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Sample records for ion beam intensity

  1. Intense ion beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, Jr., Stanley; Sudan, Ravindra N.

    1977-08-30

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

  2. Electron Cooling of Intense Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Kamerdjiev, V.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stein, J.; Stockhorst, H.; Korotaev, Yu.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-03-20

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) are presented. Intensity of the proton beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Results of the instability investigations performed at COSY during last years are presented in this report in comparison with previous results from HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) CELSIUS (Uppsala, Sweden) and LEAR (CERN). Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described. This work is supported by RFBR grant no. 05-02-16320 and INTAS grant no. 03-54-5584.

  3. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  4. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 {mu}m) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm{sup 2}) of these short-pulsed ({le} 1 {mu}s) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10{sup 10} K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology.

  5. Intense non-relativistic cesium ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lampel, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed the One Ampere Cesium Injector as a proof of principle source to supply an induction linac with a high charge density and high brightness ion beam. This is studied here. An electron beam probe was developed as the major diagnostic tool for characterizing ion beam space charge. Electron beam probe data inversion is accomplished with the EBEAM code and a parametrically adjusted model radial charge distribution. The longitudinal charge distribution was not derived, although it is possible to do so. The radial charge distribution that is derived reveals an unexpected halo of trapped electrons surrounding the ion beam. A charge fluid theory of the effect of finite electron temperature on the focusing of neutralized ion beams (Nucl. Fus. 21, 529 (1981)) is applied to the problem of the Cesium beam final focus at the end of the injector. It is shown that the theory's predictions and assumptions are consistent with the experimental data, and that it accounts for the observed ion beam radius of approx. 5 cm, and the electron halo, including the determination of an electron Debye length of approx. 10 cm.

  6. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-10-05

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  7. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense- ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.; Reass, W.A.; Coates, D.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Schleinitz, H.M.; Lovberg, R.H.; Greenly, J.B.

    1996-07-01

    A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. We are developing a 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 {mu}s duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator to address these applications.

  8. Intense ion beam optimization and characterization with thermal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1994-08-01

    The authors have developed thermal imaging of beam targets to optimize and characterize intense ion beams. The technique, which measures the beam energy-density distribution on each machine firing, has been used to rapidly develop and characterize two very different beams--a 400 kV beam used to study materials processing, and an 80 kV beam use for magnetic fusion diagnostics.

  9. Diagnostic Tools For Low Intensity Ion Micro-Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Finocchiaro, P.; Cosentino, L.; Pappalardo, A.; Vervaeke, M.; Volckaerts, B.; Vynck, P.; Hermanne, A.; Thienpont, H.

    2003-08-26

    We have developed two techniques for microscopic ion beam imaging and profiling, both based on scintillators, particularly suitable for applications in Deep Lithography with Protons (DLP) or with heavier ions. The first one employs a scintillating fiberoptic plate and a CCD camera with suitable lenses, the second makes use of a small scintillator optically coupled to a compact photomultiplier. We have proved the possibility of spanning from single beam particles counting up to several nA currents. Both devices are successfully being exploited for on-line control of low and very low intensity proton beams, down to a beam size of less than 50{mu}m.

  10. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  11. A microsecond-pulsewidth, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Greenly, J.B.; Waganaar, W.J.

    1993-07-01

    A relatively long-pulsewidth (0.1-1 {mu}s) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied-B{sub r}, magnetically-insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2-MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse-shaping.

  12. Simulating Intense Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    2001-02-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program's goal is the development of the body of knowledge needed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) to realize its promise. The intense ion beams that will drive HIF targets are rzonneutral plasmas and exhibit collective, nonlinear dynamics which must be understood using the kinetic models of plasma physics. This beam physics is both rich and subtle: a wide range in spatial and temporal scales is involved, and effects associated with both instabilities and non-ideal processes must be understood. Ion beams have a ''long memory,'' and initialization of a beam at mid-system with an idealized particle distribution introduces uncertainties; thus, it will be crucial to develop, and to extensively use, an integrated and detailed ''source-to-target'' HIF beam simulation capability. We begin with an overview of major issues.

