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Sample records for involving genetic modification

  1. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  2. Genetic modification and genetic determinism.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-06-26

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  3. Genetic modification in floriculture.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Stephen F; Brugliera, Filippa

    2011-02-01

    Micro-propagation, embryo rescue, mutagenesis via chemical or irradiation means and in vitro inter-specific hybridisation methods have been used by breeders in the floriculture industry for many years. In the past 20 years these enabling technologies have been supplemented by genetic modification methods. Though many genes of potential utility to the floricultural industry have been identified, and much has been learnt of the genetic factors and molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypes of great importance to the industry, there are only flower colour modified varieties of carnation and rose in the marketplace. To a large extent this is due to unique financial barriers to market entry for genetically modified varieties of flower crops, including use of technology fees and costs of regulatory approval.

  4. The known genetic loci for telomere length may be involved in the modification of telomeres length after birth

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Qiao; Du, Jiangbo; Yu, Fei; Huang, Tongtong; Chen, Mengxi; Lv, Hong; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin; Jin, Guangfu; Hu, Yali; Shen, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length varies considerably among individuals. It is highly heritable and decreases with ageing or ageing related diseases. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic loci associated with telomere length in adults. However, it is unclear whether these loci represent the genetic basis of telomere length or determine the individual susceptibility to shortening during growth process. Using DNA extracted from peripheral and cord blood of 444 mother-newborn pairs from a Chinese population, we measured relative telomere length (RTL) and genotyped eight known telomere length related variants that were initially identified in populations of European descent. We observed the T allele of rs10936599 and the T allele of rs2736100 were norminally associated with shorter RTL (P = 0.041 and 0.046, respectively) in maternal samples. Furthermore, the Weighted genetic score (WGS) of eight variants was significantly associated with RTL in maternal samples (R2 = 0.012, P = 0.025). However, we didn’t detect any significant associations for any individual variant or the combined WGS with RTL in newborns. These findings didn’t support the hypothesis that telomere length related loci may affect telomere length at birth, and we suggested that these loci may play a role in telomere length modification during life course. PMID:27929092

  5. [Advances in genetic modification technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baixue; Sun, Qixin; Li, Haifeng

    2015-08-01

    Genetic modification technology is a new molecular tool for targeted genome modification. It includes zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) technology, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) technology and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) (CRISPR-Cas) nucleases technology. All of these nucleases create DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) at chromosomal targeted sites and induce cell endogenous mechanisms that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathway, resulting in targeted endogenous gene knock-out or exogenous gene insertion. In recent years, genetic modification technologies have been successfully applied to bacteria, yeast, human cells, fruit fly, zebra fish, mouse, rat, livestock, cynomolgus monkey, Arabidopsis, rice, tobacco, maize, sorghum, wheat, barley and other organisms, showing its enormous advantage in gene editing field. Especially, the newly developed CRISPR-Cas9 system arose more attention because of its low cost, high effectiveness, simplicity and easiness. We reviewed the principles and the latest research progress of these three technologies, as well as prospect of future research and applications.

  6. Genetic modification of preimplantation embryos: toward adequate human research policies.

    PubMed

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects.

  7. Genetic modifications for personal enhancement: a defence.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2014-04-01

    Bioconservative commentators argue that parents should not take steps to modify the genetics of their children even in the name of enhancement because of the damage they predict for values, identities and relationships. Some commentators have even said that adults should not modify themselves through genetic interventions. One commentator worries that genetic modifications chosen by adults for themselves will undermine moral agency, lead to less valuable experiences and fracture people's sense of self. These worries are not justified, however, since the effects of modification will not undo moral agency as such. Adults can still have valuable experiences, even if some prior choices no longer seem meaningful. Changes at the genetic level will not always, either, alienate people from their own sense of self. On the contrary, genetic modifications can help amplify choice, enrich lives and consolidate identities. Ultimately, there is no moral requirement that people value their contingent genetic endowment to the exclusion of changes important to them in their future genetic identities. Through weighing risks and benefits, adults also have the power to consent to, and assume the risks of, genetic modifications for themselves in a way not possible in prenatal genetic interventions.

  8. Genetic Modification of Stem Cells for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M. Ian; Tang, Yao Liang

    2009-01-01

    Gene modification of cells for prior to their transplantation, especially stem cells, enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the Trojan horse, the gene modified cell has to gain entrance inside the host’s walls and survive and deliver its transgene products Using cellular, molecular and gene manipulation techniques the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves constructing modules of functional gene sequences. They can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell specific promoters and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and non viral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases,( including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and spinal cord injury repair), bone defects, hemophilia, and cancer. PMID:18031863

  9. Genetic modification of stem cells for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M Ian; Tang, Yao Liang

    2008-01-14

    Gene modification of cells prior to their transplantation, especially stem cells, enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the Trojan horse, the gene-modified cell has to gain entrance inside the host's walls and survive and deliver its transgene products. Using cellular, molecular and gene manipulation techniques the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves constructing modules of functional gene sequences. They can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell specific promoters and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and non-viral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene-modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases, (including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and spinal cord injury repair), bone defects, hemophilia, and cancer.

  10. Genetic modification of food animals.

    PubMed

    Van Eenennaam, Alison Louise

    2017-04-01

    Animal breeders have used a variety of methods in selective breeding programs to genetically improve food animal species. Recently this has included the use of both genetic engineering and genome editing, particularly for targeting improvement in traits for which there is no within-species or within-breed genetic variation. Both intraspecies and interspecies allele substitutions and gene knock-ins have been accomplished with genome editing tools, targeting a number of important traits. The regulatory status of such animals is unclear as the definition of a regulated article is not consistent among different regulatory agencies and organizations. In the absence of a harmonized global regulatory approach to the genetic improvement of animals, it will be difficult for breeders to effectively achieve sustainable breeding objectives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reproductive cloning combined with genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Strong, C

    2005-11-01

    Although there is widespread opposition to reproductive cloning, some have argued that its use by infertile couples to have genetically related children would be ethically justifiable. Others have suggested that lesbian or gay couples might wish to use cloning to have genetically related children. Most of the main objections to human reproductive cloning are based on the child's lack of unique nuclear DNA. In the future, it may be possible safely to create children using cloning combined with genetic modifications, so that they have unique nuclear DNA. The genetic modifications could be aimed at giving such children genetic characteristics of both members of the couple concerned. Thus, cloning combined with genetic modification could be appealing to infertile, lesbian, or gay couples who seek genetically related children who have genetic characteristics of both members. In such scenarios, the various objections to human reproductive cloning that are based on the lack of genetic uniqueness would no longer be applicable. The author argues that it would be ethically justifiable for such couples to create children in this manner, assuming these techniques could be used safely.

  12. Genetic Modification of T Cells.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Richard A; Boyerinas, Benjamin

    2016-04-20

    Gene transfer technology and its application to human gene therapy greatly expanded in the last decade. One area of investigation that appears particularly promising is the transfer of new genetic material into T cells for the potential treatment of cancer. Herein, we describe several core technologies that now yield high-efficiency gene transfer into primary human T cells. These gene transfer techniques include viral-based gene transfer methods based on modified Retroviridae and non-viral methods such as DNA-based transposons and direct transfer of mRNA by electroporation. Where specific examples are cited, we emphasize the transfer of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to T cells, which permits engineered T cells to recognize potential tumor antigens.

  13. Genetic Variations Involved in Vitamin E Status

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Patrick; Desmarchelier, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin E (VE) is the generic term for four tocopherols and four tocotrienols that exhibit the biological activity of α-tocopherol. VE status, which is usually estimated by measuring fasting blood VE concentration, is affected by numerous factors, such as dietary VE intake, VE absorption efficiency, and VE catabolism. Several of these factors are in turn modulated by genetic variations in genes encoding proteins involved in these factors. To identify these genetic variations, two strategies have been used: genome-wide association studies and candidate gene association studies. Each of these strategies has its advantages and its drawbacks, nevertheless they have allowed us to identify a list of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with fasting blood VE concentration and α-tocopherol bioavailability. However, much work remains to be done to identify, and to replicate in different populations, all the single nucleotide polymorphisms involved, to assess the possible involvement of other kind of genetic variations, e.g., copy number variants and epigenetic modifications, in order to establish a reliable list of genetic variations that will allow us to predict the VE status of an individual by knowing their genotype in these genetic variations. Yet, the potential usefulness of this area of research is exciting with regard to personalized nutrition and for future clinical trials dedicated to assessing the biological effects of the various isoforms of VE. PMID:27983595

  14. Mobilome and genetic modification of bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, S; Mayo, B; Álvarez-Martín, P

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, proper development of molecular studies in Bifidobacterium species has been hampered by growth difficulties, because of their exigent nutritive requirements, oxygen sensitivity and lack of efficient genetic tools. These studies, however, are critical to uncover the cross-talk between bifidobacteria and their hosts' cells and to prove unequivocally the supposed beneficial effects provided through the endogenous bifidobacterial populations or after ingestion as probiotics. The genome sequencing projects of different bifidobacterial strains have provided a wealth of genetic data that will be of much help in deciphering the molecular basis of the physiological properties of bifidobacteria. To this end, the purposeful development of stable cloning and expression vectors based on robust replicons - either from temperate phages or resident plasmids - is still needed. This review addresses the current knowledge on the mobile genetic elements of bifidobacteria (prophages, plasmids and transposons) and summarises the different types of vectors already available, together with the transformation procedures for introducing DNA into the cells. It also covers recent molecular studies performed with such vectors and incipient results on the genetic modification of these organisms, establishing the basis that would allow the use of bifidobacteria for future biotechnological applications.

  15. Naturalness and the genetic modification of animals.

    PubMed

    Verhoog, Henk

    2003-07-01

    In the past few years it has been recognised that so-called intrinsic concerns about genetic modification (GM) of plants and animals, for food in particular, have an important role in the public perception of GM. One of these concerns is the view that GM is 'unnatural'. This article gives an overview of the often conflicting views on the argument of unnaturalness in books and reports. The author gives a new direction to this discussion, by contrasting the common sense view of nature and animals, with the scientific concept of nature and what is natural. The view of nature and what is natural is always normative. This is illustrated by making explicit the concept of nature in organic farming, which explains why GM is rejected.

  16. Genetic modification of cells for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi; Drobinskaya, Irina; Kolossov, Eugen; Chen, Chunguang; Linn, Thomas

    2008-01-14

    Progress in gene therapy has produced promising results that translate experimental research into clinical treatment. Gene modification has been extensively employed in cell transplantation. The main barrier is an effective gene delivery system. Several viral vectors were utilized in end-stage differentiated cells. Recently, successful applications were described with adenovirus-associated vectors. As an alternative, embryonic stem cell- and stem cell-like systems were established for generation of tissue-specified gene-modified cells. Owing to the feasibility for genetic manipulations and the self-renewing potency of these cells they can be used in a way enabling large-scale in vitro production. This approach offers the establishment of in vitro cell culture systems that will deliver sufficient amounts of highly purified, immunoautologous cells suitable for application in regenerative medicine. In this review, the current technology of gene delivery systems to cells is recapitulated and the latest developments for cell transplantation are discussed.

  17. Knowledge, attitudes towards and acceptability of genetic modification in Germany.

    PubMed

    Christoph, Inken B; Bruhn, Maike; Roosen, Jutta

    2008-07-01

    Genetic modification remains a controversial issue. The aim of this study is to analyse the attitudes towards genetic modification, the knowledge about it and its acceptability in different application areas among German consumers. Results are based on a survey from spring 2005. An exploratory factor analysis is conducted to identify the attitudes towards genetic modification. The identified factors are used in a cluster analysis that identified a cluster of supporters, of opponents and a group of indifferent consumers. Respondents' knowledge of genetics and biotechnology differs among the found clusters without revealing a clear relationship between knowledge and support of genetic modification. The acceptability of genetic modification varies by application area and cluster, and genetically modified non-food products are more widely accepted than food products. The perception of personal health risks has high explanatory power for attitudes and acceptability.

  18. [Biotechnology, especially genetic modification, and legislation].

    PubMed

    de Sitter, H; Peters, P W J

    2002-05-15

    Biotechnology and genetic modification (GM) related legislation is not yet fully developed in the European Union (EU). New legislation has been recently issued ('Introduction of GMO's in the environment') and recently proposals from the European Commission ('GMO's in food and feed' and 'Traceability and labelling of GMO's') entered the decision-making process in the end of 2001. The proposals for the establishment of the European Food Authority play a role in this respect. GMO legislation is complex not in the least because of the demands for the dossiers, to be submitted with an application, while these procedures for admission must become more transparent. In this paper the relevant legislation will be discussed with the exception of that related to human health. Because of dissatisfaction with the present legislation, the European Commission in the past years granted no new approvals for introductions on the market of GMO's and for GM novel foods. New legislation should suspend the present de-facto moratorium. The tasks and position of the Inspectorate for the Health Protection and Veterinary Public Health is discussed. A provision has been made in the legislation with respect to adventitious or technically unavoidable contamination of raw materials with GMO's up to a maximum of 1%, of which the enforcement is not yet watertight. The analytical methods are being still developed.

  19. Genetically encoding lysine modifications on histone H4.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Bryan J; Hahn, Liljan E; Heitmüller, Svenja; Frauendorf, Holm; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H; Neumann, Heinz

    2015-04-17

    Post-translational modifications of proteins are important modulators of protein function. In order to identify the specific consequences of individual modifications, general methods are required for homogeneous production of modified proteins. The direct installation of modified amino acids by genetic code expansion facilitates the production of such proteins independent of the knowledge and availability of the enzymes naturally responsible for the modification. The production of recombinant histone H4 with genetically encoded modifications has proven notoriously difficult in the past. Here, we present a general strategy to produce histone H4 with acetylation, propionylation, butyrylation, and crotonylation on lysine residues. We produce homogeneous histone H4 containing up to four simultaneous acetylations to analyze the impact of the modifications on chromatin array compaction. Furthermore, we explore the ability of antibodies to discriminate between alternative lysine acylations by incorporating these modifications in recombinant histone H4.

  20. Genetic Engineering: The Modification of Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinsheimer, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes somatic and genetic manipulations of individual genotypes, using diabetes control as an example of the first mode that is potentially realizable be derepression or viral transduction of genes. Advocates the use of genetic engineering of the second mode to remove man from his biological limitations, but offers maxims to ensure the…

  1. Genetic Engineering: The Modification of Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinsheimer, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes somatic and genetic manipulations of individual genotypes, using diabetes control as an example of the first mode that is potentially realizable be derepression or viral transduction of genes. Advocates the use of genetic engineering of the second mode to remove man from his biological limitations, but offers maxims to ensure the…

  2. Recent advances in genetic modification systems for Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2017-03-01

    Actinobacteria are extremely important to human health, agriculture, and forests. Because of the vast differences of the characteristics of Actinobacteria, a lot of genetic tools have been developed for efficiently manipulating the genetics. Although there are a lot of successful examples of engineering Actinobacteria, they are still more difficult to be genetically manipulated than other model microorganisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis etc. due to the diverse genomics and biochemical machinery. Here, we review the methods to introduce heterologous DNA into Actinobacteria and the available genetic modification tools. The trends and problems existing in engineering Actinobacteria are also covered.

  3. Biochemical And Genetic Modification Of Polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Petersen, Gene R.; Richards, Gil F.

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriophages producing endopolysaccharase-type enzymes used to produce, isolate, and purify high yields of modified polysaccharides from polysaccharides produced by, and incorporated into capsules of, certain bacteria. Bacteriophages used in conversion of native polysaccharide materials into polymers of nearly uniform high molecular weight or, alternatively, into highly pure oligosaccharides. Also used in genetic selection of families of polysaccharides structurally related to native polysaccharide materials, but having altered properties. Resulting new polysaccharides and oligosaccharides prove useful in variety of products, including pharmaceutical chemicals, coating materials, biologically active carbohydrates, and drag-reducing additives for fluids.

  4. Biochemical And Genetic Modification Of Polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Petersen, Gene R.; Richards, Gil F.

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriophages producing endopolysaccharase-type enzymes used to produce, isolate, and purify high yields of modified polysaccharides from polysaccharides produced by, and incorporated into capsules of, certain bacteria. Bacteriophages used in conversion of native polysaccharide materials into polymers of nearly uniform high molecular weight or, alternatively, into highly pure oligosaccharides. Also used in genetic selection of families of polysaccharides structurally related to native polysaccharide materials, but having altered properties. Resulting new polysaccharides and oligosaccharides prove useful in variety of products, including pharmaceutical chemicals, coating materials, biologically active carbohydrates, and drag-reducing additives for fluids.

  5. Human germline genetic modification: scientific and bioethical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin R; Chan, Sarah; Harris, John

    2012-10-01

    The latest mammalian genetic modification technology offers efficient and reliable targeting of genomic sequences, in the guise of designer genetic recombination tools. These and other improvements in genetic engineering technology suggest that human germline genetic modification (HGGM) will become a safe and effective prospect in the relatively near future. Several substantive ethical objections have been raised against HGGM including claims of unacceptably high levels of risk, damage to the status of future persons, and violations of justice and autonomy. This paper critically reviews the latest GM science and discusses the key ethical objections to HGGM. We conclude that major benefits are likely to accrue through the use of safe and effective HGGM and that it would thus be unethical to take a precautionary stance against HGGM.

  6. Genetic Control of the Secondary Modification of Deoxyribonucleic Acid in Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    Mamelak, Linda; Boyer, Herbert W.

    1970-01-01

    The wild-type restriction and modification alleles of Escherichia coli K-12 and B were found to have no measurable effect on the patterns of methylated bases in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of these strains. The genetic region controlling the methylation of cytosine in E. coli K-12 was mapped close to his, and the presence or absence of this gene in E. coli B or E. coli K had no effect on the restriction and modification properties of these strains. Thus, only a few of the methylated bases in the DNA of these strains are involved in host modification, and the biological role of the remainder remains obscure. PMID:4919756

  7. Infectious diseases: Surveillance, genetic modification and simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koh, H. L.; Teh, S.Y.; De Angelis, D. L.; Jiang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases such as influenza and dengue have the potential of becoming a worldwide pandemic that may exert immense pressures on existing medical infrastructures. Careful surveillance of these diseases, supported by consistent model simulations, provides a means for tracking the disease evolution. The integrated surveillance and simulation program is essential in devising effective early warning systems and in implementing efficient emergency preparedness and control measures. This paper presents a summary of simulation analysis on influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in Malaysia. This simulation analysis provides insightful lessons regarding how disease surveillance and simulation should be performed in the future. This paper briefly discusses the controversy over the experimental field release of genetically modified (GM) Aedes aegypti mosquito in Malaysia. Model simulations indicate that the proposed release of GM mosquitoes is neither a viable nor a sustainable control strategy. ?? 2011 WIT Press.

  8. Genetic modification of flux for flux prediction of mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Quanyu; Kurata, Hiroyuki

    2009-07-01

    Gene deletion and overexpression are critical technologies for designing or improving the metabolic flux distribution of microbes. Some algorithms including flux balance analysis (FBA) and minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) predict a flux distribution from a stoichiometric matrix in the mutants in which some metabolic genes are deleted or non-functional, but there are few algorithms that predict how a broad range of genetic modifications, such as over- and underexpression of metabolic genes, alters the phenotypes of the mutants at the metabolic flux level. To overcome such existing limitations, we develop a novel algorithm that predicts the flux distribution of the mutants with a broad range of genetic modification, based on elementary mode analysis. It is denoted as genetic modification of flux (GMF), which couples two algorithms that we have developed: modified control effective flux (mCEF) and enzyme control flux (ECF). mCEF is proposed based on CEF to estimate the gene expression patterns in genetically modified mutants in terms of specific biological functions. GMF is demonstrated to predict the flux distribution of not only gene deletion mutants, but also the mutants with underexpressed and overexpressed genes in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. This achieves breakthrough in the a priori flux prediction of a broad range of genetically modified mutants. Supplementary file and programs are available at Bioinformatics online or http://www.cadlive.jp.

  9. Genetic modification in organ transplantation and in vivo luciferase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takashi; Inoue, Sei-ichiro; Sato, Yuki; Ajiki, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    The genetic modification for organ transplantation is one of the most promising strategies to regulate allogeneic immune response. Organ-selective gene transfer has especially benefit to control local immune responses. Based on the catheter technique, we tested to deliver naked plasmid DNA to target graft organs of rats (liver and limbs) by a rapid injection (hydrodynamics-based transfection). Recent advances in transplantation have been achieved by visualization of cellular process and delivered gene expression during the inflammatory process by using non-invasive in vivo imaging. Herein, we examined the fate of genetically modified grafts using a firefly luciferase expression plasmid. For liver modification before transplantation, 6.25% of body weight PBS containing plasmid DNA was injected into the liver through the inferior vena cava using a catheter, and the liver was subsequently transplanted to the recipient rat. For limb modification, the femoral caudal epigastric vein was used. In the rat liver transplantation model, substantial luciferase expression was visualized and sustained for only a few days in the grafted liver. We also addressed stress responses by this hydrodynamics procedure using reporter plasmids containing cis-acting enhancer binding site such as NF-kappa B, cAMP, or heat shock response element. In contrast to hepatic transduction, this genetic limb targeting achieved long lasting luciferase expression in the muscle for 2 months or more. Thus, our results suggest that this catheter-based in vivo transfection technique provides an effective strategy for organ-selective gene modification in transplantation, and the bioluminescent imaging is broadening its potential for evaluation to various preclinical studies.

  10. Genetic modifications of pigs for medicine and agriculture.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Jeffrey J; Prather, Randall S

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified swine hold great promise in the fields of agriculture and medicine. Currently, these swine are being used to optimize production of quality meat, to improve our understanding of the biology of disease resistance, and to reduced waste. In the field of biomedicine, swine are anatomically and physiologically analogous to humans. Alterations of key swine genes in disease pathways provide model animals to improve our understanding of the causes and potential treatments of many human genetic disorders. The completed sequencing of the swine genome will significantly enhance the specificity of genetic modifications, and allow for more accurate representations of human disease based on syntenic genes between the two species. Improvements in both methods of gene alteration and efficiency of model animal production are key to enabling routine use of these swine models in medicine and agriculture.

  11. Methods for genetic modification of megakaryocytes and platelets.

    PubMed

    Pendaries, Caroline; Watson, Stephen P; Spalton, Jennifer C

    2007-09-01

    During recent decades there have been major advances in the fields of thrombosis and haemostasis, in part through development of powerful molecular and genetic technologies. Nevertheless, genetic modification of megakaryocytes and generation of mutant platelets in vitro remains a highly specialized area of research. Developments are hampered by the low frequency of megakaryocytes and their progenitors, a poor efficiency of transfection and a lack of understanding with regard to the mechanism by which megakaryocytes release platelets. Current methods used in the generation of genetically modified megakaryocytes and platelets include mutant mouse models, cell line studies and use of viruses to transform primary megakaryocytes or haematopoietic precursor cells. This review summarizes the advantages, limitations and technical challenges of such methods, with a particular focus on recent successes and advances in this rapidly progressing field including the potential for use in gene therapy for treatment of patients with platelet disorders.

  12. Genetic modifications of pigs for medicine and agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Prather, Randall S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Genetically modified swine hold great promise in the fields of agriculture and medicine. Currently, these swine are being used to optimize production of quality meat, to improve our understanding of the biology of disease resistance, and to reduced waste. In the field of biomedicine, swine are anatomically and physiologically analogous to humans. Alterations of key swine genes in disease pathways provide model animals to improve our understanding of the causes and potential treatments of many human genetic disorders. The completed sequencing of the swine genome will significantly enhance the specificity of genetic modifications, and allow for more accurate representations of human disease based on syntenic genes between the two species. Improvements in both methods of gene alteration and efficiency of model animal production are key to enabling routine use of these swine models in medicine and agriculture. PMID:21671302

  13. Genetic modification of lymphocytes by retrovirus-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Suerth, Julia D; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher

    2012-10-01

    The genetic modification of lymphocytes is an important topic in the emerging field of gene therapy. Many clinical trials targeting immunodeficiency syndromes or cancer have shown therapeutic benefit; further applications address inflammatory and infectious disorders. Retroviral vector development requires a detailed understanding of the interactions with the host. Most researchers have used simple gammaretroviral vectors to modify lymphocytes, either directly or via hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Lentiviral, spumaviral (foamyviral) and alpharetroviral vectors were designed to reduce the necessity for cell stimulation and to utilize potentially safer integration properties. Novel surface modifications (pseudotyping) and transgenes, built using synthetic components, expand the retroviral toolbox, altogether promising increased specificity and potency. Product consistency will be an important criterion for routine clinical use.

  14. New insights toward the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis; genetic variations and epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Aslani, Saeed; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza

    2017-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, characterized by typically an axial arthritis. AS is the prototype of a group of disorders called spondyloarthropathies, which is believed to have common clinical manifestations and genetic predisposition. To date, the exact etiology of AS remains unclear. Over the past few years, however, the role of genetic susceptibility and epigenetic modifications caused through environmental factors have been extensively surveyed with respect to the pathogenesis of AS, resulted in important advances. This review article focuses on the recent advances in the field of AS research, including HLA and non-HLA susceptibility genes identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and aberrant epigenetic modifications of gene loci associated with AS. HLA genes most significantly linked with AS susceptibility include HLA-B27 and its subtypes. Numerous non-HLA genes such as those in ubiquitination, aminopeptidases and MHC class I presentation molecules like ERAP-1 were also reported. Moreover, epigenetic modifications occurred in AS has been summarized. Taken together, the findings presented in this review attempt to explain the circumstance by which both genetic variations and epigenetic modifications are involved in triggering and development of AS. Nonetheless, several unanswered dark sides continue to clog our exhaustive understanding of AS. Future researches in the field of epigenetics should be carried out to extend our vision of AS etiopathogenesis.

  15. Ethics in Prevention Science Involving Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Celia B.; Harrington, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    The Human Genome Project and rapid technological advances in genomics have begun to enrich prevention science’s contributions to understanding the role of genetic factors in the etiology, onset and escalation of mental disorders, allowing for more precise descriptions of the interplay between genetic and non-genetic influences. Understanding ethical challenges associated with the integration of genetic data into prevention science has not kept pace with the rapid increase in the collection and storage of genetic data and dissemination of research results. This article discusses ethical issues associated with (1) decisions to withhold or disclose personal genetic information to participants; (2) implications of recruitment and data collection methods that may reveal genetic information of family members; and the (3) nature and timing of informed consent. These issues are presented within the contexts of adult and pediatric research, longitudinal studies, and use of biobanks for storage of genetic materials. Recommendations for research ethics decision-making are provided. The article concludes with a section on justice and research burdens and the unique ethical responsibilities of prevention scientists to ensure the new genomic science protects the informational rights of participants, their families and communities. PMID:23354905

  16. The social and economic impact of biofortification through genetic modification.

    PubMed

    De Steur, Hans; Demont, Matty; Gellynck, Xavier; Stein, Alexander J

    2017-02-20

    Genetic modification (GM) has been advocated as an alternative or complement to micronutrient interventions such as supplementation, fortification or dietary diversification. While proof-of-concept of various GM biofortified crops looks promising, the decision tree of policy makers is much more complex, and requires insight on their socio-economic impacts: Will it actually work? Is it financially sound? Will people accept it? Can it be implemented in a globalized world? This review shows that GM biofortification could effectively reduce the burden of micronutrient deficiencies, in an economically viable way, and is generally well received by target beneficiaries, despite some resistance and uncertainty. Practically, however, protectionist and/or unscientific regulations in some developed countries raise the (perceived) bar for implementation in target countries.

  17. Human Handedness: More Evidence for Genetic Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreth, Langdon E.

    1980-01-01

    A series of environmental-genetical analyses of the left-handedness of 1,950 college students indicates that left-handedness is familial: it is more frequent in families in which at least one parent is left-handed. (Author/CM)

  18. Genetics studies involving Swiss needle cast.

    Treesearch

    R. Johnson; F. Temel; K. Jayawickrama

    2002-01-01

    Three studies were analyzed this year that examined genetic aspects of Swiss needle cast (SNC) tolerance . Families sampled across the Siuslaw National forest showed differences in foliage health traits, but very little of the variation could be explained by environmental or climatic conditions at the parent tree location. Five test sites of the Nehalem series of...

  19. Genetic modification of cerebral arterial wall: implications for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Anantha; Santhanam, R; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-10-01

    Genetic modification of cerebral vessels represents a promising and novel approach for prevention and/or treatment of various cerebral vascular disorders, including cerebral vasospasm. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of the use of gene transfer to the cerebral arteries for prevention and/or treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We also discuss the recent developments in vascular therapeutics, involving the autologous use of progenitor cells for repair of damaged vessels, as well as a cell-based gene delivery approach for the prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

  20. Genetic modification of stem cells for cardiac, diabetic, and hemophilia transplantation therapies.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M Ian; Tang, Yaoliang

    2012-01-01

    Gene modification of stem cells prior to their transplantation enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the famous Trojan horse, the gene-modified cell has to gain entrance into the host's walls and survive to deliver its transgene products. Using cellular, molecular, and gene manipulation techniques, the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia, and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves construction of functional gene sequences and their insertion into stem cells. The modifications can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell-specific promoters, and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and nonviral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene-modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hemophilia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. QTL involved in the modification of cyanidin compounds in black and red raspberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Bushakra, J M; Krieger, C; Deng, D; Stephens, M J; Allan, A C; Storey, R; Symonds, V V; Stevenson, D; McGhie, T; Chagné, D; Buck, E J; Gardiner, S E

    2013-03-01

    Fruit from Rubus species are highly valued for their flavor and nutritive qualities. Anthocyanin content contributes to these qualities, and although many studies have been conducted to identify and quantify the major anthocyanin compounds from various Rubus species, the genetic control of the accumulation of these complex traits in Rubus is not yet well understood. The identification of the regions of the genome involved in the production of anthocyanins is an important first step in identifying the genes underlying their expression. In this study, ultra and high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC and HPLC) and two newly developed Rubus linkage maps were used to conduct QTL analyses to explore the presence of associations between concentrations of five anthocyanins in fruit and genotype. In total, 27 QTL were identified on the Rubus linkage maps, four of which are associated with molecular markers designed from transcription factors and three of which are associated with molecular markers designed from anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway candidate genes. The results of this study suggest that, while QTL for anthocyanin accumulation have been identified on six of seven Rubus linkage groups (RLG), the QTL on RLG2 and RLG7 may be very important for genetic control of cyanidin modification in Rubus.

  2. Advances in genetic modification of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Andrew; Lakshmipathy, Uma

    2013-11-15

    Genetically engineered stem cells aid in dissecting basic cell function and are valuable tools for drug discovery, in vivo cell tracking, and gene therapy. Gene transfer into pluripotent stem cells has been a challenge due to their intrinsic feature of growing in clusters and hence not amenable to common gene delivery methods. Several advances have been made in the rapid assembly of DNA elements, optimization of culture conditions, and DNA delivery methods. This has lead to the development of viral and non-viral methods for transient or stable modification of cells, albeit with varying efficiencies. Most methods require selection and clonal expansion that demand prolonged culture and are not suited for cells with limited proliferative potential. Choosing the right platform based on preferred length, strength, and context of transgene expression is a critical step. Random integration of the transgene into the genome can be complicated due to silencing or altered regulation of expression due to genomic effects. An alternative to this are site-specific methods that target transgenes followed by screening to identify the genomic loci that support long-term expression with stem cell proliferation and differentiation. A highly precise and accurate editing of the genome driven by homology can be achieved using traditional methods as well as the newer technologies such as zinc finger nuclease, TAL effector nucleases and CRISPR. In this review, we summarize the different genetic engineering methods that have been successfully used to create modified embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools.

  4. Structural modification of polysaccharides: A biochemical-genetic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Petersen, Gene R.

    1991-01-01

    Polysaccharides have a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. An industry trend is underway towards the increased use of bacteria to produce polysaccharides. Long term goals of this work are the adaptation and enhancement of saccharide properties for electronic and optic applications. In this report we illustrate the application of enzyme-bearing bacteriophage on strains of the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae, which produces a polysaccharide with the relatively rare rheological property of drag-reduction. This has resulted in the production of new polysaccharides with enhanced rheological properties. Our laboratory is developing techniques for processing and structurally modifying bacterial polysaccharides and oligosaccharides which comprise their basic polymeric repeat units. Our research has focused on bacteriophage which produce specific polysaccharide degrading enzymes. This has lead to the development of enzymes generated by bacteriophage as tools for polysaccharide modification and purification. These enzymes were used to efficiently convert the native material to uniform-sized high molecular weight polymers, or alternatively into high-purity oligosaccharides. Enzyme-bearing bacteriophage also serve as genetic selection tools for bacteria that produce new families of polysaccharides with modified structures.

  5. A methodology for markerless genetic modifications in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, L J; Knutson, C M; Barney, B M

    2016-06-01

    Efficient manipulation of multiple regions within a genome can be improved by counter-selection approaches. In this work, we sought to develop a method to manipulate Azotobacter vinelandii using a counter-selection approach based on the presence of the pyrF gene. A background uracil auxotroph of A. vinelandii was first constructed by deleting the pyrF gene coding orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase. The pyrF gene and promoter were also incorporated together with an antibiotic marker to create a selection and counter-selection cassette to shuttle into various plasmids. The constructed cassette could then be removed using a plasmid lacking the pyrF gene via counter-selection resulting from the production of 5-fluorouracil. The process could be repeated multiple times using the same procedure for selection and counter-selection. Following completion, the pyrF gene may be reintroduced to the genome in its original location, leaving a completed strain devoid of any antibiotic markers. Utilization of the pyrF gene for counter-selection is a powerful tool that can be used effectively to make multiple gene deletions in A. vinelandii. This study demonstrates the successful application of a counter-selection approach to yield markerless genetic modifications to A. vinelandii, which should be of interest for a range of applications in this important model bacterium. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Genetic modification of plant metabolism for human health benefits.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kevin M

    2007-09-01

    There has been considerable research progress over the past decade on elucidating biosynthetic pathways for important human health components of crops. This has enabled the use of genetic modification (GM) techniques to develop crop varieties with increased amounts of essential vitamins and minerals, and improved profiles of 'nutraceutical' compounds. Much of the research into vitamins and minerals has focused on generating new varieties of staple crops to improve the diet of populations in developing nations. Of particular note is the development of new rice lines with increased amounts of provitamin A and iron. Research on modifying production of nutraceuticals has generally been aimed at generating new crops for markets in the developed nations, commonly to deliver distinctive cultivars with high consumer appeal. Most progress on nutraceuticals has been made with just a few types of metabolites to date, in particular in the production of novel long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in oil-seed crops and to increase amounts of flavonoids and carotenoids in tomato and potato. However, given the rapid progress on elucidating plant metabolite biosynthetic pathways, wide-ranging success with metabolic engineering for levels of human health-related compounds in plants would be expected in the near future. A key aspect for future success will be better medical information to guide metabolic engineering endeavors. Although the desired levels of many vitamins are known, detailed information is lacking for most of the nutraceuticals that have attracted much interest over the past few years.

  7. Generation and genetic modification of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schambach, Axel; Cantz, Tobias; Baum, Christopher; Cathomen, Toni

    2010-07-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) enabled by exogenous expression of the canonical Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc reprogramming factors has opened new ways to create patient- or disease-specific pluripotent cells. iPSCs represent an almost inexhaustible source of cells for targeted differentiation into somatic effector cells and hence are likely to be invaluable for therapeutic applications and disease-related research. After an introduction on the biology of reprogramming we cover emerging technological advances, including new reprogramming approaches, small-molecule compounds and tailored genetic modification, and give an outlook towards potential clinical applications of iPSCs. Although this field is progressing rapidly, reprogramming is still an inefficient process. The reader will learn about innovative tools to generate patient-specific iPSCs and how to modify these established lines in a safe way. Ideally, the disease-causing mutation is edited directly in the genome using novel technologies based on artificial nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases. Human iPSCs create fascinating options with regard to disease modeling, drug testing, developmental studies and therapeutic applications. However, important hurdles have to be taken and more efficient protocols to be established to achieve the ambitious goal of bringing iPSCs into clinical use.

  8. Genetic modification of stem cells to enhance bone repair.

    PubMed

    Gamradt, Seth C; Lieberman, Jay R

    2004-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons are often faced with difficult bone loss problems. Conventional bone grafting is usually accomplished with autogenous iliac crest bone graft that provides osteogenic cells, osteoinductive growth factors, and an osteoconductive matrix. Cadaveric bone allograft and bone graft substitutes are inferior to autogenous bone graft because they fail to supply osteogenic cells or a significant amount of osteoinductive growth factors. Recombinant growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteogenic protein-1 are currently in clinical use but these proteins require supraphysiologic dosing and considerable expense while failing to provide a sustained osteoinductive signal at the implantation site. Mesenchymal stem cells capable of differentiating into mesodermal tissues have been isolated and expanded in culture from several different sources including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and muscle. In the presence of appropriate growth factors these cells can differentiate into osteoblast lineage cells that will form bone in vitro and in vivo. Recent attention has focused on genetic modification of mesenchymal stem cells to both produce and respond to osteogenic growth factors with the goal of developing a tissue engineering strategy for bone repair. This review examines the current potential and limitations of these cellular systems for bone repair.

  9. Genetic Modification of Oncolytic Newcastle Disease Virus for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xing; Wang, Weijia; Xu, Qi; Harper, James; Carroll, Danielle; Galinski, Mark S; Suzich, JoAnn; Jin, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Clinical development of a mesogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as an oncolytic agent for cancer therapy has been hampered by its select agent status due to its pathogenicity in avian species. Using reverse genetics, we have generated a lead candidate oncolytic NDV based on the mesogenic NDV-73T strain that is no longer classified as a select agent for clinical development. This recombinant NDV has a modification at the fusion protein (F) cleavage site to reduce the efficiency of F protein cleavage and an insertion of a 198-nucleotide sequence into the HN-L intergenic region, resulting in reduced viral gene expression and replication in avian cells but not in mammalian cells. In mammalian cells, except for viral polymerase (L) gene expression, viral gene expression is not negatively impacted or increased by the HN-L intergenic insertion. Furthermore, the virus can be engineered to express a foreign gene while still retaining the ability to grow to high titers in cell culture. The recombinant NDV selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells and is able to drive potent tumor growth inhibition following intratumoral or intravenous administration in a mouse tumor model. The candidate is well positioned for clinical development as an oncolytic virus. Avian paramyxovirus type 1, NDV, has been an attractive oncolytic agent for cancer virotherapy. However, this virus can cause epidemic disease in poultry, and concerns about the potential environmental and economic impact of an NDV outbreak have precluded its clinical development. Here we describe generation and characterization of a highly potent oncolytic NDV variant that is unlikely to cause Newcastle disease in its avian host, representing an essential step toward moving NDV forward as an oncolytic agent. Several attenuation mechanisms have been genetically engineered into the recombinant NDV that reduce chicken pathogenicity to a level that is acceptable worldwide without impacting viral production in

  10. On the genetic modification of psychology, personality, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Neitzke, Alex B

    2012-12-01

    I argue that the use of heritable modifications for psychology, personality, and behavior should be limited to the reversal or prevention of relatively unambiguous instances of pathology or likely harm (e.g. sociopathy). Most of the likely modifications of psychological personality would not be of this nature, however, and parents therefore should not have the freedom to make such modifications to future children. I argue by examining the viewpoints of both the individual and society. For individuals, modifications would interfere with their capacity for self-determination in a way that undermines the very concept of self-determination. I argue that modification of psychology and personality is unlike present parenting in morally significant ways. For society, modification offers a medium for power to manipulate the makeup of persons and populations, possibly causing biological harm to the species and altering our conceptions of social responsibility.

  11. An Efficient Electroporation Protocol for the Genetic Modification of Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chicaybam, Leonardo; Barcelos, Camila; Peixoto, Barbara; Carneiro, Mayra; Limia, Cintia Gomez; Redondo, Patrícia; Lira, Carla; Paraguassú-Braga, Flávio; Vasconcelos, Zilton Farias Meira De; Barros, Luciana; Bonamino, Martin Hernán

    2017-01-01

    Genetic modification of cell lines and primary cells is an expensive and cumbersome approach, often involving the use of viral vectors. Electroporation using square-wave generating devices, like Lonza’s Nucleofector, is a widely used option, but the costs associated with the acquisition of electroporation kits and the transient transgene expression might hamper the utility of this methodology. In the present work, we show that our in-house developed buffers, termed Chicabuffers, can be efficiently used to electroporate cell lines and primary cells from murine and human origin. Using the Nucleofector II device, we electroporated 14 different cell lines and also primary cells, like mesenchymal stem cells and cord blood CD34+, providing optimized protocols for each of them. Moreover, when combined with sleeping beauty-based transposon system, long-term transgene expression could be achieved in all types of cells tested. Transgene expression was stable and did not interfere with CD34+ differentiation to committed progenitors. We also show that these buffers can be used in CRISPR-mediated editing of PDCD1 gene locus in 293T and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The optimized protocols reported in this study provide a suitable and cost-effective platform for the genetic modification of cells, facilitating the widespread adoption of this technology. PMID:28168187

  12. Construction of integrative plasmids suitable for genetic modification of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; Dos Anjos, Rute Salgues Gueiros; Basilio, Anna Carla Moreira; Leal, Guilherme Felipe Carvalho; Simões, Diogo Ardaillon; de Morais, Marcos A

    2013-01-01

    The development of efficient tools for genetic modification of industrial yeast strains is one of the challenges that face the use of recombinant cells in industrial processes. In this study, we examine how the construction of two complementary integrative vectors can fulfill the major requirements of industrial recombinant yeast strains: the use of lactose assimilation genes as a food-grade yeast selection marker, and a system of integration that does not leave hazardous genes in the host genome and involves minimal interference in the yeast physiology. The pFB plasmid set was constructed to co-integrate both LAC4-based and LAC12-based cassettes into the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus to allow yeast cells to be selected in lactose medium. This phenotype can also be used to trace the recombinant cells in the environment by simply being plated on X-gal medium. The excisable trait of the LAC12 marker allows the introduction of many different heterologous genes, and makes it possible to introduce a complete heterologous metabolic pathway. The cloned heterologous genes can be highly expressed under the strong and constitutive TPI1 gene promoter, which can be exchanged for easy digestion of enzymes if necessary. This platform was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae JP1 industrial strain where a recombinant with high stability of markers was produced without any change in the yeast physiology. Thus, it proved to be an efficient tool for the genetic modification of industrial strains.

  13. Attitudes Toward Genetic Modification Research: An Analysis of the Views of the Sputnik Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon D.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing data from the 1977 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) survey of young adults, summarizes attitudes toward genetic modification research and the demographic, educational, and occupational correlates of these attitudes. (Author/SK)

  14. Genetic Modification in Dedicated Bioenergy Crops and Strategies for Gene Confinement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic modification of dedicated bioenergy crops is in its infancy; however, there are numerous advantages to the use of these tools to improve crops used for biofuels. Potential improved traits through genetic engineering (GE) include herbicide resistance, pest, drought, cold and salt tolerance, l...

  15. A CRISPR New World: Attitudes in the Public toward Innovations in Human Genetic Modification

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Steven M.; Badgio, Daniel; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2017-01-01

    The potential to genetically modify human germlines has reached a critical tipping point with recent applications of CRISPR-Cas9. Even as researchers, clinicians, and ethicists weigh the scientific and ethical repercussions of these advances, we know virtually nothing about public attitudes on the topic. Understanding such attitudes will be critical to determining the degree of broad support there might be for any public policy or regulation developed for genetic modification research. To fill this gap, we gave an online survey to a large (2,493 subjects) and diverse sample of Americans. Respondents supported genetic modification research, although demographic variables influenced these attitudes—conservatives, women, African-Americans, and older respondents, while supportive, were more cautious than liberals, men, other ethnicities, and younger respondents. Support was also was slightly muted when the risks (unanticipated mutations and possibility of eugenics) were made explicit. The information about genetic modification was also presented as contrasting vignettes, using one of five frames: genetic editing, engineering, hacking, modification, or surgery. Despite the fact that the media and academic use of frames describing the technology varies, these frames did not influence people’s attitudes. These data contribute a current snapshot of public attitudes to inform policy with regard to human genetic modification. PMID:28589120

  16. A CRISPR New World: Attitudes in the Public toward Innovations in Human Genetic Modification.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Steven M; Badgio, Daniel; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2017-01-01

    The potential to genetically modify human germlines has reached a critical tipping point with recent applications of CRISPR-Cas9. Even as researchers, clinicians, and ethicists weigh the scientific and ethical repercussions of these advances, we know virtually nothing about public attitudes on the topic. Understanding such attitudes will be critical to determining the degree of broad support there might be for any public policy or regulation developed for genetic modification research. To fill this gap, we gave an online survey to a large (2,493 subjects) and diverse sample of Americans. Respondents supported genetic modification research, although demographic variables influenced these attitudes-conservatives, women, African-Americans, and older respondents, while supportive, were more cautious than liberals, men, other ethnicities, and younger respondents. Support was also was slightly muted when the risks (unanticipated mutations and possibility of eugenics) were made explicit. The information about genetic modification was also presented as contrasting vignettes, using one of five frames: genetic editing, engineering, hacking, modification, or surgery. Despite the fact that the media and academic use of frames describing the technology varies, these frames did not influence people's attitudes. These data contribute a current snapshot of public attitudes to inform policy with regard to human genetic modification.

  17. Chapter 4: Genetic Identification of Fungi Involved in Wood Decay

    Treesearch

    Grant Kirker

    2014-01-01

    Wood decay is a complex process that involves contributions from molds, bacteria, decay fungi, and often insects. The first step in the accurate diagnosis of decay is identification of the causal agents, but wood decay in the strictest sense (white and brown rot) is caused by cryptic fungal species that are very difficult to identify using traditional methods. Genetic...

  18. When gene medication is also genetic modification--regulating DNA treatment.

    PubMed

    Foss, Grethe S; Rogne, Sissel

    2007-07-26

    The molecular methods used in DNA vaccination and gene therapy resemble in many ways the methods applied in genetic modification of organisms. In some regulatory regimes, this creates an overlap between 'gene medication' and genetic modification. In Norway, an animal injected with plasmid DNA, in the form of DNA vaccine or gene therapy, currently is viewed as being genetically modified for as long as the added DNA is present in the animal. However, regulating a DNA-vaccinated animal as genetically modified creates both regulatory and practical challenges. It is also counter-intuitive to many biologists. Since immune responses can be elicited also to alter traits, the borderline between vaccination and the modification of properties is no longer distinct. In this paper, we discuss the background for the Norwegian interpretation and ways in which the regulatory challenge can be handled.

  19. Web application for genetic modification flux with database to estimate metabolic fluxes of genetic mutants.

    PubMed

    Mohd Ali, Noorlin; Tsuboi, Ryo; Matsumoto, Yuta; Koishi, Daisuke; Inoue, Kentaro; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kurata, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Computational analysis of metabolic fluxes is essential in understanding the structure and function of a metabolic network and in rationally designing genetically modified mutants for an engineering purpose. We had presented the genetic modification flux (GMF) that predicts the flux distribution of a broad range of genetically modified mutants. To enhance the feasibility and usability of GMF, we have developed a web application with a metabolic network database to predict a flux distribution of genetically modified mutants. One hundred and twelve data sets of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Chinese hamster ovary were registered as standard models.

  20. Avenues for genetic modification of radiation use efficiency in wheat.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, M P; van Ginkel, M; Ribaut, J M

    2000-02-01

    Radiation use efficiency (RUE) of a crop is a function of several interacting physiological phenomena, each of which can be tackled independently from the point of view of genetic improvement. Although wheat breeding has not raised RUE substantially, theoretical calculations suggest room for improvement. Selection for higher rates of leaf photosynthesis at saturating light intensities (Amax) has not resulted in improved RUE of crops, perhaps in part because most leaves in a canopy are not light-saturated. However, higher Amax may be observed as a pleiotropic effect of other yield-enhancing genes (e.g. genes for reduced height). Genetic transformation of Rubisco to double its specificity for CO2 would theoretically increase Amax by perhaps 20%, and some evidence suggests that photosynthesis at sub-saturating light intensities would also be improved. However, photo-protection may be jeopardized if capacity for oxygenase activity is impaired. Photosynthetic rate of the whole eanopy can be enhanced by manipulation of leaf angle, which is under relatively simple genetic control, and possibly by manipulating leaf-N distribution throughout the canopy. Genetic diversity for adaptation of lower canopy leaves (e.g. changes in chlorophyll a:b ratio) to reduced light intensity observed in some crops needs to be investigated in wheat. Improved RUE may be achieved by increasing sink demand (i.e. kernel number) if excess photosynthetic capacity exists during grain filling, as suggested by a number of studies in which source-sink balance was manipulated. Some evidence suggests that improved sink strength may be achieved by lengthening the duration of the period for juvenile spike growth. Balancing source- and sink-strength is a complex genetic challenge since a crop will change between source and sink limitation as conditions vary during the day, and with phenological stage. Improved RUE will be partly a function of a genotype's ability to buffer itself against changes in its

  1. Genetic modification of the diarrhoeal pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Pawlowic, Mattie C; Sateriale, Adam; Brooks, Carrie F; Studstill, Caleb J; Bar-Peled, Yael; Cipriano, Michael J; Striepen, Boris

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies into the global causes of severe diarrhoea in young children have identified the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium as the second most important diarrhoeal pathogen after rotavirus. Diarrhoeal disease is estimated to be responsible for 10.5% of overall child mortality. Cryptosporidium is also an opportunistic pathogen in the contexts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-caused AIDS and organ transplantation. There is no vaccine and only a single approved drug that provides no benefit for those in gravest danger: malnourished children and immunocompromised patients. Cryptosporidiosis drug and vaccine development is limited by the poor tractability of the parasite, which includes a lack of systems for continuous culture, facile animal models, and molecular genetic tools. Here we describe an experimental framework to genetically modify this important human pathogen. We established and optimized transfection of C. parvum sporozoites in tissue culture. To isolate stable transgenics we developed a mouse model that delivers sporozoites directly into the intestine, a Cryptosporidium clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, and in vivo selection for aminoglycoside resistance. We derived reporter parasites suitable for in vitro and in vivo drug screening, and we evaluated the basis of drug susceptibility by gene knockout. We anticipate that the ability to genetically engineer this parasite will be transformative for Cryptosporidium research. Genetic reporters will provide quantitative correlates for disease, cure and protection, and the role of parasite genes in these processes is now open to rigorous investigation.

  2. Transgenic crops: the present state and new ways of genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Szabala, Bartosz M; Osipowski, Pawel; Malepszy, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic crops were first commercialised almost 20 years ago, which makes it a good opportunity to reflect on this technology. In this review, we compare its status with the predictions included in Vasil's forecast published in 2002. Our analysis shows that science has provided a wide range of possibilities to modify different traits in plants, yet the economy benefits from that range to very different extents. We also point out the most important constituents of the technology development involving methodology improvement and novel traits expressed in varieties introduced into agriculture. Using native genes (or their elements) in transgenes, accumulating previously produced transgenes to cascade resistance and using herbicide resistance as a selectable marker have been considered typical of novel genetically modified (GM) plant varieties. A vast portion of the novelties in stacked varieties is doubtful in terms of EU regulations. Attention has also been directed to completely novel methodology solutions that hold out the prospect of a more comprehensive use of genetic modification in agriculture as a whole, and, particularly, make its use possible in the EU and even in sustainable agriculture.

  3. Powerful tools for genetic modification: Advances in gene editing.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Erica A; Drumm, Mitchell L

    2017-09-27

    Recent discoveries and technical advances in genetic engineering, methods called gene or genome editing, provide hope for repairing genes that cause diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF) or otherwise altering a gene for therapeutic benefit. There are both hopes and hurdles with these technologies, with new ideas emerging almost daily. Initial studies using intestinal organoid cultures carrying the common, F508del mutation have shown that gene editing by CRISPR/Cas9 can convert cells lacking CFTR function to cells with normal channel function, providing a precedent that this technology can be harnessed for CF. While this is an important precedent, the challenges that remain are not trivial. A logistical issue for this and many other genetic diseases is genetic heterogeneity. Approximately, 2000 mutations associated with CF have been found in CFTR, the gene responsible for CF, and thus a feasible strategy that would encompass all individuals affected by the disease is particularly difficult to envision. However, single strategies that would be applicable to all subjects affected by CF have been conceived and are being investigated. With all of these approaches, efficiency (the proportion of cells edited), accuracy (how often other sites in the genome are affected), and delivery of the gene editing components to the desired cells are perhaps the most significant, impending hurdles. Our understanding of each of these areas is increasing rapidly, and while it is impossible to predict when a successful strategy will reach the clinic, there is every reason to believe it is a question of "when" and not "if." © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Genetic modification of corneal neovascularization in Dstncorn1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami-Schulz, Sharolyn V.; Sattler, Shannon G.; Doebley, Anna-Lisa; Ikeda, Akihiro; Ikeda, Sakae

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for destrin (Dstn), an actin depolymerizing factor, lead to corneal abnormalities in mice. A null mutation in Dstn, termed Dstncorn1, isolated and maintained in the A.BY background (A.BY Dstncorn1), results in corneal epithelial hyperproliferation, inflammation and neovascularization. We previously reported that neovascularization in the cornea of Dstncorn1 on the C57BL/6 background (B6.A.BY-Dstncorn1) mice is significantly reduced when compared to A.BY Dstncorn1 mice, suggesting the existence of genetic modifier(s). The purpose of this study is to identify the genetic basis of difference in cornea neovascularization between A.BY Dstncorn1 and B6.A.BY-Dstncorn1 mice. We generated N2 mice for a whole genome scan by backcrossing F1 progeny (A.BY Dstncorn1 X B6.A.BY-Dstncorn1) to B6.A.BY-Dstncorn1 mice. N2 progeny were quantitatively phenotyped for the extent of corneal neovascularization and genotyped for markers across the mouse genome. We identified significant association of variability in corneal neovascularization with a locus on chromosome 3 (Chr3). The validity of identified quantitative trait locus (QTL) was tested using B6 consomic mice carrying Chr3 from A/J mice. Dstncorn1 mice from F1 and F2 intercrosses (B6.A.BY- Dstncorn1 x C57BL/6J-Chr 3A/J/NaJ) were phenotyped for the extent of corneal neovascularization. This analysis showed that mice carrying the A/J allele at the QTL show significantly increased neovascularization. Our results indicate the existence of a modifier that genetically interacts with the Dstn gene. This modifier demonstrates allelic differences between C57BL6 and A.BY or A/J. The modifier is sufficient to increase neovascularization in Dstncorn1 mice. PMID:23929036

  5. Prospects for reducing fumonisin contamination of maize through genetic modification.

    PubMed Central

    Duvick, J

    2001-01-01

    Fumonisins (FB) are mycotoxins found in (italic)Fusarium verticillioides-infected maize grain worldwide. Attention has focused on FBs because of their widespread occurrence, acute toxicity to certain livestock, and their potential carcinogenicity. FBs are present at low levels in most field-grown maize but may spike to high levels depending on both the environment and genetics of the host plant. Among the strategies for reducing risk of FB contamination in maize supplied to the market, development and deployment of Fusarium ear mold-resistant maize germplasm is a high priority. Breeding for increased ear mold tolerance and reduced mycotoxin levels is being practiced today in both commercial and public programs, but the amount of resistance achievable may be limited due to complicated genetics and/or linkage to undesirable agronomic traits. Molecular markers can be employed to speed up the incorporation of chromosomal regions that have a quantitative effect on resistance (quantitative trait loci). Transgenic approaches to ear mold/mycotoxin resistance are now feasible as well. These potentially include genetically enhanced resistance to insect feeding, increased fungal resistance, and detoxification/prevention of mycotoxins in the grain. An example of the first of these approaches is already on the market, namely transgenic maize expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin, targeted to the European corn borer. Some Bt maize hybrids have the potential to reduce FB levels in field-harvested grain, presumably through reduced feeding of Bt-susceptible insects in ear tissues. However, improved ear mold resistance per se is still an important goal, as the plant will still be vulnerable to noninsect routes of entry to (italic)Fusarium. A second approach, transgene-mediated control of the ability of Fusarium to infect and colonize the ear, could potentially be achieved through overexpression of specific antifungal proteins and metabolites, or enhancement of the plant's own

  6. Prospects for reducing fumonisin contamination of maize through genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Duvick, J

    2001-05-01

    Fumonisins (FB) are mycotoxins found in (italic)Fusarium verticillioides-infected maize grain worldwide. Attention has focused on FBs because of their widespread occurrence, acute toxicity to certain livestock, and their potential carcinogenicity. FBs are present at low levels in most field-grown maize but may spike to high levels depending on both the environment and genetics of the host plant. Among the strategies for reducing risk of FB contamination in maize supplied to the market, development and deployment of Fusarium ear mold-resistant maize germplasm is a high priority. Breeding for increased ear mold tolerance and reduced mycotoxin levels is being practiced today in both commercial and public programs, but the amount of resistance achievable may be limited due to complicated genetics and/or linkage to undesirable agronomic traits. Molecular markers can be employed to speed up the incorporation of chromosomal regions that have a quantitative effect on resistance (quantitative trait loci). Transgenic approaches to ear mold/mycotoxin resistance are now feasible as well. These potentially include genetically enhanced resistance to insect feeding, increased fungal resistance, and detoxification/prevention of mycotoxins in the grain. An example of the first of these approaches is already on the market, namely transgenic maize expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin, targeted to the European corn borer. Some Bt maize hybrids have the potential to reduce FB levels in field-harvested grain, presumably through reduced feeding of Bt-susceptible insects in ear tissues. However, improved ear mold resistance per se is still an important goal, as the plant will still be vulnerable to noninsect routes of entry to (italic)Fusarium. A second approach, transgene-mediated control of the ability of Fusarium to infect and colonize the ear, could potentially be achieved through overexpression of specific antifungal proteins and metabolites, or enhancement of the plant's own

  7. Adoptive cell therapy: genetic modification to redirect effector cell specificity.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Richard A; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2010-01-01

    Building on the principals that the adoptive transfer of T cells can lead to the regression of established tumors in humans, investigators are now further manipulating these cells using genetic engineering. Two decades of human gene transfer experiments have resulted in the translation of laboratory technology into robust clinical applications. The purpose of this review is to give the reader an introduction to the 2 major approaches being developed to redirect effector T-cell specificity. Primary human T cells can be engineered to express exogenous T-cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors directed against multiple human tumor antigens. Initial clinical trial results have demonstrated that both T-cell receptor- and chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells can be administered to cancer patients and mediate tumor regression.

  8. O-antigen modifications providing antigenic diversity of Shigella flexneri and underlying genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Knirel, Y A; Sun, Qiangzheng; Senchenkova, S N; Perepelov, A V; Shashkov, A S; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-07-01

    O-Antigens (O-specific polysaccharides) of Shigella flexneri, a primary cause of shigellosis, are distinguished by a wide diversity of chemical modifications following the oligosaccharide O-unit assembly. The present review is devoted to structural, serological, and genetic aspects of these modifications, including O-acetylation and phosphorylation with phosphoethanolamine that have been identified recently. The modifications confer the host with specific immunodeterminants (O-factors or O-antigen epitopes), which accounts for the antigenic diversity of S. flexneri considered as a virulence factor of the pathogen. Totally, 30 O-antigen variants have been recognized in these bacteria, the corresponding O-factors characterized using specific antibodies, and a significant extension of the serotyping scheme of S. flexneri on this basis is suggested. Multiple genes responsible for the O-antigen modifications and the resultant serotype conversions of S. flexneri have been identified. The genetic mechanisms of the O-antigen diversification by acquisition of mobile genetic elements, including prophages and plasmids, followed occasionally by gene mobilization and inactivation have been revealed. These findings further our understanding of the genetics and antigenicity of S. flexneri and assist control of shigellosis.

  9. Gene Flow in Genetically Engineered Perennial Grasses: Lessons for Modification of Dedicated Bioenergy Crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic modification of dedicated bioenergy crops, such as switchgrass, will play a major role in crop improvement for a wide range of beneficial traits specific to biofuels. One obstacle that arises regarding transgenic improvement of perennials used for biofuels is the propensity of these plants t...

  10. Are genetic variants for tobacco smoking associated with cannabis involvement?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T; Kapoor, Manav; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Edenberg, Howard J; Schuckit, Marc; Brooks, Andrew; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Saccone, Nancy; Tischfield, Jay; Bierut, Laura J

    2015-05-01

    Cannabis users are highly likely to also be tobacco cigarette smokers and a proportion of this comorbidity is attributable to shared genetic influences. Three large meta-analyses of genomewide association studies (GWAS) of tobacco smoking have identified multiple genomewide significant (p<5×10(-8)) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We examine whether these SNPs are associated with tobacco smoking and with cannabis involvement in an independent sample. Eleven SNPs associated with cigarettes per day (CPD), ever versus never smoking and current smoking/smoking cessation at p<5×10(-8) were selected from three published meta-analyses. Association analyses were conducted with similar tobacco smoking measures in 2716 European-American subjects from the Study of Addictions Genes and Environment (SAGE) and with lifetime and current cannabis use and DSM-IV cannabis abuse/dependence. Cannabis use and tobacco smoking correlated at 0.54. Rs16969968 in CHRNA5 (and its proxy, rs1051730 in CHRNA3) and rs1451240, a proxy for rs13280604 in CHRNB3, were associated with CPD after Bonferroni correction (p<0.006). rs1451240 was also associated with DSM-IV cannabis abuse/dependence. Rs6265 in BDNF was associated with smoking initiation, as in the original meta-analysis and also with lifetime cannabis use. Associations with cannabis involvement were no longer significant upon adjustment for the tobacco smoking measures. The modest associations between cannabis involvement and SNPs for tobacco smoking were not independent of the comorbidity between tobacco and cannabis involvement. Larger samples of individuals might be required to articulate the specific genetic architecture of cannabis involvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Linking the genetic architecture of cytosine modifications with human complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Moen, Erika L.; Liu, Cong; Mu, Wenbo; Gamazon, Eric R.; Delaney, Shannon M.; Wing, Claudia; Godley, Lucy A.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual variation in cytosine modifications could contribute to heterogeneity in disease risks and other complex traits. We assessed the genetic architecture of cytosine modifications at 283 540 CpG sites in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from independent samples of European and African descent. Our study suggests that cytosine modification variation was primarily controlled in local by single major modification quantitative trait locus (mQTL) and additional minor loci. Local genetic epistasis was detectable for a small proportion of CpG sites, which were enriched by more than 9-fold for CpG sites mapped to population-specific mQTL. Genetically dependent CpG sites whose modification levels negatively (repressive sites) or positively (facilitative sites) correlated with gene expression levels significantly co-localized with transcription factor binding, with the repressive sites predominantly associated with active promoters whereas the facilitative sites rarely at active promoters. Genetically independent repressive or facilitative sites preferentially modulated gene expression variation by influencing local chromatin accessibility, with the facilitative sites primarily antagonizing H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 deposition. In comparison with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), mQTL detected from LCLs were enriched in associations for a broader range of disease categories including chronic inflammatory, autoimmune and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that cytosine modification variation, while possesses a degree of cell linage specificity, is more stably inherited over development than gene expression variation. About 11% of unique single-nucleotide polymorphisms reported in the Genome-Wide Association Study Catalog were annotated, 78% as mQTL and 31% as eQTL in LCLs, which covered 37% of the investigated diseases/traits and provided insights to the biological mechanisms. PMID:24943591

  12. Are You Ready for [a] Roundup?--What Chemistry Has to Do with Genetic Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöpping, Bert

    2001-06-01

    Genetically modified crops are grown in most parts of the world nowadays. These transgenic plants have new properties such as herbicide tolerance or insect resistance that often cannot be introduced by conventional breeding. Using examples of very common transgenic varieties, the article explains how the knowledge of metabolic pathways and genetic information is used to design these plants and how the same knowledge is used to detect them. It reviews why detection of genetic modifications in plants has become necessary and describes the most common detection methods, from immunological assays to polymerase chain reaction and real-time detection.

