metastases, bone cysts, and fracture.

    PubMed

    Buie, Helen R; Bosma, Nick A; Downey, Charlene M; Jirik, Frank R; Boyd, Steven K

    2013-11-01

    Bone defects can occur in various forms and present challenges to performing a standard micro-CT evaluation of bone quality because most measures are suited to homogeneous structures rather than ones with spatially focal abnormalities. Such defects are commonly associated with pain and fragility. Research involving bone defects requires quantitative approaches to be developed if micro-CT is to be employed. In this study, we demonstrate that measures of inter-microarchitectural bone spacing are sensitive to the presence of focal defects in the proximal tibia of two distinctly different mouse models: a burr-hole model for fracture healing research, and a model of osteolytic bone metastases. In these models, the cortical and trabecular bone compartments were both affected by the defect and were, therefore, evaluated as a single unit to avoid splitting the defects into multiple analysis regions. The burr-hole defect increased mean spacing (Sp) by 27.6%, spacing standard deviation (SpSD) by 113%, and maximum spacing (Spmax) by 72.8%. Regression modeling revealed SpSD (β=0.974, p<0.0001) to be a significant predictor of the defect volume (R(2)=0.949) and Spmax (β=0.712, p<0.0001) and SpSD (β=0.271, p=0.022) to be significant predictors of the defect diameter (R(2)=0.954). In the mice with osteolytic bone metastases, spacing parameters followed similar patterns of change as reflected by other imaging technologies, specifically bioluminescence data which is indicative of tumor burden. These data highlight the sensitivity of spacing measurements to bone architectural abnormalities from 3D micro-CT data and provide a tool for quantitative evaluation of defects within a bone.

  7. The Biology of Bone and Ligament Healing.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Jessica A; Turner, Jessica Cardenas; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston; O'Connor, J Patrick

    2016-12-01

    This review describes the normal healing process for bone, ligaments, and tendons, including primary and secondary healing as well as bone-to-bone fusion. It depicts the important mediators and cell types involved in the inflammatory, reparative, and remodeling stages of each healing process. It also describes the main challenges for clinicians when trying to repair bone, ligaments, and tendons with a specific emphasis on Charcot neuropathy, fifth metatarsal fractures, arthrodesis, and tendon sheath and adhesions. Current treatment options and research areas are also reviewed.

  8. What Is Breast in the Bone?

    PubMed Central

    Shemanko, Carrie S.; Cong, Yingying; Forsyth, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The normal developmental program that prolactin generates in the mammary gland is usurped in the cancerous process and can be used out of its normal cellular context at a site of secondary metastasis. Prolactin is a pleiotropic peptide hormone and cytokine that is secreted from the pituitary gland, as well as from normal and cancerous breast cells. Experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that prolactin is associated with mammary gland development, and also the increased risk of breast tumors and metastatic disease in postmenopausal women. Breast cancer spreads to the bone in approximately 70% of cases with advanced breast cancer. Despite treatment, new bone metastases will still occur in 30%–50% of patients. Only 20% of patients with bone metastases survive five years after the diagnosis of bone metastasis. The breast cancer cells in the bone microenvironment release soluble factors that engage osteoclasts and/or osteoblasts and result in bone breakdown. The breakdown of the bone matrix, in turn, enhances the proliferation of the cancer cells, creating a vicious cycle. Recently, it was shown that prolactin accelerated the breast cancer cell-mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone breakdown by the regulation of breast cancer-secreted proteins. Interestingly, prolactin has the potential to affect multiple proteins that are involved in both breast development and likely bone metastasis, as well. Prolactin has normal bone homeostatic roles and, combined with the natural “recycling” of proteins in different tissues that can be used for breast development and function, or in bone function, increases the impact of prolactin signaling in breast cancer bone metastases. Thus, this review will focus on the role of prolactin in breast development, bone homeostasis and in breast cancer to bone metastases, covering the molecular aspects of the vicious cycle. PMID:27782069

  9. Bone end sclerosis in renal osteodystrophy simulating osteonecrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lewis, L.; Keats, T.E.

    1982-08-01

    Osteosclerosis of the bone ends is an unusual manifestation of renal osteodystrophy. In evaluating this finding one should be careful to exclude clinical and radiographic evidence for osteonecrosis. In the two known cases of this entity, bone end sclerosis has been found to develop over one to two years with symmetrical involvement of multiple bones.

  10. Bone Density Test

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Bone density test By Mayo Clinic Staff A bone density test determines if you have osteoporosis — a disease that causes bones to ... your bones could be quite weak. A bone density test enhances the accuracy of calculating your risk ...

  11. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Proximal Tibial Bone Graft Page Content What is a bone graft? Bone grafts may be needed for various ... the proximal tibia. What is a proximal tibial bone graft? Proximal tibial bone graft (PTBG) is a ...

  12. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…

  13. Homing of cancer cells to the bone.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anjali; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Pienta, Kenneth J; Taichman, Russell S

    2011-12-01

    A variety of tumor cells preferentially home to the bone. The homing of cancer cells to the bone represents a multi-step process that involves malignant progression of the tumor, invasion of the tumor through the extracellular matrix and the blood vessels and settling of the tumor cells in the bone. Gaining a greater understanding as to the mechanisms used by cancer cells in these processes will facilitate the design of drugs which could specifically target the homing process. In this review we will discuss the properties of tumor cells and the bone microenvironment which promote homing of a cancer cell to the bone. We will highlight the different steps and the molecular pathways involved when a cancer cell metastasize to the bone. Since bone is the major home for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), we will also highlight the similarities between the homing of cancer and HSC to the bone. Finally we will conclude with therapeutic and early detection strategies which can prevent homing of a cancer cell to the bone.

  14. Connecting mechanics and bone cell activities in the bone remodeling process: an integrated finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.'s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  15. Connecting Mechanics and Bone Cell Activities in the Bone Remodeling Process: An Integrated Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain–damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.’s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  16. Bone scan appearances following bone and bone marrow biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-01-01

    Bone marrow and bone biopsies are performed not infrequently in patients referred for bone scans and represent a potential cause of a ''false positive'' focal abnormality on the bone scan. The authors have therefore examined the scan appearances in a series of patients who had undergone either sternal marrow biopsy, (Salah needle, diameter 1.2 mm) trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy (Jamshidi 11 gauge needle, diameter 3.5 mm) or a transiliac bone biopsy (needle diameter 8 mm). Of 18 patients studied 1 to 45 days after sternal marrow 17 had normal scan appearances at the biopsy site and 1 had a possible abnormality. None of 9 patients studied 4 to 19 days after trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy had a hot spot at the biopsy site. A focal scan abnormality was present at the biopsy site in 9/11 patients studied 5 to 59 days after a trans iliac bone biopsy. No resultant scan abnormality was seen in 4 patients imaged within 3 days of the bone biopsy or in 3 patients imaged 79 to 138 days after the procedure. Bone marrow biopsy of the sternum or iliac crest does not usually cause bone scan abnormalities. A focal abnormality at the biopsy site is common in patients imaged 5 days to 2 months after bone biopsy. The gauge of the needle employed in the biopsy and thus the degree of bone trauma inflicted, is likely to be main factor determining the appearance of bone scan abnormalities at the biopsy site.

  17. Therapeutic effects of autologous bone marrow cells and metabolic intervention in the ischemic hindlimb of spontaneously hypertensive rats involve reduced cell senescence and CXCR4/Akt/eNOS pathways.

    PubMed

    de Nigris, Filomena; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Williams-Ignarro, Sharon; D'Armiento, Francesco P; Lerman, Lilach O; Byrns, Russell; Crimi, Ettore; Palagiano, Antonio; Fatigati, Gennaro; Ignarro, Louis J; Napoli, Claudio

    2007-10-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a major health problem, especially when associated with severe hypertension. Administration of autologous bone marrow cells (BMCs) is emerging as a novel intervention to induce neoangiogenesis in ischemic limb models and in patients with PAD. This study evaluates the neovascularization capacity of BMCs alone or in combination with metabolic cotreatment (0.8% vitamin E, 0.05% vitamin C, and 5% of L-arginine) in a rat model of ischemic hindlimbs of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Molecular mechanisms were investigated in bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (BM-EPC) derived from rats. BMC therapy increased blood flow and capillary densities and Ki67 proliferative marker, and it decreased interstitial fibrosis. These effects were amplified by metabolic cotreatment, an intervention that induces vascular protection at least partly through the nitric oxide (NO)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway, reduction of systemic oxidative stress, and macrophage activation. In addition, BMC therapy alone and, more consistently, in combination with metabolic treatment, ameliorated BM-EPC functional activity via decreased cellular senescence and improved homing capacity by increasing CXCR4-expression levels. These data suggest potential therapeutic effects of autologous BMCs and metabolic treatment in hypertensive PAD patients.

  18. STK-1, the human homolog of Flk-2/Flt-3, is selectively expressed in CD34+ human bone marrow cells and is involved in the proliferation of early progenitor/stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Small, D; Levenstein, M; Kim, E; Carow, C; Amin, S; Rockwell, P; Witte, L; Burrow, C; Ratajczak, M Z; Gewirtz, A M

    1994-01-01

    We cloned the cDNA for stem cell tyrosine kinase 1 (STK-1), the human homolog of murine Flk-2/Flt-3, from a CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell-enriched library and investigated its expression in subsets of normal human bone marrow. The cDNA encodes a protein of 993 aa with 85% identity and 92% similarity to Flk-2/Flt-3. STK-1 is a member of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family that includes KIT (steel factor receptor), FMS (colony-stimulating factor 1R), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. STK-1 expression in human blood and marrow is restricted to CD34+ cells, a population greatly enriched for stem/progenitor cells. Anti-STK-1 antiserum recognizes polypeptides of 160 and 130 kDa in several STK-1-expressing cell lines and in 3T3 cells transfected with a STK-1 expression vector. Antisense oligonucleotides directed against STK-1 sequences inhibited hematopoietic colony formation, most strongly in long-term bone marrow cultures. These data suggest that STK-1 may function as a growth factor receptor on hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7507245

  19. Reconstruction of the mandible bone by treatment of resected bone with pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masataka; Inokuchi, Tsugio; Sano, Kazuo; Sumita, Yoshinori; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Asahina, Izumi

    2012-11-01

    The results of long-term follow-up for reimplantation of the mandibular bone treated with pasteurization are reported. Mandibulectomy was performed for mandibular malignancy in 3 cases. The resected bones were subsequently reimplanted after treatment with pasteurization in 3 cases to eradicate tumor cells involved in the resected bone. Although postoperative infection was observed in 2 of 3 cases, reimplantation of the resected mandibular bone treated by pasteurization was finally successful. Ten to 22 years of follow-up was carried out. Pasteurization was able to devitalize tumor cells involved in the resected bone and to preserve bone-inductive activity. Reimplantation of pasteurization could be a useful strategy for reconstruction of the mandible in patients with mandibular malignancy.

  20. Novel approaches to bone grafting: porosity, bone morphogenetic proteins, stem cells, and the periosteum.

    PubMed

    Petrochenko, Peter; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-01-01

    The disadvantages involving the use of a patient's own bone as graft material have led surgeons to search for alternative materials. In this review, several characteristics of a successful bone graft material are discussed. In addition, novel synthetic materials and natural bone graft materials are being considered. Various factors can determine the success of a bone graft substitute. For example, design considerations such as porosity, pore shape, and interconnection play significant roles in determining graft performance. The effective delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins and the ability to restore vascularization also play significant roles in determining the success of a bone graft material. Among current approaches, shorter bone morphogenetic protein sequences, more efficient delivery methods, and periosteal graft supplements have shown significant promise for use in autograft substitutes or autograft extenders.

  1. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  2. Requirement for digestible calcium by eleven- to twenty-five-kilogram pigs as determined by growth performance, bone ash concentration, calcium and phosphorus balances, and expression of genes involved in transport of calcium in intestinal and kidney cells.

    PubMed

    González-Vega, J C; Liu, Y; McCann, J C; Walk, C L; Loor, J J; Stein, H H

    2016-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the requirement for standardized total tract digestible (STTD) Ca by 11- to 25-kg pigs based on growth performance, bone ash, or Ca and P retention and to determine the effect of dietary Ca on expression of genes related to Ca transport in the jejunum and kidneys. Six diets were formulated to contain 0.36% STTD P and 0.32, 0.40, 0.48, 0.56, 0.64, or 0.72% STTD Ca by including increasing quantities of calcium carbonate in the diets at the expense of cornstarch. Two additional diets contained 0.72% STTD Ca and 0.33% or 0.40% STTD P to determine if 0.36% STTD P had negative effects on the Ca requirement. The same batch of all diets was used in both experiments. In Exp. 1, 256 pigs (11.39 ± 1.21 kg initial BW) were randomly allotted to the 8 diets with 4 pigs per pen and 8 replicate pens per diet in a randomized complete block design. On the last day of the experiment, 1 pig from each pen was euthanized and the right femur and intestine and kidney samples were collected. Results indicated that ADG and G:F started to decline (linear and quadratic, < 0.05) at 0.54 and 0.50% STTD Ca, respectively. In contrast, bone ash increased (quadratic, < 0.05) as dietary Ca increased and reached a plateau indicating that the requirement for STTD Ca to maximize bone ash was 0.48%. Bone ash, but not ADG or G:F, increased (linear, < 0.01) as STTD increased in the diets. The mRNA expression of genes related to transcellular Ca transport decreased (linear, < 0.01) in the jejunum and in kidneys (linear and quadratic, < 0.01) as dietary Ca increased. In Exp. 2, 80 pigs (13.12 ± 1.79 kg initial BW) were placed in metabolism crates and randomly allotted to the 8 diets with 10 replicate pigs per diet in a randomized complete block design. Fecal and urine samples were collected using the marker-to-marker approach. Results indicated that the requirement for STTD Ca to maximize Ca and P retention (g/d) was 0.60 and 0.49%, respectively. In conclusion

  3. Common endocrine control of body weight, reproduction, and bone mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Shu; Elefteriou, Florent; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Bone mass is maintained constant between puberty and menopause by the balance between osteoblast and osteoclast activity. The existence of a hormonal control of osteoblast activity has been speculated for years by analogy to osteoclast biology. Through the search for such humoral signal(s) regulating bone formation, leptin has been identified as a strong inhibitor of bone formation. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular infusion of leptin has shown that the effect of this adipocyte-derived hormone on bone is mediated via a brain relay. Subsequent studies have led to the identification of hypothalamic groups of neurons involved in leptin's antiosteogenic function. In addition, those neurons or neuronal pathways are distinct from neurons responsible for the regulation of energy metabolism. Finally, the peripheral mediator of leptin's antiosteogenic function has been identified as the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics administered to mice decreased bone formation and bone mass. Conversely, beta-blockers increased bone formation and bone mass and blunted the bone loss induced by ovariectomy.

  4. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sandip; Diwaker, Preeti; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma.

  5. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Sandip; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma. PMID:27504302

  6. The Role of Semaphorin 3A in Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenxia; Hao, Jin; Duan, Xin; Wu, Nan; Zhou, Zongke; Yang, Fan; Li, Juan; Zhao, Zhihe; Huang, Shishu

    2017-01-01

    Bone remodeling occurs at the bone surface throughout adult life and associates bony quantity and quality. This process is a balance between the osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption, which cross-talks together. Semaphorin 3A is a membrane-associated secreted protein and regarded as a diffusible axonal chemorepellent, which has been identified in the involvement of bone resorption and formation synchronously. However, the role of Semaphorin 3A in bone homeostasis and diseases remains elusive, in particular the association to osteoblasts and osteoclasts. In this review article, we summarize recent progress of Semaphorin 3A in the bone mass, homeostasis, and diseases and discuss the novel application of nerve-based bone regeneration. This will facilitate the understanding of Semaphorin 3A in skeletal biology and shed new light on the modulation and potential treatment in the bone disorders. PMID:28293171

  7. Menopause and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You reach your highest bone mass (size and density) at about age 30. Then, sometime between age ... your bones, your doctor may do a bone density test (DEXA scan). This test gives exact measurements ...

  8. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  9. Dietary restrictions, bone density, and bone quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsang-hai; Ables, Gene P

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), protein restriction (PR), and specific amino acid restriction (e.g., methionine restriction (MR)) are different dietary interventions that have been confirmed with regard to their comprehensive benefits to metabolism and health. Based on bone densitometric measurements, weight loss induced by dietary restriction is known to be accompanied by reduced areal bone mineral density, bone mass, and/or bone size, and it is considered harmful to bone health. However, because of technological advancements in bone densitometric instruments (e.g., high-resolution X-ray tomography), dietary restrictions have been found to cause a reduction in bone mass/size rather than volumetric bone mineral density. Furthermore, when considering bone quality, bone health consists of diverse indices that cannot be fully represented by densitometric measurements alone. Indeed, there is evidence that moderate dietary restrictions do not impair intrinsic bone material properties, despite the reduction in whole-bone strength because of a smaller bone size. In the present review, we integrate research evidence from traditional densitometric measurements, metabolic status assays (e.g., energy metabolism, oxidative stresses, and inflammatory responses), and biomaterial analyses to provide revised conclusions regarding the effects of CR, PR, and MR on the skeleton.

  10. Mouse models for studying prostate cancer bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinlu; Hensel, Janine; Wang, Ning; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna; Shiozawa, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Once tumor cells metastasize to the bone, the prognosis for prostate cancer patients is generally very poor. The mechanisms involved in bone metastasis, however, remain elusive, because of lack of relevant animal models. In this manuscript, we describe step-by-step protocols for the xenograft mouse models that are currently used for studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. The different routes of tumor inoculation (intraosseous, intracardiac, intravenous and orthotopic) presented are useful for exploring the biology of bone metastasis. PMID:26916039

  11. Endoscopic procurement of allograft tympano-ossicular systems: valuable to replace the Schuknecht bone plug technique?

    PubMed

    Caremans, Jeroen; Hamans, Evert; Muylle, Ludo; Van de Heyning, Paul; Van Rompaey, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Recently, our group demonstrated the technical feasibility of allograft tympano-ossicular systems (ATOS) procurement directly through the external auditory canal by using a rigid endoscope. This novel technique has several advantages compared to the traditional transcranial Schuknecht bone plug technique: it avoids contact with the dura mater, it is less time-consuming and it doesn't require a thorough reconstruction of the donor. In our tissue bank, we are currently transitioning from the transcranial procurement technique to the endoscopic procurement technique. The learning curve to master the endoscopic technique is steep but our preliminary results suggest that the percentage of good quality endoscopically procured ATOS is at least similar to the percentage of good quality transcranially procured ATOS dissected from the temporal bone plug. Additionally, the number of donations has increased significantly. By avoiding contact with the dura mater and therefore eliminating the risk of potential prion disease transmission, this technical evolution in procurement technique might allow dedicated tissue banks to (re-)introduce ATOS procurement and implantation.

  12. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  13. Ocular pharmacokinetics of bimatoprost formulated in DuraSite compared to bimatoprost 0.03% ophthalmic solution in pigmented rabbit eyes

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Afshin; Bowman, Lyle M; Hou, Eddie; Hosseini, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the aqueous humor (AH) and iris-ciliary body (ICB) concentration of bimatoprost in rabbit eyes treated with ISV-215 (0.03% bimatoprost formulated in DuraSite) with the marketed product bimatoprost 0.03% ophthalmic solution. Methods The left eye of rabbits received a single topical instillation of either ISV-215 (n = 32 eyes) or bimatoprost 0.03% (n = 32 eyes). At predetermined time points, levels of bimatoprost and bimatoprost acid in the AH and the ICB were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS. Results Both bimatoprost and bimatoprost acid were detected in the AH and the ICB within 15 minutes of dosing. Bimatoprost acid concentrations in both compartments were markedly higher than bimatoprost. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.01) increase in the concentration of the prodrug in the AH and its acid form in the ICB in animals treated with ISV-215 compared to bimatoprost 0.03%. In the ISV-215-treated rabbit eyes, the highest concentrations of bimatoprost and bimatoprost acid were in the ICB and AH, respectively, while in the bimatoprost 0.03%-treated eyes, no differences in the drug content of the selected ocular tissues were observed. Conclusions Bimatoprost 0.03% formulated in DuraSite has superior ocular distribution and area under the curve compared to bimatoprost 0.03% in rabbit eyes. This improvement in the pharmacokinetic parameters of ISV-215 may provide us with a better platform to optimize a bimatoprost formulation that offers the same degree of efficacy in lowering intraocular pressure and improved therapeutic index in glaucomatous patients by lessening the ocular side effects associated with long-term use of topical prostaglandin F2α analogs. PMID:23940414

  14. Smurf Control in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lianping; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Di

    2010-01-01

    The homologous to the E6-assosiated protein carboxyl terminus (HECT) domain E3 ubiquitin ligase Smurf1 is the first E3 ligase to be implicated in regulating bone cell function. The involvement of Smurf1 in multiple signaling pathways and pathological conditions is presently an area of extensive scientific interest. This review highlights recent works exploring Smurf-regulated biological processes in bone cells and highlights recent discoveries surrounding the regulatory mechanisms modulating its catalytic activity and substrate recognition capability. Moreover, we discuss the relevance of targeting the HECT E3s through the development of small-molecule inhibitors as an anticancer therapeutic strategy. PMID:20512916

  15. Oxidatively Degradable Poly(thioketal urethane)/Ceramic Composite Bone Cements with Bone-Like Strength.

    PubMed

    McEnery, Madison A P; Lu, Sichang; Gupta, Mukesh K; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Wenke, Joseph C; Kalpakci, Kerem N; Shimko, Daniel; Duvall, Craig L; Guelcher, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic bone cements are commonly used in orthopaedic procedures to aid in bone regeneration following trauma or disease. Polymeric cements like PMMA provide the mechanical strength necessary for orthopaedic applications, but they are not resorbable and do not integrate with host bone. Ceramic cements have a chemical composition similar to that of bone, but their brittle mechanical properties limit their use in weight-bearing applications. In this study, we designed oxidatively degradable, polymeric bone cements with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering applications. We synthesized a novel thioketal (TK) diol, which was crosslinked with a lysine triisocyanate (LTI) prepolymer to create hydrolytically stable poly(thioketal urethane)s (PTKUR) that degrade in the oxidative environment associated with bone defects. PTKUR films were hydrolytically stable for up to 6 months, but degraded rapidly (<1 week) under simulated oxidative conditions in vitro. When combined with ceramic micro- or nanoparticles, PTKUR cements exhibited working times comparable to calcium phosphate cements and strengths exceeding those of trabecular bone. PTKUR/ceramic composite cements supported appositional bone growth and integrated with host bone near the bone-cement interface at 6 and 12 weeks post-implantation in rabbit femoral condyle plug defects. Histological evidence of osteoclast-mediated resorption of the cements was observed at 6 and 12 weeks. These findings demonstrate that a PTKUR bone cement with bone-like strength can be selectively resorbed by cells involved in bone remodeling, and thus represent an important initial step toward the development of resorbable bone cements for weight-bearing applications.