  13. Simulating Intense Ion Beams for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2001-02-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program's goal is the development of the body of knowledge needed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) to realize its promise. The intense ion beams that will drive HIF targets are nonneutral plasmas and exhibit collective, nonlinear dynamics which must be understood using the kinetic models of plasma physics. This beam physics is both rich and subtle: a wide range in spatial and temporal scales is involved, and effects associated with both instabilities and non-ideal processes must be understood. Ion beams have a ''long memory'', and initialization of a beam at mid-system with an idealized particle distribution introduces uncertainties; thus, it will be crucial to develop, and to extensively use, an integrated and detailed ''source-to-target'' HIF beam simulation capability. We begin with an overview of major issues.

  14. Generation of intense negative ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor); Aladzhadzhyan, Samuel H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An electron gun is used with a mirror electrostatic field to produce zero or near zero velocity electrons by forming a turning point in their trajectories. A gas capable of attaching zero or near zero velocity is introduced at this turning point, and negative ions are produced by the attachment or dissociative attachment process. Operation may be continuous or pulsed. Ions thus formed are extracted by a simple lens system and suitable biasing of grids.

  15. Intense ion beam neutralization using underdense background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdanier, William; Roy, Prabir K.; Kaganovich, Igor

    2015-01-15

    Producing an overdense background plasma for neutralization purposes with a density that is high compared to the beam density is not always experimentally possible. We show that even an underdense background plasma with a small relative density can achieve high neutralization of intense ion beam pulses. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that if the total plasma electron charge is not sufficient to neutralize the beam charge, electron emitters are necessary for effective neutralization but are not needed if the plasma volume is so large that the total available charge in the electrons exceeds that of the ion beam. Several regimes of possible underdense/tenuous neutralization plasma densities are investigated with and without electron emitters or dense plasma at periphery regions, including the case of electron emitters without plasma, which does not effectively neutralize the beam. Over 95% neutralization is achieved for even very underdense background plasma with plasma density 1/15th the beam density. We compare results of particle-in-cell simulations with an analytic model of neutralization and find close agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. Further, we show experimental data from the National Drift Compression experiment-II group that verifies the result that underdense plasma can neutralize intense heavy ion beams effectively.

  16. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  17. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  18. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  19. Deposition and surface treatment with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Stinnett, R.W.; McIntyre, D.C.

    1995-02-08

    Intense pulsed ion beams (500 keV, 30 kA, 0.5 {mu}s) are being investigated for materials processing. Demonstrated and potential applications include film deposition, glazing and joining, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion improvement, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. Initial experiments at Los Alamos have emphasized thin-film formation by depositing beam ablated target material on substrates. We have deposited films with complex stoichiometry such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, and formed diamond-like-carbon films. Instantaneous deposition rates of 1 mm/sec have been achieved because of the short ion range (typically 1{mu}m), excellent target coupling, and the inherently high energy of these beams. Currently the beams are produced in single shot uncomplicated diodes with good electrical efficiency. High-voltage modulator technology and diodes capable of repetitive firing, needed for commercial application, are being developed.

  20. High power target approaches for intense radioactive ion beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L. ||; Hodges, T.A.; Hsu, H.; Fikani, M.M.

    1997-02-01

    Development of conceptual approaches for targets to produce intense radioactive ion beams is needed in anticipation of activity for a next-generation, intense ISOL-type radioactive beams facility, strongly recommended in the NSAC 1995 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science. The production of isotopes in vapor form for subsequent mass separation and acceleration will depend on the ability to control target temperature profiles within the target resulting from interactions of the intense production beams with the target material. A number of earlier studies have identified promising approaches which need, however, to be carefully analyzed for specific target systems. A survey will be made of these earlier concepts employing various cooling techniques, including imposition of thermal barriers between the target materials and cooling systems. Some results of preliminary analyses are summarized. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Microsecond pulse width, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.; Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Faehl, R. J.; Greenly, J. B.; Waganaar, W. J.

    1993-10-01

    A relatively long-pulse width (0.1-1 μs) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied Br, magnetically insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. The diode is designed with the aid of multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse shaping. The effect of a plasma opening switch on diode behavior is considered.

  2. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  3. High power targets for production of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W. L.; Drake, D. M.; Wilson, M. T.; Walker, J. J.; Lenz, J. W.