  13. An Efficient and Versatile System for Visualization and Genetic Modification of Dopaminergic Neurons in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Edgar R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The brain dopaminergic (DA) system is involved in fine tuning many behaviors and several human diseases are associated with pathological alterations of the DA system such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and drug addiction. Because of its complex network integration, detailed analyses of physiological and pathophysiological conditions are only possible in a whole organism with a sophisticated tool box for visualization and functional modification. Methods & Results Here, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the tetracycline-regulated transactivator (tTA) or the reverse tetracycline-regulated transactivator (rtTA) under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, TH-tTA (tet-OFF) and TH-rtTA (tet-ON) mice, to visualize and genetically modify DA neurons. We show their tight regulation and efficient use to overexpress proteins under the control of tet-responsive elements or to delete genes of interest with tet-responsive Cre. In combination with mice encoding tet-responsive luciferase, we visualized the DA system in living mice progressively over time. Conclusion These experiments establish TH-tTA and TH-rtTA mice as a powerful tool to generate and monitor mouse models for DA system diseases. PMID:26291828

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Diversity Evolving in Helicobacter pylori Communities through Genetic Modifications in Fucosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Christina; Skoglund, Anna; Moran, Anthony P.; Annuk, Heidi; Engstrand, Lars; Normark, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the gastric mucosa of half the human population. It is one of the most genetically diverse bacterial organisms and subvariants are continuously emerging within an H. pylori population. In this study we characterized a number of single-colony isolates from H. pylori communities in various environmental settings, namely persistent human gastric infection, in vitro bacterial subcultures on agar medium, and experimental in vivo infection in mice. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen chain revealed considerable phenotypic diversity between individual cells in the studied bacterial communities, as demonstrated by size variable O-antigen chains and different levels of Lewis glycosylation. Absence of high-molecular-weight O-antigen chains was notable in a number of experimentally passaged isolates in vitro and in vivo. This phenotype was not evident in bacteria obtained from a human gastric biopsy, where all cells expressed high-molecular-weight O-antigen chains, which thus may be the preferred phenotype for H. pylori colonizing human gastric mucosa. Genotypic variability was monitored in the two genes encoding α1,3-fucosyltransferases, futA and futB, that are involved in Lewis antigen expression. Genetic modifications that could be attributable to recombination events within and between the two genes were commonly detected and created a diversity, which together with phase variation, contributed to divergent LPS expression. Our data suggest that the surrounding environment imposes a selective pressure on H. pylori to express certain LPS phenotypes. Thus, the milieu in a host will select for bacterial variants with particular characteristics that facilitate adaptation and survival in the gastric mucosa of that individual, and will shape the bacterial community structure. PMID:19043574

  15. Genetic and Environmental Factors Associated with Cannabis Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Ryan; Winstone, Jonathan MA; Agrawal, Arpana

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 50-70% of the variation in cannabis use and use disorders can be attributed to heritable factors. For cannabis use, the remaining variance can be parsed in to familial and person-specific environmental factors while for use disorders, only the latter contribute. While numerous candidate gene studies have identified the role of common variation influencing liability to cannabis involvement, replication has been elusive. To date, no genomewide association study has been sufficiently powered to identify significant loci. Despite this, studies adopting polygenic techniques and integrating genetic variation with neural phenotypes and measures of environmental risk, such as childhood adversity, are providing promising new leads. It is likely that the small effect sizes associated with variants related to cannabis involvement will only be robustly identified in substantially larger samples. Results of such large-scale efforts will provide valuable single variant targets for translational research in neurogenetic, pharmacogenetic and non-human animal models as well as polygenic risk indices that can be used to explore a host of other genetic hypotheses related to cannabis use and misuse. PMID:27642547

  16. A posttranslational modification cascade involving p38, Tip60, and PRAK mediates oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Seit-Nebi, Alim; Han, Xuemei; Aslanian, Aaron; Tat, John; Liao, Rong; Yates, John R; Sun, Peiqing

    2013-06-06

    Oncogene-induced senescence is an important tumor-suppressing defense mechanism. However, relatively little is known about the signaling pathway mediating the senescence response. Here, we demonstrate that a multifunctional acetyltransferase, Tip60, plays an essential role in oncogenic ras-induced senescence. Further investigation reveals a cascade of posttranslational modifications involving p38, Tip60, and PRAK, three proteins that are essential for ras-induced senescence. Upon activation by ras, p38 induces the acetyltransferase activity of Tip60 through phosphorylation of Thr158; activated Tip60 in turn directly interacts with and induces the protein kinase activity of PRAK through acetylation of K364 in a manner that depends on phosphorylation of both Tip60 and PRAK by p38. These posttranslational modifications are critical for the prosenescent function of Tip60 and PRAK, respectively. These results have defined a signaling pathway that mediates oncogene-induced senescence, and identified posttranslational modifications that regulate the enzymatic activity and biological functions of Tip60 and PRAK.

  17. Self-association and modification of a genetically engineered polypeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Top, Ayben

    A genetically synthesized polypeptide and polyethylene glycol (5 kDa or 10 kDa) functionalized forms of its alanine-rich helical domain were characterized. The polypeptide composed of an N-terminal histidine tag, and an alanine-rich domain, denoted as 17H6, has a sequence of: MGH10 SSGHIHM(AAAQEAAAAQAAAQAEAAQAAQ)6AGGYGGMG. 17H6 was originally designed as a scaffold to investigate multivalent interactions after glycosylation through reactive glutamic acid residues. We speculated that the protonation of the glutamic acid residues in these sequences would afford facile opportunities to manipulate their folding and assembly behavior considering the beta-sheet propensities of similar polypeptides at acidic pH. Thus, in the first part of this study, thermal unfolding, reversible self-association, and irreversible aggregation of 17H6 were investigated. Dynamic light scattering, and thermal unfolding measurements indicate that 17H6 spontaneously and reversibly self-associates at an acidic pH and ambient temperature. The resulting multimers have an average hydrodynamic radius of ˜ 10-20 nm and reversibly dissociate to monomers upon an increase to pH 7.4. Both free monomer and 17H6 chains within the multimers are beta-helical and folded at ambient and sub-ambient temperatures. Reversible unfolding of the monomer occurs upon heating of solutions at pH 7.4. At pH 2.3, heating first causes incomplete dissociation and unfolding of the constituent chains. Further incubation at an elevated temperature (80°C) induces additional structural and morphological changes and results in fibrils with a beta-sheet structure and a width of 5-10 nm (7 nm mean) as observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the second part, the histidine tag, which imparts solubility to the alanine-rich domain at acidic pH was cleaved. Propionaldehyde-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules (5 kDa or 10 kDa) were attached to the N-terminus of the cleaved polypeptide, c17H6, as a

  18. Histone modifications involved in cassette exon inclusions: a quantitative and interpretable analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Jin, Ting; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2014-12-19

    Chromatin structure and epigenetic modifications have been shown to involve in the co-transcriptional splicing of RNA precursors. In particular, some studies have suggested that some types of histone modifications (HMs) may participate in the alternative splicing and function as exon marks. However, most existing studies pay attention to the qualitative relationship between epigenetic modifications and exon inclusion. The quantitative analysis that reveals to what extent each type of epigenetic modification is responsible for exon inclusion is very helpful for us to understand the splicing process. In this paper, we focus on the quantitative analysis of HMs' influence on the inclusion of cassette exons (CEs) into mature RNAs. With the high-throughput ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data obtained from ENCODE website, we modeled the association of HMs with CE inclusions by logistic regression whose coefficients are meaningful and interpretable for us to reveal the effect of each type of HM. Three type of HMs, H3K36me3, H3K9me3 and H4K20me1, were found to play major role in CE inclusions. HMs' effect on CE inclusions is conservative across cell types, and does not depend on the expression levels of the genes hosting CEs. HMs located in the flanking regions of CEs were also taken into account in our analysis, and HMs within bounded flanking regions were shown to affect moderately CE inclusions. Moreover, we also found that HMs on CEs whose length is approximately close to nucleosomal-DNA length affect greatly on CE inclusion. We suggested that a few types of HMs correlate closely to alternative splicing and perhaps function jointly with splicing machinery to regulate the inclusion level of exons. Our findings are helpful to understand HMs' effect on exon definition, as well as the mechanism of co-transcriptional splicing.

  19. Hippocampal epigenetic modification at the doublecortin gene is involved in the impairment of neurogenesis with aging.

    PubMed

    Kuzumaki, Naoko; Ikegami, Daigo; Tamura, Rie; Sasaki, Takuya; Niikura, Keiichi; Narita, Michiko; Miyashita, Kazuhiko; Imai, Satoshi; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Ando, Takayuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Narita, Minoru

    2010-08-01

    Recent research has suggested that epigenetic mechanisms, which exert lasting control over gene expression without altering the genetic code, could mediate stable changes in brain function. A growing body of evidence supports the idea that epigenetic changes play a role in the etiology of aging and its associated brain dysfunction. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the age-related changes in the expression of doublecortin, which is a marker for neuronal precursors, along with epigenetic modification in the hippocampus of aged mice. In the present study, the doublecortin-positive cells were almost completely absent from the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of 28-month-old mice. Furthermore, the expression level of doublecortin mRNA was significantly decreased in the hippocampus of aged mice. Under these conditions, a significant decrease in H3K4 trimethylation and a significant increase in H3K27 trimethylation at doublecortin promoters were observed with aging without any changes in the expression of their associated histone methylases and demethylases in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that aging produces a dramatic decrease in the expression of doublecortin along with epigenetic modifications in the hippocampus.

  20. Regulation of transcription by the Arabidopsis UVR8 photoreceptor involves a specific histone modification.

    PubMed

    Velanis, Christos N; Herzyk, Pawel; Jenkins, Gareth I

    2016-11-01

    The photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) specifically mediates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B wavelengths. UVR8 acts by regulating transcription of a set of genes, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Previous research indicated that UVR8 can associate with chromatin, but the specificity and functional significance of this interaction are not clear. Here we show, by chromatin immunoprecipitation, that UV-B exposure of Arabidopsis increases acetylation of lysines K9 and/or K14 of histone H3 at UVR8-regulated gene loci in a UVR8-dependent manner. The transcription factors HY5 and/or HYH, which mediate UVR8-regulated transcription, are also required for this chromatin modification, at least for the ELIP1 gene. Furthermore, sequencing of the immunoprecipitated DNA revealed that all UV-B-induced enrichments in H3K9,14diacetylation across the genome are UVR8-dependent, and approximately 40 % of the enriched loci contain known UVR8-regulated genes. In addition, inhibition of histone acetylation by anacardic acid reduces the UV-B induced, UVR8 mediated expression of ELIP1 and CHS. No evidence was obtained in yeast 2-hybrid assays for a direct interaction between either UVR8 or HY5 and several proteins involved in light-regulated histone modification, nor for the involvement of these proteins in UVR8-mediated responses in plants, although functional redundancy between proteins could influence the results. In summary, this study shows that UVR8 regulates a specific chromatin modification associated with transcriptional regulation of a set of UVR8-target genes.

  1. Genetic modification of the mouse: general technology - pronuclear and blastocyst injection.

    PubMed

    Voncken, Jan Willem

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of germ line mutations in mice via genetic engineering involves alterations of the structure and characteristics of genes. These alterations are mostly introduced via molecular genetic technology either in embryonal stem cells or in one-cell stage embryos. This chapter describes classic biotechnological methods used to generate mice from modified pre-implantation embryos.

  2. Advances in the Development of Gene-Targeting Vectors to Increase the Efficiency of Genetic Modification.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shinta; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting via homologous recombination, albeit highly inefficient in human cells, is considered a powerful tool for analyzing gene functions. Despite recent progress in the application of artificial nucleases for genome editing, safety issues remain a concern, particularly when genetic modification is used for therapeutic purposes. Therefore, the development of gene-targeting vectors is necessary for safe and sophisticated genetic modification. In this paper, we describe the effect of vector structure on random integration, which is a major obstacle in efficient gene targeting. In addition, we focus on the features of exon-trapping-type gene-targeting vectors, and discuss a novel strategy for negative selection to enhance gene targeting in human cells.

  3. Immune modulation by genetic modification of dendritic cells with lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Bricogne, Christopher; Lanna, Alessio; Dufait, Inès; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Laranga, Roberta; Padella, Antonella; Arce, Frederick; Baratchian, Mehdi; Ramirez, Natalia; Lopez, Natalia; Kochan, Grazyna; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Guerrero-Setas, David; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2013-09-01

    Our work over the past eight years has focused on the use of HIV-1 lentiviral vectors (lentivectors) for the genetic modification of dendritic cells (DCs) to control their functions in immune modulation. DCs are key professional antigen presenting cells which regulate the activity of most effector immune cells, including T, B and NK cells. Their genetic modification provides the means for the development of targeted therapies towards cancer and autoimmune disease. We have been modulating with lentivectors the activity of intracellular signalling pathways and co-stimulation during antigen presentation to T cells, to fine-tune the type and strength of the immune response. In the course of our research, we have found unexpected results such as the surprising immunosuppressive role of anti-viral signalling pathways, and the close link between negative co-stimulation in the immunological synapse and T cell receptor trafficking. Here we review our major findings and put them into context with other published work.

  4. Genetic Modification of Human Pancreatic Progenitor Cells Through Modified mRNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Song; Chow, Christie C; Zhou, Junwei; Leung, Po Sing; Tsui, Stephen K; Lui, Kathy O

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a highly efficient genetic modification strategy for human pancreatic progenitor cells using modified mRNA-encoding GFP and Neurogenin-3. The properties of modified mRNA offer an invaluable platform to drive protein expression, which has broad applicability in pathway regulation, directed differentiation, and lineage specification. This approach can also be used to regulate expression of other pivotal transcription factors during pancreas development and might have potential therapeutic values in regenerative medicine.

  5. Corrigendum to: Optimum profile modifications of spur gears by means of genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Marco; Bonori, Giorgio; Pellicano, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the present work is to correct some inaccuracies of the paper "Bonori, G., Barbieri, M., Pellicano, F., 2008, Optimum Profile Modifications of Spur Gears by Means of Genetic Algorithms, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 313, pp. 603-616"; in that work, the aim was the reduction of vibrations in spur gears by means of profile modifications. This goal was achieved by using an ad hoc genetic algorithm, where the objective function was the peak to peak or the harmonic content of the Static Transmission Error (STE) computed by Finite Element calculations. The efficiency in terms of vibration reduction of the optimized profile reliefs was checked using a one degree of freedom dynamic model. This dynamic model considers time varying mesh stiffness, backlash, and profile error. In the original paper the effect of intentional profile modifications was considered as part of the mesh stiffness, thus overestimating their effect in vibration reduction. In the present corrigendum, the dynamic model is updated, keeping into account profile deviations by means of an error function. Finally, the optimal profile modifications found in the original paper are checked using the updated model.

  6. Tailored HIV-1 Vectors for Genetic Modification of Primary Human Dendritic Cells and Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Turpin, Jocelyn; Cordeil, Stephanie; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Mahieux, Renaud; Lachuer, Joël; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) play a key role in the regulation of the immune system and are the target of numerous gene therapy applications. The genetic modification of MDDCs is possible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LVs) but requires high viral doses to bypass their natural resistance to viral infection, and this in turn affects their physiological properties. To date, a single viral protein is able to counter this restrictive phenotype, Vpx, a protein derived from members of the HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus SM lineage that counters at least two restriction factors present in myeloid cells. By tagging Vpx with a short heterologous membrane-targeting domain, we have obtained HIV-1 LVs incorporating high levels of this protein (HIV-1-Src-Vpx). These vectors efficiently transduce differentiated MDDCs and monocytes either as previously purified populations or as populations within unsorted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In addition, these vectors can be efficiently pseudotyped with receptor-specific envelopes, further restricting their cellular tropism almost uniquely to MDDCs. Compared to conventional HIV-1 LVs, these novel vectors allow for an efficient genetic modification of MDDCs and, more importantly, do not cause their maturation or affect their survival, which are unwanted side effects of the transduction process. This study describes HIV-1-Src-Vpx LVs as a novel potent tool for the genetic modification of differentiated MDDCs and of circulating monocyte precursors with strong potential for a wide range of gene therapy applications. PMID:23077304

  7. Stable genetic modification of human embryonic stem cells by lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Gropp, Michal; Itsykson, Pavel; Singer, Orna; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Reinhartz, Etti; Galun, Eithan; Reubinoff, Benjamin E

    2003-02-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of the early preimplantation embryo. An efficient strategy for stable genetic modification of hES cells may be highly valuable for manipulating the cells in vitro and may promote the study of hES cell biology, human embryogenesis, and the development of cell-based therapies. Here, we demonstrate that vectors derived from self-inactivating (SIN) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are efficient tools for stable genetic modification of hES cells. Transduction of hES cells by a modified vector derived from SIN HIV-1 and containing the woodchuck hepatitis regulatory element (WPRE) and the central polypurine tract (cPPT) sequence facilitated stable transgene expression during prolonged (38 weeks) undifferentiated proliferation in vitro. Southern blot analysis revealed that the viral vector had integrated into the host cells' DNA. Transgene expression was maintained throughout differentiation into progeny of all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo in teratomas. Thus, the transduced hES cells retained the capability for self-renewal and their pluripotent potential. Genetic modification of hES cells by lentiviral vectors provides a powerful tool for basic and applied research in the area of human ES cells.

  8. Genetic modification of plant cell walls to enhance biomass yield and biofuel production in bioenergy crops.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanting; Fan, Chunfen; Hu, Huizhen; Li, Ying; Sun, Dan; Wang, Youmei; Peng, Liangcai

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls represent an enormous biomass resource for the generation of biofuels and chemicals. As lignocellulose property principally determines biomass recalcitrance, the genetic modification of plant cell walls has been posed as a powerful solution. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the effects of distinct cell wall polymers (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, pectin, wall proteins) on the enzymatic digestibility of biomass under various physical and chemical pretreatments in herbaceous grasses, major agronomic crops and fast-growing trees. We also compare the main factors of wall polymer features, including cellulose crystallinity (CrI), hemicellulosic Xyl/Ara ratio, monolignol proportion and uronic acid level. Furthermore, the review presents the main gene candidates, such as CesA, GH9, GH10, GT61, GT43 etc., for potential genetic cell wall modification towards enhancing both biomass yield and enzymatic saccharification in genetic mutants and transgenic plants. Regarding cell wall modification, it proposes a novel groove-like cell wall model that highlights to increase amorphous regions (density and depth) of the native cellulose microfibrils, providing a general strategy for bioenergy crop breeding and biofuel processing technology.

  9. Tailored HIV-1 vectors for genetic modification of primary human dendritic cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Durand, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Turpin, Jocelyn; Cordeil, Stephanie; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Mahieux, Renaud; Lachuer, Joël; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Cimarelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) play a key role in the regulation of the immune system and are the target of numerous gene therapy applications. The genetic modification of MDDCs is possible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LVs) but requires high viral doses to bypass their natural resistance to viral infection, and this in turn affects their physiological properties. To date, a single viral protein is able to counter this restrictive phenotype, Vpx, a protein derived from members of the HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus SM lineage that counters at least two restriction factors present in myeloid cells. By tagging Vpx with a short heterologous membrane-targeting domain, we have obtained HIV-1 LVs incorporating high levels of this protein (HIV-1-Src-Vpx). These vectors efficiently transduce differentiated MDDCs and monocytes either as previously purified populations or as populations within unsorted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In addition, these vectors can be efficiently pseudotyped with receptor-specific envelopes, further restricting their cellular tropism almost uniquely to MDDCs. Compared to conventional HIV-1 LVs, these novel vectors allow for an efficient genetic modification of MDDCs and, more importantly, do not cause their maturation or affect their survival, which are unwanted side effects of the transduction process. This study describes HIV-1-Src-Vpx LVs as a novel potent tool for the genetic modification of differentiated MDDCs and of circulating monocyte precursors with strong potential for a wide range of gene therapy applications.

  10. Chapter VIII. Contributions of propagation techniques and genetic modification to breeding - genetic engineering for disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic engineering offers an opportunity to develop flower bulb crops with resistance to fungal, viral, and bacterial pathogens. Several of the flower bulb crops, Lilium spp., Gladiolus, Zantedeschia, Muscari, Hyacinthus, Narcissus, Ornithogalum, Iris, and Alstroemeria, have been transformed with t...

  11. Enterobacter gergoviae membrane modifications are involved in the adaptive response to preservatives used in cosmetic industry.

    PubMed

    Périamé, Marina; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Davin-Regli, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms in Enterobacter gergoviae which are involved in recurrent contaminations in cosmetic products that are incorporated with preservatives. Bacterial strains from two backgrounds were examined for a profound understanding of the mechanisms of adaptation against preservatives. It included a series of Ent. gergoviae strain-ATCC 33028 derivatives, isolated using increasing methylisothiazolinone-chloromethylisothiazolinone (MIT-CMIT) and triclosan concentrations. The other series was of Ent. gergoviae isolates from cosmetic products exhibiting MIT-CMIT and triclosan resistance. We evaluated the outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanisms activities responsible for the resistant trait via immunoblotting assays. Additionally, for understanding the efflux activity real-time efflux, experiments were performed. A cross-insusceptibility between preservatives and some disinfectants was observed in MIT-CMIT-resistant derivative isolates, but antibiotics susceptibility was not altered. Resistance to EDTA was significant in all preservatives insusceptible derivative strains, indicating modifications in the LPS layer. Furthermore, an array of real-time efflux assays indicated different activity levels while no variations were detected in porins and AcrAB-TolC pumps production. Overexpression of a specific flagellin-type protein was observed in one of the MIT-CMIT- and triclosan-resistant strains. Another candidate, a 25-kDa peroxiredoxin enzyme involved in oxidative detoxification, was identified to be overexpressed in MIT-CMIT derivative. A similar profile was also observed among strains isolated from cosmetic products. Our study highlights the existence of adaptive mechanisms such as overexpression of detoxifying enzymes, flagellin, modification of membrane structure/function in Ent. gergoviae. They might be involved in recurrent episodes of contaminations occurring in the cosmetic production

  12. Rice putative methyltransferase gene OsTSD2 is required for root development involving pectin modification

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lianghuan; Wu, Chunyan; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Yangyang; Fang, Chuanying; Jin, Cheng; Liu, Xianqing; Luo, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Pectin synthesis and modification are vital for plant development, although the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of the OsTSD2 gene, which encodes a putative methyltransferase in rice. All three independent T-DNA insertion lines of OsTSD2 displayed dwarf phenotypes and serial alterations in different zones of the root. These alterations included abnormal cellular adhesion and schizogenous aerenchyma formation in the meristematic zone, inhibited root elongation in the elongation zone, and higher lateral root density in the mature zone. Immunofluorescence (with LM19) and Ruthenium Red staining of the roots showed that unesterified homogalacturonan (HG) was increased in Ostsd2 mutants. Biochemical analysis of cell wall pectin polysaccharides revealed that both the monosaccharide composition and the uronic acid content were decreased in Ostsd2 mutants. Increased endogenous ABA content and opposite roles performed by ABA and IAA in regulating cellular adhesion in the Ostsd2 mutants suggested that OsTSD2 is required for root development in rice through a pathway involving pectin synthesis/modification. A hypothesis to explain the relationship among OsTSD2, pectin methylesterification, and root development is proposed, based on pectin’s function in regional cell extension/division in a zone-dependent manner. PMID:27497286

  13. Functional dissection of protein complexes involved in yeast chromosome biology using a genetic interaction map.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean R; Miller, Kyle M; Maas, Nancy L; Roguev, Assen; Fillingham, Jeffrey; Chu, Clement S; Schuldiner, Maya; Gebbia, Marinella; Recht, Judith; Shales, Michael; Ding, Huiming; Xu, Hong; Han, Junhong; Ingvarsdottir, Kristin; Cheng, Benjamin; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Berger, Shelley L; Hieter, Phil; Zhang, Zhiguo; Brown, Grant W; Ingles, C James; Emili, Andrew; Allis, C David; Toczyski, David P; Weissman, Jonathan S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Krogan, Nevan J

    2007-04-12

    Defining the functional relationships between proteins is critical for understanding virtually all aspects of cell biology. Large-scale identification of protein complexes has provided one important step towards this goal; however, even knowledge of the stoichiometry, affinity and lifetime of every protein-protein interaction would not reveal the functional relationships between and within such complexes. Genetic interactions can provide functional information that is largely invisible to protein-protein interaction data sets. Here we present an epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) consisting of quantitative pairwise measurements of the genetic interactions between 743 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in various aspects of chromosome biology (including DNA replication/repair, chromatid segregation and transcriptional regulation). This E-MAP reveals that physical interactions fall into two well-represented classes distinguished by whether or not the individual proteins act coherently to carry out a common function. Thus, genetic interaction data make it possible to dissect functionally multi-protein complexes, including Mediator, and to organize distinct protein complexes into pathways. In one pathway defined here, we show that Rtt109 is the founding member of a novel class of histone acetyltransferases responsible for Asf1-dependent acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56. This modification, in turn, enables a ubiquitin ligase complex containing the cullin Rtt101 to ensure genomic integrity during DNA replication.

  14. Human Genetic Evidence for Involvement of CD137 in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Söderström, Leif Å; Gertow, Karl; Folkersen, Lasse; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Sundman, Eva; Sheikine, Yuri; Goel, Anuj; Baldassarre, Damiano; Humphries, Steve E; de Faire, Ulf; Watkins, Hugh; Tremoli, Elena; Veglia, Fabrizio; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Göran K; Olofsson, Peder S

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease and the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Inflammation promotes plaque instability and clinical disease, such as myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Subclinical atherosclerosis begins with thickening of the arterial intimal layer, and increased intima-media thickness (IMT) in the carotid artery is a widely used measurement of subclinical atherosclerosis. Activation of CD137 (tumor necrosis factor receptor super family 9) promotes inflammation and disease development in murine atherosclerosis. CD137 is expressed in human atherosclerosis, but its role is largely unknown. This study uses a genetic approach to investigate CD137 in human atherosclerotic disease. In publicly available data on genotype and gene expression from the HapMap project, the minor T allele of rs2453021, a single nucleotide polymorphism in CD137, was significantly associated with CD137 gene expression. In the PROCARDIS and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) cohorts of 13,029 cases and controls, no significant association was detected between the minor T allele of rs2453021 and risk for coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction. However, in the IMPROVE multicenter study of 3,418 individuals, the minor T allele of rs2453021 was associated with increased IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA), as measured by ultrasonography, with presence of plaque in CCA and with increased incidence of adverse noncardiac vascular events. Taken together, this study shows that the minor T allele of rs2453021 is associated with increased IMT in the CCA and increased risk of incident noncardiac vascular events, thus providing the first human genetic evidence for involvement of CD137 in atherosclerosis. PMID:25032953

  15. Characterization of unknown genetic modifications using high throughput sequencing and computational subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Tengs, Torstein; Zhang, Haibo; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Bohlin, Jon; Butenko, Melinka A; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Sorteberg, Hilde-Gunn Opsahl; Berdal, Knut G

    2009-01-01

    Background When generating a genetically modified organism (GMO), the primary goal is to give a target organism one or several novel traits by using biotechnology techniques. A GMO will differ from its parental strain in that its pool of transcripts will be altered. Currently, there are no methods that are reliably able to determine if an organism has been genetically altered if the nature of the modification is unknown. Results We show that the concept of computational subtraction can be used to identify transgenic cDNA sequences from genetically modified plants. Our datasets include 454-type sequences from a transgenic line of Arabidopsis thaliana and published EST datasets from commercially relevant species (rice and papaya). Conclusion We believe that computational subtraction represents a powerful new strategy for determining if an organism has been genetically modified as well as to define the nature of the modification. Fewer assumptions have to be made compared to methods currently in use and this is an advantage particularly when working with unknown GMOs. PMID:19814792

  16. Special considerations in prognostic research in cancer involving genetic polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of genetic polymorphisms may help identify putative prognostic markers and determine the biological basis of variable prognosis in patients. However, in contrast to other variables commonly used in the prognostic studies, there are special considerations when studying genetic polymorphisms. For example, variable inheritance patterns (recessive, dominant, codominant, and additive genetic models) need to be explored to identify the specific genotypes associated with the outcome. In addition, several characteristics of genetic polymorphisms, such as their minor allele frequency and linkage disequilibrium among multiple polymorphisms, and the population substructure of the cohort investigated need to be accounted for in the analyses. In addition, in cancer research due to the genomic differences between the tumor and non-tumor DNA, differences in the genetic information obtained using these tissues need to be carefully assessed in prognostic studies. In this article, we review these and other considerations specific to genetic polymorphism by focusing on genetic prognostic studies in cancer. PMID:23773794

  17. Safety assessment considerations for food and feed derived from plants with genetic modifications that modulate endogenous gene expression and pathways.

    PubMed

    Kier, Larry D; Petrick, Jay S

    2008-08-01

    The current globally recognized comparative food and feed safety assessment paradigm for biotechnology-derived crops is a robust and comprehensive approach for evaluating the safety of both the inserted gene product and the resulting crop. Incorporating many basic concepts from food safety, toxicology, nutrition, molecular biology, and plant breeding, this approach has been used effectively by scientists and regulatory agencies for 10-15 years. Current and future challenges in agriculture include the need for improved yields, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and improved nutrition. The next generation of biotechnology-derived crops may utilize regulatory proteins, such as transcription factors that modulate gene expression and/or endogenous plant pathways. In this review, we discuss the applicability of the current safety assessment paradigm to biotechnology-derived crops developed using modifications involving regulatory proteins. The growing literature describing the molecular biology underlying plant domestication and conventional breeding demonstrates the naturally occurring genetic variation found in plants, including significant variation in the classes, expression, and activity of regulatory proteins. Specific examples of plant modifications involving insertion or altered expression of regulatory proteins are discussed as illustrative case studies supporting the conclusion that the current comparative safety assessment process is appropriate for these types of biotechnology-developed crops.

  18. Identification of Host Genes Involved in Geminivirus Infection Using a Reverse Genetics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Ana P.; Bejarano, Eduardo R.

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses, like all viruses, rely on the host cell machinery to establish a successful infection, but the identity and function of these required host proteins remain largely unknown. Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), a monopartite geminivirus, is one of the causal agents of the devastating Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD). The transgenic 2IRGFP N. benthamiana plants, used in combination with Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS), entail an important potential as a tool in reverse genetics studies to identify host factors involved in TYLCSV infection. Using these transgenic plants, we have made an accurate description of the evolution of TYLCSV replication in the host in both space and time. Moreover, we have determined that TYLCSV and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) do not dramatically influence each other when co-infected in N. benthamiana, what makes the use of TRV-induced gene silencing in combination with TYLCSV for reverse genetic studies feasible. Finally, we have tested the effect of silencing candidate host genes on TYLCSV infection, identifying eighteen genes potentially involved in this process, fifteen of which had never been implicated in geminiviral infections before. Seven of the analyzed genes have a potential anti-viral effect, whereas the expression of the other eleven is required for a full infection. Interestingly, almost half of the genes altering TYLCSV infection play a role in postranslational modifications. Therefore, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying geminivirus infections, and at the same time reveal the 2IRGFP/VIGS system as a powerful tool for functional reverse genetics studies. PMID:21818318

  19. What do individuals in different science groups within a life sciences organization think about genetic modification?

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mark; Small, Bruce; Roth, Hein; Mallon, Mary; Jerebine, Bryce

    2005-07-01

    An assessment was undertaken of the attitudes of individuals within the science community towards a program to produce genetically modified cattle for altered milk composition, expectantly allowing for research into the treatment of multiple sclerosis in humans. The majority of respondents to an electronic survey expressed favorable attitudes to the program, thought it beneficial, respected individual freedom and was fair and just and disagreed that it was harmful. A passion for science and having a suitable lifestyle were the most important motivating factors for individuals. Finally, there were a wide range of responses to a number of cultural beliefs or myths. Science grouping significantly affected the responses. Compared with Systems and Land groups, Plant and Reproduction groups more strongly agreed with the project, thought it less harmful to interest groups, felt that genetic modification of animals was more morally acceptable, and more strongly agreed with the myth statements. These results indicate a diversity of beliefs and attitudes towards genetic modification amongst those within the science community, and highlight the importance of understanding ethics and myths in dealing with them. It is suggested that the diversity of beliefs could be better used to help shape public policy and understanding of biotechnology.

  20. Genetic Modification of the Lung Directed Toward Treatment of Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Sondhi, Dolan; Stiles, Katie M; De, Bishnu P; Crystal, Ronald G

    2017-01-01

    Genetic modification therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for many diseases of the lung intractable to other treatments. Lung gene therapy has been the subject of numerous preclinical animal experiments and human clinical trials, for targets including genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and α1-antitrypsin deficiency, complex disorders such as asthma, allergy, and lung cancer, infections such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Pseudomonas, as well as pulmonary arterial hypertension, transplant rejection, and lung injury. A variety of viral and non-viral vectors have been employed to overcome the many physical barriers to gene transfer imposed by lung anatomy and natural defenses. Beyond the treatment of lung diseases, the lung has the potential to be used as a metabolic factory for generating proteins for delivery to the circulation for treatment of systemic diseases. Although much has been learned through a myriad of experiments about the development of genetic modification of the lung, more work is still needed to improve the delivery vehicles and to overcome challenges such as entry barriers, persistent expression, specific cell targeting, and circumventing host anti-vector responses.

  1. Metabolite profiling of maize kernels--genetic modification versus environmental influence.

    PubMed

    Frank, Thomas; Röhlig, Richard M; Davies, Howard V; Barros, Eugenia; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2012-03-28

    A metabolite profiling approach based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied to investigate the metabolite profiles of genetically modified (GM) Bt-maize (DKC78-15B, TXP 138F) and Roundup Ready-maize (DKC78-35R). For the comparative investigation of the impact of genetic modification versus environmental influence on the metabolite profiles, GM maize was grown together with the non-GM near-isogenic comparators under different environmental conditions, including several growing locations and seasons in Germany and South Africa. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant differences between GM and non-GM maize grown in Germany and South Africa. For the factor genotype, 4 and 3%, respectively, of the total number of peaks detected by GC-MS showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.01) in peak heights as compared to the respective isogenic lines. However, ANOVA for the factor environment (growing location, season) revealed higher numbers of significant differences (p < 0.01) between the GM and the non-GM maize grown in Germany (42%) and South Africa (10%), respectively. This indicates that the majority of differences observed are related to natural variability rather than to the genetic modifications. In addition, multivariate data assessment by means of principal component analysis revealed that environmental factors, that is, growing locations and seasons, were dominant parameters driving the variability of the maize metabolite profiles.

  2. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells as a therapy for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Younan, Patrick; Kowalski, John; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-28

    The combination of genetic modification and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation may provide the necessary means to develop an alternative treatment option to conventional antiretroviral therapy. As HSCs give rise to all hematopoietic cell types susceptible to HIV infection, modification of HSCs is an ideal strategy for the development of infection-resistant immune cell populations. Although promising results have been obtained in multiple animal models, additional evidence is needed to convincingly demonstrate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Here, we review the potential of HSC transplantation and the recently identified limitations of this approach. Using the Berlin Patient as a model for a functional cure, we contrast the confines of autologous versus allogeneic transplantation. Finally, we suggest that although autologous, gene-modified HSC-transplantation may significantly reduce plasma viremia, reaching the lower detection limits currently obtainable through daily HAART will remain a challenging endeavor that will require innovative combinatorial therapies.

  3. [New alternatives in the prevention of iron deficiency. Use of genetic engineering in food modification].

    PubMed

    García-Casal, M N

    1999-09-01

    This article reviews the possible applications of new food biotechnology techniques to introduce some compounds into plants or animals. The potential for these plant modification methods has ample applications ranging from improvements in food production and development for human consumption, production of antibodies or therapeutic proteins, inclusion of nutrients to improve nutritional value of the food to production of vaccines. It must be clear though that currently the scope and consequences of such modifications are not completely clear. There is some concern about potential secondary effects and the hypothesis of the appearance of new viruses due to recombinant genetical transformations that have not been totally rejected. However the tendency is towards considering the process as safe. Finally some evidence is presented about the possibility of introducing the capacity to synthesize vitamin A in vegetables or produce rice with high content of iron as real alternatives to fight some of the nutritional deficiencies most common worldwide.

  4. Supernatural T cells: genetic modification of T cells for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Michael H; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K

    2005-12-01

    Immunotherapy is receiving much attention as a means of treating cancer, but complete, durable responses remain rare for most malignancies. The natural immune system seems to have limitations and deficiencies that might affect its ability to control malignant disease. An alternative to relying on endogenous components in the immune repertoire is to generate lymphocytes with abilities that are greater than those of natural T cells, through genetic modification to produce 'supernatural' T cells. This Review describes how such T cells can circumvent many of the barriers that are inherent in the tumour microenvironment while optimizing T-cell specificity, activation, homing and antitumour function.

  5. Genetic modification of human embryonic stem cells for derivation of target cells.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Antonietta; Trounson, Alan

    2008-05-08

    Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may yield models to study organogenesis, produce cells and tissues for therapies, and identify clinically relevant compounds for disease treatment. Optimal conditions for specific differentiation of hESCs are still being determined. Incorporation of fluorescent reporter genes will enable high-throughput screening to identify fate-specifying molecules. Ectopic expression, or silencing, of key developmental genes can also direct differentiation toward specific lineages. Here, we briefly overview various genetic modifications used to generate useful hESC lines. We identify strengths and limitations to each method and propose the most suitable approaches for different applications.

  6. Modification of the genetic effect of gamma irradiation by electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Grigor'eva, N.N.; Shakbazov, V.G.

    1985-09-01

    The authors study the effect of direct current of varying strength and polarity on the genetic damage due to gamma irradiation of Vicia faba seedlings. The modificational effect of direct current observed earlier is confirmed here. The extent and nature of this effect depends on the strength and polarity of the current as well as interval between irradiation and exposure to the electric field. Conditions having no effect on the irradiated seedlings, those protecting the cells from damage and enhancing the irradiation effect, are identified.

  7. novPTMenzy: a database for enzymes involved in novel post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2015-01-01

    With the recent discoveries of novel post-translational modifications (PTMs) which play important roles in signaling and biosynthetic pathways, identification of such PTM catalyzing enzymes by genome mining has been an area of major interest. Unlike well-known PTMs like phosphorylation, glycosylation, SUMOylation, no bioinformatics resources are available for enzymes associated with novel and unusual PTMs. Therefore, we have developed the novPTMenzy database which catalogs information on the sequence, structure, active site and genomic neighborhood of experimentally characterized enzymes involved in five novel PTMs, namely AMPylation, Eliminylation, Sulfation, Hydroxylation and Deamidation. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the sequence and structural features of these known PTM catalyzing enzymes, we have created Hidden Markov Model profiles for the identification of similar PTM catalyzing enzymatic domains in genomic sequences. We have also created predictive rules for grouping them into functional subfamilies and deciphering their mechanistic details by structure-based analysis of their active site pockets. These analytical modules have been made available as user friendly search interfaces of novPTMenzy database. It also has a specialized analysis interface for some PTMs like AMPylation and Eliminylation. The novPTMenzy database is a unique resource that can aid in discovery of unusual PTM catalyzing enzymes in newly sequenced genomes. Database URL: http://www.nii.ac.in/novptmenzy.html PMID:25931459

  8. novPTMenzy: a database for enzymes involved in novel post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2015-01-01

    With the recent discoveries of novel post-translational modifications (PTMs) which play important roles in signaling and biosynthetic pathways, identification of such PTM catalyzing enzymes by genome mining has been an area of major interest. Unlike well-known PTMs like phosphorylation, glycosylation, SUMOylation, no bioinformatics resources are available for enzymes associated with novel and unusual PTMs. Therefore, we have developed the novPTMenzy database which catalogs information on the sequence, structure, active site and genomic neighborhood of experimentally characterized enzymes involved in five novel PTMs, namely AMPylation, Eliminylation, Sulfation, Hydroxylation and Deamidation. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the sequence and structural features of these known PTM catalyzing enzymes, we have created Hidden Markov Model profiles for the identification of similar PTM catalyzing enzymatic domains in genomic sequences. We have also created predictive rules for grouping them into functional subfamilies and deciphering their mechanistic details by structure-based analysis of their active site pockets. These analytical modules have been made available as user friendly search interfaces of novPTMenzy database. It also has a specialized analysis interface for some PTMs like AMPylation and Eliminylation. The novPTMenzy database is a unique resource that can aid in discovery of unusual PTM catalyzing enzymes in newly sequenced genomes. Database URL: http://www.nii.ac.in/novptmenzy.html © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. The evolution of adenoviral vectors through genetic and chemical surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-02-17

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges.

  10. Genetic Modification for Improving Seed Vigor Is Transitioning from Model Plants to Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolin; Ning, Fen; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Although seed vigor is a complex physiological trait controlled by quantitative trait loci, technological advances in the laboratory are being translated into applications for enhancing seed vigor in crop plants. In this article, we summarize and discuss pioneering work in the genetic modification of seed vigor, especially through the over-expression of protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT, EC 2.1.1.77) in seeds. The impressive success in improving rice seed vigor through the over-expression of PIMT provides a valuable reference for engineering high-vigor seeds for crop production. In recent decades, numerous genes/proteins associated with seed vigor have been identified. It is hoped that such potential candidates may be used in the development of genetically edited crops for a high and stable yield potential in crop production. This possibility is very valuable in the context of a changing climate and increasing world population. PMID:28149305

  11. Genetic Modification for Improving Seed Vigor Is Transitioning from Model Plants to Crop Plants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Ning, Fen; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Although seed vigor is a complex physiological trait controlled by quantitative trait loci, technological advances in the laboratory are being translated into applications for enhancing seed vigor in crop plants. In this article, we summarize and discuss pioneering work in the genetic modification of seed vigor, especially through the over-expression of protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT, EC 2.1.1.77) in seeds. The impressive success in improving rice seed vigor through the over-expression of PIMT provides a valuable reference for engineering high-vigor seeds for crop production. In recent decades, numerous genes/proteins associated with seed vigor have been identified. It is hoped that such potential candidates may be used in the development of genetically edited crops for a high and stable yield potential in crop production. This possibility is very valuable in the context of a changing climate and increasing world population.

  12. In vitro expansion and genetic modification of gastrointestinal stem cells as organoids

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A key issue for sustainable culture of adult epithelial cells is enrichment for stem cell populations in tissue organoids. Gastrointestinal stem cells can be propagated using conditioned media from a supportive cell line (L-WRN). This protocol describes how to prepare conditioned media and culture stem cell-enriched epithelial organoids from the mouse gastrointestine. These organoids are also amenable to genetic modification with recombinant lentiviruses. This system enables many types of cell biological assays that have been performed with immortalized cell lines to be applied to organoids. Isolation of epithelial cell units from mice takes up to 2 hours and stem cell-enriched gastrointestinal organoids are obtained within 3 days. Genetically modified organoids with lentiviruses can be obtained in 2 weeks. PMID:24232249

  13. Scalable human ES culture for therapeutic use: propagation, differentiation, genetic modification and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Rao, M

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells unlike most adult stem cell populations can replicate indefinitely while preserving genetic, epigenetic, mitochondrial and functional profiles. ESCs are therefore an excellent candidate cell type for providing a bank of cells for allogenic therapy and for introducing targeted genetic modifications for therapeutic intervention. This ability of prolonged self-renewal of stem cells and the unique advantages that this offers for gene therapy, discovery efforts, cell replacement, personalized medicine and other more direct applications requires the resolution of several important manufacturing, gene targeting and regulatory issues. In this review, we assess some of the advance made in developing scalable culture systems, improvement in vector design and gene insertion technology and the changing regulatory landscape.

  14. The Evolution of Adenoviral Vectors through Genetic and Chemical Surface Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges. PMID:24549268

  15. Safe genetic modification of cardiac stem cells using a site-specific integration technique.

    PubMed

    Lan, Feng; Liu, Junwei; Narsinh, Kazim H; Hu, Shijun; Han, Leng; Lee, Andrew S; Karow, Marisa; Nguyen, Patricia K; Nag, Divya; Calos, Michele P; Robbins, Robert C; Wu, Joseph C

    2012-09-11

    Human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) are a promising cell source for regenerative repair after myocardial infarction. Exploitation of their full therapeutic potential may require stable genetic modification of the cells ex vivo. Safe genetic engineering of stem cells, using facile methods for site-specific integration of transgenes into known genomic contexts, would significantly enhance the overall safety and efficacy of cellular therapy in a variety of clinical contexts. We used the phiC31 site-specific recombinase to achieve targeted integration of a triple fusion reporter gene into a known chromosomal context in hCPCs and human endothelial cells. Stable expression of the reporter gene from its unique chromosomal integration site resulted in no discernible genomic instability or adverse changes in cell phenotype. Namely, phiC31-modified hCPCs were unchanged in their differentiation propensity, cellular proliferative rate, and global gene expression profile when compared with unaltered control hCPCs. Expression of the triple fusion reporter gene enabled multimodal assessment of cell fate in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence microscopy, bioluminescence imaging, and positron emission tomography. Intramyocardial transplantation of genetically modified hCPCs resulted in significant improvement in myocardial function 2 weeks after cell delivery, as assessed by echocardiography (P=0.002) and MRI (P=0.001). We also demonstrated the feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of genetically modifying differentiated human endothelial cells, which enhanced hind limb perfusion (P<0.05 at day 7 and 14 after transplantation) on laser Doppler imaging. The phiC31 integrase genomic modification system is a safe, efficient tool to enable site-specific integration of reporter transgenes in progenitor and differentiated cell types.

  16. Genetic Modification in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Homologous Recombination and CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Xue, Haipeng; Wu, Jianbo; Li, Shenglan; Rao, Mahendra S; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification is an indispensable tool to study gene function in normal development and disease. The recent breakthrough of creating human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by defined factors (Takahashi et al., Cell 131:861-872, 2007) provides a renewable source of patient autologous cells that not only retain identical genetic information but also give rise to many cell types of the body including neurons and glia. Meanwhile, the rapid advancement of genome modification tools such as gene targeting by homologous recombination (Capecchi, Nat Rev Genet 6:507-512, 2005) and genome editing tools such as CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas (CRISPR-associated) system, TALENs (Transcription activator-like effector nucleases), and ZFNs (Zinc finger nucleases) (Wang et al., Cell 153:910-918, 2013; Mali et al., Science 339:823-826, 2013; Hwang et al., Nat Biotechnol 31:227-229, 2013; Friedland et al., Nat Methods 10(8):741-743, 2013; DiCarlo et al., Nucleic Acids Res 41:4336-4343, 2013; Cong et al., Science 339:819-823, 2013) has greatly accelerated the development of human genome manipulation at the molecular level. This chapter describes the protocols for making neural lineage reporter lines using homologous recombination and the CRISPR/Cas system-mediated genome editing, including construction of targeting vectors, guide RNAs, transfection into hPSCs, and selection and verification of successfully targeted clones. This method can be applied to various needs of hPSC genetic engineering at high efficiency and high reliability.

  17. Safe Genetic Modification of Cardiac Stem Cells Using a Site-Specific Integration Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Feng; Liu, Junwei; Narsinh, Kazim H.; Hu, Shijun; Han, Leng; Lee, Andrew S.; Karow, Marisa; Nguyen, Patricia K.; Nag, Divya; Calos, Michele P.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) are a promising cell source for regenerative repair after myocardial infarction. Exploitation of their full therapeutic potential may require stable genetic modification of the cells ex vivo. Safe genetic engineering of stem cells, using facile methods for site-specific integration of transgenes into known genomic contexts, would significantly enhance the overall safety and efficacy of cellular therapy in a variety of clinical contexts. Methods and Results We employed the phiC31 site-specific recombinase to achieve targeted integration of a triple fusion reporter gene into a known chromosomal context in hCPCs and human endothelial cells (hECs). Stable expression of the reporter gene from its unique chromosomal integration site resulted in no discernible genomic instability or adverse changes in cell phenotype. Namely, phiC31-modified hCPCs were unchanged in their differentiation propensity, cellular proliferative rate, and global gene expression profile when compared to unaltered control hCPCs. Expression of the triple fusion reporter gene enabled multimodal assessment of cell fate in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence microscopy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Intramyocardial transplantation of genetically modified hCPCs resulted in significant improvement in myocardial function two weeks after cell delivery, as assessed by echocardiography (P = 0.002) and magnetic resonance imaging (P = 0.001). We also demonstrated the feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of genetically modifying differentiated hECs, which enhanced hindlimb perfusion (P<0.05 at day 7 and 14 after transplantation) on laser Doppler imaging. Conclusions The phiC31 integrase genomic modification system is a safe, efficient tool to enable site-specific integration of reporter transgenes in progenitor and differentiated cell types. PMID:22965984

  18. Shared genetic data and the rights of involved people.

    PubMed

    Sellaroli, Valentina; Cucca, Francesco; Santosuosso, Amedeo

    2007-01-01

    The authors examine the two main attitudes toward genetics: Exceptionalism and Undervaluation. They firstly pose the basis of the matter from the scientific point of view and then verify how these two attitudes really work in the different fields where human genetics finds relevant applications, dealing with the questions arising from the unique characteristics of genetic data that is shared among the whole bio-group. Then some judicial cases related to the conflicts arising when genetic data are stored in repositories, whatever the aims and reasons, are presented and discussed. The matter is then considered from the criminal law perspective, in the light of the new possible implications of DNA fingerprinting in criminal investigations. Finally, some general considerations on opposing Exceptionalism/Undervaluation viewpoints and the real reason for making up new rules are presented.

  19. Genetic modification of stem cells for improved therapy of the infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Haider, Husnain Kh; Mustafa, Anique; Feng, Yuliang; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2011-10-03

    The conventional treatment modalities for ischemic heart disease only provide symptomatic relief to the patient without repairing and regenerating the damaged myocardium. Stem cell transplantation has emerged as a promising alternative therapeutic approach for cardiovascular diseases. Stem cells possess the potential of differentiation to adopt morphofunctional cardiac and vasculogenic phenotypes to repopulate the scar tissue and restore regional blood flow in the ischemic myocardium. These beneficial therapeutic effects make stem cell transplantation the method of choice for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. The efficacy of stem cell transplantation may be augmented by genetic manipulation of the cells prior to transplantation. Not only will insertion of therapeutic transgene(s) into the stem cells support the survival and differentiation of cells in the unfavorable microenvironment of the ischemic myocardium, but also the genetically manipulated stem cells will serve as a source of the transgene expression product in the heart for therapeutic benefits. We provide an overview of the extensively studied stem cell types for cardiac regeneration, the various methods in which these cells have been genetically manipulated and rationale of genetic modification of stem cells for use in regenerative cardiovascular therapeutics.

  20. Genetic code expansion in stable cell lines enables encoded chromatin modification

    PubMed Central

    Elsässer, Simon J.; Ernst, Russell J; Walker, Olivia S.; Chin, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded unnatural amino acids provide powerful strategies for modulating the molecular functions of proteins in mammalian cells. However this approach has not been coupled to genome-wide measurements, because efficient unnatural amino acid incorporation is limited to transient expression settings that lead to very heterogeneous expression. We demonstrate that stable \\ integration of the Methanosarcina mazei pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylS)/tRNAPylCUA pair (and its derivatives) into the mammalian genome enables efficient, homogeneous unnatural amino acid incorporation into target proteins in diverse mammalian cells, and we reveal the distinct transcriptional responses of ES cells and MEFs to amber suppression. Genetically encoding Nε-acetyl-lysine in place of six lysine residues in histone H3 enables deposition of pre-acetylated histones into cellular chromatin, via a pathway that is orthogonal to enzymatic modification. Upon synthetically encoding lysine-acetylation at natural modification sites we determine the consequences of acetylation at specific amino acids in histones on gene expression. PMID:26727110

  1. Recent patents on genetic modification of plants and microbes for biomass conversion to biofuels.

    PubMed

    Lubieniechi, Simona; Peranantham, Thinesh; Levin, David B

    2013-04-01

    Development of sustainable energy systems based on renewable biomass feedstocks is now a global effort. Lignocellulosic biomass contains polymers of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, bound together in a complex structure. Liquid biofuels, such as ethanol, can be made from biomass via fermentation of sugars derived from the cellulose and hemicellulose within lignocellulosic materials, but pre-treatment of the biomass to release sugars for microbial conversion is a significant barrier to commercial success of lignocellulosic biofuel production. Strategies to reduce the energy and cost inputs required for biomass pre-treatment include genetic modification of plant materials to reduce lignin content. Significant efforts are also underway to create recombinant microorganisms capable of converting sugars derived from lignocellulosic biomass to a variety of biofuels. An alternative strategy to reduce the costs of cellulosic biofuel production is the use of cellulolytic microorganisms capable of direct microbial conversion of ligno-cellulosic biomass to fuels. This paper reviews recent patents on genetic modification of plants and microbes for biomass conversion to biofuels.

  2. Improving efficacy of cancer immunotherapy by genetic modification of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Burga, Rachel A; Nguyen, Tuongvan; Zulovich, Jane; Madonna, Sarah; Ylisastigui, Loyda; Fernandes, Rohan; Yvon, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are members of the innate immune system that recognize target cells via activating and inhibitory signals received through cell receptors. Derived from the lymphoid lineage, NK cells are able to produce cytokines and exert a cytotoxic effect on viral infected and malignant cells. It is their unique ability to lyse target cells rapidly and without prior education that renders NK cells a promising effector cell for adoptive cell therapy. However, both viruses and tumors employ evasion strategies to avoid attack by NK cells, which represent biological challenges that need to be harnessed to fully exploit the cytolytic potential of NK cells. Using genetic modification, the function of NK cells can be enhanced to improve their homing, cytolytic activity, in vivo persistence and safety. Examples include gene modification to express chemokine, high-affinity Fc receptor and chimeric antigen receptors, suicide genes and the forced expression of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-15. Preclinical studies have clearly demonstrated that such approaches are effective in improving NK-cell function, homing and safety. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the genetic manipulations of NK cells and their application for cellular immunotherapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. GENETIC MODIFICATION OF GIBBERELLIC ACID SIGNALING TO PROMOTE CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN TREE ROOTS AND STEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    encode proteins involved in gibberellin metabolism or signalling. Intact genomic copies of PtGA20ox7, PtGA2ox2,Pt RGL1_1, PtRGL1_2 and PtGAI1 genes from the genome-sequenced Populus trichocarpa clone Nisqually-1 were transformed into Populus tremula - alba (clone INRA 717-1B4), and growth, morphology and xylem cell size characterized in the greenhouse. Each cisgene encompassed 1-2?kb of 5' and 1?kb of 3' flanking DNA, as well as all native exons and introns. Large numbers of independent insertion events per cisgene (19-38), including empty vector controls, were studied. Three of the cisgenic modifications had significant effects on plant growth rate, morphology or wood properties. The PtGA20ox7 cisgene increased rate of shoot regeneration in vitro, accelerated early growth, and variation in growth rate was correlated with PtGA20ox7 gene expression. PtRGL1_1 and PtGA2ox2 caused reduced growth, while PtRGL1_2 gave rise to plants that grew normally but had significantly longer xylem fibres. RT-PCR studies suggested that the lack of growth inhibition observed in PtRGL1_2 cisgenic plants was a result of co-suppression. PtGAI1 slowed regeneration rate and both PtGAI1 and PtGA20ox7 gave rise to increased variance among events for early diameter and volume index, respectively. Our work suggests that cisgenic insertion of additional copies of native genes involved in growth regulation may provide tools to help modify plant architecture, expand the genetic variance in plant architecture available to breeders and accelerate transfer of alleles between difficult-to-cross species. The role of gibberellins (GAs) in regulation of lateral root development is poorly understood. We show that GA-deficient (35S:PcGA2ox1) and GA-insensitive (35S:rgl1) transgenic Populus exhibited increased lateral root proliferation and elongation under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, and these effects were reversed by exogenous GA treatment. In addition, RNA interference suppression of two poplar GA 2

  4. Detection of thermogenesis in rodents in response to anti-obesity drugs and genetic modification

    PubMed Central

    Arch, Jonathan R. S.; Trayhurn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Many compounds and genetic manipulations are claimed to confer resistance to obesity in rodents by raising energy expenditure. Examples taken from recent and older literature, demonstrate that such claims are often based on measurements of energy expenditure after body composition has changed, and depend on comparisons of energy expenditure divided by body weight. This is misleading because white adipose tissue has less influence than lean tissue on energy expenditure. Application of this approach to human data would suggest that human obesity is usually due to a low metabolic rate, which is not an accepted view. Increased energy expenditure per animal is a surer way of demonstrating thermogenesis, but even then it is important to know whether this is due to altered body composition (repartitioning), or increased locomotor activity rather than thermogenesis per se. Regression analysis offers other approaches. The thermogenic response to some compounds has a rapid onset and so cannot be due to altered body composition. These compounds usually mimic or activate the sympathetic nervous system. Thermogenesis occurs in, but may not be confined to, brown adipose tissue. It should not be assumed that weight loss in response to these treatments is due to thermogenesis unless there is a sustained increase in 24-h energy expenditure. Thyroid hormones and fibroblast growth factor 21 also raise energy expenditure before they affect body composition. Some treatments and genetic modifications alter the diurnal rhythm of energy expenditure. It is important to establish whether this is due to altered locomotor activity or efficiency of locomotion. There are no good examples of compounds that do not affect short-term energy expenditure but have a delayed effect. How and under what conditions a genetic modification or compound increases energy expenditure influences the decision on whether to seek drugs for the target or take a candidate drug into clinical studies. PMID:23580228

  5. Genetic Mechanisms Involved in the Phenotype of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, David

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of significant intellectual disability in the human population, occurring in roughly 1 in 700 live births. The ultimate cause of DS is trisomy of all or part of the set of genes located on chromosome 21. How this trisomy leads to the phenotype of DS is unclear. The completion of the DNA…

  6. Genetic Mechanisms Involved in the Phenotype of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, David

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of significant intellectual disability in the human population, occurring in roughly 1 in 700 live births. The ultimate cause of DS is trisomy of all or part of the set of genes located on chromosome 21. How this trisomy leads to the phenotype of DS is unclear. The completion of the DNA…

  7. Cryopreservation and lentiviral-mediated genetic modification of human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Leejee H; Zhang, Cheng; Chuck, Roy S; Stark, Walter J; Naylor, Stuart; Binley, Katie; Chakravarti, Shukti; Jun, Albert S

    2007-07-01

    To determine the viability and potential usefulness of cryopreserved human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells by characterizing their morphology, gene expression, and ability for genetic modification by the lentiviral vector equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Primary cultured endothelial cells were dissociated from human corneas and grown in organ culture medium. Corneal endothelial cell origin was confirmed by morphology and immunostaining with polyclonal anti-collagen VIII antibodies. Cells of different passages were cryopreserved in medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide and were assessed after thawing for morphology, proliferative capacity, gene expression, and ability to form cell-cell junctions. EIAV encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was used to transduce cryopreserved human corneal endothelial cells. Transduced cells were then sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Cryopreserved, primary, cultured human corneal endothelial cells are viable and retain their ability to proliferate, produce collagen VIII, and express ZO-1, a tight-junction protein. EIAV-based gene transfer of eGFP is highly efficient and nontoxic to cryopreserved human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells. These genetically modified cells can be selected to nearly pure populations with FACS sorting. Human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells retain their phenotypic properties after cryopreservation. The ability to store, genetically modify, and sort these cells through FACS to pure populations has the potential to greatly expand their future therapeutic application to treat corneal endothelial disorders.

  8. Anticodon Modifications in the tRNA Set of LUCA and the Fundamental Regularity in the Standard Genetic Code

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T. S.; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    Based on (i) an analysis of the regularities in the standard genetic code and (ii) comparative genomics of the anticodon modification machinery in the three branches of life, we derive the tRNA set and its anticodon modifications as it was present in LUCA. Previously we proposed that an early ancestor of LUCA contained a set of 23 tRNAs with unmodified anticodons that was capable of translating all 20 amino acids while reading 55 of the 61 sense codons of the standard genetic code (SGC). Here we use biochemical and genomic evidence to derive that LUCA contained a set of 44 or 45 tRNAs containing 2 or 3 modifications while reading 59 or 60 of the 61 sense codons. Subsequent tRNA modifications occurred independently in the Bacteria and Eucarya, while the Archaea have remained quite close to the tRNA set as it was present in LUCA. PMID:27454314

  9. Reactivation of L1 retrotransposon by benzo(a)pyrene involves complex genetic and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Teneng, Ivo; Montoya-Durango, Diego E; Quertermous, James L; Lacy, Mary E; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2011-03-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke and a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion which likely contributes to the tumorigenic processes in human cancers including lung and esophageal. Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) or L1 is a mobile element within the mammalian genome that propagates via a "copy-and-paste" mechanism using reverse transcriptase and RNA intermediates. L1 is strongly expressed during early embryogenesis and then silenced as cells initiate differentiation programming. Although the complex transcriptional control mechanisms of L1 are not well understood, L1 reactivation has been described in several human cancers and following exposure of mouse or human cells to BaP. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms and epigenetic events that regulate L1 reactivation following BaP exposure. We show that challenge of HeLa cells with BaP induces early enrichment of the transcriptionally-active chromatin markers histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4Me3) and histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), and reduces association of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) with the L1 promoter. These changes are followed by proteasome-dependent decreases in cellular DNMT1 expression and sustained reduction of cytosine methylation within the L1 promoter CpG island. Pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome signaling pathway with the inhibitor MG132 blocks degradation of DNMT1 and alters BaP-mediated histone epigenetic modifications. We conclude that genetic reactivation of L1 by BaP involves an ordered cascade of epigenetic events that begin with nucleosomal histone modifications and is completed with alterations in DNMT1 recruitment to the L1 promoter and reduced DNA methylation of CpG islands.

  10. Reactivation of L1 retrotransposon by benzo(a)pyrene involves complex genetic and epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Quertermous, James L; Lacy, Mary E

    2011-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke and a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion that likely contributes to the tumorigenic processes in human cancers including lung and esophageal. Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) or L1 is a mobile element within the mammalian genome that propagates via a “copy-and-paste” mechanism using reverse transcriptase and RNA intermediates. L1 is strongly expressed during early embryogenesis and then silenced as cells initiate differentiation programming. Although the complex transcriptional control mechanisms of L1 are not well understood, L1 reactivation has been described in several human cancers and following exposure of mouse or human cells to BaP. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms and epigenetic events that regulate L1 reactivation following BaP exposure. We show that challenge of HeLa cells with BaP induces early enrichment of the transcriptionally-active chromatin markers histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4Me3) and histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), and reduces association of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) with the L1 promoter. These changes are followed by proteasome-dependent decreases in cellular DNMT1 expression and sustained reduction of cytosine methylation within the L1 promoter CpG island. Pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome signaling pathway with the inhibitor MG132 blocks degradation of DNMT1 and alters BaP-mediated histone epigenetic modifications. We conclude that genetic reactivation of L1 by BaP involves an ordered cascade of epigenetic events that begin with nucleosomal histone modifications and is completed with alterations in DNMT1 recruitment to the L1 promoter and reduced DNA methylation of CpG islands. PMID:21150308

  11. Identification of Glutaminyl Cyclase Genes Involved in Pyroglutamate Modification of Fungal Lignocellulolytic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W; Dana, Craig M; Iavarone, Anthony T; Clark, Douglas S; Glass, N Louise

    2017-01-17

    The breakdown of plant biomass to simple sugars is essential for the production of second-generation biofuels and high-value bioproducts. Currently, enzymes produced from filamentous fungi are used for deconstructing plant cell wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars for biorefinery applications. A post-translational N-terminal pyroglutamate modification observed in some of these enzymes occurs when N-terminal glutamine or glutamate is cyclized to form a five-membered ring. This modification has been shown to confer resistance to thermal denaturation for CBH-1 and EG-1 cellulases. In mammalian cells, the formation of pyroglutamate is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases. Using the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we identified two genes (qc-1 and qc-2) that encode proteins homologous to mammalian glutaminyl cyclases. We show that qc-1 and qc-2 are essential for catalyzing the formation of an N-terminal pyroglutamate on CBH-1 and GH5-1. CBH-1 and GH5-1 produced in a Δqc-1 Δqc-2 mutant, and thus lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate modification, showed greater sensitivity to thermal denaturation, and for GH5-1, susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. QC-1 and QC-2 are endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized proteins. The pyroglutamate modification is predicted to occur in a number of additional fungal proteins that have diverse functions. The identification of glutaminyl cyclases in fungi may have implications for production of lignocellulolytic enzymes, heterologous expression, and biotechnological applications revolving around protein stability. Pyroglutamate modification is the post-translational conversion of N-terminal glutamine or glutamate into a cyclized amino acid derivative. This modification is well studied in animal systems but poorly explored in fungal systems. In Neurospora crassa, we show that this modification takes place in the ER and is catalyzed by two well-conserved enzymes, ubiquitously conserved throughout the fungal kingdom. We

  12. Optimum profile modifications of spur gears by means of genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonori, Giorgio; Barbieri, Marco; Pellicano, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    An original application of Genetic Algorithms (GAs) is developed in order to optimize spur gear pairs toward vibration and noise reduction. The approach takes into account the most important parameters of micro-geometric modifications, namely tip and root relief, therefore the parameter space is eight dimensional. The objective function of the GA depends on the static transmission error (STE) that is related to teeth flexibility. STE is estimated by means of a nonlinear finite element approach: either the amplitude of the STE fluctuation or its harmonic content are considered as objective functions. The effectiveness of the approach is checked on an actual test case: GAs are able to find the optimum after a reasonable number of steps; such optimum is obtained on static basis and gives a strong vibration reduction. The reliability test proves that GAs lead to robust optima.