  16. Compromised Bone Microarchitecture and Estimated Bone Strength in Young Adults With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Milliren, Carly E.; Derrico, Nicholas; Uluer, Ahmet; Sicilian, Leonard; Lapey, Allen; Sawicki, Gregory; Gordon, Catherine M.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Finkelstein, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Young adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at risk for low bone density and fractures, but the underlying alterations in bone microarchitecture that may contribute to their increased fracture risk are currently unknown. Objective: The main goal of this study was to use high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) to characterize the bone microarchitecture, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and estimated strength of the radius and tibia in young adults with CF compared with healthy volunteers. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional study at an outpatient clinical research center within a tertiary academic medical center. Participants: Thirty young adults with CF, 18 to 40 years of age, were evaluated and compared with 60 healthy volunteers matched by age (±2 years), gender, and race. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcomes were HR-pQCT–derived cortical and trabecular vBMD, bone microarchitecture, and estimates of bone strength. Results: At the radius and tibia, young adults with CF had smaller bone cross-sectional area and lower vBMD. Cortical and trabecular microarchitecture were compromised at both sites, most notably involving the trabecular bone of the tibia. These differences translated into lower estimated bone strength both at the radius and tibia. After accounting for body mass index differences, young adults with CF had lower bone area and estimated bone strength at the radius and had compromised trabecular microarchitecture and lower total and trabecular vBMD and estimated bone strength at the tibia. Alterations in trabecular bone density and microarchitecture and estimated strength measures of the tibia were also greater than expected based on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-derived areal BMD differences. Conclusions: Young adults with CF have compromised bone microarchitecture and lower estimated bone strength at both the radius and tibia, even after accounting for their smaller body size. These

  17. Adverse Effects of Osteocytic Constitutive Activation of ß-Catenin on Bone Strength and Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sixu; Feng, Jianquan; Bao, Quanwei; Li, Ang; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Yue; Zhao, Yufeng; Guo, Qingshan; Jing, Junjun; Lin, Shuxian; Zong, Zhaowen

    2015-07-01

    The activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in both mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts has been demonstrated to increase bone mass, showing promise for the treatment of low bone volume conditions such as osteoporosis. However, the possible side effects of manipulating this pathway have not been fully addressed. Previously, we reported that the constitutive activation of ß-catenin in osteoblasts impaired vertebral linear growth. In the present study, β-catenin was constitutively activated in osteocytes by crossing Catnb+/lox(exon 3) mice with dentin matrix protein 1(DMP1)-Cre transgenic mice, and the effects of this activation on bone mass, bone growth and bone strength were then observed. DMP1-Cre was found to be predominantly expressed in osteocytes, with weak expression in a small portion of osteoblasts and growth plate chondrocytes. After the activation, the cancellous bone mass was dramatically increased, almost filling the entire bone marrow cavity in long bones. However, bone strength decreased significantly. Thinner and more porous cortical bone along with impaired mineralization were responsible for the decrease in bone strength. Furthermore, the mice showed shorter stature with impaired linear growth of the long bones. Moreover, the concentration of serum phosphate decreased significantly after the activation of ß-catenin, and a high inorganic phosphate (Pi) diet could partially rescue the phenotype of decreased mineralization level and impaired linear growth. Taken together, the constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteocytes may increase cancellous bone mass; however, the activation also had adverse effects on bone strength and bone growth. These adverse effects should be addressed before the adoption of any therapeutic clinical application involving adjustment of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  18. Physiological bases of bone regeneration I. Histology and physiology of bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tresguerres-Hernández-Gil, Isabel; Alobera-Gracia, Miguel Angel; del-Canto-Pingarrón, Mariano; Blanco-Jerez, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Bone is the only body tissue capable of regeneration, allowing the restitutio ad integrum following trauma. In the event of a fracture or bone graft, new bone is formed, which following the remodeling process is identical to the pre-existing. Bone is a dynamic tissue in constant formation and resorption. This balanced phenomena, known as the remodeling process, allows the renovation of 5-15% of the total bone mass per year under normal conditions. Bone remodeling consists of the resorption of a certain amount of bone by osteoclasts, likewise the formation of osteoid matrix by osteoblasts, and its subsequent mineralization. This phenomenon occurs in small areas of the cortical bone or the trabecular surface, called Basic Multicellular Units (BMU). Treatment in Traumatology, Orthopedics, Implantology, and Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, is based on the biologic principals of bone regeneration, in which cells, extracellular matrix, and osteoinductive signals are involved. The aim of this paper is to provide an up date on current knowledge on the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of bone regeneration, paying particular attention to the role played by the cells and proteins of the bone matrix.

  19. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  20. Bone regeneration: current concepts and future directions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bone regeneration is a complex, well-orchestrated physiological process of bone formation, which can be seen during normal fracture healing, and is involved in continuous remodelling throughout adult life. However, there are complex clinical conditions in which bone regeneration is required in large quantity, such as for skeletal reconstruction of large bone defects created by trauma, infection, tumour resection and skeletal abnormalities, or cases in which the regenerative process is compromised, including avascular necrosis, atrophic non-unions and osteoporosis. Currently, there is a plethora of different strategies to augment the impaired or 'insufficient' bone-regeneration process, including the 'gold standard' autologous bone graft, free fibula vascularised graft, allograft implantation, and use of growth factors, osteoconductive scaffolds, osteoprogenitor cells and distraction osteogenesis. Improved 'local' strategies in terms of tissue engineering and gene therapy, or even 'systemic' enhancement of bone repair, are under intense investigation, in an effort to overcome the limitations of the current methods, to produce bone-graft substitutes with biomechanical properties that are as identical to normal bone as possible, to accelerate the overall regeneration process, or even to address systemic conditions, such as skeletal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:21627784

  1. Bone scan appearances following biopsy of bone and bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-10-01

    The influence of sternal marrow aspiration, iliac crest marrow aspiration, and iliac crest bone biopsy on bone scan appearances was examined. Eighteen patients were scanned a mean of 9.9 days after sternal marrow aspiration with a Salah needle. Bone scans obtained in 9 patients a mean of 10 days aftr iliac crest trephine marrow biopsy with a Jamshidi needle showed no abnormality at the biopsy site. In 18 patients with metabolic bone disease who had undergone iliac crest bone biopsy with an 8 mm needle, a scan abnormality due to the biopsy was usually present when the interval between the biopsy and the scan was 5 days to 2 months. Patients who were scanned within 3 days of iliac crest bone biopsy or more than 2 months after biopsy had normal scan appearance at the biopsy site.

  2. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  3. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... secrete factors that interact with the naturally occurring cells in the bone and cause bone destruction, new bone formation, or both. Effects Because MBD weakens the affected bones, people with the disease are prone to fractures. Broken ...

  4. Preventing painful age-related bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michelle L; Chartier, Stephane R; Mitchell, Stefanie A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related bone fractures are usually painful and have highly negative effects on a geriatric patient’s functional status, quality of life, and survival. Currently, there are few analgesic therapies that fully control bone fracture pain in the elderly without significant unwanted side effects. However, another way of controlling age-related fracture pain would be to preemptively administer an osteo-anabolic agent to geriatric patients with high risk of fracture, so as to build new cortical bone and prevent the fracture from occurring. A major question, however, is whether an osteo-anabolic agent can stimulate the proliferation of osteogenic cells and build significant amounts of new cortical bone in light of the decreased number and responsiveness of osteogenic cells in aging bone. To explore this question, geriatric and young mice, 20 and 4 months old, respectively, received either vehicle or a monoclonal antibody that sequesters sclerostin (anti-sclerostin) for 28 days. From days 21 to 28, animals also received sustained administration of the thymidine analog, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), which labels the DNA of dividing cells. Animals were then euthanized at day 28 and the femurs were examined for cortical bone formation, bone mineral density, and newly borne BrdU+ cells in the periosteum which is a tissue that is pivotally involved in the formation of new cortical bone. In both the geriatric and young mice, anti-sclerostin induced a significant increase in the thickness of the cortical bone, bone mineral density, and the proliferation of newly borne BrdU+ cells in the periosteum. These results suggest that even in geriatric animals, anti-sclerostin therapy can build new cortical bone and increase the proliferation of osteogenic cells and thus reduce the likelihood of painful age-related bone fractures. PMID:27837171

  5. Bone Health and Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lupsa, Beatrice C; Insogna, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue leading to decreased bone strength and an increased risk of low-energy fractures. Central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements are the gold standard for determining bone mineral density. Bone loss is an inevitable consequence of the decrease in estrogen levels during and following menopause, but additional risk factors for bone loss can also contribute to osteoporosis in older women. A well-balanced diet, exercise, and smoking cessation are key to maintaining bone health as women age. Pharmacologic agents should be recommended in patients at high risk for fracture.

  6. Pediatric aneurysmal bone cyst in the ischial region

    PubMed Central

    Hetaimish, Bandar M.; Alshaya, Osama S.

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expanding osteolytic lesion. ABC represents 1% of all primary benign bone tumors, whereby 4-12% occur in the pelvis. The etiology of this disease remains vague. Aneurysmal bone cyst can exist either as primary bone lesion (70%) or as secondary lesion arising from another bone disorder (30%). Moreover, pelvic ABCs are characterized by their large size and high vascularity. We present a rare pediatric case with ABC involving the ischial region. A 5-year-old girl presented with left pelvic pain and limping for the past 6 months. Initial imaging showed an expansile lesion in the left ischium, and computed tomography guided biopsy showed giant cells in histopathology study with no evidence of metastasis. The patient underwent intraoperative frozen section followed by extensive intra-lesional bone excision. Bone curettage was pursued along with bone grafting. The case was successfully managed without postoperative complications after the 6-month follow-up period. PMID:27381543

  7. The role of pleiotrophin in bone repair.

    PubMed

    Lamprou, Margarita; Kaspiris, Angelos; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Giannoudis, Peter V; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2014-12-01

    Bone has an enormous capacity for growth, regeneration, and remodelling, largely due to induction of osteoblasts that are recruited to the site of bone formation. Although the pathways involved have not been fully elucidated, it is well accepted that the immediate environment of the cells is likely to play a role via cell–matrix interactions, mediated by several growth factors. Formation of new blood vessels is also significant and interdependent to bone formation, suggesting that enhancement of angiogenesis could be beneficial during the process of bone repair. Pleiotrophin (PTN), also called osteoblast-specific factor 1, is a heparin-binding angiogenic growth factor, with a well-defined and significant role in both physiological and pathological angiogenesis. In this review we summarise the existing evidence on the role of PTN in bone repair.

  8. New therapeutic targets for cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Krzeszinski, Jing Y.; Wan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are dejected consequences of many types of tumors including breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid cancers. This complicated process begins with the successful tumor cell epithelial–mesenchymal transition, escape from the original site, and penetration into circulation. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on both tumor-intrinsic traits and various molecules supplied by the bone metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of cancer cells in the osseous environment, which awaken their dormancy to form micro- and macro-metastasis, involve an intricate interaction between the circulating tumor cells and local bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and macrophages. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the identification of new molecules and novel mechanisms during each step of bone metastasis that may serve as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25962679

  9. Relationships among maxillofacial morphologies, bone properties, and bone metabolic markers in patients with jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Saito, D; Mikami, T; Oda, Y; Hasebe, D; Nishiyama, H; Saito, I; Kobayashi, T

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships among bone properties, bone metabolic markers, and types of jaw deformity. The subjects were 55 female patients with jaw deformities. Skeletal morphology was examined using lateral cephalograms, and the patients were divided into three groups according to the type of anteroposterior skeletal pattern. Serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b, as well as deoxypyridinoline in urine, were measured as bone metabolic markers. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were used to assess bone properties at the calcaneal bone. The bone volume and bone density of the condylar process were measured in 43 patients by computed tomography. There were no significant differences in bone metabolic markers and QUS parameters between the groups, although bone formation and resorption markers tended to be higher in patients with a protrusive mandible. On the other hand, patients with mandibular retrusion had a higher tendency to have small and dense condylar processes. In conclusion, the results suggest that growth depression or a degenerative change in the mandibular condyle is involved in the pathogenesis of mandibular retrusion, although risk factors for progressive condylar resorption were not determined.

  10. The role of bone marrow-derived cells during the bone healing process in the GFP mouse bone marrow transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Katase, Naoki; Buery, Rosario Rivera; Tamamura, Ryo; Ito, Satoshi; Takagi, Shin; Iida, Seiji; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    Bone healing is a complex and multistep process in which the origin of the cells participating in bone repair is still unknown. The involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in tissue repair has been the subject of recent studies. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells in bone healing were traced using the GFP bone marrow transplantation model. Bone marrow cells from C57BL/6-Tg (CAG-EGFP) were transplanted into C57BL/6 J wild mice. After transplantation, bone injury was created using a 1.0-mm drill. Bone healing was histologically assessed at 3, 7, 14, and 28 postoperative days. Immunohistochemistry for GFP; double-fluorescent immunohistochemistry for GFP-F4/80, GFP-CD34, and GFP-osteocalcin; and double-staining for GFP and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were performed. Bone marrow transplantation successfully replaced the hematopoietic cells into GFP-positive donor cells. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that osteoblasts or osteocytes in the repair stage were GFP-negative, whereas osteoclasts in the repair and remodeling stages and hematopoietic cells were GFP-positive. The results indicated that bone marrow-derived cells might not differentiate into osteoblasts. The role of bone marrow-derived cells might be limited to adjustment of the microenvironment by differentiating into inflammatory cells, osteoclasts, or endothelial cells in immature blood vessels.

  11. Definition of bone necrosis by the pathologist

    PubMed Central

    Fondi, Cristina; Franchi, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a common disorder that may go clinically unrecognized or may result in the collapse of the architecture of bone, determining severe anatomic alterations of the involved site. Osteonecrosis is not a specific disease entity, but rather the result of a number of conditions ultimately leading to an impairment of blood supply to the bone tissue, although there is evidence that modifications of bone remodelling activity and weakening of bone structure with formation of microfractures are implicated as well. According to the site involved and to the factors promoting its development, the morbid anatomy and histopathology of osteonecrosis show a different appearance. This review discusses the main skeletal manifestations of osteonecrosis, including subarticular avascular necrosis of the femoral head and of the knee, as well as osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:22460748

  12. Pathophysiology of bone loss in disuse osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Christian; Vico, Laurence

    2011-12-01

    Osteoporosis, or rather the localised bone loss observed in patients with spinal cord injury, as well as during any type of immobilisation involves various processes and structures including the direct response of the musculoskeletal system to unloading, the central and peripheral nervous systems and their effects on bone cells and on the vascular system, the bone remodelling unit in its marrow compartment and a number of local factors controlling cell-cell cross-talk as well as calciotropic hormones. The authors present a detailed review of these different mechanisms which are all involved regardless of the type of immobilisation: pathological, environmental, or experimental. These factors are interconnected and put bone at the centre of the regulation of body homeostasis. A better knowledge of these mechanisms should promote the development of preventive therapies for the often neglected osteoporotic fractures that occur in patients with spinal cord injury.

  13. Factors stimulating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lind, M; Bünger, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review is to describe major approaches for stimulating bone healing and to review other factors affecting bone healing. Spinal bone fusion after surgery is a demanding process requiring optimal conditions for clinical success. Bone formation and healing can be enhanced through various methods. Experimental studies have revealed an array of stimulative measures. These include biochemical stimulation by use of hormones and growth factors, physical stimulation through mechanical and electromagnetic measures, and bone grafting by use of bone tissue or bone substitutes. Newer biological techniques such as stem cell transplantation and gene therapy can also be used to stimulate bone healing. Apart from bone transplantation, clinical experience with the many stimulation modalities is limited. Possible areas for clinical use of these novel methods are discussed.

  14. Regulation of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Maryam; Peymani, Amir; Sahmani, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells.In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), wingless-type (Wnt) genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX). PMID:28367467

  15. Bisphosphonates and bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Pazianas, Michael; van der Geest, Stefan; Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are bone-avid compounds used as first-line medications for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. They are also used in other skeletal pathologies such as Paget's and metastatic bone disease. They effectively reduce osteoclast viability and also activity in the resorptive phase of bone remodelling and help preserve bone micro-architecture, both major determinants of bone strength and ultimately of the susceptibility to fractures. The chemically distinctive structure of each BP used in the clinic determines their unique affinity, distribution/penetration throughout the bone and their individual effects on bone geometry, micro-architecture and composition or what we call ‘bone quality'. BPs have no clinically significant anabolic effects. This review will touch upon some of the components of bone quality that could be affected by the administration of BPs. PMID:24876930

  16. [Microdestruction of the bone].

    PubMed

    Iankovskiĭ, V É

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the detection of microcracks in the compact bone tissue surrounding the fracture and in deformed bone undergoing subcritical loading. The portions of deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones were obtained in the form of blocks longitudinally sawcut from the regions of primary and secondary bone rupture. A total of 300 such blocks were available for the examination. All portions of the deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones showed up microcracks commensurate with the bone structures. They were actually hardened traces of deformation that preceded the fracture and reflected the volume of the destroyed bone tissue; moreover, in certain cases they allowed to identify the kind of the object that exerted the external action (either a blow or slow bending).

  17. Regulation of Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Maryam; Peymani, Amir; Sahmani, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells.In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), wingless-type (Wnt) genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX).

  18. Expression of CD31, Met/hepatocyte growth factor receptor and bone morphogenetic protein in bone metastasis of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Arihiro, K; Inai, K

    2001-02-01

    The mechanism of metastasis of osteosarcoma cells to other bones has not yet fully been clarified. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether various factors involve the formation of osteosarcoma metastatic foci in other bones. Immunohistochemically, CD31 expression in osteosarcoma with no bone metastasis and osteosarcoma with bone metastasis was noted in 10 and 75% of cases, respectively. Met/hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor expression in osteosarcoma with no bone metastasis and osteosarcoma with bone metastasis was noted in 90 and 25% of cases, respectively. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) expression in osteosarcoma with no bone metastasis and osteosarcoma with bone metastasis was noted in 20 and 75% of cases, respectively. Metastasis of osteosarcoma cells to other bones was significantly correlated with expression of BMP and CD31 and with no expression of Met/HGF receptor protein in osteosarcoma cells. In contrast, expression of insulin-like growth factor receptor in osteosarcoma cells did not correlate significantly with bone metastasis. These results suggest that formation of metastatic foci of osteosarcoma cells in other bones is regulated by CD31, which is associated with migration between endothelial cells, by BMP, which can induce and activate various mesenchymal cells affecting bone formation, and by escape of effect by HGF, which promotes differentiation of osteosarcoma cells.

  19. Rhus javanica Gall Extract Inhibits the Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Osteoclasts and Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Park, Eui Kyun; Huh, Man-Il; Kim, Hong Kyun; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption is a therapeutic strategy for the management of postmenopausal bone loss. This study investigated the effects of Rhus javanica (R. javanica) extracts on bone marrow cultures to develop agents from natural sources that may prevent osteoclastogenesis. Extracts of R. javanica (eGr) cocoons spun by Rhus javanica (Bell.) Baker inhibited the osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. The effects of aqueous extract (aeGr) or 100% ethanolic extract (eeGr) on ovariectomy- (OVX-) induced bone loss were investigated by various biochemical assays. Furthermore, microcomputed tomography (µCT) was performed to study bone remodeling. Oral administration of eGr (30 mg or 100 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks) augmented the inhibition of femoral bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and other factors involved in bone remodeling when compared to OVX controls. Additionally, eGr slightly decreased bone turnover markers that were increased by OVX. Therefore, it may be suggested that the protective effects of eGr could have originated from the suppression of OVX-induced increase in bone turnover. Collectively, the findings of this study indicate that eGr has potential to activate bone remodeling by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and bone loss. PMID:27313644

  20. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Cugati, Goutham; Pande, Anil; Jain, Pradeep K; Symss, Nigel Peter; Ramamurthi, Ravi; Vasudevan, Chakravarthy M

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign, locally proliferative vascular disorder of non-neoplastic osseous lesions in children and young adults. Seventy-five percent of ABCs occur before the age of 20 years. They comprise 1.4% of all primary bone tumors, and commonly occur in the long bones. Spinal ABCs are much rarer. We present to you one such rare case of ABC involving the lumbar spine which was successfully treated with surgery. The clinical pathological and radiological features are described. The treatment options available are discussed.

  1. [Progress in individual identification of burned bones].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-dong; Ren, Fu; Xing, Rui-xian; Pei, Lin-guo

    2009-02-01

    The burned bone DNA test have became more and more important in identifying the individuals and paternity involved in the fire, explosion disasters as well as burn corpse crimes. As an important genetic marker system, STR has been widely used in forensic individual identification, paternity test and other fields. In this article, the influence of burned temperature and time to STR typing was reviewed, the choice of STR locus and DNA extraction methods were discussed about burned bones.