    1999-04-26

    Issues are discussed in producing intense Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) using the Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) approach, based on the use of thick targets employed at existing facilities. Some new physics studies may possibly be addressed by improving the performance of these existing targets through improvements in release and effusion properties to optimize the RIB yields. It is, however, acknowledged that many desired physics objectives using RIB can be met only by employing production beams of energetic light ions or protons with currents up to 100 {mu}A. Development of targets that use such intense production beams needs to address the requirement to control operational temperatures derived from internal production beam interactions with the target materials. In addition, issues arise for target materials in terms of their thermal characteristics, such as thermal conductivity and thermo-mechanical properties. A target concept is described for an in-beam test of a prototype target for actual thermal behavior under RIB production conditions. For such a test, a high-power test facility is needed; fortunately, the prototypical production beam currents required exist at the TRIUMF accelerator facility. An experimental proposal has been approved for such a test.

  4. Intense ion-beam dynamics in the NICA collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, O. S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Sidorin, A. O.; Trubnikov, G. V.

    2016-12-01

    The problems of intense ion-beam dynamics in the developed and optimized optical structure of the NICA collider are considered. Conditions for beam collisions and obtaining the required parameters of luminosity in the operation energy range are discussed. The restriction on collider luminosity is related to effects of the domination of the space charge and intrabeam scattering. Applying methods of cooling, electron and stochastic ones, will permit one to suppress these effects and reach design luminosity. The work also deals with systems of magnetic field correction and problems of calculating the dynamic aperture of the collider.

  5. Irradiation of Materials using Short, Intense Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter; Ji, Q.; Persaud, A.; Feinberg, E.; Silverman, M.; Sulyman, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Stepanov, A.; Zimmer, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present experiments studying material properties created with nanosecond and millimeter-scale ion beam pulses on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Berkeley Lab. The explored scientific topics include the dynamics of ion induced damage in materials, materials synthesis far from equilibrium, warm dense matter and intense beam-plasma physics. We describe the improved accelerator performance, diagnostics and results of beam-induced irradiation of thin samples of, e.g., tin and silicon. Bunches with >3x1010 ions/pulse with 1-mm radius and 2-30 ns FWHM duration and have been created. To achieve the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV He+ ion beam is neutralized in a drift compression section which removes the space charge defocusing effect during the final compression and focusing. Quantitative comparison of detailed particle-in-cell simulations with the experiment play an important role in optimizing the accelerator performance and keep pace with the accelerator repetition rate of <1/minute. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy under contracts DE-AC0205CH11231 (LBNL), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC02-09CH11466 (PPPL).

  6. Survey of Collective Instabilities and Beam-Plasma Interactions in Intense Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Qin, Hong; Startsev, Edward A.; Rose, David V.; Lund, Steven M.; Welch, Dale R.; Sefkow, Adam

    2008-06-19

    This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding based on advanced analytical and numerical studies of collective processes and beam-plasma interactions in intense heavy ion beams for applications to ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion. The topics include: discussion of the conditions for quiescent beam propagation over long distances; and the electrostatic Harris instability and the transverse electromagnetic Weibel instability in highly anisotropic, intense one-component ion beams. In the longitudinal drift compression and transverse compression regions, collective processes associated with the interaction of the intense ion beam with a charge-neutralizing background plasma are described, including the electrostatic electron-ion two-stream instability, the multispecies electromagnetic Weibel instability, and collective excitations in the presence of a solenoidal magnetic field. The effects of a velocity tilt on reducing two-stream instability growth rates are also discussed. Operating regimes are identified where the possible deleterious effects of collective processes on beam quality are minimized.

  7. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  8. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; ...

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystalmore » Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.« less

  9. Energy gain and spectral tailoring of ion beams using ultra-high intensity laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Swantusch, Marco; Cerchez, Mirela; Spickermann, Sven; Auorand, Bastian; Wowra, Thomas; Boeker, Juergen; Willi, Oswald

    2015-11-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration over the past decade has produced a huge amount of research. Nowadays, several multi-beam facilities with high rep rate system, e.g. ELI, are being developed across the world for different kinds of experiments. The study of interaction dynamics of multiple beams possessing ultra-high intensity and ultra-short pulse duration is of vital importance. Here, we present the first experimental results on ion acceleration using two ultra-high intensity beams. Thanks to the unique capability of Arcturus laser at HHU Düsseldorf, two almost identical, independent beams in laser parameters such as intensity (>1020 W/cm2), pulse duration (30 fs) and contrast (>1010), could be accessed. Both beams are focused onto a 5 μm thin Ti target. While ensuring spatial overlap of the two beams, at relative temporal delay of ~ 50 ps (optimum delay), the proton and carbon ion energies were enhanced by factor of 1.5. Moreover, strong modulation in C4+ions near the high energy cut-off is observed later than the optimum delay for the proton enhancement. This offers controlled tailoring of the spectral content of heavy ions.