  13. [Detection of genetic modification in maize and maize products by ELISA-test].

    PubMed

    Urbanek-Karłowska, Bogumiła; Sawilska-Rautenstrauch, Dorota; Jedra, Małgorzata; Badowski, Paweł

    2003-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay methods--TRAIT Test--was applied for detection of genetic modification in maize seeds and foodstuffs, which have been produced from this crop. TRAIT Test is based on the identification GMO protein Cry 1Ab produced by a gene derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) incorporated into insect resistant corn grain. The experiment was carried out on maize standards and foodstuffs from Warsaw market. The positive result was obtained for one maize product, which was not labelled as GMO. The presence of GMO material was approximately equal to 1%. In conclusion, this test is proper for fast routine qualitative (yes/no) determination GMO material in maize seeds and unprocessed food products.

  14. Genetic modification of the human germ line: The reasons why this project has no future.

    PubMed

    Morange, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Modification of the human germ line has remained a distant but valuable objective for most biologists since the emergence of genetics (and even before). To study the historical transformations of this project, I have selected three periods - the 1930s, at the pinnacle of eugenics, around 1974 when molecular biology triumphed, and today - and have adopted three criteria to estimate the feasibility of this project: the state of scientific knowledge, the existence of suitable tools, and societal demands. Although the long-awaited techniques to modify the germ line are now available, I will show that most of the expectations behind this project have disappeared, or are considered as being reachable by highly different strategies.

  15. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with nonviral systems: past progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, E P; Zoumbos, N C; Athanassiadou, A

    2005-10-01

    Serious unwanted complications provoked by retroviral gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have recently raised the need for the development and assessment of alternative gene transfer vectors. Within this context, nonviral gene transfer systems are attracting increasing interest. Their main advantages include low cost, ease of handling and large-scale production, large packaging capacity and, most importantly, biosafety. While nonviral gene transfer into HSCs has been restricted in the past by poor transfection efficiency and transient maintenance, in recent years, biotechnological developments are converting nonviral transfer into a realistic approach for genetic modification of cells of hematopoietic origin. Herein we provide an overview of past accomplishments in the field of nonviral gene transfer into hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells and we point at future challenges. We argue that episomally maintained self-replicating vectors combined with physical methods of delivery show the greatest promise among nonviral gene transfer strategies for the treatment of disorders of the hematopoietic system.

  16. Redirecting adenovirus tropism by genetic, chemical, and mechanical modification of the adenovirus surface for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2016-06-01

    Despite remarkable advancements, clinical evaluations of adenovirus (Ad)-mediated cancer gene therapies have highlighted the need for improved delivery and targeting. Genetic modification of Ad capsid proteins has been extensively attempted. Although genetic modification enhances the therapeutic potential of Ad, it is difficult to successfully incorporate extraneous moieties into the capsid and the engineering process is laborious. Recently, chemical modification of the Ad surface with nanomaterials and targeting moieties has been found to enhance Ad internalization into the target by both passive and active mechanisms. Alternatively, external stimulus-mediated targeting can result in selective accumulation of Ad in the tumor and prevent dissemination of Ad into surrounding nontarget tissues. In the present review, we discuss various genetic, chemical, and mechanical engineering strategies for overcoming the challenges that hinder the therapeutic efficacy of Ad-based approaches. Surface modification of Ad by genetic, chemical, or mechanical engineering strategies enables Ad to overcome the shortcomings of conventional Ad and enhances delivery efficiency through distinct and unique mechanisms that unmodified Ad cannot mimic. However, although the therapeutic potential of Ad-mediated gene therapy has been enhanced by various surface modification strategies, each strategy still possesses innate limitations that must be addressed, requiring innovative ideas and designs.

  17. Genetic recombination pathways and their application for genome modification of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Mikko; Tuuri, Timo; Savilahti, Harri

    2010-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from early human embryo and retain a potential to differentiate into all adult cell types. They provide vast opportunities in cell replacement therapies and are expected to become significant tools in drug discovery as well as in the studies of cellular and developmental functions of human genes. The progress in applying different types of DNA recombination reactions for genome modification in a variety of eukaryotic cell types has provided means to utilize recombination-based strategies also in human embryonic stem cells. Homologous recombination-based methods, particularly those utilizing extended homologous regions and those employing zinc finger nucleases to boost genomic integration, have shown their usefulness in efficient genome modification. Site-specific recombination systems are potent genome modifiers, and they can be used to integrate DNA into loci that contain an appropriate recombination signal sequence, either naturally occurring or suitably pre-engineered. Non-homologous recombination can be used to generate random integrations in genomes relatively effortlessly, albeit with a moderate efficiency and precision. DNA transposition-based strategies offer substantially more efficient random strategies and provide means to generate single-copy insertions, thus potentiating the generation of genome-wide insertion libraries applicable in genetic screens. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent advances in genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagasato, Masaki; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Aoki, Kazunori

    2017-05-01

    Adenoviruses are widely used to deliver genes to a variety of cell types and have been used in a number of clinical trials for gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. However, several concerns must be addressed for the clinical use of adenovirus vectors. Selective delivery of a therapeutic gene by adenovirus vectors to target cancer is precluded by the widespread distribution of the primary cellular receptors. The systemic administration of adenoviruses results in hepatic tropism independent of the primary receptors. Adenoviruses induce strong innate and acquired immunity in vivo. Furthermore, several modifications to these vectors are necessary to enhance their oncolytic activity and ensure patient safety. As such, the adenovirus genome has been engineered to overcome these problems. The first part of the present review outlines recent progress in the genetic modification of adenovirus vectors for cancer treatment. In addition, several groups have recently developed cancer-targeting adenovirus vectors by using libraries that display random peptides on a fiber knob. Pancreatic cancer-targeting sequences have been isolated, and these oncolytic vectors have been shown by our group to be associated with a higher gene transduction efficiency and more potent oncolytic activity in cell lines, murine models, and surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer. In the second part of this review, we explain that combining cancer-targeting strategies can be a promising approach to increase the clinical usefulness of oncolytic adenovirus vectors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. An injectable spheroid system with genetic modification for cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Nomoto, Takahiro; Endo, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Yu; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    The new methodology to increase a therapeutic potential of cell transplantation was developed here by the use of three-dimensional spheroids of transplanting cells subsequent to the genetic modification with non-viral DNA vectors, polyplex nanomicelles. Particularly, spheroids in regulated size of 100-μm of primary hepatocytes transfected with luciferase gene were formed on the micropatterned culture plates coated with thermosensitive polymer, and were recovered in the form of injectable liquid suspension simply by cooling the plates. After subcutaneously transplanting these hepatocyte spheroids, efficient transgene expression was observed in host tissue for more than a month, whereas transplantation of a single-cell suspension from a monolayer culture resulted in an only transient expression. The spheroid system contributed to the preservation of innate functions of transplanted hepatocytes in the host tissue, such as albumin expression, thereby possessing high potential for expressing transgene. Intravital observation of transplanted cells showed that those from spheroid cultures had a tendency to localize in the vicinity of blood vessels, making a favorable microenvironment for preserving cell functionality. Furthermore, spheroids transfected with erythropoietin-expressing DNA showed a significantly higher hematopoietic effect than that of cell suspensions from monolayer cultures, demonstrating high potential of this genetically-modified spheroid transplantation system for therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Why genetic modification of lignin leads to low-recalcitrance biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Carmona, Christopher; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C.; ...

    2014-11-11

    Genetic modification of plants via down-regulation of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase leads to incorporation of aldehyde groups in the lignin polymer. Moreover, the resulting lignocellulosic biomass has increased bioethanol yield. However, a molecular-scale explanation of this finding is currently lacking. We perform molecular dynamics simulation of the copolymer with hemicellulose of wild type and the genetically modified lignin, in aqueous solution. We find that the non-covalent association with hemicellulose of lignin containing aldehyde groups is reduced compared to the wild-type. This phase separation may increase the cell wall porosity in the mutant plants, thus explaining their easier deconstruction to biofuels. Themore » thermodynamic origin of the reduced lignin-hemicellulose association is found to be a more favorable self-interaction energy and less favorable interaction with hemicellulose for the mutant lignin. Furthermore, reduced hydration water density fluctuations are found for the mutant lignin, implying a more hydrophobic lignin surface. Our results provide a detailed description of how aldehyde incorporation makes lignin more hydrophobic and reduces its association with hemicellulose, thus suggesting that increased lignin hydrophobicity may be an optimal characteristic required for improved biofuel production.« less

  1. Effects of genetic modifications to flax (Linum usitatissimum) on arbuscular mycorrhiza and plant performance.

    PubMed

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Turnau, Katarzyna; Góralska, Katarzyna; Anielska, Teresa; Szopa, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Although arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known for their positive effect on flax growth, the impact of genetic manipulation in this crop on arbuscular mycorrhiza and plant performance was assessed for the first time. Five types of transgenic flax that were generated to improve fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, through increased levels of either phenylpropanoids (W92.40), glycosyltransferase (GT4, GT5), or PR2 beta-1,3-glucanase (B14) or produce polyhydroxybutyrate (M50), were used. Introduced genetic modifications did not change the degree of mycorrhizal colonization as compared to parent cultivars Linola and Nike. Arbuscules were well developed in each tested transgenic type (except M50). In two lines (W92.40 and B14), a higher abundance of arbuscules was observed when compared to control, untransformed flax plants. However, in some cases (W92.40, GT4, GT5, and B14 Md), the mycorrhizal dependency for biomass production of transgenic plants was slightly lower when compared to the original cultivars. No significant influence of mycorrhiza on the photosynthetic activity of transformed lines was found, but in most cases P concentration in mycorrhizal plants remained higher than in nonmycorrhizal ones. The transformed flax lines meet the demands for better quality of fiber and higher resistance to pathogens, without significantly influencing the interaction with AMF.

  2. Why genetic modification of lignin leads to low-recalcitrance biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, Christopher; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C.; Petridis, Loukas

    2014-11-11

    Genetic modification of plants via down-regulation of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase leads to incorporation of aldehyde groups in the lignin polymer. Moreover, the resulting lignocellulosic biomass has increased bioethanol yield. However, a molecular-scale explanation of this finding is currently lacking. We perform molecular dynamics simulation of the copolymer with hemicellulose of wild type and the genetically modified lignin, in aqueous solution. We find that the non-covalent association with hemicellulose of lignin containing aldehyde groups is reduced compared to the wild-type. This phase separation may increase the cell wall porosity in the mutant plants, thus explaining their easier deconstruction to biofuels. The thermodynamic origin of the reduced lignin-hemicellulose association is found to be a more favorable self-interaction energy and less favorable interaction with hemicellulose for the mutant lignin. Furthermore, reduced hydration water density fluctuations are found for the mutant lignin, implying a more hydrophobic lignin surface. Our results provide a detailed description of how aldehyde incorporation makes lignin more hydrophobic and reduces its association with hemicellulose, thus suggesting that increased lignin hydrophobicity may be an optimal characteristic required for improved biofuel production.

  3. Tolerance to MHC class II disparate allografts through genetic modification of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Peter T.; Tripathi, Sudipta; Tian, Chaorui; Iacomini, John; Bagley, Jessamyn

    2012-01-01

    Induction of molecular chimerism through genetic modification of bone marrow is a powerful tool for the induction of tolerance. Here we demonstrate for the first time that expression of an allogeneic MHC class II gene in autologous bone marrow cells, resulting in a state of molecular chimerism, induces tolerance to MHC class II mismatched skin grafts, a stringent test of transplant tolerance. Reconstitution of recipients with syngeneic bone marrow transduced with retrovirus encoding H-2I-Ab (I-Ab) resulted the long-term expression of the retroviral gene product on the surface of MHC class II-expressing bone marrow derived cell types. Mechanistically, tolerance was maintained by the presence of regulatory T cells, which prevented proliferation and cytokine production by alloreactive host T cells. Thus, the introduction of MHC class II genes into bone marrow derived cells through genetic engineering results in tolerance. These results have the potential to extend the clinical applicability of molecular chimerism for tolerance induction. PMID:22833118

  4. Epigenetic Histone Modifications Involved in Profibrotic Gene Regulation by 12/15-Lipoxygenase and Its Oxidized Lipid Products in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hang; Reddy, Marpadga A; Deshpande, Supriya; Jia, Ye; Park, Jung Tak; Lanting, Linda L; Jin, Wen; Kato, Mitsuo; Xu, Zhong Gao; Das, Sadhan; Natarajan, Rama

    2016-03-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, including histone post-translational modifications and DNA methylation, are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), but the mediators are not well known. Moreover, although dyslipidemia contributes to DN, epigenetic changes triggered by lipids are unclear. In diabetes, increased expression of 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) enhances oxidized lipids such as 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [12(S)-HETE], which promote oxidant stress, glomerular and mesangial cell (MC) dysfunction, and fibrosis, and mediate the actions of profibrotic growth factors. We hypothesized that 12/15-LO and its oxidized lipid products can regulate epigenetic mechanisms mediating profibrotic gene expression related to DN. 12(S)-HETE increased profibrotic gene expression and enrichment of permissive histone lysine modifications at their promoters in MCs. 12(S)-HETE also increased protein levels of SET7, a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and promoted its nuclear translocation and enrichment at profibrotic gene promoters. Furthermore, SET7 (Setd7) gene silencing inhibited 12(S)-HETE-induced profibrotic gene expression. 12/15-LO (Alox15) gene silencing or genetic knockout inhibited transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced expression of Setd7 and profibrotic genes and histone modifications in MCs. Furthermore, 12/15-LO knockout in mice ameliorated key features of DN and abrogated increases in renal SET7 and profibrotic genes. Additionally, 12/15-LO siRNAs in vivo blocked increases in renal SET7 and profibrotic genes in diabetic mice. These novel results demonstrate for the first time that 12/15-LO-derived oxidized lipids regulate histone modifications associated with profibrotic gene expression in MCs, and 12/15-LO can mediate similar actions of TGF-β1 and diabetes. Targeting 12/15-LO might be a useful strategy to inhibit key epigenetic mechanisms involved in DN.

  5. Identification of Glutaminyl Cyclase Genes Involved in Pyroglutamate Modification of Fungal Lignocellulolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vincent W.; Dana, Craig M.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The breakdown of plant biomass to simple sugars is essential for the production of second-generation biofuels and high-value bioproducts. Currently, enzymes produced from filamentous fungi are used for deconstructing plant cell wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars for biorefinery applications. A post-translational N-terminal pyroglutamate modification observed in some of these enzymes occurs when N-terminal glutamine or glutamate is cyclized to form a five-membered ring. This modification has been shown to confer resistance to thermal denaturation for CBH-1 and EG-1 cellulases. In mammalian cells, the formation of pyroglutamate is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases. Using the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we identified two genes (qc-1 and qc-2) that encode proteins homologous to mammalian glutaminyl cyclases. We show that qc-1 and qc-2 are essential for catalyzing the formation of an N-terminal pyroglutamate on CBH-1 and GH5-1. CBH-1 and GH5-1 produced in a Δqc-1 Δqc-2 mutant, and thus lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate modification, showed greater sensitivity to thermal denaturation, and for GH5-1, susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. QC-1 and QC-2 are endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized proteins. The pyroglutamate modification is predicted to occur in a number of additional fungal proteins that have diverse functions. The identification of glutaminyl cyclases in fungi may have implications for production of lignocellulolytic enzymes, heterologous expression, and biotechnological applications revolving around protein stability. PMID:28096492

  6. Identification of Glutaminyl Cyclase Genes Involved in Pyroglutamate Modification of Fungal Lignocellulolytic Enzymes

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Vincent W.; Dana, Craig M.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; ...

    2017-01-17

    The breakdown of plant biomass to simple sugars is essential for the production of second-generation biofuels and high-value bioproducts. Currently, enzymes produced from filamentous fungi are used for deconstructing plant cell wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars for biorefinery applications. A post-translational N-terminal pyroglutamate modification observed in some of these enzymes occurs when N-terminal glutamine or glutamate is cyclized to form a five-membered ring. This modification has been shown to confer resistance to thermal denaturation for CBH-1 and EG-1 cellulases. In mammalian cells, the formation of pyroglutamate is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases. Using the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we identifiedmore » two genes (qc-1 and qc-2) that encode proteins homologous to mammalian glutaminyl cyclases. We show that qc-1 and qc-2 are essential for catalyzing the formation of an N-terminal pyroglutamate on CBH-1 and GH5-1. CBH-1 and GH5-1 produced in a Δqc-1 Δqc-2 mutant, and thus lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate modification, showed greater sensitivity to thermal denaturation, and for GH5-1, susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. QC-1 and QC-2 are endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized proteins. The pyroglutamate modification is predicted to occur in a number of additional fungal proteins that have diverse functions. The identification of glutaminyl cyclases in fungi may have implications for production of lignocellulolytic enzymes, heterologous expression, and biotechnological applications revolving around protein stability.« less

  7. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  8. RNA editing and modifications of RNAs might have favoured the evolution of the triplet genetic code from an ennuplet code.

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, Massimo; Moracci, Marco; Cobucci-Ponzano, Beatrice

    2014-10-21

    Here we suggest that the origin of the genetic code, that is to say, the birth of first mRNAs has been triggered by means of a widespread modification of all RNAs (proto-mRNAs and proto-tRNAs), as today observed in the RNA editing and in post-transcriptional modifications of RNAs, which are considered as fossils of this evolutionary stage of the genetic code origin. We consider also that other mechanisms, such as the trans-translation and ribosome frameshifting, could have favoured the transition from an ennuplet code to a triplet code. Therefore, according to our hypothesis all these mechanisms would be reflexive of this period of the evolutionary history of the genetic code. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Computational identification of novel biochemical systems involved in oxidation, glycosylation and other complex modifications of bases in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Zhang, Dapeng; Maxwell Burroughs, A.; Aravind, L.

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of the TET/JBP family of dioxygenases that modify bases in DNA has sparked considerable interest in novel DNA base modifications and their biological roles. Using sensitive sequence and structure analyses combined with contextual information from comparative genomics, we computationally characterize over 12 novel biochemical systems for DNA modifications. We predict previously unidentified enzymes, such as the kinetoplastid J-base generating glycosyltransferase (and its homolog GREB1), the catalytic specificity of bacteriophage TET/JBP proteins and their role in complex DNA base modifications. We also predict the enzymes involved in synthesis of hypermodified bases such as alpha-glutamylthymine and alpha-putrescinylthymine that have remained enigmatic for several decades. Moreover, the current analysis suggests that bacteriophages and certain nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses contain an unexpectedly diverse range of DNA modification systems, in addition to those using previously characterized enzymes such as Dam, Dcm, TET/JBP, pyrimidine hydroxymethylases, Mom and glycosyltransferases. These include enzymes generating modified bases such as deazaguanines related to queuine and archaeosine, pyrimidines comparable with lysidine, those derived using modified S-adenosyl methionine derivatives and those using TET/JBP-generated hydroxymethyl pyrimidines as biosynthetic starting points. We present evidence that some of these modification systems are also widely dispersed across prokaryotes and certain eukaryotes such as basidiomycetes, chlorophyte and stramenopile alga, where they could serve as novel epigenetic marks for regulation or discrimination of self from non-self DNA. Our study extends the role of the PUA-like fold domains in recognition of modified nucleic acids and predicts versions of the ASCH and EVE domains to be novel ‘readers’ of modified bases in DNA. These results open opportunities for the investigation of the biology of these systems

  10. Computational identification of novel biochemical systems involved in oxidation, glycosylation and other complex modifications of bases in DNA.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Zhang, Dapeng; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Aravind, L

    2013-09-01

    Discovery of the TET/JBP family of dioxygenases that modify bases in DNA has sparked considerable interest in novel DNA base modifications and their biological roles. Using sensitive sequence and structure analyses combined with contextual information from comparative genomics, we computationally characterize over 12 novel biochemical systems for DNA modifications. We predict previously unidentified enzymes, such as the kinetoplastid J-base generating glycosyltransferase (and its homolog GREB1), the catalytic specificity of bacteriophage TET/JBP proteins and their role in complex DNA base modifications. We also predict the enzymes involved in synthesis of hypermodified bases such as alpha-glutamylthymine and alpha-putrescinylthymine that have remained enigmatic for several decades. Moreover, the current analysis suggests that bacteriophages and certain nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses contain an unexpectedly diverse range of DNA modification systems, in addition to those using previously characterized enzymes such as Dam, Dcm, TET/JBP, pyrimidine hydroxymethylases, Mom and glycosyltransferases. These include enzymes generating modified bases such as deazaguanines related to queuine and archaeosine, pyrimidines comparable with lysidine, those derived using modified S-adenosyl methionine derivatives and those using TET/JBP-generated hydroxymethyl pyrimidines as biosynthetic starting points. We present evidence that some of these modification systems are also widely dispersed across prokaryotes and certain eukaryotes such as basidiomycetes, chlorophyte and stramenopile alga, where they could serve as novel epigenetic marks for regulation or discrimination of self from non-self DNA. Our study extends the role of the PUA-like fold domains in recognition of modified nucleic acids and predicts versions of the ASCH and EVE domains to be novel 'readers' of modified bases in DNA. These results open opportunities for the investigation of the biology of these systems and

  11. Nuclear-encoded factors involved in post-transcriptional processing and modification of mitochondrial tRNAs in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) encodes 22 tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) that are necessary for the intraorganellar translation of the 13 mtDNA-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Maturation of mt-tRNAs involves 5′ and 3′ nucleolytic excision from precursor RNAs, as well as extensive post-transcriptional modifications. Recent data suggest that over 7% of all mt-tRNA residues in mammals undergo post-transcriptional modification, with over 30 different modified mt-tRNA positions so far described. These processing and modification steps are necessary for proper mt-tRNA function, and are performed by dedicated, nuclear-encoded enzymes. Recent growing evidence suggests that mutations in these nuclear genes (nDNA), leading to incorrect maturation of mt-tRNAs, are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. Furthermore, mtDNA mutations in mt-tRNA genes, which may also affect mt-tRNA function, processing, and modification, are also frequently associated with human disease. In theory, all pathogenic mt-tRNA variants should be expected to affect only a single process, which is mitochondrial translation, albeit to various extents. However, the clinical manifestations of mitochondrial disorders linked to mutations in mt-tRNAs are extremely heterogeneous, ranging from defects of a single tissue to complex multisystem disorders. This review focuses on the current knowledge of nDNA coding for proteins involved in mt-tRNA maturation that have been linked to human mitochondrial pathologies. We further discuss the possibility that tissue specific regulation of mt-tRNA modifying enzymes could play an important role in the clinical heterogeneity observed for mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mt-tRNA genes. PMID:25806043

  12. The interplay of restriction-modification systems with mobile genetic elements and their prokaryotic hosts

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Pedro H.; Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P.C.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of restriction-modification (R-M) systems in providing immunity against horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and in stabilizing mobile genetic elements (MGEs) have been much debated. However, few studies have precisely addressed the distribution of these systems in light of HGT, its mechanisms and its vectors. We analyzed the distribution of R-M systems in 2261 prokaryote genomes and found their frequency to be strongly dependent on the presence of MGEs, CRISPR-Cas systems, integrons and natural transformation. Yet R-M systems are rare in plasmids, in prophages and nearly absent from other phages. Their abundance depends on genome size for small genomes where it relates with HGT but saturates at two occurrences per genome. Chromosomal R-M systems might evolve under cycles of purifying and relaxed selection, where sequence conservation depends on the biochemical activity and complexity of the system and total gene loss is frequent. Surprisingly, analysis of 43 pan-genomes suggests that solitary R-M genes rarely arise from the degradation of R-M systems. Solitary genes are transferred by large MGEs, whereas complete systems are more frequently transferred autonomously or in small MGEs. Our results suggest means of testing the roles for R-M systems and their associations with MGEs. PMID:25120263

  13. Genetic modification of photosynthesis with E. coli genes for trehalose synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pellny, Till K; Ghannoum, Oula; Conroy, Jann P; Schluepmann, Henriette; Smeekens, Sjef; Andralojc, John; Krause, Klaus Peter; Goddijn, Oscar; Paul, Matthew J

    2004-01-01

    Improvement in photosynthesis per unit leaf area has been difficult to alter by breeding or genetic modification. We report large changes in photosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum transformed with E. coli genes for the trehalose pathway. Significantly, photosynthetic capacity (CO2 assimilation at varying light and CO2, and quantum yield of PSII electron transport) per unit leaf area and per leaf dry weight were increased in lines of N. tabacum transformed with the E. coli gene otsA, which encodes trehalose phosphate synthase. In contrast, transformation with otsB, which encodes trehalose phosphate phosphatase or Trec, encoding trehalose phosphate hydrolase, produced the opposite effect. Changes in CO2 assimilation per unit leaf area were closely related to the amount and activity of Rubisco, but not to the maximum activities of other Calvin cycle enzymes. Alterations in photosynthesis were associated with trehalose 6-phosphate content rather than trehalose. When growth parameters were determined, a greater photosynthetic capacity did not translate into greater relative growth rate or biomass. This was because photosynthetic capacity was negatively related to leaf area and leaf area ratio. In contrast, relative growth rate and biomass were positively related to leaf area. These results demonstrate a novel means of modifying Rubisco content and photosynthesis, and the complexities of regulation of photosynthesis at the whole plant level, with potential benefits to biomass production through improved leaf area.

  14. Effects of genetic modification on herbivore-induced volatiles from maize.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jennifer M; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2006-04-01

    Large-scale implementation of transgenic crop varieties raises concerns about possible nontarget effects on other organisms. This study examines the effects of genetic modification on plant volatile production and its potential impact on arthropod population dynamics. We compared herbivore-induced volatile emissions from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) maize plants to those from a nontransformed isoline following exposure to various types of leaf damage. When equal numbers of Helicoverpa zea Boddie (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae fed on Bt and non-Bt maize, volatile emissions were significantly lower in the transgenic plants, which also exhibited less leaf damage. When damage levels were controlled by adding more larvae to Bt plants, the plants' volatile emissions increased but displayed significant differences from those of nontransgenic plants. Significantly higher amounts of linalool, beta-myrcene, and geranyl acetate were released from transgenic maize than from non-Bt plants. Manipulating the duration of feeding by individual larvae to produce similar damage patterns resulted in similar volatile profiles for Bt and non-Bt plants. Controlling damage levels more precisely by mechanically wounding leaves and applying larval regurgitant likewise resulted in similar emission patterns for Bt and non-Bt maize. Overall, changes in the herbivore-induced volatile profiles of Bt maize appeared to be a consequence of altered larval feeding behavior rather than of changes in biochemical plant defense pathways. The implications of these findings for understanding the impacts of plant-mediated cues on pest and natural enemy behavior in transgenic crop systems are discussed.

  15. Clinical lung xenotransplantation--what donor genetic modifications may be necessary?

    PubMed

    Cooper, David K C; Ekser, Burcin; Burlak, Christopher; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Hara, Hidetaka; Paris, Leela; Tector, A Joseph; Phelps, Carol; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Ayares, David; Robson, Simon C; Pierson, Richard N

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful lung xenotransplantation appear to be even greater than for other organs. This difficulty may be related to several macro anatomic factors, such as the uniquely fragile lung parenchyma and associated blood supply that results in heightened vulnerability of graft function to segmental or lobar airway flooding caused by loss of vascular integrity (also applicable to allotransplants). There are also micro-anatomic considerations, such as the presence of large numbers of resident inflammatory cells, such as pulmonary intravascular macrophages and natural killer (NK) T cells, and the high levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF) associated with the microvasculature. We have considered what developments would be necessary to allow successful clinical lung xenotransplantation. We suggest this will only be achieved by multiple genetic modifications of the organ-source pig, in particular to render the vasculature resistant to thrombosis. The major problems that require to be overcome are multiple and include (i) the innate immune response (antibody, complement, donor pulmonary and recipient macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils, and NK cells), (ii) the adaptive immune response (T and B cells), (iii) coagulation dysregulation, and (iv) an inflammatory response (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, HMGB1, C-reactive protein). We propose that the genetic manipulation required to provide normal thromboregulation alone may include the introduction of genes for human thrombomodulin/endothelial protein C-receptor, and/or tissue factor pathway inhibitor, and/or CD39/CD73; the problem of pig vWF may also need to be addressed. It would appear that exploration of every available therapeutic path will be required if lung xenotransplantation is to be successful. To initiate a clinical trial of lung xenotransplantation, even as a bridge to allotransplantation (with a realistic possibility of survival long enough for a human lung allograft to be obtained), significant advances and much

  16. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  17. Quantitative Genetics Identifies Cryptic Genetic Variation Involved in the Paternal Regulation of Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Nuno D.; Bemer, Marian; Müller, Lena M.; Baroux, Célia; Spillane, Charles; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development requires a correct balancing of maternal and paternal genetic information. This balance is mediated by genomic imprinting, an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression. The parental conflict (or kinship) theory proposes that imprinting can evolve due to a conflict between maternal and paternal alleles over resource allocation during seed development. One assumption of this theory is that paternal alleles can regulate seed growth; however, paternal effects on seed size are often very low or non-existent. We demonstrate that there is a pool of cryptic genetic variation in the paternal control of Arabidopsis thaliana seed development. Such cryptic variation can be exposed in seeds that maternally inherit a medea mutation, suggesting that MEA acts as a maternal buffer of paternal effects. Genetic mapping using recombinant inbred lines, and a novel method for the mapping of parent-of-origin effects using whole-genome sequencing of segregant bulks, indicate that there are at least six loci with small, paternal effects on seed development. Together, our analyses reveal the existence of a pool of hidden genetic variation on the paternal control of seed development that is likely shaped by parental conflict. PMID:26811909

  18. Quantitative Genetics Identifies Cryptic Genetic Variation Involved in the Paternal Regulation of Seed Development.

    PubMed

    Pires, Nuno D; Bemer, Marian; Müller, Lena M; Baroux, Célia; Spillane, Charles; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development requires a correct balancing of maternal and paternal genetic information. This balance is mediated by genomic imprinting, an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression. The parental conflict (or kinship) theory proposes that imprinting can evolve due to a conflict between maternal and paternal alleles over resource allocation during seed development. One assumption of this theory is that paternal alleles can regulate seed growth; however, paternal effects on seed size are often very low or non-existent. We demonstrate that there is a pool of cryptic genetic variation in the paternal control of Arabidopsis thaliana seed development. Such cryptic variation can be exposed in seeds that maternally inherit a medea mutation, suggesting that MEA acts as a maternal buffer of paternal effects. Genetic mapping using recombinant inbred lines, and a novel method for the mapping of parent-of-origin effects using whole-genome sequencing of segregant bulks, indicate that there are at least six loci with small, paternal effects on seed development. Together, our analyses reveal the existence of a pool of hidden genetic variation on the paternal control of seed development that is likely shaped by parental conflict.

  19. Genetic modification of alphaGal expression in xenogeneic endothelial cells yields a complex immunological response.

    PubMed

    Fischbeck, J A; Baier, J M; Akella, R; Hern-Anderson, D; Schmidt, C E

    2001-12-01

    The source of cells for tissue engineering applications remains a hurdle, predominantly for procedures in which there is insufficient time to harvest a patient's own cells. Animal cells are readily available, but undergo immune rejection. Rejection of animal (i.e., xenogeneic) tissue involves practically every component of the immune system. The initial phase, hyperacute rejection (HAR), involves natural xenoreactive antibodies and the complement system, and leads to endothelial cell lysis and rapid tissue destruction. The cell-surface epitope, galactose-alpha(1,3)-galactose (alphaGal), is presumed to play a key role in HAR. The later stage of immune response (delayed xenograft rejection or DXR), is mediated by immune cells such as monocytes. Carbohydrates are likely also involved in DXR, but their role in this phase of the immune response is less clear. A better understanding of all stages of xenogeneic immune rejection may make it feasible to create cell lines that are immune tolerant. In these studies, we have genetically modified bovine endothelial cells to study the roles of carbohydrates in immune rejection. Our studies suggest that one or more epitopes other than alphaGal may influence complement-mediated lysis. Furthermore, antibodies, as instigators in the complement response, and monocytes appear to recognize different cell surface epitopes.

  20. Mapping and expression analyses during porcine foetal muscle development of 12 genes involved in histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Y B; Yerle, M; Liu, B

    2009-04-01

    Histone modifications (methylation and demethylation) regulate gene expression and play a role in cell proliferation and differentiation by their actions on chromatin structure. In this context, we studied the temporal expression profiles of genes acting on histone methylation and demethylation during skeletal muscle proliferation and differentiation. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the mRNA levels of CARM1, JARID1A, JMJD2A, LSD1, PRMT2, PRMT5, SMYD1, SMYD2, SMYD3, SETDB1, Suv39h2 and SUZ12 in foetal skeletal muscle. Our results showed that CARM1, JARID1A, JMJD2A, SMYD1 and SMYD2 were differentially expressed in embryonic muscles of 33 days post-conception (dpc), 65 dpc and 90 dpc. These 12 genes were mapped to porcine chromosomes (SSC) 2q21-24, 5q25, 6q35, 6q12-21, 6p15, 7q21, 3q21-27, 9q26, 10p16, 4q15-16, 10q14-16 and 12p12 respectively. Taking into account the reported QTL mapping results, gene expression analysis and radiation hybrid mapping results, these results suggest that five genes (CARM1, JARID1A, JMJD2A, SMYD1 and SMYD2) could be good candidate genes for growth and backfat thickness traits.

  1. Hydroxylation of a conserved tRNA modification establishes non-universal genetic code in echinoderm mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Asuteka; Ohara, Mitsuhiro; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2017-09-01

    The genetic code is not frozen but still evolving, which can result in the acquisition of 'dialectal' codons that deviate from the universal genetic code. RNA modifications in the anticodon region of tRNAs play a critical role in establishing such non-universal genetic codes. In echinoderm mitochondria, the AAA codon specifies asparagine instead of lysine. By analyzing mitochondrial (mt-) tRNA(Lys) isolated from the sea urchin (Mesocentrotus nudus), we discovered a novel modified nucleoside, hydroxy-N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (ht(6)A), 3' adjacent to the anticodon (position 37). Biochemical analysis revealed that ht(6)A37 has the ability to prevent mt-tRNA(Lys) from misreading AAA as lysine, thereby indicating that hydroxylation of N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t(6)A) contributes to the establishment of the non-universal genetic code in echinoderm mitochondria.

  2. The most common genes involved in epigenetics modifications among Iranian patients with breast cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Iranshahi, N; Zafari, P; Yari, K H; Alizadeh, E

    2016-10-31

    Breast cancer, with a lifelong risk of one in nine, is the most common cancer among women. In Iran, breast cancer is one of the growing and important women's health problems. Several environmental, genetic and epigenetics factors have been suggested to have a role in breast cancer development. Epigenetics alterations are heritable changes in gene expression that occur without causing any change in DNA sequence. DNA methylation as a main epigenetics modification in human cancer is found as a promising biomarker in early detection of breast cancer. Association between epigenetics changes of many gene promoters with the risk of breast cancer has been investigated worldwide. This aberrant methylation may be occur in specific genes related to cell cycle, cell adhesion, apoptosis and DNA repairing mechanisms and results in silencing of these important genes. In this review study, we have gathered all the data until December 2015 about epigenetics modifications among Iranian population with breast cancer.  We searched international web databases such as: PubMed, Scopus, and Persian web databases; IranMedex and Magiran to investigate the association of epigenetics change and incidence of breast cancer among Iranian population. Using "methylation" or "epigenetics" key words and "Iran" as affiliation, all the published data were 31. After arbitrary limitation in search keywords the result have been 20 articles.  Data analysis show that "ER-α" and "E-Cadherin" are most common studied genes in epigenetics modifications. Also, maximum studies were done in Tehran and Tabriz. We thought that more studies will be helpful to reveal the relation of methylation status in candidate genes with the breast cancer risk in Iranian populations.

  3. Genetic modification of iron metabolism in mice affects the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Buhnik-Rosenblau, Keren; Moshe-Belizowski, Shirly; Danin-Poleg, Yael; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G

    2012-10-01

    The composition of the gut microbiota is affected by environmental factors as well as host genetics. Iron is one of the important elements essential for bacterial growth, thus we hypothesized that changes in host iron homeostasis, may affect the luminal iron content of the gut and thereby the composition of intestinal bacteria. The iron regulatory protein 2 (Irp2) and one of the genes mutated in hereditary hemochromatosis Hfe , are both proteins involved in the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis. To test our hypothesis, fecal metal content and a selected spectrum of the fecal microbiota were analyzed from Hfe-/-, Irp2-/- and their wild type control mice. Elevated levels of iron as well as other minerals in feces of Irp2-/- mice compared to wild type and Hfe-/- mice were observed. Interestingly significant variation in the general fecal-bacterial population-patterns was observed between Irp2-/- and Hfe-/- mice. Furthermore the relative abundance of five species, mainly lactic acid bacteria, was significantly different among the mouse lines. Lactobacillus (L.) murinus and L. intestinalis were highly abundant in Irp2-/- mice, Enterococcus faecium species cluster and a species most similar to Olsenella were highly abundant in Hfe-/- mice and L. johnsonii was highly abundant in the wild type mice. These results suggest that deletion of iron metabolism genes in the mouse host affects the composition of its intestinal bacteria. Further studying the relationship between gut microbiota and genetic mutations affecting systemic iron metabolism in human should lead to clinical implications.

  4. Osteoblastic Differentiation of Human and Equine Adult Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells when BMP-2 or BMP-7 homodimer genetic modification is compared to BMP-2/7 heterodimer genetic modification in the Presence and Absence of Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, RS; Goodrich, LR; Frisbie, DD; Kisiday, JD; Carbone, B; McIlwraith, CW; Centeno, CJ; Hidaka, C

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSCs) have been targeted for use in enhancement of bone healing; and their osteogenic potential may be further augmented by genes encoding bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP’s). The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of genetic modification of human and equine BMDMSCs with BMP-2 or 7 or BMP-2 and 7 on their osteoblastogenic differentiation in the presence or absence of dexamethasone. The BMDMSCs were harvested from the iliac crest of 3 human donors and tuber coxae of 3 equine donors. Monolayer cells were genetically modified using adenovirus vectors encoding BMP-2, -7 or both and cultured in the presence or absence of dexamethasone. Expression of BMPs was confirmed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. To evaluate osteoblastic differentiation, cellular morphology was assessed every other day and expression and secretion of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), as well as expression levels of osteonectin, osteocalcin, and Runx2 were measured for up to 14 days. Human and equine BMDMSCs showed a capacity for osteogenic differentiation regardless of genetic modification or dexamethasone supplementation. Dexamethasone supplementation was more important for osteoblastogenic differentiation of equine BMDMSCs than human BMDMSCs. Genetic modification of BMDMSCs increased ALP secretion with AdBMP-2 homodimer having the greatest effect in both human and equine cells compared to AdBMP 7 or AdBMP 2/7. BMP protein elution rates reached their maximal concentration between day 4 and 8 and remained relatively stable thereafter, suggesting that genetically modified BMDMSCs could be useful for cell-based delivery of BMPs to a site of bone formation. PMID:20309952

  5. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L

    2009-06-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase super-family, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  6. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L.

    2010-01-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase superfamily, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  7. Genetic Variation and Its Reflection on Posttranslational Modifications in Frequency Clock and Mating Type a-1 Proteins in Sordaria fimicola

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Rabia; Akram, Faiza; Jamil, Tazeen; Lee, Siu Fai

    2017-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) occur in all essential proteins taking command of their functions. There are many domains inside proteins where modifications take place on side-chains of amino acids through various enzymes to generate different species of proteins. In this manuscript we have, for the first time, predicted posttranslational modifications of frequency clock and mating type a-1 proteins in Sordaria fimicola collected from different sites to see the effect of environment on proteins or various amino acids pickings and their ultimate impact on consensus sequences present in mating type proteins using bioinformatics tools. Furthermore, we have also measured and walked through genomic DNA of various Sordaria strains to determine genetic diversity by genotyping the short sequence repeats (SSRs) of wild strains of S. fimicola collected from contrasting environments of two opposing slopes (harsh and xeric south facing slope and mild north facing slope) of Evolution Canyon (EC), Israel. Based on the whole genome sequence of S. macrospora, we targeted 20 genomic regions in S. fimicola which contain short sequence repeats (SSRs). Our data revealed genetic variations in strains from south facing slope and these findings assist in the hypothesis that genetic variations caused by stressful environments lead to evolution. PMID:28717646

  8. Genetic Variation and Its Reflection on Posttranslational Modifications in Frequency Clock and Mating Type a-1 Proteins in Sordaria fimicola.

    PubMed

    Arif, Rabia; Akram, Faiza; Jamil, Tazeen; Mukhtar, Hamid; Lee, Siu Fai; Saleem, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) occur in all essential proteins taking command of their functions. There are many domains inside proteins where modifications take place on side-chains of amino acids through various enzymes to generate different species of proteins. In this manuscript we have, for the first time, predicted posttranslational modifications of frequency clock and mating type a-1 proteins in Sordaria fimicola collected from different sites to see the effect of environment on proteins or various amino acids pickings and their ultimate impact on consensus sequences present in mating type proteins using bioinformatics tools. Furthermore, we have also measured and walked through genomic DNA of various Sordaria strains to determine genetic diversity by genotyping the short sequence repeats (SSRs) of wild strains of S. fimicola collected from contrasting environments of two opposing slopes (harsh and xeric south facing slope and mild north facing slope) of Evolution Canyon (EC), Israel. Based on the whole genome sequence of S. macrospora, we targeted 20 genomic regions in S. fimicola which contain short sequence repeats (SSRs). Our data revealed genetic variations in strains from south facing slope and these findings assist in the hypothesis that genetic variations caused by stressful environments lead to evolution.

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia associated skeletal muscle weakness involves mitochondrial dysfunction and epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Winchester, Lee J; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-05-01

    HHcy has been implicated in elderly frailty, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Using C57 and CBS+/- mice and C2C12 cell line, we investigated mechanisms behind HHcy induced skeletal muscle weakness and fatigability. Possible alterations in metabolic capacity (levels of LDH, CS, MM-CK and COX-IV), in structural proteins (levels of dystrophin) and in mitochondrial function (ATP production) were examined. An exercise regimen was employed to reverse HHcy induced changes. CBS+/- mice exhibited more fatigability, and generated less contraction force. No significant changes in muscle morphology were observed. However, there is a corresponding reduction in large muscle fiber number in CBS+/- mice. Excess fatigability was not due to changes in key enzymes involved in metabolism, but was due to reduced ATP levels. A marginal reduction in dystrophin levels along with a decrease in mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) were observed. There was also an increase in the mir-31, and mir-494 quantities that were implicated in dystrophin and mtTFA regulation respectively. The molecular changes elevated during HHcy, with the exception of dystrophin levels, were reversed after exercise. In addition, the amount of NRF-1, one of the transcriptional regulators of mtTFA, was significantly decreased. Furthermore, there was enhancement in mir-494 levels and a concomitant decline in mtTFA protein quantity in homocysteine treated cells. These changes in C2C12 cells were also accompanied by an increase in DNMT3a and DNMT3b proteins and global DNA methylation levels. Together, these results suggest that HHcy plays a causal role in enhanced fatigability through mitochondrial dysfunction which involves epigenetic changes.

  10. Genetic modification of dividing cells using episomally maintained S/MAR DNA vectors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suet-Ping; Harbottle, Richard Paul

    2013-08-13

    The development of episomally maintained DNA vectors to genetically modify dividing cells efficiently and stably, without the risk of integration-mediated genotoxicity, should prove to be a valuable tool in genetic research. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Region (S/MAR) DNA vectors to model the restoration of a functional wild-type copy of the gene folliculin (FLCN) implicated in the renal cancer Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD). Inactivation of FLCN has been shown to be involved in the development of sporadic renal neoplasia in BHD. S/MAR-modified BHD tumor cells (named UOK257-FS) show restored stable FLCN expression and have normalized downstream TGFβ signals. We demonstrate that UOK257-FS cells show a reduced growth rate in vitro and suppression of xenograft tumor development in vivo, compared with the original FLCN-null UOK257 cell line. In addition, we demonstrate that mTOR signaling in serum-starved FLCN-restored cells is differentially regulated compared with the FLCN-deficient cell. The novel UOK257-FS cell line will be useful for studying the signaling pathways affected in BHD pathogenesis. Significantly, this study demonstrates the suitability of S/MAR vectors to successfully model the functional expression of a therapeutic gene in a cancer cell line and will aid the identification of novel cancer markers for diagnosis and therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e115; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.40; published online 13 August 2013.

  11. Methylated H3K4, a transcription-associated histone modification, is involved in the DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Faucher, David; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2010-08-26

    Eukaryotic genomes are associated with a number of proteins such as histones that constitute chromatin. Post-translational histone modifications are associated with regulatory aspects executed by chromatin and all transactions on genomic DNA are dependent on them. Thus, it will be relevant to understand how histone modifications affect genome functions. Here we show that the mono ubiquitylation of histone H2B and the tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3), both known for their involvement in transcription, are also important for a proper response of budding yeast cells to DNA damaging agents and the passage through S-phase. Cells that cannot methylate H3K4 display a defect in double-strand break (DSB) repair by non-homologous end joining. Furthermore, if such cells incur DNA damage or encounter a stress during replication, they very rapidly lose viability, underscoring the functional importance of the modification. Remarkably, the Set1p methyltransferase as well as the H3K4me3 mark become detectable on a newly created DSB. This recruitment of Set1p to the DSB is dependent on the presence of the RSC complex, arguing for a contribution in the ensuing DNA damage repair process. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Set1p and its substrate H3K4me3, which has been reported to be important for the transcription of active genes, also plays an important role in genome stability of yeast cells. Given the high degree of conservation for the methyltransferase and the histone mark in a broad variety of organisms, these results could have similar implications for genome stability mechanisms in vertebrate and mammalian cells.

  12. CAZyme content of Pochonia chlamydosporia reflects that chitin and chitosan modification are involved in nematode parasitism.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Martinez, Almudena; Lenfant, Nicolas; Escudero, Nuria; Zavala-Gonzalez, Ernesto A; Henrissat, Bernard; Lopez-Llorca, Luis V

    2016-11-01

    Pochonia chlamydosporia is a soil fungus with a multitrophic lifestyle combining endophytic and saprophytic behaviors, in addition to a nematophagous activity directed against eggs of root-knot and other plant parasitic nematodes. The carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by the genome of P. chlamydosporia suggest that the endophytic and saprophytic lifestyles make use of a plant cell wall polysaccharide degradation machinery that can target cellulose, xylan and, to a lesser extent, pectin. This enzymatic machinery is completed by a chitin breakdown system that involves not only chitinases, but also chitin deacetylases and a large number of chitosanases. P. chlamydosporia can degrade and grow on chitin and is particularly efficient on chitosan. The relevance of chitosan breakdown during nematode egg infection is supported by the immunolocalization of chitosan in Meloidogyne javanica eggs infected by P. chlamydosporia and by the fact that the fungus expresses chitosanase and chitin deacetylase genes during egg infection. This suggests that these enzymes are important for the nematophagous activity of the fungus and they are targets for improving the capabilities of P. chlamydosporia as a biocontrol agent in agriculture.

  13. Parallel Post-Polyketide Synthase Modification Mechanism Involved in FD-891 Biosynthesis in Streptomyces graminofaciens A-8890.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Kawamura, Koichi; Furuya, Takashi; Yamanishi, Hiroto; Motegi, Atsushi; Komatsubara, Akiko; Numakura, Mario; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-02-02

    To isolate a key polyketide biosynthetic intermediate for the 16-membered macrolide FD-891 (1), we inactivated two biosynthetic genes coding for post-polyketide synthase (PKS) modification enzymes: a methyltransferase (GfsG) and a cytochrome P450 (GfsF). Consequently, FD-892 (2), which lacks the epoxide moiety at C8-C9, the hydroxy group at C10, and the O-methyl group at O-25 of FD-891, was isolated from the gfsF/gfsG double-knockout mutant. In addition, 25-O-methyl-FD-892 (3) and 25-O-demethyl-FD-891 (4) were isolated from the gfsF and gfsG mutants, respectively. We also confirmed that GfsG efficiently catalyzes the methylation of 2 and 4 in vitro. Further, GfsF catalyzed the epoxidation of the double bond at C8-C9 of 2 and 3 and subsequent hydroxylation at C10, to afford 4 and 1, respectively. These results suggest that a parallel post-PKS modification mechanism is involved in FD-891 biosynthesis.

  14. Discovery and Characterization of an Amidinotransferase Involved in the Modification of Archaeal tRNA*♦

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Gabriela; Chikwana, Vimbai M.; Maxwell, Adrienne; El-Yacoubi, Basma; Swairjo, Manal A.; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    The presence of the 7-deazaguanosine derivative archaeosine (G+) at position 15 in tRNA is one of the diagnostic molecular characteristics of the Archaea. The biosynthesis of this modified nucleoside is especially complex, involving the initial production of 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine (preQ0), an advanced precursor that is produced in a tRNA-independent portion of the biosynthesis, followed by its insertion into the tRNA by the enzyme tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (arcTGT), which replaces the target guanine base yielding preQ0-tRNA. The enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of preQ0 were recently identified, but the enzyme(s) catalyzing the conversion of preQ0-tRNA to G+-tRNA have remained elusive. Using a comparative genomics approach, we identified a protein family implicated in the late stages of archaeosine biosynthesis. Notably, this family is a paralog of arcTGT and is generally annotated as TgtA2. Structure-based alignments comparing arcTGT and TgtA2 reveal that TgtA2 lacks key arcTGT catalytic residues and contains an additional module. We constructed a Haloferax volcanii ΔtgtA2 derivative and demonstrated that tRNA from this strain lacks G+ and instead accumulates preQ0. We also cloned the corresponding gene from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (mj1022) and characterized the purified recombinant enzyme. Recombinant MjTgtA2 was shown to convert preQ0-tRNA to G+-tRNA using several nitrogen sources and to do so in an ATP-independent process. This is the only example of the conversion of a nitrile to a formamidine known in biology and represents a new class of amidinotransferase chemistry. PMID:20129918

  15. Discovery and characterization of an amidinotransferase involved in the modification of archaeal tRNA.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Gabriela; Chikwana, Vimbai M; Maxwell, Adrienne; El-Yacoubi, Basma; Swairjo, Manal A; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2010-04-23

    The presence of the 7-deazaguanosine derivative archaeosine (G(+)) at position 15 in tRNA is one of the diagnostic molecular characteristics of the Archaea. The biosynthesis of this modified nucleoside is especially complex, involving the initial production of 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine (preQ(0)), an advanced precursor that is produced in a tRNA-independent portion of the biosynthesis, followed by its insertion into the tRNA by the enzyme tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (arcTGT), which replaces the target guanine base yielding preQ(0)-tRNA. The enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of preQ(0) were recently identified, but the enzyme(s) catalyzing the conversion of preQ(0)-tRNA to G(+)-tRNA have remained elusive. Using a comparative genomics approach, we identified a protein family implicated in the late stages of archaeosine biosynthesis. Notably, this family is a paralog of arcTGT and is generally annotated as TgtA2. Structure-based alignments comparing arcTGT and TgtA2 reveal that TgtA2 lacks key arcTGT catalytic residues and contains an additional module. We constructed a Haloferax volcanii DeltatgtA2 derivative and demonstrated that tRNA from this strain lacks G(+) and instead accumulates preQ(0). We also cloned the corresponding gene from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (mj1022) and characterized the purified recombinant enzyme. Recombinant MjTgtA2 was shown to convert preQ(0)-tRNA to G(+)-tRNA using several nitrogen sources and to do so in an ATP-independent process. This is the only example of the conversion of a nitrile to a formamidine known in biology and represents a new class of amidinotransferase chemistry.

  16. Does Religious Involvement Protect against Early Drinking? A Behavior Genetic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, K. Paige

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescent involvement in religious organizations has been hypothesized to protect against early age at first drink. However, the correlation between adolescent religiosity and later age at first drink may be confounded by environmental or genetic differences between families. This study tests whether, after controlling for shared…

  17. Does Religious Involvement Protect against Early Drinking? A Behavior Genetic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, K. Paige

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescent involvement in religious organizations has been hypothesized to protect against early age at first drink. However, the correlation between adolescent religiosity and later age at first drink may be confounded by environmental or genetic differences between families. This study tests whether, after controlling for shared…

  18. Genetic analysis of maintenance of pEC156, a naturally occurring Escherichia coli plasmid that carries genes of the EcoVIII restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Werbowy, Olesia; Boratynski, Robert; Dekowska, Agnieszka; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    In the present study the role of the mechanisms responsible for maintenance of a natural plasmid pEC156, that carries genes of the EcoVIII restriction-modification system was investigated. Analysis of this plasmid's genetic content revealed the presence of genetic determinants suggesting two such mechanisms. The first of them relies on site specific recombination utilizing the Xer/cer molecular machinery, while the second involves a restriction-modification system as an addiction module. Our analysis indicated that three factors affect the maintenance of pEC156: (i) a cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers, (ii) a gene coding for EcoVIII endonuclease, and (iii) plasmid copy number control. The lowest stability was observed with pEC156 derivatives deprived of the cer site. Decreased stability of pEC156 derivatives was also observed in E.coli strains deficient in genes coding for proteins involved in plasmid multimer resolution (XerC, XerD, ArgR and PepA). A similar effect, but to a much lesser extent was observed for the pEC156 derivative without a functional gene coding for EcoVIII endonuclease. Our results indicate that the presence of the cer site is more important for pEC156 stable maintenance than the presence of a functional gene coding for EcoVIII endonuclease. In our work we also tested maintenance of pEC156 possessing a ColE1-type replicon in bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae family. We have found that pEC156 was most stably maintained in Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella oxytoca representing coli-type enterobacteria. We have found that in all enterobacteria tested pEC156 derivatives deficient in the cer site were significantly less stably maintained than cer(+) variants.

  19. Comparison of Allergenicity at Gly m 4 and Gly m Bd 30K of Soybean after Genetic Modification.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Chang, Ching-Yun; Liao, En-Chih

    2017-02-15

    Despite rapid growth of genetically modified (GM) crops, effective evaluations of genetic modification on allergenicity are still lacking. Gly m Bd 30K is cross-reactive with cow's milk protein casein, Gly m 4, and with birch pollen allergen Bet v 1. Here we compared the allergenicity between GM and non-GM soybeans with respect to the foci Gly m 4 and Gly m Bd 30K. Recombinant allergens of Gly m Bd 30K and Gly m 4 were generated and polyclonal antibodies raised to identify these two allergenic components in soybeans. GM soybean was first PCR-confirmed using 35S promoter. A total of 20 soybeans (half GM, half non-GM) obtained from a food market were used to assess their allergenicity based on IgE-binding and histamine release. The concentrations of Gly m Bd 30K and Gly m 4 in soybeans were then determined. Most soybean-allergic patients (9 of 10) showed IgE-positive reactions to the allergen of 30 kDa in molecular weight. That allergen turned out to be Glycine max Gly m Bd 30K based on LC-MS/MS analyses. Gly m Bd 30K is therefore the major allergen in the soybean. An increase in the transcription of both the Gly m 4 (stress-induced protein SAM22) and Gly m Bd 28K (soybean allergen precursor) was found after genetic modification. The protein concentrations of Gly m 4 and Gly m Bd 30K were not statistically significant different between non-GM and GM soybeans. There were also no statistical significances between them in the tests of IgE binding and histamine release. In conclusion, soybeans showed similar concentrations of Gly m Bd 30K and Gly m 4 regardless of genetic modification or absence thereof. The allergenicity of both Gly m Bd 30K and Gly m 4 was therefore not altered after genetic modification. Patients showing hypersensitivity to soybeans and who had pre-existing allergy to birch pollen and cow's milk casein might not further increase their allergic reactions following exposures to the GM soybeans.

  20. HMCan-diff: a method to detect changes in histone modifications in cells with different genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ashoor, Haitham; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Bajic, Vladimir B; Boeva, Valentina

    2017-05-05

    Comparing histone modification profiles between cancer and normal states, or across different tumor samples, can provide insights into understanding cancer initiation, progression and response to therapy. ChIP-seq histone modification data of cancer samples are distorted by copy number variation innate to any cancer cell. We present HMCan-diff, the first method designed to analyze ChIP-seq data to detect changes in histone modifications between two cancer samples of different genetic backgrounds, or between a cancer sample and a normal control. HMCan-diff explicitly corrects for copy number bias, and for other biases in the ChIP-seq data, which significantly improves prediction accuracy compared to methods that do not consider such corrections. On in silico simulated ChIP-seq data generated using genomes with differences in copy number profiles, HMCan-diff shows a much better performance compared to other methods that have no correction for copy number bias. Additionally, we benchmarked HMCan-diff on four experimental datasets, characterizing two histone marks in two different scenarios. We correlated changes in histone modifications between a cancer and a normal control sample with changes in gene expression. On all experimental datasets, HMCan-diff demonstrated better performance compared to the other methods. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. HMCan-diff: a method to detect changes in histone modifications in cells with different genetic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Haitham; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Comparing histone modification profiles between cancer and normal states, or across different tumor samples, can provide insights into understanding cancer initiation, progression and response to therapy. ChIP-seq histone modification data of cancer samples are distorted by copy number variation innate to any cancer cell. We present HMCan-diff, the first method designed to analyze ChIP-seq data to detect changes in histone modifications between two cancer samples of different genetic backgrounds, or between a cancer sample and a normal control. HMCan-diff explicitly corrects for copy number bias, and for other biases in the ChIP-seq data, which significantly improves prediction accuracy compared to methods that do not consider such corrections. On in silico simulated ChIP-seq data generated using genomes with differences in copy number profiles, HMCan-diff shows a much better performance compared to other methods that have no correction for copy number bias. Additionally, we benchmarked HMCan-diff on four experimental datasets, characterizing two histone marks in two different scenarios. We correlated changes in histone modifications between a cancer and a normal control sample with changes in gene expression. On all experimental datasets, HMCan-diff demonstrated better performance compared to the other methods. PMID:28053124

  2. Metabolic flux responses to genetic modification for shikimic acid production by Bacillus subtilis strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is a key chiral starting molecule for the synthesis of the neuramidase inhibitor GS4104 against viral influenza. Microbial production of SA has been extensively investigated in Escherichia coli, and to a less extent in Bacillus subtilis. However, metabolic flux of the high SA-producing strains has not been explored. In this study, we constructed with genetic manipulation and further determined metabolic flux with 13C-labeling test of high SA-producing B. subtilis strains. Results B. subtilis 1A474 had a mutation in SA kinase gene (aroI) and accumulated 1.5 g/L of SA. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA, aroB, aroC or aroD in B. subtilis revealed that aroD had the most significantly positive effects on SA production. Simultaneous overexpression of genes for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (aroA) and SA dehydrogenase (aroD) in B. subtilis BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD resulted in SA production of 3.2 g/L. 13C-Metabolic flux assay (MFA) on the two strains BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu and BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD indicated the carbon flux from glucose to SA increased to 4.6% in BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD from 1.9% in strain BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu. The carbon flux through tricarboxylic acid cycle significantly reduced, while responses of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis to high SA production were rather weak, in the strain BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD. Based on the results from MFA, two potential targets for further optimization of SA production were identified. Experiments on genetic deletion of phosphoenoylpyruvate kinase gene confirmed its positive influence on SA production, while the overexpression of the transketolase gene did not lead to increase in SA production. Conclusion Of the genes involved in shikimate pathway in B. subtilis, aroD exerted most significant influence on SA accumulation. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA and aroD doubled SA production than its parent strain. MFA revealed metabolic flux

  3. [Parkinson's disease: Role of genetic and environment factors. Involvement in everyday clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Defebvre, L

    2010-10-01

    Genetics and exposure to toxins constitute the main determinants in the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). At least, 13 loci and nine genes involved in familial and sporadic forms have been described. A significant association between occupational exposure to pesticides (especially insecticides) and PD has been confirmed recently with rare cases even being recognized as occupational disease. We develop in this paper a practical approach for such situations where a common genetic or toxic origin is suggested. Such an approach can be applied very broadly using case by case study then further analysis in a specialized center of reference in the field of genetics or occupational diseases and the environment. A pedigree needs to be drawn to evaluate a potential genetic factor with, if possible, the examination of various family members. Depending on the mode of inheritance, age of disease onset and phenotypic expression, genetic analysis will be carried out (mainly the study of parkin gene for recessive transmission and LRRK2 gene for dominant transmission). The evaluation of a toxic factor is more difficult because its direct involvement may not always be defined with certainty, the collection of information is more complex (product list, causal relationship, protection system used...). The course of action will identify the existence of a potential risk factor particularly in patients at risk (farmers, workers in a factory using heavy metals) by considering secondary specialized consultation with the occupational physician or pathology consultation work for possible development of a procedure for recognition of occupational disease.

  4. A strategy for genetic modification of the spike-encoding segment of human reovirus T3D for reovirus targeting.

    PubMed

    van den Wollenberg, D J M; van den Hengel, S K; Dautzenberg, I J C; Cramer, S J; Kranenburg, O; Hoeben, R C

    2008-12-01

    Human Orthoreovirus Type 3 Dearing is not pathogenic to humans and has been evaluated clinically as an oncolytic agent. Its transduction efficiency and the tumor cell selectivity may be enhanced by incorporating ligands for alternative receptors. However, the genetic modification of reoviruses has been difficult, and genetic targeting of reoviruses has not been reported so far. Here we describe a technique for generating genetically targeted reoviruses. The propagation of wild-type reoviruses on cells expressing a modified sigma 1-encoding segment embedded in a conventional RNA polymerase II transcript leads to substitution of the wild-type genome segment by the modified version. This technique was used for generating reoviruses that are genetically targeted to an artificial receptor expressed on U118MG cells. These cells lack the junction adhesion molecule-1 and therefore resist infection by wild-type reoviruses. The targeted reoviruses were engineered to carry the ligand for this receptor at the C terminus of the sigma 1 spike protein. This demonstrates that the C terminus of the sigma 1 protein is a suitable locale for the insertion of oligopeptide ligands and that targeting of reoviruses is feasible. The genetically targeted viruses can be propagated using the modified U118MG cells as helper cells. This technique may be applicable for the improvement of human reoviruses as oncolytic agents.