  2. The zebrafish infraorbital bones: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Carolyn; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara Anne

    2014-02-01

    The infraorbital (IO) bone series, a component of the circumorbital series, makes up five of the eight dermal bones found in the orbital region of the zebrafish skull. Ossifying in a set sequence, the IOs are closely associated with the cranial lateral line system as they house neuromast sensory receptors in bony canals. We conducted a detailed analysis of the condensation to mineralization phases of development of these bones. Our analyses involved both bone and osteoblast staining of zebrafish at 20 different time points. IO bone condensations are shaped as templates for the final bone shape, and they mineralize at one or more centers of ossification. Initially, mineralization is closely associated with the lateral line canals and/or foramen, and the onset of mineralization is temporally variable. Canal wall mineralization is a process that continues into adulthood and completely mineralized canal roofs were not found. Our comprehensive growth series detailing the ossification of each IO bone provides important insight into the growth and development of this series of neural crest-derived flat bones in the zebrafish craniofacial skeleton.

  3. Hypoxia signalling manipulation for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Drager, Justin; Harvey, Edward J; Barralet, Jake

    2015-04-22

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signalling is intricately involved in coupling angiogenesis and osteogenesis during bone development and repair. Activation of HIFs in response to a hypoxic bone micro-environment stimulates the transcription of multiple genes with effects on angiogenesis, precursor cell recruitment and differentiation. Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which oxygen content regulates the levels and activity of HIFs. In particular, the discovery of the role of oxygen-dependent hydroxylase enzymes in modulating the activity of HIF-1α has sparked interest in potentially promising therapeutic strategies in multiple clinical fields and most recently bone healing. Several small molecules, termed hypoxia mimics, have been identified as activators of the HIF pathway and have demonstrated augmentation of both bone vascularity and bone regeneration in vivo. In this review we discuss key elements of the hypoxic signalling pathway and its role in bone regeneration. Current strategies for the manipulation of this pathway for enhancing bone repair are presented with an emphasis on recent pre-clinical in vivo investigations. These findings suggest promising approaches for the development of therapies to improve bone repair and tissue engineering strategies.

  4. An Update into the Application of Nanotechnology in Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Brannigan, K.; Griffin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone differs from other organs in that it can regenerate and remodel without scar formation. There are instances of trauma, congenital bone disorder, bone disease and bone cancer where this is not possible. Without bone grafts and implants, deformity and disability would result. Human bone grafts are limited in their management of large or non-union fractures. In response, synthetic bone grafts and implants are available to the Orthopaedic Surgeon. Unfortunately these also have their limitations and associated complications. Nanotechnology involves the research, design and manufacture of materials with a grain size less than 100nm. Nano-phase materials follow the laws of quantum physics, not classical mechanics, resulting in novel behavioural differences compared to conventional counterparts. Methods: Past, present and future nanotechnology in bone healing literature is reviewed and discussed. The article highlights concepts which are likely to be instrumental to the future of nanotechnology in bone healing. Results: Nanotechnology in bone healing is an emerging field within Orthopaedic Surgery. There is a requirement for bone healing technologies which are biochemically and structurally similar to bone. Nanotechnology is a potential solution as the arrangement of bone includes nanoscopic collagen fibres and hydroxyapatite. This review centers on the novel field of nanotechnology in bone healing with discussion focusing on advances in bone grafts, implants, diagnostics and drug delivery. Conclusion: The concept of nanotechnology was first introduced in 1959. Current nanoproducts for bone healing include nano-HA-paste-ostim and nano-beta-tricalcium phosphate-Vitoss. Nanophase technologies are considered to be superior bone healing solutions. Limited safety data and issues regarding cost and mass scale production require further research into this exciting field. PMID:28217207

  5. Occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures in growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Mogha, I V; Aithal, H P; Kinjavdekar, P; Singh, G R; Pawde, A M; Kushwaha, R B

    2007-11-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to record the occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures, and the efficacy of Intramedullary (IM) Steinmann pin fixing in growing dogs. All the records of growing dogs during a 10-year-period were screened to record the cause of trauma, the age and sex of the animal, the bone involved, the type and location of the fracture, the status of fixation, alignment, maintenance of fixation and fracture healing. The results were analysed and comparisons were made between growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones. Among the 310 cases of fractures recorded, the bones were osteopenic in 91 cases (29%). Minor trauma was the principal cause of fracture in dogs with osteopenia (25%), and indigenous breeds were most commonly affected (38%). Fractures in dogs with osteopenic bones were most commonly recorded in the age group of 2-4 months (53%), whereas fractures in normal dogs were almost equally distributed between 2 and 8 months of age. Male dogs were affected significantly more often in both groups. In osteopenic bones, most fractures were recorded in the femur (56%), and they were distributed equally along the length of the bone. Whereas in normal bones, fractures were almost equally distributed in radius/ulna, femur and tibia, and were more often recorded at the middle and distal third of long bones. Oblique fractures were most common in both groups; however, comminuted fractures were more frequent in normal bones, whereas incomplete fractures were more common in osteopenic bones. Ninety-nine fracture cases treated with IM pinning (66 normal, 33 osteopenic) were evaluated for the status of fracture reduction and healing. In a majority of the cases (61%) with osteopenic bones, the diameter of the pin was relatively smaller than the diameter of the medullary cavity (<70-75%), whereas in 68% of the cases in normal bones the pin diameter was optimum. The status of fracture fixing was satisfactory to good in significantly more

  6. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  7. Mechanical Vibration Mitigates the Decrease of Bone Quantity and Bone Quality of Leptin Receptor-Deficient Db/Db Mice by Promoting Bone Formation and Inhibiting Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Luo, Erping; Cai, Jing; Tong, Shichao; Zhai, Mingming; Shen, Guanghao; Wang, Xin; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, a major hormonal product of adipocytes, is involved in regulating appetite and energy metabolism. Substantial studies have revealed the anabolic actions of leptin on skeletons and bone cells both in vivo and in vitro. Growing evidence has substantiated that leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice exhibit decreased bone mass and impaired bone microstructure despite several conflicting results previously reported. We herein systematically investigated bone microarchitecture, mechanical strength, bone turnover and its potential molecular mechanisms in db/db mice. More importantly, we also explored an effective approach for increasing bone mass in leptin receptor-deficient animals in an easy and noninvasive manner. Our results show that deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture and decreases of skeletal mechanical strength-including maximum load, yield load, stiffness, energy, tissue-level modulus and hardness-in db/db mice were significantly ameliorated by 12-week, whole-body vibration (WBV) with 0.5 g, 45 Hz via micro-computed tomography (μCT), three-point bending, and nanoindentation examinations. Serum biochemical analysis shows that WBV significantly decreased serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) and CTx-1 levels and also mitigated the reduction of serum osteocalcin (OCN) in db/db mice. Bone histomorphometric analysis confirmed that decreased bone formation-lower mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, and osteoblast numbers in cancellous bone-in db/db mice were suppressed by WBV. Real-time PCR assays show that WBV mitigated the reductions of tibial alkaline phosphatase (ALP), OCN, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), type I collagen (COL1), BMP2, Wnt3a, Lrp6, and β-catenin mRNA expression, and prevented the increases of tibial sclerostin (SOST), RANK, RANKL, RANL/osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene levels in db/db mice. Our results show that WBV promoted bone quantity and quality in db/db mice with obvious

  8. New insights to the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in bone phenotype and in dioxin-induced modulation of bone microarchitecture and material properties.

    PubMed

    Herlin, Maria; Finnilä, Mikko A J; Zioupos, Peter; Aula, Antti; Risteli, Juha; Miettinen, Hanna M; Jämsä, Timo; Tuukkanen, Juha; Korkalainen, Merja; Håkansson, Helen; Viluksela, Matti

    2013-11-15

    Bone is a target for high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands, such as dioxins. Although bone morphology, mineral density and strength are sensitive endpoints of dioxin toxicity, less is known about effects on bone microarchitecture and material properties. This study characterizes TCDD-induced modulations of bone tissue, and the role of AHR in dioxin-induced bone toxicity and for normal bone phenotype. Six AHR-knockout (Ahr(-/-)) and wild-type (Ahr(+/+)) mice of both genders were exposed to TCDD weekly for 10 weeks, at a total dose of 200μg/kgbw. Bones were examined with micro-computed tomography, nanoindentation and biomechanical testing. Serum levels of bone remodeling markers were analyzed, and the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation was profiled using PCR array. In Ahr(+/+) mice, TCDD-exposure resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner and more porous cortical bone, and a more compact trabecular bone compartment. Bone remodeling markers and altered expression of a number of osteogenesis related genes indicated imbalanced bone remodeling. Untreated Ahr(-/-) mice displayed a slightly modified bone phenotype as compared with untreated Ahr(+/+) mice, while TCDD exposure caused only a few changes in bones of Ahr(-/-) mice. Part of the effects of both TCDD-exposure and AHR-deficiency were gender dependent. In conclusion, exposure of adult mice to TCDD resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner cortical bone, mechanically weaker bones and most notably, increased trabecular bone volume fraction in Ahr(+/+) mice. AHR is involved in bone development of a normal bone phenotype, and is crucial for manifestation of TCDD-induced bone alterations.

  9. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Steven R

    2012-08-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. The changes in periarticular bone tend to occur very early in the development of OA. Although chondrocytes also have the capacity to modulate their functional state in response to loading, the capacity of these cells to repair and modify their surrounding extracellular matrix is relatively limited in comparison to the adjacent subchondral bone. This differential adaptive capacity likely underlies the more rapid appearance of detectable skeletal changes in OA in comparison to the articular cartilage. The OA changes in periarticular bone include increases in subchondral cortical bone thickness, gradual decreases in subchondral trabeular bone mass, formation of marginal joint osteophytes, development of bone cysts and advancement of the zone of calcified cartilage between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The expansion of the zone of calcified cartilage contributes to overall thinning of the articular cartilage. The mechanisms involved in this process include the release of soluble mediators from chondrocytes in the deep zones of the articular cartilage and/or the influences of microcracks that have initiated focal remodeling in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in an attempt to repair the microdamage. There is the need for further studies to define the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the interaction between subchondral bone and articular cartilage and for applying this information to the development of therapeutic interventions to improve the

  10. Dissecting the role of bone marrow stromal cells on bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro, Denise; Park, Serk In; Sterling, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-induced bone disease is a dynamic process that involves interactions with many cell types. Once metastatic cancer cells reach the bone, they are in contact with many different cell types that are present in the cell-rich bone marrow. These cells include the immune cells, myeloid cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and mesenchymal stem cells. Each of these cell populations can influence the behavior or gene expression of both the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment. Additionally, the tumor itself can alter the behavior of these bone marrow cells which further alters both the microenvironment and the tumor cells. While many groups focus on studying these interactions, much remains unknown. A better understanding of the interactions between the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment will improve our knowledge on how tumors establish in bone and may lead to improvements in diagnosing and treating bone metastases. This review details our current knowledge on the interactions between tumor cells that reside in bone and their microenvironment.

  11. Bone marrow culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... There may be some bleeding at the puncture site. More serious risks, such as serious bleeding or infection, are very rare. Alternative Names Culture - bone marrow Images Bone marrow aspiration References ...

  12. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  13. Smoking and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information Facts About Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones weaken ... adopt new habits for healthy bones. Smoking and Osteoporosis Cigarette smoking was first identified as a risk ...

  14. The role of bone in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lajeunesse, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Bone, and especially the subchondral bone plate, is involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). OA bone tissue is sclerotic yet undermineralized indicating abnormal bone cell metabolism. Studies in both human and animal models of OA support the concept that bone sclerosis could precede cartilage degradation and loss. Clinical studies show that the indices of bone resorption and formation are increased in OA patients. A working hypothesis of the sequence of changes leading to OA holds that enhanced bone remodeling is the initiating event triggering cartilage damage. The attempt to repair the damaged cartilage then leads to a number of biochemical adaptations in bone and cartilage. In bone, this repair attempt modifies insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and alters the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)/plasmin system. In the cartilage, it also modifies IGF-1/IGFBP levels and the uPA/plasmin system. However, bone changes may overwhelm the attempts to repair cartilage, and lead to further sclerosis and damage. Some of these specific pathways have been investigated, and indeed are modified in OA subchondral osteoblasts. Thus, subchondral bone sclerosis in OA may be due to abnormal osteoblasts characterized by increased metabolic activities that result in an increase in osteoid matrix that is undermineralized. The exact role played by cytokines and prostaglandins remains controversial. However, restraining collagen deposition and mineral removal, and/or improving mineral deposition, could provide a better, more mineralized, bone matrix in OA patients.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival soft tissue and alveolar bone following tooth extraction. For target identification and validation, hard and soft tissue were extracted from mini-pigs at the indicated times after tooth extraction. From triplicate experiments, 56 proteins in soft tissue and 27 proteins in alveolar bone were found to be differentially expressed before and after tooth extraction. The expression of 21 of those proteins was altered in both soft tissue and bone. Comparison of the activated networks in soft tissue and alveolar bone highlighted their distinct responsibilities in bone and tissue healing. Moreover, we found that there is crosstalk between identified proteins in soft tissue and alveolar bone with respect to cellular assembly, organization, and communication. Among these proteins, we examined in detail the expression patterns and associated networks of ATP5B and fibronectin 1. ATP5B is involved in nucleic acid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and neurological disease, and fibronectin 1 is involved in cellular assembly, organization, and maintenance. Collectively, our findings indicate that bone regeneration is accompanied by a profound interaction among networks regulating cellular resources, and they provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the healing of periodontal tissue after tooth extraction. PMID:23824910

  16. [Hyperprolactinaemia and bone mineral density].

    PubMed

    Kostrzak, Anna; Męczekalski, Błażej

    2015-08-01

    Hyperprolactinaemia is one of the most common endocrinological disorder at women at the reproductive age. Prolactin is produced by the anterior lobe of the pituitary.The main role of prolactin is associated with mamotrophic action and lactogenesis. Hyperprolactinaemia causes several symptoms such as menstrual disorders, infertility, decrease of sexual function, galactorrhea in women and gynecomasty, impotence and decrease of semen quality in men. Recent studies have presented prolactin as a homone involved in many metabolic processes. Long-term consequences of high prolactin serum concentration are related to higher risk of cardiovascular system disease, disturbances in lipid profile and immunological system. Hyperprolactiaemia causes decrease of bone mass density (BMD). High serum prolactin levels lead to increase of the risk of osteopenia or/and osteoporosis. Decrease of BMD results from hypoestrogenism induced by hyperprolactinaemia and also by the direct negative influence of prolactin on bone. Hyperprolactinaemia related to prolactinoma significantly (more than functional hyperprolactiaemia) increases the risk of osteopenia, osteoporosis and bone fractures. Important group of patients threatened by osteoporosis and bone fracture is constituted by women which use antipsychotic drugs (which induce hyperprolactinaemia). Hyperprolactinaemia diagnosed in patients should be treated as soon as possible. Hyperprolactinaemic patients should be diagnosed in the direction of osteopenia and osteoporosis. When diagnosis is confirmed proper treatment is indicated.

  17. Medicines and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... studies also show that drinking a lot of alcohol might weaken bones. Questions to ask your doctor • Do any of my medicines cause bone loss? • Are there different medicines I can take? • Do I need a bone density test? • What should I do to protect my ...

  18. Temporal bone meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Hooper, R; Siu, K; Cousins, V

    1990-10-01

    Meningiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of space-occupying lesions of the temporal bone. Five cases of meningiomas of the temporal bone are described and the literature reviewed. These tumours may stimulate Schwannomas and glomus tumours in their presentation and radiological findings. The tumours were managed by combining standard neurosurgical approaches with temporal bone and skull base techniques.

  19. Understanding Bone Strength Is Not Enough.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Christopher J; van der Meulen, Marjolein Ch

    2017-01-09

    Increases in fracture risk beyond what are expected from bone mineral density (BMD) are often attributed to poor "bone quality," such as impaired bone tissue strength. Recent studies, however, have highlighted the importance of tissue material properties other than strength, such as fracture toughness. Here we review the concepts behind failure properties other than strength and the physical mechanisms through which they cause mechanical failure: strength describes failure from a single overload; fracture toughness describes failure from a modest load combined with a preexisting flaw or damage; and fatigue strength describes failure from thousands to millions of cycles of small loads. In bone, these distinct failure mechanisms appear to be more common in some clinical fractures than others. For example, wrist fractures are usually the result of a single overload, the failure mechanism dominated by bone strength, whereas spinal fractures are rarely the result of a single overload, implicating multiple loading cycles and increased importance of fatigue strength. The combination of tissue material properties and failure mechanisms that lead to fracture represent distinct mechanistic pathways, analogous to molecular pathways used to describe cell signaling. Understanding these distinct mechanistic pathways is necessary because some characteristics of bone tissue can increase fracture risk by impairing fracture toughness or fatigue strength without impairing bone tissue strength. Additionally, mechanistic pathways to failure associated with fracture toughness and fatigue involve multiple loading events over time, raising the possibility that a developing fracture could be detected and interrupted before overt failure of a bone. Over the past two decades there have been substantial advancements in fracture prevention by understanding bone strength and fractures caused by a single load, but if we are to improve fracture risk prevention beyond what is possible now, we must

  20. A host-parasite list of the haematozoa of domestic poultry in sub-Saharan Africa and the isolation of Plasmodium durae Herman from turkeys and francolins in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Huchzermeyer, F W

    1993-03-01

    An annotated host-parasite list of the blood parasites of domestic poultry in sub-Saharan Africa is presented. This list contains the haematozoa found in domestic waterfowl (ducks, geese and muscovies) and phasianids (turkey, fowl and peafowl). In South Africa Plasmodium durae was isolated from 4 out of 8 backyard turkeys, from 3 out of 26 Swainson's francolins and from 1 redwing francolin, but not from 20 helmeted guineafowls and 9 greywing francolins. This points at Swainson's and redwing francolins as being the main natural hosts of P. durae in South Africa. The increase in the period of prepatency after intramuscular subinoculation as compared with the intravenous route was found to correspond to that of a 1,000 fold dilution of an intravenous inoculum of parasitized blood. This delay was not due to an intervening cycle of exoerythrocytic schizogony, but to large numbers of the injected erythrocytes apparently not finding their way into the circulation of the new host.

  1. Bone cysts in sarcoidosis: what is their clinical significance?

    PubMed

    Yanardağ, Halil; Pamuk, Omer Nuri

    2004-09-01

    The incidence of bone cysts in sarcoidosis, a multisystemic disease, varies in different series, and these cysts are generally asymptomatic. We evaluated bone cysts in 516 sarcoidosis patients with available hand X-rays and in 200 patients with foot X-rays. Bone cysts were present in 21 cases (19 females, two males). The cysts were localized in phalanges of the hand in all cases, in feet in five cases, and in nasal bone in one. Six patients with bone cysts also had lupus pernio. Among those with cystic bone lesions, females were more frequent; extrapulmonary and skin involvement and lupus pernio were significantly more common. We diagnosed cystic bone lesions in 3.6% of our sarcoidosis patients and conclude that cysts were more frequent in females and in patients with lupus pernio.

  2. Mammalian cortical bone in tension is non-Haversian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, Ashwij; Banerjee, Anuradha; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    Cortical bone, found in the central part of long bones like femur, is known to adapt to local mechanical stresses. This adaptation has been linked exclusively with Haversian remodelling involving bone resorption and formation of secondary osteons. Compared to primary/plexiform bone, the Haversian bone has lower stiffness, fatigue strength and fracture toughness, raising the question why nature prefers an adaptation that is detrimental to bone's primary function of bearing mechanical stresses. Here, we show that in the goat femur, Haversian remodelling occurs only at locations of high compressive stresses. At locations corresponding to high tensile stresses, we observe a microstructure that is non-Haversian. Compared with primary/plexiform bone, this microstructure's mineralisation is significantly higher with a distinctly different spatial pattern. Thus, the Haversian structure is an adaptation only to high compressive stresses rendering its inferior tensile properties irrelevant as the regions with high tensile stresses have a non-Haversian, apparently primary microstructure.

  3. Heterogeneity of tumor cells in the bone microenvironment: Mechanisms and therapeutic targets for bone metastasis of prostate or breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Suzui, Masumi

    2016-04-01

    Bone is the most common target organ of metastasis of prostate and breast cancers. This produces considerable morbidity due to skeletal-related events, SREs, including bone pain, hypercalcemia, pathologic fracture, and compression of the spinal cord. The mechanism of bone metastasis is complex and involves cooperative reciprocal interaction among tumor cells, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and the mineralized bone matrix. The interaction between the metastatic tumor and bone stromal cells has been commonly referred to as the "vicious cycle". Tumor cells stimulate osteoblasts, which in turn stimulate osteoclasts through the secretion of cytokines such as the TNF family member receptor activator of nuclear κB ligand (RANKL). Activated osteoclasts degrade the bone matrix by producing strong acid and proteinases. Bone degradation by osteoclasts releases TGFβ and other growth factors stored in the bone matrix, that further stimulate tumor cells. Bone modifying agents, targeting osteoclast activity, such as bisphosphonate and RANKL antibodies are considered as the standard of care for reducing SREs of patients with bone metastatic diseases. These agents decrease osteoclast activity and delay worsening of skeletal pain and aggravation of bone metastatic diseases. While the management of SREs by these agents may improve patients' lives, this treatment does not address the specific issues of the patients with bone metastasis such as tumor dormancy, drug resistance, or improvement of survival. Here, we review the mechanisms of bone metastasis formation, tumor heterogeneity in the bone microenvironment, and conventional therapy for bone metastatic diseases and discuss the potential development of new therapies targeting tumor heterogeneity in the bone microenvironment.

  4. Autologous Bone Graft in Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher P; Chiodo, Christopher P

    2016-12-01

    Bone graft is a common adjunct procedure in orthopedic surgery used for fusions, fracture repair, and the reconstruction of skeletal defects in the foot and ankle. Autologous graft, or autograft, involves the transport of bone from a donor site to another location in the same patient. It is considered by many to be the gold standard of bone grafting, as it is provides all biologic factors required for functional graft. Further, autograft is 100% histocompatible with no risk of disease transmission.

  5. Cat-scratch disease and bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ismaili-Alaoui, Nadia; Vuong, Valerie; Marcu-Marin, M; Sergent-Alaoui, Aline; Chevallier, Bertrand; de Labriolle-Vaylet, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Cat-scratch disease is a bacterial infection caused by Bartonella henselae. Bone involvement is rare. We describe the case of a 7-year-old boy with a systemic form of the disease. He presented with a 15-day history of fever, altered general condition, weight loss and cough, associated with back pain, and right-sided coxalgia. Bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate showed spinal involvement, the iliac crest, the right ankle, and the right first metatarsal. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed these locations. He was positive for anti-Bartonella henselae. The fever regressed before treatment with rifampicin began, and he made a full recovery.

  6. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, Judith R.; Anderson, Gerhard D.; Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.

    1996-01-01

    Method for fusing bone. The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  7. Bone metastases, general and clinical issues.

    PubMed

    Greco, C; Forte, L; Erba, P; Mariani, G

    2011-08-01

    The skeleton is the most common organ for metastasis from solid tumours. Bone metastases pose significant diagnostic and clinical challenges and represent an important cause of cancer-related morbidity. Without appropriate bone-directed therapy, many patients will be at high risk for potentially debilitating skeletal-related events (SREs), such as pain, bone fractures, neurologic deficits and hypercalcemia, severely impacting on the patient's quality of life. Because of their high incidence, bone metastases impose significant demands on health care resources. The optimal management of skeletal metastases depends on the underlying biology of the disease, the extent of bone involvement, the presence and severity of symptoms, the availability of effective systemic therapies and life expectancy of the patient. This article discusses clinical issues concerning diagnosis and available treatment approaches based on the presentation of skeletal involvement. Emphasis is placed on the role of external beam-radiotherapy as a local mode of treatment for palliation of bone pain, decompression of epidural compression and as potential ablative approach through high-dose image-guided irradiation (IGRT) in patients presenting with oligometastatic disease.

  8. Platform switching and bone platform switching.

    PubMed

    Carinci, Francesco; Brunelli, Giorgio; Danza, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Bone platform switching involves an inward bone ring in the coronal part of the implant that is in continuity with the alveolar bone crest. Bone platform switching is obtained by using a dental fixture with a reverse conical neck. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional vs reverse conical neck implants. In the period between May 2004 and November 2007, 86 patients (55 females and 31 males; median age, 53 years) were operated and 234 implants were inserted: 40 and 194 were conventional vs reverse conical neck implants, respectively. Kaplan-Meier algorithm and Cox regression were used to detect those variables associated with the clinical outcome. No differences in survival and success rates were detected between conventional vs reverse conical neck implants alone or in combination with any of the studied variables. Although bone platform switching leads to several advantages, no statistical difference in alveolar crest resorption is detected in comparison with reverse conical neck implants. We suppose that the proximity of the implant abutment junction to the alveolar crestal bone gives no protection against the microflora contained in the micrograph. Additional studies on larger series and a combination of platform switching and bone platform switching could lead to improved clinical outcomes.

  9. Bone health and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Jason J; Manlangit, Kristine; Squires, Kathleen E

    2013-06-01

    Low bone mineral density is common among persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and studies reporting increased fracture rates in this patient population are emerging. The causes of low bone mineral density, osteoporosis, and fractures in persons with HIV are likely multifactorial, involving traditional risk factors, HIV infection, and exposure to antiretroviral treatment. Specific antiretrovirals such as tenofovir may cause a greater loss of bone mineral density compared with other agents and have recently been linked to an increased risk for fracture. As a result, recent treatment guidelines suggest that clinicians consider avoiding tenofovir as initial therapy in postmenopausal women. Evaluating bone mineral density and vitamin D status in persons with HIV may be important steps in identifying those requiring pharmacotherapy; however, the appropriate timing for bone mineral density and vitamin D screening is uncertain, as is the appropriate method of replacing vitamin D in HIV-positive patients who are deficient. Further study is necessary to definitively determine the approach to evaluating bone health and managing low bone mineral density and vitamin D deficiency in patients with HIV infection.

  10. Weight Loss and Bone Mineral Density

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Gary R.; Plaisance, Eric P.; Fisher, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Despite evidence that energy deficit produces multiple physiological and metabolic benefits, clinicians are often reluctant to prescribe weight loss in older individuals or those with low BMD, fearing BMD will be decreased. Confusion exists concerning the effects weight loss has on bone health. Recent Findings Bone density is more closely associated with lean mass than total body mass and fat mass. Although rapid/large weight loss is often associated with loss of bone density, slower/smaller weight loss is much less apt to adversely affect BMD, especially when it is accompanied with high intensity resistance and/or impact loading training. Maintenance of calcium and vitamin D intake seems to positively affect BMD during weight loss. While dual energy X-ray absorptiometry is normally used to evaluate bone density, it may overestimate BMD loss following massive weight loss. Volumetric quantitative computed tomography may be more accurate for tracking bone density changes following large weight loss. Summary Moderate weight loss does not necessarily compromise bone health, especially when exercise training is involved. Training strategies that include heavy resistance training and high impact loading that occur with jump training may be especially productive in maintaining, or even increasing bone density with weight loss. PMID:25105997

  11. New insights to the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in bone phenotype and in dioxin-induced modulation of bone microarchitecture and material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Herlin, Maria; Finnilä, Mikko A.J.; Zioupos, Peter; Aula, Antti; Risteli, Juha; Miettinen, Hanna M.; Jämsä, Timo; Tuukkanen, Juha; Korkalainen, Merja; Håkansson, Helen; Viluksela, Matti

    2013-11-15

    Bone is a target for high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands, such as dioxins. Although bone morphology, mineral density and strength are sensitive endpoints of dioxin toxicity, less is known about effects on bone microarchitecture and material properties. This study characterizes TCDD-induced modulations of bone tissue, and the role of AHR in dioxin-induced bone toxicity and for normal bone phenotype. Six AHR-knockout (Ahr{sup −/−}) and wild-type (Ahr{sup +/+}) mice of both genders were exposed to TCDD weekly for 10 weeks, at a total dose of 200 μg/kg bw. Bones were examined with micro-computed tomography, nanoindentation and biomechanical testing. Serum levels of bone remodeling markers were analyzed, and the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation was profiled using PCR array. In Ahr{sup +/+} mice, TCDD-exposure resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner and more porous cortical bone, and a more compact trabecular bone compartment. Bone remodeling markers and altered expression of a number of osteogenesis related genes indicated imbalanced bone remodeling. Untreated Ahr{sup −/−} mice displayed a slightly modified bone phenotype as compared with untreated Ahr{sup +/+} mice, while TCDD exposure caused only a few changes in bones of Ahr{sup −/−} mice. Part of the effects of both TCDD-exposure and AHR-deficiency were gender dependent. In conclusion, exposure of adult mice to TCDD resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner cortical bone, mechanically weaker bones and most notably, increased trabecular bone volume fraction in Ahr{sup +/+} mice. AHR is involved in bone development of a normal bone phenotype, and is crucial for manifestation of TCDD-induced bone alterations. - Highlights: • TCDD disrupts bone remodeling resulting in altered cortical and trabecular bone. • In trabecular bone an anabolic effect is observed. • Cortical bone is thinner, more porous, harder, stiffer and mechanically weaker. • AHR ablation

  12. Diabetes and bone health: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaghavan, Vikram; Mazur, Matthew M.; Evans, Brad; Liu, Jiayong; Ebraheim, Nabil A.

    2017-01-01

    As the prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, research on some of the lesser-known effects, including impaired bone health, are gaining a lot of attention. The two most common forms of diabetes are type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These two differ in their physiology, with T1DM stemming from an inability to produce insulin, and T2DM involving an insufficient response to the insulin that is produced. This review aims to highlight the most current information regarding diabetes as it relates to bone health. It looks at biochemical changes that characterize diabetic bone; notably increased adiposity, altered bone metabolism, and variations in bone mineral density (BMD). Then several hypotheses are analyzed, concerning how these changes may be detrimental to the highly orchestrated processes that are involved in bone formation and turnover, and ultimately result in the distinguishing features of diabetic bone. The review proceeds by explaining the effects of antidiabetes medications on bone health, then highlighting several ways that diabetes can play a part in other clinical treatment outcomes. With diabetes negatively affecting bone health and creating other clinical problems, and its treatment options potentiating these effects, physicians should consider the use of anti-osteoporotic drugs to supplement standard anti-diabetes medications in patients suffering with diabetic bone loss. PMID:28344668

  13. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  14. Bone scintiscanning updated.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Scott, J R; Jackson, F I

    1976-03-01

    Use of modern materials and methods has given bone scintiscanning a larger role in clinical medicine, The safety and ready availability of newer agents have led to its greater use in investigating both benign and malignant disease of bone and joint. Present evidence suggests that abnormal accumulation of 99mTc-polyphosphate and its analogues results from ionic deposition at crystal surfaces in immature bone, this process being facilitated by an increase in bone vascularity. There is, also, a component of matrix localization. These factors are in keeping with the concept that abnormal scintiscan sites represent areas of increased osteoblastic activity, although this may be an oversimplification. Increasing evidence shows that the bone scintiscan is more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting focal disease of bone, and its ability to reflect the immediate status of bone further complements radiographic findings. The main limitation of this method relates to nonspecificity of the results obtained.

  15. Calcium and bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C.; Robinson, Lisa J.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Sun, Li; Friedman, Peter A.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Zaidi, Mone

    2013-01-01

    Calcium transport and calcium signaling are of basic importance in bone cells. Bone is the major store of calcium and a key regulatory organ for calcium homeostasis. Bone, in major part, responds to calcium-dependent signals from the parathyroids and via vitamin D metabolites, although bone retains direct response to extracellular calcium if parathyroid regulation is lost. Improved understanding of calcium transporters and calcium-regulated cellular processes has resulted from analysis of genetic defects, including several defects with low or high bone mass. Osteoblasts deposit calcium by mechanisms including phosphate and calcium transport with alkalinization to absorb acid created by mineral deposition; cartilage calcium mineralization occurs by passive diffusion and phosphate production. Calcium mobilization by osteoclasts is mediated by acid secretion. Both bone forming and bone resorbing cells use calcium signals as regulators of differentiation and activity. This has been studied in more detail in osteoclasts, where both osteoclast differentiation and motility are regulated by calcium. PMID:21674636

  16. Marble Bone Disease: A Rare Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harinathbabu, Maheswari; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Prabhu, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease, is a rare skeletal disorder due to a defective function of the osteoclasts. This defect renders bones more susceptible to osteomyelitis due to decreased vascularity. This disorder is inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Healthcare professionals should urge these patients to maintain their oral health as well as general health, as this condition makes these patients more susceptible to frequent infections and fractures. This case report emphasizes the signs and symptoms of marble bone disease and presents clinical and radiographic findings.  PMID:26594603

  17. The oxytocin-bone axis.

    PubMed

    Colaianni, G; Tamma, R; Di Benedetto, A; Yuen, T; Sun, L; Zaidi, M; Zallone, A

    2014-02-01

    We recently demonstrated a direct action of oxytocin (OT) on skeletal homeostasis, mainly mediated through stimulation of osteoblasts (OBs) formation and through the reciprocal modulation of osteoclast (OCs) formation and function. Thus, mice lacking the hormone or its receptor develop a low turnover osteoporosis that worsens with age in both sexes. The skeletons of OT (Ot) and OT receptor (Oxtr) null mice display a pronounced decrease in vertebral and femoral trabecular volume. At the cellular level, OBs from Ot KO and Oxtr KO mice exhibit lower mineralization activity and, at the mRNA level, all master genes for osteoblast differentiation are down-regulated. Moreover, OT has dual effects on OCs: it increases osteoclast formation both directly, by activating nuclear factor kB (NFkB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling and, indirectly, through the up-regulation of receptor activator nuclear factor-kappaB ligand synthesis by OBs. On the other hand, it inhibits bone resorption by triggering cytosolic Ca(2+) release and nitric oxide synthesis in mature OCs. OT is locally produced by osteoblasts acting as paracrine-autocrine regulators of bone formation modulated by oestrogens. The oestrogen signal involved in this feedforward circuit is nongenomic because it requires an intact MAPK kinase signal transduction pathway, instead of the classical nuclear translocation of oestrogen receptor. The ability of oestrogen to increase bone mass in vivo is to some extent OXTR-dependent. Thus, Oxtr KO mice injected 17β-oestradiol did not show any effects on bone formation parameters, whereas the same treatment increases trabecular and cortical bone in wild-type mice. An intact OT autocrine-paracrine circuit appears to be essential for optimal skeletal remodelling.

  18. Psycholegal issues in sibling bone marrow donation.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Victoria

    1992-01-01

    The only hope of survival for children with a number of life-threatening illnesses is a successful bone marrow transplant (BMT). Unlike the treatment source for most therapies, the raw material for transplant therapy comes from a human being. Although many BMTs are autologous, utilizing the patient's own bone marrow, a large percentage of childhood BMTs rely on bone marrow from children or adolescents who are biological siblings to the sick child. Medical and legal systems are confronted with a dilemma when healthy children are needed to undergo minimally risky, yet somewhat painful, procedures for the benefit of their critically ill siblings. This article reviews legal issues involved in sibling bone marrow donation and psychological research that is relevant to those issues. The article concludes with proposed directions for future psycholegal research and a discussion of ethical issues that are not amenable to empirical investigation.

  19. Norepinephrine Regulates Condylar Bone Loss via Comorbid Factors.

    PubMed

    Jiao, K; Niu, L; Xu, X; Liu, Y; Li, X; Tay, F R; Wang, M

    2015-06-01

    Degenerative changes of condylar subchondral bone occur frequently in temporomandibular disorders. Although psychologic stresses and occlusal abnormalities have been implicated in temporomandibular disorder, it is not known if these risks represent synergistic comorbid factors that are involved in condylar subchondral bone degradation that is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system. In the present study, chronic immobilization stress (CIS), chemical sympathectomy, and unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) were sequentially applied in a murine model. Norepinephrine contents in the subjects' serum and condylar subchondral bone were detected by ELISA; bone and cartilage remodeling parameters and related gene expression in the subchondral bone were examined. Subchondral bone loss and increased subchondral bone norepinephrine level were observed in the CIS and UAC groups. These groups exhibited decreased bone mineral density, volume fraction, and bone formation rate; decreased expressions of osterix, collagen I, and osteocalcin; but increased trabecular separation, osteoclast number and surface, and RANKL expression. Combined CIS + UAC produced more severe subchondral bone loss, higher bone norepinephrine level, and decreased chondrocyte density and cartilage thickness when compared to CIS or UAC alone. Sympathectomy simultaneously prevented subchondral bone loss and decreased bone norepinephrine level in all experimental subgroups when compared to the vehicle-treated counterparts. Norepinephrine also decreased mRNA expression of osterix, collagen I, and osteocalcin by mesenchymal stem cells at 7 and 14 d of stimulation and increased the expression of RANKL and RANKL/OPG ratio by mesenchymal stem cells at 2 h. In conclusion, CIS and UAC synergistically promote condylar subchondral bone loss and cartilage degradation; such processes are partially regulated by norepinephrine within subchondral bone.

  20. Dental implants with versus without peri-implant bone defects treated with guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique is highly successful for the treatment of peri-implant bone defects. The aim was to determine whether or not implants associated with GBR due to peri-implant defects show the same survival and success rates as implants placed in native bone without defects. Material and Methods Patients with a minimum of two submerged dental implants: one suffering a dehiscence or fenestration defect during placement and undergoing simultaneous guided bone regeneration (test group), versus the other entirely surrounded by bone (control group) were treated and monitored annually for three years. Complications with the healing procedure, implant survival, implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests setting an alpha value of 0.05. Results Seventy-two patients and 326 implants were included (142 test, 184 control). One hundred and twenty-five dehiscences (average height 1.92±1.11) and 18 fenestrations (average height 3.34±2.16) were treated. At 3 years post-loading, implant survival rates were 95.7% (test) and 97.3% (control) and implant success rates were 93.6% and 96.2%, respectively. Mean marginal bone loss was 0.54 (SD 0.26 mm) for the test group and 0.43 (SD 0.22 mm) for the control group. No statistically significant differences between both groups were found. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, implants with peri-implant defects treated with guided bone regeneration exhibited similar survival and success rates and peri-implant marginal bone loss to implants without those defects. Large-scale randomized controlled studies with longer follow-ups involving the assessment of esthetic parameters and hard and soft peri-implant tissue stability are needed. Key words:Guided bone regeneration, peri-implant defects, dental implants, marginal bone level, success rate, survival rate. PMID:26330931

  1. Photodynamic therapy of diseased bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisland, Stuart K.; Yee, Albert; Siewerdsen, Jeffery; Wilson, Brian C.; Burch, Shane

    2005-08-01

    Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) defines the oxygen-dependent reaction that occurs upon light-mediated activation of a photosensitizing compound, culminating in the generation of cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species, predominantly, singlet oxygen. We are investigating PDT treatment of diseased bone. Methods: Using a rat model of human breast cancer (MT-1)-derived bone metastasis we confirmed the efficacy of benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid (BPD-MA)-PDT for treating metastatic lesions within vertebrae or long bones. Results: Light administration (150 J) 15 mins after BPDMA (2.5 mg/Kg, i.v.) into the lumbar (L3) vertebra of rats resulted in complete ablation of the tumour and surrounding bone marrow 48 hrs post-PDT without paralysis. Porcine vertebrae provided a model comparable to that of human for light propagation (at 150 J/cm) and PDT response (BPD-MA; 6 mg/m2, i.v.) in non-tumour vertebrae. Precise fibre placement was afforded by 3-D cone beam computed tomography. Average penetration depth of light was 0.16 +/- 0.04 cm, however, the necrotic/non-necrotic interface extended 0.6 cm out from the treatment fiber with an average incident fluence rate of 4.3 mW/cm2. Non-necrotic tissue damage was evident 2 cm out from the treatment fiber. Current studies involving BPD-MA-PDT treatment of primary osteosarcomas in the forelimbs of dogs are very promising. Magnetic resonance imaging 24 hr post treatment reveal well circumscribed margins of treatment that encompass the entire 3-4 cm lesion. Finally, we are also interested in using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT to treat osteomyelitis. Response to therapy was monitored as changes in bioluminescence signal of staphylococcus aureus (SA)-derived biofilms grown onto 0.5 cm lengths of wire and subjected to ALA-PDT either in vitro or in vivo upon implant into the intramedullary space of rat tibia. Transcutaneous delivery of PDT (75 J/cm2) effectively eradicated SAbiofilms within bone. Conclusions: Results support

  2. Biological Regulation of Bone Quality

    PubMed Central

    Alliston, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The ability of bone to resist fracture is determined by the combination of bone mass and bone quality. Like bone mass, bone quality is carefully regulated. Of the many aspects of bone quality, this review focuses on biological mechanisms that control the material quality of the bone extracellular matrix (ECM). Bone ECM quality depends upon ECM composition and organization. Proteins and signaling pathways that affect the mineral or organic constituents of bone ECM impact bone ECM material properties, such as elastic modulus and hardness. These properties are also sensitive to pathways that regulate bone remodeling by osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes. Several extracellular proteins, signaling pathways, intracellular effectors, and transcription regulatory networks have been implicated in the control of bone ECM quality. A molecular understanding of these mechanisms will elucidate the biological control of bone quality and suggest new targets for the development of therapies to prevent bone fragility. PMID:24894149

  3. Diet-induced obesity, gut microbiota and bone, including alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Eaimworawuthikul, Sathima; Thiennimitr, Parameth; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-02-07

    Obesity is a major risk factor for several pathologies, including jaw bone resorption. The underlying mechanisms involved in pathological conditions resulting from obesity include chronic systemic inflammation and the development of insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have indicated the importance of the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of inflammation and insulin resistance in obesity, only a few studies have established a relationship between obesity, gut microbiota and status of the jaw bone. This review aims to summarize current findings relating to these issues, focusing on the role of obesity and gut microbiota on jaw bone health, including possible mechanisms which can explain this link.

  4. Elastic intramedullary nailing and DBM-Bone marrow injection for the treatment of simple bone cysts

    PubMed Central

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios D; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2007-01-01

    Background Simple or unicameral bone cysts are common benign fluid-filled lesions usually located at the long bones of children before skeletal maturity. Methods We performed demineralized bone matrix and iliac crest bone marrow injection combined with elastic intramedullary nailing for the treatment of simple bone cysts in long bones of 9 children with a mean age of 12.6 years (range, 4 to 15 years). Results Two of the 9 patients presented with a pathological fracture. Three patients had been referred after the failure of previous treatments. Four patients had large lesions with impending pathological fractures that interfered with daily living activities. We employed a ratio to ascertain the severity of the lesion. The extent of the lesion on the longitudinal axis was divided with the normal expected diameter of the long bone at the site of the lesion. The mean follow-up was 77 months (range, 5 to 8 years). All patients were pain free and had full range of motion of the adjacent joints at 6 weeks postoperatively. Review radiographs showed that all 7 cysts had consolidated completely (Neer stage I) and 2 cysts had consolidated partially (Neer stage II). Until the latest examination there was no evidence of fracture or re-fracture. Conclusion Elastic intramedullary nailing has the twofold benefits of continuous cyst decompression, and early immediate stability to the involved bone segment, which permits early mobilization and return to the normal activities of the pre-teen patients. PMID:17916249

  5. Assessment of bone mineral status in children with Marfan syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder with skeletal involvement. It is caused by mutations in fibrillin1 (FBN1) gene resulting in activation of TGF-ßeta, which developmentally regulates bone mass and matrix properties. There is no consensus regarding bone minerali...

  6. Generalized metabolic bone disease in Neurofibromatosis type I

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal abnormalities are a recognized component of Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1), but a generalized metabolic bone defect in NF1 has not been fully characterized thus far. The purpose of this study was to characterize at the densitometric, biochemical, and pathological level the bone involvement ...