  5. Efficient marker-free recovery of custom genetic modifications with CRISPR/Cas9 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Arribere, Joshua A; Bell, Ryan T; Fu, Becky X H; Artiles, Karen L; Hartman, Phil S; Fire, Andrew Z

    2014-11-01

    Facilitated by recent advances using CRISPR/Cas9, genome editing technologies now permit custom genetic modifications in a wide variety of organisms. Ideally, modified animals could be both efficiently made and easily identified with minimal initial screening and without introducing exogenous sequence at the locus of interest or marker mutations elsewhere. To this end, we describe a coconversion strategy, using CRISPR/Cas9 in which screening for a dominant phenotypic oligonucleotide-templated conversion event at one locus can be used to enrich for custom modifications at another unlinked locus. After the desired mutation is identified among the F1 progeny heterozygous for the dominant marker mutation, F2 animals that have lost the marker mutation are picked to obtain the desired mutation in an unmarked genetic background. We have developed such a coconversion strategy for Caenorhabditis elegans, using a number of dominant phenotypic markers. Examining the coconversion at a second (unselected) locus of interest in the marked F1 animals, we observed that 14-84% of screened animals showed homologous recombination. By reconstituting the unmarked background through segregation of the dominant marker mutation at each step, we show that custom modification events can be carried out recursively, enabling multiple mutant animals to be made. While our initial choice of a coconversion marker [rol-6(su1006)] was readily applicable in a single round of coconversion, the genetic properties of this locus were not optimal in that CRISPR-mediated deletion mutations at the unselected rol-6 locus can render a fraction of coconverted strains recalcitrant to further rounds of similar mutagenesis. An optimal marker in this sense would provide phenotypic distinctions between the desired mutant/+ class and alternative +/+, mutant/null, null/null, and null/+ genotypes. Reviewing dominant alleles from classical C. elegans genetics, we identified one mutation in dpy-10 and one mutation in

  6. Parent Involvement, Sibling Companionship, and Adolescent Substance Use: A Longitudinal, Genetically-Informed Design

    PubMed Central

    Samek, Diana R.; Rueter, Martha A.; Keyes, Margaret A.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2015-01-01

    A large literature shows that parent and sibling relationship factors are associated with an increased likelihood of adolescent substance use. Less is known about the etiology of these associations. Using a genetically-informed sibling design, we examined the prospective associations between parent involvement, sibling companionship, and adolescent substance use at two points in mid- and late-adolescence. Adolescents were adopted (n = 568) or the biological offspring of both parents (n = 412). Cross-lagged panel results showed that higher levels of parent involvement in early adolescence were associated with lower levels of substance use later in adolescence. Results did not significantly differ across adoption status, suggesting this association cannot be due to passive gene-environment correlation. Adolescent substance use at Time 1 was not significantly associated with parent involvement at Time 2, suggesting this association does not appear to be solely due to evocative (i.e. “child-driven”) effects either. Together, results support a protective influence of parent involvement on subsequent adolescent substance use that is environmental in nature. The cross-paths between sibling companionship and adolescent substance use were significant and negative in direction (i.e., protective) for sisters, but positive for brothers (in line with a social contagion hypothesis). These effects were consistent across genetically related and unrelated pairs, and thus appear to be environmentally mediated. For mixed gender siblings, results were consistent with environmentally-driven, protective influence hypothesis for genetically unrelated pairs, but in line with a genetically influenced, social contagion hypothesis for genetically related pairs. Implications are discussed. PMID:26030026

  7. A genetic system to assess in vivo the functions of histones and histone modifications in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Günesdogan, Ufuk; Jäckle, Herbert; Herzig, Alf

    2010-10-01

    Despite the fundamental role of canonical histones in nucleosome structure, there is no experimental system for higher eukaryotes in which basic questions about histone function can be directly addressed. We developed a new genetic tool for Drosophila melanogaster in which the canonical histone complement can be replaced with multiple copies of experimentally modified histone transgenes. This new histone-replacement system provides a well-defined and direct cellular assay system for histone function with which to critically test models in chromatin biology dealing with chromatin assembly, variant histone functions and the biological significance of distinct histone modifications in a multicellular organism.

  8. The Functional Significance of Posttranslational Modifications on Polo-Like Kinase 1 Revealed by Chemical Genetic Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, Amber L.; McPherson, Brittany M.; Trueman, Natalie G.; Burkard, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis is coordinated by carefully controlled phosphorylation and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) plays a central role in regulating mitosis and cytokinesis by phosphorylating target proteins. Yet, Plk1 is itself a target for posttranslational modification by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We developed a chemical-genetic complementation assay to evaluate the functional significance of 34 posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on human Plk1. To do this, we used human cells that solely express a modified analog-sensitive Plk1 (Plk1AS) and complemented with wildtype Plk1. The wildtype Plk1 provides cells with a functional Plk1 allele in the presence of 3-MB-PP1, a bulky ATP-analog inhibitor that specifically inhibits Plk1AS. Using this approach, we evaluated the ability of 34 singly non-modifiable Plk1 mutants to complement Plk1AS in the presence of 3-MB-PP1. Mutation of the T-loop activating residue T210 and adjacent T214 are lethal, but surprisingly individual mutation of the remaining 32 posttranslational modification sites did not disrupt the essential functions of Plk1. To evaluate redundancy, we simultaneously mutated all phosphorylation sites in the kinase domain except for T210 and T214 or all sites in the C-terminal polo-box domain (PBD). We discovered that redundant phosphorylation events within the kinase domain are required for accurate chromosome segregation in anaphase but those in the PBD are dispensable. We conclude that PTMs within the T-loop of Plk1 are essential and nonredundant, additional modifications in the kinase domain provide redundant control of Plk1 function, and those in the PBD are dispensable for essential mitotic functions of Plk1. This comprehensive evaluation of Plk1 modifications demonstrates that although phosphorylation and ubiquitination are important for mitotic progression, many individual PTMs detected in human tissue may have redundant, subtle, or dispensable roles in gene function. PMID

  9. Genetic analysis of absB, a Streptomyces coelicolor locus involved in global antibiotic regulation.

    PubMed

    Adamidis, T; Champness, W

    1992-07-01

    The filamentous soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor is known to produce four antibiotics which are genetically and structurally distinct. An extensive search for antibiotic regulatory mutants led to the discovery of absB mutants, which are antibiotic deficient but sporulation proficient. Genetic analysis of the absB mutants has resulted in definition of the absB locus at 5 o'clock on the genetic map. Multiple cloned copies of the actII-ORF4 gene, an activator of synthesis of the antibiotic actinorhodin, restore actinorhodin biosynthetic capability to the absB mutants. These results are interpreted to mean that the failure of absB mutants to produce antibiotics results from decreased expression of the antibiotic genes. The absB gene is proposed to be involved in global regulation of antibiotic synthesis.

  10. Emotional attitudes of young people completing secondary schools towards genetic modification of organisms (GMO) and genetically modified foods (GMF).

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, Anna; Zagórski, Jerzy; Bujak, Franciszek; Lachowski, Stanisław; Florek-Łuszczki, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was recognition of the opinions of adolescents completing secondary schools concerning genetically modified organisms and genetically modified food, especially the respondents' emotional attitude towards scientific achievements in the area of live genetically modified organisms. The study covered a group of 500 school adolescents completing secondary school at the level of maturity examination. The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey using a self-designed questionnaire form. Knowledge concerning the possible health effects of consumption of food containing GMO among adolescents competing secondary schools is on a relatively low level; the adolescents examined 'know rather little' or 'very little know' about this problem. In respondents' opinions the results of reliable studies pertaining to the health effects of consumption of GMO 'rather do not exist'. The respondents are against the cultivation of GM plants and breeding of GM animals on own farm in the future. Secondary school adolescents considered that the production of genetically modified food means primarily the enrichment of biotechnological companies, higher income for food producers, and not the elimination of hunger in the world or elimination of many diseases haunting humans.

  11. Possible modification of Alzheimer's disease by statins in midlife: interactions with genetic and non-genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Mitsuru; Sato, Naoyuki; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of statins, commonly prescribed for hypercholesterolemia, in treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not yet been fully established. A recent randomized clinical trial did not show any therapeutic effects of two statins on cognitive function in AD. Interestingly, however, the results of the Rotterdam study, one of the largest prospective cohort studies, showed reduced risk of AD in statin users. Based on the current understanding of statin actions and AD pathogenesis, it is still worth exploring whether statins can prevent AD when administered decades before the onset of AD or from midlife. This review discusses the possible beneficial effects of statins, drawn from previous clinical observations, pathogenic mechanisms, which include β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau metabolism, genetic and non-genetic risk factors (apolipoprotein E, cholesterol, sex, hypertension, and diabetes), and other clinical features (vascular dysfunction and oxidative and inflammatory stress) of AD. These findings suggest that administration of statins in midlife might prevent AD in late life by modifying genetic and non-genetic risk factors for AD. It should be clarified whether statins inhibit Aβ accumulation, tau pathological features, and brain atrophy in humans. To answer this question, a randomized controlled study using amyloid positron emission tomography (PET), tau-PET, and magnetic resonance imaging would be useful. This clinical evaluation could help us to overcome this devastating disease.

  12. Visualization and genetic modification of resident brain microglia using lentiviral vectors regulated by microRNA-9.

    PubMed

    Åkerblom, Malin; Sachdeva, Rohit; Quintino, Luis; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Chapman, Katie Z; Manfre, Giuseppe; Lindvall, Olle; Lundberg, Cecilia; Jakobsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Functional studies of resident microglia require molecular tools for their genetic manipulation. Here we show that microRNA-9-regulated lentiviral vectors can be used for the targeted genetic modification of resident microglia in the rodent brain. Using transgenic reporter mice, we demonstrate that murine microglia lack microRNA-9 activity, whereas most other cells in the brain express microRNA-9. Injection of microRNA-9-regulated vectors into the adult rat brain induces transgene expression specifically in cells with morphological features typical of ramified microglia. The majority of transgene-expressing cells colabels with the microglia marker Iba1. We use this approach to visualize and isolate activated resident microglia without affecting circulating and infiltrating monocytes or macrophages in an excitotoxic lesion model in rat striatum. The microRNA-9-regulated vectors described here are a straightforward and powerful tool that facilitates functional studies of resident microglia.

  13. Genetic modification of chondrocytes with insulin-like growth factor-1 enhances cartilage healing in an equine model.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, L R; Hidaka, C; Robbins, P D; Evans, C H; Nixon, A J

    2007-05-01

    Gene therapy with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increases matrix production and enhances chondrocyte proliferation and survival in vitro. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arthroscopically-grafted chondrocytes genetically modified by an adenovirus vector encoding equine IGF-1 (AdIGF-1) would have a beneficial effect on cartilage healing in an equine femoropatellar joint model. A total of 16 horses underwent arthroscopic repair of a single 15 mm cartilage defect in each femoropatellar joint. One joint received 2 x 10(7) AdIGF-1 modified chondrocytes and the contralateral joint received 2 x 10(7) naive (unmodified) chondrocytes. Repairs were analysed at four weeks, nine weeks and eight months after surgery. Morphological and histological appearance, IGF-1 and collagen type II gene expression (polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry), collagen type II content (cyanogen bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis), proteoglycan content (dimethylmethylene blue assay), and gene expression for collagen type I, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, aggrecanase-1, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and TIMP-3 were evaluated. Genetic modification of chondrocytes significantly increased IGF-1 mRNA and ligand production in repair tissue for up to nine weeks following transplantation. The gross and histological appearance of IGF-1 modified repair tissue was improved over control defects. Gross filling of defects was significantly improved at four weeks, and a more hyaline-like tissue covered the lesions at eight months. Histological outcome at four and nine weeks post-transplantation revealed greater tissue filling of defects transplanted with genetically modified chondrocytes, whereas repair tissue in control defects was thin and irregular and more fibrous. Collagen type II expression in IGF-1 gene-transduced defects was increased 100-fold at four weeks and

  14. Efficient Marker-Free Recovery of Custom Genetic Modifications with CRISPR/Cas9 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Arribere, Joshua A.; Bell, Ryan T.; Fu, Becky X. H.; Artiles, Karen L.; Hartman, Phil S.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2014-01-01

    Facilitated by recent advances using CRISPR/Cas9, genome editing technologies now permit custom genetic modifications in a wide variety of organisms. Ideally, modified animals could be both efficiently made and easily identified with minimal initial screening and without introducing exogenous sequence at the locus of interest or marker mutations elsewhere. To this end, we describe a coconversion strategy, using CRISPR/Cas9 in which screening for a dominant phenotypic oligonucleotide-templated conversion event at one locus can be used to enrich for custom modifications at another unlinked locus. After the desired mutation is identified among the F1 progeny heterozygous for the dominant marker mutation, F2 animals that have lost the marker mutation are picked to obtain the desired mutation in an unmarked genetic background. We have developed such a coconversion strategy for Caenorhabditis elegans, using a number of dominant phenotypic markers. Examining the coconversion at a second (unselected) locus of interest in the marked F1 animals, we observed that 14–84% of screened animals showed homologous recombination. By reconstituting the unmarked background through segregation of the dominant marker mutation at each step, we show that custom modification events can be carried out recursively, enabling multiple mutant animals to be made. While our initial choice of a coconversion marker [rol-6(su1006)] was readily applicable in a single round of coconversion, the genetic properties of this locus were not optimal in that CRISPR-mediated deletion mutations at the unselected rol-6 locus can render a fraction of coconverted strains recalcitrant to further rounds of similar mutagenesis. An optimal marker in this sense would provide phenotypic distinctions between the desired mutant/+ class and alternative +/+, mutant/null, null/null, and null/+ genotypes. Reviewing dominant alleles from classical C. elegans genetics, we identified one mutation in dpy-10 and one mutation in

  15. Genetic and epigenetic determinants mediate proneness of oncogene breakpoint sites for involvement in TCR translocations.

    PubMed

    Larmonie, N S D; van der Spek, A; Bogers, A J J C; van Dongen, J J M; Langerak, A W

    2014-03-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) translocations are a genetic hallmark of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lead to juxtaposition of oncogene and TCR loci. Oncogene loci become involved in translocations because they are accessible to the V(D)J recombination machinery. Such accessibility is predicted at cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS) sites ('Type 1') as well as other sites that are subject to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) ('Type 2') during early stages of thymocyte development. As chromatin accessibility markers have not been analyzed in the context of TCR-associated translocations, various genetic and epigenetic determinants of LMO2, TAL1 and TLX1 translocation breakpoint (BP) sites and BP cluster regions (BCRs) were examined in human thymocytes to establish DSB proneness and heterogeneity of BP site involvement in TCR translocations. Our data show that DSBs in BCRs are primarily induced in the presence of a genetic element of sequence vulnerability (cRSSs, transposable elements), whereas breaks at single BP sites lacking such elements are more likely induced by chance or perhaps because of patient-specific genetic vulnerability. Vulnerability to obtain DSBs is increased by features that determine chromatin organization, such as methylation status and nucleosome occupancy, although at different levels at different BP sites.

  16. Human loci involved in drug biotransformation: worldwide genetic variation, population structure, and pharmacogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Fuselli, Silvia

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the role of inheritance in individual variation in drug response is the focus of pharmacogenetics (PGx). A key part of this understanding is quantifying the role of genetic ancestry in this phenotypic outcome. To provide insight into the relationship between ethnicity and drug response, this study first infers the global distribution of PGx variation and defines its structure. Second, the study evaluates if geographic population structure stems from all PGx loci in general, or if structure is caused by specific genes. Lastly, we identify the genetic variants contributing the greatest proportion of such structure. Our study describes the global genetic structure of PGx loci across the 52 populations of the Human Genome Diversity Cell-Line Panel, the most inclusive set of human populations freely available for studies on human genetic variation. By analysing genetic variation at 1,001 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in biotransformation of exogenous substances, we describe the between-populations PGx variation, as well geographical groupings of diversity. In addition, with discriminant analysis of principal component (DAPC), we infer how many and which groups of populations are supported by PGx variation, and identify which SNPs actually contribute to the PGx structure between such groups. Our results show that intergenic, synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs show similar levels of genetic variation across the globe. Conversely, loci coding for Cytochrome P450s (mainly metabolizing exogenous substances) show significantly higher levels of genetic diversity between populations than the other gene categories. Overall, genetic variation at PGx loci correlates with geographic distances between populations, and the apportionment of genetic variation is similar to that observed for the rest of the genome. In other words, the pattern of PGx variation has been mainly shaped by the demographic history of our species, as in the case of most of our

  17. Gene flow in genetically engineered perennial grasses: Lessons for modification of dedicated bioenergy crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential ecological consequences of the commercialization of genetically engineered (GD) crops have been the subject of intense debate, particularly when the GE crops are perennial and capable of outcrossing to wild relatives. The essential ecological impact issues for engi...

  18. Gene flow in genetically engineered perennial grasses: Lessons for modification of dedicated bioenergy crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential ecological consequences of the commercialization of genetically engineered (GD) crops have been the subject of intense debate, particularly when the GE crops are perennial and capable of outcrossing to wild relatives. The essential ecological impact issues for engi...

  19. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael

    2011-06-23

    Plants utilize light as a source of information via families of photoreceptors such as the red/far-red absorbing phytochromes (PHY) and the blue/UVA absorbing cryptochromes (CRY). The main goal of the Neff lab is to use molecular-genetic mutant screens to elucidate signaling components downstream of these photoreceptors. Activation-tagging mutagenesis led to the identification of two putative transcription factors that may be involved in both photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling pathways. sob1-D (suppressor of phyB-dominant) mutant phenotypes are caused by the over-expression of a Dof transcription factor previously named OBP3. Our previous studies indicate that OBP3 is a negative regulator of light-mediated cotyledon expansion and may be involved in modulating responsiveness to the growth-regulating hormone auxin. The sob2-D mutant uncovers a role for LEP, a putative AP2/EREBP-like transcription factor, in seed germination, hypocotyl elongation and responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid. Based on photobiological and genetic analysis of OBP3-knockdown and LEP-null mutations, we hypothesize that these transcription factors are involved in both light-mediated seedling development and hormone signaling. To examine the role that these genes play in photomorphogenesis we will: 1) Further explore the genetic role of OBP3 in cotyledon/leaf expansion and other photomorphogenic processes as well as examine potential physical interactions between OBP3 and CRY1 or other signaling components that genetically interact with this transcription factor 2) Test the hypothesis that OBP3 is genetically involved in auxin signaling and root development as well as examine the affects of this hormone and light on OBP3 protein accumulation. 3) Test the hypothesis that LEP is involved in seed germination, seedling photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling. Together these experiments will lead to a greater understanding of the complexity of interactions between photoreceptors and DNA

  20. Differential modification of genetic susceptibility to childhood eczema by two probiotics.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A R; Han, D Y; Wickens, K; Barthow, C; Mitchell, E A; Stanley, T V; Dekker, J; Crane, J; Ferguson, L R

    2014-10-01

    In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled birth cohort, we have recently shown a beneficial effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) for the prevention of eczema in children through to 6 years of age but no effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis HN019 (HN019). Among this cohort of children, we aim to investigate whether these probiotics could modify the expression of genetic predisposition to eczema conferred by genetic variation in susceptibility genes. Thirty-three eczema susceptibility SNPs (in eleven genes) were genotyped in 331 children of European ancestry. Children who carried a genetic variant that put them at a high risk of developing eczema were less likely to develop eczema if they had been randomized to the HN001 intervention group compared to those in the placebo group. HN019 was also able to protect against the effects of some SNPs. As well as modifying genetic susceptibility to childhood eczema, HN001 was also found to modify genetic susceptibility to eczema severity and atopy risk. This is the first study to show an effect of a probiotic on reducing eczema risk amongst those with particular eczema-associated genotypes. Our findings suggest that Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 may be particularly effective in preventing eczema in children with specific high-risk genotypes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Increasing public involvement in enriching our fish stocks through genetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, H O; Quezada, F

    1999-11-01

    A total of 70%, of the world's conventional commercial fish species are now fully exploited, overexploited, depleted or recovering from depletion. This dramatic crash in the capture world fisheries production has led to problems in foods distribution, balance of payments, employment, and ecological depletion. Public support for breeding programs with terrestrial farm animals and plants in agriculture have revolutionized this industry over the past few hundred years. However, new genetic rearing technologies to improve marine animal production through aquaculture that utilize modern biology to obtain sustainable aquaculture and preserve biodiversity provide a promise to address these problems. However aquaculture has not been subject to public discussion and approval. Public involvement, not necessarily acquiescence, provide value added in the decision making process. Public understanding and involvement involves three stages. (i) Public concern over the pool of genetic information; (ii) if aquaculture is to respond to the fisheries crises with innovation, the knowledge gap between public understanding and scientific information must be bridged; and (iii) strategies must be developed for achieving this. Release of recombinant DNA to the environment, and handling exotic species, are useful case studies. Illustrations will be given of communication bridges to the public and ways to involve the public in making policy decisions.

  2. Genetic Control of Chromatin States in Humans Involves Local and Distal Chromosomal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grubert, Fabian; Zaugg, Judith B.; Kasowski, Maya; Ursu, Oana; Spacek, Damek V.; Martin, Alicia R.; Greenside, Peyton; Srivas, Rohith; Phanstiel, Doug H.; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Heidari, Nastaran; Euskirchen, Ghia; Huber, Wolfgang; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Kundaje, Anshul; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Deciphering the impact of genetic variants on gene regulation is fundamental to understanding human disease. Although gene regulation often involves long-range interactions, it is unknown to what extent non-coding genetic variants influence distal molecular phenotypes. Here, we integrate chromatin profiling for three histone marks in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 75 sequenced individuals with LCL-specific Hi-C and ChIA-PET-based chromatin contact maps to uncover one of the largest collections of local and distal histone quantitative trait loci (hQTLs). Distal QTLs are enriched within topologically associated domains and exhibit largely concordant variation of chromatin state coordinated by proximal and distal non-coding genetic variants. Histone QTLs are enriched for common variants associated with autoimmune diseases and enable identification of putative target genes of disease-associated variants from genome-wide association studies. These analyses provide insights into how genetic variation can affect human disease phenotypes by coordinated changes in chromatin at interacting regulatory elements. PMID:26300125

  3. Genes and quantitative genetic variation involved with senescence in cells, organs, and the whole plant

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Senescence, the deterioration of morphological, physiological, and reproductive functions with age that ends with the death of the organism, was widely studied in plants. Genes were identified that are linked to the deterioration of cells, organs and the whole plant. It is, however, unclear whether those genes are the source of age dependent deterioration or get activated to regulate such deterioration. Furthermore, it is also unclear whether such genes are active as a direct consequence of age or because they are specifically involved in some developmental stages. At the individual level, it is the relationship between quantitative genetic variation, and age that can be used to detect the genetic signature of senescence. Surprisingly, the latter approach was only scarcely applied to plants. This may be the consequence of the demanding requirements for such approaches and/or the fact that most research interest was directed toward plants that avoid senescence. Here, I review those aspects in turn and call for an integrative genetic theory of senescence in plants. Such conceptual development would have implications for the management of plant genetic resources and generate progress on fundamental questions raised by aging research. PMID:25755664

  4. Systematic review of genetic association studies involving histologically confirmed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kayleigh L; Miller, Michael H; Dillon, John F

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has an increasing prevalence in Western countries, affecting up to 20% of the population. Objective The aim of this project was to systematically review and summarise the genetic association studies that investigate possible genetic influences that confer susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Design The MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases were searched to identify candidate gene studies on histologically diagnosed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Results A total of 85 articles have been summarised and categorised on the basis of the general pathway each candidate gene is involved in, including lipid metabolism, lipoprotein processing, cholesterol synthesis, glucose homoeostasis, inflammatory response, protection against oxidative stress and whole body metabolism. Conclusions The main findings demonstrate a small but consistent association of PNPLA3 with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Genetic association studies have investigated general disease susceptibility, histological characteristics, severity and progression. However, further study is required to better elucidate the genetic factors influencing fatty liver disease. PMID:26462272

  5. DNA Mapping Made Simple: An Intellectual Activity about the Genetic Modification of Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Miguel; Arrabaca, Joao; Chagas, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Since the discovery of the DNA double helix (in 1953 by Watson and Crick), technologies have been developed that allow scientists to manipulate the genome of bacteria to produce human hormones, as well as the genome of crop plants to achieve high yield and enhanced flavor. The universality of the genetic code has allowed DNA isolated from a…

  6. DNA Mapping Made Simple: An Intellectual Activity about the Genetic Modification of Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Miguel; Arrabaca, Joao; Chagas, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Since the discovery of the DNA double helix (in 1953 by Watson and Crick), technologies have been developed that allow scientists to manipulate the genome of bacteria to produce human hormones, as well as the genome of crop plants to achieve high yield and enhanced flavor. The universality of the genetic code has allowed DNA isolated from a…

  7. Progress and prospects for genetic modification of nonhuman primate models in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Chan, Anthony W S

    2013-01-01

    The growing interest of modeling human diseases using genetically modified (transgenic) nonhuman primates (NHPs) is a direct result of NHPs (rhesus macaque, etc.) close relation to humans. NHPs share similar developmental paths with humans in their anatomy, physiology, genetics, and neural functions; and in their cognition, emotion, and social behavior. The NHP model within biomedical research has played an important role in the development of vaccines, assisted reproductive technologies, and new therapies for many diseases. Biomedical research has not been the primary role of NHPs. They have mainly been used for safety evaluation and pharmacokinetics studies, rather than determining therapeutic efficacy. The development of the first transgenic rhesus macaque (2001) revolutionized the role of NHP models in biomedicine. Development of the transgenic NHP model of Huntington's disease (2008), with distinctive clinical features, further suggested the uniqueness of the model system; and the potential role of the NHP model for human genetic disorders. Modeling human genetic diseases using NHPs will continue to thrive because of the latest advances in molecular, genetic, and embryo technologies. NHPs rising role in biomedical research, specifically pre-clinical studies, is foreseeable. The path toward the development of transgenic NHPs and the prospect of transgenic NHPs in their new role in future biomedicine needs to be reviewed. This article will focus on the advancement of transgenic NHPs in the past decade, including transgenic technologies and disease modeling. It will outline new technologies that may have significant impact in future NHP modeling and will conclude with a discussion of the future prospects of the transgenic NHP model.

  8. Progress and Prospects for Genetic Modification of Nonhuman Primate Models in Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony W. S.

    2013-01-01

    The growing interest of modeling human diseases using genetically modified (transgenic) nonhuman primates (NHPs) is a direct result of NHPs (rhesus macaque, etc.) close relation to humans. NHPs share similar developmental paths with humans in their anatomy, physiology, genetics, and neural functions; and in their cognition, emotion, and social behavior. The NHP model within biomedical research has played an important role in the development of vaccines, assisted reproductive technologies, and new therapies for many diseases. Biomedical research has not been the primary role of NHPs. They have mainly been used for safety evaluation and pharmacokinetics studies, rather than determining therapeutic efficacy. The development of the first transgenic rhesus macaque (2001) revolutionized the role of NHP models in biomedicine. Development of the transgenic NHP model of Huntington's disease (2008), with distinctive clinical features, further suggested the uniqueness of the model system; and the potential role of the NHP model for human genetic disorders. Modeling human genetic diseases using NHPs will continue to thrive because of the latest advances in molecular, genetic, and embryo technologies. NHPs rising role in biomedical research, specifically pre-clinical studies, is foreseeable. The path toward the development of transgenic NHPs and the prospect of transgenic NHPs in their new role in future biomedicine needs to be reviewed. This article will focus on the advancement of transgenic NHPs in the past decade, including transgenic technologies and disease modeling. It will outline new technologies that may have significant impact in future NHP modeling and will conclude with a discussion of the future prospects of the transgenic NHP model. PMID:24174443

  9. Guided implant surgery with modification of the technique involving the raising of a semicircular miniflap: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Peñarrocha, María; Viña, José; Maestre, Laura; Peñarrocha, David; Balaguer, José

    2012-09-01

    An evaluation is made of pain, swelling and peri-implant attached mucosal width after implant-based rehabilitation involving guided surgery and a modification of the technique with the raising of a semicircular miniflap, in single and partial replacements. A case-control study was carried out. The study group consisted of 12 patients with the placement of 19 implants using a guided surgery and miniflap technique. The control group consisted of 12 patients with the placement of 22 implants using the conventional technique. Each patient scored postoperative swelling and pain by means of a visual analog scale (VAS). Attached vestibular mucosa width was evaluated 12 weeks after implant placement. Twelve operations were carried out in each group. Immediate aesthetics were established for all implants of the study group. One implant failed in each group. Maximum pain was recorded after 6 hours in both groups (mean VAS score 4 and 4.9 in the study and control group, respectively). Maximum swelling was recorded after 24 hours (mean VAS score 2.5) in the study group and on the second day (mean VAS score 3.4) in the control group. The mean attached vestibular mucosa width was 2.9 mm in the study group and 3.2 mm in the control group. In this preliminary study, guided implant surgery with a semicircular miniflap in single and partial replacements resulted in slightly less postoperative pain and swelling than with the conventional implant technique. The attached vestibular mucosa width was greater in the control group, though the differences were very small.

  10. Guided implant surgery with modification of the technique involving the raising of a semicircular miniflap: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Viña, José; Maestre, Laura; Peñarrocha, David; Balaguer, José

    2012-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation is made of pain, swelling and peri-implant attached mucosal width after implant-based rehabilitation involving guided surgery and a modification of the technique with the raising of a semicircular miniflap, in single and partial replacements. Study design: A case-control study was carried out. The study group consisted of 12 patients with the placement of 19 implants using a guided surgery and miniflap technique. The control group consisted of 12 patients with the placement of 22 implants using the conventional technique. Each patient scored postoperative swelling and pain by means of a visual analog scale (VAS). Attached vestibular mucosa width was evaluated 12 weeks after implant placement. Results: Twelve operations were carried out in each group. Immediate aesthetics were established for all implants of the study group. One implant failed in each group. Maximum pain was recorded after 6 hours in both groups (mean VAS score 4 and 4.9 in the study and control group, respectively). Maximum swelling was recorded after 24 hours (mean VAS score 2.5) in the study group and on the second day (mean VAS score 3.4) in the control group. The mean attached vestibular mucosa width was 2.9 mm in the study group and 3.2 mm in the control group. Conclusion: In this preliminary study, guided implant surgery with a semicircular miniflap in single and partial replacements resulted in slightly less postoperative pain and swelling than with the conventional implant technique. The attached vestibular mucosa width was greater in the control group, though the differences were very small. Key words:Guided surgery, flapless surgery, miniflap, peri-implant mucosa. PMID:22549666

  11. Gene discovery for enzymes involved in limonene modification or utilization by the mountain pine beetle-associated pathogen Grosmannia clavigera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Lim, Lynette; Madilao, Lina; Lah, Ljerka; Bohlmann, Joerg; Breuil, Colette

    2014-08-01

    To successfully colonize and eventually kill pine trees, Grosmannia clavigera (Gs cryptic species), the main fungal pathogen associated with the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), has developed multiple mechanisms to overcome host tree chemical defenses, of which terpenoids are a major component. In addition to a monoterpene efflux system mediated by a recently discovered ABC transporter, Gs has genes that are highly induced by monoterpenes and that encode enzymes that modify or utilize monoterpenes [especially (+)-limonene]. We showed that pine-inhabiting Ophiostomale fungi are tolerant to monoterpenes, but only a few, including Gs, are known to utilize monoterpenes as a carbon source. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that Gs can modify (+)-limonene through various oxygenation pathways, producing carvone, p-mentha-2,8-dienol, perillyl alcohol, and isopiperitenol. It can also degrade (+)-limonene through the C-1-oxygenated pathway, producing limonene-1,2-diol as the most abundant intermediate. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data indicated that Gs may utilize limonene 1,2-diol through beta-oxidation and then valine and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolic pathways. The data also suggested that at least two gene clusters, located in genome contigs 108 and 161, were highly induced by monoterpenes and may be involved in monoterpene degradation processes. Further, gene knockouts indicated that limonene degradation required two distinct Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), an epoxide hydrolase and an enoyl coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratase. Our work provides information on enzyme-mediated limonene utilization or modification and a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between an economically important fungal pathogen and its host's defense chemicals.

  12. Gene Discovery for Enzymes Involved in Limonene Modification or Utilization by the Mountain Pine Beetle-Associated Pathogen Grosmannia clavigera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Lim, Lynette; Madilao, Lina; Lah, Ljerka; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    To successfully colonize and eventually kill pine trees, Grosmannia clavigera (Gs cryptic species), the main fungal pathogen associated with the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), has developed multiple mechanisms to overcome host tree chemical defenses, of which terpenoids are a major component. In addition to a monoterpene efflux system mediated by a recently discovered ABC transporter, Gs has genes that are highly induced by monoterpenes and that encode enzymes that modify or utilize monoterpenes [especially (+)-limonene]. We showed that pine-inhabiting Ophiostomale fungi are tolerant to monoterpenes, but only a few, including Gs, are known to utilize monoterpenes as a carbon source. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that Gs can modify (+)-limonene through various oxygenation pathways, producing carvone, p-mentha-2,8-dienol, perillyl alcohol, and isopiperitenol. It can also degrade (+)-limonene through the C-1-oxygenated pathway, producing limonene-1,2-diol as the most abundant intermediate. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data indicated that Gs may utilize limonene 1,2-diol through beta-oxidation and then valine and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolic pathways. The data also suggested that at least two gene clusters, located in genome contigs 108 and 161, were highly induced by monoterpenes and may be involved in monoterpene degradation processes. Further, gene knockouts indicated that limonene degradation required two distinct Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), an epoxide hydrolase and an enoyl coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratase. Our work provides information on enzyme-mediated limonene utilization or modification and a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between an economically important fungal pathogen and its host's defense chemicals. PMID:24837377

  13. Oligosaccharide modification by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-V in macrophages are involved in pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Arisa; Yutani, Mizuki; Terao, Mika; Kimura, Akihiro; Itoi, Saori; Murota, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Eiji; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Oligosaccharide modification by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-V (GnT-V), which catalyses the formation of β1,6 GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine) branches on N-glycans, is associated with various pathologies, such as cancer metastasis, multiple sclerosis and liver fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrated the involvement of GnT-V in the pathophysiology of scleroderma. High expression of GnT-V was observed in infiltrating cells in skin section samples from systemic and localized patients with scleroderma. Most of the infiltrating cells were T cells and macrophages, most of which were CD163(+) M2 macrophages. To determine the role of GnT-V in scleroderma, we next investigated skin sclerosis in GnT-V knockout (MGAT5(-/-) ) mice. Expression of GnT-V was also elevated in bleomycin (BLM)-injected sclerotic skin, and MGAT5(-/-) mice were resistant to BLM-induced skin sclerosis with reduced collagen type 1 α1 content, suggesting the biological significance of GnT-V in skin sclerosis. Furthermore, the number of CD163(+) M2 macrophages and CD3-positive T cells in BLM-induced skin sclerosis was significantly fewer in MGAT5(-/-) mice. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), IL-4-induced expressions of Fizz1 and Ym1 were significantly reduced in MGAT5(-/-) mice-derived BMDMs. Taken together, these results suggest the induction of GnT-V in skin sclerosis progression is possibly dependent on increased numbers of M2 macrophages in the skin, which are important for tissue fibrosis and remodelling. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. MODIFICATION OF NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFCTS OF MERCURY BY A GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF COPROPORPHYRINOGEN OXIDASE IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James S.; Heyer, Nicholas J.; Echeverria, Diana; Russo, Joan E.; Martin, Michael D.; Bernardo, Mario F.; Luis, Henrique S.; Vaz, Lurdes; Farin, Federico M.

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is neurotoxic, and children may be particularly susceptible to this effect. A current major challenge is the identification of children who may be uniquely susceptible to Hg toxicity because of genetic disposition. We examined the hypothesis that CPOX4, a genetic variant of the heme pathway enzyme coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX) that affects susceptibility to mercury toxicity in adults, also modifies the neurotoxic effects of Hg in children. Five hundred seven children, 8–12 years of age at baseline, participated in a clinical trial to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects of Hg from dental amalgam tooth fillings in children. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and at 7 subsequent annual intervals for neurobehavioral performance and urinary mercury levels. Following the completion of the clinical trial, genotyping assays for CPOX4 allelic status were performed on biological samples provided by 330 of the trial participants. Regression modeling strategies were employed to evaluate associations between CPOX4 status, Hg exposure, and neurobehavioral test outcomes. Among girls, few significant CPOX4-Hg interactions or independent main effects for Hg or CPOX4 were observed. In contrast, among boys, numerous significant interaction effects between CPOX4 and Hg were observed spanning all 5 domains of neurobehavioral performance. All underlying dose-response associations between Hg exposure and test performance were restricted to boys with the CPOX4 variant, and all of these associations were in the expected direction where increased exposure to Hg decreased performance. These findings are the first to demonstrate genetic susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg exposure in children. The paucity of responses among same-age girls with comparable Hg exposure provides evidence of sexual dimorphism in genetic susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg in children and adolescents. PMID:22765978

  15. Modification of neurobehavioral effects of mercury by a genetic polymorphism of coproporphyrinogen oxidase in children.

    PubMed

    Woods, James S; Heyer, Nicholas J; Echeverria, Diana; Russo, Joan E; Martin, Michael D; Bernardo, Mario F; Luis, Henrique S; Vaz, Lurdes; Farin, Federico M

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is neurotoxic, and children may be particularly susceptible to this effect. A current major challenge is the identification of children who may be uniquely susceptible to Hg toxicity because of genetic disposition. We examined the hypothesis that CPOX4, a genetic variant of the heme pathway enzyme coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX) that affects susceptibility to mercury toxicity in adults, also modifies the neurotoxic effects of Hg in children. Five hundred seven children, 8-12 years of age at baseline, participated in a clinical trial to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects of Hg from dental amalgam tooth fillings in children. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and at 7 subsequent annual intervals for neurobehavioral performance and urinary mercury levels. Following the completion of the clinical trial, genotyping assays for CPOX4 allelic status were performed on biological samples provided by 330 of the trial participants. Regression modeling strategies were employed to evaluate associations between CPOX4 status, Hg exposure, and neurobehavioral test outcomes. Among girls, few significant CPOX4-Hg interactions or independent main effects for Hg or CPOX4 were observed. In contrast, among boys, numerous significant interaction effects between CPOX4 and Hg were observed spanning all 5 domains of neurobehavioral performance. All underlying dose-response associations between Hg exposure and test performance were restricted to boys with the CPOX4 variant, and all of these associations were in the expected direction where increased exposure to Hg decreased performance. These findings are the first to demonstrate genetic susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg exposure in children. The paucity of responses among same-age girls with comparable Hg exposure provides evidence of sexual dimorphism in genetic susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg in children and adolescents.

  16. Specialized Genetic Recombination Systems in Bacteria: Their Involvement in Gene Expression and Evolution,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    I AA-M98 873 WALTER EED ARMY INST OF RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC F/ 6 6 /13 I SPECIALIZED GENETIC RECOMBINATION SYSTEMS IN BACTERIA? THI R IM--ETC(U) 1980 D...YEO EOT5 EIDCV7E Bacteria: Their Involvement in Gene Expression _______________ and Evolution. 6 . PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.)G S...undifferentiated organisms that reproduce by asexual fission, a process characterized by the doubling of the cellular 81 2 09 11) 6 136 contents followed by

  17. Behavioral and Environmental Modification of the Genetic Influence on Body Mass Index: A Twin Study.

    PubMed

    Horn, Erin E; Turkheimer, Eric; Strachan, Eric; Duncan, Glen E

    2015-07-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has a strong genetic basis, with a heritability around 0.75, but is also influenced by numerous behavioral and environmental factors. Aspects of the built environment (e.g., environmental walkability) are hypothesized to influence obesity by directly affecting BMI, by facilitating or inhibiting behaviors such as physical activity that are related to BMI, or by suppressing genetic tendencies toward higher BMI. The present study investigated relative influences of physical activity and walkability on variance in BMI using 5079 same-sex adult twin pairs (70 % monozygotic, 65 % female). High activity and walkability levels independently suppressed genetic variance in BMI. Estimating their effects simultaneously, however, suggested that the walkability effect was mediated by activity. The suppressive effect of activity on variance in BMI was present even with a tendency for low-BMI individuals to select into environments that require higher activity levels. Overall, our results point to community- or macro-level interventions that facilitate individual-level behaviors as a plausible approach to addressing the obesity epidemic among US adults.

  18. Behavioral and environmental modification of the genetic influence on body mass index: A twin study

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Erin E.; Turkheimer, Eric; Strachan, Eric; Duncan, Glen E.

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has a strong genetic basis, with a heritability around 0.75, but is also influenced by numerous behavioral and environmental factors. Aspects of the built environment (e.g., environmental walkability) are hypothesized to influence obesity by directly affecting BMI, by facilitating or inhibiting behaviors such as physical activity that are related to BMI, or by suppressing genetic tendencies toward higher BMI. The present study investigated relative influences of physical activity and walkability on variance in BMI using 5,079 same-sex adult twin pairs (70% monozygotic, 65% female). High activity and walkability levels independently suppressed genetic variance in BMI. Estimating their effects simultaneously, however, suggested that the walkability effect was mediated by activity. The suppressive effect of activity on variance in BMI was present even with a tendency for low-BMI individuals to select into environments that require higher activity levels. Overall, our results point to community- or macro-level interventions that facilitate individual-level behaviors as a plausible approach to addressing the obesity epidemic among U.S. adults. PMID:25894925

  19. Science, governance, and public participation: an analysis of decision making on genetic modification in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Priya; Wright, Jeanette

    2012-05-01

    The acceptance of public participation in science and technology governance in liberal democratic contexts is evident in the institutionalization of a variety of mechanisms for participation in recent decades. Yet questions remain about the extent to which institutions have actually transformed their policy practice to embrace democratic governance of techno-scientific decision making. A critical discourse analysis of the response to public participation by the Environmental Risk ManagementAuthority (ERMA), the key decision-making body on genetic modification in Aotearoa/New Zealand, in a specific case demonstrates that ERMA systematically marginalized concerns raised by the public about risk management, ethics, and ecological, economic, and cultural issues in order to give primacy to a positivist, technological worldview. Such delegitimization of public perspectives pre-empts the possibility of the democratic governance of science.

  20. A survey of the use of soy in processed Turkish meat products and detection of genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Ulca, Pelin; Balta, Handan; Senyuva, Hamide Z

    2014-01-01

    To screen for possible illegal use of soybeans in meat products, the performance characteristics of a commercial polymer chain reaction (PCR) kit for detection of soybean DNA in raw and cooked meat products were established. Minced chicken and beef products containing soybean at levels from 0.1% to 10.0% were analysed by real-time PCR to amplify the soybean lectin gene. The PCR method could reliably detect the addition of soybean at a level of 0.1%. A survey of 38 Turkish processed meat products found only six samples to be negative for the presence of soybean. In 32 (84%) positive samples, 13 (34%) contained levels of soy above 0.1%. Of soybean positive samples, further DNA analysis was conducted by real-time PCR to detect whether genetically modified (GM) soybean had been used. Of 32 meat samples containing soybean, two samples were positive for GM modification.

  1. Genetic Modification of Short Rotation Poplar Biomass Feedstock for Efficient Conversion to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Dinus, R.J.

    2000-08-30

    The Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing poplars (Populus species and hybrids) as sources of renewable energy, i.e., ethanol. Notable increases in adaptability, volume productivity, and pest/stress resistance have been achieved via classical selection and breeding and intensified cultural practices. Significant advances have also been made in the efficiencies of harvesting and handling systems. Given these and anticipated accomplishments, program leaders are considering shifting some attention to genetically modifying feedstock physical and chemical properties, so as to improve the efficiency with which feedstocks can be converted to ethanol. This report provides an in-depth review and synthesis of opportunities for and feasibilities of genetically modifying feedstock qualities via classical selection and breeding, marker-aided selection and breeding, and genetic transformation. Information was collected by analysis of the literature, with emphasis on that published since 1995, and interviews with prominent scientists, breeders, and growers. Poplar research is well advanced, and literature is abundant. The report therefore primarily reflects advances in poplars, but data from other species, particularly other shortrotation hardwoods, are incorporated to fill gaps. An executive summary and recommendations for research, development, and technology transfer are provided immediately after the table of contents. The first major section of the report describes processes most likely to be used for conversion of poplar biomass to ethanol, the various physical and chemical properties of poplar feedstocks, and how such properties are expected to affect process efficiency. The need is stressed for improved understanding of the impact of change on both overall process and individual process step efficiencies. The second part documents advances in trait measurement instrumentation and methodology

  2. Homing endonucleases: from microbial genetic invaders to reagents for targeted DNA modification

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Barry L.

    2011-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are microbial DNA-cleaving enzymes that mobilize their own reading frames by generating double strand breaks at specific genomic invasion sites. These proteins display an economy of size, and yet recognize long DNA sequences (typically 20 to 30 basepairs). They exhibit a wide range of fidelity at individual nucleotide positions, in a manner that is strongly influenced by host constraints on the coding sequence of the targeted gene. The activity of these proteins leads to site-specific recombination events that can result in the insertion, deletion, mutation or correction of DNA sequences. Over the past 15 years the crystal structures of representatives from several homing endonuclease families have been solved, and methods have been described to create variants of these enzymes that cleave novel DNA targets. Engineered homing endonucleases proteins are now being used to generate targeted genomic modifications for a variety of biotech and medical applications. PMID:21220111

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes Toward, and Acceptability of Genetic Modification among Western Balkan University Students of Life Sciences (AGREE Study).

    PubMed

    Veličković, Vladica; Jović, Marko; Nalić, Ena; Višnjić, Aleksandar; Radulović, Olivera; Šagrić, Čedomir; Ćirić, Milan

    2016-01-01

    There are still no data on the attitudes and acceptance of genetic modification (GM) food in European developing countries, such as the Western Balkan countries. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and acceptance of GM but also to shed light on the multifactorial process leading to acceptance of genetic modifications among Western Balkan students of life sciences. In this cross-sectional study, the final study population sample was composed of 1251 university students. The instrument for data collection was a questionnaire consisting of 49 items composed of 5 sections taken from the literature. Attitudes toward GM were analyzed by using Q-mode factor analysis and principal component analysis was run for the assessment of perception of personal health risks. The acceptability of GM was analyzed in binary probit models assessing the acceptability of GM products in different areas of application with Q models, sociodemographic variables, perception of personal health risks factors, respondents' knowledge about biotechnology, gender, and age as explanatory variables. This study demonstrated that students of life sciences supported the implementation of GM in industry and medicine production but not in food production. Their acceptance was most influenced by 3 out of 5 attitude models that were identified (p < 0.0001). Regarding the perception of personal health risks, the factor "credence risks" was seen as a negative predictor of acceptance of GM in industry and food production (p < 0.05). The main knowledge predictor of rejecting GM was misconception, whereas real knowledge had no impact (p < 0.0001). The AGREE study provided the first rough picture of the knowledge, attitudes, and acceptance of GM in this area. Given the target population, it could be expected that the general population's acceptance of all observed elements, especially knowledge, would be lower.

  4. Dual targeting of gene delivery by genetic modification of adenovirus serotype 5 fibers and cell-selective transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Work, L M; Ritchie, N; Nicklin, S A; Reynolds, P N; Baker, A H

    2004-08-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene delivery is a promising approach for genetic manipulation of the vasculature and is being used in both preclinical models and clinical trials. However, safety concerns relating to infection of nontarget tissue and the poor infectivity of vascular cells compared to other cell types necessitates Ad vector refinement. Here, we combine a transductional targeting approach to improve vascular cell infectivity through RGD peptide insertion into adenovirus fibers, combined with transcriptional targeting to endothelial cells using a approximately 1 kb fragment of the fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-1 (FLT-1) promoter. Single- and double-modified vectors were characterized in human cell lines that either support or have silenced FLT-1 expression. In rat hepatocytes and endothelial cells, the double modification substantially shifted transduction profiles toward vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, in intact aortae derived from spontaneously hypertensive rats that display enhanced alphav integrin expression on dysfunctional endothelium, enhanced levels of transduction were observed using the double-modified vector but not in aortae derived from normotensive control rats. Our data indicate that Ad-mediated transduction can be beneficially modified in vitro and in vivo by combining fiber modification and a cell-selective promoter within a single-component vector system.

  5. Genetic, metabolic and environmental factors involved in the development of liver cirrhosis in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is a chronic illness caused by inflammatory responses and progressive fibrosis. Globally, the most common causes of chronic liver disease include persistent alcohol abuse, followed by viral hepatitis infections and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, regardless of the etiological factors, the susceptibility and degree of liver damage may be influenced by genetic polymorphisms that are associated with distinct ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Consequently, metabolic genes are influenced by variable environmental lifestyle factors, such as diet, physical inactivity, and emotional stress, which are associated with regional differences among populations. This Topic Highlight will focus on the genetic and environmental factors that may influence the metabolism of alcohol and nutrients in the setting of distinct etiologies of liver disease. The interaction between genes and environment in the current-day admixed population, Mestizo and Native Mexican, will be described. Additionally, genes involved in immune regulation, insulin sensitivity, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix deposition may modulate the degree of severity. In conclusion, LC is a complex disease. The onset, progression, and clinical outcome of LC among the Mexican population are influenced by specific genetic and environmental factors. Among these are an admixed genome with a heterogenic distribution of European, Amerindian and African ancestry; a high score of alcohol consumption; viral infections; a hepatopathogenic diet; and a high prevalence of obesity. The variance in risk factors among populations suggests that intervention strategies directed towards the prevention and management of LC should be tailored according to such population-based features. PMID:26556986

  6. Genetic, metabolic and environmental factors involved in the development of liver cirrhosis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-11-07

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is a chronic illness caused by inflammatory responses and progressive fibrosis. Globally, the most common causes of chronic liver disease include persistent alcohol abuse, followed by viral hepatitis infections and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, regardless of the etiological factors, the susceptibility and degree of liver damage may be influenced by genetic polymorphisms that are associated with distinct ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Consequently, metabolic genes are influenced by variable environmental lifestyle factors, such as diet, physical inactivity, and emotional stress, which are associated with regional differences among populations. This Topic Highlight will focus on the genetic and environmental factors that may influence the metabolism of alcohol and nutrients in the setting of distinct etiologies of liver disease. The interaction between genes and environment in the current-day admixed population, Mestizo and Native Mexican, will be described. Additionally, genes involved in immune regulation, insulin sensitivity, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix deposition may modulate the degree of severity. In conclusion, LC is a complex disease. The onset, progression, and clinical outcome of LC among the Mexican population are influenced by specific genetic and environmental factors. Among these are an admixed genome with a heterogenic distribution of European, Amerindian and African ancestry; a high score of alcohol consumption; viral infections; a hepatopathogenic diet; and a high prevalence of obesity. The variance in risk factors among populations suggests that intervention strategies directed towards the prevention and management of LC should be tailored according to such population-based features.

  7. Pesticides that inhibit the ubiquitin-proteasome system: effect measure modification by genetic variation in SKP1 in Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Shannon L; Fitzmaurice, Arthur G; Cockburn, Myles; Bronstein, Jeff M; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Ritz, Beate

    2013-10-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions known as Lewy bodies, a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology, may protect against cytotoxic proteins. Since the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) degrades cytotoxic proteins, dysfunction in the UPS may contribute to PD etiology. Our goal in this study was to screen pesticides for proteasome inhibition and investigate (i) whether ambient exposures to pesticides that inhibit the UPS increase PD risk and (ii) whether genetic variation in candidate genes of the UPS pathway modify those increased risks. We assessed 26S UPS activity in SK-N-MC(u) cells by fluorescence. We recruited idiopathic PD cases (n=360) and population-based controls (n=816) from three counties in California with considerable commercial agriculture. We determined ambient pesticide exposure by our validated GIS-based model utilizing residential and workplace address histories. We limited effect measure modification assessment to Caucasians (287 cases, 453 controls). Eleven of 28 pesticides we screened inhibited 26S UPS activity at 10 µM. Benomyl, cyanazine, dieldrin, endosulfan, metam, propargite, triflumizole, and ziram were associated with increased PD risk. We estimated an odds ratio of 2.14 (95% CI: 1.42, 3.22) for subjects with ambient exposure to any UPS-inhibiting pesticide at both residential and workplace addresses; this association was modified by genetic variation in the s-phase kinase-associated protein 1 gene (SKP1; interaction p-value=0.005). Our results provide evidence that UPS-inhibiting pesticides play a role in the etiology of PD and suggest that genetic variation in candidate genes involved in the UPS pathway might exacerbate the toxic effects of pesticide exposures.

  8. Pesticides that Inhibit the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Effect Measure Modification by Genetic Variation in SKP1 in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Shannon L.; Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Cockburn, Myles; Bronstein, Jeff M.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Ritz, Beate

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions known as Lewy bodies, a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathology, may protect against cytotoxic proteins. Since the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) degrades cytotoxic proteins, dysfunction in the UPS may contribute to PD etiology. Our goal in this study was to screen pesticides for proteasome inhibition and investigate (i) whether ambient exposures to pesticides that inhibit the UPS increase PD risk and (ii) whether genetic variation in candidate genes of the UPS pathway modify those increased risks. We assessed 26S UPS activity in SK-N-MCu cells by fluorescence. We recruited idiopathic PD cases (n=360) and population-based controls (n=816) from three counties in California with considerable commercial agriculture. We determined ambient pesticide exposure by our validated GIS-based model utilizing residential and workplace address histories. We limited effect measure modification assessment to Caucasians (287 cases, 453 controls). 11 of 28 pesticides we screened inhibited 26S UPS activity at 10μM. Benomyl, cyanazine, dieldrin, endosulfan, metam, propargite, triflumizole, and ziram were associated with increased PD risk. We estimated an odds ratio of 2.14 (95%CI: 1.42,3.22) for subjects with ambient exposure to any UPS-inhibiting pesticide at both residential and workplace addresses; this association was modified by genetic variation in the s-phase kinase-associated protein 1 gene (SKP1; interaction p-value=0.005). Our results provide evidence that UPS-inhibiting pesticides play a role in the etiology of PD and suggest that genetic variation in candidate genes involved in the UPS pathway might exacerbate the toxic effects of pesticide exposures. PMID:23988235

  9. Modification of neurobehavioral effects of mercury by genetic polymorphisms of metallothionein in children.

    PubMed

    Woods, James S; Heyer, Nicholas J; Russo, Joan E; Martin, Michael D; Pillai, Pradeep B; Farin, Federico M

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is neurotoxic, and children may be particularly susceptible to this effect. A current major challenge is the identification of children who may be uniquely susceptible to Hg toxicity because of genetic disposition. We examined the hypothesis that genetic variants of metallothionein (MT) that are reported to affect Hg toxicokinetics in adults would modify the neurotoxic effects of Hg in children. Five hundred seven children, 8-12 years of age at baseline, participated in a clinical trial to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects of Hg from dental amalgam tooth fillings. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and at 7 subsequent annual intervals for neurobehavioral performance and urinary Hg levels. Following the completion of the clinical trial, we performed genotyping assays for variants of MT isoforms MT1M (rs2270837) and MT2A (rs10636) on biological samples provided by 330 of the trial participants. Regression modeling strategies were employed to evaluate associations between allelic status, Hg exposure, and neurobehavioral test outcomes. Among girls, few significant interactions or independent main effects for Hg exposure and either of the MT gene variants were observed. In contrast, among boys, numerous significant interaction effects between variants of MT1M and MT2A, alone and combined, with Hg exposure were observed spanning multiple domains of neurobehavioral function. All dose-response associations between Hg exposure and test performance were restricted to boys and were in the direction of impaired performance. These findings suggest increased susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg among children with relatively common genetic variants of MT, and may have important public health implications for future strategies aimed at protecting children and adolescents from the potential health risks associated with Hg exposure. We note that because urinary Hg reflects a composite exposure index that cannot be attributed to a specific

  10. Activation and genetic modification of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Michael, Agnieszka; John, Justin; Meyer, Brendan; Pandha, Hardev

    2010-03-05

    Live attenuated bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella typhimurium, have shown promise as delivery vehicles for DNA. We have examined two new strains of S. typhimurium and their impact on dendritic cell maturation (CD12-sifA/aroC mutant and WT05-ssaV/aroC, both in TML background). Strain WT05 matured dendritic cells in a more efficient way; caused higher release of cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-1beta; and was efficient for gene transfer. These findings suggest that the genetic background of the attenuation can influence the pattern of inflammatory immune response to Salmonella infection.

  11. Genetic modification technology for nutrition and improving diets: an ethical perspective.

    PubMed

    Glass, Sara; Fanzo, Jessica

    2017-04-01

    Genetically modified (GM) techniques to improve the nutrition and health content of foods is a highly debated area riddled with ethical dilemmas. Assessing GM technology with a public health ethical framework, this paper identifies public health goals, the potential burdens of the technology, and areas to consider for minimizing burdens and ensuring beneficence, autonomy, and little infringements on justice. Both policymakers and food producers should acknowledge local food environments and the agricultural context of each community in order to effectively prepare communication strategies and equitably distribute any proposed GM food intervention.

  12. Genetic modulation of lipid profiles following lifestyle modification or metformin treatment: the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Pollin, Toni I; Isakova, Tamara; Jablonski, Kathleen A; de Bakker, Paul I W; Taylor, Andrew; McAteer, Jarred; Pan, Qing; Horton, Edward S; Delahanty, Linda M; Altshuler, David; Shuldiner, Alan R; Goldberg, Ronald B; Florez, Jose C; Franks, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    Weight-loss interventions generally improve lipid profiles and reduce cardiovascular disease risk, but effects are variable and may depend on genetic factors. We performed a genetic association analysis of data from 2,993 participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program to test the hypotheses that a genetic risk score (GRS) based on deleterious alleles at 32 lipid-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms modifies the effects of lifestyle and/or metformin interventions on lipid levels and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lipoprotein subfraction size and number. Twenty-three loci previously associated with fasting LDL-C, HDL-C, or triglycerides replicated (P = 0.04-1 × 10(-17)). Except for total HDL particles (r = -0.03, P = 0.26), all components of the lipid profile correlated with the GRS (partial |r| = 0.07-0.17, P = 5 × 10(-5)-1 10(-19)). The GRS was associated with higher baseline-adjusted 1-year LDL cholesterol levels (β = +0.87, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 8 × 10(-5), P(interaction) = 0.02) in the lifestyle intervention group, but not in the placebo (β = +0.20, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.35) or metformin (β = -0.03, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.90; P(interaction) = 0.64) groups. Similarly, a higher GRS predicted a greater number of baseline-adjusted small LDL particles at 1 year in the lifestyle intervention arm (β = +0.30, SEE ± 0.012 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.01, P(interaction) = 0.01) but not in the placebo (β = -0.002, SEE ± 0.008 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.74) or metformin (β = +0.013, SEE ± 0.008 nmol/L/allele, P = 0.12; P(interaction) = 0.24) groups. Our findings suggest that a high genetic burden confers an adverse lipid profile and predicts attenuated response in LDL-C levels and small LDL particle number to dietary and physical activity interventions aimed at weight loss.