  7. [Bone and Nutrition. Sclerostin and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Sawako; Nagamoto, Kenta; Ogata, Mao; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-07-01

    Osteocytes orchestrate bone resorption and bone formation by controlling osteoclast and osteoblast activity. On the other hand, osteocytes secret FGF23 (fibroblast growth factor 23), FGF23 acts on the kidney to control phosphate homeostasis. Sclerostin is also released from osteocytes and it regulated osteoblast activity through Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Therefore, an antibody that targets sclerostin is currently in phase- III clinical trials for the treatment of osteoporosis and it is expected as new therapeutics.

  8. Monosodium glutamate-sensitive hypothalamic neurons contribute to the control of bone mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elefteriou, Florent; Takeda, Shu; Liu, Xiuyun; Armstrong, Dawna; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Using chemical lesioning we previously identified hypothalamic neurons that are required for leptin antiosteogenic function. In the course of these studies we observed that destruction of neurons sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) in arcuate nuclei did not affect bone mass. However MSG treatment leads to hypogonadism, a condition inducing bone loss. Therefore the normal bone mass of MSG-treated mice suggested that MSG-sensitive neurons may be implicated in the control of bone mass. To test this hypothesis we assessed bone resorption and bone formation parameters in MSG-treated mice. We show here that MSG-treated mice display the expected increase in bone resorption and that their normal bone mass is due to a concomitant increase in bone formation. Correction of MSG-induced hypogonadism by physiological doses of estradiol corrected the abnormal bone resorptive activity in MSG-treated mice and uncovered their high bone mass phenotype. Because neuropeptide Y (NPY) is highly expressed in MSG-sensitive neurons we tested whether NPY regulates bone formation. Surprisingly, NPY-deficient mice had a normal bone mass. This study reveals that distinct populations of hypothalamic neurons are involved in the control of bone mass and demonstrates that MSG-sensitive neurons control bone formation in a leptin-independent manner. It also indicates that NPY deficiency does not affect bone mass.

  9. Assessment of Long Bone Flexural Properties from Bone Densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert; Cleek, Tammy; Katz, BethAnn

    1994-01-01

    While bone densitometry is the accepted non-invasive method of quantifying bone mineral content in bones, its assessment of bone structural properties is less well understood. The objective of our current work is to compare cross-section shape or areal properties of long bones computed from densitometry data with cross-section flexural properties obtained from surface strain measurements.

  10. Imaging of giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Shaligram; Pardiwala, Dinshaw N

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign but locally aggressive and destructive lesion generally occurring in skeletally mature individuals. Typically involving the epiphysiometaphyseal region of long bones, the most common sites include the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal radius. On radiographs, GCT demonstrates a lytic lesion centered in the epiphysis but involving the metaphysis and extending at least in part to the adjacent articular cortex. Most are eccentric, but become symmetric and centrally located with growth. Most cases show circumscribed borders or so-called geographical destruction with no periosteal reaction unless a pathological fracture is present. There is no mineralized tumor matrix. Giant cell tumor can produce wide-ranging appearances depending on site, complications such as hemorrhage or pathological fracture and after surgical intervention. This review demonstrates a spectrum of these features and describes the imaging characteristics of GCT in conventional radiographs, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scans, positron emission tomography scans and angiography. PMID:21139758

  11. Finite element modeling and experimentation of bone drilling forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lughmani, W. A.; Bouazza-Marouf, K.; Ashcroft, I.

    2013-07-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. This paper presents a 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  13. Bone Surface Mapping Method

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng; Zhang, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Bone shape is an important factor to determine the bone's structural function. For the asymmetrically shaped and anisotropically distributed bone in vivo, a surface mapping method is proposed on the bases of its geometric transformation invariance and its uniqueness of the principal axes of inertia. Using spiral CT scanning, we can make precise measurements to bone in vivo. The coordinate transformations lead to the principal axes of inertia, with which the prime meridian and the contour can be set. Methods such as tomographic reconstruction and boundary development are employed so that the surface of bone in vivo can be mapped. Experimental results show that the surface mapping method can reflect the shape features and help study the surface changes of bone in vivo. This method can be applied to research into the surface characteristics and changes of organ, tissue or cell whenever its digitalized surface is obtained. PMID:22412952

  14. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  15. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Sikavitsas, V I; Temenoff, J S; Mikos, A G

    2001-10-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  16. Adrenal gland and bone.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Rowan; Cooper, Mark S

    2010-11-01

    The adrenal gland synthesizes steroid hormones from the adrenal cortex and catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. Both cortisol and adrenal androgens can have powerful effects on bone. The overproduction of cortisol in Cushing's disease leads to a dramatic reduction in bone density and an increase risk of fracture. Overproduction of adrenal androgens in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) leads to marked changes in bone growth and development with early growth acceleration but ultimately a significant reduction in final adult height. The role of more physiological levels of glucocorticoids and androgens on bone metabolism is less clear. Cortisol levels measured in elderly individuals show a weak correlation with measures of bone density and change in bone density over time with a high cortisol level associated with lower bone density and more rapid bone loss. Cortisol levels and the dynamics of cortisol secretion change with age which could also explain some age related changes in bone physiology. It is also now clear that adrenal steroids can be metabolized within bone tissue itself. Local synthesis of cortisol within bone from its inactive precursor cortisone has been demonstrated and the amount of cortisol produced within osteoblasts appears to increase with age. With regard to adrenal androgens there is a dramatic reduction in levels with aging and several studies have examined the impact that restoration of these levels back to those seen in younger individuals has on bone health. Most of these studies show small positive effects in women, not men, but the skeletal sites where benefits are seen varies from study to study.

  17. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  18. Bone scanning in otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Noyek, A M

    1979-09-01

    Modern radionuclide bone scanning has introduced a new concept in physiologic and anatomic diagnostic imaging to general medicine. As otolaryngologists must diagnose and treat disease in relation to the bony and/or cartilaginous supporting structures of the neurocranium and upper airway, this modality should be included in the otolaryngologist's diagnostic armamentarium. It is the purpose of this manuscript to study the specific applications of bone scanning to our specialty at this time, based on clinical experience over the past three years. This thesis describes the development of bone scanning in general (history of nuclear medicine and nuclear physics; history of bone scanning in particular). General concepts in nuclear medicine are then presented; these include a discussion of nuclear semantics, principles of radioactive emmissions, the properties 99mTc as a radionuclide, and the tracer principle. On the basis of these general concepts, specific concepts in bone scanning are then brought forth. The physiology of bone and the action of the bone scan agents is presented. Further discussion considers the availability and production of the bone scan agent, patient factors, the gamma camera, the triphasic bone scan and the ultimate diagnostic principle of the bone scan. Clinical applications of bone scanning in otolaryngology are then presented in three sections. Proven areas of application include the evaluation of malignant tumors of the head and neck, the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders, the diagnosis of facial fractures, the evaluation of osteomyelitis, nuclear medicine imaging of the larynx, and the assessment of systemic disease. Areas of adjunctive or supplementary value are also noted, such as diagnostic imaging of meningioma. Finally, areas of marginal value in the application of bone scanning are described.

  19. Radionuclide bone imaging and densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclides and the Normal Bone Scan; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Malignant Disease; Pediatric Applications of Radionuclide Bone Imaging; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Arthritis and Metabolic and Miscellaneous Disorders; and Soft Tissue Activity on the Radionuclide Bone Scan.

  20. Bone scanning in clinical practice

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelman, I. )

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include the history of bone scanning, mechanisms of uptake of diphosphonate in bone, the normal bone scan, and the role of bone scanning in clinical practice. The aim of this book is to provide a source of reference relating to bone scan imaging for all those who are interested in the skeleton.

  1. Vitamin C reverses hypogonadal bone loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies correlate low vitamin C intake with bone loss. The genetic deletion of enzymes involved in de novo vitamin C synthesis in mice, likewise, causes severe osteoporosis. However, very few studies have evaluated a protective role of this dietary supplement on the skeleton. Here, ...

  2. Aging and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Boskey, A.L.; Coleman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Bones provide mechanical and protective function, while also serving as housing for marrow and a site for regulation of calcium ion homeostasis. The properties of bones do not remain constant with age; rather, they change throughout life, in some cases improving in function, but in others, function deteriorates. Here we review the modifications in the mechanical function and shape of bones, the bone cells, the matrix they produce, and the mineral that is deposited on this matrix, while presenting recent theories about the factors leading to these changes. PMID:20924069

  3. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  4. Autoinflammatory bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Stern, Sara M; Ferguson, Polly J

    2013-11-01

    Autoinflammatory bone disease is a new branch of autoinflammatory diseases caused by seemingly unprovoked activation of the innate immune system leading to an osseous inflammatory process. The inflammatory bone lesions in these disorders are characterized by chronic inflammation that is typically culture negative with no demonstrable organism on histopathology. The most common autoinflammatory bone diseases in childhood include chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO), synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis syndrome, Majeed syndrome, deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and cherubism. In this article, the authors focus on CNO and summarize the distinct genetic autoinflammatory bone syndromes.

  5. Hypercalciuric Bone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favus, Murray J.

    2008-09-01

    Hypercalciuria plays an important causal role in many patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. The source of the hypercalciuria includes increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption. In CaOx stone formers with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH), Ca metabolic balance studies have revealed negative Ca balance and persistent hypercalciuria in the fasting state and during low dietary Ca intake. Bone resorption may also contribute to the high urine Ca excretion and increase the risk of bone loss. Indeed, low bone mass by DEXA scanning has been discovered in many IH patients. Thiazide diuretic agents reduce urine Ca excretion and may increase bone mineral density (BMD), thereby reducing fracture risk. Dietary Ca restriction that has been used unsuccessfully in the treatment of CaOx nephrolithiasis in the past may enhance negative Ca balance and accelerate bone loss. DEXA scans may demonstrate low BMD at the spine, hip, or forearm, with no predictable pattern. The unique pattern of bone histologic changes in IH differs from other causes of low DEXA bone density including postmenopausal osteoporosis, male hypogonadal osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Hypercalciuria appears to play an important pathologic role in the development of low bone mass, and therefore correction of urine Ca losses should be a primary target for treatment of the bone disease accompanying IH.

  6. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, J.R.; Anderson, G.D.; Bigio, I.J.; Johnson, T.M.

    1996-03-12

    The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  7. Bone fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Feltrin, Gian Pietro; Stramare, Roberto; Miotto, Diego; Giacomini, Dario; Saccavini, Claudio

    2004-06-01

    Fractal analysis is a quantitative method used to evaluate complex anatomic findings in their elementary component. Its application to biologic images, particularly to cancellous bones, has been well practiced within the past few years. The aims of these applications are to assess changes in bone and the loss of spongious architecture, indicate bone fragility, and to show the increased risk for fracture in primary or secondary osteoporosis. The applications are very promising to help complete the studies that can define bone density (bone mineral density by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry or quantitative computed tomography), and also have the capacity to distinguish the patients with a high or low risk for fracture. Their extension to the clinical fields, to define a test for fracture risk, is still limited by difficult application to the medical quantitative imaging of bones, between correct application at superficial bones and unreliable application to deep bones. The future evolution and validity do not depend upon fractal methods but upon well-detailed imaging of the bones in clinical conditions.

  8. Endothelial Notch activity promotes angiogenesis and osteogenesis in bone.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Saravana K; Kusumbe, Anjali P; Wang, Lin; Adams, Ralf H

    2014-03-20

    Blood vessel growth in the skeletal system and osteogenesis seem to be coupled, suggesting the existence of molecular crosstalk between endothelial and osteoblastic cells. Understanding the nature of the mechanisms linking angiogenesis and bone formation should be of great relevance for improved fracture healing or prevention of bone mass loss. Here we show that vascular growth in bone involves a specialized, tissue-specific form of angiogenesis. Notch signalling promotes endothelial cell proliferation and vessel growth in postnatal long bone, which is the opposite of the well-established function of Notch and its ligand Dll4 in the endothelium of other organs and tumours. Endothelial-cell-specific and inducible genetic disruption of Notch signalling in mice not only impaired bone vessel morphology and growth, but also led to reduced osteogenesis, shortening of long bones, chondrocyte defects, loss of trabeculae and decreased bone mass. On the basis of a series of genetic experiments, we conclude that skeletal defects in these mutants involved defective angiocrine release of Noggin from endothelial cells, which is positively regulated by Notch. Administration of recombinant Noggin, a secreted antagonist of bone morphogenetic proteins, restored bone growth and mineralization, chondrocyte maturation, the formation of trabeculae and osteoprogenitor numbers in endothelial-cell-specific Notch pathway mutants. These findings establish a molecular framework coupling angiogenesis, angiocrine signals and osteogenesis, which may prove significant for the development of future therapeutic applications.

  9. Endothelial Notch activity promotes angiogenesis and osteogenesis in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Saravana K.; Kusumbe, Anjali P.; Wang, Lin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2014-03-01

    Blood vessel growth in the skeletal system and osteogenesis seem to be coupled, suggesting the existence of molecular crosstalk between endothelial and osteoblastic cells. Understanding the nature of the mechanisms linking angiogenesis and bone formation should be of great relevance for improved fracture healing or prevention of bone mass loss. Here we show that vascular growth in bone involves a specialized, tissue-specific form of angiogenesis. Notch signalling promotes endothelial cell proliferation and vessel growth in postnatal long bone, which is the opposite of the well-established function of Notch and its ligand Dll4 in the endothelium of other organs and tumours. Endothelial-cell-specific and inducible genetic disruption of Notch signalling in mice not only impaired bone vessel morphology and growth, but also led to reduced osteogenesis, shortening of long bones, chondrocyte defects, loss of trabeculae and decreased bone mass. On the basis of a series of genetic experiments, we conclude that skeletal defects in these mutants involved defective angiocrine release of Noggin from endothelial cells, which is positively regulated by Notch. Administration of recombinant Noggin, a secreted antagonist of bone morphogenetic proteins, restored bone growth and mineralization, chondrocyte maturation, the formation of trabeculae and osteoprogenitor numbers in endothelial-cell-specific Notch pathway mutants. These findings establish a molecular framework coupling angiogenesis, angiocrine signals and osteogenesis, which may prove significant for the development of future therapeutic applications.

  10. Parietal bone osteomyelitis in melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Hariprasad Sadanand; Mallela, Ajay Raj; Shastry, Barkur Ananthakrishna; Acharya, Vasudeva

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 55-year-old man with uncontrolled diabetes who presented with pneumonia. During his hospital stay his clinical status worsened and he had a focal seizure. MRI showed central nervous system involvement and parietal bone osteomyelitis. As the patient's blood culture and endotracheal aspirate grew Burkholderia pseudomallei, melioidosis was diagnosed. He was treated with meropenem after failure to respond to ceftazidime. He gradually improved over a period of 4 weeks and was discharged. Early diagnosis and therapy resulted in improved outcome. PMID:25725029

  11. Fibrocartilaginous Dysplasia of the Bone: A Rare Variant of Fibrous Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-05

    Fibrocartilaginous dysplasia (FCD) is a rare variant of fibrous dysplasia (FD) which frequently involves the long bones, and the proximal femur is the most commonly affected site. This benign, lytic, and expansile bone lesion causes progressive deformity in the bones and may lead to pathological fracture. Radiologically, this lesion may mimic cartilaginous benign and malignant bone tumors. Therefore, histopathological differentiation of FCD from other cartilaginous tumors is of the utmost importance. The treatment is often surgical, in the form of curettage and bone grafting or corrective osteotomy, to treat progressive deformity in the long bones. The risk of pathological fracture is high in FCD with bony deformity and often requires surgery.

  12. Bone Loss Triggered by the Cytokine Network in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekara, Dulshara Sachini; Yu, Jiyeon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifelong process in vertebrates that relies on the correct balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Bone loss and fracture risk are implicated in inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The network of inflammatory cytokines produced during chronic inflammation induces an uncoupling of bone formation and resorption, resulting in significant bone loss in patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Here, we review and discuss the involvement of the inflammatory cytokine network in the pathophysiological aspects and the therapeutic advances in inflammatory autoimmune diseases. PMID:26065006

  13. [Hypertension, CKD and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-05-01

    The patients with "Hypertension" and "Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) " are accompanied with an osteoporosis. In hypertension patients, excess urinary calcium secretion induces secondary parathyroidsim to increase serum calcium (Ca) level, which may lead to Ca release from bone. In this aspect, there are several reports that anti-hypertensive drugs, especially thiazides, increase bone mineral density and decrease the incidence of bone fracture. In addition, we demonstrated that renin-angiotensin system can be involved in the process of osteoporosis. Angiotensin II significantly induced the expression of RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) in osteoblasts, leading to the activation of osteoclasts, while these effects were completely blocked by an Ang II type 1 receptor blockade. As for CKD, excess phosphorus (P) due to renal dysfunction induces secondary parathyroidism to decrease serum P level, which similarly leads to osteoporosis. Moreover, excess P can increase FGF23 expression and decrease activated vitamin D, which also resulted in progression of osteoporosis. Both "Hypertension" and "Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) " are inducible factor to osteoporosis.

  14. Engineered matrices for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Shelley R.; Hu, Yunhua; Pugh, Amy; Brown, Leanna; Nguyen, Jesse T.; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.

    2000-06-01

    Traditional therapies of autografts and allogeneic banked bone can promote reasonable clinical outcome to repair damaged bone. However, under certain conditions the success of these traditional approaches plummets, providing the incentive for researchers to develop clinical alternatives. The evolving field of tissue engineering in the musculoskeletal system attempts to mimic many of the components from the intact, healthy subject. Those components consist of a biologic scaffold, cells, extracellular matrix, and signaling molecules. The bone biomimetic, i.e., an engineered matrix, provides a porous structural architecture for the regeneration and ingrowth of osseous tissue at the site of injury. To further enhance the regenerative cascade, our strategy has involved porous biodegradable scaffolds containing and releasing signaling molecules and providing a suitable environment for cell attachment, growth and differentiation. In addition, the inclusion of genetically modified osteogenic precursor cells has brought the technology closer to developing a tissue-engineered equivalent. The presentation will describe various formulations and the methods utilized to evaluate the clinical utility of these biomimetics.

  15. Mechanical signals as anabolic agents in bone.

    PubMed

    Ozcivici, Engin; Luu, Yen Kim; Adler, Ben; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clinton T

    2010-01-01

    Aging and a sedentary lifestyle conspire to reduce bone quantity and quality, decrease muscle mass and strength, and undermine postural stability, culminating in an elevated risk of skeletal fracture. Concurrently, a marked reduction in the available bone-marrow-derived population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) jeopardizes the regenerative potential that is critical to recovery from musculoskeletal injury and disease. A potential way to combat the deterioration involves harnessing the sensitivity of bone to mechanical signals, which is crucial in defining, maintaining and recovering bone mass. To effectively utilize mechanical signals in the clinic as a non-drug-based intervention for osteoporosis, it is essential to identify the components of the mechanical challenge that are critical to the anabolic process. Large, intense challenges to the skeleton are generally presumed to be the most osteogenic, but brief exposure to mechanical signals of high frequency and extremely low intensity, several orders of magnitude below those that arise during strenuous activity, have been shown to provide a significant anabolic stimulus to bone. Along with positively influencing osteoblast and osteocyte activity, these low-magnitude mechanical signals bias MSC differentiation towards osteoblastogenesis and away from adipogenesis. Mechanical targeting of the bone marrow stem-cell pool might, therefore, represent a novel, drug-free means of slowing the age-related decline of the musculoskeletal system.

  16. Mechanical signals as anabolic agents in bone

    PubMed Central

    Ozcivici, Engin; Luu, Yen Kim; Adler, Ben; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clinton T.

    2013-01-01

    Aging and a sedentary lifestyle conspire to reduce bone quantity and quality, decrease muscle mass and strength, and undermine postural stability, culminating in an elevated risk of skeletal fracture. Concurrently, a marked reduction in the available bone-marrow-derived population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) jeopardizes the regenerative potential that is critical to recovery from musculoskeletal injury and disease. A potential way to combat the deterioration involves harnessing the sensitivity of bone to mechanical signals, which is crucial in defining, maintaining and recovering bone mass. To effectively utilize mechanical signals in the clinic as a non-drug-based intervention for osteoporosis, it is essential to identify the components of the mechanical challenge that are critical to the anabolic process. Large, intense challenges to the skeleton are generally presumed to be the most osteogenic, but brief exposure to mechanical signals of high frequency and extremely low intensity, several orders of magnitude below those that arise during strenuous activity, have been shown to provide a significant anabolic stimulus to bone. Along with positively influencing osteoblast and osteocyte activity, these low-magnitude mechanical signals bias MSC differentiation towards osteoblastogenesis and away from adipogenesis. Mechanical targeting of the bone marrow stem-cell pool might, therefore, represent a novel, drug-free means of slowing the age-related decline of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:20046206

  17. Function of osteocytes in bone--their role in mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Burger, E H; Klein-Nulend, J; van der Plas, A; Nijweide, P J

    1995-07-01

    Although osteocytes are by far the most abundant cell type of bone, they are least understood in terms of function and regulation. Previous studies have concentrated on their possible role as mobilizers of bone calcium, via the process of osteocytic osteolysis. Currently, however, their possible involvement in mechanical adaptation, the process whereby bone tissue maintains maximal functional strength with minimal bone mass, is discussed. We have recently obtained experimental evidence that osteocytes are the mechanosensory cells of bone, involved in the transduction of mechanical loads into biochemical signals. Our results support the hypothesis that flow of fluid through the lacunar-canalicular system as a result of loading provides the physical signal that activates the cells.

  18. Horizontal bone augmentation by means of guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Benic, Goran I; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2014-10-01

    The development of bone augmentation procedures has allowed placement of dental implants into jaw bone areas lacking an amount of bone sufficient for standard implant placement. Thus, the indications for implants have broadened to include jaw regions with bone defects and those with a bone anatomy that is unfavorable for implant anchorage. Of the different techniques, the best documented and the most widely used method to augment bone in localized alveolar defects is guided bone regeneration. A large body of evidence has demonstrated the successful use of guided bone regeneration to regenerate missing bone at implant sites with insufficient bone volume and the long-term success of implants placed simultaneously with, or after, guided bone regeneration. However, the influence of guided bone regeneration on implant survival and success rates, and the long-term stability of the augmented bone, remain unknown. Many of the materials and techniques currently available for bone regeneration of alveolar ridge defects were developed many years ago. Recently, various new materials and techniques have been introduced. Many of them have, however, not been sufficiently documented in clinical studies. The aim of this review was to present the scientific basis of guided bone regeneration and the accepted clinical procedures. A classification of bone defects has been presented, aiming at simplifying the decision-making process regarding the choice of strategy for bone augmentation. Finally, an outlook into actual research and the possible future options related to bone augmentation has been provided.

  19. Treatment of Periradicular Bone Defect by Periosteal Pedicle Graft as a Barrier Membrane and Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the usefulness of Periosteal Pedicle Graft (PPG) as a barrier membrane and Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft (DFDBA) for bone regeneration in periradicular bone defect. A patient with intraoral discharging sinus due to carious exposed pulp involvement was treated by PPG and DFDBA. Clinical and radiological evaluations were done immediately prior to surgery, three months, six months and one year after surgery. Patient was treated using split-thickness flap, PPG, apicoectomy, defect fill with DFDBA and lateral displacement along with suturing of the PPG prior to suturing the flap, in order to close the communication between the oral and the periapical surroundings through sinus tract opening. After one year, successful healing of periradicular bone defect was achieved. Thus, PPG as a barrier membrane and DFDBA have been shown to have the potential to stimulate bone formation when used in periradicular bone defect. PMID:28274066

  20. Rare Giant Cell Tumor of Olecranon Bone!!!!

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Pawan; Gautam, Vishal; Saini, Narender; Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a bone tumor involving epiphyseal area of bone abutting the subchondral bone. Commonly found in long bones such as proximal tibia and distal femur. We report a case of GCT of olecranon bone in a 23-year-old male. Case Report: A 23-year-old patient presented to our outpatient department with pain and mild swelling at the elbow from last 2 to 3 months. On examination, it was seen that there was a moderate swelling at the tip of the olecranon. The magnetic resonance imaging reported a lytic lesion in the olecranon but sparing the coronoid process of the ulna, the biopsy report confirmed that histologically it was a GCT of the bone. Total excision of the tumor was done after lifting the aponeurosis of the triceps muscle. The area remaining after excision of the tumor was phenol cauterized and cleaned with hydrogen peroxide solution. Triceps was reinserted on the remaining ulna. At follow-up the radiographs showed adequate excision of the tumor. The patient gained a full range of movement at the elbow and was functionally restored. There were no signs of any systemic spread of the tumor. Conclusion: GCT though a very common bone tumor could be missed if present in atypical locations. Radiographically soap bubble appearance might not be present in every case, and there could be multiple diagnoses for lytic lesion in bone. Proper investigations and histopathological examination are necessary for accurate diagnosis and further treatment planning. Early treatment helps in complete excision of tumor along with return of adequate function of the patient. PMID:28164048

  1. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise; Osteopenia - exercise ... To build up bone density, the exercise must make your muscles pull on your bones. These are called weight-bearing exercises. Some of them are: ...

  2. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on ... media links Share this: Page Content What is bone health and how do you build strong bones? ...

  3. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  4. Distinctive Head and Neck Bone and Soft Tissue Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Purgina, Bibianna; Lai, Chi K

    2017-03-01

    Benign and malignant primary bone and soft tissue lesions of the head and neck are rare. The uncommon nature of these tumors, combined with the complex anatomy of the head and neck, pose diagnostic challenges to pathologists. This article describes the pertinent clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of selected bone and soft tissue tumors involving the head and neck region, including angiofibroma, glomangiopericytoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, chordoma, chondrosarcoma, and osteosarcoma. Emphasis is placed on key diagnostic pitfalls, differential diagnosis, and the importance of correlating clinical and radiographic information, particularly for tumors involving bone.

  5. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2 induced bone formation.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosaku; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Bargouti, Maggie; Liu, Hui; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    The mechanisms driving bone marrow stem cell mobilization are poorly understood. A recent murine study found that circulating bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells (MOPCs) were recruited to the site of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-induced bone formation. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and its cellular receptor CXCR4 have been shown to mediate the homing of stem cells to injured tissues. We hypothesized that chemokines, such as SDF-1, are also involved with mobilization of bone marrow cells. The CD45(-) fraction is a major source of MOPCs. In this report we determined that the addition of BMP-2 or SDF-1 to collagen implants increased the number of MOPCs in the peripheral blood. BMP-2-induced mobilization was blocked by CXCR4 antibody, confirming the role of SDF-1 in mobilization. We determined for the first time that addition of SDF-1 to implants containing BMP-2 enhances mobilization, homing of MOPCs to the implant, and ectopic bone formation induced by suboptimal BMP-2 doses. These results suggest that SDF-1 increases the number of osteoprogenitor cells that are mobilized from the bone marrow and then home to the implant. Thus, addition of SDF-1 to BMP-2 may improve the efficiency of BMPs in vivo, making their routine use for orthopaedic applications more affordable and available to more patients.

  6. A structural approach in the study of bones: fossil and burnt bones at nanosize scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piga, Giampaolo; Baró, Maria Dolors; Escobal, Irati Golvano; Gonçalves, David; Makhoul, Calil; Amarante, Ana; Malgosa, Assumpció; Enzo, Stefano; Garroni, Sebastiano

    2016-12-01

    We review the different factors affecting significantly mineral structure and composition of bones. Particularly, it is assessed that micro-nanostructural and chemical properties of skeleton bones change drastically during burning; the micro- and nanostructural changes attending those phases manifest themselves, amongst others, in observable alterations to the bones colour, morphology, microstructure, mechanical strength and crystallinity. Intense changes involving the structure and chemical composition of bones also occur during the fossilization process. Bioapatite material is contaminated by an heavy fluorination process which, on a long-time scale reduces sensibly the volume of the original unit cell, mainly the a-axis of the hexagonal P63/m space group. Moreover, the bioapatite suffers to a varying degree of extent by phase contamination from the nearby environment, to the point that rarely a fluorapatite single phase may be found in fossil bones here examined. TEM images supply precise and localized information, on apatite crystal shape and dimension, and on different processes that occur during thermal processes or fossilization of ancient bone, complementary to that given by X-ray diffraction and Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared spectroscopy. We are presenting a synthesis of XRD, ATR-IR and TEM results on the nanostructure of various modern, burned and palaeontological bones.

  7. Force-induced bone growth and adaptation: A system theoretical approach to understanding bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Solvey; Findeisen, Rolf

    2010-06-01

    The modeling, analysis, and design of treatment therapies for bone disorders based on the paradigm of force-induced bone growth and adaptation is a challenging task. Mathematical models provide, in comparison to clinical, medical and biological approaches an structured alternative framework to understand the concurrent effects of the multiple factors involved in bone remodeling. By now, there are few mathematical models describing the appearing complex interactions. However, the resulting models are complex and difficult to analyze, due to the strong nonlinearities appearing in the equations, the wide range of variability of the states, and the uncertainties in parameters. In this work, we focus on analyzing the effects of changes in model structure and parameters/inputs variations on the overall steady state behavior using systems theoretical methods. Based on an briefly reviewed existing model that describes force-induced bone adaptation, the main objective of this work is to analyze the stationary behavior and to identify plausible treatment targets for remodeling related bone disorders. Identifying plausible targets can help in the development of optimal treatments combining both physical activity and drug-medication. Such treatments help to improve/maintain/restore bone strength, which deteriorates under bone disorder conditions, such as estrogen deficiency.

  8. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  9. Automated trabecular bone histomorphometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The toxicity of alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides and the relationship between bone tumor incidence and the local dosimetry of radionuclides in bone are investigated. The microdistributions of alpha-emitting radionuclides in the trabecular bone from the proximal humerus, distal humerus, proximal ulna, proximal femur, and distal femur of six young adult beagles injected with Am-241 (three with 2.8 micro-Ci/kg and three with 0.9 micro-Ci/kg) are estimated using a computer-controlled microscope photometer system; the components of the University of Utah Optical Track Scanner are described. The morphometric parameters for the beagles are calculated and analyzed. It is observed that the beagles injected with 0.9 micro-Ci of Am-241/kg showed an increase in the percentage of bone and trabecular bone thickness, and a reduction in the width of the bone marrow space and surface/volume ratio. The data reveal that radiation damage causes abnormal bone structure.

  10. BONES, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.

    THIS GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR USE WITH THE ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT ON "BONES.""BONES" HAS BEEN TAUGHT IN THE FOURTH GRADE AND REQUIRES FROM 10 TO 25 LESSONS, DEPENDING ON THE NUMBER OF ACTIVITIES USED. THE GUIDE DOES NOT PROVIDE DETAILED INSTRUCTION FOR CONDUCTING CLASSES, BUT RATHER SOME POSSIBLE ACTIVITIES, AND LEAVES…

  11. Osteocyte and bone structure.

    PubMed

    Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Nijweide, Peter J; Burger, Elisabeth H

    2003-06-01

    The osteocyte is the most abundant cell type of bone. There are approximately 10 times as many osteocytes as osteoblasts in adult human bone, and the number of osteoclasts is only a fraction of the number of osteoblasts. Our current knowledge of the role of osteocytes in bone metabolism is far behind our insight into the properties and functions of the osteoblasts and osteoclasts. However, the striking structural design of bone predicts an important role for osteocytes in determining bone structure. Over the past several years, the role of osteocytes as the professional mechanosensory cells of bone, and the lacunocanalicular porosity as the structure that mediates mechanosensing have become clear. Strain-derived flow of interstitial fluid through this porosity seems to mechanically activate the osteocytes, as well as ensure transport of cell signaling molecules, nutrients, and waste products. This concept explains local bone gain and loss--as well as remodeling in response to fatigue damage--as processes supervised by mechanosensitive osteocytes. Alignment during remodeling seems to occur as a result of the osteocyte's sensing different canalicular flow patterns around the cutting cone and reversal zone during loading, therefore determining the bone's structure.

  12. [Metabolic bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Jakob, F

    2007-10-01

    Osteomalacia is caused by impaired vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling, calcium deficiency, and altered bone mineralization. This can be due to insufficient sunlight exposure, malabsorption, reduced D hormone activation in chronic kidney disease, and rare alterations of VDR signaling and phosphate metabolism. Leading symptoms are bone pain, muscular cramps, and increased incidence of falls in the elderly. The adequate respective countermeasures are to optimize the daily intake of calcium and vitamin D3 and to replace active D hormone and phosphate if deficient. Osteoporosis is characterized by bone fragility fractures upon minor physical impact. Indications for diagnosis and treatment can be established by estimating the absolute fracture risk, taking into account bone mineral density, age, gender, and individual risk factors. Exercise, intervention programs to avoid falls, and specific drugs are capable of substantially reducing fracture risk even in the elderly. Secondary osteoporosis primarily requires both bone-altering medications and effective treatment of underlying diseases.

  13. Bone and Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, María Belén; Longobardi, Vanesa; Bai, Julio César

    2016-04-01

    More than 50% of untreated patients with celiac disease (CD) have bone loss detected by bone densitometry (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry:DXA). Moreover, patients with CD are more likely to have osteoporosis and fragility fractures, especially of the distal radius. Although still controversial, we recommend DXA screening in all celiac disease patients, particularly in those with symptomatic CD at diagnosis and in those who present risk factors for fracture such as older age, menopausal status, previous fracture history, and familial hip fracture history. Bone microarchitecture, especially the trabecular network, may be deteriorated, explaining the higher fracture risk in these patients. Adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation are also recommended to optimize bone recovery, especially during the first years of gluten free diet (GFD). If higher fracture risk persists after 1 or 2 years of GFD, specific osteoactive treatment may be necessary to improve bone health.

  14. Ultrasonic bone densitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A device, for measuring the density of a bone structure so as to monitor the calcium content, is described. A pair of opposed spaced ultrasonic transducers are held within a clamping apparatus closely adjacent the bone being analyzed. These ultrasonic transducers incude piezoelectric crystals shaped to direct signals through the bone encompassed in the heel and finger of the subject being tested. A pulse generator is coupled to one of the transducers and generates an electric pulse for causing the transducers to generate an ultrasonic sound wave which is directed through the bone structure to the other transducer. An electric circuit, including an amplifier and a bandpass filter couples the signals from the receiver transducer back to the pulse generator for retriggering the pulse generator at a frequency proportional to the duration that the ultrasonic wave takes to travel through the bone structure being examined.

  15. Identification of Bone Marrow-Derived Soluble Factors Regulating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Li, Wan-Ju

    2017-02-14

    Maintaining properties of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in culture for regenerative applications remains a great challenge. An emerging approach of constructing a culture environment mimicking the bone marrow niche to regulate BMSC activities has been developed. In this study, we have demonstrated a systematic approach to identify soluble factors of interest extracted from human bone marrow and used them in BMSC culture for tissue regeneration. We have found that lipocalin-2 and prolactin are key factors in bone marrow, involved in regulating BMSC activities. Treating the cell with lipocalin-2 and prolactin delays cellular senescence of BMSCs and primes the cell for osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. We have also demonstrated that BMSCs pretreated with lipocalin-2 and prolactin can enhance the repair of calvarial defects in mice. Together, our study provides research evidence of using a viable approach to prime BMSC properties in vitro for improving cell-based tissue regeneration in vivo.

  16. Bone Cells Dynamics during Peri-Implantitis: a Theoretical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Pedro de Sousa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The present manuscript aims a detailed characterization of the bone cells dynamics during physiological bone remodelling and, subsequently, to address the cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a fundamental role in the immune-inflammatory-induced uncoupled bone remodelling observed in peri-implantitis. Results An intimate relationship between the immune system and bone is acknowledged to be determinant for bone tissue remodelling and integrity. Due to the close interaction of immune and bone cells, the two systems share a number of surface receptors, cytokines, signalling pathways and transcription factors that are involved in mutual regulatory mechanisms. This physiological equilibrium is disturbed in pathological conditions, as verified in peri-implantitis establishment and development. Activation of the innate and adaptive immune response, challenged by the local bacterial infection, induces the synthesis of high levels of a variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that disturb the normal functioning of the bone cells, by uncoupling bone resorption and formation, ending up with a net alveolar bone loss and subsequent implant failure. Most data points to an immune-inflammatory induced osteoclast differentiation and function, as the major underlying mechanism to the uncoupled bone resorption to bone formation. Further, the disturbed functioning of osteoblasts, reflected by the possible expression of a fibro-osteoblastic phenotype, may also play a role. Conclusions Alveolar bone loss is a hallmark of peri-implantitis. A great deal of data is still needed on the cellular and humoral crosstalk in the context of an integrated view of the osteoimmunologic interplay occurring in the peri-implantitis environment subjacent to the bone loss outcome. PMID:27833731

  17. Bone status of adult female butyrylcholinesterase gene-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Malte; Kauschke, Vivien; Sender, Jonas; Kampschulte, Marian; Kovtun, Anna; Dürselen, Lutz; Heiss, Christian; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) degrades acetylcholine in addition to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which is involved in embryonic development of limbs. Since BChE is expressed by osteoblast-like cells we asked whether it is functional in adult bone remodeling. We addressed this issue by analyzing BChE gene-deficient mice (BChE-KO). Bones were extracted from 16-week old female BChE-KO and corresponding wild type mice (WT). Femoral bones were used for biomechanical testing and μCT evaluation of cancellous and cortical bone. Also vertebrae Th12 and L1 were investigated with μCT while L3 was used for tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP) histomorphometry and Th10 for gene expression analysis by means of real-time RT-PCR. BChE-KO did not reveal significant differences in biomechanical bone strength and bone mineral density determined by μCT. Microarchitecture of cancellous and cortical bone showed an increase in μCT parameters like trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, and relative cortical bone area of femoral BChE-KO bone compared to WT. In vertebrae no changes of microstructure and mRNA expression were detected. However, osteoclast histomorphometry with TRAP stained sections demonstrated a significant increase in relative osteoclast number. In conclusion, in adult murine bone the role of BChE is limited to bone specific changes in microarchitecture and to an increase in relative number of bone resorbing osteoclasts whereas the main collagen resorbing enzyme Cathepsin-K (CtsK) was stably expressed. Besides, AChE might be able to compensate the lack of BChE. Thus, further analyses using bone tissue specific AChE BChE cre-lox double knockout mice would be helpful.

  18. Juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M; Dellaero, D T; Harrelson, J M; Scully, S P

    1999-07-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign primary or secondary lesions that commonly arise in long bones and often before skeletal maturity. Little has been written about aneurysmal bone cysts that abut the physeal plate. The records of 15 patients with juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts were reviewed. Fourteen of the patients were referred with abnormal radiographs after evaluation for pain in the affected limb. One patient presented with abnormal radiographs after fracture about the aneurysmal bone cyst. None of the patients had evidence of growth plate disruption. The children's ages ranged from 2 to 14 years, with a mean of 9.8 years. There were 10 boys and five girls. Lesion locations included: six in the proximal tibia, three in the distal fibula, two in the distal tibia, two in the proximal femur, one in the distal femur, and one in the distal radius. All of the lesions abutted the physeal plate and fell into one of the types in Campanacci's classification of juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts. Three lesions were classified as Type 1, eight were Type 2, and four were Type 3. This study included no cases of Type 4 or 5 lesions. Treatment of all lesions consisted of excision, curettage, and bone grafting with care taken to preserve the growth plate. Adjunctive cauterization was performed in two cases. There were no incidences of postoperative physeal plate arrest. Overgrowth of the fibula occurred in one patient. Three patients experienced recurrent lesions. One of the children underwent repeat curettage and bone grafting with no additional recurrence. In the other two children with recurrence, the lesion had grown away from the physeal plate while remaining static in size and asymptomatic. Based on this study, juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts may be treated satisfactorily with intralesional surgery and bone grafting with expectation of normal physeal growth.

  19. What Happens After Treatment for Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Bone Cancer? For some people with bone cancer, treatment ... Treatment for Bone Cancer Stops Working More In Bone Cancer About Bone Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  20. The in situ mechanics of trabecular bone marrow: the potential for mechanobiological response.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Thomas A; Kreipke, Tyler C; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M; Niebur, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    Bone adapts to habitual loading through mechanobiological signaling. Osteocytes are the primary mechanical sensors in bone, upregulating osteogenic factors and downregulating osteoinhibitors, and recruiting osteoclasts to resorb bone in response to microdamage accumulation. However, most of the cell populations of the bone marrow niche,which are intimately involved with bone remodeling as the source of bone osteoblast and osteoclast progenitors, are also mechanosensitive. We hypothesized that the deformation of trabecular bone would impart mechanical stress within the entrapped bone marrow consistent with mechanostimulation of the constituent cells. Detailed fluid-structure interaction models of porcine femoral trabecular bone and bone marrow were created using tetrahedral finite element meshes. The marrow was allowed to flow freely within the bone pores, while the bone was compressed to 2000 or 3000 microstrain at the apparent level.Marrow properties were parametrically varied from a constant 400 mPas to a power law rule exceeding 85 Pas. Deformation generated almost no shear stress or pressure in the marrow for the low viscosity fluid, but exceeded 5 Pa when the higher viscosity models were used. The shear stress was higher when the strain rate increased and in higher volume fraction bone. The results demonstrate that cells within the trabecular bone marrow could be mechanically stimulated by bone deformation, depending on deformation rate, bone porosity, and bone marrow properties. Since the marrow contains many mechanosensitive cells, changes in the stimulatory levels may explain the alterations in bone marrow morphology with aging and disease, which may in turn affect the trabecular bone mechanobiology and adaptation.

  1. Gallium scintigraphy in bone infarction. Correlation with bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, R.R.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of gallium-67 images in bone infarction was studied in nine patients with sickle cell disease and correlated with the bone scan findings. Gallium uptake in acute infarction was decreased or absent with a variable bone scan uptake, and normal in healing infarcts, which showed increased uptake on bone scan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  2. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  3. Silicon and bone health.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, R

    2007-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health.