  13. Genetic Modulation of Lipid Profiles following Lifestyle Modification or Metformin Treatment: The Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kathleen A.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Taylor, Andrew; McAteer, Jarred; Pan, Qing; Horton, Edward S.; Delahanty, Linda M.; Altshuler, David; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Florez, Jose C.; Bray, George A.; Culbert, Iris W.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Eberhardt, Barbara; Greenway, Frank; Guillory, Fonda G.; Herbert, April A.; Jeffirs, Michael L.; Kennedy, Betty M.; Lovejoy, Jennifer C.; Morris, Laura H.; Melancon, Lee E.; Ryan, Donna; Sanford, Deborah A.; Smith, Kenneth G.; Smith, Lisa L.; Amant, Julia A. St.; Tulley, Richard T.; Vicknair, Paula C.; Williamson, Donald; Zachwieja, Jeffery J.; Polonsky, Kenneth S.; Tobian, Janet; Ehrmann, David; Matulik, Margaret J.; Clark, Bart; Czech, Kirsten; DeSandre, Catherine; Hilbrich, Ruthanne; McNabb, Wylie; Semenske, Ann R.; Caro, Jose F.; Watson, Pamela G.; Goldstein, Barry J.; Smith, Kellie A.; Mendoza, Jewel; Liberoni, Renee; Pepe, Constance; Spandorfer, John; Donahue, Richard P.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Prineas, Ronald; Rowe, Patricia; Calles, Jeanette; Cassanova-Romero, Paul; Florez, Hermes J.; Giannella, Anna; Kirby, Lascelles; Larreal, Carmen; McLymont, Valerie; Mendez, Jadell; Ojito, Juliet; Perry, Arlette; Saab, Patrice; Haffner, Steven M.; Montez, Maria G.; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martinez, Arlene; Hamman, Richard F.; Nash, Patricia V.; Testaverde, Lisa; Anderson, Denise R.; Ballonoff, Larry B.; Bouffard, Alexis; Calonge, B. Ned; Delve, Lynne; Farago, Martha; Hill, James O.; Hoyer, Shelley R.; Jortberg, Bonnie T.; Lenz, Dione; Miller, Marsha; Price, David W.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Seagle, Helen; Smith, Carissa M.; Steinke, Sheila C.; VanDorsten, Brent; Horton, Edward S.; Lawton, Kathleen E.; Arky, Ronald A.; Bryant, Marybeth; Burke, Jacqueline P.; Caballero, Enrique; Callaphan, Karen M.; Ganda, Om P.; Franklin, Therese; Jackson, Sharon D.; Jacobsen, Alan M.; Jacobsen, Alan M.; Kula, Lyn M.; Kocal, Margaret; Malloy, Maureen A.; Nicosia, Maryanne; Oldmixon, Cathryn F.; Pan, Jocelyn; Quitingon, Marizel; Rubtchinsky, Stacy; Seely, Ellen W.; Schweizer, Dana; Simonson, Donald; Smith, Fannie; Solomon, Caren G.; Warram, James; Kahn, Steven E.; Montgomery, Brenda K.; Fujimoto, Wilfred; Knopp, Robert H.; Lipkin, Edward W.; Marr, Michelle; Trence, Dace; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Murphy, Mary E.; Applegate, William B.; Bryer-Ash, Michael; Frieson, Sandra L.; Imseis, Raed; Lambeth, Helen; Lichtermann, Lynne C.; Oktaei, Hooman; Rutledge, Lily M.K.; Sherman, Amy R.; Smith, Clara M.; Soberman, Judith E.; Williams-Cleaves, Beverly; Metzger, Boyd E.; Johnson, Mariana K.; Behrends, Catherine; Cook, Michelle; Fitzgibbon, Marian; Giles, Mimi M.; Heard, Deloris; Johnson, Cheryl K.H.; Larsen, Diane; Lowe, Anne; Lyman, Megan; McPherson, David; Molitch, Mark E.; Pitts, Thomas; Reinhart, Renee; Roston, Susan; Schinleber, Pamela A.; Nathan, David M.; McKitrick, Charles; Turgeon, Heather; Abbott, Kathy; Anderson, Ellen; Bissett, Laurie; Cagliero, Enrico; Florez, Jose C.; Delahanty, Linda; Goldman, Valerie; Poulos, Alexandra; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Carrion-Petersen, Mary Lou; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Edelman, Steven V.; Henry, Robert R.; Horne, Javiva; Janesch, Simona Szerdi; Leos, Diana; Mudaliar, Sundar; Polonsky, William; Smith, Jean; Vejvoda, Karen; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Lee, Jane E.; Allison, David B.; Aronoff, Nancy J.; Crandall, Jill P.; Foo, Sandra T.; Pal, Carmen; Parkes, Kathy; Pena, Mary Beth; Rooney, Ellen S.; Wye, Gretchen E.H. Van; Viscovich, Kristine A.; Marrero, David G.; Prince, Melvin J.; Kelly, Susie M.; Dotson, Yolanda F.; Fineberg, Edwin S.; Guare, John C; Hadden, Angela M.; Ignaut, James M.; Jackson, Marcia L.; Kirkman, Marion S.; Mather, Kieren J.; Porter, Beverly D.; Roach, Paris J.; Rowland, Nancy D.; Wheeler, Madelyn L.; Ratner, Robert E.; Youssef, Gretchen; Shapiro, Sue; Bavido-Arrage, Catherine; Boggs, Geraldine; Bronsord, Marjorie; Brown, Ernestine; Cheatham, Wayman W.; Cola, Susan; Evans, Cindy; Gibbs, Peggy; Kellum, Tracy; Levatan, Claresa; Nair, Asha K.; Passaro, Maureen; Uwaifo, Gabriel; Saad, Mohammed F.; Budget, Maria; Jinagouda, Sujata; Akbar, Khan; Conzues, Claudia; Magpuri, Perpetua; Ngo, Kathy; Rassam, Amer; Waters, Debra; Xapthalamous, Kathy; Santiago, Julio V.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; White, Neil H.; Das, Samia; Santiago, Ana; Brown, Angela; Fisher, Edwin; Hurt, Emma; Jones, Tracy; Kerr, Michelle; Ryder, Lucy; Wernimont, Cormarie; Saudek, Christopher D.; Bradley, Vanessa; Sullivan, Emily; Whittington, Tracy; Abbas, Caroline; Brancati, Frederick L.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Charleston, Jeanne B.; Freel, Janice; Horak, Katherine; Jiggetts, Dawn; Johnson, Deloris; Joseph, Hope; Loman, Kimberly; Mosley, Henry; Rubin, Richard R.; Samuels, Alafia; Stewart, Kerry J.; Williamson, Paula; Schade, David S.; Adams, Karwyn S.; Johannes, Carolyn; Atler, Leslie F.; Boyle, Patrick J.; Burge, Mark R.; Canady, Janene L.; Chai, Lisa; Gonzales, Ysela; Hernandez-McGinnis, Doris A.; Katz, Patricia; King, Carolyn; Rassam, Amer; Rubinchik, Sofya; Senter, Willette; Waters, Debra; Shamoon, Harry; Brown, Janet O.; Adorno, Elsie; Cox, Liane; Crandall, Jill; Duffy, Helena; Engel, Samuel; Friedler, Allison; Howard-Century, Crystal J.; Kloiber, Stacey; Longchamp, Nadege; Martinez, Helen; Pompi, Dorothy; Scheindlin, Jonathan; Violino, Elissa; Walker, Elizabeth; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Zimmerman, Elise; Zonszein, Joel; Orchard, Trevor; Wing, Rena R.; Koenning, Gaye; Kramer, M. Kaye; Barr, Susan; Boraz, Miriam; Clifford, Lisa; Culyba, Rebecca; Frazier, Marlene; Gilligan, Ryan; Harrier, Susan; Harris, Louann; Jeffries, Susan; Kriska, Andrea; Manjoo, Qurashia; Mullen, Monica; Noel, Alicia; Otto, Amy; Semler, Linda; Smith, Cheryl F.; Smith, Marie; Venditti, Elizabeth; Weinzierl, Valarie; Williams, Katherine V.; Wilson, Tara; Arakaki, Richard F.; Latimer, Renee W.; Baker-Ladao, Narleen K.; Beddow, Ralph; Dias, Lorna; Inouye, Jillian; Mau, Marjorie K.; Mikami, Kathy; Mohideen, Pharis; Odom, Sharon K.; Perry, Raynette U.; Knowler, William C.; Cooeyate, Norman; Hoskin, Mary A.; Percy, Carol A.; Acton, Kelly J.; Andre, Vickie L.; Barber, Rosalyn; Begay, Shandiin; Bennett, Peter H.; Benson, Mary Beth; Bird, Evelyn C.; Broussard, Brenda A.; Chavez, Marcella; Dacawyma, Tara; Doughty, Matthew S.; Duncan, Roberta; Edgerton, Cyndy; Ghahate, Jacqueline M.; Glass, Justin; Glass, Martia; Gohdes, Dorothy; Grant, Wendy; Hanson, Robert L.; Horse, Ellie; Ingraham, Louise E.; Jackson, Merry; Jay, Priscilla; Kaskalla, Roylen S.; Kessler, David; Kobus, Kathleen M.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Manus, Catherine; Michaels, Sara; Morgan, Tina; Nashboo, Yolanda; Nelson, Julie A.; Poirier, Steven; Polczynski, Evette; Reidy, Mike; Roumain, Jeanine; Rowse, Debra; Sangster, Sandra; Sewenemewa, Janet; Tonemah, Darryl; Wilson, Charlton; Yazzie, Michelle; Bain, Raymond; Fowler, Sarah; Brenneman, Tina; Abebe, Solome; Bamdad, Julie; Callaghan, Jackie; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Gao, Yuping; Grimes, Kristina L.; Grover, Nisha; Haffner, Lori; Jones, Steve; Jones, Tara L.; Katz, Richard; Lachin, John M.; Mucik, Pamela; Orlosky, Robert; Rochon, James; Sapozhnikova, Alla; Sherif, Hanna; Stimpson, Charlotte; Temprosa, Marinella; Walker-Murray, Fredricka; Marcovina, Santica; Strylewicz, Greg; Aldrich, F. Alan; O'Leary, Dan; Stamm, Elizabeth; Rautaharju, Pentti; Prineas, Ronald J.; Alexander, Teresa; Campbell, Charles; Hall, Sharon; Li, Yabing; Mills, Margaret; Pemberton, Nancy; Rautaharju, Farida; Zhang, Zhuming; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth; Moran, Robert R.; Ganiats, Ted; David, Kristin; Sarkin, Andrew J.; Eastman, R.; Fradkin, Judith; Garfield, Sanford; Gregg, Edward; Zhang, Ping; Herman, William; Florez, Jose C.; Altshuler, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Franks, Paul W.; Hanson, Robert L.; Jablonski, Kathleen; Knowler, William C.; McAteer, Jarred B.; Pollin, Toni I.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Weight-loss interventions generally improve lipid profiles and reduce cardiovascular disease risk, but effects are variable and may depend on genetic factors. We performed a genetic association analysis of data from 2,993 participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program to test the hypotheses that a genetic risk score (GRS) based on deleterious alleles at 32 lipid-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms modifies the effects of lifestyle and/or metformin interventions on lipid levels and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lipoprotein subfraction size and number. Twenty-three loci previously associated with fasting LDL-C, HDL-C, or triglycerides replicated (P = 0.04–1×10−17). Except for total HDL particles (r = −0.03, P = 0.26), all components of the lipid profile correlated with the GRS (partial |r| = 0.07–0.17, P = 5×10−5–1×10−19). The GRS was associated with higher baseline-adjusted 1-year LDL cholesterol levels (β = +0.87, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 8×10−5, P interaction = 0.02) in the lifestyle intervention group, but not in the placebo (β = +0.20, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.35) or metformin (β = −0.03, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.90; P interaction = 0.64) groups. Similarly, a higher GRS predicted a greater number of baseline-adjusted small LDL particles at 1 year in the lifestyle intervention arm (β = +0.30, SEE±0.012 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.01, P interaction = 0.01) but not in the placebo (β = −0.002, SEE±0.008 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.74) or metformin (β = +0.013, SEE±0.008 nmol/L/allele, P = 0.12; P interaction = 0.24) groups. Our findings suggest that a high genetic burden confers an adverse lipid profile and predicts attenuated response in LDL-C levels and small LDL particle number to dietary and physical activity interventions aimed at weight loss. PMID:22951888

  14. [Dignity or integrity - does the genetic modification of animals require new concepts in animal ethics?].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Animal genetic engineering seems to point at a normative gap beyond pathocentric welfare theories in animal ethics. Recently developed approaches aim to bridge this gap by means of new normative criteria such as animal dignity and animal integrity. The following comparison of dignity and integrity in the context of animal ethics shows that the dignity concept faces serious problems because of its necessarily anthroporelational character and the different functions of contingent and inherent dignity within ethical reasoning. Unlike animal dignity the concept of animal integrity could prove to be a useful enhancement for pathocentric approaches.

  15. Genetic Mutations and Epigenetic Modifications: Driving Cancer and Informing Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Krysta Mila; Boudreau, Jeanette E.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer treatment is undergoing a significant revolution from “one-size-fits-all” cytotoxic therapies to tailored approaches that precisely target molecular alterations. Precision strategies for drug development and patient stratification, based on the molecular features of tumors, are the next logical step in a long history of approaches to cancer therapy. In this review, we discuss the history of cancer treatment from generic natural extracts and radical surgical procedures to site-specific and combinatorial treatment regimens, which have incrementally improved patient outcomes. We discuss the related contributions of genetics and epigenetics to cancer progression and the response to targeted therapies and identify challenges and opportunities for the success of precision medicine. The identification of patients who will benefit from targeted therapies is more complex than simply identifying patients whose tumors harbour the targeted aberration, and intratumoral heterogeneity makes it difficult to determine if a precision therapy is successful during treatment. This heterogeneity enables tumors to develop resistance to targeted approaches; therefore, the rational combination of therapeutic agents will limit the threat of acquired resistance to therapeutic success. By incorporating the view of malignant transformation modulated by networks of genetic and epigenetic interactions, molecular strategies will enable precision medicine for effective treatment across cancer subtypes. PMID:28685150

  16. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus transcriptomes reveal consequences of chemical pretreatment and genetic modification of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Zurawski, Jeffrey V; Conway, Jonathan M; Khatibi, Piyum; Lewis, Derrick L; Li, Quanzi; Chiang, Vincent L; Kelly, Robert M

    2017-03-20

    Recalcitrance of plant biomass is a major barrier for commercially feasible cellulosic biofuel production. Chemical and enzymatic assays have been developed to measure recalcitrance and carbohydrate composition; however, none of these assays can directly report which polysaccharides a candidate microbe will sense during growth on these substrates. Here, we propose using the transcriptomic response of the plant biomass-deconstructing microbe, Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus, as a direct measure of how suitable a sample of plant biomass may be for fermentation based on the bioavailability of polysaccharides. Key genes were identified using the global gene response of the microbe to model plant polysaccharides and various types of unpretreated, chemically pretreated and genetically modified plant biomass. While the majority of C. saccharolyticus genes responding were similar between plant biomasses; subtle differences were discernable, most importantly between chemically pretreated or genetically modified biomass that both exhibit similar levels of solubilization by the microbe. Furthermore, the results here present a new paradigm for assessing plant-microbe interactions that can be deployed as a biological assay to report on the complexity and recalcitrance of plant biomass.

  17. A BioBrick compatible strategy for genetic modification of plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant biotechnology can be leveraged to produce food, fuel, medicine, and materials. Standardized methods advocated by the synthetic biology community can accelerate the plant design cycle, ultimately making plant engineering more widely accessible to bioengineers who can contribute diverse creative input to the design process. Results This paper presents work done largely by undergraduate students participating in the 2010 International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) competition. Described here is a framework for engineering the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana with standardized, BioBrick compatible vectors and parts available through the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (http://www.partsregistry.org). This system was used to engineer a proof-of-concept plant that exogenously expresses the taste-inverting protein miraculin. Conclusions Our work is intended to encourage future iGEM teams and other synthetic biologists to use plants as a genetic chassis. Our workflow simplifies the use of standardized parts in plant systems, allowing the construction and expression of heterologous genes in plants within the timeframe allotted for typical iGEM projects. PMID:22716313

  18. Genetic modification of T cells improves the effectiveness of adoptive tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jakóbisiak, Marek; Gołab, Jakub

    2010-10-01

    Appropriate combinations of immunotherapy and gene therapy promise to be more effective in the treatment of cancer patients than either of these therapeutic approaches alone. One such treatment is based on the application of patients' cytotoxic T cells, which can be activated, expanded, and genetically engineered to recognize particular tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Because T cells recognizing TAAs might become unresponsive in the process of tumor development as a result of tumor evasion strategies, immunogenic viral antigens or alloantigens could be used for the expansion of cytotoxic T cells and then redirected through genetic engineering. This therapeutic approach has already demonstrated promising results in melanoma patients and could be used in the treatment of many other tumors. The graft-versus-leukemia, or more generally graft-versus-tumor, reaction based on the application of a donor lymphocyte infusion can also be ameliorated through the incorporation of suicide genes into donor lymphocytes. Such lymphocytes could be safely and more extensively used in tumor patients because they could be eliminated should a severe graft-versus-host reaction develop.

  19. A genomic approach to nutritional, pharmacological and genetic issues of faba bean (Vicia faba): prospects for genetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Ray, Heather; Georges, Fawzy

    2010-01-01

    Cultivated faba bean (Vicia faba) is widely used as human food, especially in Europe, Northern Africa and China.  In view of its superior feeding value over field peas or other legumes, it is also widely used as animal feed for a variety of species.   V. faba also contains medically important components such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (levo-DOPA, L-DOPA), the principal treatment used for Parkinson's disease patients.  However, this species also contains several antinutritional components, including the pyrimidine glycosides vicine and convicine; phytates; and the sucrose galactosides including raffinose, stachyose and verbascose.  We have undertaken a genomic project to provide publicly available expressed sequence tag sequences (EST) prepared from early to mid developing embryo in an attempt to identify genes that are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of L-DOPA and the vicine group of compounds.  As initial examples of the utility of this approach, we describe the complete sequence of fabatin, new defensins, type 4 metallothioneins and a variety of other key genes which were identified in this EST library. No candidate sequences corresponding to the biosynthesis of L-DOPA or the vicine group could be identified at this early stage of seed development.

  20. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials.

  1. Enhanced Genetic Modification of Adult Growth Factor Mobilized Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells With Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M.; Epps, Elizabeth W.; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials. PMID:25107584

  2. Meta-analysis of the independent and cumulative effects of multiple genetic modifications on pig lung xenograft performance during ex vivo perfusion with human blood.

    PubMed

    Harris, Donald G; Quinn, Kevin J; French, Beth M; Schwartz, Evan; Kang, Elizabeth; Dahi, Siamak; Phelps, Carol J; Ayares, David L; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Pierson, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs are a promising potential source of lung xenografts. Ex vivo xenoperfusion is an effective platform for testing the effect of new modifications, but typical experiments are limited by testing of a single genetic intervention and small sample sizes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the individual and aggregate effects of donor genetic modifications on porcine lung xenograft survival and injury in an extensive pig lung xenoperfusion series. Data from 157 porcine lung xenoperfusion experiments using otherwise unmodified heparinized human blood were aggregated as either continuous or dichotomous variables. Lungs were wild type in 17 perfusions (11% of the study group), while 31 lungs (20% of the study group) had one genetic modification, 40 lungs (39%) had 2, and 47 lungs (30%) had 3 or more modifications. The primary endpoint was functional lung survival to 4 h of perfusion. Secondary analyses evaluated previously identified markers associated with known lung xenograft injury mechanisms. In addition to comparison among all xenografts grouped by survival status, a subgroup analysis was performed of lungs incorporating the GalTKO.hCD46 genotype. Each increase in the number of genetic modifications was associated with additional prolongation of lung xenograft survival. Lungs that exhibited survival to 4 h generally had reduced platelet activation and thrombin generation. GalTKO and the expression of hCD46, HO-1, hCD55, or hEPCR were associated with improved survival. hTBM, HLA-E, and hCD39 were associated with no significant effect on the primary outcome. This meta-analysis of an extensive lung xenotransplantation series demonstrates that increasing the number of genetic modifications targeting known xenogeneic lung injury mechanisms is associated with incremental improvements in lung survival. While more detailed mechanistic studies are needed to explore the relationship between gene expression and pathway-specific injury and explore

  3. Specific genetic modifications of domestic animals by gene targeting and animal cloning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    2003-01-01

    The technology of gene targeting through homologous recombination has been extremely useful for elucidating gene functions in mice. The application of this technology was thought impossible in the large livestock species until the successful creation of the first mammalian clone "Dolly" the sheep. The combination of the technologies for gene targeting of somatic cells with those of animal cloning made it possible to introduce specific genetic mutations into domestic animals. In this review, the principles of gene targeting in somatic cells and the challenges of nuclear transfer using gene-targeted cells are discussed. The relevance of gene targeting in domestic animals for applications in bio-medicine and agriculture are also examined. PMID:14614774

  4. Large-Scale Culture and Genetic Modification of Human Natural Killer Cells for Cellular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lapteva, Natalia; Parihar, Robin; Rollins, Lisa A; Gee, Adrian P; Rooney, Cliona M

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in methods for the ex vivo expansion of human natural killer (NK) cells have facilitated the use of these powerful immune cells in clinical protocols. Further, the ability to genetically modify primary human NK cells following rapid expansion allows targeting and enhancement of their immune function. We have successfully adapted an expansion method for primary NK cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or from apheresis products in gas permeable rapid expansion devices (G-Rexes). Here, we describe an optimized protocol for rapid and robust NK cell expansion as well as a method for highly efficient retroviral transduction of these ex vivo expanded cells. These methodologies are good manufacturing practice (GMP) compliant and could be used for clinical-grade product manufacturing.

  5. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells: recent advances in the gene therapy of inherited diseases.

    PubMed

    Bueren, Juan A; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José A; Lamana, María Luisa; Segovia, José C

    2003-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells constitute a rare population of precursor cells with remarkable properties for being used as targets in gene therapy protocols. The last years have been particularly productive both in the fields of gene therapy and stem cell biology. Results from ongoing clinical trials have shown the first unquestionable clinical benefits of immunodeficient patients transplanted with genetically modified autologous stem cells. On the other hand, severe side effects in a few patients treated with gene therapy have also been reported, indicating the usefulness of further improving the vectors currently used in gene therapy clinical trials. In the field of stem cell biology, evidence showing the plastic potential of adult hematopoietic stem cells and data indicating the multipotency of adult mesenchymal precursor cells have been presented. Also, the generation of embryonic stem cells by means of nuclear transfer techniques has appeared as a new methodology with direct implications in gene therapy.

  6. Non-coding RNAs in crop genetic modification: considerations and predictable environmental risk assessments (ERA).

    PubMed

    Ramesh, S V

    2013-09-01

    Of late non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs)-mediated gene silencing is an influential tool deliberately deployed to negatively regulate the expression of targeted genes. In addition to the widely employed small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing approach, other variants like artificial miRNA (amiRNA), miRNA mimics, and artificial transacting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) are being explored and successfully deployed in developing non-coding RNA-based genetically modified plants. The ncRNA-based gene manipulations are typified with mobile nature of silencing signals, interference from viral genome-derived suppressor proteins, and an obligation for meticulous computational analysis to prevaricate any inadvertent effects. In a broad sense, risk assessment inquiries for genetically modified plants based on the expression of ncRNAs are competently addressed by the environmental risk assessment (ERA) models, currently in vogue, designed for the first generation transgenic plants which are based on the expression of heterologous proteins. Nevertheless, transgenic plants functioning on the foundation of ncRNAs warrant due attention with respect to their unique attributes like off-target or non-target gene silencing effects, small RNAs (sRNAs) persistence, food and feed safety assessments, problems in detection and tracking of sRNAs in food, impact of ncRNAs in plant protection measures, effect of mutations etc. The role of recent developments in sequencing techniques like next generation sequencing (NGS) and the ERA paradigm of the different countries in vogue are also discussed in the context of ncRNA-based gene manipulations.

  7. Conservation and modification of genetic and physiological toolkits underpinning diapause in bumble bee queens.

    PubMed

    Amsalem, Etya; Galbraith, David A; Cnaani, Jonathan; Teal, Peter E A; Grozinger, Christina M

    2015-11-01

    Diapause is the key adaptation allowing insects to survive unfavourable conditions and inhabit an array of environments. Physiological changes during diapause are largely conserved across species and are hypothesized to be regulated by a conserved suite of genes (a 'toolkit'). Furthermore, it is hypothesized that in social insects, this toolkit was co-opted to mediate caste differentiation between long-lived, reproductive, diapause-capable queens and short-lived, sterile workers. Using Bombus terrestris queens, we examined the physiological and transcriptomic changes associated with diapause and CO2 treatment, which causes queens to bypass diapause. We performed comparative analyses with genes previously identified to be associated with diapause in the Dipteran Sarcophaga crassipalpis and with caste differentiation in bumble bees. As in Diptera, diapause in bumble bees is associated with physiological and transcriptional changes related to nutrient storage, stress resistance and core metabolic pathways. There is a significant overlap, both at the level of transcript and gene ontology, between the genetic mechanisms mediating diapause in B. terrestris and S. crassipalpis, reaffirming the existence of a conserved insect diapause genetic toolkit. However, a substantial proportion (10%) of the differentially regulated transcripts in diapausing queens have no clear orthologs in other species, and key players regulating diapause in Diptera (juvenile hormone and vitellogenin) appear to have distinct functions in bumble bees. We also found a substantial overlap between genes related to caste determination and diapause in bumble bees. Thus, our studies demonstrate an intriguing interplay between pathways underpinning adaptation to environmental extremes and the evolution of sociality in insects.

  8. Cell cycle arrest induced by inhibitors of epigenetic modifications in maize (Zea mays) seedling leaves: characterization of the process and possible mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Haoli; Wang, Qing; Li, Yingnan; Huang, Yan; Xie, Liangfu; Gao, Fei; He, Shibin; Li, Lijia

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic modifications play crucial roles in the regulation of chromatin architecture and are involved in cell cycle progression, including mitosis and meiosis. To explore the relationship between epigenetic modifications and the cell cycle, we treated maize (Zea mays) seedlings with six different epigenetic modification-related inhibitors and identified the postsynthetic phase (G2 ) arrest via flow cytometry analysis. Total H4K5ac levels were significantly increased and the distribution of H3S10ph signalling was obviously changed in mitosis under various treatments. Further statistics of the cells in different periods of mitosis confirmed that the cell cycle was arrested at preprophase. Concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were relatively higher in the treated plants and the antioxidant thiourea could negate the influence of the inhibitors. Moreover, all of the treated plants displayed negative results in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labelling (TUNEL) and γ-H2AX immunostaining assays after exposure for 3 d. Additionally, the expression level of topoisomerase genes in the treated plants was relatively lower than that in the untreated plants. These results suggest that these inhibitors of epigenetic modifications could cause preprophase arrest via reactive oxygen species formation inhibiting the expression of DNA topoisomerase genes, accompanied by changes in the H4K5ac and H3S10ph histone modifications.

  9. Improving the immunogenicity of a trivalent Neisseria meningitidis native outer membrane vesicle vaccine by genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Wen, Zhiyun; Lin, Jing; Xu, Hui; Herbert, Paul; Wang, Xin-Min; Mehl, John T; Ahl, Patrick L; Dieter, Lance; Russell, Ryann; Kosinski, Mike J; Przysiecki, Craig T

    2016-07-29

    Trivalent native outer membrane vesicles (nOMVs) derived from three genetically modified Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strains have been previously evaluated immunologically in mice and rabbits. This nOMV vaccine elicited serum bactericidal activity (SBA) against multiple N. meningitidis serogroup B strains as well as strains from serogroups C, Y, W, and X. In this study, we used trivalent nOMVs isolated from the same vaccine strains and evaluated their immunogenicity in an infant Rhesus macaque (IRM) model whose immune responses to the vaccine are likely to be more predictive of the responses in human infants. IRMs were immunized with trivalent nOMV vaccines and sera were evaluated for exogenous human serum complement-dependent SBA (hSBA). Antibody responses to selected hSBA generating antigens contained within the trivalent nOMVs were also measured and we found that antibody titers against factor H binding protein variant 2 (fHbpv2) were very low in the sera from animals immunized with these original nOMV vaccines. To increase the fHbp content in the nOMVs, the vaccine strains were further genetically altered by addition of another fHbp gene copy into the porB locus. Trivalent nOMVs from the three new vaccine strains had higher fHbp antigen levels and generated higher anti-fHbp antibody responses in immunized mice and IRMs. As expected, fHbp insertion into the porB locus resulted in no PorB expression. Interestingly, higher expression of PorA, an hSBA generating antigen, was observed for all three modified vaccine strains. Compared to the trivalent nOMVs from the original strains, higher PorA levels in the improved nOMVs resulted in higher anti-PorA antibody responses in mice and IRMs. In addition, hSBA titers against other strains with PorA as the only hSBA antigen in common with the vaccine strains also increased. Copyright © 2016 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic modification in Bacillus subtilis for production of C30 carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Isamu

    2012-01-01

    C30 carotenoids, which have shorter backbones than C40 carotenoids, are known to be produced in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus that causes opportunistic infection. The first committed enzyme in the C30 carotenoid synthetic pathway is dehydrosqualene synthase CrtM. CrtM converts farnesyl pyrophosphate to dehydrosqualene. Dehydrosqualene desaturase CrtN then converts dehydrosqualene to the yellow C30 carotenoid, 4,4'-diaponeurosporene. This chapter describes a method to synthesize C30 carotenoids in Bacillus subtilis, which is generally recognized as a safe (GRAS) organism. Introduction of S. aureus crtM and crtN genes into B. subtilis results in yellow pigmentation. The B. subtilis transformant accumulates two C30 carotenoids, 4,4'-diapolycopene and 4,4'-diaponeurosporene. Furthermore, together with crtMN, introduction of S. aureus crtP and crtQ genes, which encode mixed function oxidase and glycosyltransferase, respectively, donates the ability to produce glycosylated C30 carotenoic acid. Thus, carotenoid biosynthesis genes of S. aureus is applicable to genetically modify B. subtilis in order to construct a safe organism producing C30 carotenoids.

  11. Human embryonic stem cells: culture, differentiation, and genetic modification for regenerative medicine applications.

    PubMed

    Lebkowski, J S; Gold, J; Xu, C; Funk, W; Chiu, C P; Carpenter, M K

    2001-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells can proliferate extensively in culture and can differentiate into representatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vitro and in vivo. The undifferentiated hES cells have now been cultured for more than 50 passages in vitro, yet maintain a normal karyotype. The hES cells express a series of specific surface antigens, as well as OCT-4 and human telomerase, proteins associated with a pluripotent and immortal phenotype. On differentiation, OCT-4 and human telomerase expression decreases with the emergence of a maturing population of cells. During hES cell differentiation, modulation of the expression of many genes has been evaluated using microarray analysis. To improve the ease, reproducibility, and scalability of hES culture, methods have been developed to propagate the cells in the absence of mouse embryonic cell feeders. hES cells maintained in culture using extracellular matrix factors together with mouse embryonic cell conditioned medium proliferate indefinitely while maintaining a normal karyotype, proliferation rate, and complement of undifferentiated cell markers. hES cells cultured without feeder layers retain their capacity to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers in vitro and in teratomas. The hES cells can also be genetically modified transiently or stably using both plasmid and viral gene transfer agents. These analyses and technological developments will aid in the realization of the full potential of hES cells for both research and therapeutic applications.

  12. A rapid generation of adenovirus vector with a genetic modification in hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Di, Bingyan; Mao, Qinwen; Zhao, Junli; Li, Xing; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin

    2012-02-10

    The generation of hexon-modified adenovirus vector has proven difficult. In this paper, we developed a novel method for rapid generation of hexon-modified adenoviral vector via one step ligation in vitro followed by quick white/blue color screening. The new system has the following features. First, eGFP expression driven by the CMV promoter in E1 region functions as a reporter to evaluate the tropism of hexon-modified adenovirus in vitro. Second, it has two unique restriction enzyme sites with sticky ends located in the hexon HVR5 region. Third, a lacZ expression cassette under the control of plac promoter is placed between the two restriction enzyme sites, which allows recombinants to be selected using blue/white screening. To prove the principle of the method, genetically modified adenoviruses were successfully produced by insertion of NGR, RGD or Tat PTD peptide into hexon HVR5. Furthermore, the transduction efficiency of the Tat PTD modified virus was shown to be a significant enhancement in A172 and CHO-K1 cells. In conclusion, the novel system makes the production of truly retargeted vectors more promising, which would be of substantial benefit for cancer gene therapy.

  13. Genetic modification of neurons to express bevacizumab for local anti-angiogenesis treatment of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Martin J; Funato, Kosuke; Wang, Lan; Aronowitz, Eric; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Havlicek, David F; Frenk, Esther Z; De, Bishnu P; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Sondhi, Dolan; Hackett, Neil R; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Tabar, Viviane; Crystal, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    The median survival of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is approximately 1 year. Following surgical removal, systemic therapies are limited by the blood-brain barrier. To circumvent this, we developed a method to modify neurons with the genetic sequence for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies using adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vectors, directing persistent, local expression in the tumor milieu. The human U87MG GBM cell line or patient-derived early passage GBM cells were administered to the striatum of NOD/SCID immunodeficient mice. AAVrh.10BevMab, an AAVrh.10-based vector coding for bevacizumab (Avastin), an anti-human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monoclonal antibody, was delivered to the area of the GBM xenograft. Localized expression of bevacizumab was demonstrated by quantitative PCR, ELISA and western blotting. Immunohistochemistry showed that bevacizumab was expressed in neurons. Concurrent administration of AAVrh.10BevMab with the U87MG tumor reduced tumor blood vessel density and tumor volume, and increased survival. Administration of AAVrh.10BevMab 1 week after U87MG xenograft reduced growth and increased survival. Studies with patient-derived early passage GBM primary cells showed a reduction in primary tumor burden with an increased survival. These data support the strategy of AAV-mediated central nervous system gene therapy to treat GBM, overcoming the blood-brain barrier through local, persistent delivery of an anti-angiogenesis monoclonal antibody.

  14. Modelling complex features from histone modification signatures using genetic algorithm for the prediction of enhancer region.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nung Kion; Fong, Pui Kwan; Abdullah, Mohd Tajuddin

    2014-01-01

    Using Genetic Algorithm, this paper presents a modelling method to generate novel logical-based features from DNA sequences enriched with H3K4mel histone signatures. Current histone signature is mostly represented using k-mers content features incapable of representing all the possible complex interactions of various DNA segments. The main contributions are, among others: (a) demonstrating that there are complex interactions among sequence segments in the histone regions; (b) developing a parse tree representation of the logical complex features. The proposed novel feature is compared to the k-mers content features using datasets from the mouse (mm9) genome. Evaluation results show that the new feature improves the prediction performance as shown by f-measure for all datasets tested. Also, it is discovered that tree-based features generated from a single chromosome can be generalized to predict histone marks in other chromosomes not used in the training. These findings have a great impact on feature design considerations for histone signatures as well as other classifier design features.

  15. Production of marine plant biomass: Management, cultivation, and genetic modification of macrophytic algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermeer, J. P.

    1982-12-01

    Every second of every day, the Sun's fusion reactions convert thousands of tons of hydrogen into helium with the release of almost unimaginable amounts of energy. Through the photosynthetic activity of plants, both aquatic and terrestrial, a small fraction of this energy is trapped and stored as plant biomass. The oceans cover a greater fraction of the globe than do the land masses, making it appropriate to consider their contribution to the total biomass production, and their potential as a source of raw materials for the extraction of chemicals and fuels. A rather broad synthesis, convering the total seaweed resource and some of the constraints placed on harvesting these plants, attempts to farm the oceans to increase the supply of desirable species, attempts to cultivate seaweeds in enclosures where environmental parameters are controlled, and finally, the limited amount of genetic manipulation that was applied to these plants was presented. Only the larger red and brown seaweeds were considered because they represent the bulk of the biomass.

  16. The functional readthrough extension of malate dehydrogenase reveals a modification of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Hofhuis, Julia; Schueren, Fabian; Nötzel, Christopher; Lingner, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta; Jahn, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Translational readthrough gives rise to C-terminally extended proteins, thereby providing the cell with new protein isoforms. These may have different properties from the parental proteins if the extensions contain functional domains. While for most genes amino acid incorporation at the stop codon is far lower than 0.1%, about 4% of malate dehydrogenase (MDH1) is physiologically extended by translational readthrough and the actual ratio of MDH1x (extended protein) to ‘normal' MDH1 is dependent on the cell type. In human cells, arginine and tryptophan are co-encoded by the MDH1x UGA stop codon. Readthrough is controlled by the 7-nucleotide high-readthrough stop codon context without contribution of the subsequent 50 nucleotides encoding the extension. All vertebrate MDH1x is directed to peroxisomes via a hidden peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS) in the readthrough extension, which is more highly conserved than the extension of lactate dehydrogenase B. The hidden PTS of non-mammalian MDH1x evolved to be more efficient than the PTS of mammalian MDH1x. These results provide insight into the genetic and functional co-evolution of these dually localized dehydrogenases. PMID:27881739

  17. Application of lambda Red recombination system to Vibrio cholerae genetics: simple methods for inactivation and modification of chromosomal genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shouji; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Morita, Masatomo; Arakawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Haruo

    2009-06-01

    The lambda Red-based recombination system is very useful for genetic manipulation of some Gram-negative bacteria. Here we report simple procedures for the inactivation and modification of genes of interest on Vibrio cholerae chromosome using this recombination technique. For this purpose, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment carrying an antibiotic resistance cassette flanked by regions homologous to the target locus was electroporated into recipient V. cholerae strains expressing a highly proficient lambda Red recombination system. Two PCR procedures were tested to generate an amplification product carrying an antibiotic resistance cassette flanked by short (50 or 100 nt) or long (1000 nt) homologous extensions, which allowed successful disruption of four chromosomal loci (ctxB, toxT, lacZ, and recA). Our results suggest that 100-nt homology between the PCR product and the target gene is sufficient to stimulate the lambda Red-dependent recombination. To increase recombination efficiency, however, the PCR procedure should be used to generate a product with 1000-nt homologous extensions. Furthermore, we applied this gene replacement method to create lacZ reporter fusion to the target gene. Transcriptional fusion to the V. cholerae ctxA gene was constructed using a PCR product that contains the 100-nt homologous extension to ctxA on each side of the lacZ::cat cassette, and was shown to respond appropriately to a null mutation in the regulatory gene, toxT. Use of the techniques presented here should prompt rapid and efficient mutagenesis/modification of V. cholerae chromosomal genes.

  18. Achromobacter xylosoxidans: an emerging pathogen carrying different elements involved in horizontal genetic transfer.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German Matías; Almuzara, Marisa; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Adams, Christina; Galanternik, Laura; Vay, Carlos; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, numerous cases of multidrug-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans infections have been documented in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis patients. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms and mobile elements related to multidrug resistance in this bacterium, we studied 24 non-epidemiological A. xylosoxidans clinical isolates from Argentina. Specific primers for plasmids, transposons, insertion sequences, bla(ampC), intI1, and intI2 genes were used in PCR reactions. The obtained results showed the presence of wide host range IncP plasmids in ten isolates and a high dispersion of class 1 integrons (n = 10) and class 2 integrons (n = 3). Four arrays in the variable region (vr) of class 1 integrons were identified carrying different gene cassettes as the aminoglycoside resistance aac(6')-Ib and aadA1, the trimethoprim resistance dfrA1 and dfrA16, and the β-lactamase bla(OXA-2). In only one of the class 2 integrons, a vr was amplified that includes sat2-aadA1. The bla(ampC) gene was found in all isolates, confirming its ubiquitous nature. Our results show that A. xylosoxidans clinical isolates contain a rich variety of genetic elements commonly associated with resistance genes and their dissemination. This supports the hypothesis that A. xylosoxidans is becoming a reservoir of horizontal genetic transfer elements commonly involved in spreading antibiotic resistance.

  19. Systematic Analysis of the Genetic Variability That Impacts SUMO Conjugation and Their Involvement in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao-Dong; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-01-01

    Protein function has been observed to rely on select essential sites instead of requiring all sites to be indispensable. Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation or sumoylation, which is a highly dynamic reversible process and its outcomes are extremely diverse, ranging from changes in localization to altered activity and, in some cases, stability of the modified, has shown to be especially valuable in cellular biology. Motivated by the significance of SUMO conjugation in biological processes, we report here on the first exploratory assessment whether sumoylation related genetic variability impacts protein functions as well as the occurrence of diseases related to SUMO. Here, we defined the SUMOAMVR as sumoylation related amino acid variations that affect sumoylation sites or enzymes involved in the process of connectivity, and categorized four types of potential SUMOAMVRs. We detected that 17.13% of amino acid variations are potential SUMOAMVRs and 4.83% of disease mutations could lead to SUMOAMVR with our system. More interestingly, the statistical analysis demonstrates that the amino acid variations that directly create new potential lysine sumoylation sites are more likely to cause diseases. It can be anticipated that our method can provide more instructive guidance to identify the mechanisms of genetic diseases. PMID:26154679

  20. Curve-based multivariate distance matrix regression analysis: application to genetic association analyses involving repeated measures

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Rany M.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Most, if not all, human phenotypes exhibit a temporal, dosage-dependent, or age effect. Despite this fact, it is rare that data are collected over time or in sequence in relevant studies of the determinants of these phenotypes. The costs and organizational sophistication necessary to collect repeated measurements or longitudinal data for a given phenotype are clearly impediments to this, but greater efforts in this area are needed if insights into human phenotypic expression are to be obtained. Appropriate data analysis methods for genetic association studies involving repeated or longitudinal measures are also needed. We consider the use of longitudinal profiles obtained from fitted functions on repeated data collections from a set of individuals whose similarities are contrasted between sets of individuals with different genotypes to test hypotheses about genetic influences on time-dependent phenotype expression. The proposed approach can accommodate uncertainty of the fitted functions, as well as weighting factors across the time points, and is easily extended to a wide variety of complex analysis settings. We showcase the proposed approach with data from a clinical study investigating human blood vessel response to tyramine. We also compare the proposed approach with standard analytic procedures and investigate its robustness and power via simulation studies. The proposed approach is found to be quite flexible and performs either as well or better than traditional statistical methods. PMID:20423962

  1. Systematic Analysis of the Genetic Variability That Impacts SUMO Conjugation and Their Involvement in Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao-Dong; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2015-07-01

    Protein function has been observed to rely on select essential sites instead of requiring all sites to be indispensable. Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation or sumoylation, which is a highly dynamic reversible process and its outcomes are extremely diverse, ranging from changes in localization to altered activity and, in some cases, stability of the modified, has shown to be especially valuable in cellular biology. Motivated by the significance of SUMO conjugation in biological processes, we report here on the first exploratory assessment whether sumoylation related genetic variability impacts protein functions as well as the occurrence of diseases related to SUMO. Here, we defined the SUMOAMVR as sumoylation related amino acid variations that affect sumoylation sites or enzymes involved in the process of connectivity, and categorized four types of potential SUMOAMVRs. We detected that 17.13% of amino acid variations are potential SUMOAMVRs and 4.83% of disease mutations could lead to SUMOAMVR with our system. More interestingly, the statistical analysis demonstrates that the amino acid variations that directly create new potential lysine sumoylation sites are more likely to cause diseases. It can be anticipated that our method can provide more instructive guidance to identify the mechanisms of genetic diseases.

  2. Sustained Analgesic Peptide Secretion and Cell Labeling Using a Novel Genetic Modification

    PubMed Central

    Gajavelli, Shyam; Castellanos, Daniel A.; Furmanski, Orion; Schiller, Paul C.; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Cell-based therapy for neuropathic pain could provide analgesics to local pain modulatory regions in a sustained, renewable fashion. In order to provide enhanced analgesic efficacy, transplantable cells may be engineered to produce complementary or increased levels of analgesic peptides. In addition, genetic labeling of modified cells is desirable for identification and tracking, but it should be retained intracellularly as desired analgesic peptides are secreted. Usually constructs encode proteins destined for either extra- or intra-cellular compartments, as these pathways do not cross. However, interactions between intracellular destinations provide a window of opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this report, we have explored this approach using a potential supplementary analgesic peptide, [Ser1]-histogranin (SHG), the stable synthetic derivative of a naturally occurring peptide with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonistic properties. A synthetic SHG gene was combined with (i) nerve growth factor-β (NGF-β) amino-terminal signal peptide to enable secretion, and (ii) a fluorescent cellular label (mRFP) with intervening cathepsin L cleavage site, and subcloned into a lentiviral vector. In addition, an endoplasmic retention signal, KDEL, was added to enable retrieval of mRFP. Using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopic profile analysis, cells transduced by such lentiviruses were shown to synthesize a single SHG-mRFP polypeptide that was processed, targeted to expected subcellular destinations in several cell types. Dot blot and Western analysis revealed stable transduction and long-term secretion of SHG from PC12 cells in vitro. Transplantation of such cells provided modest analgesia in a rodent pain model consistent with low levels of SHG peptide in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These results suggest that it is possible to deliver proteins with different final destinations from a single construct, such as pharmacologically active peptide for

  3. Sustained analgesic peptide secretion and cell labeling using a novel genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Gajavelli, Shyam; Castellanos, Daniel A; Furmanski, Orion; Schiller, Paul C; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    Cell-based therapy for neuropathic pain could provide analgesics to local pain modulatory regions in a sustained, renewable fashion. In order to provide enhanced analgesic efficacy, transplantable cells may be engineered to produce complementary or increased levels of analgesic peptides. In addition, genetic labeling of modified cells is desirable for identification and tracking, but it should be retained intracellularly as desired analgesic peptides are secreted. Usually constructs encode proteins destined for either extra- or intracellular compartments, as these pathways do not cross. However, interactions between intracellular destinations provide a window of opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this report, we have explored this approach using a potential supplementary analgesic peptide, [Ser1]-histogranin (SHG), the stable synthetic derivative of a naturally occurring peptide with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonistic properties. A synthetic SHG gene was combined with (i) nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-beta) amino-terminal signal peptide to enable secretion, and (ii) a fluorescent cellular label (mRFP) with intervening cathepsin L cleavage site, and subcloned into a lentiviral vector. In addition, an endoplasmic retention signal, KDEL, was added to enable retrieval of mRFP. Using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopic profile analysis, cells transduced by such lentiviruses were shown to synthesize a single SHG-mRFP polypeptide that was processed, targeted to expected subcellular destinations in several cell types. Dot blot and Western analysis revealed stable transduction and long-term secretion of SHG from PC12 cells in vitro. Transplantation of such cells provided modest analgesia in a rodent pain model consistent with low levels of SHG peptide in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These results suggest that it is possible to deliver proteins with different final destinations from a single construct, such as pharmacologically active peptide for

  4. On the application of the genetic algorithm to the predictability problems involving "on-off" switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Q.

    2011-12-01

    On the application of the genetic algorithm to the predictability problems involving "on-off" switches ZHENG Qin(1,2), DAI Yi(1), ZHANG Lu(1)and LU Xiaoqing(1) (1)Institute of Science, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 211101, China; (2)State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China Abstract The lower bound of maximum predictable time can be formulated into a constrained nonlinear optimization problem, and the traditional solution to this problem is the filtering method and the conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) method. Usually, the CNOP method is implemented with the help of a gradient descent algorithm based on the adjoint method, which is named as the ADJ-CNOP, hereinafter. However, with the increasing improvement of actual prediction models, more and more physical processes are taken into consideration in models in the form of parameterization, thus giving rise to the "on-off" switch problem, which affects tremendously the effectiveness of the conventional gradient descent algorithm based on the adjoint method. This paper attempts to apply a genetic algorithm (GA) to the CNOP method, named as the GA-CNOP, to solve the predictability problems involving the "on-off" switches. As the precision of the filtering method depends uniquely on the division of the constraint region, its results are taken as benchmarks and a series of comparisons between the ADJ-CNOP and the GA-CNOP are performed. It is revealed that the GA-CNOP can always figure out the accurate lower bound of maximum predictable time even in discontinuous cases, while the ADJ-CNOP, owing to the effect of "on-off" switches, often yields the incorrect lower bound of maximum predictable time. This would suggest that in non-smooth cases, using a GA to solve the predictability problems is more effective than using the conventional

  5. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M; Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collée, J Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I; Neuhausen, Susan L; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V; Nielsen, Finn C; Greene, Mark H; Greene, Mark I; Mai, Phuong L; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Daly, Mark J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Altshuler, David M; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-10-28

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5) and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4). These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  6. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  7. A versatile mini-mazF-cassette for marker-free targeted genetic modification in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhiwei; Deng, Bin; Jiao, Zhihua; Wu, Bingbing; Xu, Xin; Yu, Dongyou; Li, Weifen

    2013-11-01

    There are some drawbacks for MazF-cassette constructed in previous reports for marker-free genetic manipulation in Bacillus subtilis, including cloning-dependent methodology and non-strictly controlled expression system. In our study, the modifications on mazF-cassette are carried out, such as using mini Zeocin resistance gene as positive-selectable marker and strictly controlled xyl promoter from the B. subtilis to replace non-strictly controlled IPTG-inducible Pspac or xyl promoter from Bacillus megaterium. Then the mini-mazF-cassette was successfully applied to knock-out the amyE gene, to delete a 90-kb gene cluster, and to knock-in a green fluorescent protein expression cassette employing a cloning-independent methodology, without introducing undesirable redundant sequences at the modified locus in the B. subtilis 1A751. Besides, the mini-mazF-cassette could be used repeatedly to delete multiple genes or gene clusters with only a 2- to 2.5-kb PCR-fused fragment, which largely reduced the frequency of nucleic acid mutations generated by PCR compared to previous reports. We further demonstrated that the frequency of spontaneous mazF-resistant mutants was lower, and the frequency of generating desired clones was nearly 100%. The entire procedure for marker-free genetic manipulation using the mini-mazF-cassette can be finished in about 3days. This modified cassette has remarkable improvement compared to existing approaches and is applicable for available manipulating Bacillus species chromosomes. © 2013.

  8. Three different targets for the genetic modification of wine yeast strains resulting in improved effectiveness of bentonite fining.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ramos, Daniel; Quirós, Manuel; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2009-09-23

    Bentonite fining is used in the clarification of white wines to prevent protein haze. This treatment results in the loss of a significant portion of the wine itself, as well as aroma compounds important for the quality of white wines. Among other interesting effects on wine quality, yeast cell wall mannoproteins have been shown to stabilize wine against protein haze. A previous work showed that wine yeast strains engineered by deletion of KNR4 release increased amounts of mannoproteins and produce wines showing attenuated responses in protein haze tests. This paper describes the technological properties of several new recombinant wine yeast strains, deleted for genes involved in cell-wall biogenesis, as well as the regulatory gene KNR4. Stabilization of wines produced by three of the six recombinant strains analyzed required 20-40% less bentonite than those made with their nonrecombinant counterparts. The availability of multiple targets for genetically improving yeast mannoprotein release, as shown in this work, is relevant not only for genetic engineering of wine yeast but especially for the feasibility of genetically improving this character by classical methods of strain development such as random mutagenesis or sexual hybridization.

  9. Towards improved butanol production through targeted genetic modification of Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Katrin M; Grosse-Honebrink, Alexander; Derecka, Kamila; Rotta, Carlo; Zhang, Ying; Minton, Nigel P

    2017-03-01

    Declining fossil fuel reserves, coupled with environmental concerns over their continued extraction and exploitation have led to strenuous efforts to identify renewable routes to energy and fuels. One attractive option is to convert glycerol, a by-product of the biodiesel industry, into n-butanol, an industrially important chemical and potential liquid transportation fuel, using Clostridium pasteurianum. Under certain growth conditions this Clostridium species has been shown to predominantly produce n-butanol, together with ethanol and 1,3-propanediol, when grown on glycerol. Further increases in the yields of n-butanol produced by C. pasteurianum could be accomplished through rational metabolic engineering of the strain. Accordingly, in the current report we have developed and exemplified a robust tool kit for the metabolic engineering of C. pasteurianum and used the system to make the first reported in-frame deletion mutants of pivotal genes involved in solvent production, namely hydA (hydrogenase), rex (Redox response regulator) and dhaBCE (glycerol dehydratase). We were, for the first time in C. pasteurianum, able to eliminate 1,3-propanediol synthesis and demonstrate its production was essential for growth on glycerol as a carbon source. Inactivation of both rex and hydA resulted in increased n-butanol titres, representing the first steps towards improving the utilisation of C. pasteurianum as a chassis for the industrial production of this important chemical. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimization of methods for the genetic modification of human T cells.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon Cd

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+) T cells are not only critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNA interference (RNAi) owing to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low because of multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4(+) T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T-cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4(+) T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4(+) T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4(+) T cells.

  11. Optimization of Methods for the Genetic Modification of Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Y.; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon C.D.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNAi due to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low due to multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4+ T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4+ T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4+ T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4+ T cells. PMID:26027856

  12. A Drosophila screen identifies neurofibromatosis-1 genetic modifiers involved in systemic and synaptic growth

    PubMed Central

    Walker, James A; Bernards, André

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by loss of a negative regulator of Ras oncoproteins. Unknown genetic modifiers have been implicated in NF1’s characteristic variability. Drosophila melanogaster dNf1 phenotypes include cognitive deficits and reduced growth, both of which resemble human symptoms. We recently reported results of a screen for dominant modifiers of dNf1 growth. Suppressors include the dAlk tyrosine kinase and its activating ligand, two other genes involved in Ras/ERK signal transduction, the synaptic scaffold Dap160 and the CCKLR-17D1 drosulfakinin receptor. Additional modifiers include several genes involved in cAMP/PKA signaling. Providing mechanistic insights, dAlk, jeb, and CCKLR-17D1 also suppress a dNf1 synaptic overgrowth defect, and increasing cAMP/PKA signaling in the neuroendocrine ring gland rescued the dNf1 growth deficiency. Finally, among the several suppressors identified in our screen, we specifically implicate ALK as a potential therapeutic target by showing that NF1-regulated ALK/RAS/ERK signaling is conserved in human cells. PMID:25054093

  13. Messages promoting genetic modification of crops in the context of climate change: Evidence for psychological reactance.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hang; McComas, Katherine A; Besley, John C

    2017-01-01

    Genetic modification (GM) of crops and climate change are arguably two of today's most challenging science communication issues. Increasingly, these two issues are connected in messages proposing GM as a viable option for ensuring global food security threatened by climate change. This study examines the effects of messages promoting the benefits of GM in the context of climate change. Further, it examines whether explicit reference to "climate change," or "global warming" in a GM message results in different effects than each other, or an implicit climate reference. An online sample of U.S. participants (N = 1050) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: "climate change" cue, "global warming" cue, implicit cue, or control (no message). Generally speaking, framing GM crops as a way to help ensure global food security proved to be an effective messaging strategy in increasing positive attitudes toward GM. In addition, the implicit cue condition led to liberals having more positive attitudes and behavioral intentions toward GM than the "climate change" cue condition, an effect mediated by message evaluations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-07-29

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes.

  15. Persistence of antigen is required to maintain transplantation tolerance induced by genetic modification of bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, C; Bagley, J; Iacomini, J

    2006-09-01

    Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) resulting in a state of molecular chimerism can be used to induce donor-specific tolerance to allografts. However, the requirements for maintaining tolerance in molecular chimeras remain unknown. Here, we examined whether long-term expression of a retrovirally encoded alloantigen in hematopoietic cells is required to maintain donor-specific tolerance in molecular chimeras. To this end, mice were reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow transduced with retroviruses carrying the gene encoding the allogeneic MHC class I molecule Kb. Following induction of molecular chimerism, mice were depleted of cells expressing Kb by administration of the anti-Kb monoclonal antibody Y-3. Mice that were effectively depleted of cells expressing the retrovirally encoded MHC class I antigen rejected Kb disparate skin allografts. In contrast, control molecular chimeras accepted Kb disparate skin allografts indefinitely. These data suggest maintenance of tolerance in molecular chimeras requires long-term expression of retrovirally transduced alloantigen on the progeny of retrovirally transduced HSCs.

  16. A Systems Biology Overview on Human Diabetic Nephropathy: From Genetic Susceptibility to Post-Transcriptional and Post-Translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Conserva, Francesca; Gesualdo, Loreto; Papale, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), a microvascular complication occurring in approximately 20-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is characterized by the progressive impairment of glomerular filtration and the development of Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions leading to end-stage renal failure (ESRD). The causes and molecular mechanisms mediating the onset of T2DM chronic complications are yet sketchy and it is not clear why disease progression occurs only in some patients. We performed a systematic analysis of the most relevant studies investigating genetic susceptibility and specific transcriptomic, epigenetic, proteomic, and metabolomic patterns in order to summarize the most significant traits associated with the disease onset and progression. The picture that emerges is complex and fascinating as it includes the regulation/dysregulation of numerous biological processes, converging toward the activation of inflammatory processes, oxidative stress, remodeling of cellular function and morphology, and disturbance of metabolic pathways. The growing interest in the characterization of protein post-translational modifications and the importance of handling large datasets using a systems biology approach are also discussed.

  17. A Systems Biology Overview on Human Diabetic Nephropathy: From Genetic Susceptibility to Post-Transcriptional and Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Conserva, Francesca; Gesualdo, Loreto; Papale, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), a microvascular complication occurring in approximately 20–40% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is characterized by the progressive impairment of glomerular filtration and the development of Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions leading to end-stage renal failure (ESRD). The causes and molecular mechanisms mediating the onset of T2DM chronic complications are yet sketchy and it is not clear why disease progression occurs only in some patients. We performed a systematic analysis of the most relevant studies investigating genetic susceptibility and specific transcriptomic, epigenetic, proteomic, and metabolomic patterns in order to summarize the most significant traits associated with the disease onset and progression. The picture that emerges is complex and fascinating as it includes the regulation/dysregulation of numerous biological processes, converging toward the activation of inflammatory processes, oxidative stress, remodeling of cellular function and morphology, and disturbance of metabolic pathways. The growing interest in the characterization of protein post-translational modifications and the importance of handling large datasets using a systems biology approach are also discussed. PMID:26798653

  18. Epigenetic Modifications in Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wise, Ingrid A; Charchar, Fadi J

    2016-03-25

    Essential hypertension (EH) is a complex, polygenic condition with no single causative agent. Despite advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of EH, hypertension remains one of the world's leading public health problems. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that epigenetic modifications are as important as genetic predisposition in the development of EH. Indeed, a complex and interactive genetic and environmental system exists to determine an individual's risk of EH. Epigenetics refers to all heritable changes to the regulation of gene expression as well as chromatin remodelling, without involvement of nucleotide sequence changes. Epigenetic modification is recognized as an essential process in biology, but is now being investigated for its role in the development of specific pathologic conditions, including EH. Epigenetic research will provide insights into the pathogenesis of blood pressure regulation that cannot be explained by classic Mendelian inheritance. This review concentrates on epigenetic modifications to DNA structure, including the influence of non-coding RNAs on hypertension development.

  19. Genetic and Epigenetic Modifications of Sox2 Contribute to the Invasive Phenotype of Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Marta M.; Diez-Valle, Ricardo; Manterola, Lorea; Rubio, Angel; Liu, Dan; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Urquiza, Leire; Jauregi, Patricia; de Munain, Adolfo Lopez; Sampron, Nicolás; Aramburu, Ander; Tejada-Solís, Sonia; Vicente, Carmen; Odero, María D.; Bandrés, Eva; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Idoate, Miguel A.; Lang, Frederick F.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2011-01-01

    We undertook this study to understand how the transcription factor Sox2 contributes to the malignant phenotype of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive primary brain tumor. We initially looked for unbalanced genomic rearrangements in the Sox2 locus in 42 GBM samples and found that Sox2 was amplified in 11.5% and overexpressed in all the samples. These results prompted us to further investigate the mechanisms involved in Sox2 overexpression in GBM. We analyzed the methylation status of the Sox2 promoter because high CpG density promoters are associated with key developmental genes. The Sox2 promoter presented a CpG island that was hypomethylated in all the patient samples when compared to normal cell lines. Treatment of Sox2-negative glioma cell lines with 5-azacitidine resulted in the re-expression of Sox2 and in a change in the methylation status of the Sox2 promoter. We further confirmed these results by analyzing data from GBM cases generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observed Sox2 overexpression (86%; N = 414), Sox2 gene amplification (8.5%; N = 492), and Sox 2 promoter hypomethylation (100%; N = 258), suggesting the relevance of this factor in the malignant phenotype of GBMs. To further explore the role of Sox2, we performed in vitro analysis with brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) and established glioma cell lines. Downmodulation of Sox2 in BTSCs resulted in the loss of their self-renewal properties. Surprisingly, ectopic expression of Sox2 in established glioma cells was not sufficient to support self-renewal, suggesting that additional factors are required. Furthermore, we observed that ectopic Sox2 expression was sufficient to induce invasion and migration of glioma cells, and knockdown experiments demonstrated that Sox2 was essential for maintaining these properties. Altogether, our data underscore the importance of a pleiotropic role of Sox2 and suggest that it could be used as a therapeutic target in GBM. PMID:22069467

  20. Genetic variation and posttranslational modification of bovine κ-casein: effects on caseino-macropeptide release during renneting.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hanne B; Pedersen, Katrine S; Johansen, Lene B; Poulsen, Nina A; Bakman, Mette; Chatterton, Dereck E W; Larsen, Lotte B

    2015-02-01

    Chymosin-induced cleavage of κ-casein (κ-CN) occurs during the first enzymatic phase in milk coagulation during cheese manufacturing, where the hydrophilic C-terminal peptide of κ-CN, named caseino-macropeptide (CMP), is released into the whey. The CMP peptide is known for its rather heterogeneous composition with respect to both genetic variation and multiple posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation and O-linked glycosylation. An approach of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used to investigate (1) the overall protein profile and (2) the release of various forms of CMP after addition of chymosin to individual cow milk samples from 2 breeds, Danish Jersey (DJ) and Danish Holstein-Friesian (DH). The cows were selected to represent distinct homo- and heterozygous types of the κ-CN genetic variants A, B, and E (i.e., genotypes AA, BB, AB, EE, and AE). Initially, investigation of the protein profile showed milk with κ-CN BB exhibited the highest relative content of κ-CN, whereas AE milk exhibited the lowest, and after 40min of renneting >90% of intact κ-CN was hydrolyzed by chymosin in milk representing all κ-CN genotype. By in-depth analysis of the CMP chromatographic profile, multiple CMP isoforms with 1 to 3 O-linked glycans (1-3 G) and 1 to 3 phosphate groups (1-3 P) were identified, as well as nonmodified CMP isoforms. The number of identified CMP isoforms varied to some extent between breeds (21CMP isoforms identified in DJ, 26CMP isoforms in DH) and between κ-CN genetic variants (CMP variant A being the most heterogeneous compared with CMP B and E), as well as between individual samples within each breed. The predominant forms of glycans attached to CMP were found to be the acidic tetrasaccharide {N-acetyl-neuraminic acid α(2-3)galactose β(1-3)[N-acetyl-neuraminic acid α(2-6)]N-acetyl galactose} or trisaccharides {N-acetyl-neuraminic acid α(2-3)galactose β(1-3)N-acetyl galactose and galactose β(1-3)[N

  1. Control of peptide nanotube diameter by chemical modifications of an aromatic residue involved in a single close contact

    PubMed Central

    Tarabout, Christophe; Roux, Stéphane; Gobeaux, Frédéric; Fay, Nicolas; Pouget, Emilie; Meriadec, Cristelle; Ligeti, Melinda; Thomas, Daniel; IJsselstijn, Maarten; Besselievre, François; Buisson, David-Alexandre; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Petitjean, Michel; Valéry, Céline; Perrin, Lionel; Rousseau, Bernard; Artzner, Franck; Paternostre, Maité; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly is an attractive pathway for bottom-up synthesis of novel nanomaterials. In particular, this approach allows the spontaneous formation of structures of well-defined shapes and monodisperse characteristic sizes. Because nanotechnology mainly relies on size-dependent physical phenomena, the control of monodispersity is required, but the possibility of tuning the size is also essential. For self-assembling systems, shape, size, and monodispersity are mainly settled by the chemical structure of the building block. Attempts to change the size notably by chemical modification usually end up with the loss of self-assembly. Here, we generated a library of 17 peptides forming nanotubes of monodisperse diameter ranging from 10 to 36 nm. A structural model taking into account close contacts explains how a modification of a few Å of a single aromatic residue induces a fourfold increase in nanotube diameter. The application of such a strategy is demonstrated by the formation of silica nanotubes of various diameters. PMID:21518895

  2. Transcriptome-wide N6-methyladenosine profiling of rice callus and leaf reveals the presence of tissue-specific competitors involved in selective mRNA modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuli; Wang, Xiliang; Li, Cuiping; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun; Song, Shuhui

    2014-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most prevalent internal modification present in mRNAs of all higher eukaryotes. With the development of MeRIP-seq technique, in-depth identification of mRNAs with m6A modification becomes feasible. Here we present a transcriptome-wide m6A modification profiling effort for rice transcriptomes of differentiated callus and leaf, which yields 8,138 and 14,253 m6A-modified genes, respectively. The m6A peak (m6A-modified nucleotide position on mRNAs) distribution exhibits preference toward both translation termination and initiation sites. The m6A peak enrichment is negatively correlated with gene expression and weakly positively correlated with certain gene features, such as exon length and number. By comparing m6A-modified genes between the 2 samples, we define 1,792 and 6,508 tissue-specific m6A-modified genes (TSMGs) in callus and leaf, respectively. Among which, 626 and 5,509 TSMGs are actively expressed in both tissues but are selectively m6A-modified (SMGs) only in one of the 2 tissues. Further analyses reveal characteristics of SMGs: (1) Most SMGs are differentially expressed between callus and leaf. (2) Two conserved RNA-binding motifs, predicted to be recognized by PUM and RNP4F, are significantly over-represented in SMGs. (3) GO enrichment analysis shows that SMGs in callus mainly participate in transcription regulator/factor activity whereas SMGs in leaf are mainly involved in plastid and thylakoid. Our results suggest the presence of tissue-specific competitors involved in SMGs. These findings provide a resource for plant RNA epitranscriptomic studies and further enlarge our knowledge on the function of RNA m6A modification. PMID:25483034

  3. A systematic genetic screen for genes involved in sensing inorganic phosphate availability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Joonhyuk; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Xu, Yi -Fan; ...

    2017-05-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to changes in extracellular inorganic phosphate (Pi) availability by regulating the activity of the phosphate-responsive (PHO) signaling pathway, enabling cells to maintain intracellular levels of the essential nutrient Pi. Pi-limitation induces upregulation of inositol heptakisphosphate (IP7) synthesized by the inositol hexakisphosphate kinase Vip1, triggering inhibition of the Pho80/Pho85 cyclin-cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) complex by the CDK inhibitor Pho81, which upregulates the PHO regulon through the CDK target and transcription factor Pho4. To identify genes that are involved in signaling upstream of the Pho80/Pho85/Pho81 complex and how they interact with each other to regulate the PHO pathway, wemore » performed genome-wide screens with the synthetic genetic array method. We identified more than 300 mutants with defects in signaling upstream of the Pho80/Pho85/Pho81 complex, including AAH1, which encodes an adenine deaminase that negatively regulates the PHO pathway in a Vip1-dependent manner. Moreover, we showed that even in the absence of VIP1, the PHO pathway can be activated under prolonged periods of Pi starvation, suggesting complexity in the mechanisms by which the PHO pathway is regulated.« less

  4. A Forward Genetic Screen for Molecules Involved in Pheromone-Induced Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Neal, Scott J; Park, JiSoo; DiTirro, Danielle; Yoon, Jason; Shibuya, Mayumi; Choi, Woochan; Schroeder, Frank C; Butcher, Rebecca A; Kim, Kyuhyung; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-05-03

    Animals must constantly assess their surroundings and integrate sensory cues to make appropriate behavioral and developmental decisions. Pheromones produced by conspecific individuals provide critical information regarding environmental conditions. Ascaroside pheromone concentration and composition are instructive in the decision of Caenorhabditis elegans to either develop into a reproductive adult or enter into the stress-resistant alternate dauer developmental stage. Pheromones are sensed by a small set of sensory neurons, and integrated with additional environmental cues, to regulate neuroendocrine signaling and dauer formation. To identify molecules required for pheromone-induced dauer formation, we performed an unbiased forward genetic screen and identified phd (pheromone response-defective dauer) mutants. Here, we describe new roles in dauer formation for previously identified neuronal molecules such as the WD40 domain protein QUI-1 and MACO-1 Macoilin, report new roles for nociceptive neurons in modulating pheromone-induced dauer formation, and identify tau tubulin kinases as new genes involved in dauer formation. Thus, phd mutants define loci required for the detection, transmission, or integration of pheromone signals in the regulation of dauer formation.