  4. Growth and bone development.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas; Javaid, Kassim; Hanson, Mark; Dennison, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality through its association with age-related fractures. Although most effort in fracture prevention has been directed at retarding the rate of age-related bone loss, and reducing the frequency and severity of trauma among elderly people, evidence is growing that peak bone mass is an important contributor to bone strength during later life. The normal patterns of skeletal growth have been well characterized in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. It has been confirmed that boys have higher bone mineral content, but not volumetric bone density, than girls. Furthermore, there is a dissociation between the peak velocities for height gain and bone mineral accrual, in both genders. Puberty is the period during which volumetric density appears to increase in both axial and appendicular sites. Many factors influence the accumulation of bone mineral during childhood and adolescence, including heredity, gender, diet, physical activity, endocrine status, and sporadic risk factors such as cigarette smoking. In addition to these modifiable factors during childhood, evidence has also accrued that fracture risk might be programmed during intrauterine life. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a relationship between birthweight, weight in infancy, and adult bone mass. This appears to be mediated through modulation of the set-point for basal activity of pituitary-dependent endocrine systems such as the hypothalamicpituitary-adrenal and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axes. Maternal smoking, diet (particularly vitamin D deficiency), and physical activity also appear to modulate bone mineral acquisition during intrauterine life; furthermore, both low birth size and poor childhood growth are directly linked to the later risk of hip fracture. The optimization of maternal nutrition and intrauterine growth should also be included within preventive strategies against osteoporotic fracture, albeit for future

  5. Phase field approaches of bone remodeling based on TIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François; Rahouadj, Rachid; Boisse, Julien; Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The process of bone remodeling includes a cycle of repair, renewal, and optimization. This adaptation process, in response to variations in external loads and chemical driving factors, involves three main types of bone cells: osteoclasts, which remove the old pre-existing bone; osteoblasts, which form the new bone in a second phase; osteocytes, which are sensing cells embedded into the bone matrix, trigger the aforementioned sequence of events. The remodeling process involves mineralization of the bone in the diffuse interface separating the marrow, which contains all specialized cells, from the newly formed bone. The main objective advocated in this contribution is the setting up of a modeling and simulation framework relying on the phase field method to capture the evolution of the diffuse interface between the new bone and the marrow at the scale of individual trabeculae. The phase field describes the degree of mineralization of this diffuse interface; it varies continuously between the lower value (no mineral) and unity (fully mineralized phase, e.g. new bone), allowing the consideration of a diffuse moving interface. The modeling framework is the theory of continuous media, for which field equations for the mechanical, chemical, and interfacial phenomena are written, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Additional models for the cellular activity are formulated to describe the coupling of the cell activity responsible for bone production/resorption to the kinetics of the internal variables. Kinetic equations for the internal variables are obtained from a pseudo-potential of dissipation. The combination of the balance equations for the microforce associated to the phase field and the kinetic equations lead to the Ginzburg-Landau equation satisfied by the phase field with a source term accounting for the dissipative microforce. Simulations illustrating the proposed framework are performed in a one-dimensional situation showing the evolution of

  6. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone micro-environment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:24398856

  7. Bone density in patients with chondromalacia patella.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Iraj; Khazaeli, Shabnam; Hatami, Parta; Malekpour, Mahdi

    2010-06-01

    Chondromalacia of the patella is the most common cause of anterior knee pain in young women. The etiology of the disease is not well-understood but the initial lesion is a disorganization of collagenous structures. Since the disease is proposed to be due to generalized constitutional disturbance, we postulated that bony structures could also be involved. To investigate this hypothesis we measured the bone density of 286 patients with the diagnosis of chondromalacia of the patella during a 4-year period using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method. We found a significant number of patients having low bone densities. This problem was more pronounced in men and in younger age groups. We suggest base-line bone density evaluation in all patients, treatment of osteopenia or osteoporosis in select patients and regular follow-ups using DXA.

  8. Wine and bone health: a review.

    PubMed

    Kutleša, Zvonimir; Budimir Mršić, Danijela

    2016-01-01

    A light-to-moderate wine consumption has been shown to provide several beneficial effects on the skeletal system, including reduced risk of bone mass loss and fractures. Wine is rich in phenolic compounds, strong phytoestrogens and natural antioxidants, to which bone protection is mainly attributed. The objective of this review was to give an overview of the exact mechanisms by which wine consumption is involved in bone protection. We found a great variety of in vitro research on the beneficial effects of isolated wine phenolics on the skeletal system, with a significant lack of evidence of their in vivo effects. In addition, we found almost no studies investigating how wine, a mixture of these phenolics dissolved in ethanol, affects the skeletal system. Our results warrant further research on this interesting topic.

  9. Craniofacial bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wan, Derrick C; Nacamuli, Randall P; Longaker, Michael T

    2006-04-01

    Repair and reconstruction of the craniofacial skeleton represents a significant biomedical burden, with thousands of procedures per-formed annually secondary to injuries and congenital malformations. Given the multitude of current approaches, the need for more effective strategies to repair these bone deficits is apparent. This article explores two major modalities for craniofacial bone tissue engineering: distraction osteogenesis and cellular based therapies. Current understanding of the guiding principles for each of these modalities is elaborated on along with the knowledge gained from clinical and investigative studies. By laying this foundation, future directions for craniofacial distraction and cell-based bone engineering have emerged with great promise for the advancement of clinical practice.

  10. Bone graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Reena A; Rozental, Tamara D

    2012-11-01

    Replacement of missing bone stock is a reconstructive challenge to upper extremity surgeons and decision-making with regards to available choices remains difficult. Preference is often given to autograft in the form of cancellous, cortical, or corticocancellous grafts from donor sites. However, the available volume from such donor sites is limited and fraught with potential complications. Advances in surgical management and medical research have produced a wide array of potential substances that can be used for bone graft substitute. Considerations in selecting bone grafts and substitutes include characteristic capabilities, availability, patient morbidity, immunogenicity, potential disease transmission, and cost variability.

  11. Paget Disease of Bone.

    PubMed

    Al-Rashid, Mamun; Ramkumar, Dipak B; Raskin, Kevin; Schwab, Joseph; Hornicek, Francis J; Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A

    2015-10-01

    The current understanding of Paget disease of bone (PDB) has vastly changed since Paget described the first case in 1877. Medical management of this condition remains the mainstay of treatment. Surgical intervention is usually only used in fractures through pagetic bone, need for realignment to correct deformity in major long bones, prophylactic treatment of impending fractures, joint arthroplasty in severe arthritis, or spinal decompression in cases of bony compression of neural elements. Advances in surgical technique have allowed early return to function and mobilization. Despite medical and surgical intervention, a small subset of patients with PDB develops Paget sarcoma.

  12. Bone resorption: an actor of dental and periodontal development?

    PubMed

    Gama, Andrea; Navet, Benjamin; Vargas, Jorge William; Castaneda, Beatriz; Lézot, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Dental and periodontal tissue development is a complex process involving various cell-types. A finely orchestrated network of communications between these cells is implicated. During early development, communications between cells from the oral epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme govern the dental morphogenesis with successive bud, cap and bell stages. Later, interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cells occur during dental root elongation. Root elongation and tooth eruption require resorption of surrounding alveolar bone to occur. For years, it was postulated that signaling molecules secreted by dental and periodontal cells control bone resorbing osteoclast precursor recruitment and differentiation. Reverse signaling originating from bone cells (osteoclasts and osteoblasts) toward dental cells was not suspected. Dental defects reported in osteopetrosis were associated with mechanical stress secondary to defective bone resorption. In the last decade, consequences of bone resorption over-activation on dental and periodontal tissue formation have been analyzed with transgenic animals (RANK (Tg) and Opg (-∕-) mice). Results suggest the existence of signals originating from osteoclasts toward dental and periodontal cells. Meanwhile, experiments consisting in transitory inhibition of bone resorption during root elongation, achieved with bone resorption inhibitors having different mechanisms of action (bisphosphonates and RANKL blocking antibodies), have evidenced dental and periodontal defects that support the presence of signals originating bone cells toward dental cells. The aim of the present manuscript is to present the data we have collected in the last years that support the hypothesis of a role of bone resorption in dental and periodontal development.

  13. The bone diagnostic instrument III: Testing mouse femora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Connor; Mathews, Phillip; Yurtsev, Eugene; Sahar, Nadder; Kohn, David; Hansma, Paul

    2009-06-01

    Here we describe modifications that allow the bone diagnostic instrument (BDI) [P. Hansma et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 064303 (2008); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 075105 (2006)], developed to test human bone, to test the femora of mice. These modifications include reducing the effective weight of the instrument on the bone, designing and fabricating new probe assemblies to minimize damage to the small bone, developing new testing protocols that involve smaller testing forces, and fabricating a jig for securing the smaller bones for testing. With these modifications, the BDI was used to test the hypothesis that short-term running has greater benefit on the mechanical properties of the femur for young growing mice compared to older, skeletally mature mice. We measured elastic modulus, hardness, and indentation distance increase (IDI), which had previously been shown to be the best discriminators in model systems known to exhibit differences in mechanical properties at the whole bone level. In the young exercised murine femora, the IDI was significantly lower than in young control femora. Since IDI has a relation to postyield properties, these results suggest that exercise during bone development increases post yield mechanical competence. We were also able to measure effects of aging on bone properties with the BDI. There was a significant increase in the IDI, and a significant decrease in the elastic modulus and hardness between the young and old groups. Thus, with the modifications described here, the BDI can take measurements on mouse bones and obtain statistically significant results.

  14. The Use of Bone Graft Substitute in Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liodaki, Eirini; Kraemer, Robert; Mailaender, Peter; Stang, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bone defects are a very common problem in hand surgery, occurring in bone tumor surgery, in complicated fractures, and in wrist surgery. Bone substitutes may be used instead of autologous bone graft to avoid donor site morbidity. In this article, we will review our experience with the use of Cerament bone void filler (Bonesupport, Lund, Sweden) in elective and trauma hand surgery. A prospective clinical study was conducted with 16 patients treated with this bone graft substitute in our department over a period of 3.5 years. Twelve patients (2 female, 10 male; with an average age of 42.42 years) with monostoic enchondroma of the phalanges were treated and 4 patients (1 female, 3 male; with an average age of 55.25 years) with complicated metacarpal fractures with bone defect. Data such as postoperative course with rating of pain, postoperative complications, functional outcome assessment at 1, 2, 3, 6 months, time to complete remodeling were registered. Postoperative redness and swelling after bone graft substitute use was noticed in 7 patients with enchondroma surgery due to the thin soft-tissue envelope of the fingers. Excellent total active motion of the involved digit was noticed in 10 of 12 enchondroma patients and in all 4 fracture patients at 2-month follow-up. In summary, satisfying results are described, making the use of injectable bone graft substitute in the surgical treatment of enchondromas, as well as in trauma hand surgery a good choice. PMID:27310946

  15. Bone resorption: an actor of dental and periodontal development?

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Andrea; Navet, Benjamin; Vargas, Jorge William; Castaneda, Beatriz; Lézot, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Dental and periodontal tissue development is a complex process involving various cell-types. A finely orchestrated network of communications between these cells is implicated. During early development, communications between cells from the oral epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme govern the dental morphogenesis with successive bud, cap and bell stages. Later, interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cells occur during dental root elongation. Root elongation and tooth eruption require resorption of surrounding alveolar bone to occur. For years, it was postulated that signaling molecules secreted by dental and periodontal cells control bone resorbing osteoclast precursor recruitment and differentiation. Reverse signaling originating from bone cells (osteoclasts and osteoblasts) toward dental cells was not suspected. Dental defects reported in osteopetrosis were associated with mechanical stress secondary to defective bone resorption. In the last decade, consequences of bone resorption over-activation on dental and periodontal tissue formation have been analyzed with transgenic animals (RANKTg and Opg−∕− mice). Results suggest the existence of signals originating from osteoclasts toward dental and periodontal cells. Meanwhile, experiments consisting in transitory inhibition of bone resorption during root elongation, achieved with bone resorption inhibitors having different mechanisms of action (bisphosphonates and RANKL blocking antibodies), have evidenced dental and periodontal defects that support the presence of signals originating bone cells toward dental cells. The aim of the present manuscript is to present the data we have collected in the last years that support the hypothesis of a role of bone resorption in dental and periodontal development. PMID:26594180

  16. Detection of micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, T.; Yang, M.; Ehara, H.; Ito, S.; Nishino, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Shimokawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Imaeda, T.; Doi, T.; Kawada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer were examined for micrometastases to the bone marrow using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene. Of nine patients with bone metastases detectable by bone scan imaging, five patients had PSA mRNA expression in the bone marrow detectable by RT-PCR. Of 26 patients with negative bone scan findings, seven patients had PSA mRNA expression detectable in the bone marrow. RT-PCR could detect micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow that were not detectable by bone scan imaging. Of 16 patients with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater, only nine (56.3%) had bone metastases detected by bone scans. Of the remaining seven patients, five had micrometastases to the bone marrow detected by RT-PCR. Overall, 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater had metastatic bone diseases including bone marrow micrometastases. Of 19 patients with a serum PSA concentration of less than 25 ng ml(-1), two (10.5%) had only micrometastatic disease detected by RT-PCR. A significant correlation was observed between the incidence of bone involvement and the serum PSA concentration. This study suggests that RT-PCR will potentially develop into a relevant tool to assess bone involvement including bone marrow micrometastases and establish a precise correlation between serum PSA concentration and metastatic bone disease in patients with prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:9043017

  17. Dependence of Long Bone Flexural Properties on Bone Mineral Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, BethAnn; Cleek, Tammy M.; Whalen, Robert T.; Connolly, James P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether a non-invasive determination of long bone cross-sectional areal properties using bone densitometry accurately estimates true long bone flexural properties. In this study, section properties of two pairs of human female embalmed tibiae were compared using two methods: special analysis of bone densitometry data, and experimental determination of flexural regidities from bone surface strain measurements during controlled loading.

  18. Giant cell tumor of bone: Multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, AK; Nath, R; Mishra, MP

    2007-01-01

    Background: The clinical behavior and treatment of giant cell tumor of bone is still perplexing. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinico-pathological correlation of tumor and its relevance in treatment and prognosis. Materials and Methods: Ninety -three cases of giant cell tumor were treated during 1980-1990 by different methods. The age of the patients varied from 18-58 yrs with male and female ratio as 5:4. The upper end of the tibia was most commonly involved (n=31), followed by the lower end of the femur(n=21), distal end of radius(n=14), upper end of fibula (n=9), proximal end of femur(n=5), upper end of the humerus(n=3), iliac bone(n=2), phalanx (n=2) and spine(n=1). The tumors were also encountered on uncommon sites like metacarpals (n=4) and metatarsal(n=1). Fifty four cases were treated by curettage and bone grafting. Wide excision and reconstruction was performed in twenty two cases. Nine cases were treated by wide excision while primary amputation was performed in four cases. One case required only curettage. Three inaccessible lesions of ilium and spine were treated by radiotherapy. Results: 19 of 54 treated by curettage and bone grafting showed a recurrence. The repeat curettage and bone grafting was performed in 18 cases while amputation was done in one. One each out of the cases treated by wide excision and reconstruction and wide excision alone recurred. In this study we observed that though curettage and bone grafting is still the most commonly adopted treatment, wide excision of tumor with reconstruction has shown lesser recurrence. Conclusion: For radiologically well-contained and histologically typical tumor, curettage and autogenous bone grafting is the treatment of choice. The typical tumors with radiologically deficient cortex, clinically aggressive tumors and tumors with histological Grade III should be treated by wide excision and reconstruction. PMID:21139762

  19. Bone Grafts in Craniofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elsalanty, Mohammed E.; Genecov, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of cranial and maxillofacial defects is a challenging task. The standard reconstruction method has been bone grafting. In this review, we shall describe the biological principles of bone graft healing, as pertinent to craniofacial reconstruction. Different types and sources of bone grafts will be discussed, as well as new methods of bone defect reconstruction. PMID:22110806

  20. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Parents > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow A A A What's in this ... ósea What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone marrow, the spongy ...

  1. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow A A A What's in this ... Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone marrow, the spongy ...

  2. Paget disease of the bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may indicate Paget disease include: Bone scan Bone x-ray Elevated markers of bone breakdown (for example, N-telopeptide) This disease may ... of Paget disease. Alternative Names Osteitis deformans Images ... X-ray References Ralston SH. Paget disease of bone. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  3. Instrumentation for bone density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meharg, L. S.

    1968-01-01

    Measurement system evaluates the integrated bone density over a specific cross section of bone. A digital computer converts stored bone scan data to equivalent aluminum calibration wedge thickness, and bone density is then integrated along the scan by using the trapezoidal approximation integration formula.

  4. Gravity, Calcium, and Bone: Update, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1991-01-01

    Some of the results of recent short-term flights and ground-based experiments that have contributed new insights into skeletal adaptation, calcium metabolism, and growth processes in 0 g, are highlighted. After 6 months in space, bone demineralization, invariably involving the os calcis, was found not to extend to the lumbar spine in 4 exercising cosmonauts. A flight experiment in the Space Shuttle crew has documented the early events in the calcium endocrine system during spaceflight. On the ground, brief and long-term bed rest studies of healthy volunteers in the head-down tile (HDT) model of weightlessness were completed. The skeleton of the adult male responds more rapidly to unloading than previously recognized. Regional changes in bone density can be quantified in only 30 days, are highly individual, and follow the direction of gravitational forces in the HDT model during inactivity. Bone biopsy results in healthy volunteers after bed rest differ from results in paraplegics from the same sampling site. Flight experiments in growing rats reveal changes in the composition of bone mineral and matrix in the femur postflight that were found to be highly regional and suggestive of an effect of gravity on mineral distribution. These observations may be relevant to the results from an earlier Cosmos flight where artificial gravity in space was found to maintain bone strength, but not to correct the radial growth deficit.

  5. Isolated metaphyseal injury influences unrelated bones

    PubMed Central

    Tätting, Love; Sandberg, Olof; Bernhardsson, Magnus; Ernerudh, Jan; Aspenberg, Per

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Fracture healing involves different inflammatory cells, some of which are not part of the traditional bone field, such as B-cells and cytotoxic T-cells. We wanted to characterize bone healing by flow cytometry using 15 different inflammatory cell markers in a mouse model of metaphyseal injury, and incidentally discovered a previously unknown general skeletal reaction to trauma. Material and methods A bent needle was inserted and twisted to traumatize the cancellous bone in the proximal tibia of C57/Bl6 female mice. This is known to induce vivid bone formation locally in the marrow compartment. Cells were harvested from the injured region, the uninjured contralateral tibia, and the humerus. The compositions of the immune cell populations were compared to those in untraumatized control animals. Results Tibial metaphyseal injury led to substantial changes in the cell populations over time. Unexpectedly, similar changes were also seen in the contralateral tibia and in the humerus, despite the lack of local trauma. Most leukocyte subsets were affected by this generalized reaction. Interpretation A relatively small degree of injury to the proximal tibia led to systemic changes in the immune cell populations in the marrow of unrelated bones, and probably in the entire skeleton. The few changes that were specific for the injury site appeared to relate to modulatory functions. PMID:28128005

  6. CT imaging of bone and bone marrow infiltration in malignant melanoma--Challenges and limitations for clinical staging in comparison to 18FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bier, Georg; Hoffmann, Vera; Kloth, Christopher; Othman, Ahmed E; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus; La Fougère, Christian; Pfannenberg, Christina; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Klumpp, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Rationale of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in comparison to PET/CT. Fifty patients (age 61 ± 15.12 years) with metastatic malignant melanoma underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT, including contrast-enhanced CT. 2 readers evaluated the CT images in consensus for bone and bone marrow lesions focusing on lesion location, type and size. PET/CT was used as reference standard to estimate sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value. Moreover, the bone marrow density was estimated in the long bones and the sacral bone. Serum hamoglobin, thrombocyte level and S100 protein were correlated with the presence or absence of bone and bone marrow lesions. According to PET/CT as standard of reference, of 594 bone and medullary lesions 495 were considered malignant. Of these 77.8% were medullary, 20.4% lytic, 1% sclerotic and 0.8% mixed lytic/sclerotic. Contrast-enhanced CT yielded a lesion-based sensitivity of 36.8% and a specificity of 87.9% (PPV 93.8%; NPV 21.8%). Patient-based sensitivity and specificity were 78.8% and 82.4%, respectively. Of the missed lesions, most were medullary (95.8%). A disseminated bone marrow involvement (defined as >10 bone marrow lesions or diffuse infiltration of a whole body segment) was described in 11 cases, in 6 cases the disseminated involvement was underestimated or missed on CT. In cases with disseminated bone marrow involvement the bone marrow density was significantly higher in the humerus (p=0.04), but not in the femur or sacral bone (p=0.06). Multivariate analysis revealed no isolated effect of bone metastases on S100 serum and hemoglobin level, but both were significantly altered in patients with disseminated bone marrow involvement (p<0.05). In conclusion, the diagnostic value of computed tomography for the detection of bone marrow metastases in patients with melanoma, is limited. Especially in cases with disseminated bone marrow

  7. What Is Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in parts of the face. The trachea (windpipe), larynx (voice box), and the outer part of the ... bone. Occasionally, chondrosarcoma will develop in the trachea, larynx, and chest wall. Other sites are the scapula ( ...

  8. Healthy Bones Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my bones more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Reprinted from The Surgeon General’s Report on ... women who don’t smoke, and they often go through menopause earlier. Smokers also may absorb less ...

  9. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myelodysplastic syndrome; MDS) A nerve tissue tumor called neuroblastoma Bone marrow disease that leads to an abnormal ... Hairy cell leukemia Hodgkin lymphoma Multiple myeloma Myelofibrosis Neuroblastoma Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Platelet count Polycythemia vera Primary ...

  10. Bone mineral density test

    MedlinePlus

    ... density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... most common and accurate way uses a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan. DEXA uses low- ...

  11. Bone pain or tenderness

    MedlinePlus

    ... 13. Weber TJ. Osteoporosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... other disorders of bone. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  12. Bone Densitometry in Children.

    PubMed

    Adams, Judith E

    2016-07-01

    Maximizing peak bone mass in childhood is relevant to optimizing bone health in later life, so the study of the skeleton in children in health and disease is important. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most widely used clinical tool for the assessment of bone status in children. Technological developments in DXA enable vertebral fracture assessment at much lower ionizing radiation doses than spinal radiographs. Quantitative computed tomography remains predominantly a research tool but has some advantages over DXA in not being size dependent. High-resolution peripheral computed tomography measures trabecular and cortical bone microstructure but is technically challenging, particularly in children, and not widely available, so it is unlikely to be used in clinical practice. Other quantitative techniques (quantitative magnetic resonance imaging, digital X-ray absorptiometry, quantitative ultrasound) have been applied in children but remain research applications, and they are only covered briefly in this review.

  13. Bone Loss in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... individuals who have used corticosteroids for some time. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY Vitamin D is necessary for the absorption of calcium. ... small bowel involvement—are at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency. This, in turn, may result in bone loss ...

  14. Alcohol and bone.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed across the world in different cultural and social settings. Types of alcohol consumption differ between (a) light, only occasional consumption, (b) heavy chronic alcohol consumption, and (c) binge drinking as seen as a new pattern of alcohol consumption among teenagers and young adults. Heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Osteoporosis is regularly mentioned as a secondary consequence of alcoholism, and chronic alcohol abuse is established as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. The review will present the different mechanisms and effects of alcohol intake on bone mass, bone metabolism, and bone strength, including alcoholism-related "life-style factors" such as malnutrition, lack of exercise, and hormonal changes as additional causative factors, which also contribute to the development of osteoporosis due to alcohol abuse.