  5. A Forward Genetic Screen for Molecules Involved in Pheromone-Induced Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Scott J.; Park, JiSoo; DiTirro, Danielle; Yoon, Jason; Shibuya, Mayumi; Choi, Woochan; Schroeder, Frank C.; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Kim, Kyuhyung; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-01-01

    Animals must constantly assess their surroundings and integrate sensory cues to make appropriate behavioral and developmental decisions. Pheromones produced by conspecific individuals provide critical information regarding environmental conditions. Ascaroside pheromone concentration and composition are instructive in the decision of Caenorhabditis elegans to either develop into a reproductive adult or enter into the stress-resistant alternate dauer developmental stage. Pheromones are sensed by a small set of sensory neurons, and integrated with additional environmental cues, to regulate neuroendocrine signaling and dauer formation. To identify molecules required for pheromone-induced dauer formation, we performed an unbiased forward genetic screen and identified phd (pheromone response-defective dauer) mutants. Here, we describe new roles in dauer formation for previously identified neuronal molecules such as the WD40 domain protein QUI-1 and MACO-1 Macoilin, report new roles for nociceptive neurons in modulating pheromone-induced dauer formation, and identify tau tubulin kinases as new genes involved in dauer formation. Thus, phd mutants define loci required for the detection, transmission, or integration of pheromone signals in the regulation of dauer formation. PMID:26976437

  6. Genetic Polymorphisms Involved in Folate Metabolism and Maternal Risk for Down Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balduino Victorino, Daniella; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria; Pavarino, Érika Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Inconclusive results of the association between genetic polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism and maternal risk for Down syndrome (DS) have been reported. Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted. We searched electronic databases through May, 2014, for eligible studies. Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the strength of the association, which was estimated by fixed or random effects models. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated using Q-test and I2 statistic. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were also conducted. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's and Egger's tests. A total of 17 case-controls studies were included. There was evidence for an association between the MTRR c.66A>G (rs1801394) polymorphism and maternal risk for DS. In the subgroup analysis, increased maternal risk for DS was found in Caucasians. Additionally, the polymorphic heterozygote MTHFD1 1958GA genotype was associated significantly with maternal risk for DS, when we limit the analysis by studies conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Finally, considering MTR c.2756A>G (rs1805087), TC2 c.776C>G (rs1801198), and CBS c.844ins68, no significant associations have been found, neither in the overall analyses nor in the stratified analyses by ethnicity. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggested that the MTRR c.66A>G (rs1801394) polymorphism and MTHFD1 c.1958G>A (rs2236225) were associated with increased maternal risk for DS. PMID:25544792

  7. Genetic Analysis of Transvection Effects Involving Cis-Regulatory Elements of the Drosophila Ultrabithorax Gene

    PubMed Central

    Micol, J. L.; Castelli-Gair, J. E.; Garcia-Bellido, A.

    1990-01-01

    The Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene of Drosophila melanogaster contains two functionally distinguishable regions: the protein-coding Ubx transcription unit and, upstream of it, the transcribed but non-protein-coding bxd region. Numerous recessive, partial loss-of-function mutations which appear to be regulatory mutations map within the bxd region and within the introns of the Ubx transcription unit. In addition, mutations within the Ubx unit exons are known and most of these behave as null alleles. Ubx(1) is one such allele. We have confirmed that, although the Ubx(1) allele does not produce detectable Ubx proteins (UBX), it does retain other genetic functions detectable by their effects on the expression of a paired, homologous Ubx allele, i.e., by transvection. We have extended previous analyses made by E. B. Lewis by mapping the critical elements of the Ubx gene which participate in transvection effects. Our results show that the Ubx(1) allele retains wild-type functions whose effectiveness can be reduced (1) by additional cis mutations in the bxd region or in introns of the Ubx transcription unit, as well as (2) by rearrangements disturbing pairing between homologous Ubx genes. Our results suggest that those remnant functions in Ubx(1) are able to modulate the activity of the allele located in the homologous chromosome. We discuss the normal cis regulatory role of these functions involved in trans interactions between homologous Ubx genes, as well as the implications of our results for the current models on transvection. PMID:2123161

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of molecules involved in host immune response to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Hu, Zhen; Shang, Weilong; Zhu, Junmin; Xu, Chuanshan; Rao, Xiancai

    2012-11-01

    The dengue virus (DENV) belongs to the flavivirus family. Each of the four distinct serotypes of this virus is capable of causing human disease, especially in tropical and subtropical areas. The majority of people infected with DENV manifest asymptomatic or dengue fever with flu-like self-limited symptoms. However, a small portion of patients emerge with severe manifestations referred to as dengue hemorrhagic fever, which has a high mortality rate if not treated promptly. The host immune system, which plays important roles throughout the whole process of DENV infection, has been confirmed to have double-edged effects on DENV infection. Recently, much attention has been paid to the genetic heterogeneity of molecules involved in the host immune response to DENV infection. This heterogeneity has been proved to be the determining factor for DENV disease orientation. The present review discusses the primary functions and single nucleotide polymorphisms of some critical molecules in the human DENV immunological defense, especially the polymorphism locus associated with the DENV pathogenesis and disease susceptibility. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface modification of coir fibre involving oxidation of lignins followed by reaction with furfuryl alcohol: Characterization and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Sudhir Kumar; Sarkhel, Gautam; Choudhury, Arup

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the chemical treatment of the coir fibres was executed through oxidation with aqueous ClO2 followed by grafting with furfuryl alcohol (FA), leading to create a coating around the fibres more compatible with the polymeric matrices. The ClO2 was used to oxidize mainly phenolic syringyl and guaiacyl units of the lignin polymer to create quinones, which were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In addition, the surface features of modified fibres were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The extent of FA-grafting was found higher (weight gain 17.7%) for oxidized fibre compared to those for non-oxidized fibre (weight gain 2.2%). The surface modification with FA-grafting reduced the hydrophilicity of the coir fibre, as confirm by the dynamic contact angle and water absorption measurements. The thermal and mechanical properties of untreated, oxidized and FA-grafted coir fibres were evaluated and compared.

  10. When is genetic modification socially acceptable? When used to advance human health through avenues other than food

    PubMed Central

    Olynk Widmar, Nicole J.; Tyner, Wallace E.; Ruple, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Given the potential for genetic modification (GM) to impact human health, via food and health mechanisms, a greater understanding of the social acceptance of GM is necessary to facilitate improved health outcomes. This analysis sought to quantify U.S. residents’ acceptance of GM across five potential uses (grain production, fruit or vegetable production, livestock production, human medicine, and human health, i.e. disease vector control) and provides an in-depth analysis of a timely case study–the Zika virus (ZIKV). The two categories with the highest levels of acceptance for GM use were human medicine (62% acceptance) and human health (68% acceptance); the proportions agreeing with the use of GM for these two categories were statistically different from all other categories. Acceptance of GM in food uses revealed 44% of the sample accepted the use of GM in livestock production while grain production and fruit and vegetable production showed similar levels of agreement with 49% and 48% of responses, respectively. Two variables were significant in all five models predicting GM acceptance; namely, being male and GM awareness. Being male was significant and positive for all models; respondents who reported being male were more likely (than those who reported female) to agree with all five of the uses of GM studied. Those who were reportedly aware of GM mosquito technology were also more likely to agree with all uses of GM technology investigated. The potential relationship between awareness of GM technology uses and acceptance of other uses could help inform rates of acceptance of new technologies by various population segments. PMID:28591218

  11. When is genetic modification socially acceptable? When used to advance human health through avenues other than food.

    PubMed

    Olynk Widmar, Nicole J; Dominick, S R; Tyner, Wallace E; Ruple, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Given the potential for genetic modification (GM) to impact human health, via food and health mechanisms, a greater understanding of the social acceptance of GM is necessary to facilitate improved health outcomes. This analysis sought to quantify U.S. residents' acceptance of GM across five potential uses (grain production, fruit or vegetable production, livestock production, human medicine, and human health, i.e. disease vector control) and provides an in-depth analysis of a timely case study-the Zika virus (ZIKV). The two categories with the highest levels of acceptance for GM use were human medicine (62% acceptance) and human health (68% acceptance); the proportions agreeing with the use of GM for these two categories were statistically different from all other categories. Acceptance of GM in food uses revealed 44% of the sample accepted the use of GM in livestock production while grain production and fruit and vegetable production showed similar levels of agreement with 49% and 48% of responses, respectively. Two variables were significant in all five models predicting GM acceptance; namely, being male and GM awareness. Being male was significant and positive for all models; respondents who reported being male were more likely (than those who reported female) to agree with all five of the uses of GM studied. Those who were reportedly aware of GM mosquito technology were also more likely to agree with all uses of GM technology investigated. The potential relationship between awareness of GM technology uses and acceptance of other uses could help inform rates of acceptance of new technologies by various population segments.

  12. Informed consent, participation in, and withdrawal from a population based cohort study involving genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, K; Kita, Y; Ueshima, H

    2005-01-01

    Design: Descriptive analyses. Setting and participants: The study evaluated two non-genetic subcohorts comprising 3166 people attending for a health checkup during 2002, and two genetic subcohorts comprising 2195 people who underwent a checkup during 2003. Main outcome measurements: Analysis endpoints were differences in participation rates between the non-genetic and genetic subcohorts, differences between providing non-extensive and extensive preliminary information, and changes in participation status between baseline and at 6 months. Results: Participation rates in the genetic subcohorts were 4·7–9·3% lower than those in the non-genetic subcohorts. The odds ratios (OR) of participation in genetic research were between 0·60 and 0·77, and the OR for withdrawal from the research was over 7·70; providing preliminary extensive information about genetic research reduced the withdrawal risks (OR 0·15 for all dependent variables) but worsened participation rates (OR 0·63–0·74). Conclusions: The general population responded sceptically towards genetic research. It is crucial that genetic researchers utilise an informative and educational consent process worthy of public trust. PMID:15994356

  13. Nucleotide modifications within bacterial messenger RNAs regulate their translation and are able to rewire the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Clementi, Nina; Faserl, Klaus; Glasner, Heidelinde; Breuker, Kathrin; Lindner, Herbert; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-29

    Nucleotide modifications within RNA transcripts are found in every organism in all three domains of life. 6-methyladeonsine (m(6)A), 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C) and pseudouridine (Ψ) are highly abundant nucleotide modifications in coding sequences of eukaryal mRNAs, while m(5)C and m(6)A modifications have also been discovered in archaeal and bacterial mRNAs. Employing in vitro translation assays, we systematically investigated the influence of nucleotide modifications on translation. We introduced m(5)C, m(6)A, Ψ or 2'-O-methylated nucleotides at each of the three positions within a codon of the bacterial ErmCL mRNA and analyzed their influence on translation. Depending on the respective nucleotide modification, as well as its position within a codon, protein synthesis remained either unaffected or was prematurely terminated at the modification site, resulting in reduced amounts of the full-length peptide. In the latter case, toeprint analysis of ribosomal complexes was consistent with stalling of translation at the modified codon. When multiple nucleotide modifications were introduced within one codon, an additive inhibitory effect on translation was observed. We also identified the m(5)C modification to alter the amino acid identity of the corresponding codon, when positioned at the second codon position. Our results suggest a novel mode of gene regulation by nucleotide modifications in bacterial mRNAs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Genetic alterations of JAK/STAT cascade and histone modification in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type

    PubMed Central

    Kang, So Young; Kim, Seok Jin; Hwang, Jinha; Lee, Seungho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo; Yoo, Hae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type (ENKL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that more frequently occurs in East Asia and Latin America. Even though its molecular background has been discussed in the last few years, the current knowledge does not explain the disease pathogenesis in most cases of ENKL. Here, we performed multiple types of next-generation sequencing on 34 ENKL samples, including whole-exome sequencing (9 cancer tissues and 4 cancer cell lines), targeted sequencing (21 cancer tissues), and RNA sequencing (3 cancer tissues and 4 cancer cell lines). Mutations were found most frequently in 3 genes, STAT3, BCOR, and MLL2 (which were present in 9, 7, and 6 cancer samples, respectively), whereas there were only 2 cases of JAK3 mutation. In total, JAK/STAT pathway- and histone modification-related genes accounted for 55.9% and 38.2% of cancer samples, respectively, and their involvement in ENKL pathogenesis was also supported by gene expression analysis. In addition, we provided 177 genes upregulated only in cancer tissues, which appear to be linked with angiocentric and angiodestructive growth of ENKL. In this study, we propose several novel driver genes of ENKL, and show that these genes and their functional groups may be future therapeutic targets of this disease. PMID:25980440

  15. Gelation of rhamnogalacturonan I is based on galactan side chain interaction and does not involve chemical modifications.

    PubMed

    Mikshina, Polina V; Makshakova, Olga N; Petrova, Anna A; Gaifullina, Ilzira Z; Idiyatullin, Bulat Z; Gorshkova, Tatyana A; Zuev, Yuriy F

    2017-09-01

    The article presents the structural principles of microwave-induced formation of new gel type from pectic rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I). The backbone of gel-forming RG-I does not contain consecutive galacturonic residues and modifying groups that can be the cause of junction zone formation as it occurs in course of classical ways of pectin gelation. Microwave irradiation does not cause destruction and chemical modifications of RG-I. Removal of half of galactan chains from RG-I leads to loss of gelling capability pointing out on their leading role in this process. Rising of intensity of the bands attributed to galactose and glycosidic linkages in RG-I gel comparing to solution where this polymer exists as molecule associate indicates that the spatial organization of galactans in gel is changed. A model of the RG-I gelation is proposed: being destabilized at volumetric microwave heating RG-I associates are repacked forming network where RG-I molecules are entangled by galactan chains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A prediction of the amino acids and structures involved in DNA recognition by type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, S S; Dryden, D T

    1997-01-01

    The S subunits of type I DNA restriction/modification enzymes are responsible for recognising the DNA target sequence for the enzyme. They contain two domains of approximately 150 amino acids, each of which is responsible for recognising one half of the bipartite asymmetric target. In the absence of any known tertiary structure for type I enzymes or recognisable DNA recognition motifs in the highly variable amino acid sequences of the S subunits, it has previously not been possible to predict which amino acids are responsible for sequence recognition. Using a combination of sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction methods to analyse the sequences of S subunits, we predict that all of the 51 known target recognition domains (TRDs) have the same tertiary structure. Furthermore, this structure is similar to the structure of the TRD of the C5-cytosine methyltransferase, Hha I, which recognises its DNA target via interactions with two short polypeptide loops and a beta strand. Our results predict the location of these sequence recognition structures within the TRDs of all type I S subunits. PMID:9254696

  17. Lysine pyrrolation is a naturally-occurring covalent modification involved in the production of DNA mimic proteins.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Hiroaki; Chikazawa, Miho; Otaki, Natsuki; Hioki, Yusuke; Shimozu, Yuki; Nakashima, Fumie; Shibata, Takahiro; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Shoichi; Matsumi, Noriyoshi; Uchida, Koji

    2014-06-18

    Covalent modification of proteins exerts significant effects on their chemical properties and has important functional and regulatory consequences. We now report the identification and verification of an electrically-active form of modified proteins recognized by a group of small molecules commonly used to interact with DNA. This previously unreported property of proteins was initially discovered when the γ-ketoaldehydes were identified as a source of the proteins stained by the DNA intercalators. Using 1,4-butanedial, the simplest γ-ketoaldehyde, we characterized the structural and chemical criteria governing the recognition of the modified proteins by the DNA intercalators and identified N(ε)-pyrrolelysine as a key adduct. Unexpectedly, the pyrrolation conferred an electronegativity and electronic properties on the proteins that potentially constitute an electrical mimic to the DNA. In addition, we found that the pyrrolated proteins indeed triggered an autoimmune response and that the production of specific antibodies against the pyrrolated proteins was accelerated in human systemic lupus erythematosus. These findings and the apparent high abundance of N(ε)-pyrrolelysine in vivo suggest that protein pyrrolation could be an endogenous source of DNA mimic proteins, providing a possible link connecting protein turnover and immune disorders.

  18. Histone H3K9 modifications are a local chromatin event involved in ethanol-induced neuroadaptation of the NR2B gene.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley; Lieu, Mai; Carreon, Stephanie; Li, Ji

    2011-09-01

    Expression of the NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) gene is upregulated following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment and withdrawal, which underlies behavioral alterations in addiction. The goal of this study was to characterize the changes of histone modifications induced by CIE treatment and its subsequent removal associated to the upregulation of NR2B gene transcription. To investigate the involvement of histone acetylation in the effect of ethanol on the NR2B gene, we examined the influence of CIE on histone acetylation in the 5' regulatory region of NR2B using a qChIP assay. CIE treatment and its subsequent removal produced a remarkable and selected increase in histone H3K9 acetylation. Interestingly, the majority of the increased H3K9 acetylation occurred after ethanol removal, which was coincident with a decrease in H3K9 methylation in the same time duration. Further examination of the mechanisms of ethanol-induced alterations on the histone modifications revealed that CIE-induced acetylation of H3K9 was not due to the changes in global enzyme activities or the expression of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylase (HDACs). Instead, we found a significant downregulation in some histone methyltransferases (HMTs) at both the global level and the local chromatin of the NR2B gene following CIE treatment. Moreover, our experiments also indicated a decrease of G9a, Suv39 h1 and HDAC1-3 in the chromatin of the NR2B gene promoter, which may be responsible for the altered H3K9 modifications. Taken together, the findings suggest a mechanism where the changes in H3K9 modifications in the local chromatin of the NR2B gene underlie alcohol-induced neuroadaptation.

  19. Epidemiological and genetic clues for molecular mechanisms involved in uterine leiomyoma development and growth

    PubMed Central

    Commandeur, Arno E.; Styer, Aaron K.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are highly prevalent benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. In the USA, the lifetime risk for women developing uterine leiomyomas is estimated as up to 75%. Except for hysterectomy, most therapies or treatments often provide only partial or temporary relief and are not successful in every patient. There is a clear racial disparity in the disease; African-American women are estimated to be three times more likely to develop uterine leiomyomas and generally develop more severe symptoms. There is also familial clustering between first-degree relatives and twins, and multiple inherited syndromes in which fibroid development occurs. Leiomyomas have been described as clonal and hormonally regulated, but despite the healthcare burden imposed by the disease, the etiology of uterine leiomyomas remains largely unknown. The mechanisms involved in their growth are also essentially unknown, which has contributed to the slow progress in development of effective treatment options. METHODS A comprehensive PubMed search for and critical assessment of articles related to the epidemiological, biological and genetic clues for uterine leiomyoma development was performed. The individual functions of some of the best candidate genes are explained to provide more insight into their biological function and to interconnect and organize genes and pathways in one overarching figure that represents the current state of knowledge about uterine leiomyoma development and growth. RESULTS In this review, the widely recognized roles of estrogen and progesterone in uterine leiomyoma pathobiology on the basis of clinical and experimental data are presented. This is followed by fundamental aspects and concepts including the possible cellular origin of uterine fibroids. The central themes in the subsequent parts are cytogenetic aberrations in leiomyomas and the racial/ethnic disparities in uterine fibroid biology. Then, the attributes of various in vitro and

  20. Environmental Moderators of Genetic Influences on Adolescent Delinquent Involvement and Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of empirical research reveals that genetic factors account for a substantial amount of variance in measures of antisocial behaviors. At the same time, evidence is also emerging indicating that certain environmental factors moderate the effects that genetic factors have on antisocial outcomes. Despite this line of research, much…

  1. Environmental Moderators of Genetic Influences on Adolescent Delinquent Involvement and Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of empirical research reveals that genetic factors account for a substantial amount of variance in measures of antisocial behaviors. At the same time, evidence is also emerging indicating that certain environmental factors moderate the effects that genetic factors have on antisocial outcomes. Despite this line of research, much…

  2. Indole-3-acetic acid UDP-glucosyltransferase from immature seeds of pea is involved in modification of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Hetmann, Anna; Jakubowska, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The glycosylation of auxin is one of mechanisms contributing to hormonal homeostasis. The enzyme UDPG: indole-3-ylacetyl-β-D-glucosyltransferase (IAA glucosyltransferase, IAGlc synthase) catalyzes the reversible reaction: IAA+UDPG↔1-O-IA-glucose+UDP, which is the first step in the biosynthesis of IAA-ester conjugates in monocotyledonous plants. In this study, we report IAA-glucosyltransferase isolated using a biochemical approach from immature seed of pea (Pisum sativum). The enzyme was purified by PEG fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel anion-exchange chromatography and preparative PAGE. LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of the enzyme revealed the high identity with maize IAGlc synthase, but lack of homology with other IAA-glucosyltransferases from dicots. Biochemical characterization showed that of several acyl acceptors tested, the enzyme had the highest activity on IAA as the glucosyl acceptor (Km=0.52 mM, Vmax=161 nmol min(-1), kcat/Km=4.36 mM s(-1)) and lower activity on indole-3-propionic acid and 1-naphthalene acetic acid. Whereas indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-propionic acid were competitive inhibitors of IAGlc synthase, D-gluconic acid lactone, an inhibitor of β-glucosidase activity, potentiated the enzyme activity at the optimal concentration of 0.3mM. Moreover, we demonstrated that the 1-O-IA-glucose synthesized by IAGlc synthase is the substrate for IAA labeling of glycoproteins from pea seeds indicating a possible role of this enzyme in the covalent modification of a class of proteins by a plant hormone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modifications to the HIPAA Privacy, Security, Enforcement, and Breach Notification rules under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; other modifications to the HIPAA rules.

    PubMed

    2013-01-25

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS or ``the Department'') is issuing this final rule to: Modify the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy, Security, and Enforcement Rules to implement statutory amendments under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (``the HITECH Act'' or ``the Act'') to strengthen the privacy and security protection for individuals' health information; modify the rule for Breach Notification for Unsecured Protected Health Information (Breach Notification Rule) under the HITECH Act to address public comment received on the interim final rule; modify the HIPAA Privacy Rule to strengthen the privacy protections for genetic information by implementing section 105 of Title I of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA); and make certain other modifications to the HIPAA Privacy, Security, Breach Notification, and Enforcement Rules (the HIPAA Rules) to improve their workability and effectiveness and to increase flexibility for and decrease burden on the regulated entities.

  4. Molecular evolution and population genetics of two Drosophila mettleri cytochrome P450 genes involved in host plant utilization

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Jeremy M.; Matzkin, Luciano M.; Castrezana, Sergio; Markow, Therese A.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation is one of the primary goals of evolutionary biology. The evolution of xenobiotic resistance in insects has proven to be an especially suitable arena for studying the genetics of adaptation, and resistant phenotypes are known to result from both coding and regulatory changes. In this study, we examine the evolutionary history and population genetics of two Drosophila mettleri cytochrome P450 genes that are putatively involved in the detoxification of alkaloids present in two of its cactus hosts: saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) and senita (Lophocereus schottii). Previous studies demonstrated that Cyp28A1 was highly upregulated following exposure to rotting senita tissue while Cyp4D10 was highly upregulated following exposure to rotting saguaro tissue. Here, we show that a subset of sites in Cyp28A1 experienced adaptive evolution specifically in the D. mettleri lineage. Moreover, neutrality tests in several populations were also consistent with a history of selection on Cyp28A1. In contrast, we did not find evidence for positive selection on Cyp4D10, though this certainly does not preclude its involvement in host plant use. A surprising result that emerged from our population genetic analyses was the presence of significant genetic differentiation between flies collected from different host plant species (saguaro and senita) at Organ Pipe National Monument, Arizona, USA. This preliminary evidence suggests that D. mettleri may have evolved into distinctive host races that specialize on different hosts, a possibility that warrants further investigation. PMID:18510584

  5. Searching Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) for information on genetic loci involved in human disease.

    PubMed

    Borate, Bhavesh; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2009-09-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive compendium of information on human genes and genetic disorders, with a particular emphasis on the interplay between observed phenotypes and underlying genotypes. This unit focuses on the basic methodology for formulating OMIM searches and illustrates the types of information that can be retrieved from OMIM, including descriptions of clinical manifestations resulting from genetic abnormalities. This unit also provides information on additional relevant medical and molecular biology databases. A basic knowledge of OMIM should be part of the armamentarium of physicians and scientists with an interest in research on and clinical aspects of genetic disorders.

  6. Searching Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) for information on genetic loci involved in human disease.

    PubMed

    Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2012-04-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive compendium of information on human genes and genetic disorders, with a particular emphasis on the interplay between observed phenotypes and underlying genotypes. This unit focuses on the basic methodology for formulating OMIM searches and illustrates the types of information that can be retrieved from OMIM, including descriptions of clinical manifestations resulting from genetic abnormalities. This unit also provides information on additional relevant medical and molecular biology databases. A basic knowledge of OMIM should be part of the armamentarium of physicians and scientists with an interest in research on the clinical aspects of genetic disorders.

  7. Ubiquitin modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swatek, Kirby N; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic multifaceted post-translational modification involved in nearly all aspects of eukaryotic biology. Once attached to a substrate, the 76-amino acid protein ubiquitin is subjected to further modifications, creating a multitude of distinct signals with distinct cellular outcomes, referred to as the 'ubiquitin code'. Ubiquitin can be ubiquitinated on seven lysine (Lys) residues or on the N-terminus, leading to polyubiquitin chains that can encompass complex topologies. Alternatively or in addition, ubiquitin Lys residues can be modified by ubiquitin-like molecules (such as SUMO or NEDD8). Finally, ubiquitin can also be acetylated on Lys, or phosphorylated on Ser, Thr or Tyr residues, and each modification has the potential to dramatically alter the signaling outcome. While the number of distinctly modified ubiquitin species in cells is mind-boggling, much progress has been made to characterize the roles of distinct ubiquitin modifications, and many enzymes and receptors have been identified that create, recognize or remove these ubiquitin modifications. We here provide an overview of the various ubiquitin modifications present in cells, and highlight recent progress on ubiquitin chain biology. We then discuss the recent findings in the field of ubiquitin acetylation and phosphorylation, with a focus on Ser65-phosphorylation and its role in mitophagy and Parkin activation. PMID:27012465

  8. Genetic, molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in human obesity: Society for Endocrinology Medal Lecture 2012.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Sadaf I

    2015-01-01

    The health consequences of obesity represent one of the major public health challenges of our time. Whilst the role of environmental drivers such as reduced physical activity and increased food intake is widely acknowledged, the importance of biological factors which influence individual variation in weight is less readily recognised. Considerable evidence suggests that genetic factors influence a person's weight in a given environment and that these genetic influences are more potent at the extremes of the body mass index (BMI) distribution. The discovery that genetic disruption of certain pathways can lead to severe obesity has informed our current understanding of how body weight is regulated by brain circuits that regulate appetite and energy expenditure. These studies provide a framework for investigating patients and ultimately may guide the development of more rational-targeted therapies for genetically susceptible individuals with severe obesity. © 2014 The Author. Clinical Endocrinology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Modification of hydrological properties in a fine textured soil following field application of pelletized biochar: investigation of the mechanism involved.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza Andrenelli, Maria; Mocali, Stefano; Pellegrini, Sergio; Vignozzi, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    The application of pelletized biochar is seldom employed in field, and its effect on soil hydrological behaviour scarcely investigated. Biochar is usually added in powdered or granular form to improve the homogeneity of distribution, meanwhile favouring its interaction with soil matrix. In this study we evaluated the possibility of applying pelletized biochar as soil conditioner to enhance, during a single cropping season, the hydrological behaviour of a silty clay loam soil prone to structure degradation. For that purpose, the water retention curves (WRCs) were determined on undisturbed soil samples (0-15 cm) three months after the addition, at the rate of 14 Mg ha-1, of two differently pyrolyzed biochars (B1 and B2). Starting from the WRCs the pore size distribution was determined. The gravimetric water content at both field capacity (-10 kPa) and wilting point (-1,500 kPa) was also measured on biochar samples to assess their available water capacity (AWC). In both the treatments, soil bulk density (BD) was significantly lower compared to control, apparently as direct consequence of the addition of low density pellets. Actually, excluding the intrinsic biochar porosity from soil bulk density calculation, BD values of the treated soils remain lower of around 10% over control. Such findings suggest that a modification of soil structural characteristics might have been induced by pellet addition. Data of the WRCs indicate a significant increase of transmission (500-50 micron), storage (50-0.5 micron) and AWC pores (30-0.2 micron) in the amended soils. The two biochars affected the AWC by direct pore contribution, but the extent of such effect was related to the biochar type: the tested pelletized biomass seems to have positive effects provided that the pyrolysis temperature does not exceed 800°C, as in the case of B1. The overall hydrological improvement might be correlated to both the inherent biochar retention capacity and a merely mechanical process of

  10. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  11. Post-translational modifications of myofilament proteins involved in length-dependent prolongation of relaxation in rabbit right ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Monasky, Michelle M; Taglieri, Domenico M; Jacobson, Alice K; Haizlip, Kaylan M; Solaro, R John; Janssen, Paul M L

    2013-07-01

    The phosphorylation state of several cardiac myofilament proteins changes with the level of stretch in intact, twitch-contracting cardiac muscles. It remains unclear which kinases are involved in the length-dependent phosphorylation of these proteins. We set out to investigate which kinases are involved after a step-wise change in cardiac muscle length. We hypothesize that myofilament protein phosphorylation by PKCβII and PKA alters contractile kinetics during length-dependent activation. Right ventricular intact trabeculae were isolated from New Zealand White rabbit hearts and stimulated to contract at 1Hz. Twitch force recordings where taken at taut and optimal muscle lengths before and after administration of kinase inhibitors at 37°C. PKCβII inhibition significantly decreased time from stimulation to peak force (TTP), time from peak force to 50% relaxation (RT50), and 90% relaxation (RT90) at optimal muscle length. This led to a loss in the length-dependent increase of RT50 and RT90 in the presence of the PKCβII inhibitor, whereas the length-dependent increase in RT50 and RT90 was seen in the controls. PKA inhibition using H-89 significantly decreased TTP at both taut and optimal muscle lengths. Detection of Ser/Thr phosphorylation with ProQ-diamond staining indicates a role for PKCβII in the phosphorylation of tropomyosin and myosin light chain-2 (MLC2) and PKA for tropomyosin, troponin-I, MLC2, myosin binding protein-C, troponin-T (TnT) 3 and TnT4. Our data provide evidence for two signaling kinases acting upon myofilament proteins during length-dependent activation, and provide further insight for length-dependent myofilament function.

  12. Carbon metabolism of peach fruit after harvest: changes in enzymes involved in organic acid and sugar level modifications.

    PubMed

    Borsani, Julia; Budde, Claudio O; Porrini, Lucía; Lauxmann, Martin A; Lombardo, Verónica A; Murray, Ricardo; Andreo, Carlos S; Drincovich, María F; Lara, María V

    2009-01-01

    Peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) is a climacteric fruit that ripens after harvest, prior to human consumption. Organic acids and soluble sugars contribute to the overall organoleptic quality of fresh peach; thus, the integrated study of the metabolic pathways controlling the levels of these compounds is of great relevance. Therefore, in this work, several metabolites and enzymes involved in carbon metabolism were analysed during the post-harvest ripening of peach fruit cv 'Dixiland'. Depending on the enzyme studied, activity, protein level by western blot, or transcript level by quantitative real time-PCR were analysed. Even though sorbitol did not accumulate at a high level in relation to sucrose at harvest, it was rapidly consumed once the fruit was separated from the tree. During the ripening process, sucrose degradation was accompanied by an increase of glucose and fructose. Specific transcripts encoding neutral invertases (NIs) were up-regulated or down-regulated, indicating differential functions for each putative NI isoform. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was markedly induced, and may participate as a glycolytic shunt, since the malate level did not increase during post-harvest ripening. The fermentative pathway was highly induced, with increases in both the acetaldehyde level and the enzymes involved in this process. In addition, proteins differentially expressed during the post-harvest ripening process were also analysed. Overall, the present study identified enzymes and pathways operating during the post-harvest ripening of peach fruit, which may contribute to further identification of varieties with altered levels of enzymes/metabolites or in the evaluation of post-harvest treatments to produce fruit of better organoleptic attributes.

  13. Involvement of membrane sterols in hypergravity-induced modifications of growth and cell wall metabolism in plant stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, T.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Suzuki, M.; Muranaka, T.; Hoson, T.

    Organisms living on land resist the gravitational force by constructing a tough body Plants have developed gravity resistance responses after having first went ashore more than 500 million years ago The mechanisms of gravity resistance responses have been studied under hypergravity conditions which are easily produced on earth by centrifugation In Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity treatment greatly increased the expression level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase HMGR which is involved in synthesis of terpenoids such as membrane sterols In the present study we examined the role of membrane sterols in gravity resistance in plants by analyzing sterol levels of stem organs grown under hypergravity conditions and by analyzing responses to hypergravity of the organs whose sterol level was modulated Hypergravity inhibited elongation growth but stimulated lateral expansion of Arabidopsis hypocotyls and azuki bean epicotyls Under hypergravity conditions sterol levels were kept high as compared with 1 g controls during incubation Lovastatin an inhibitor HMGR prevented lateral expansion as the gravity resistance response in azuki bean epicotyls Similar results were obtained in analyses with loss of function mutants of HMGR in Arabidopsis It has been shown that sterols play a role in cellulose biosynthesis probably as the primer In wild type Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity increased the cellulose content but it did not influence the content in HMGR mutants These results suggest that hypergravity increases

  14. Rice (Oryza sativa) Laccases Involved in Modification and Detoxification of Herbicides Atrazine and Isoproturon Residues in Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng Tian; Lu, Yi Chen; Zhang, Shuang; Luo, Fang; Yang, Hong

    2016-08-24

    Atrazine (ATR) and isoproturon (IPU) as herbicides have become serious environmental contaminants due to their overuse in crop production. Although ATR and IPU in soils are easily absorbed by many crops, the mechanisms for their degradation or detoxification in plants are poorly understood. This study identified a group of novel genes encoding laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) that are possibly involved in catabolism or detoxification of ATR and IPU residues in rice. Transcriptome profiling shows at least 22 differentially expressed laccase genes in ATR/IPU-exposed rice. Some of the laccase genes were validated by RT-PCR analysis. The biochemical properties of the laccases were analyzed, and their activities in rice were induced under ATR/IPU exposure. To investigate the roles of laccases in degrading or detoxifying ATR/IPU in rice, transgenic yeast cells (Pichia pastoris X-33) expressing two rice laccase genes (LOC_Os01g63180 and LOC_Os12g15680) were generated. Both transformants were found to accumulate less ATR/IPU compared to the control. The ATR/IPU-degraded products in the transformed yeast cells using UPLC-TOF-MS/MS were further characterized. Two metabolites, hydroxy-dehydrogenated atrazine (HDHA) and 2-OH-isopropyl-IPU, catalyzed by laccases were detected in the eukaryotic cells. These results indicate that the laccase-coding genes identified here could confer degradation or detoxification of the herbicides and suggest that the laccases could be one of the important enzymatic pathways responsible for ATR/IPU degradation/detoxification in rice.

  15. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome. Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs. Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. PMID:26560341

  16. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes.

    PubMed

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-11-11

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome.Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs.Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular

  17. Conserved genetic basis of a quantitative plumage trait involved in mate choice.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Nicholas I; Badcock, Nichola S; Hart, Tom; Scribner, Kim; Janssen, Kirstin; Nadeau, Nicola J

    2004-03-19

    A key question in evolutionary genetics is whether shared genetic mechanisms underlie the independent evolution of similar phenotypes across phylogenetically divergent lineages. Here we show that in two classic examples of melanic plumage polymorphisms in birds, lesser snow geese (Anser c. caerulescens) and arctic skuas (Stercorarius parasiticus), melanism is perfectly associated with variation in the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene. In both species, the degree of melanism correlates with the number of copies of variant MC1R alleles. Phylogenetic reconstructions of variant MC1R alleles in geese and skuas show that melanism is a derived trait that evolved in the Pleistocene.

  18. Shared Genetic Factors Involved in Celiac Disease, Type 2 Diabetes and Anorexia Nervosa Suggest Common Molecular Pathways for Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Joanna; Montén, Caroline; Gudjonsdottir, Audur H.; Arnell, Henrik; Browaldh, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Agardh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic regions involved in immune-regulatory mechanisms to be associated with celiac disease. Previous GWAS also revealed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa associated with celiac disease, suggesting involvement of common metabolic pathways for development of these chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to extend these previous analyses to study the gene expression in the gut from children with active celiac disease. Material and Methods Thirty six target genes involved in type 2 diabetes and four genes associated with anorexia nervosa were investigated for gene expression in small intestinal biopsies from 144 children with celiac disease at median (range) age of 7.4 years (1.6–17.8) and from 154 disease controls at a median (range) age 11.4.years (1.4–18.3). Results A total of eleven of genes were differently expressed in celiac patients compared with disease controls of which CD36, CD38, FOXP1, SELL, PPARA, PPARG, AGT previously associated with type 2 diabetes and AKAP6, NTNG1 with anorexia nervosa remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion Shared genetic factors involved in celiac disease, type 2 diabetes and anorexia nervosa suggest common underlying molecular pathways for these diseases. PMID:27483138

  19. High acceptance of an early dyslexia screening test involving genetic analyses in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Wilcke, Arndt; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes; Angela, h c; Friederici, D; Emmrich, Frank; Brauer, Jens; Wilcke, Arndt; Neef, Nicole; Boltze, Johannes; Skeide, Michael; Kirsten, Holger; Schaadt, Gesa; Müller, Bent; Kraft, Indra; Czepezauer, Ivonne; Bobovnikov, Nadin

    2016-01-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by severe problems in the acquisition of reading and writing skills. It has a strong neurobiological basis. Genetic influence is estimated at 50–70%. One of the central problems with dyslexia is its late diagnosis, normally not before the end of the 2nd grade, resulting in the loss of several years for early therapy. Currently, research is focusing on the development of early tests for dyslexia, which may be based on EEG and genetics. Our aim was to determine the acceptance of such a future test among parents. We conducted a representative survey in Germany with 1000 parents of children aged 3–7 years, with and without experience of dyslexia. 88.7% of the parents supported the introduction of an early test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics; 82.8% would have their own children tested, and 57.9% were willing to pay for the test if health insurance did not cover the costs. Test acceptance was significantly higher if parents had prior experience with dyslexia. The perceived benefits of such a test were early recognition and remediation and, preventing deficits. Concerns regarded the precision of the test, its potentially stigmatizing effect and its costs. The high overall support for the test leads to the conclusion that parents would accept a test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics. PMID:26036858

  20. High acceptance of an early dyslexia screening test involving genetic analyses in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wilcke, Arndt; Müller, Bent; Schaadt, Gesa; Kirsten, Holger; Boltze, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by severe problems in the acquisition of reading and writing skills. It has a strong neurobiological basis. Genetic influence is estimated at 50-70%. One of the central problems with dyslexia is its late diagnosis, normally not before the end of the 2nd grade, resulting in the loss of several years for early therapy. Currently, research is focusing on the development of early tests for dyslexia, which may be based on EEG and genetics. Our aim was to determine the acceptance of such a future test among parents. We conducted a representative survey in Germany with 1000 parents of children aged 3-7 years, with and without experience of dyslexia. 88.7% of the parents supported the introduction of an early test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics; 82.8% would have their own children tested, and 57.9% were willing to pay for the test if health insurance did not cover the costs. Test acceptance was significantly higher if parents had prior experience with dyslexia. The perceived benefits of such a test were early recognition and remediation and, preventing deficits. Concerns regarded the precision of the test, its potentially stigmatizing effect and its costs. The high overall support for the test leads to the conclusion that parents would accept a test for dyslexia based on EEG and genetics.

  1. Genetic variation in genes involved in folate and drug metabolism in a south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Padmalatha S; Murali, T. S; Vasudevan, T. G; Prasada, Shama K.; Bhagavath, Ashok Kumar; Pai, Pranita; Gopinath, P. M.; Satyamoorthy, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic variations represented as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) vary across the world population. This genetic polymorphism (such as SNPs) plays an important role in pharmacogenomics. SNPs that affects cellular metabolism, by altering the enzyme activity, have an important role in therapeutic outcome. Allele frequencies in number of clinically relevant SNPs within south Indian populations are not yet known. Hence, we genotyped randomly selected unrelated south Indian subjects from different locations of south India representing the heterogeneous ethnic background of the population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Common variants of MTHFD1, TYMS, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR, CBS and SULT1A1 gene polymorphisms were screened from healthy unrelated south Indian volunteers. Genotypes were determined using RFLP analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified products and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Chi-square test was performed to test for deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each locus. RESULTS: Gene allele frequency for several polymorphisms in our study differed significantly between the populations of other nations reported for several of the SNPs. These results demonstrate that the populations in different geographic regions may have widely varying genetic allele frequencies for clinically relevant SNPs. CONCLUSION: The present study reports, for the first time, the frequency distribution of MTHFD1, TYMS, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR, CBS and SULTIA1 gene polymorphisms in a south Indian population. Population-specific genetic polymorphism studies will help in practicing pharmacogenomic principles in the clinics. PMID:21747588

  2. A novel approach to facilitate dopaminergic neuron generation from stem-cells: the combination of genetic modification and signaling factors within a three-dimensional perfusion microbioreactor.

    PubMed

    Song, Lin; Liu, Peng; Han, Chao; Liu, Yang; Zou, Wei; Piao, Hua; Wang, Yachen; Liu, Jing

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cell replacement therapy holds great promise for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Many efforts have been made to improve current methods for differentiating stem or somatic cells into functional dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Previous studies have demonstrated that lineage-specific factors, extrinsic signaling factors and the cellular microenvironment are important considerations for generating functional DA neurons. We hypothesize that a combination of genetic modification, neurotrophic or extrinsic signaling factors and the construction of dynamic neural networks within a three-dimensional perfusion microbioreactor will produce greater efficiency and effectiveness in DA neuron generation from stem-cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic and epigenetic changes involving (retro)transposons in animal hybrids and polyploids.

    PubMed

    Arkhipova, I R; Rodriguez, F

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are discrete genetic units that have the ability to change their location within chromosomal DNA, and constitute a major and rapidly evolving component of eukaryotic genomes. They can be subdivided into 2 distinct types: retrotransposons, which use an RNA intermediate for transposition, and DNA transposons, which move only as DNA. Rapid advances in genome sequencing significantly improved our understanding of TE roles in genome shaping and restructuring, and studies of transcriptomes and epigenomes shed light on the previously unknown molecular mechanisms underlying genetic and epigenetic TE controls. Knowledge of these control systems may be important for better understanding of reticulate evolution and speciation in the context of bringing different genomes together by hybridization and perturbing the established regulatory balance by ploidy changes. See also sister article focusing on plants by Bento et al. in this themed issue.

  4. Genomic analysis of clonal eosinophils by CGH arrays reveals new genetic regions involved in chronic eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Arefi, Maryam; Robledo, Cristina; Peñarrubia, María J; García de Coca, Alfonso; Cordero, Miguel; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; García, Juan Luis

    2014-11-01

    To assess the presence of genetic imbalances in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), 38 patients with chronic eosinophilia were studied by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH): seven had chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), BCR-ABL1 positive, nine patients had myeloproliferative neoplasia Ph- (MPN-Ph-), three had a myeloid neoplasm associated with a PDGFRA rearrangement, and the remaining two cases were Lymphoproliferative T neoplasms associated with eosinophilia. In addition, 17 patients had a secondary eosinophilia and were used as controls. Eosinophilic enrichment was carried out in all cases. Genomic imbalances were found in 76% of all MPN patients. Losses on 20q were the most frequent genetic abnormality in MPNs (32%), affected the three types of MPN studied. This study also found losses at 11q13.3 in 26% of patients with MPN-Ph- and in 19p13.11 in two of the three patients with an MPN associated with a PDGFRA rearrangement. In addition, 29% of patients with CML had losses on 8q24. In summary, aCGH revealed clonality in eosinophils in most MPNs, suggesting that it could be a useful technique for defining clonality in these diseases. The presence of genetic losses in new regions could provide new insights into the knowledge of these MPN associated with eosinophilia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Engineering high Zn in tomato shoots through expression of AtHMA4 involves tissue-specific modification of endogenous genes.

    PubMed

    Kendziorek, Maria; Klimecka, Maria; Barabasz, Anna; Borg, Sören; Rudzka, Justyna; Szczęsny, Paweł; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    2016-08-12

    To increase the Zn level in shoots, AtHMA4 was ectopically expressed in tomato under the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. However, the Zn concentration in the shoots of transgenic plants failed to increase at all tested Zn levels in the medium. Modification of Zn root/shoot distribution in tomato expressing 35S::AtHMA4 depended on the concentration of Zn in the medium, thus indicating involvement of unknown endogenous metal-homeostasis mechanisms. To determine these mechanisms, those metal-homeostasis genes that were expressed differently in transgenic and wild-type plants were identified by microarray and RT-qPCR analysis using laser-assisted microdissected RNA isolated from two root sectors: (epidermis + cortex and stele), and leaf sectors (upper epidermis + palisade parenchyma and lower epidermis + spongy parenchyma). Zn-supply-dependent modification of Zn root/shoot distribution in AtHMA4-tomato (increase at 5 μM Zn, no change at 0.5 μM Zn) involved tissue-specific, distinct from that in the wild type, expression of tomato endogenous genes. First, it is suggested that an ethylene-dependent pathway underlies the detected changes in Zn root/shoot partitioning, as it was induced in transgenic plants in a distinct way depending on Zn exposure. Upon exposure to 5 or 0.5 μM Zn, in the epidermis + cortex of the transgenics' roots the expression of the Strategy I Fe-uptake system (ethylene-dependent LeIRT1 and LeFER) was respectively lower or higher than in the wild type and was accompanied by respectively lower or higher expression of the identified ethylene genes (LeNR, LeACO4, LeACO5) and of LeChln. Second, the contribution of LeNRAMP2 expression in the stele is shown to be distinct for wild-type and transgenic plants at both Zn exposures. Ethylene was also suggested as an important factor in a pathway induced in the leaves of transgenic plants by high Zn in the apoplast, which results in the initiation of loading of the excess Zn into the

  6. Maize Histone Deacetylase hda101 Is Involved in Plant Development, Gene Transcription, and Sequence-Specific Modulation of Histone Modification of Genes and Repeats[W

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Vincenzo; Locatelli, Sabrina; Varotto, Serena; Donn, Guenter; Pirona, Raul; Henderson, David A.; Hartings, Hans; Motto, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Enzymes catalyzing histone acetylation and deacetylation contribute to the modulation of chromatin structure, thus playing an important role in regulating gene and genome activity. We showed that downregulation and overexpression of the maize (Zea mays) Rpd3-type hda101 histone deacetylase gene induced morphological and developmental defects. Total levels of acetylated histones and histone acetylation of both repetitive and nonrepetitive sequences were affected in hda101 transgenic mutants. However, only transcript levels of genes but not repeats were altered. In particular, hda101 transgenic mutants showed differential expression of genes involved in vegetative-to-reproductive transition, such as liguleless2 and knotted-like genes and their repressor rough sheath2, which are required for meristem initiation and maintenance. Perturbation of hda101 expression also affected histone modifications other than acetylation, including histone H3 dimethylation at Lys-4 and Lys-9 and phosphorylation at Ser-10. Our results indicate that hda101 affects gene transcription and provide evidence of its involvement in setting the histone code, thus mediating developmental programs. Possible functional differences between maize hda101 and its Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog HDA19 are discussed. PMID:17468264

  7. Maize histone deacetylase hda101 is involved in plant development, gene transcription, and sequence-specific modulation of histone modification of genes and repeats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Vincenzo; Locatelli, Sabrina; Varotto, Serena; Donn, Guenter; Pirona, Raul; Henderson, David A; Hartings, Hans; Motto, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Enzymes catalyzing histone acetylation and deacetylation contribute to the modulation of chromatin structure, thus playing an important role in regulating gene and genome activity. We showed that downregulation and overexpression of the maize (Zea mays) Rpd3-type hda101 histone deacetylase gene induced morphological and developmental defects. Total levels of acetylated histones and histone acetylation of both repetitive and nonrepetitive sequences were affected in hda101 transgenic mutants. However, only transcript levels of genes but not repeats were altered. In particular, hda101 transgenic mutants showed differential expression of genes involved in vegetative-to-reproductive transition, such as liguleless2 and knotted-like genes and their repressor rough sheath2, which are required for meristem initiation and maintenance. Perturbation of hda101 expression also affected histone modifications other than acetylation, including histone H3 dimethylation at Lys-4 and Lys-9 and phosphorylation at Ser-10. Our results indicate that hda101 affects gene transcription and provide evidence of its involvement in setting the histone code, thus mediating developmental programs. Possible functional differences between maize hda101 and its Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog HDA19 are discussed.

  8. Genetic model of multi-step breast carcinogenesis involving the epithelium and stroma: clues to tumour-microenvironment interactions.

    PubMed

    Kurose, K; Hoshaw-Woodard, S; Adeyinka, A; Lemeshow, S; Watson, P H; Eng, C

    2001-09-01

    Although numerous studies have reported that high frequencies of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at various chromosomal arms have been identified in breast cancer, differential LOH in the neoplastic epithelial and surrounding stromal compartments has not been well examined. Using laser capture microdissection, which enables separation of neoplastic epithelium from surrounding stroma, we microdissected each compartment of 41 sporadic invasive adenocarcinomas of the breast. Frequent LOH was identified in both neoplastic epithelial and/or stromal compartments, ranging from 25 to 69% in the neoplastic epithelial cells, and from 17 to 61% in the surrounding stromal cells, respectively. The great majority of markers showed a higher frequency of LOH in the neoplastic epithelial compartment than in the stroma, suggesting that LOH in neoplastic epithelial cells might precede LOH in surrounding stromal cells. Furthermore, we sought to examine pair-wise associations of particular genetic alterations in either epithelial or stromal compartments. Seventeen pairs of markers showed statistically significant associations. We also propose a genetic model of multi-step carcinogenesis for the breast involving the epithelial and stromal compartments and note that genetic alterations occur in the epithelial compartments as the earlier steps followed by LOH in the stromal compartments. Our study strongly suggests that interactions between breast epithelial and stromal compartments might play a critical role in breast carcinogenesis and several genetic alterations in both epithelial and stromal compartments are required for breast tumour growth and progression.

  9. Genetic Analysis of the Pathogenic Molecular Sub-phenotype Interferon Alpha Identifies Multiple Novel Loci Involved in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Silvia N.; Ghodke-Puranik, Yogita; Dorschner, Jessica M.; Chrabot, Beverly S.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Tsao, Betty P.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Skol, Andrew D.; Niewold, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation of multiple organ systems and dysregulated interferon responses. SLE is both genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous, greatly reducing the power of case-control studies in SLE. Elevated circulating interferon alpha (IFN-α) is a stable, heritable trait in SLE, which has been implicated in primary disease pathogenesis. 40–50% of patients have high IFN-α, and high levels correspond with clinical differences. To study genetic heterogeneity in SLE, we performed a case-case study comparing patients with high vs. low IFN-α in over 1550 SLE cases, including GWAS and replication cohorts. In meta-analysis, the top associations in European ancestry were PRKG1 rs7897633 (PMeta=2.75 × 10−8) and PNP rs1049564 (PMeta=1.24 × 10−7). We also found evidence for cross-ancestral background associations with the ANKRD44 and PLEKHF2 loci. These loci have not been previously identified in case-control SLE genetic studies. Bioinformatic analyses implicated these loci functionally in dendritic cells and natural killer cells, both of which are involved in IFN-α production in SLE. As case-control studies of heterogeneous diseases reach a limit of feasibility with respect to subject number and detectable effect size, the study of informative pathogenic subphenotypes becomes an attractive strategy for genetic discovery in complex disease. PMID:25338677

  10. Genetic diversity of variants involved in drug response and metabolism in Sri Lankan populations: implications for clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sze Ling; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Ross, Colin J D; Toh, Meng Tiak; Carleton, Bruce; Hayden, Michael R; Teo, Yik Ying; Dissanayake, Vajira H W; Brunham, Liam R

    2016-01-01

    Interpopulation differences in drug responses are well documented, and in some cases they correspond to differences in the frequency of associated genetic markers. Understanding the diversity of genetic markers associated with drug response across different global populations is essential to infer population rates of drug response or risk for adverse drug reactions, and to guide implementation of pharmacogenomic testing. Sri Lanka is a culturally and linguistically diverse nation, but little is known about the population genetics of the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of pharmacogenomic variants in the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. We examined the allelic diversity of more than 7000 variants in genes involved in drug biotransformation and response in the three major ethnic populations of Sri Lanka (Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamils, and Moors), and compared them with other South Asian, South East Asian, and European populations using Wright's Fixation Index, principal component analysis, and STRUCTURE analysis. We observed overall high levels of similarity within the Sri Lankan populations (median FST=0.0034), and between Sri Lankan and other South Asian populations (median FST=0.0064). Notably, we observed substantial differentiation between Sri Lankan and European populations for important pharmacogenomic variants related to warfarin (VKORC1 rs9923231) and clopidogrel (CYP2C19 rs4986893) response. These data expand our understanding of the population structure of Sri Lanka, provide a resource for pharmacogenomic research, and have implications for the clinical use of genetic testing of pharmacogenomic variants in these populations.

  11. Global Proteome Analyses of Lysine Acetylation and Succinylation Reveal the Widespread Involvement of both Modification in Metabolism in the Embryo of Germinating Rice Seed.

    PubMed

    He, Dongli; Wang, Qiong; Li, Ming; Damaris, Rebecca Njeri; Yi, Xingling; Cheng, Zhongyi; Yang, Pingfang

    2016-03-04

    Regulation of rice seed germination has been shown to mainly occur at post-transcriptional levels, of which the changes on proteome status is a major one. Lysine acetylation and succinylation are two prevalent protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) involved in multiple biological processes, especially for metabolism regulation. To investigate the potential mechanism controlling metabolism regulation in rice seed germination, we performed the lysine acetylation and succinylation analyses simultaneously. Using high-accuracy nano-LC-MS/MS in combination with the enrichment of lysine acetylated or succinylated peptides from digested embryonic proteins of 24 h after imbibition (HAI) rice seed, a total of 699 acetylated sites from 389 proteins and 665 succinylated sites from 261 proteins were identified. Among these modified lysine sites, 133 sites on 78 proteins were commonly modified by two PTMs. The overlapped PTM sites were more likely to be in polar acidic/basic amino acid regions and exposed on the protein surface. Both of the acetylated and succinylated proteins cover nearly all aspects of cellular functions. Ribosome complex and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis-related proteins were significantly enriched in both acetylated and succinylated protein profiles through KEGG enrichment and protein-protein interaction network analyses. The acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA metabolism-related enzymes were found to be extensively modified by both modifications, implying the functional interaction between the two PTMs. This study provides a rich resource to examine the modulation of the two PTMs on the metabolism pathway and other biological processes in germinating rice seed.

  12. Genetic modification of corticosteroid receptor signalling: novel insights into pathophysiology and treatment strategies of human affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Müller, Marianne; Holsboer, Florian; Keck, Martin E

    2002-01-01

    Every disturbance of the body, either real or imagined, evokes a stress response. Essential to this stress response is the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system, finally resulting in the release of glucocorticoid hormones from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid hormones, in turn, feed back to this system by central activation of two types of corticosteroid receptors: the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) which markedly differ in their neuroanatomical distribution and ligand affinity. Whereas a brief period of controllable stress, experienced with general arousal and excitement, can be a challenge and might thus be beneficial, chronically elevated levels of circulating corticosteroids are believed to enhance vulnerability to a variety of diseases, including affective disorders. Corticosteroids are known to influence emotions and cognitive processes, such as learning and memory. In addition, corticosteroids play extremely important roles in modulating fear and anxiety-related behaviour. The mechanisms by which corticosteroids exert their effects on behaviour are often indirect, by modulating particular sets of neurons or neurotransmitter systems. In addition, the timing of corticosteroid increase (before, during or after exposure to a stressor) determines whether and how behaviour is affected. The cumulative evidence makes a strong case implicating corticosteroid receptor dysfunction in the pathogenesis of affective disorders. Although definitive controlled trials remain to be conducted, there is evidence indicating that cortisol-lowering or corticosteroid receptor antagonist treatments may be of clinical benefit in selected individuals with major depression. A more detailed knowledge of the GR signalling pathways therefore opens up the possibility to specifically target GR function. In recent years, refined molecular technologies and the generation of genetically engineered mice (e.g. "conventional

  13. Selection for fitness at the individual or population levels: modelling effects of genetic modifications in microalgae on productivity and environmental safety.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kevin J; Greenwell, H Christopher; Lovitt, Robert W; Shields, Robin J

    2010-04-07

    A mechanistic model of microalgae is used to explore the implications of modifying microalgal chlorophyll content and photosynthetic efficiency with an aim to optimising commercial biomass production. The models show the potential for a 10 fold increase in microalgae productivity in genetically modified versus unmodified configurations, while also enabling the use of bioreactors of greater optical depth operating at lower dilution rates. Analysis suggests that natural selection of a trait benefiting the individual (high Chl:C(max), i.e., high antennae size) conflicts with artificial selection of a trait (low Chl:C(max)) of most benefit to production at the population level. The implication is that GM strains rather than strains selected from nature will be most beneficial for commercial algal biofuels production. Further, escaped GM algae populations may, depending on the specific nature of the modification, be quickly out-competed by the natural forms because individually a high Chl:C is beneficial in low light environments. However, it remains possible that changes in biochemical composition associated with genetic modification of photosystem competence, or with other selection processes to enhance commercial gain, may adversely affect the value of such organisms as prey for zooplankton, leading to the unwanted generation of future harmful algae.

  14. Bcl-xL Genetic Modification Enhanced the Therapeutic Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Heart Infarction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaodong; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Tao; Yang, Zhonglu; Wang, Huishan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Low survival rate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) severely limited the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy in the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI). Bcl-xL genetic modification might enhance MSC survival after transplantation. Methods. Adult rat bone marrow MSCs were modified with human Bcl-xL gene (hBcl-xL-MSCs) or empty vector (vector-MSCs). MSC apoptosis and paracrine secretions were characterized using flow cytometry, TUNEL, and ELISA in vitro. In vivo, randomized adult rats with MI received myocardial injections of one of the three reagents: hBcl-xL-MSCs, vector-MSCs, or culture medium. Histochemistry, TUNEL, and echocardiography were carried out to evaluate cell engraftment, apoptosis, angiogenesis, scar formation, and cardiac functional recovery. Results. In vitro, cell apoptosis decreased 43%, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and plate-derived growth factor (PDGF) increased 1.5-, 0.7-, and 1.2-fold, respectively, in hBcl-xL-MSCs versus wild type and vector-MSCs. In vivo, cell apoptosis decreased 40% and 26% in hBcl-xL-MSC group versus medium and vector-MSC group, respectively. Similar results were observed in cell engraftment, angiogenesis, scar formation, and cardiac functional recovery. Conclusions. Genetic modification of MSCs with hBcl-xL gene could be an intriguing strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy in the treatment of heart infarction.

  15. Pancreatic β-cell prosurvival effects of the incretin hormones involve post-translational modification of Kv2.1 delayed rectifier channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S-J; Widenmaier, S B; Choi, W S; Nian, C; Ao, Z; Warnock, G; McIntosh, C H S

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are the major incretin hormones that exert insulinotropic and anti-apoptotic actions on pancreatic β-cells. Insulinotropic actions of the incretins involve modulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. In multiple cell types, Kv channel activity has been implicated in cell volume changes accompanying initiation of the apoptotic program. Focusing on Kv2.1, we examined whether regulation of Kv channels in β-cells contributes to the prosurvival effects of incretins. Overexpression of Kv2.1 in INS-1 β-cells potentiated apoptosis in response to mitochondrial and ER stress and, conversely, co-stimulation with GIP/GLP-1 uncoupled this potentiation, suppressing apoptosis. In parallel, incretins promoted phosphorylation and acetylation of Kv2.1 via pathways involving protein kinase A (PKA)/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase-1 (MSK-1) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT)/histone deacetylase (HDAC). Further studies demonstrated that acetylation of Kv2.1 was mediated by incretin actions on nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of CREB binding protein (CBP) and its interaction with Kv2.1. Regulation of β-cell survival by GIP and GLP-1 therefore involves post-translational modifications (PTMs) of Kv channels by PKA/MSK-1 and HAT/HDAC. This appears to be the first demonstration of modulation of delayed rectifier Kv channels contributing to the β-cell prosurvival effects of incretins and of 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-stimulated export of a nuclear lysine acetyltransferase that regulates cell surface ion channel function. PMID:21818121

  16. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-08-20

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects.

  17. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  18. A mosaic genetic screen for genes involved in the early steps of Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jagut, Marlène; Mihaila-Bodart, Ludivine; Molla-Herman, Anahi; Alin, Marie-Françoise; Lepesant, Jean-Antoine; Huynh, Jean-René

    2013-03-01

    The first hours of Drosophila embryogenesis rely exclusively on maternal information stored within the egg during oogenesis. The formation of the egg chamber is thus a crucial step for the development of the future adult. It has emerged that many key developmental decisions are made during the very first stages of oogenesis. We performed a clonal genetic screen on the left arm of chromosome 2 for mutations affecting early oogenesis. During the first round of screening, we scored for defects in egg chambers morphology as an easy read-out of early abnormalities. In a second round of screening, we analyzed the localization of centrosomes and Orb protein within the oocyte, the position of the oocyte within the egg chamber, and the progression through meiosis. We have generated a collection of 71 EMS-induced mutants that affect oocyte determination, polarization, or localization. We also recovered mutants affecting the number of germline cyst divisions or the differentiation of follicle cells. Here, we describe the analysis of nine complementation groups and eight single alleles. We mapped several mutations and identified alleles of Bicaudal-D, lethal(2) giant larvae, kuzbanian, GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase, tho2, and eiF4A. We further report the molecular identification of two alleles of the Drosophila homolog of Che-1/AATF and demonstrate its antiapoptotic activity in vivo. This collection of mutants will be useful to investigate further the early steps of Drosophila oogenesis at a genetic level.

  19. Dissection of genetic and environmental factors involved in tomato organoleptic quality.

    PubMed

    Carli, Paola; Barone, Amalia; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria R

    2011-03-31

    One of the main tomato breeding objectives is to improve fruit organoleptic quality. However, this task is made somewhat challenging by the complex nature of sensory traits and the lack of efficient selection criteria. Sensory quality depends on numerous factors, including fruit colour, texture, aroma, and composition in primary and secondary metabolites. It is also influenced by genotypic differences, the nutritional regime of plants, stage of ripening at harvest and environmental conditions. In this study, agronomic, biochemical and sensory characterization was performed on six Italian heirlooms grown in different environmental conditions. We identified a number of links among traits contributing to fruit organoleptic quality and to the perception of sensory attributes. PCA analysis was used to highlight some biochemical, sensory and agronomic discriminating traits: this statistical test allowed us to identify which sensory attributes are more closely linked to environmental conditions and those, instead, linked to the genetic constitution of tomato. Sweetness, sourness, saltiness and tomato flavour are not only grouped in the same PCA factor, but also result in a clear discrimination of tomato ecotypes in the three different fields. The three different traditional varieties cluster on the basis of attributes like juiciness, granulosity, hardness and equatorial diameter, and are therefore more closely related to the genetic background of the cultivar. This finding suggests that a different method should be undertaken to improve sensory traits related to taste perception and texture. Our results might be used to ascertain in what direction to steer breeding in order to improve the flavour characteristics of tomato ecotypes.

  20. Using microarray analysis to evaluate genetic polymorphisms involved in the metabolism of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ban, Susumu; Kondo, Tomoko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Sasaki, Seiko; Konishi, Kanae; Washino, Noriaki; Fujita, Syoichi; Kishi, Reiko

    2007-05-01

    The field of molecular biology currently faces the need for a comprehensive method of evaluating individual differences derived from genetic variation in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs in human genes are generally considered to be very useful in determining inherited genetic disorders, susceptibility to certain diseases, and cancer predisposition. Quick and accurate discrimination of SNPs is the key characteristic of technology used in DNA diagnostics. For this study, we first developed a DNA microarray and then evaluated its efficacy by determining the detection ability and validity of this method. Using DNA obtained from 380 pregnant Japanese women, we examined 13 polymorphisms of 9 genes, which are associated with the metabolism of environmental chemical compounds found in high frequency among Japanese populations. The ability to detect CYP1A1 I462V, CYP1B1 L432V, GSTP1 I105V and AhR R554K gene polymorphisms was above 98%, and agreement rates when compared with real time PCR analysis methods (kappa values) showed high validity: 0.98 (0.96), 0.97 (0.93), 0.90 (0.81), 0.90 (0.91), respectively. While this DNA microarray analysis should prove important as a method for initial screening, it is still necessary that we find better methods for improving the detection of other gene polymorphisms not part of this study.

  1. Chromatin remodeling gene EZH2 involved in the genetic etiology of autism in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; You, Yang; Yue, Weihua; Yu, Hao; Lu, Tianlan; Wu, Zhiliu; Jia, Meixiang; Ruan, Yanyan; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Dai; Wang, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of severe neurodevelopmental disorders. Epigenetic factors play a critical role in the etiology of ASD. Enhancer of zest homolog 2 (EZH2), which encodes a histone methyltransferase, plays an important role in the process of chromatin remodeling during neurodevelopment. Further, EZH2 is located in chromosome 7q35-36, which is one of the linkage regions for autism. However, the genetic relationship between autism and EZH2 remains unclear. To investigate the association between EZH2 and autism in Chinese Han population, we performed a family-based association study between autism and three tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that covered 95.4% of the whole region of EZH2. In the discovery cohort of 239 trios, two SNPs (rs740949 and rs6464926) showed a significant association with autism. To decrease false positive results, we expanded the sample size to 427 trios. A SNP (rs6464926) was significantly associated with autism even after Bonferroni correction (p=0.008). Haplotype G-T (rs740949 and rs6464926) was a risk factor for autism (Z=2.655, p=0.008, Global p=0.024). In silico function prediction for SNPs indicated that these two SNPs might be regulatory SNPs. Expression pattern of EZH2 showed that it is highly expressed in human embryonic brains. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that EZH2 might contribute to the genetic etiology of autism in Chinese Han population.

  2. Expanding the Spectrum of Genes Involved in Huntington Disease Using a Combined Clinical and Genetic Approach.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Louise-Laure; Tesson, Christelle; Charles, Perrine; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Hahn, Valérie; Youssov, Katia; Freeman, Leorah; Grabli, David; Roze, Emmanuel; Noël, Sandrine; Peuvion, Jean-Noel; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD), a prototypic monogenic disease, is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the HTT gene exceeding 35 units. However, not all patients with an HD phenotype carry the pathological expansion in HTT, and the positive diagnosis rate is poor. To examine patients with HD phenotypes to determine the frequency of HD phenocopies with typical features of HD but without pathological CAG repeat expansions in HTT in an attempt to improve the positive diagnosis rate. Between January 1, 2004, and April 18, 2011, a total of 226 consecutive index patients with an HD phenotype were referred to specialized clinics of the French National Huntington Disease Reference Centre for Rare Diseases. They underwent detailed clinical examination and follow-up, as well as neuropsychological, biological, imaging, and genetic examinations. Nucleotide expansions in JPH3, ATN1, TBP, and C9ORF72 and mutations in PRNP, as well as acquired conditions commonly causing HD phenocopies, were first screened. The diagnostic rate of HD phenocopies and frequency of other etiologies using deep clinical phenotyping and next generation sequencing. Our goal was to improve the genetic diagnosis of HD phenocopies and to identify new HD related genes. One hundred ninety-eight patients carried a pathological CAG repeat expansion in HTT, whereas 28 patients (12 women and 16 men) did not. Huntington disease phenocopies accounted for 12.4%, and their mean (SD) age at onset was similar to those of the HD-HTT group (47.3 [12.7] years vs 50.3 [16.4] years, P = .29). We first identified 3 patients with abnormal CTG expansions in JPH3, a fourth patient with an antiphospholipid syndrome, and a fifth patient with B12 avitaminosis. A custom-made 63-gene panel was generated based on clinical evolution and exome sequencing. It contained genes responsible for HD phenocopies and other neurodegenerative conditions, as well as candidate genes from exome sequencing in 3 index cases with imaging features of brain

  3. Variants of SCARB1 and VDR Involved in Complex Genetic Interactions May Be Implicated in the Genetic Susceptibility to Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pośpiech, Ewelina; Ligęza, Janusz; Wilk, Wacław; Gołas, Aniela; Jaszczyński, Janusz; Stelmach, Andrzej; Ryś, Janusz; Blecharczyk, Aleksandra; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Jura, Jolanta; Branicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The current data are still inconclusive in terms of a genetic component involved in the susceptibility to renal cell carcinoma. Our aim was to evaluate 40 selected candidate polymorphisms for potential association with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) based on independent group of 167 patients and 200 healthy controls. The obtained data were searched for independent effects of particular polymorphisms as well as haplotypes and genetic interactions. Association testing implied position rs4765623 in the SCARB1 gene (OR = 1.688, 95% CI: 1.104–2.582, P = 0.016) and a haplotype in VDR comprising positions rs739837, rs731236, rs7975232, and rs1544410 (P = 0.012) to be the risk factors in the studied population. The study detected several epistatic effects contributing to the genetic susceptibility to ccRCC. Variation in GNAS1 was implicated in a strong synergistic interaction with BIRC5. This effect was part of a model suggested by multifactor dimensionality reduction method including also a synergy between GNAS1 and SCARB1 (P = 0.036). Significance of GNAS1-SCARB1 interaction was further confirmed by logistic regression (P = 0.041), which also indicated involvement of SCARB1 in additional interaction with EPAS1 (P = 0.008) as well as revealing interactions between GNAS1 and EPAS1 (P = 0.016), GNAS1 and MC1R (P = 0.031), GNAS1 and VDR (P = 0.032), and MC1R and VDR (P = 0.035). PMID:25945350

  4. Variants of SCARB1 and VDR Involved in Complex Genetic Interactions May Be Implicated in the Genetic Susceptibility to Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pośpiech, Ewelina; Ligęza, Janusz; Wilk, Wacław; Gołas, Aniela; Jaszczyński, Janusz; Stelmach, Andrzej; Ryś, Janusz; Blecharczyk, Aleksandra; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Jura, Jolanta; Branicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The current data are still inconclusive in terms of a genetic component involved in the susceptibility to renal cell carcinoma. Our aim was to evaluate 40 selected candidate polymorphisms for potential association with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) based on independent group of 167 patients and 200 healthy controls. The obtained data were searched for independent effects of particular polymorphisms as well as haplotypes and genetic interactions. Association testing implied position rs4765623 in the SCARB1 gene (OR = 1.688, 95% CI: 1.104-2.582, P = 0.016) and a haplotype in VDR comprising positions rs739837, rs731236, rs7975232, and rs1544410 (P = 0.012) to be the risk factors in the studied population. The study detected several epistatic effects contributing to the genetic susceptibility to ccRCC. Variation in GNAS1 was implicated in a strong synergistic interaction with BIRC5. This effect was part of a model suggested by multifactor dimensionality reduction method including also a synergy between GNAS1 and SCARB1 (P = 0.036). Significance of GNAS1-SCARB1 interaction was further confirmed by logistic regression (P = 0.041), which also indicated involvement of SCARB1 in additional interaction with EPAS1 (P = 0.008) as well as revealing interactions between GNAS1 and EPAS1 (P = 0.016), GNAS1 and MC1R (P = 0.031), GNAS1 and VDR (P = 0.032), and MC1R and VDR (P = 0.035).

  5. Genetic susceptibility to Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: involvement of several genes of the innate immunity and chemokine-dependent migration pathways.

    PubMed

    Frade, Amanda Farage; Pissetti, Cristina Wide; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Saba, Bruno; Lin-Wang, Hui Tzu; Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; de Melo Borges, Ariana; Buck, Paula; Dias, Fabrício; Baron, Monique; Ferreira, Ludmila Rodrigues Pinto; Schmidt, Andre; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Hirata, Mario; Sampaio, Marcelo; Fragata, Abílio; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Donadi, Eduardo; Kalil, Jorge; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Chevillard, Christophe

    2013-12-12

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America. Thirty percent of infected individuals develop chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy that is, by far, the most important clinical consequence of T. cruzi infection. The others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Migration of Th1-type T cells play a major role in myocardial damage. Our genetic analysis focused on CCR5, CCL2 and MAL/TIRAP genes. We used the Tag SNPs based approach, defined to catch all the genetic information from each gene. The study was conducted on a large Brazilian population including 315 CCC cases and 118 ASY subjects. The CCL2rs2530797A/A and TIRAPrs8177376A/A were associated to an increase susceptibility whereas the CCR5rs3176763C/C genotype is associated to protection to CCC. These associations were confirmed when we restricted the analysis to severe CCC, characterized by a left ventricular ejection fraction under 40%. Our data show that polymorphisms affecting key molecules involved in several immune parameters (innate immunity signal transduction and T cell/monocyte migration) play a role in genetic susceptibility to CCC development. This also points out to the multigenic character of CCC, each polymorphism imparting a small contribution. The identification of genetic markers for CCC will provide information for pathogenesis as well as therapeutic targets.

  6. Genetic susceptibility to Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: involvement of several genes of the innate immunity and chemokine-dependent migration pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America. Thirty percent of infected individuals develop chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy that is, by far, the most important clinical consequence of T. cruzi infection. The others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Migration of Th1-type T cells play a major role in myocardial damage. Methods Our genetic analysis focused on CCR5, CCL2 and MAL/TIRAP genes. We used the Tag SNPs based approach, defined to catch all the genetic information from each gene. The study was conducted on a large Brazilian population including 315 CCC cases and 118 ASY subjects. Results The CCL2rs2530797A/A and TIRAPrs8177376A/A were associated to an increase susceptibility whereas the CCR5rs3176763C/C genotype is associated to protection to CCC. These associations were confirmed when we restricted the analysis to severe CCC, characterized by a left ventricular ejection fraction under 40%. Conclusions Our data show that polymorphisms affecting key molecules involved in several immune parameters (innate immunity signal transduction and T cell/monocyte migration) play a role in genetic susceptibility to CCC development. This also points out to the multigenic character of CCC, each polymorphism imparting a small contribution. The identification of genetic markers for CCC will provide information for pathogenesis as well as therapeutic targets. PMID:24330528

  7. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Besides their putative usage for therapies, stem cells are a promising tool for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis. For this purpose induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from patients harbouring specific mutations. In contrast to adult stem cells, iPS cells are pluripotent and can efficiently be grown in culture. However, iPS cells are modulated due to the ectopic induction of pluripotency, harbour other somatic mutations accumulated during the life span of the source cells, exhibit only imperfectly cleared epigenetic memory of the source cell, and are often genomically instable. In addition, iPS cells from patients only allow the investigation of mutations, which are not prenatally lethal. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have a high proliferation and differentiation potential, but raise ethical issues. Human embryos, which are not transferred in the course of in vitro fertilization, because of preimplantation genetic diagnosis of a genetic defect, are still rarely donated for the establishment of ES cell lines. In addition, their usage for studies on gene functions for oncogenesis is hampered by the fact the ES cells are already tumorigenic per se. In 2003 amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been discovered, which meanwhile have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. Monoclonal human AFS cell lines derived from amniocenteses have a high proliferative potential, are genomically stable and are not associated with ethical controversies. Worldwide amniocenteses are performed for routine human genetic diagnosis. We here discuss how generation and banking of monoclonal human AFS cell lines with specific chromosomal aberrations or monogenic disease mutations would allow to study the functional consequences of disease causing mutations. In addition, recently a protocol for efficient and highly reproducible siRNA-mediated long-term knockdown of endogenous gene

  8. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  9. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Werbowy, Olesia; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively). The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2) nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake. PMID:26848973

  10. Applying the Good Laboratory Practice regulations to studies involving genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Holden, D E

    1995-12-01

    How can the Environmental Protection Agency's Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, originally written primarily for mammalian toxicology studies, be applied to regulatory studies conducted for genetically modified plants? Do they fit? Can they be applied and still make sense? How is a Quality Assurance Unit (QAU) to interpret the requirements in this new area of biotechnology? The answers to these questions are discussed in this brief presentation of how one team within the Monsanto QAU, along with the researchers, developed am effective and comprehensive compliance program by applying the "traditional approach" to the GLP regulations to a new and important scientific field in regulatory compliance. Topics discussed will address the differences in the approach between traditional toxicity testing and the newer technology and how the differences were resolved, new and innovative definitions of particular phases and other aspects of regulatory studies, and how the draft regulations for pesticidal plants will help this area of technology in the future.

  11. Distinct selective forces and Neanderthal introgression shaped genetic diversity at genes involved in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Mozzi, Alessandra; Forni, Diego; Cagliani, Rachele; Pozzoli, Uberto; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2017-07-21

    In addition to high intelligence, humans evolved specialized social-cognitive skills, which are specifically affected in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes affected in ASD represent suitable candidates to study the evolution of human social cognition. We performed an evolutionary analysis on 68 genes associated to neurodevelopmental disorders; our data indicate that genetic diversity was shaped by distinct selective forces, including natural selection and introgression from archaic hominins. We discuss the possibility that segregation distortion during spermatogenesis accounts for a subset of ASD mutations. Finally, we detected modern-human-specific alleles in DYRK1A and TCF4. These variants are located within regions that display chromatin features typical of transcriptional enhancers in several brain areas, strongly suggesting a regulatory role. These SNPs thus represent candidates for association with neurodevelopmental disorders, and await experimental validation in future studies.

  12. Phage Genetic Sites Involved in λ Growth Inhibition by the Escherichia Coli Rap Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, P.; Guarneros, G.

    1989-01-01

    The rap mutation of Escherichia coli prevents the growth of bacteriophage λ. We have isolated phage mutants that compensate for the host deficiency. The mutations, named bar, were genetically located to three different loci of the λ genome: barI in the attP site, barII in the cIII ea10 region, and barIII within or very near the imm434 region. The level of λ leftward transcription correlates with rap exclusion. Phage λ mutants partially defective in the pL promoter or in pL-transcript antitermination showed a Bar(-) phenotype. Conversely, mutants constitutive for transcription from the pI or pL promoters were excluded more stringently by rap bacteria. We conclude that rap exclusion depends on the magnitude of transcription through the wild type bar loci in the phage genome. PMID:2523838

  13. A genetic study of a Staphylococus aureus plasmid involving cure and transference.

    PubMed

    Darini, A L

    1996-01-01

    High frequency transfer and elimination of drug resistance may indicate an extrachromosomal inheritance of genetic determinants. This study shows the cure and transfer of a small plasmid and tetracycline resistance in Staphylococcus aureus 1030 (55)Tet strains. Several methods are available for plasmid elimination. We used ethidium bromide, an agent that binds to DNA, and thus inhibits DNA polymerase. This caused a high frequency of loss of the small plasmid and resistance to tetracycline. Transfer of tetracycline resistance was done in a mixed culture at a frequency of 10(-6). This type of study is very important to physicians and epidemiology investigators and provides better knowledge on antibiotic-resistance mechanisms that may occur in vivo in a hospital environment.

  14. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions ( de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically colocalize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  15. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B.; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions (de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically co-localize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  16. Reduced generation time of apple seedlings to within a year by means of a plant virus vector: a new plant-breeding technique with no transmission of genetic modification to the next generation.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Noriko; Kishigami, Ryusuke; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Fruit trees have a long juvenile phase. For example, the juvenile phase of apple (Malus × domestica) generally lasts for 5-12 years and is a serious constraint for genetic analysis and for creating new apple cultivars through cross-breeding. If modification of the genes involved in the transition from the juvenile phase to the adult phase can enable apple to complete its life cycle within 1 year, as seen in herbaceous plants, a significant enhancement in apple breeding will be realized. Here, we report a novel technology that simultaneously promotes expression of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS T gene (AtFT) and silencing of apple TERMINAL FLOWER 1 gene (MdTFL1-1) using an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vector (ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1) to accelerate flowering time and life cycle in apple seedlings. When apple cotyledons were inoculated with ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1 immediately after germination, more than 90% of infected seedlings started flowering within 1.5-3 months, and almost all early-flowering seedlings continuously produced flower buds on the lateral and axillary shoots. Cross-pollination between early-flowering apple plants produced fruits with seeds, indicating that ALSV-AtFT/MdTFL1 inoculation successfully reduced the time required for completion of the apple life cycle to 1 year or less. Apple latent spherical virus was not transmitted via seeds to successive progenies in most cases, and thus, this method will serve as a new breeding technique that does not pass genetic modification to the next generation.

  17. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  18. Plasmid-based genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells: analysis of cell survival and transgene expression after transplantation in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ronsyn, Mark W; Daans, Jasmijn; Spaepen, Gie; Chatterjee, Shyama; Vermeulen, Katrien; D'Haese, Patrick; Van Tendeloo, Viggo Fi; Van Marck, Eric; Ysebaert, Dirk; Berneman, Zwi N; Jorens, Philippe G; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2007-12-14

    Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSC) are attractive targets for ex vivo cell and gene therapy. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of a plasmid-based strategy for genetic modification of human (h)MSC with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and neurotrophin (NT)3. Three genetically modified hMSC lines (EGFP, NT3, NT3-EGFP) were established and used to study cell survival and transgene expression following transplantation in rat spinal cord. First, we demonstrate long-term survival of transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells in rat spinal cord under, but not without, appropriate immune suppression. Next, we examined the stability of EGFP or NT3 transgene expression following transplantation of hMSC-EGFP, hMSC-NT3 and hMSC-NT3-EGFP in rat spinal cord. While in vivo EGFP mRNA and protein expression by transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells was readily detectable at different time points post-transplantation, in vivo NT3 mRNA expression by hMSC-NT3 cells and in vivo EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells was, respectively, undetectable or declined rapidly between day 1 and 7 post-transplantation. Further investigation revealed that the observed in vivo decline of EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells: (i) was associated with a decrease in transgenic NT3-EGFP mRNA expression as suggested following laser capture micro-dissection analysis of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell transplants at day 1 and day 7 post-transplantation, (ii) did not occur when hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells were transplanted subcutaneously, and (iii) was reversed upon re-establishment of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell cultures at 2 weeks post-transplantation. Finally, because we observed a slowly progressing tumour growth following transplantation of all our hMSC cell transplants, we here demonstrate that omitting immune suppressive therapy is sufficient to prevent further tumour growth and to eradicate malignant xenogeneic cell transplants. In this study, we demonstrate that genetically modified hMSC lines can survive

  19. Plasmid-based genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells: analysis of cell survival and transgene expression after transplantation in rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Ronsyn, Mark W; Daans, Jasmijn; Spaepen, Gie; Chatterjee, Shyama; Vermeulen, Katrien; D'Haese, Patrick; Van Tendeloo, Viggo FI; Van Marck, Eric; Ysebaert, Dirk; Berneman, Zwi N; Jorens, Philippe G; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSC) are attractive targets for ex vivo cell and gene therapy. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of a plasmid-based strategy for genetic modification of human (h)MSC with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and neurotrophin (NT)3. Three genetically modified hMSC lines (EGFP, NT3, NT3-EGFP) were established and used to study cell survival and transgene expression following transplantation in rat spinal cord. Results First, we demonstrate long-term survival of transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells in rat spinal cord under, but not without, appropriate immune suppression. Next, we examined the stability of EGFP or NT3 transgene expression following transplantation of hMSC-EGFP, hMSC-NT3 and hMSC-NT3-EGFP in rat spinal cord. While in vivo EGFP mRNA and protein expression by transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells was readily detectable at different time points post-transplantation, in vivo NT3 mRNA expression by hMSC-NT3 cells and in vivo EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells was, respectively, undetectable or declined rapidly between day 1 and 7 post-transplantation. Further investigation revealed that the observed in vivo decline of EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells: (i) was associated with a decrease in transgenic NT3-EGFP mRNA expression as suggested following laser capture micro-dissection analysis of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell transplants at day 1 and day 7 post-transplantation, (ii) did not occur when hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells were transplanted subcutaneously, and (iii) was reversed upon re-establishment of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell cultures at 2 weeks post-transplantation. Finally, because we observed a slowly progressing tumour growth following transplantation of all our hMSC cell transplants, we here demonstrate that omitting immune suppressive therapy is sufficient to prevent further tumour growth and to eradicate malignant xenogeneic cell transplants. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrate that genetically

  20. A collection of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes involved in modification and detoxification of herbicide atrazine in rice (Oryza sativa) plants.

    PubMed

    Rong Tan, Li; Chen Lu, Yi; Jing Zhang, Jing; Luo, Fang; Yang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases constitute one of the largest families of protein genes involved in plant growth, development and acclimation to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, whether these genes respond to organic toxic compounds and their biological functions for detoxifying toxic compounds such as herbicides in rice are poorly understood. The present study identified 201 genes encoding cytochrome P450s from an atrazine-exposed rice transcriptome through high-throughput sequencing. Of these, 69 cytochrome P450 genes were validated by microarray and some of them were confirmed by real time PCR. Activities of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and p-nitroanisole O-demethylase (PNOD) related to toxicity were determined and significantly induced by atrazine exposure. To dissect the mechanism underlying atrazine modification and detoxification by P450, metabolites (or derivatives) of atrazine in plants were analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS). Major metabolites comprised desmethylatrazine (DMA), desethylatrazine (DEA), desisopropylatrazine (DIA), hydroxyatrazine (HA), hydroxyethylatrazine (HEA) and hydroxyisopropylatrazine (HIA). All of them were chemically modified by P450s. Furthermore, two specific inhibitors of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and malathion (MAL) were used to assess the correlation between the P450s activity and rice responses including accumulation of atrazine in tissues, shoot and root growth and detoxification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Brucella melitensis MucR, an orthologue of Sinorhizobium meliloti MucR, is involved in resistance to oxidative, detergent, and saline stresses and cell envelope modifications.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, A; Terwagne, M; Zygmunt, M S; Cloeckaert, A; De Bolle, X; Letesson, J J

    2013-02-01

    Brucella spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti are alphaproteobacteria that share not only an intracellular lifestyle in their respective hosts, but also a crucial requirement for cell envelope components and their timely regulation for a successful infectious cycle. Here, we report the characterization of Brucella melitensis mucR, which encodes a zinc finger transcriptional regulator that has previously been shown to be involved in cellular and mouse infections at early time points. MucR modulates the surface properties of the bacteria and their resistance to environmental stresses (i.e., oxidative stress, cationic peptide, and detergents). We show that B. melitensis mucR is a functional orthologue of S. meliloti mucR, because it was able to restore the production of succinoglycan in an S. meliloti mucR mutant, as detected by calcofluor staining. Similar to S. meliloti MucR, B. melitensis MucR also represses its own transcription and flagellar gene expression via the flagellar master regulator ftcR. More surprisingly, we demonstrate that MucR regulates a lipid A core modification in B. melitensis. These changes could account for the attenuated virulence of a mucR mutant. These data reinforce the idea that there is a common conserved circuitry between plant symbionts and animal pathogens that regulates the relationship they have with their hosts.

  2. Reassortment and modification of hemagglutinin cleavage motif of avian/WSN influenza viruses generated by reverse genetics that correlate with attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lu, J-H; Long, J-X; Jia, L-J; Liu, Y-L; Shao, W-X; Zhang, Y-M; Liu, X-F

    2006-01-01

    Avian influenza associated with H9N2 and H5N1 subtypes of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) has raised great concerns in China. To study this problem, reverse genetics has been employed. Three reassortants, rgH9N2, rgH5N1 and rgH5N2, were prepared and compared. Their hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes originated from Chinese AIV isolates of H9N2 or H5N1 subtype, while the rest of their genes were derived from A/WSN/33(H1N1) virus (WSN). In the H5 HA reassortants, the multibasic cleavage site was converted to a monobasic one. The results demonstrated that the reassortants did not produce CPE on MDCK cells in the absence of trypsin, showed egg-adaptation phenotype and stability of HA and NA during consecutive egg passages, and were not lethal to chickens and mice. However, the rgH5N1 reassortant exhibited a residual virulence in terms of lethality to chick embryos and pathogenesis in chickens. It can be concluded that (i) the genetic modification of H5 HA attenuated the H5 reassortants, (ii) the presence of internal WSN proteins contributed to the attenuated properties of the reassortants independently on H5 HA, and (iii) also the overall genome composition contributed to virulence differences. This report provides further contribution of reverse genetics to the knowledge of virulence of influenza viruses.

  3. Handling ethical, legal and social issues in birth cohort studies involving genetic research: responses from studies in six countries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Research involving minors has been the subject of much ethical debate. The growing number of longitudinal, pediatric studies that involve genetic research present even more complex challenges to ensure appropriate protection of children and families as research participants. Long-term studies with a genetic component involve collection, retention and use of biological samples and personal information over many years. Cohort studies may be established to study specific conditions (e.g. autism, asthma) or may have a broad aim to research a range of factors that influence the health and development of children. Studies are increasingly intended to serve as research platforms by providing access to data and biological samples to researchers over many years. This study examines how six birth cohort studies in North America and Europe that involve genetic research handle key ethical, legal and social (ELS) issues: recruitment, especially parental authority to include a child in research; initial parental consent and subsequent assent and/or consent from the maturing child; withdrawal; confidentiality and sample/data protection; handling sensitive information; and disclosure of results. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out in 2008/09 with investigators involved in six birth cohort studies in Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands and the United States. Interviewees self-identified as being knowledgeable about ELS aspects of the study. Interviews were conducted in English. Results The studies vary in breadth of initial consent, but none adopt a blanket consent for future use of samples/data. Ethics review of new studies is a common requirement. Studies that follow children past early childhood recognise a need to seek assent/consent as the child matures. All studies limit access to identifiable data and advise participants of the right to withdraw. The clearest differences among studies concern handling of sensitive

  4. Handling ethical, legal and social issues in birth cohort studies involving genetic research: responses from studies in six countries.

    PubMed

    Ries, Nola M; LeGrandeur, Jane; Caulfield, Timothy

    2010-03-23

    Research involving minors has been the subject of much ethical debate. The growing number of longitudinal, pediatric studies that involve genetic research present even more complex challenges to ensure appropriate protection of children and families as research participants. Long-term studies with a genetic component involve collection, retention and use of biological samples and personal information over many years. Cohort studies may be established to study specific conditions (e.g. autism, asthma) or may have a broad aim to research a range of factors that influence the health and development of children. Studies are increasingly intended to serve as research platforms by providing access to data and biological samples to researchers over many years.This study examines how six birth cohort studies in North America and Europe that involve genetic research handle key ethical, legal and social (ELS) issues: recruitment, especially parental authority to include a child in research; initial parental consent and subsequent assent and/or consent from the maturing child; withdrawal; confidentiality and sample/data protection; handling sensitive information; and disclosure of results. Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out in 2008/09 with investigators involved in six birth cohort studies in Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands and the United States. Interviewees self-identified as being knowledgeable about ELS aspects of the study. Interviews were conducted in English. The studies vary in breadth of initial consent, but none adopt a blanket consent for future use of samples/data. Ethics review of new studies is a common requirement. Studies that follow children past early childhood recognise a need to seek assent/consent as the child matures. All studies limit access to identifiable data and advise participants of the right to withdraw. The clearest differences among studies concern handling of sensitive information and return of results. In

  5. Genetic Modification of the Association between Peripubertal Dioxin Exposure and Pubertal Onset in a Cohort of Russian Boys

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Olivier; Korrick, Susan A.; Williams, Paige L.; Sergeyev, Oleg; Emond, Claude; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Burns, Jane S.; Altshul, Larisa M.; Patterson, Donald G.; Turner, Wayman E.; Lee, Mary M.; Revich, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Background: Exposure to dioxins has been associated with delayed pubertal onset in both epidemiologic and animal studies. Whether genetic polymorphisms may modify this association is currently unknown. Identifying such genes could provide insight into mechanistic pathways. This is one of the first studies to assess genetic susceptibility to dioxins. Objectives: We evaluated whether common polymorphisms in genes affecting either molecular responses to dioxin exposure or pubertal onset influence the association between peripubertal serum dioxin concentration and male pubertal onset. Methods: In this prospective cohort of Russian adolescent boys (n = 392), we assessed gene–environment interactions for 337 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 46 candidate genes and two intergenic regions. Dioxins were measured in the boys’ serum at age 8–9 years. Pubertal onset was based on testicular volume and on genitalia staging. Statistical approaches for controlling for multiple testing were used, both with and without prescreening for marginal genetic associations. Results: After accounting for multiple testing, two tag SNPs in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/NR3C1) gene and one in the estrogen receptor-α (ESR1) gene were significant (q < 0.2) modifiers of the association between peripubertal serum dioxin concentration and male pubertal onset defined by genitalia staging, although not by testicular volume. The results were sensitive to whether multiple comparison adjustment was applied to all gene–environment tests or only to those with marginal genetic associations. Conclusions: Common genetic polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor and estrogen receptor-α genes may modify the association between peripubertal serum dioxin concentration and pubertal onset. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:23060366

  6. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer.

  7. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P.

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:25938495

  8. A Genetic and Mosaic Analysis of a Locus Involved in the Anesthesia Response of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mir, B.; Iyer, S.; Ramaswami, M.; Krishnan, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a genetic and behavioral analysis of several alleles of har38, a mutant with altered sensitivity to the general anesthetic halothane. We obtained a P-element-induced allele of har38 and generated several excision alleles by remobilizing the P element. The mutants narrow abdomen (na) and har85 are confirmed to be allelic to har38. Besides a decreased sensitivity to halothane, all mutant alleles of this locus cause a characteristic walking behavior in the absence of anesthetics. We have quantified this behavior using a geotaxis apparatus. Responses of the mutant alleles to different inhalational anesthetics were tested. The results strongly favor a multipathway model for the onset of anesthesia. Mosaic flies were tested for their response to halothane and checked for their abnormal walking behavior. The analysis suggests that both the behaviors are exhibited only by such mosaics as have the entire head of mutant origin. It is likely that this focus represents an element of a common pathway in the anesthetic response to several inhalational anesthetics but not all. This result is the first demonstration of regional specificity in the CNS of any animal for general anesthetic action. PMID:9335606

  9. A putative mobile genetic element carrying a novel type IIF restriction-modification system (PluTI)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Feroz; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Mikihiko; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Ishikawa, Ken; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2010-01-01

    Genome comparison and genome context analysis were used to find a putative mobile element in the genome of Photorhabdus luminescens, an entomopathogenic bacterium. The element is composed of 16-bp direct repeats in the terminal regions, which are identical to a part of insertion sequences (ISs), a DNA methyltransferase gene homolog, two genes of unknown functions and an open reading frame (ORF) (plu0599) encoding a protein with no detectable sequence similarity to any known protein. The ORF (plu0599) product showed DNA endonuclease activity, when expressed in a cell-free expression system. Subsequently, the protein, named R.PluTI, was expressed in vivo, purified and found to be a novel type IIF restriction enzyme that recognizes 5′-GGCGC/C-3′ (/ indicates position of cleavage). R.PluTI cleaves a two-site supercoiled substrate at both the sites faster than a one-site supercoiled substrate. The modification enzyme homolog encoded by plu0600, named M.PluTI, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to protect DNA from R.PluTI cleavage in vitro, and to suppress the lethal effects of R.PluTI expression in vivo. These results suggested that they constitute a restriction–modification system, present on the putative mobile element. Our approach thus allowed detection of a previously uncharacterized family of DNA-interacting proteins. PMID:20071747

  10. Post-translational modification: nature’s escape from genetic imprisonment and the basis for dynamic information encoding

    PubMed Central

    Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Lippens, Guy; Steen, Hanno; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    We discuss protein post-translational modification (PTM) from an information processing perspective. PTM at multiple sites on a protein creates a combinatorial explosion in the number of potential “mod-forms”, or global patterns of modification. Distinct mod-forms can elicit distinct downstream responses, so that the overall response depends partly on the effectiveness of a particular mod-form to elicit a response and partly on the stoichiometry of that mod-form in the molecular population. We introduce the “mod-form distribution”—the relative stoichiometries of each mod-form—as the most informative measure of a protein’s state. Distinct mod-form distributions may summarise information about distinct cellular and physiological conditions and allow downstream processes to interpret this information accordingly. Such information “encoding” by PTMs may facilitate evolution by weakening the need to directly link upstream conditions to downstream responses. Mod-form distributions provide a quantitative framework in which to interpret ideas of “PTM codes” that are emerging in several areas of biology, as we show by reviewing examples of ion channels, GPCRs, microtubules and transcriptional co-regulators. We focus particularly on examples other than the well known “histone code”, to emphasise the pervasive use of information encoding in molecular biology. Finally, we touch briefly on new methods for measuring mod-form distributions. PMID:22899623

  11. Genetic diversity of variants involved in drug response and metabolism in Sri Lankan populations: implications for clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sze Ling; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Ross, Colin J.D.; Toh, Meng Tiak; Carleton, Bruce; Hayden, Michael R.; Teo, Yik Ying; Dissanayake, Vajira H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interpopulation differences in drug responses are well documented, and in some cases they correspond to differences in the frequency of associated genetic markers. Understanding the diversity of genetic markers associated with drug response across different global populations is essential to infer population rates of drug response or risk for adverse drug reactions, and to guide implementation of pharmacogenomic testing. Sri Lanka is a culturally and linguistically diverse nation, but little is known about the population genetics of the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of pharmacogenomic variants in the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. Methods We examined the allelic diversity of more than 7000 variants in genes involved in drug biotransformation and response in the three major ethnic populations of Sri Lanka (Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamils, and Moors), and compared them with other South Asian, South East Asian, and European populations using Wright’s Fixation Index, principal component analysis, and STRUCTURE analysis. Results We observed overall high levels of similarity within the Sri Lankan populations (median FST=0.0034), and between Sri Lankan and other South Asian populations (median FST=0.0064). Notably, we observed substantial differentiation between Sri Lankan and European populations for important pharmacogenomic variants related to warfarin (VKORC1 rs9923231) and clopidogrel (CYP2C19 rs4986893) response. Conclusion These data expand our understanding of the population structure of Sri Lanka, provide a resource for pharmacogenomic research, and have implications for the clinical use of genetic testing of pharmacogenomic variants in these populations. PMID:26444257

  12. Beyond the MHC: A canine model of dermatomyositis shows a complex pattern of genetic risk involving novel loci

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jacquelyn M.; Hill, Cody M.; Anderson, Kendall J.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a chronic inflammatory myopathy and vasculopathy driven by genetic and environmental influences. Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of an analogous, spontaneous disease of dogs also termed dermatomyositis (DMS). As in JDM, we observed a significant association with a haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (DLA-DRB1*002:01/-DQA1*009:01/-DQB1*001:01), particularly in homozygosity (P-val = 0.0001). However, the high incidence of the haplotype among healthy dogs indicated that additional genetic risk factors are likely involved in disease progression. We conducted genome-wide association studies in two modern breeds having common ancestry and detected strong associations with novel loci on canine chromosomes 10 (P-val = 2.3X10-12) and 31 (P-val = 3.95X10-8). Through whole genome resequencing, we identified primary candidate polymorphisms in conserved regions of PAN2 (encoding p.Arg492Cys) and MAP3K7CL (c.383_392ACTCCACAAA>GACT) on chromosomes 10 and 31, respectively. Analyses of these polymorphisms and the MHC haplotypes revealed that nine of 27 genotypic combinations confer high or moderate probability of disease and explain 93% of cases studied. The pattern of disease risk across PAN2 and MAP3K7CL genotypes provided clear evidence for a significant epistatic foundation for this disease, a risk further impacted by MHC haplotypes. We also observed a genotype-phenotype correlation wherein an earlier age of onset is correlated with an increased number of risk alleles at PAN2 and MAP3K7CL. High frequencies of multiple genetic risk factors are unique to affected breeds and likely arose coincident with artificial selection for desirable phenotypes. Described herein is the first three-locus association with a complex canine disease and two novel loci that provide targets for exploration in JDM and related immunological dysfunction. PMID:28158183

  13. Beyond the MHC: A canine model of dermatomyositis shows a complex pattern of genetic risk involving novel loci.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jacquelyn M; Noorai, Rooksana E; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Hill, Cody M; Anderson, Kendall J; Famula, Thomas R; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2017-02-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a chronic inflammatory myopathy and vasculopathy driven by genetic and environmental influences. Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of an analogous, spontaneous disease of dogs also termed dermatomyositis (DMS). As in JDM, we observed a significant association with a haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (DLA-DRB1*002:01/-DQA1*009:01/-DQB1*001:01), particularly in homozygosity (P-val = 0.0001). However, the high incidence of the haplotype among healthy dogs indicated that additional genetic risk factors are likely involved in disease progression. We conducted genome-wide association studies in two modern breeds having common ancestry and detected strong associations with novel loci on canine chromosomes 10 (P-val = 2.3X10-12) and 31 (P-val = 3.95X10-8). Through whole genome resequencing, we identified primary candidate polymorphisms in conserved regions of PAN2 (encoding p.Arg492Cys) and MAP3K7CL (c.383_392ACTCCACAAA>GACT) on chromosomes 10 and 31, respectively. Analyses of these polymorphisms and the MHC haplotypes revealed that nine of 27 genotypic combinations confer high or moderate probability of disease and explain 93% of cases studied. The pattern of disease risk across PAN2 and MAP3K7CL genotypes provided clear evidence for a significant epistatic foundation for this disease, a risk further impacted by MHC haplotypes. We also observed a genotype-phenotype correlation wherein an earlier age of onset is correlated with an increased number of risk alleles at PAN2 and MAP3K7CL. High frequencies of multiple genetic risk factors are unique to affected breeds and likely arose coincident with artificial selection for desirable phenotypes. Described herein is the first three-locus association with a complex canine disease and two novel loci that provide targets for exploration in JDM and related immunological dysfunction.

  14. Multitrophic interactions involving genetically modified potatoes, nontarget aphids, natural enemies and hyperparasitoids.

    PubMed

    Cowgill, S E; Danks, C; Atkinson, H J

    2004-03-01

    Genetically modified (GM) potatoes expressing a cysteine proteinase inhibitor (cystatin) have been developed as an option for the management of plant parasitic nematodes. The relative impact of such plants on predators and parasitoids (natural enemies) of nontarget insects was determined in a field trial. The trial consisted of GM plants, control plants grown in soil treated with a nematicide and untreated control plants. The quantity of nontarget aphids and their quality as hosts for natural enemies were studied. Aphid density was significantly reduced by nematicide treatment and few natural enemies were recorded from treated potatoes during the study. In contrast, similar numbers of aphids and their more abundant predators were recorded from the untreated control and the GM potatoes. The size of aphids on GM and control plants was recorded twice during the study. During the first sampling period (2-9 July) aphids clip-caged on GM plants were smaller than those on control plants. During the second sampling period (23-30 July) there was no difference in aphid size between those from the GM and control plants. Host size is an important component of host quality. It can affect the size and fecundity of parasitoid females and the sex ratio of their offspring. However, neither the fitness of females of Aphidius ervi, the most prevalent primary parasitoid, nor the sex ratio of their progeny, were affected when the parasitoids developed on aphids feeding on GM plants. Two guilds of secondary parasitoid were also recorded during the study. The fitness of the most abundant species, Aspahes vulgaris, was not affected when it developed on hosts from GM plants. The transgene product, OC I Delta D86, was not detected in aphids that had fed on GM plants in the field, suggesting that there is minimal secondary exposure of natural enemies to the inhibitor. The results indicate that transgenic nematode resistance is potentially more compatible with aphid biological control than is

  15. Identification of a Genetic Locus in Pseudomonas aureofaciens Involved in Fungal Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, F. L.; Conner, A. J.; Mahanty, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    In iron-rich conditions, Pseudomonas aureofaciens PA147-2 produces an antibiotic-like compound that inhibits the growth of a plant fungal pathogen, Aphanomyces euteiches. To contribute to the potential use of PA147-2 as a biocontrol organism, we report the identification of a genetic locus important for antibiotic biosynthesis. Mutants defective for fungal inhibition (Af-) were generated by Tn5 mutagenesis. Southern hybridization of total DNAs from three Af- mutants indicated that loss of fungal inhibition was due to a single Tn5 insertion in each mutant. Restriction mapping of the mutation points showed that in two mutants the Tn5 insertions were in the same 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment and were separated by 2.1 kb. A genomic library of PA147-2 was constructed and screened by using a region of DNA flanking the Tn5 insertion in one mutant (PA109) as a probe to recover complementing cosmids. Three cosmids containing a 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment complementary to the two mutants were recovered. Allele replacement by homologous recombination with putative complementing cosmids restored one mutant to antifungal activity against A. euteiches. Southern analysis of the complemented mutants confirmed that allele replacement had occurred between cosmid DNA and Tn5. The wild-type 16.0-kb EcoRI fragment was cloned from the cosmid and complemented the two mutants to antifungal activity. An antifungal compound was isolated from PA147-2 grown on solid medium. Antifungal activity correlated to a peak on high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Under the same growth and extraction conditions, the antifungal activity seen in PA147-2 was absent in two Af- mutants. Furthermore, absence of an antifungal compound in each mutant correlated to the absence of the wild-type “antifungal” peak on high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Images PMID:16349166

  16. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    PubMed

    Vanti, Manuela; Gallastegui, Edurne; Respaldiza, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Gil, Alfonso; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Jordan, Albert; Chávez, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR), which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  17. Genetic modification of a chicken expression system for the galactosylation of therapeutic proteins produced in egg white.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Akifumi; Tsunashima, Hiroyuki; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Sasamoto, Takako; Yamada, Yuki; Kojima, Yasuhiro; Motono, Makoto; Kojima, Jun; Inayoshi, Yujin; Miyake, Katsuhide; Park, Enoch Y; Iijima, Shinji

    2012-02-01

    As a tool for large scale production of recombinant proteins, chickens have advantages such as high productivity and low breeding costs compared to other animals. We previously reported the production of erythropoietin, the tumor necrosis factor receptor fused to an Fc fragment, and an Fc-fused single-chain Fv antibody in eggs laid by genetically manipulated chickens. In egg white, however, the incomplete addition of terminal sugars such as sialic acid and galactose was found on N-linked glycans of exogenously expressed proteins. This could be a draw back to the use of transgenic chickens since the loss of these terminal sugars may affect the functions and stability of recombinant proteins purified from chicken egg white for pharmaceutical usage. To overcome this problem, we studied galactosyltransferase (GalT) activity in the magnum where the majority of egg-white proteins are secreted. In the magnum, lower β1,4-GalT1 expression and poor galactose-transfer activity were observed. Thus, we supposed that the lack of GalT1 activity may partly cause the incomplete glycosylation of egg-white proteins, and generated genetically manipulated chickens expressing GalT1 by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. In a Golgi fraction prepared from magnum cells of the genetically manipulated chickens, significant GalT activity was detected. The series of analyses revealed a considerable improvement in the galactosylation of native egg-white proteins as well as an exogenously expressed single-chain Fv antibody fused to an Fc fragment. We conclude that chickens with genetically modified GalT activity in the magnum could be an attractive platform for producing galactosylated therapeutics.

  18. Efficient genetic modification and germ-line transmission of primordial germ cells using piggyBac and Tol2 transposons.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Joni; Taylor, Lorna; Sherman, Adrian; Kawakami, Koichi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Sang, Helen M; McGrew, Michael J

    2012-06-05

    The derivation of germ-line competent avian primordial germ cells establishes a cell-based model system for the investigation of germ cell differentiation and the production of genetically modified animals. Current methods to modify primordial germ cells using DNA or retroviral vectors are inefficient and prone to epigenetic silencing. Here, we validate the use of transposable elements for the genetic manipulation of primordial germ cells. We demonstrate that chicken primordial germ cells can be modified in vitro using transposable elements. Both piggyBac and Tol2 transposons efficiently transpose primordial germ cells. Tol2 transposon integration sites were spread throughout both the macro- and microchromosomes of the chicken genome and were more prevalent in gene transcriptional units and intronic regions, consistent with transposon integrations observed in other species. We determined that the presence of insulator elements was not required for reporter gene expression from the integrated transposon. We further demonstrate that a gene-trap cassette carried in the Tol2 transposon can trap and mutate endogenous transcripts in primordial germ cells. Finally, we observed that modified primordial germ cells form functional gametes as demonstrated by the generation of transgenic offspring that correctly expressed a reporter gene carried in the transposon. Transposable elements are therefore efficient vectors for the genetic manipulation of primordial germ cells and the chicken genome.

  19. The genetic basis of inherited anomalies of the teeth. Part 2: syndromes with significant dental involvement.

    PubMed

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Berdal, Ariane; Vinckier, Frans; de Ravel, Thomy; Fryns, Jean Pierre; Verloes, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Teeth are specialized structural components of the craniofacial skeleton. Developmental defects occur either alone or in combination with other birth defects. In this paper, we review the dental anomalies in several multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndromes, in which the dental component is pivotal in the recognition of the phenotype and/or the molecular basis of the disorder is known. We will consider successively syndromic forms of amelogenesis imperfecta or enamel defects, dentinogenesis imperfecta (i.e. osteogenesis imperfecta) and other dentine anomalies. Focusing on dental aspects, we will review a selection of MCA syndromes associated with teeth number and/or shape anomalies. A better knowledge of the dental phenotype may contribute to an earlier diagnosis of some MCA syndromes involving teeth anomalies. They may serve as a diagnostic indicator or help confirm a syndrome diagnosis.

  20. The case for an ancestral genetic system involving simple analogues of the nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Schwartz, Alan W.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    The idea that the first living systems on earth were based on self-replicating RNA molecules has recently become popular as a result of the discovery of ribozymes. However, there are several major problems associated with the prebiotic synthesis of ribonucleotides. In addition, there is the newly recognized problem of enantiomeric cross-inhibition, whereby template-directed polymerization involving one enantiomer of RNA is inhibited strongly by the presence of the other enantiomer. Here, it is proposed that RNA was preceded in the evolution of life by a polymer constructed from flexible, acyclic, probably prochiral nucleotide analogues that were synthesized readily on the primitive earth. Several potentially prebiotic nucleotide analogues are considered in this context, and some of the consequences of this proposal are discussed.

  1. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A; Masuda, Claudio A; Jenkins, Brian V; Nelms, Keats A; Goodnow, Christopher C; Glynne, Richard J; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kay, Steve A

    2009-02-17

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. The case for an ancestral genetic system involving simple analogues of the nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Schwartz, Alan W.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    The idea that the first living systems on earth were based on self-replicating RNA molecules has recently become popular as a result of the discovery of ribozymes. However, there are several major problems associated with the prebiotic synthesis of ribonucleotides. In addition, there is the newly recognized problem of enantiomeric cross-inhibition, whereby template-directed polymerization involving one enantiomer of RNA is inhibited strongly by the presence of the other enantiomer. Here, it is proposed that RNA was preceded in the evolution of life by a polymer constructed from flexible, acyclic, probably prochiral nucleotide analogues that were synthesized readily on the primitive earth. Several potentially prebiotic nucleotide analogues are considered in this context, and some of the consequences of this proposal are discussed.

  3. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Jenkins, Brian V.; Nelms, Keats A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Glynne, Richard J.; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.; Kay, Steve A.

    2009-01-01

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19196968

  4. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  5. Roles of vascular and metabolic components in cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: short- and long-term modification by non-genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoyuki; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-11-05

    It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD). Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of (1) compromised vascular reactivity, (2) vascular lesions, (3) hypo/hyperglycemia, and (4) exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. β-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: (1) functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, (2) MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, (3) clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, (4) amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  6. Inhibition of oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis of human adipose-derived stem cells by genetic modification with antiapoptotic protein bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ziwei; Shen, Liangyun; Lin, Yue; Wang, Shuqin; Zheng, Dongfeng; Tan, Qian

    2014-08-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have become a promising tool for a wide range of cell-based therapies. However, transplanted ADSCs do not survive well under ischemic conditions. In this study we aimed to inhibit oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced apoptosis of human ADSCs by genetic modification with antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. After isolation and culture, the phenotypes of human ADSCs at passage 3 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Then, genetic modification of ADSCs with Bcl-2 was carried out. Bcl-2 gene transfection was verified by Western blot analysis and multipotent differentiation properties were evaluated in Bcl-2-modified ADSCs (Bcl-2-ADSCs). Apoptosis was evaluated by a TUNEL assay under ischemic conditions induced by OGD. Apoptotic nuclei were also assessed and quantified by Hoechst staining. The cultured ADSCs expressed stem cell-associated markers CD29, CD34, CD44, and CD90, but not fibroblast marker HLA-DR or hematopoietic stem cell marker CD133. The Bcl-2 gene was transferred into ADSCs efficiently, and Bcl-2-ADSCs differentiated into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. In addition, Bcl-2 overexpression reduced the percentage of apoptotic Bcl-2-ADSCs by 38 % under OGD. Our results indicate that Bcl-2 overexpression through gene transfection inhibits apoptosis of ADSCs under ischemic conditions. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  7. Integration-free reprogramming of human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) without viral vectors, recombinant DNA, and genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are envisaged to be integral components of multicellular systems engineered for therapeutic applications. The reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via recombinant expression of a limited number of transcription factors, which was first achieved by Yamanaka and colleagues in 2007, heralded a major breakthrough in the stem cell field. Since then, there has been rapid progress in the field of iPSC generation, including the identification of various small molecules that can enhance reprogramming efficiency and reduce the number of different transcription factors required for reprogramming. Nevertheless, the major obstacles facing clinical applications of iPSCs are safety concerns associated with the use of viral vectors and recombinant DNA for expressing the appropriate transcription factors during reprogramming. In particular, permanent genetic modifications to newly reprogrammed iPSCs have to be avoided in order to meet stringent safety requirements for clinical therapy. These safety challenges can be overcome by new technology platforms that enable cellular reprogramming to iPSCs without the need to utilize either recombinant DNA or viral vectors. The use of recombinant cell-penetrating peptides and direct transfection of synthetic mRNA encoding appropriate transcription factors have both been shown to successfully reprogram somatic cells to iPSCs. It has also been shown more recently that the direct transfection of certain miRNA species can reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency without the need for any of the transcription factors commonly utilized for iPSC generation. This chapter describes protocols for iPSC generation with these new techniques, which would obviate the use of recombinant DNA and viral vectors in cellular reprogramming, thus avoiding permanent genetic modification to the reprogrammed cells.

  8. Genetic loci of Mycoplasma agalactiae involved in systemic spreading during experimental intramammary infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Zimmermann, Martina; Flöck, Martina; Brunthaler, Rene; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2016-10-20

    Mycoplasmas are amongst the most successful pathogens of both humans and animals yet the molecular basis of mycoplasma pathogenesis is poorly understood. This is partly due to the lack of classical virulence factors and little similarity to common bacterial pathogenic determinants. Using Mycoplasma agalactiae as a model we initiated research in this direction by screening a transposon mutant library in the natural sheep host using a negative selection method. Having successfully identified putative factors involved in the colonization of local infection and lymphogenic sites, the current study assessed mutants unable to spread systemically in sheep after experimental intramammary infection. Analysis of distant body sites for complete absence of mutants via SSM PCR revealed that additional set of genes, such as pdhB, oppC, oppB, gtsB, MAG1890, MAG5520 and MAG3650 are required for systemic spreading apart from those that were necessary for initial colonization. Additional in vitro studies with the mutants absent at these systemic sites confirmed the potential role of some of the respective gene products concerning their interaction with host cells. Mutants of pdhB, oppC and MAG4460 exhibited significantly slower growth in the presence of HeLa cells in MEM medium. This first attempt to identify genes exclusively required for systemic spreading provides a basis for further in-depth research to understand the exact mechanism of chronicity and persistence of M. agalactiae.

  9. Development of a Versatile Procedure Based on Natural Transformation for Marker-Free Targeted Genetic Modification in Streptococcus thermophilus▿

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Dandoy, Damien; Boutry, Céline; Delplace, Brigitte; de Frahan, Marie Henry; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Hols, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    A versatile natural transformation protocol was established for and successfully applied to 18 of the 19 Streptococcus thermophilus strains tested. The efficiency of the protocol enables the use of in vitro-amplified mutagenesis fragments to perform deletion or insertion of large genetic fragments. Depending on the phenotype linked to the mutation, markerless mutants can be selected either in two steps, i.e., resistance marker insertion and excision using an adapted Cre-loxP system, or in one step using a powerful positive screening procedure as illustrated here for histidine prototrophy. PMID:20935129

  10. Genetic Manipulation of Leishmania donovani to Explore the Involvement of Argininosuccinate Synthase in Oxidative Stress Management

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Abul Hasan; Jardim, Armando; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Saini, Savita; Abhishek, Kumar; Singh, Ruby; Verma, Sudha; Kumar, Ajay; Das, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) produced by the phagocytic cells are the most common arsenals used to kill the intracellular pathogens. However, Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, has evolved mechanisms to survive by counterbalancing the toxic oxygen metabolites produced during infection. Polyamines, the major contributor in this anti-oxidant machinery, are largely dependent on the availability of L-arginine in the intracellular milieu. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) plays an important role as the rate-limiting step required for converting L-citrulline to argininosuccinate to provide arginine for an assortment of metabolic processes. Leishmania produce an active ASS enzyme, yet it has an incomplete urea cycle as it lacks an argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). There is no evidence for endogenous synthesis of L-arginine in Leishmania, which suggests that these parasites salvage L-arginine from extracellular milieu and makes the biological function of ASS and the production of argininosuccinate in Leishmania unclear. Our previous quantitative proteomic analysis of Leishmania promastigotes treated with sub-lethal doses of ROS, RNS, or a combination of both, led to the identification of several differentially expressed proteins which included ASS. To assess the involvement of ASS in stress management, a mutant cell line with greatly reduced ASS activity was created by a double-targeted gene replacement strategy in L. donovani promastigote. Interestingly, LdASS is encoded by three copies of allele, but Western blot analysis showed the third allele did not appear to express ASS. The free thiol levels in the mutant LdASS-/-/+ cell line were decreased. Furthermore, the cell viability in L-arginine depleted medium was greatly attenuated on exposure to different stress environments and was adversely impacted in its ability to infect mice. These findings suggest that ASS is important for Leishmania donovani to counterbalance the stressed environments

  11. Possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of melatonin against sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Anant

    2009-08-01

    Sleep is an important physiological process responsible for the maintenance of physical, mental and emotional health of a living being. Sleep deprivation is considered risky for several pathological diseases such as anxiety and motor and cognitive dysfunctions. Sleep deprivation has recently been reported to cause oxidative damage. This study has been designed to explore the possible involvement of the GABAergic mechanism in protective effects of melatonin against 72-h sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice. Mice were sleep-deprived for a period of 72 h using the grid over water suspended method. Animals were divided into groups of 6-8 animals each. Melatonin (5 and 10 mg/kg), flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg), picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) and muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) were administered for 5 days starting 2 days before 72-h sleep deprivation. Various behavioural tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber, actophotometer) and body weight assessment followed by oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were carried out. The 72-h sleep deprivation caused significant anxiety-like behaviour, weight loss, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage as compared with naïve (without sleep deprivation). Treatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved locomotor activity, weight loss and antianxiety effect as compared with control (sleep-deprived). Biochemically, melatonin treatment significantly restored reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared with control animals (72-h sleep-deprived). Flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) pretreatments with a lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg) significantly antagonized the protective effect of melatonin. However, muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) pretreatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) potentiated the protective effect of melatonin which was significant as compared with their

  12. The potential for modification in cloning and vitrification technology to enhance genetic progress in beef cattle in Northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, Andrew W; Walton, Simon; Swain, David L; Walsh, Kerry B; Vajta, Gábor

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in embryology and related research offer considerable possibilities to accelerate genetic improvement in cattle breeding. Such progress includes optimization and standardization of laboratory embryo production (in vitro fertilization - IVF), introduction of a highly efficient method for cryopreservation (vitrification), and dramatic improvement in the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning) in terms of required effort, cost, and overall outcome. Handmade cloning (HMC), a simplified version of somatic cell nuclear transfer, offers the potential for relatively easy and low-cost production of clones. A potentially modified method of vitrification used at a centrally located laboratory facility could result in cloned offspring that are economically competitive with elite animals produced by more traditional means. Apart from routine legal and intellectual property issues, the main obstacle that hampers rapid uptake of these technologies by the beef cattle industry is a lack of confidence from scientific and commercial sources. Once stakeholder support is increased, the combined application of these methods makes a rapid advance toward desirable traits (rapid growth, high-quality beef, optimized reproductive performance) a realistic goal. The potential impact of these technologies on genetic advancement in beef cattle herds in which improvement of stock is sought, such as in northern Australia, is hard to overestimate. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial soil heterogeneity has a greater effect on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and plant growth than genetic modification with Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes.

    PubMed

    Cheeke, Tanya E; Schütte, Ursel M; Hemmerich, Chris M; Cruzan, Mitchell B; Rosenstiel, Todd N; Bever, James D

    2015-05-01

    Maize, genetically modified with the insect toxin genes of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), is widely cultivated, yet its impacts on soil organisms are poorly understood. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbiotic associations with plant roots and may be uniquely sensitive to genetic changes within a plant host. In this field study, the effects of nine different lines of Bt maize and their corresponding non-Bt parental isolines were evaluated on AMF colonization and community diversity in plant roots. Plants were harvested 60 days after sowing, and data were collected on plant growth and per cent AMF colonization of roots. AMF community composition in roots was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing of the 28S rRNA genes, and spatial variation in mycorrhizal communities within replicated experimental field plots was examined. Growth responses, per cent AMF colonization of roots and AMF community diversity in roots did not differ between Bt and non-Bt maize, but root and shoot biomass and per cent colonization by arbuscules varied by maize cultivar. Plot identity had the most significant effect on plant growth, AMF colonization and AMF community composition in roots, indicating spatial heterogeneity in the field. Mycorrhizal fungal communities in maize roots were autocorrelated within approximately 1 m, but at greater distances, AMF community composition of roots differed between plants. Our findings indicate that spatial variation and heterogeneity in the field has a greater effect on the structure of AMF communities than host plant cultivar or modification by Bt toxin genes.

  14. Identification of muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in catecholamine secretion in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells by genetic deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Miyata, Hironori; Matsui, Minoru; Inoue, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Activation of muscarinic receptors results in catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells in many mammals, and muscarinic receptors partly mediate synaptic transmission from the splanchnic nerve, at least in guinea pigs. To elucidate the physiological functions of muscarinic receptors in chromaffin cells, it is necessary to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in excitation. Experimental Approach To identify muscarinic receptors, pharmacological tools and strains of mice where one or several muscarinic receptor subtypes were genetically deleted were used. Cellular responses to muscarinic stimulation in isolated chromaffin cells were studied with the patch clamp technique and amperometry. Key Results Muscarinic M1, M4 and M5 receptors were immunologically detected in mouse chromaffin cells, and these receptors disappeared after the appropriate gene deletion. Mouse cells secreted catecholamines in response to muscarinic agonists, angiotensin II and a decrease in external pH. Genetic deletion of M1, but not M3, M4 or M5, receptors in mice abolished secretion in response to muscarine, but not to other stimuli. The muscarine-induced secretion was suppressed by MT7, a snake peptide toxin specific for M1 receptors. Similarly, muscarine failed to induce an inward current in the presence of MT7 in mouse and rat chromaffin cells. The binding affinity of VU0255035 for the inhibition of muscarine-induced currents agreed with that for the M1 receptor. Conclusions and Implications Based upon the effects of genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors and MT7, it is concluded that the M1 receptor alone is responsible for muscarine-induced catecholamine secretion. PMID:25393049

  15. Genetic heterogeneity and minor CYP1B1 involvement in the molecular basis of primary congenital glaucoma in Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Sivadorai, P; Cherninkova, S; Bouwer, S; Kamenarova, K; Angelicheva, D; Seeman, P; Hollingsworth, K; Mihaylova, V; Oscar, A; Dimitrova, G; Kaneva, R; Tournev, I; Kalaydjieva, L

    2008-07-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance, with mutations in the cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) gene detected in an average of approximately 50% of cases worldwide. The Roma/Gypsies are considered to be a rare example of a single founder CYP1B1 mutation, E387K (identified in the Slovak Roma), accounting for 100% of disease alleles. Contrary to this concept, unusual genetic heterogeneity was revealed in this study of 21 Gypsy PCG patients from Bulgaria and 715 controls from the general Gypsy population. In our small sample of affected subjects, we identified five different CYP1B1 mutations - four known (E229K, R368H, E387K and R390C) and one novel and potentially pathogenic (F445I), which together accounted for approximately 30% of disease alleles. E387K was rare in both the patient and the control group, indicating that its high frequency in the Slovak Roma is the product of local founder effect not representative of the overall molecular pattern of PCG in the Gypsy population. Data on other Mendelian disorders and on the population genetics of the Gypsies suggest that a true founder mutation is likely to exist and has remained undetected. Our analysis of another candidate gene, MYOC, and the GLC3B and GLC3C loci did not provide support for their involvement. The molecular basis of PCG in the Gypsies is thus unresolved, and diagnostic analyses should be extended beyond the E387K mutation.

  16. Pathway analysis of whole exome sequence data provides further support for the involvement of histone modification in the aetiology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David

    2016-10-01

    Weighted burden pathway analysis was applied to whole exome sequence data for 2045 schizophrenic patients and 2045 controls. Overall, there was a statistically significant excess of pathways with more rare, functional variants in cases than in controls. Among the highest ranked were pathways relating to histone modification, as well as neuron differentiation and membrane and vesicle function. This bolsters the evidence from previous studies that histone modification pathways may be important in the aetiology of schizophrenia.

  17. Genetic modification of the effect of maternal household air pollution exposure on birth weight in Guatemalan newborns

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lisa M.; Yousefi, Paul; Penaloza, Renee; Balmes, John; Holland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Low birth weight is associated with exposure to air pollution during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether null polymorphisms of Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), specifically GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes in infants or mothers, modifies the association between high exposures to household air pollution (HAP) from cooking fires and birth weight. Pregnant women in rural Guatemala were randomized to receive a chimney stove or continue to use open fires for cooking. Newborns were measured within 48 hours of birth. 132 mother-infant pairs provided infant genotypes (n=130) and/or maternal genotypes (n=116). Maternal null GSTM1 was associated with a 144 gram (95% CI: -291, 1) and combined maternal/infant null GSTT1 was associated with a 155 gram (95% CI -303, -8) decrease in birth weight. Although there was a trend toward higher birth weights with increasing number of expressed GST genes, the effect modification by chimney stove use was not demonstrated. PMID:25305053

  18. Genetic modification of the effect of maternal household air pollution exposure on birth weight in Guatemalan newborns.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lisa M; Yousefi, Paul; Peñaloza, Reneé; Balmes, John; Holland, Nina

    2014-12-01

    Low birth weight is associated with exposure to air pollution during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether null polymorphisms of Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), specifically GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes in infants or mothers, modify the association between high exposures to household air pollution (HAP) from cooking fires and birth weight. Pregnant women in rural Guatemala were randomized to receive a chimney stove or continue to use open fires for cooking. Newborns were measured within 48 h of birth. 132 mother-infant pairs provided infant genotypes (n=130) and/or maternal genotypes (n=116). Maternal null GSTM1 was associated with a 144 g (95% CI, -291, 1) and combined maternal/infant null GSTT1 was associated with a 155 g (95% CI, -303, -8) decrease in birth weight. Although there was a trend toward higher birth weights with increasing number of expressed GST genes, the effect modification by chimney stove use was not demonstrated.

  19. Genetic characterization of ovine herpesvirus 2 strains involved in water buffaloes malignant catarrhal fever outbreaks in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Maria Grazia; Galiero, Giorgio; Fusco, Giovanna

    2017-02-01

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) was responsible for two outbreaks of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) on two water buffalo farms in Southern Italy. In this study, the presence of this virus in the nasal swabs from sick animals as well as in the organs of dead buffaloes was ascertained by a Real-time PCR assay. Positive samples also underwent a relative quantitative analysis of the viral DNA in them. All the dead animals had the highest relative viral quantities, while buffaloes recovering from the virus had intermediate quantities, and asymptomatic OvHV-2-positive sheep had the lowest relative quantities (as compared with the calibrator). The strains involved in the MCF outbreaks underwent genetic characterization by sequencing segments of their ORF50, ORF75 and Ov9.5 genes. The results showed that the outbreaks were caused by two specific genetic variants of OvHV-2, and that these variants exhibit nucleotide differences at the loci analysed. Sheep living in the surrounding farms, as well as sheep kept with buffaloes, were also investigated as possible transmitters of the virus. In this regard, local strategies for the control of MCF should consider separating reservoir species from susceptible animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  1. Application of capillary electrophoretic chips in protein profiling of plant extracts for identification of genetic modifications of maize.