  15. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... not being scanned. Alternative Names X-ray - bone Images Skeleton Skeletal spine Osteogenic sarcoma - x-ray References ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  16. Bone Loss in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... individuals who have used corticosteroids for some time. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY Vitamin D is necessary for the absorption of calcium. ... are critical for building healthy bone. Because this vitamin is absorbed in the small intestine, people with ...

  17. Children with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Special help given to children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is described, including adapted equipment to allow for writing and use of a classroom assistant to aid participation in a regular classroom. (CL)

  18. What causes bone loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Any treatment or condition that causes calcium or vitamin D to be poorly absorbed can also lead to weak bones. Some of these are: Gastric bypass (weight-loss surgery) Cystic fibrosis Other conditions that ...

  19. What Is Bone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... during your bone-building years. Women, Men, and Osteoporosis Women are more likely than men to develop ... loss and a greater risk of developing osteoporosis. Osteoporosis Prevention Osteoporosis is preventable for many people. Prevention ...

  20. Reduction of bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Cindy

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on reduction of bone strength are presented. WEHI 231 B growth rates, experimental chambers used to apply the electric field to the cell cultures, and a mouse suspended by rotating cuff in electromagnetic field are shown.

  1. Small Animal Bone Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Animal models, in particular mice, offer the possibility of naturally achieving or genetically engineering a skeletal phenotype associated with disease and conducting destructive fracture tests on bone to determine the resulting change in bone’s mechanical properties. Several recent developments, including nano- and micro- indentation testing, microtensile and microcompressive testing, and bending tests on notched whole bone specimens, offer the possibility to mechanically probe small animal bone and investigate the effects of aging, therapeutic treatments, disease, and genetic variation. In contrast to traditional strength tests on small animal bones, fracture mechanics tests display smaller variation and therefore offer the possibility of reducing sample sizes. This article provides an analysis of what such tests measure and proposes methods to reduce errors associated with testing smaller than ideal specimens. PMID:18672104

  2. [Incretin and bone].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuichiro

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones including gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP) -1 are incretin, which are secreted immediately after meal ingestion and stimulate insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. Characterization of extra-pancreatic GIP and GLP-1 receptors has revealed that these hormones regulate bone turnover. GIP intermittently stimulates osteoblasts and GLP-1 suppresses osteoclasts through a calcitonin-dependent pathway to increase the bone volume.

  3. Clinical Impact and Cellular Mechanisms of Iron Overload-Associated Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Jeney, Viktória

    2017-01-01

    Diseases/conditions with diverse etiology, such as hemoglobinopathies, hereditary hemochromatosis and menopause, could lead to chronic iron accumulation. This condition is frequently associated with a bone phenotype; characterized by low bone mass, osteoporosis/osteopenia, altered microarchitecture and biomechanics, and increased incidence of fractures. Osteoporotic bone phenotype constitutes a major complication in patients with iron overload. The purpose of this review is to summarize what we have learnt about iron overload-associated bone loss from clinical studies and animal models. Bone is a metabolically active tissue that undergoes continuous remodeling with the involvement of osteoclasts that resorb mineralized bone, and osteoblasts that form new bone. Growing evidence suggests that both increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation are involved in the pathological bone-loss in iron overload conditions. We will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in this detrimental process. Fuller understanding of this complex mechanism may lead to the development of improved therapeutics meant to interrupt the pathologic effects of excess iron on bone. PMID:28270766

  4. SEPARATION OF NEWLY FORMED BONE FROM OLDER COMPACT BONE REVEALS CLEAR COMPOSITIONAL DIFFERENCES IN BONE MATRIX

    PubMed Central

    Midura, Ronald J.; Midura, Sharon B.; Su, Xiaowei; Gorski, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    In long bone diaphyses, woven bone forms first and then transitions into a more mineralized compact bone tissue. Prior evidence suggests that the non-collagenous protein composition of woven bone may be distinct from that of more mature bone tissue, particularly with respect to a diverse group of phosphorylated, extracellular matrix proteins. To critically test this hypothesis, we developed an in situ approach to isolate newly formed bone from more mature bone within the same long bone, and combine this anatomical approach with Western blotting to make relative comparisons of 7 phosphorylated matrix proteins important for bone physiology and biomineralization. Interestingly, 75 kDa bone sialoprotein (BSP), 63 kDa osteopontin, and the 75 kDa form of bone acidic glycoprotein-75 (BAG-75) were enriched in primary bone as opposed to more mature cortical bone, while osteonectin, fetuin A, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) appeared to be equally distributed between these two bone tissue compartments. Analyses also revealed the presence of larger sized forms of osteopontin (and to a lesser degree BSP) mostly in newly formed bone, while larger forms of BAG-75 were mostly detected in more mature cortical bone. Smaller sized forms of DMP-1 and BAG-75 were detected in both newly formed and more mature bone tissue extracts, and they are likely the result of proteolytic processing in vivo. Intact DMP-1 (97 kDa) was only detected in unmineralized matrix extracts. These findings indicate that newly formed bone exhibits a non-collagenous matrix protein composition distinct from that of more mature compact bone even within the same long bone, and suggest that the temporal fate of individual non-collagenous proteins is variable in growing bone. PMID:21958842

  5. Bone marrow chimera experiments to determine the contribution of hematopoietic stem cells to cerebral angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Machein, Marcia Regina; Plate, Karl H

    2014-01-01

    The generation of bone marrow chimera in mice is a valuable tool to study a variety of cellular processes. Donor bone marrow cells expressing reporter genes have been used to study the process of cell differentiation and the mechanisms involved in bone marrow cell recruitment. Bone marrow cells bearing genetic manipulation have been used in bone marrow chimeras to elucidate the role of molecules in different physiological and pathological settings. Since in the normal adult brain angiogenesis does not occur, models of brain injury like ischemia and tumor growth have been used to study the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to the cerebral vasculature. This chapter describes the procedures to perform bone marrow transplantation in order to study the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to vascularization in an orthotopic glioma model.

  6. [Image-guided bone consolidation in oncology: Cementoplasty and percutaneous screw fixation].

    PubMed

    Buy, Xavier; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Catena, Vittorio; Roubaud, Guilhem; Kind, Michele; Palussiere, Jean

    2017-03-17

    Bone metastases are a common finding in oncology. They often induce pain but also fractures which impair quality of life, especially when involving weight-bearing bones. Percutaneous image-guided consolidation techniques play a major role for the management of bone metastases. Cementoplasty aims to stabilize bone and control pain by injecting acrylic cement into a weakened bone. This minimally invasive technique has proven its efficacy for bones submitted to compression forces: vertebra, acetabular roof, and condyles. However, long bone diaphysis should be treated with caution due to lower resistance of the cement subject to torsional forces. The recent improvements of navigation systems allow percutaneous image-guided screw fixation without requiring open surgery. This fast-track procedure avoids postponing introduction of systemic therapies. If needed, cementoplasty can be combined with screw insertion to ensure better anchoring in major osteolysis. Interventional radiology bone consolidation techniques increase the therapeutic field in oncology. A multidisciplinary approach remains mandatory to select the best indications.

  7. Systems analysis of bone.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Karl J

    2009-01-01

    The genetic variants contributing to variability in skeletal traits has been well studied, and several hundred QTLs have been mapped and several genes contributing to trait variation have been identified. However, many questions remain unanswered. In particular, it is unclear whether variation in a single gene leads to alterations in function. Bone is a highly adaptive system and genetic variants affecting one trait are often accompanied by compensatory changes in other traits. The functional interactions among traits, which is known as phenotypic integration, has been observed in many biological systems, including bone. Phenotypic integration is a property of bone that is critically important for establishing a mechanically functional structure that is capable of supporting the forces imparted during daily activities. In this paper, bone is reviewed as a system and primarily in the context of functionality. A better understanding of the system properties of bone will lead to novel targets for future genetic analyses and the identification of genes that are directly responsible for regulating bone strength. This systems analysis has the added benefit of leaving a trail of valuable information about how the skeletal system works. This information will provide novel approaches to assessing skeletal health during growth and aging and for developing novel treatment strategies to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with fragility fractures.

  8. Bone Remodeling Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foucar, Charlie; Goldberg, Leslie; Hon, Bodin; Moore, Shannon; Williams, Evan

    2009-01-01

    The impact of bone loss due to different mechanical loadings in microgravity is a major concern for astronauts upon reintroduction to gravitational forces in exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. it has been shown that astronauts not only lose bone at differing rates, with levels up to 2% per month, but each astronaut will respond to bone loss treatments differently. Pre- and post-flight imaging techniques and frozen urine samples for post-flight laboratory immunoassays To develop a novel, non-invasive, highly . sensitive, portable, intuitive, and low-powered device to measure bone resorption levels in 'real time' to provide rapid and Individualized feedback to maximize the efficacy of bone loss countermeasures 1. Collect urine specimen and analyze the level of bone resorption marker, DPD (deoxypridinoline) excreted. 2. Antibodies specific to DPD conjugated with nanoshells and mixed with specimen, the change in absorbance from agglutination is measured by an optical device. 3. The concentration of DPD is displayed and recorded on a PDA

  9. Bone marrow adipocytes promote tumor growth in bone via FABP4-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Hardaway, Aimalie L.; Powell, Katelyn; Turchick, Audrey; Feldmann, Daniel; Podgorski, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of skeletal metastases and death from prostate cancer greatly increases with age and obesity, conditions which increase marrow adiposity. Bone marrow adipocytes are metabolically active components of bone metastatic niche that modulate the function of neighboring cells; yet the mechanisms of their involvement in tumor behavior in bone have not been explored. In this study, using experimental models of intraosseous tumor growth and diet-induced obesity, we demonstrate the promoting effects of marrow fat on growth and progression of skeletal prostate tumors. We reveal that exposure to lipids supplied by marrow adipocytes induces expression of lipid chaperone FABP4, pro-inflammatory interleukin IL-1β, and oxidative stress protein HMOX-1 in metastatic tumor cells and stimulates their growth and invasiveness. We show that FABP4 is highly overexpressed in prostate skeletal tumors from obese mice and in bone metastasis samples from prostate cancer patients. In addition, we provide results suggestive of bi-directional interaction between FABP4 and PPARγ pathways that may be driving aggressive tumor cell behavior in bone. Together, our data provide evidence for functional relationship between bone marrow adiposity and metastatic prostate cancers and unravel the FABP4/IL-1β axis as a potential therapeutic target for this presently incurable disease. PMID:24240026

  10. Med19 promotes bone metastasis and invasiveness of bladder urothelial carcinoma via bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hui; Feng, Chen-chen; Ding, Guan-xiong; Meng, Dong-liang; Ding, Qiang; Fang, Zu-jun; Xia, Guo-wei; Xu, Gang; Jiang, Hao-wen

    2013-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) remained a major health problem. Med19 was related to tumor growth of BCa. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were reported to be critical in bone metastasis of cancer. We therefore investigated the relations between Med19 and BMPs in BCa and their effect on bone metastasis of BCa. Bladder cancer cell lines were cultured and interfered with Med19 shRNA and control. Expressions of BMP-1, BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-5, BMP-6, BMP-7, BMP-9, and BMP-15 were studied between 2 groups. Fifty-two BCa samples were included for immunohistochemical staining of Med19 and BMP-2. Expressions were scored and studied statistically. Invasiveness was studied with Transwell assay. Silencing or Med19 in BCa cells induced altered expressions of BMPs. Increased expressions of BMP-1, BMP-4, BMP-6, BMP-7, and BMP-15 and decreased expressions of BMP-2, BMP-5, and BMP-9 were noticed, but only BMP-2 reached statistical significance. Expressions of Med19 and BMP-2 were significantly higher in cases with bone metastasis and were positively correlated in cases with bone metastasis and muscle invasion. Med19 is a critical factor involved in the invasiveness and promotion of bone metastasis of BCa, possibly via BMP-2.

  11. Endochondral bone growth, bone calcium accretion, and bone mineral density: how are they related?

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-07-01

    Endochondral bone growth in young growing mammals or adult mammals with persistent growth plates progresses from proliferation, maturation and hypertrophy of growth plate chondrocytes to mineralization of cartilaginous matrix to form an osseous tissue. This complex process is tightly regulated by a number of factors with different impacts, such as genetics, endocrine/paracrine factors [e.g., PTHrP, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), IGF-1, FGFs, and prolactin], and nutritional status (e.g., dietary calcium and vitamin D). Despite a strong link between growth plate function and elongation of the long bone, little is known whether endochondral bone growth indeed determines bone calcium accretion, bone mineral density (BMD), and/or peak bone mass. Since the process ends with cartilaginous matrix calcification, an increase in endochondral bone growth typically leads to more calcium accretion in the primary spongiosa and thus higher BMD. However, in lactating rats with enhanced trabecular bone resorption, bone elongation is inversely correlated with BMD. Although BMD can be increased by factors that enhance endochondral bone growth, the endochondral bone growth itself is unlikely to be an important determinant of peak bone mass since it is strongly determined by genetics. Therefore, endochondral bone growth and bone elongation are associated with calcium accretion only in a particular subregion of the long bone, but do not necessarily predict BMD and peak bone mass.

  12. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the sphenoid bone.

    PubMed

    Aralasmak, A; Aygun, N; Westra, W H; Yousem, D M

    2006-09-01

    We present 2 patients with giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of the sphenoid bone. The first patient is an 8-year-old boy with involvement of the greater wing, and the second is a 53- year-old man with a lateral pterygoid plate mass. Both patients presented with rapid expansion of lytic bone lesions, which had solid and cystic components and lacked matrix calcification. Biopsies were indeterminate for definitive diagnoses. The radiologic appearance, location, and incidence of the lesions, and the patient's age and medical history are helpful aids in narrowing the differential diagnosis of sphenoid bone lesions. However, the imaging and, occasionally, even the histologic findings may not suggest the specific diagnosis of GCRG, which must be added into the differential diagnosis of rapidly enlarging cystic bone lesions of the sphenoid bone.

  13. [Multifocal epithelioid angiosarcoma of bone with lung metastases].

    PubMed

    Pacheco, C; Albalá, M D; Blanco, M; Hidalgo, F J

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that may arise from vascular or lymphatic tissue. Bone primary angiosarcoma is extremely rare, representing less than 1% of all angiosarcomas. It́s a very aggressive neoplasm and patients have metastatic disease at initial diagnosis in a large percentage of cases. On radiographs, these lesions are usually aggressive osteolytic lesions, commonly with soft-tissue mass extension, and tumoral enhancement on CT or MR imaging. The appearance of the bone scan is variable, describing studies with tracer uptake or low uptake. These tumours are more often found in the long bones, but spinal involvement has been reported in 10% of patients. There are a few reports in the literature of bone angiosarcoma with lung metastases. We present a patient with multifocal epithelioid angiosarcoma (spine and ribs) and multiple lung metastasis, evidenced by CT and conventional bone scintigraphy, with a fast growth.

  14. [Fluoride effect on bone formation--an overview].

    PubMed

    Mohr, H

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate our present knowledge of fluoride effect on bone formation on basis of the literature. It is likely that fluoride affects the remodelling processes of the skeleton as well as growth related bone formation. During bone remodelling the amount of bone and osteoid tissue is increased by alteration of the balance between resorption and formation. This finding may be accompagnied by impaired mineralization. In studies of fluoride effect on growth related bone formation a number of quantitative histologic alterations have been observed. These include reduction in epiphyseal plate thickness and changes in cellular morphology as well as a retardation of mineralization. The pathogenetic mechanisms behind the observed effects and the variation in tissue response are still unexplained. Fluoride may have a direct cellular effect causing disturbances in cell morphology and metabolism, but the effects may also involve local supracellular mechanisms as well as the general homeostasis of the individual.

  15. Fracture healing in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wing Hoi; Miclau, Theodore; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Yang, Frank F; Alt, Volker

    2016-06-01

    As the world population rises, osteoporotic fracture is an emerging global threat to the well-being of elderly patients. The process of fracture healing by intramembranous ossification or/and endochondral ossification involve many well-orchestrated events including the signaling, recruitment and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during the early phase; formation of a hard callus and extracellular matrix, angiogenesis and revascularization during the mid-phase; and finally callus remodeling at the late phase of fracture healing. Through clinical and animal research, many of these factors are shown to be impaired in osteoporotic bone. Animal studies related to post-menopausal estrogen deficient osteoporosis (type I) have shown healing to be prolonged with decreased levels of MSCs and decreased levels of angiogenesis. Moreover, the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) was shown to be delayed in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture. This might be related to the observed difference in mechanical sensitivity between normal and osteoporotic bones, which requires further experiments to elucidate. In mice fracture models related to senile osteoporosis (type II), it was observed that chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation were impaired; and that transplantation of juvenile bone marrow would result in enhanced callus formation. Other factors related to angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have also been noted to be impaired in aged models, affecting the degradation of cartilaginous matrixes and vascular invasion; the result is changes in matrix composition and growth factors concentrations that ultimately impairs healing during age-related osteoporosis. Most osteoporotic related fractures occur at metaphyseal sites clinically, and reports have indicated that differences exist between diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures. An animal model that satisfies three main criteria (metaphyseal region, plate fixation, osteoporosis) is suggested for future research for

  16. [Is bone biopsy necessary for the diagnosis of metabolic bone diseases? Necessity of bone biopsy].

    PubMed

    Ito, Akemi; Yajima, Aiji

    2011-09-01

    Histological analysis of undecalcified bone biopsy specimens is a valuable clinical and research tool for studying the etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of metabolic bone diseases. In case of osteoporosis, bone biopsy is not usually required for the diagnosis ; however, bone histomorphometry may be useful in rare cases with unusual skeletal fragility. Bone histomorphometry also provides valuable information on the mechanism of action, safety and efficacy of new anti-osteoporosis drugs. Bone histomorphometry is useful for the diagnosis and the assessment of treatment response in rickets/osteomalacia and in CKD-MBD (chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders) . In Japan, bone biopsy is often performed to establish the diagnosis of Paget's disease of bone, especially to differentiate it from metastatic bone disease.

  17. Bone formation: roles of genistein and daidzein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone remodeling consists of a balance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Osteoporosis is the result of increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation causing a decreased bone mass density, loss of bone microarchitecture, and an increased risk of fractu...

  18. Bone marrow derived stem cells in joint and bone diseases: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Marmotti, Antonio; de Girolamo, Laura; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Mattia, Silvia; Rossi, Roberto; Montaruli, Angela; Dettoni, Federico; Castoldi, Filippo; Peretti, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Stem cells have huge applications in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Their use is currently not restricted to the life-threatening diseases but also extended to disorders involving the structural tissues, which may not jeopardize the patients' life, but certainly influence their quality of life. In fact, a particularly popular line of research is represented by the regeneration of bone and cartilage tissues to treat various orthopaedic disorders. Most of these pioneering research lines that aim to create new treatments for diseases that currently have limited therapies are still in the bench of the researchers. However, in recent years, several clinical trials have been started with satisfactory and encouraging results. This article aims to review the concept of stem cells and their characterization in terms of site of residence, differentiation potential and therapeutic prospective. In fact, while only the bone marrow was initially considered as a "reservoir" of this cell population, later, adipose tissue and muscle tissue have provided a considerable amount of cells available for multiple differentiation. In reality, recently, the so-called "stem cell niche" was identified as the perivascular space, recognizing these cells as almost ubiquitous. In the field of bone and joint diseases, their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lines makes their application ideally immediate through three main modalities: (1) cells selected by withdrawal from bone marrow, subsequent culture in the laboratory, and ultimately transplant at the site of injury; (2) bone marrow aspirate, concentrated and directly implanted into the injury site; (3) systemic mobilization of stem cells and other bone marrow precursors by the use of growth factors. The use of this cell population in joint and bone disease will be addressed and discussed, analysing both the clinical outcomes but also the basic research background, which has justified their use for the

  19. Porous Surface Modified Bioactive Bone Cement for Enhanced Bone Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Dong, Jingjing; Guo, Dagang; Mao, Mengmeng; Kong, Liang; Li, Yang; Wu, Zixiang; Lei, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. Materials and Methods The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant–bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. Results The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect. Conclusions

  20. Osteocyte density in woven bone.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, C J; Majeska, R J; Schaffler, M B

    2004-11-01

    Woven bone forms rapidly during tissue growth, following injury and in response to certain anabolic stimuli. Functional differences between woven and lamellar bone may be due, in part, to differences in osteocyte density (cells per unit tissue). Woven bone has been estimated to contain four to eight times more osteocytes than lamellar bone, although primary data to support this assertion are limited. Given recent findings implicating osteocytes as regulators of bone remodeling, bone formation and bone volume, such large differences in osteocyte density between woven and lamellar bone may have important consequences. In this study, we compared the density of osteocyte lacunae (lacunae/mm(2) tissue) in rat lamellar bone with that in woven bone formed under several different circumstances. We found that the lacunar density of lamellar cortical bone in the rat (834+/-83 cells/mm2, mean+/-SD) did not differ significantly from that of periosteal woven bone formed via intramembranous osteogenesis, either in response to mechanical loading (921+/-204 cells/mm2) or in the periosteal buttressing region of the fracture callus (1138+/-168 cells/mm2). In contrast, lacunar density of endochondrally derived woven bone in the center (gap) region of fracture callus was nearly 100% greater (1875+/-270 cells/mm2) than in lamellar cortical bone while lacunar density of primary spongiosa of the growth plate was 40% greater (1674+/-228 cells/mm2) than that in lamellar cancellous bone (1189+/-164). These findings demonstrate that lacunar density in woven bone varies depending on skeletal site and developmental history and appears to be elevated in endochondrally derived woven bone adjacent to marrow space. Given the considerable evidence supporting osteocytes as local initiators of bone remodeling, we suggest that woven bone with increased lacunar density may undergo remodeling at an accelerated rate.