    PubMed

    Poboży, Ewa; Filaber, Monika; Koc, Anna; Garcia-Reyes, Juan F

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the chip gel electrophoresis with LIF detection was applied in protein profiling of fractionated and total extracts of maize standards. The sensitivity of such determinations can be enhanced by lyophilization of extracts or employing filtering and preconcentration with cutoff filters. Combinatorial peptide ligand library applied for sample processing prior to the electrophoretic analysis was, especially, an effective pretreatment step in the determination of low-abundance proteins. Several repeatable differences were observed for protein profiles between maize standards not containing the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and those containing GMO, which can be potentially employed for identification of GMO in maize samples and foods of maize origin. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Genetic modification of adeno-associated viral vector type 2 capsid enhances gene transfer efficiency in polarized human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    White, April F; Mazur, Marina; Sorscher, Eric J; Zinn, Kurt R; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2008-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common genetic disease characterized by defects in the expression of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Gene therapy offers better hope for the treatment of CF. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are capable of stable expression with low immunogenicity. Despite their potential in CF gene therapy, gene transfer efficiency by AAV is limited because of pathophysiological barriers in these patients. Although a few AAV serotypes have shown better transduction compared with the AAV2-based vectors, gene transfer efficiency in human airway epithelium has still not reached therapeutic levels. To engineer better AAV vectors for enhanced gene delivery in human airway epithelium, we developed and characterized mutant AAV vectors by genetic capsid modification, modeling the well-characterized AAV2 serotype. We genetically incorporated putative high-affinity peptide ligands to human airway epithelium on the GH loop region of AAV2 capsid protein. Six independent mutant AAV were constructed, containing peptide ligands previously reported to bind with high affinity for known and unknown receptors on human airway epithelial cells. The vectors were tested on nonairway cells and nonpolarized and polarized human airway epithelial cells for enhanced infectivity. One of the mutant vectors, with the peptide sequence THALWHT, not only showed the highest transduction in undifferentiated human airway epithelial cells but also indicated significant transduction in polarized cells. Interestingly, this modified vector was also able to infect cells independently of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan receptor. Incorporation of this ligand on other AAV serotypes, which have shown improved gene transfer efficiency in the human airway epithelium, may enhance the application of AAV vectors in CF gene therapy.

  3. The LspC3-41I restriction-modification system is the major determinant for genetic manipulations of Lysinibacillus sphaericus C3-41.

    PubMed

    Fu, Pan; Ge, Yong; Wu, Yiming; Zhao, Ni; Yuan, Zhiming; Hu, Xiaomin

    2017-05-19

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus has been widely used in integrated mosquito control program and it is one of the minority bacterial species unable to metabolize carbohydrates. In consideration of the high genetic conservation at genomic level and difficulty of genetic horizontal transfer, it is hypothesized that effective restriction-modification (R-M) systems existed in mosquitocidal L. sphaericus. In this study, six type II R-M systems including LspC3-41I were predicted in L. sphaericus C3-41 genome. It was found that the cell free extracts (CFE) from this strain shown similar restriction and methylation activity on exogenous Bacillus/Escherichia coli shuttle vector pBU4 as the HaeIII, which is an isoschizomer of BspRI. The Bsph_0498 (encoding the predicted LspC3-41IR) knockout mutant Δ0498 and the complement strain RC0498 were constructed. It was found that the unmethylated pBU4 can be digested by the CFE of C3-41 and RC0498, but not by that of Δ0498. Furthermore, the exogenous plasmid pBU4 can be transformed at very high efficacy into Δ0498, low efficacy into RC0498, but no transformation into C3-41, indicating that LspC3-41I might be a major determinant for the genetic restriction barrier of strain C3-41. Besides, lspC3-41IR and lspC3-41IM genes are detected in other two strains besides C3-41 of the tested 16 L. sphaericus strains, which all belonging to serotype H5 and MLST sequence type (ST) 1. Furthermore, the three strains are not horizontal transferred, and this restriction could be overcome by in vitro methylation either by the host CFE or by commercial methytransferase M. HaeIII. The results provide an insight to further study the genetic restriction, modification and evolution of mosquitocidal L. sphaericus, also a theoretical basis and a method for the genetic manipulations of L. sphaericus. LspC3-41I is identified as the major determinant for the restriction barrier of L. sphaericus C3-41. Only three strains of the tested 16 L. sphaericus strains

  4. Umbilical cord blood stem cells as targets for genetic modification: new therapeutic approaches to somatic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williams, D A; Moritz, T

    1994-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood is an abundant source of long term repopulating stem cells and therefore we investigated the utilization of these cells as targets for genetic manipulation directed towards human gene therapy. Using two different retroviral vectors, one which transfers the neomycin resistance gene and the other which transfers therapeutically relevant adenosine deaminase gene, we have demonstrated increased gene transfer efficiency into committed progenitor cells (CPCs) and long term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) derived from cord blood versus adult bone marrow. We further identified a chymotryptic fragment of the extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin (FN 30/35), to which primitive hematopoietic cells adhere. Gene transfer efficiency into hematopoietic cells adherent to FN 30/35 is significantly increased when compared to infection on bovine serum albumin-coated control plates. Utilization of this fragment allowed retroviral mediated gene transfer into cord blood derived CPCs and LTC-ICs with high efficiencies, similar to that observed after coculture of hematopoietic cells on virus producer cells. These data imply cord blood may be a promising source for efficient gene delivery to the human hematopoietic system, and the utilization of the FN 30/35 fibronectin molecule may provide a clinically applicable protocol to achieve this aim.

  5. Genetic Modification of the Marine-Isolated Yeast Aureobasidium melanogenum P16 for Efficient Pullulan Production from Inulin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zai-Chao; Liu, Nan-Nan; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2015-08-01

    In this study, in order to directly and efficiently convert inulin into pullulan, the INU1 gene from Kluyveromyces maximum KM was integrated into the genomic DNA and actively expressed in the high pullulan producer Aureobasidium melanogenum P16 isolated from the mangrove ecosystem. After the ability to produce pullulan from inulin by different transformants was examined, it was found that the recombinant strain EI36, one of the transformants, produced 40.92 U/ml of inulinase activity while its wild-type strain P16 only yielded 7.57 U/ml of inulinase activity. Most (99.27 %) of the inulinase produced by the recombinant strain EI36 was secreted into the culture. During the 10-l fermentation, 70.57 ± 1.3 g/l of pullulan in the fermented medium was attained from inulin (138.0 g/l) within 108 h, high inulinase activity (42.03 U/ml) was produced within 60 h, the added inulin was actively hydrolyzed by the secreted inulinase, and most of the reducing sugars were used by the recombinant strain EI36. This confirmed that the genetically engineered yeast of A. melanogenum strain P16 was suitable for direct pullulan production from inulin.

  6. The genetic basis of C-glycosyl flavone B-ring modification in maize (Zea mays L.) silks.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Cruz, Moisés; Snook, Maurice; McMullen, Michael D

    2003-04-01

    Resistance to corn earworm (CEW) (Helicoverpa zea Boddie) has been attributed to high concentrations of C-glycosyl flavones and chlorogenic acid in maize (Zea mays L.) silks. The most common C-glycosyl flavones isolated from maize silks are maysin, apimaysin, and methoxymaysin, which are distinguished by their B-ring substitutions. For a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the synthesis of these compounds, we conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) study with two populations: (Tx501 x NC7A)F2 and (Tx501 x Mp708)F2. For chlorogenic acid, maysin, and methoxymaysin concentration, the major QTL for both populations was located on chromosome 4 near umc1963. For apimaysin, the major QTL in both populations was located at the position of the pr1 locus on chromosome 5. The QTL alleles on chromosome 4 that increased the synthesis of methoxymaysin significantly decreased the synthesis of maysin and chlorogenic acid. This decrease in maysin concentration was four-fold greater than the increase in methoxymaysin. Our results indicate that the QTL on chromosome 4, responsible for the increase in methoxymaysin synthesis, alters the dynamics of both the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid pathways.

  7. Genetic modification of a vaginal strain of Lactobacillus fermentum and its maintenance within the reproductive tract after intravaginal administration.

    PubMed

    Rush, C M; Hafner, L M; Timms, P

    1994-10-01

    Many micro-organisms cause important diseases of the female genital tract. Because systematic vaccination does not usually provide a good immune response at mucosal sites, commensal lactobacilli from the female genital tract were developed as vehicles to deliver continued doses of foreign antigen directly to the genital mucosal surface with the aim of stimulating strong local mucosal immune responses. Lactobacilli were shown to be common inhabitants of the genital tract of the animal model studied, the guinea-pig. One species, Lactobacillus fermentum, was found in all guinea-pigs studied and was chosen for genetic manipulation. Improved methods of electroporation were developed to enable the routine transformation of L. fermentum BR11 strain with the broad host range plasmid pNZ17. This recombinantly modified Lactobacillus strain was shown to possess good segregational stability over 120 generations in the absence of antibiotic selection. When this recombinant L. fermentum strain was administered to the vaginal tract of three guinea-pigs it persisted for only 5 days. Despite the relatively short period of persistence in these initial experiments, this novel vaccine approach could provide an effective means of stimulating mucosal immunity in the female genital tract.

  8. Chromatin Modifications Associated With Diabetes and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Schones, Dustin E; Leung, Amy; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity across the globe has doubled over the past several decades, leading to escalating rates of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Given this dramatic rise in disease incidence, understanding the cause of these diseases is therefore of paramount importance. Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes mellitus, result from a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. Although the genetic basis of these diseases has been extensively studied, the molecular pathways whereby environmental factors influence disease progression are only beginning to be understood. One manner by which environmental factors can contribute to disease progression is through modifications to chromatin. The highly structured packaging of the genome into the nucleus through chromatin has been shown to be fundamental to tissue-specific gene regulation. Modifications to chromatin can regulate gene expression and are involved in a myriad of biological functions, and hence, disruption of these modifications is central to many human diseases. These modifications can furthermore be epigenetic in nature, thereby contributing to prolonged disease risk. Recent work has demonstrated that modifications to chromatin are associated with the progression of both diabetes mellitus and obesity, which is the subject of this review. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Genetic identification of intracellular trafficking regulators involved in Notch-dependent binary cell fate acquisition following asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Le Bras, Stéphanie; Rondanino, Christine; Kriegel-Taki, Géraldine; Dussert, Aurore; Le Borgne, Roland

    2012-10-15

    Notch signalling is involved in numerous cellular processes during development and throughout adult life. Although ligands and receptors are largely expressed in the whole organism, activation of Notch receptors only takes place in a subset of cells and/or tissues and is accurately regulated in time and space. Previous studies have demonstrated that endocytosis and recycling of both ligands and/or receptors are essential for this regulation. However, the precise endocytic routes, compartments and regulators involved in the spatiotemporal regulation are largely unknown. In order to identify intracellular trafficking regulators of Notch signalling, we have undertaken a tissue-specific dsRNA genetic screen of candidates potentially involved in endocytosis and recycling within the endolysosomal pathway. dsRNA against 418 genes was induced in the Drosophila melanogaster sensory organ lineage in which Notch signalling regulates binary cell fate acquisition. Gain or loss of Notch signalling phenotypes were observed in adult sensory organs for 113 of them. Furthermore, 26 genes were found to regulate the steady state localisation of Notch, Sanpodo, a Notch co-factor, and/or Delta in the pupal lineage. In particular, we identified 20 genes with previously unknown function in D. melanogaster intracellular trafficking. Among them, we identified CG2747 and we show that it regulates the localisation of clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex, a negative regulator of Notch signalling. Together, our results further demonstrate the essential function of intracellular trafficking in regulating Notch-signalling-dependent binary cell fate acquisition and constitute an additional step toward the elucidation of the routes followed by Notch receptor and ligands during signalling.

  10. Effect modification by population dietary folate on the association between MTHFR genotype, homocysteine, and stroke risk: a meta-analysis of genetic studies and randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michael V; Newcombe, Paul; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Sofat, Reecha; Ricketts, Sally L; Cooper, Jackie; Breteler, Monique MB; Bautista, Leonelo E; Sharma, Pankaj; Whittaker, John C; Smeeth, Liam; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Algra, Ale; Shmeleva, Veronika; Szolnoki, Zoltan; Roest, Mark; Linnebank, Michael; Zacho, Jeppe; Nalls, Michael A; Singleton, Andrew B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hardy, John; Worrall, Bradford B; Rich, Stephen S; Matarin, Mar; Norman, Paul E; Flicker, Leon; Almeida, Osvaldo P; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Shimokata, Hiroshi; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bobak, Martin; Sterne, Jonathan AC; Smith, George Davey; Talmud, Philippa J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Humphries, Steve E; Price, Jackie F; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Hankey, Graeme J; Meschia, James F; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Hingorani, Aroon D; Casas, Juan P

    2011-01-01

    folate status (predicted RR 1·00, 95% CI 0·90 to 1·11). Although the predicted effect of homocysteine reduction from large genetic studies in low folate regions (Asia) was larger (RR 0·78, 95% CI 0·68 to 0·90), no trial has evaluated the effect of lowering of homocysteine on stroke risk exclusively in a low folate region. Interpretation In regions with increasing levels or established policies of population folate supplementation, evidence from genetic studies and randomised trials is concordant in suggesting an absence of benefit from lowering of homocysteine for prevention of stroke. Further large-scale genetic studies of the association between MTHFR 677C→T and stroke in low folate settings are needed to distinguish effect modification by folate from small-study bias. If future randomised trials of homocysteine-lowering interventions for stroke prevention are undertaken, they should take place in regions with low folate consumption. Funding Full funding sources listed at end of paper (see Acknowledgments). PMID:21803414

  11. Discovery of a New Genetic Variant of Methionine Aminopeptidase from Streptococci with Possible Post-Translational Modifications: Biochemical and Structural Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Saddanapu, Venkateshwarlu; Reddi, Ravikumar; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-terminal methionine excision is an essential co-translational process that occurs in the cytoplasm of all organisms. About 60-70% of the newly synthesized proteins undergo this modification. Enzyme responsible for the removal of initiator methionine is methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP), which is a dinuclear metalloprotease. This protein is conserved through all forms of life from bacteria to human except viruses. MetAP is classified into two isoforms, Type I and II. Removal of the map gene or chemical inhibition is lethal to bacteria and to human cell lines, suggesting that MetAP could be a good drug target. In the present study we describe the discovery of a new genetic variant of the Type I MetAP that is present predominantly in the streptococci bacteria. There are two inserts (insert one: 27 amino acids and insert two: four residues) within the catalytic domain. Possible glycosylation and phosphorylation posttranslational modification sites are identified in the ‘insert one’. Biochemical characterization suggests that this enzyme behaves similar to other MetAPs in terms of substrate specificity. Crystal structure Type Ia MetAP from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpMetAP1a) revealed that it contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit and well ordered inserts with structural features that corroborate the possible posttranslational modification. Both the new inserts found in the SpMetAP1a structurally align with the P-X-X-P motif found in the M. tuberculosis and human Type I MetAPs as well as the 60 amino acid insert in the human Type II enzyme suggesting possible common function. In addition, one of the β-hairpins within in the catalytic domain undergoes a flip placing a residue which is essential for enzyme activity away from the active site and the β-hairpin loop of this secondary structure in the active site obstructing substrate binding. This is the first example of a MetAP crystallizing in the inactive form. PMID:24124477

  12. Involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in animal tests of anxiety and depression: evidence from genetic models.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, David H; Commissaris, Randall C; De La Garza, Richard; File, Sandra E; Knapp, Darin J; Seiden, Lewis S

    2003-06-01

    Clinical studies have suggested the involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in anxiety and depressive disorders because partial 5-HT1A receptor agonists such as buspirone are therapeutic. The present review considers evidence from genetic animal models that support a role for 5-HT1A receptors in anxiety-like and depressed-like behavior in animals. Selective breeding for differential hypothermic responses to a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist led to the development of the high DPAT sensitive (HDS) and low DPAT sensitive (LDS) lines of rats. The HDS rats differ from the LDS rats on several behavioral measures reflective of anxiety or depression, including reduced social interaction, reduced responding in a conflict task and exaggerated immobility in the forced swim test. However, they do not differ from the LDS rats in the elevated plus maze task, which is a commonly used test of anxiety. Nor do the HDS rats exhibit a typical anxiogenic response to the hippocampal administration of the 5-HT1A agonist. Although the HDS rats do exhibit elevations in 5-HT1A receptors in regions of the limbic cortex, it is not clear whether these increases account for the behavioral differences. Paradoxically, 5-HT1A receptor knockout mice also exhibit anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze, open field and conflict tests compared to wild type mice. However, the knockouts exhibited less immobility in the forced swim test than wild type control mice. Recent studies using selective regional reinstatement of the receptor have implicated the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in these changes in anxiety-like behavior. Thus, preliminary evidence from two different types of genetic animal models suggests that anxiety-like behavior can arise if the 5-HT1A receptor function is eliminated or overexpressed. Further study with additional tests of anxiety are needed to confirm this intriguing relationship.

  13. Genetic characterization of congenital tufting enteropathy: epcam associated phenotype and involvement of SPINT2 in the syndromic form.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Julie; Goulet, Olivier; Canioni, Danielle; Brousse, Nicole; Lemale, Julie; Tounian, Patrick; Coulomb, Aurore; Marinier, Evelyne; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Ruemmele, Frank; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Roche, Olivier; Bodemer, Christine; Colomb, Virginie; Talbotec, Cécile; Lacaille, Florence; Campeotto, Florence; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Janecke, Andreas R; Mueller, Thomas; Koletzko, Sibylle; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Munnich, Arnold; Poirier, Françoise; Smahi, Asma

    2014-03-01

    Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is a rare and severe enteropathy recently ascribed to mutations in the epcam gene. Here we establish SPINT2, previously ascribed to congenital sodium diarrhea, as a second gene associated with CTE and report molecular and immunohistochemistry data in 57 CTE patients. Inclusion criteria were early onset diarrhea and intestinal insufficiency with the typical histological CTE abnormalities. The clinical phenotype was registered, the entire coding regions of epcam and SPINT2 sequenced, and immunostaining of EpCAM and SPINT2 performed on intestinal biopsies. An epcam mutation was involved in 41 patients (73 %) who mainly displayed isolated digestive symptoms. Mutations severely affected gene expression since the EpCAM signal on intestinal tissues was either undetectable or low and irregular. Twelve other patients (21 %) carried mutations in SPINT2, and were phenotypically characterized by systematic association with keratitis (p < 10(-4)) and, for half of them, with choanal atresia (p < 10(-4)). Dependency on parenteral nutrition (PN) was comparable in patients with epcam or SPINT2 mutations, but the frequent epcam mutation c.556-14A>G (abnormal splicing) was significantly associated with a better outcome (p = 0.032) with milder PN dependency to weaning in some cases. Finally, four patients (7 %) with isolated digestive symptoms had no detectable epcam or SPINT2 mutation. Two candidate genes, Elf3 and Claudin7, were excluded from this population. Our study allows us to separate CTE patients into at least three genetic classes, each with specific phenotypes. The genetics approach raises the question of the distinction between two congenital enteropathies. Our findings should help improve the diagnosis of CTE, guide toward strategies of long-term PN management, and limit indications for intestinal transplantation to life-threatening PN complications.

  14. O-METHYL PHOSPHORAMIDATE MODIFICATIONS ON THE CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI ARE INVOLVED IN SERUM RESISTANCE, INFECTION, AND INSECTICIDAL ACTIVITY

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most commonly reported cause of bacterial foodborne illness in North America. C. jejuni decorates its surface polysaccharides with a variety of variable phosphorylated structures, including O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modifications on the capsular polysaccharide. Alt...

  15. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with Reading Disabilities: Preliminary Genetic Findings on the Involvement of the ADRA2A Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, J.; Langley, K.; Pay, H.; Payton, A.; Worthington, J.; Ollier, W.; Thapar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and reading disability (RD) tend to co-occur and quantitative genetic studies have shown this to arise primarily through shared genetic influences. However, molecular genetic studies have shown different genes to be associated with each of these conditions. Neurobiological studies have…

  16. Accumulation of Squalene in a Microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Genetic Modification of Squalene Synthase and Squalene Epoxidase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kajikawa, Masataka; Kinohira, Seiko; Ando, Akira; Shimoyama, Miki; Kato, Misako; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    Several microalgae accumulate high levels of squalene, and as such provide a potentially valuable source of this useful compound. However, the molecular mechanism of squalene biosynthesis in microalgae is still largely unknown. We obtained the sequences of two enzymes involved in squalene synthesis and metabolism, squalene synthase (CrSQS) and squalene epoxidase (CrSQE), from the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. CrSQS was functionally characterized by expression in Escherichia coli and CrSQE by complementation of a budding yeast erg1 mutant. Transient expression of CrSQS and CrSQE fused with fluorescent proteins in onion epidermal tissue suggested that both proteins were co-localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. CrSQS-overexpression increased the rate of conversion of 14C-labeled farnesylpyrophosphate into squalene but did not lead to over-accumulation of squalene. Addition of terbinafine caused the accumulation of squalene and suppression of cell survival. On the other hand, in CrSQE-knockdown lines, the expression level of CrSQE was reduced by 59–76% of that in wild-type cells, and significant levels of squalene (0.9–1.1 μg mg–1 cell dry weight) accumulated without any growth inhibition. In co-transformation lines with CrSQS-overexpression and CrSQE-knockdown, the level of squalene was not increased significantly compared with that in solitary CrSQE-knockdown lines. These results indicated that partial knockdown of CrSQE is an effective strategy to increase squalene production in C. reinhardtii cells. PMID:25764133

  17. Accumulation of squalene in a microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by genetic modification of squalene synthase and squalene epoxidase genes.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Masataka; Kinohira, Seiko; Ando, Akira; Shimoyama, Miki; Kato, Misako; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    Several microalgae accumulate high levels of squalene, and as such provide a potentially valuable source of this useful compound. However, the molecular mechanism of squalene biosynthesis in microalgae is still largely unknown. We obtained the sequences of two enzymes involved in squalene synthesis and metabolism, squalene synthase (CrSQS) and squalene epoxidase (CrSQE), from the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. CrSQS was functionally characterized by expression in Escherichia coli and CrSQE by complementation of a budding yeast erg1 mutant. Transient expression of CrSQS and CrSQE fused with fluorescent proteins in onion epidermal tissue suggested that both proteins were co-localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. CrSQS-overexpression increased the rate of conversion of 14C-labeled farnesylpyrophosphate into squalene but did not lead to over-accumulation of squalene. Addition of terbinafine caused the accumulation of squalene and suppression of cell survival. On the other hand, in CrSQE-knockdown lines, the expression level of CrSQE was reduced by 59-76% of that in wild-type cells, and significant levels of squalene (0.9-1.1 μg mg-1 cell dry weight) accumulated without any growth inhibition. In co-transformation lines with CrSQS-overexpression and CrSQE-knockdown, the level of squalene was not increased significantly compared with that in solitary CrSQE-knockdown lines. These results indicated that partial knockdown of CrSQE is an effective strategy to increase squalene production in C. reinhardtii cells.

  18. Identification and characterization of a NaCl-responsive genetic locus involved in survival during desiccation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Vriezen, Jan A C; de Bruijn, Frans J; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    The Rhizobiaceae are a bacterial family of enormous agricultural importance due to the ability of its members to fix atmospheric nitrogen in an intimate relationship with plants. Their survival as naturally occurring soil bacteria in agricultural soils as well as popular seed inocula is affected directly by drought and salinity. Survival after desiccation in the presence of NaCl is enabled by underlying genetic mechanisms in the model organism Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Since salt stress parallels a loss in water activity, the identification of NaCl-responsive loci may identify loci involved in survival during desiccation. This approach enabled identification of the loci asnO and ngg by their reduced ability to grow on increased NaCl concentrations, likely due to their inability to produce the osmoprotectant N-acetylglutaminylglutamine (NAGGN). In addition, the mutant harboring ngg::Tn5luxAB was affected in its ability to survive desiccation and responded to osmotic stress. The desiccation sensitivity may have been due to secondary functions of Ngg (N-acetylglutaminylglutamine synthetase)-like cell wall metabolism as suggested by the presence of a d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (dAla-dAla) domain and by sensitivity of the mutant to β-lactam antibiotics. asnO::Tn5luxAB is expressed during the stationary phase under normal growth conditions. Amino acid sequence similarity to enzymes producing β-lactam inhibitors and increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics may indicate that asnO is involved in the production of a β-lactam inhibitor.

  19. Identification and Characterization of a NaCl-Responsive Genetic Locus Involved in Survival during Desiccation in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Vriezen, Jan A. C.; de Bruijn, Frans J.

    2013-01-01

    The Rhizobiaceae are a bacterial family of enormous agricultural importance due to the ability of its members to fix atmospheric nitrogen in an intimate relationship with plants. Their survival as naturally occurring soil bacteria in agricultural soils as well as popular seed inocula is affected directly by drought and salinity. Survival after desiccation in the presence of NaCl is enabled by underlying genetic mechanisms in the model organism Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Since salt stress parallels a loss in water activity, the identification of NaCl-responsive loci may identify loci involved in survival during desiccation. This approach enabled identification of the loci asnO and ngg by their reduced ability to grow on increased NaCl concentrations, likely due to their inability to produce the osmoprotectant N-acetylglutaminylglutamine (NAGGN). In addition, the mutant harboring ngg::Tn5luxAB was affected in its ability to survive desiccation and responded to osmotic stress. The desiccation sensitivity may have been due to secondary functions of Ngg (N-acetylglutaminylglutamine synthetase)-like cell wall metabolism as suggested by the presence of a d-alanine-d-alanine ligase (dAla-dAla) domain and by sensitivity of the mutant to β-lactam antibiotics. asnO::Tn5luxAB is expressed during the stationary phase under normal growth conditions. Amino acid sequence similarity to enzymes producing β-lactam inhibitors and increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics may indicate that asnO is involved in the production of a β-lactam inhibitor. PMID:23851090

  20. Genetic modification stimulated by the induction of a site-specific break distant from the locus of correction in haploid and diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Samantha; Storici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Generation of a site-specific break at a genomic locus to stimulate homologous recombination (HR) is used in many organisms to efficiently target genes for various types of genetic modification. Additionally, a site-specific chromosomal break can be used to trigger HR at genomic regions distant from the break, thereby largely expanding the region available for introducing desired mutations. In contrast to the former approach, the latter presents an alternative way in which genes can be efficiently modified also when it is not possible or desirable to introduce a break in the vicinity of the targeting locus. This type of in vivo site-directed mutagenesis distant from a break can be accomplished in the yeast model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the generation of a double-strand break (DSB) in yeast chromosomal DNA activates HR at long regions upstream and downstream from the break site. Here we provide a protocol for efficiently altering a yeast chromosomal locus following the induction of a DSB several kilobase pairs distant from the site of gene correction. The techniques described can be used in both diploid and haploid yeast strains, and we provide examples of the gene correction assays.

  1. Genetic modification of human embryonic stem cells with adenoviral vectors: differences of infectability between lines and correlation of infectability with expression of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor.

    PubMed

    Brokhman, Irina; Pomp, Oz; Fishman, Lital; Tennenbaum, Tamar; Amit, Michal; Itzkovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2009-04-01

    Adenovirus is an efficient vector for expression of transgenes in dividing and nondividing cells. However, very few studies of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have utilized adenoviral vectors. We examine here the ability of adenovirus to infect naive hESCs and the differentiated derivatives of multiple hESC lines. We found a striking variation in adenovirus infection rates between lines. The variability in infection rates was positively correlated with the expression of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, but not that of alpha(nu)-integrin. Adenoviral infection did not interfere with the expression of pluripotency markers, even after passaging. In addition, infection did not affect differentiation of hESC-derived neural precursors in vitro. We also found that green fluorescent protein expression mediated by adenovirus can be a useful marker for tracking hESC in xenografts. We conclude that adenovirus is a practical vector for genetic modification of naive hESC from most, but not all lines, but may be more generally useful for gene transfer into differentiated derivatives of hESC lines.

  2. Enhancement of antitumor activity of gammaretrovirus carrying IL-12 gene through genetic modification of envelope targeting HER2 receptor: a promising strategy for bladder cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Y-S; Shiau, A-L; Chen, Y-F; Tsai, H-T; Tzai, T-S; Wu, C-L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an HER2-targeted, envelope-modified Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based gammaretroviral vector carrying interleukin (IL)-12 gene for bladder cancer therapy. It displayed a chimeric envelope protein containing a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody to the HER2 receptor and carried the mouse IL-12 gene. The fragment of anti-erbB2scFv was constructed into the proline-rich region of the viral envelope of the packaging vector lacking a transmembrane subunit of the carboxyl terminal region of surface subunit. As compared with envelope-unmodified gammaretroviruses, envelope-modified ones had extended viral tropism to human HER2-expressing bladder cancer cell lines, induced apoptosis, and affected cell cycle progression despite lower viral titers. Moreover, animal studies showed that envelope-modified gammaretroviruses carrying IL-12 gene exerted higher antitumor activity in terms of retarding tumor growth and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice than unmodified ones, which were associated with enhanced tumor cell apoptosis as well as increased intratumoral levels of IL-12, interferon-gamma, IL-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha proteins. Therefore, the antitumor activity of gammaretroviruses carrying the IL-12 gene was enhanced through genetic modification of the envelope targeting HER2 receptor, which may be a promising strategy for bladder cancer therapy.

  3. Genetic modification of mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing CCR1 increases cell viability, migration, engraftment, and capillary density in the injured myocardium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Zhang, Zhiping; Guo, Jian; Ni, Aiguo; Deb, Arjun; Zhang, Lunan; Mirotsou, Maria; Pratt, Richard E; Dzau, Victor J

    2010-06-11

    Although mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has been shown to promote cardiac repair in acute myocardial injury in vivo, its overall restorative capacity appears to be restricted mainly because of poor cell viability and low engraftment in the ischemic myocardium. Specific chemokines are upregulated in the infarcted myocardium. However the expression levels of the corresponding chemokine receptors (eg, CCR1, CXCR2) in MSCs are very low. We hypothesized that this discordance may account for the poor MSC engraftment and survival. To determine whether overexpression of CCR1 or CXCR2 chemokine receptors in MSCs augments their cell survival, migration and engraftment after injection in the infarcted myocardium. Overexpression of CCR1, but not CXCR2, dramatically increased chemokine-induced murine MSC migration and protected MSC from apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, when MSCs were injected intramyocardially one hour after coronary artery ligation, CCR1-MSCs accumulated in the infarcted myocardium at significantly higher levels than control-MSCs or CXCR2-MSCs 3 days postmyocardial infarction (MI). CCR1-MSC-injected hearts exhibited a significant reduction in infarct size, reduced cardiomyocytes apoptosis and increased capillary density in injured myocardium 3 days after MI. Furthermore, intramyocardial injection of CCR1-MSCs prevented cardiac remodeling and restored cardiac function 4 weeks after MI. Our results demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo salutary effects of genetic modification of stem cells. Specifically, overexpression of chemokine receptor enhances the migration, survival and engraftment of MSCs, and may provide a new therapeutic strategy for the injured myocardium.

  4. Modification of embryonic resistance to heat shock in cattle by melatonin and genetic variation in HSPA1L.

    PubMed

    Ortega, M Sofia; Rocha-Frigoni, Nathália A S; Mingoti, Gisele Zoccal; Roth, Zvi; Hansen, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    development means that the negative effects of heat shock on the zygote are not mediated by ROS, (2) previously reported effect of melatonin on fertility of heat-stressed cows might involve actions independent of the antioxidant properties of melatonin, and (3) the deletion mutation in the promoter of HSPA1L confers protection to the zygote from heat shock and high oxygen. Perhaps, embryonic survival during heat stress could be improved by selecting for thermotolerant genotypes. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Light, Kathleen C.; White, Andrea T.; Tadler, Scott; Iacob, Eli; Light, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    In complex multisymptom disorders like fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) that are defined primarily by subjective symptoms, genetic and gene expression profiles can provide very useful objective information. This paper summarizes research on genes that may be linked to increased susceptibility in developing and maintaining these disorders, and research on resting and stressor-evoked changes in leukocyte gene expression, highlighting physiological pathways linked to stress and distress. These include the adrenergic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and serotonergic pathways, and exercise responsive metabolite-detecting ion channels. The findings to date provide some support for both inherited susceptibility and/or physiological dysregulation in all three systems, particularly for catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) genes, the glucocorticoid and the related mineralocorticoid receptors (NR3C1, NR3C2), and the purinergic 2X4 (P2X4) ion channel involved as a sensory receptor for muscle pain and fatigue and also in upregulation of spinal microglia in chronic pain models. Methodological concerns for future research, including potential influences of comorbid clinical depression and antidepressants and other medications, on gene expression are also addressed. PMID:22110941

  6. First successful reduction of clinical allergenicity of food by genetic modification: Mal d 1-silenced apples cause fewer allergy symptoms than the wild-type cultivar.

    PubMed

    Dubois, A E J; Pagliarani, G; Brouwer, R M; Kollen, B J; Dragsted, L O; Eriksen, F D; Callesen, O; Gilissen, L J W J; Krens, F A; Visser, R G F; Smulders, M J M; Vlieg-Boerstra, B J; Flokstra-de Blok, B J; van de Weg, W E

    2015-11-01

    Genetic modification of allergenic foods such as apple has the potential to reduce their clinical allergenicity, but this has never been studied by oral challenges in allergic individuals. We performed oral food challenges in 21 apple-allergic individuals with Elstar apples which had undergone gene silencing of the major allergen of apple, Mal d 1, by RNA interference. Downregulation of Mal d 1 gene expression in the apples was verified by qRT-PCR. Clinical responses to the genetically modified apples were compared to those seen with the wild-type Elstar using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Gene silencing produced two genetically modified apple lines expressing Mal d 1.02 and other Mal d 1 gene mRNA levels which were extensively downregulated, that is only 0.1-16.4% (e-DR1) and 0.2-9.9% (e-DR2) of those of the wild-type Elstar, respectively. Challenges with these downregulated apple lines produced significantly less intense maximal symptoms to the first dose (Vmax1) than with Elstar (Vmax1 Elstar 3.0 mm vs 0.0 mm for e-DR1, P = 0.017 and 0.0 mm for e-DR2, P = 0.043), as well as significantly less intense mean symptoms per dose (meanV/d) than with Elstar (meanV/d Elstar 2.2 mm vs 0.2 mm for e-DR1, P = 0.017 and 0.0 mm for e-DR2, P = 0.043). Only one subject (5%) remained symptom-free when challenged with the Elstar apple, whereas 43% did so with e-DR1 and 63% with e-DR2. These data show that mRNA silencing of Mal d 1 results in a marked reduction of Mal d 1 gene expression in the fruit and reduction of symptoms when these apples are ingested by allergic subjects. Approximately half of the subjects developed no symptoms whatsoever, and virtually all subjects wished to consume the apple again in the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Chemical modification of thiol groups of mitochondrial F1-ATPase from the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Involvement of alpha- and gamma-subunits in the enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Falson, P.; Di Pietro, A.; Gautheron, D.C.

    1986-06-05

    Mitochondrial F1-ATPase from the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been prepared under a stable form and in relatively high amounts by an improved purification procedure. Specific chemical modification of the enzyme by the thiol reagent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) at pH 6.8 leads to complete inactivation characterized by complex kinetics and pH dependence, indicating that several thiols are related to the enzyme activity. A complete protection against NEM effect is afforded by low concentrations of nucleotides in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/, with ADP and ATP being more efficient than GTP. A total binding of 5 mol of (/sup 14/C)NEM/mol of F1-ATPase is obtained when the enzyme is 85% inactivated: 3 mol of the label are located on the alpha-subunits and 2 on the gamma-subunit. Two out of the 3 mol on the alpha-subunits bind very rapidly before any inactivation occurs. Complete protection by ATP against inactivation by NEM prevents the modification of three essential thiols out of the group of five thiols labeled in the absence of ATP: one is located on a alpha-subunit and two on the gamma-subunit. These two essential thiols of the gamma-subunit can be differentiated by modification with 6,6'-dithiodinicotinic acid (CPDS), another specific thiol reagent. A maximal binding of 4 mol of (/sup 14/C)CPDS/mol of enzyme is obtained, concomitant to a 25% inhibition. Sequential modification of the enzyme by CPDS and (/sup 14/C)NEM leads to the same final deep inactivation as that obtained with (/sup 14/C)NEM alone. One out of the two thiols of the gamma-subunit is no longer accessible to (/sup 14/C)NEM after CPDS treatment. When incubated at pH 6.8 with (/sup 3/H)ATP in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/, F1-ATPase is able to bind 3, largely exchangeable, mol of nucleotide/mol of enzyme. Modification of the three essential thiols by NEM dramatically decreases the binding of /sup 3/H-nucleotide down to about 1 mol/mol of enzyme.

  8. The rural-urban effect on spatial genetic structure of type II Toxoplasma gondii strains involved in human congenital toxoplasmosis, France, 2002-2009.

    PubMed

    Ajzenberg, Daniel; Collinet, Frédéric; Aubert, Dominique; Villena, Isabelle; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Devillard, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis involves Toxoplasma gondii type II strains in 95% of cases in France. We used spatial principal component analysis (sPCA) and 15 microsatellite markers to investigate the spatial genetic structure of type II strains involved in 240 cases of congenital toxoplasmosis in France from 2002 through 2009. Mailing addresses of patients were geo-referenced a posteriori in decimal degrees and categorized into urban or rural areas of residence. No spatial genetic structure was found for type II strains that infected mothers who were living in urban areas, but a global spatial genetic structure was found for those that infected mothers who were living in a rural environment. Our results suggest that sources of infection by T. gondii are different in rural and urban areas in France, and advocate for targeted messages in the prevention of toxoplasmosis according to the type of residence of susceptible people.

  9. Genuine genetic redundancy in maleylacetate-reductase-encoding genes involved in degradation of haloaromatic compounds by Cupriavidus necator JMP134.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pantoja, Danilo; Donoso, Raúl A; Sánchez, Miguel A; González, Bernardo

    2009-11-01

    Maleylacetate reductases (MAR) are required for biodegradation of several substituted aromatic compounds. To date, the functionality of two MAR-encoding genes (tfdF(I) and tfdF(II)) has been reported in Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4), a known degrader of aromatic compounds. These two genes are located in tfd gene clusters involved in the turnover of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) and 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB). The C. necator JMP134 genome comprises at least three other genes that putatively encode MAR (tcpD, hqoD and hxqD), but confirmation of their functionality and their role in the catabolism of haloaromatic compounds has not been assessed. RT-PCR expression analyses of C. necator JMP134 cells exposed to 2,4-D, 3-CB, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) or 4-fluorobenzoate (4-FB) showed that tfdF(I) and tfdF(II) are induced by haloaromatics channelled to halocatechols as intermediates. In contrast, 2,4,6-TCP only induces tcpD, and any haloaromatic compounds tested did not induce hxqD and hqoD. However, the tcpD, hxqD and hqoD gene products showed MAR activity in cell extracts and provided the MAR function for 2,4-D catabolism when heterologously expressed in MAR-lacking strains. Growth tests for mutants of the five MAR-encoding genes in strain JMP134 showed that none of these genes is essential for degradation of the tested compounds. However, the role of tfdF(I)/tfdF(II) and tcpD genes in the expression of MAR activity during catabolism of 2,4-D and 2,4,6-TCP, respectively, was confirmed by enzyme activity tests in mutants. These results reveal a striking example of genetic redundancy in the degradation of aromatic compounds.

  10. Evidence for the Involvement of Membranous Bodies in the Processes Leading to Genetic Transformation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenholme, David R.; Vermeulen, Cornelius A.; Venema, Gerhardus

    1966-01-01

    Wolstenholme, David R. (Max-Planck-Institut für Biologie, Tübingen, Germany), Cornelius A. Vermeulen, and Gerhardus Venema. Evidence for the involvement of membranous bodies in the processes leading to genetic transformation in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1111–1121. 1966.—Data obtained from electron microscopic autoradiographs of profiles of cells of a Bacillus subtilis population exposed to H3-thymidine-labeled donor deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) during the phase of maximal competence indicated that molecules originating from absorbed DNA are closely associated with membranous bodies, particularly with those situated in the cytoplasm, but that most if not all of the radioactive molecules are outside the bodies. It is suggested that membranous bodies produce enzymes essential to the eventual incorporation of transforming DNA into the bacterial genome, or to the breakdown and utilization or expulsion of absorbed DNA not incorporated as transformant (or to both processes). During the phase of maximal competence, the total number of membranous bodies seen in profiles increased continuously to as much as 2.3 times the numbers found during earlier stages of culture. This increase was not accounted for by a decrease in bacterial cell volume, but resulted from an actual increase in total volume of membranous bodies. The number of membranous bodies visibly connecting plasma membrane and nuclear region increased during maximal competence to as much as 30 times the numbers found in earlier stages. As both increases were found in the absence of donor DNA and only began after maximal competence was attained, it seemed most probable that they were an expression of a physiological state influenced by the continuing deficiency of nutrients in the growth medium during this phase of culture. Images PMID:4959042

  11. Modulation of monoamine oxidase (MAO) expression in neuropsychiatric disorders: genetic and environmental factors involved in type A MAO expression.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Riederer, Peter; Maruyama, Wakako

    2016-02-01

    -A activity may increase the levels of serotonin and norepinephrine, resulting in disturbed neurotransmitter system development and behavior. This review discusses genetic and environmental factors involved in the regulation of MAO-A expression, in the contexts of neuropsychiatric function and of the regulation of neuronal survival and death.

  12. Estimation of genetic parameters and detection of chromosomal regions affecting the major milk proteins and their post translational modifications in Danish Holstein and Danish Jersey cattle.

    PubMed

    Buitenhuis, Bart; Poulsen, Nina A; Gebreyesus, Grum; Larsen, Lotte B

    2016-08-02

    In the Western world bovine milk products are an important protein source in human diet. The major proteins in bovine milk are the four caseins (CN), αS1-, αS2-, β-, and k-CN and the two whey proteins, β-LG and α-LA. It has been shown that both the amount of specific CN and their isoforms including post-translational modifications (PTM) influence technological properties of milk. Therefore, the aim of this study was to 1) estimate genetic parameters for individual proteins in Danish Holstein (DH) (n = 371) and Danish Jersey (DJ) (n = 321) milk, and 2) detect genomic regions associated with specific milk protein and their different PTM forms using a genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach. For DH, high heritability estimates were found for protein percentage (0.47), casein percentage (0.43), k-CN (0.77), β-LG (0.58), and α-LA (0.40). For DJ, high heritability estimates were found for protein percentage (0.70), casein percentage (0.52), and α-LA (0.44). The heritability for G-k-CN, U-k-CN and GD was higher in the DH compared to the DJ, whereas the heritability for the PD of αS1-CN was lower in DH compared to DJ, whereas the PD for αS2-CN was higher in DH compared to DJ. The GWAS results for the main milk proteins were in line what has been earlier published. However, we showed that there were SNPs specifically regulating G-k-CN in DH. Some of these SNPs were assigned to casein protein kinase genes (CSNK1G3, PRKCQ). The genetic analysis of the major milk proteins and their PTM forms revealed that these were heritable in both DH and DJ. In DH, genomic regions specific for glycosylation of k-CN were detected. Furthermore, genomic regions for the major milk proteins confirmed the regions on BTA6 (casein cluster), BTA11 (PEAP), and BTA14 (DGAT1) as important regions influencing protein composition in milk. The results from this study provide confidence that it is possible to breed for specific milk protein including the different PTM forms.

  13. A single injection of gain-of-function mutant PCSK9 adeno-associated virus vector induces cardiovascular calcification in mice with no genetic modification

    PubMed Central

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Hagita, Sumihiko; Rogers, Maximillian A.; Creager, Michael D.; Pham, Tan; Choi, Jung; Mlynarchik, Andrew K; Pieper, Brett; Kjolby, Mads; Aikawa, Masanori; Aikawa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background Studying atherosclerotic calcification in vivo requires mouse models with genetic modifications. Previous studies showed that injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) encoding a gain-of-function mutant PCSK9 into mice promotes atherosclerosis. Aim We aim to study cardiovascular calcification induced by PCSK9 AAV in C57BL/6J mice. Methods 10 week-old C57BL/6J mice received a single injection of AAV encoding mutant mPCSK9 (rAAV8/D377Y-mPCSK9). Ldlr−/− mice served as positive controls. Mice consumed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 15 or 20 weeks. Aortic calcification was assessed by fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) of a near-infrared calcium tracer. Results Serum levels of PCSK9 (0.14 µg/ml to 20 µg/ml, p < 0.01) and total cholesterol (82 mg/dL to 820 mg/dL, p < 0.01) increased within one week after injection and remained elevated for 20 weeks. Atherosclerotic lesion size was similar between PCSK9 AAV and Ldlr−/− mice. Aortic calcification was 0.01%±0.01 in PCSK9 AAV mice and 15.3%±6.1 in Ldlr−/− mice at 15 weeks (p < 0.01); by 20 weeks, the PCSK9 AAV mice aortic calcification grew to 12.4%±4.9. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase activity was similar in PCSK9 AAV mice and Ldlr−/− mice at 15 and 20 weeks, respectively. As example of the utility of this model in testing modulators of calcification in vivo, PCSK9 AAV injection to sortilin-deficient mice demonstrated reduced aortic calcification by 46.3% (p < 0.05) compared to littermate controls. Conclusion A single injection of gain-of-function PCSK9 AAV into C57BL/6J mice is a useful tool to study cardiovascular calcification in mice with no genetic manipulation. PMID:27318830

  14. Genetics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  15. Genetics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  16. Genetic background and epigenetic modifications in the core of the nucleus accumbens predict addiction-like behavior in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Flagel, Shelly B.; Chaudhury, Sraboni; Waselus, Maria; Kelly, Rebeca; Sewani, Salima; Clinton, Sarah M.; Thompson, Robert C.; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a demonstration in the rat of a clear genetic difference in the propensity for addiction-related behaviors following prolonged cocaine self-administration. It relies on the use of selectively bred high-responder (bHR) and low-responder (bLR) rat lines that differ in several characteristics associated with “temperament,” including novelty-induced locomotion and impulsivity. We show that bHR rats exhibit behaviors reminiscent of human addiction, including persistent cocaine-seeking and increased reinstatement of cocaine seeking. To uncover potential underlying mechanisms of this differential vulnerability, we focused on the core of the nucleus accumbens and examined expression and epigenetic regulation of two transcripts previously implicated in bHR/bLR differences: fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and the dopamine D2 receptor (D2). Relative to bHRs, bLRs had lower FGF2 mRNA levels and increased association of a repressive mark on histones (H3K9me3) at the FGF2 promoter. These differences were apparent under basal conditions and persisted even following prolonged cocaine self-administration. In contrast, bHRs had lower D2 mRNA under basal conditions, with greater association of H3K9me3 at the D2 promoter and these differences were no longer apparent following prolonged cocaine self-administration. Correlational analyses indicate that the association of H3K9me3 at D2 may be a critical substrate underlying the propensity to relapse. These findings suggest that low D2 mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens core, likely mediated via epigenetic modifications, may render individuals more susceptible to cocaine addiction. In contrast, low FGF2 levels, which appear immutable even following prolonged cocaine exposure, may serve as a protective factor. PMID:27114539

  17. Genetic Stabilization of the Drug-Resistant PMEN1 Pneumococcus Lineage by Its Distinctive DpnIII Restriction-Modification System

    PubMed Central

    Eutsey, Rory A.; Powell, Evan; Dordel, Janina; Salter, Susannah J.; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) exhibits a high degree of genomic diversity and plasticity. Isolates with high genomic similarity are grouped into lineages that undergo homologous recombination at variable rates. PMEN1 is a pandemic, multidrug-resistant lineage. Heterologous gene exchange between PMEN1 and non-PMEN1 isolates is directional, with extensive gene transfer from PMEN1 strains and only modest transfer into PMEN1 strains. Restriction-modification (R-M) systems can restrict horizontal gene transfer, yet most pneumococcal strains code for either the DpnI or DpnII R-M system and neither limits homologous recombination. Our comparative genomic analysis revealed that PMEN1 isolates code for DpnIII, a third R-M system syntenic to the other Dpn systems. Characterization of DpnIII demonstrated that the endonuclease cleaves unmethylated double-stranded DNA at the tetramer sequence 5′ GATC 3′, and the cognate methylase is a C5 cytosine-specific DNA methylase. We show that DpnIII decreases the frequency of recombination under in vitro conditions, such that the number of transformants is lower for strains transformed with unmethylated DNA than in those transformed with cognately methylated DNA. Furthermore, we have identified two PMEN1 isolates where the DpnIII endonuclease is disrupted, and phylogenetic work by Croucher and colleagues suggests that these strains have accumulated genomic differences at a higher rate than other PMEN1 strains. We propose that the R-M locus is a major determinant of genetic acquisition; the resident R-M system governs the extent of genome plasticity. PMID:26081630

  18. Complete Bordetella avium, Bordetella hinzii and Bordetella trematum lipid A structures and genomic sequence analyses of the loci involved in their modifications.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Alexey; Shah, Nita R; AlBitar-Nehme, Sami; Basheer, Soorej M; Trento, Ilaria; Tirsoaga, Alina; Moksa, Michelle; Hirst, Martin; Perry, Malcolm B; Hamidi, Asmaa El; Fernandez, Rachel C; Caroff, Martine

    2014-08-01

    Endotoxin is recognized as one of the virulence factors of the Bordetella avium bird pathogen, and characterization of its structure and corresponding genomic features are important for an understanding of its role in pathogenicity and for an improved general knowledge of Bordetella spp virulence factors. The structure of the biologically active part of B. avium LPS, lipid A, is described and compared to those of another bird pathogen, opportunistic in humans, Bordetella hinzii, and to that of Bordetella trematum, a human pathogen. Sequence analyses showed that the three strains have homologues of acyl-chain modifying enzymes PagL, PagP and LpxO, of the 1-phosphatase LpxE, in addition to LgmA, LgmB and LgmC, which are required for the glucosamine modification. MALDI mass spectrometry identified a high amount of glucosamine substituting the phosphate groups of B. avium lipid A; this modification was absent from B. hinzii and B. trematum. The acylation patterns of the three lipid As were similar, but they differed from those of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. They were also found to be close to the lipid A structure of Bordetella bronchiseptica, a mammalian pathogen, only differing from the latter by the degree of hydroxylation of the branched fatty acid.

  19. Posttranslational Protein Modification in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Eichler, Jerry; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2005-01-01

    One of the first hurdles to be negotiated in the postgenomic era involves the description of the entire protein content of the cell, the proteome. Such efforts are presently complicated by the various posttranslational modifications that proteins can experience, including glycosylation, lipid attachment, phosphorylation, methylation, disulfide bond formation, and proteolytic cleavage. Whereas these and other posttranslational protein modifications have been well characterized in Eucarya and Bacteria, posttranslational modification in Archaea has received far less attention. Although archaeal proteins can undergo posttranslational modifications reminiscent of what their eucaryal and bacterial counterparts experience, examination of archaeal posttranslational modification often reveals aspects not previously observed in the other two domains of life. In some cases, posttranslational modification allows a protein to survive the extreme conditions often encountered by Archaea. The various posttranslational modifications experienced by archaeal proteins, the molecular steps leading to these modifications, and the role played by posttranslational modification in Archaea form the focus of this review. PMID:16148304

  20. Posttranslational protein modification in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Jerry; Adams, Michael W W

    2005-09-01

    One of the first hurdles to be negotiated in the postgenomic era involves the description of the entire protein content of the cell, the proteome. Such efforts are presently complicated by the various posttranslational modifications that proteins can experience, including glycosylation, lipid attachment, phosphorylation, methylation, disulfide bond formation, and proteolytic cleavage. Whereas these and other posttranslational protein modifications have been well characterized in Eucarya and Bacteria, posttranslational modification in Archaea has received far less attention. Although archaeal proteins can undergo posttranslational modifications reminiscent of what their eucaryal and bacterial counterparts experience, examination of archaeal posttranslational modification often reveals aspects not previously observed in the other two domains of life. In some cases, posttranslational modification allows a protein to survive the extreme conditions often encountered by Archaea. The various posttranslational modifications experienced by archaeal proteins, the molecular steps leading to these modifications, and the role played by posttranslational modification in Archaea form the focus of this review.

  1. DNA methylation at the CfrBI site is involved in expression control in the CfrBI restriction–modification system

    PubMed Central

    Beletskaya, Irina V.; Zakharova, Marina V.; Shlyapnikov, Michael G.; Semenova, Lidiya M.; Solonin, Alexander S.

    2000-01-01

    We have previously found that genes of the CfrBI restriction–modification (R-M) system from Citrobacter freundii are oriented divergently and that their promoter regions overlap. The overlapping promoters suggest regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level. In this study the transcription regulation of CfrBI R-M genes was analyzed in vivo and in vitro in Escherichia coli. It was shown that in the presence of CfrBI methyltransferase (M·CfrBI), cell galactokinase activity decreases 10-fold when the galactokinase gene (galK) is under the control of the cfrBIM promoter and increases 20-fold when galK is under the control of the cfrBIR promoter. The CfrBI site, proven to be unique for the entire CfrBI R-M gene sequence, is located in the –35 cfrBIM promoter region and is in close vicinity of the –10 cfrBIR promoter region. A comparison of the cfrBIM and the cfrBIR promoter activities in the in vitro transcription system using methylated and unmethylated DNA fragments as templates demonstrated that the efficiency of CfrBI R-M gene transcription is regulated by enzymatic modification at the N-4-position of cytosine bases of the CfrBI site by M·CfrBI. From the results of the in vivo and in vitro experiments we suggest a new model of gene expression regulation in type II R-M systems. PMID:11000275

  2. DNA methylation at the CfrBI site is involved in expression control in the CfrBI restriction-modification system.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, I V; Zakharova, M V; Shlyapnikov, M G; Semenova, L M; Solonin, A S

    2000-10-01

    We have previously found that genes of the CFR:BI restriction-modification (R-M) system from Citrobacter freundii are oriented divergently and that their promoter regions overlap. The overlapping promoters suggest regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level. In this study the transcription regulation of CFR:BI R-M genes was analyzed in vivo and in vitro in Escherichia coli. It was shown that in the presence of CFR:BI methyltransferase (M.CFR:BI), cell galactokinase activity decreases 10-fold when the galactokinase gene (galK) is under the control of the cfrBIM promoter and increases 20-fold when galK is under the control of the cfrBIR promoter. The CFR:BI site, proven to be unique for the entire CFR:BI R-M gene sequence, is located in the -35 cfrBIM promoter region and is in close vicinity of the -10 cfrBIR promoter region. A comparison of the cfrBIM and the cfrBIR promoter activities in the in vitro transcription system using methylated and unmethylated DNA fragments as templates demonstrated that the efficiency of CFR:BI R-M gene transcription is regulated by enzymatic modification at the N-4-position of cytosine bases of the CFR:BI site by M.CFR:BI. From the results of the in vivo and in vitro experiments we suggest a new model of gene expression regulation in type II R-M systems.

  3. Behavior modification.

    PubMed

    Pelham, W E; Fabiano, G A

    2000-07-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic and substantially impairing disorder. This means that treatment must also be chronic and substantial. Behavior Modification, and in many cases, the combination of behavior modification and stimulant medication, is a valid, useful treatment for reducing the pervasive impairment experienced by children with ADHD. Based on the research evidence reviewed, behavior modification should be the first line of treatment for children with ADHD.

  4. Genetic moderation of the association between adolescent romantic involvement and depression: Contributions of serotonin transporter gene polymorphism, chronic stress, and family discord

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Lisa R.; Hammen, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Studies support a link between adolescent romantic involvement and depression. Adolescent romantic relationships may increase depression risk by introducing chronic stress, and genetic vulnerability to stress reactivity/emotion dysregulation may moderate these associations. We tested genetic moderation of longitudinal associations between adolescent romantic involvement and later depressive symptoms by a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region gene (5-HTTLPR), and examined contributory roles of chronic stress and family discord. Three hundred eighty-one youth participated at ages 15 and 20. The results indicated that 5-HTTLPR moderated the association between age 15 romantic involvement and age 20 depressive symptoms, with strongest effects for short homozygotes. Conditional process analysis revealed that chronic stress functioned as a moderated mediator of this association, fully accounting for the romantic involvement-depression link among short/short genotypes. Also, romantic involvement predicted later depressive symptoms most strongly among short-allele carriers with high family discord. Results have important implications for understanding the romantic involvement-depression link and the behavioral and emotional Correlates of the 5-HTTLPR genotype. PMID:26037034

  5. Genetic moderation of the association between adolescent romantic involvement and depression: Contributions of serotonin transporter gene polymorphism, chronic stress, and family discord.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lisa R; Hammen, Constance

    2016-05-01

    Studies support a link between adolescent romantic involvement and depression. Adolescent romantic relationships may increase depression risk by introducing chronic stress, and genetic vulnerability to stress reactivity/emotion dysregulation may moderate these associations. We tested genetic moderation of longitudinal associations between adolescent romantic involvement and later depressive symptoms by a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region gene (5-HTTLPR) and examined contributory roles of chronic stress and family discord. Three hundred eighty-one youth participated at ages 15 and 20. The results indicated that 5-HTTLPR moderated the association between age 15 romantic involvement and age 20 depressive symptoms, with strongest effects for short homozygotes. Conditional process analysis revealed that chronic stress functioned as a moderated mediator of this association, fully accounting for the romantic involvement-depression link among short/short genotypes. Also, romantic involvement predicted later depressive symptoms most strongly among short-allele carriers with high family discord. The results have important implications for understanding the romantic involvement-depression link and the behavioral and emotional correlates of the 5-HTTLPR genotype.

  6. Chemical modifications of momordin-a and luffin-a, ribosome-inactivating proteins from the seeds of Momordica charantia and Luffa cylindrica: involvement of His140, Tyr165, and Lys231 in the protein-synthesis inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Minami, Y; Islam, M R; Funatsu, G

    1998-05-01

    Effects of chemical modifications on the protein-synthesis inhibitory (PSI) activities of momordin-a and luffin-a were investigated. Treatment with a 50-fold excess of diethylpyrocarbonate at pH 6.5 modified one histidine residue in momordin-a and luffin-a and reduced their PSI activities to 10% and 8.3%, respectively. Modifications with a 20-fold excess of KI3 at pH 7.0 at 0 degree C greatly reduced their PSI activities to 10% by iodination of nearly one tyrosine residue. The PSI activity of momordin-a was rapidly reduced to 6.4% by the modification of one lysine residue with trinitrobenzensulfonic acid as in the case of luffin-a reported previously. By analyses of the tryptic peptides from the modified momordin-a and luffin-a, the modified residues were identified as His140, Tyr165, and Lys231. Furthermore, the amounts of three modified momordin-a binding to rat liver ribosomes were reduced to about half or less than half of that of native momordin-a. From these results, it was suggested that His140, Tyr165, and Lys231 are highly exposed on the surface of momordin-a and luffin-a molecules and are involved in their PSI activities, probably by binding to ribosomes.

  7. Epigenetic Modifications and Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Saeed; Jafari, Naser; Javan, Mohammad Reza; Karami, Jafar; Ahmadi, Majid; Jafarnejad, Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Breakthroughs in genetic studies, like whole human genome sequencing and genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have richened our knowledge of etiopathology of autoimmune diseases (AID) through discovery of genetic patterns. Nonetheless, the precise etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that non-genetic factors also play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. Although there is no certain definition, epigenetics has been known as heritable alterations in gene function without changes in the nucleotide sequence. DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNA-associated gene expression suppression are the central mechanisms for epigenetic regulations. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by both inflammatory and neurodegenerative features. Although studies on epigenetic alterations in MS only began in the past decade, a mounting number of surveys suggest that epigenetic changes may be involved in the initiation and development of MS, probably through bridging the effects of environmental risk factors to genetics. Arming with clear understanding of epigenetic dysregulations underpins development of epigenetic therapies. Identifying agents inhibiting the enzymes controlling epigenetic modifications, particularly DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases, will be promising therapeutic tool toward MS. In the article underway, it is aimed to go through the recent progresses, attempting to disclose how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of MS and how can be used as therapeutic approach.

  8. Information disclosure in population-based research involving genetics: a framework for the practice of ethics in epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Kristman, Vicki L; Kreiger, Nancy

    2008-04-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project has resulted in increased epidemiological research to identify genes and their products as risk factors for adverse health events. A parallel increase in ethical issues associated with genetic research is noted. One such issue is whether or not epidemiologists should disclose individual genetic results to research participants. Existing ethical guidelines and frameworks are not helpful for determining whether disclosure is the moral choice. The purpose of this paper was to develop a framework for use by epidemiologists, research ethics boards, and institutional review boards during the protocol development stage to ethically address the dilemma regarding disclosure of individual genetic information. The core principles of research ethics were introduced and applied to the issues surrounding disclosure of genetic information. A principle-based framework was developed through analysis of the current ethical arguments for and against disclosure. Finally, examples demonstrating the use of the framework were provided. The proposed framework will not solve all ethical dilemmas related to individual disclosure of genetic information. It is, however, a useful starting point to facilitate the consideration process.

  9. Food Habits, Lifestyle Factors, and Risk of Prostate Cancer in Central Argentina: A Case Control Study Involving Self-Motivated Health Behavior Modifications after Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Sandaly O. S.; Pacheco, Fabio J.; Zapata, Gimena M. J.; Garcia, Julieta M. E.; Previale, Carlos A.; Cura, Héctor E.; Craig, Winston J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second most important non-communicable disease worldwide and disproportionately impacts low- to middle-income countries. Diet in combination with other lifestyle habits seems to modify the risk for some cancers but little is known about South Americans. Food habits of Argentinean men pre- and post-diagnosis of prostate cancer (n = 326) were assessed along with other lifestyle factors. We studied whether any of the behaviors and risk factors for prostate cancer were found in men with other cancers (n = 394), compared with control subjects (n = 629). Before diagnosis, both cases reported a greater mean consumption of meats and fats and lower intakes of fruits, green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains than the controls (all p < 0.001). After diagnosis, cases significantly reduced the intake of meats and fats, and reported other dietary modifications with increased consumption of fish, fruits (including red fruits in prostate cancer), cruciferous vegetables, legumes, nuts, and black tea (all p < 0.001). Additional lifestyle aspects significantly predominant in cases included a reduced quality of sleep, emotional stress, low physical activity, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, living in rural areas, and being exposed to environmental contaminants. Argentinian men were predisposed to modify their unhealthy dietary habits and other lifestyle factors after cancer diagnosis. PMID:27409631

  10. Food Habits, Lifestyle Factors, and Risk of Prostate Cancer in Central Argentina: A Case Control Study Involving Self-Motivated Health Behavior Modifications after Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Sandaly O S; Pacheco, Fabio J; Zapata, Gimena M J; Garcia, Julieta M E; Previale, Carlos A; Cura, Héctor E; Craig, Winston J

    2016-07-09

    Cancer is the second most important non-communicable disease worldwide and disproportionately impacts low- to middle-income countries. Diet in combination with other lifestyle habits seems to modify the risk for some cancers but little is known about South Americans. Food habits of Argentinean men pre- and post-diagnosis of prostate cancer (n = 326) were assessed along with other lifestyle factors. We studied whether any of the behaviors and risk factors for prostate cancer were found in men with other cancers (n = 394), compared with control subjects (n = 629). Before diagnosis, both cases reported a greater mean consumption of meats and fats and lower intakes of fruits, green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains than the controls (all p < 0.001). After diagnosis, cases significantly reduced the intake of meats and fats, and reported other dietary modifications with increased consumption of fish, fruits (including red fruits in prostate cancer), cruciferous vegetables, legumes, nuts, and black tea (all p < 0.001). Additional lifestyle aspects significantly predominant in cases included a reduced quality of sleep, emotional stress, low physical activity, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, living in rural areas, and being exposed to environmental contaminants. Ar