  10. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D P; Friedman, A; Vay, J L; Haber, I

    2004-12-09

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{_}summary.html.

  11. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, David P.; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2005-03-15

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse 'slice' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{sub s}ummary.html.

  12. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    DOE PAGES

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this ismore » sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.« less

  13. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-15

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ('heavy-ion fusion'). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly 'wobbling' each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  14. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  15. Beam Phase Space of an Intense Ion Beam in a Neutralizing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Bazouin, Guillaume; Beneytout, Alice; Lidia, Steven M.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Grote, David P.

    2011-10-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I) generates high intensity ion beams to explore warm dense matter physics. Transverse final focusing is accomplished with an 8-Tesla, 10-cm long pulsed solenoid magnet combined with a background neutralizing plasma to effectively cancel the space charge field of the ion beam. We report on phase space measurements of the beam before the neutralization channel and of the focused ion beam at the target plane. These are compared to WARP particle-in-cell simulations of the ion beam propagation through the focusing system and neutralizing plasma. Due to the orientation of the plasma sources with respect to the focusing magnet, the plasma distribution within the final focusing lens is strongly affected by the magnetic field, an effect which can influence the peak intensity at the target and which is included in the model of the experiment. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, LBNL under Contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  16. Intense ion beam applications to magnetic confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R N

    1980-08-18

    The ion ring project objective is to trap a ring of high energy, axis-encircling ions in a magnetic mirror. The number of ring ions should be such as to produce deltaB/B on the ring axis of order 10%. The second experiment, LONGSHOT, is directed to producing a long pulse ion beam source so that the total number of protons required for an ion ring can be provided a lower diode power and, hence, at much less cost than that of 100 nsec pulsed power generators like the NRL GAMBLE II. A detailed report of the progress on IREX and LONGSHOT is given. (MOW)

  17. Hollow structure formation of intense ion beams with sharp edge in background plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Wang, You-Nian

    2016-02-15

    The transport of intense ion beams with sharp radial beam edge in plasmas has been studied with two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations. The initial solid beam evolves into a hollow beam due to the nonlinear sharp transverse force peak in the regions of beam edge. The magnitude and nonlinearity of this peak are enhanced as the ion beam travels further into the plasma, due to the self-consistent interactions between the beam ions and the plasma electrons. This structure formation is shown to be independent on the beam radius.

  18. Ion beam surface treatment: A new technique for thermally modifying surfaces using intense, pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stinnett, R.W.; Buchheit, R.G.; Neau, E.L.

    1995-08-01

    The emerging capability to produce high average power (10--300 kW) pulsed ion beams at 0.2{minus}2 MeV energies is enabling us to develop a new, commercial-scale thermal surface treatment technology called Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST). This new technique uses high energy, pulsed ({le}500 ns) ion beams to directly deposit energy in the top 1--20 micrometers of the surface of any material. The depth of treatment is controllable by varying the ion energy and species. Deposition of the energy in a thin surface layer allows melft of the layer with relatively small energies (1--10J/cm2) and allows rapid cooling of the melted layer by thermal conduction into the underlying substrate. Typical cooling rates of this process (109 K/sec) are sufficient to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures (nanocrystalline and metastable phases). Results from initial experiments confirm surface hardening, amorphous layer and nanocrystalline grain size formation, corrosion resistance in stainless steel and aluminum, metal surface polishing, controlled melt of ceramic surfaces, and surface cleaning and oxide layer removal as well as surface ablation and redeposition. These results follow other encouraging results obtained previously in Russia using single pulse ion beam systems. Potential commercialization of this surface treatment capability is made possible by the combination of two new technologies, a new repetitive high energy pulsed power capability (0.2{minus}2MV, 25--50 kA, 60 ns, 120 Hz) developed at SNL, and a new repetitive ion beam system developed at Cornell University.

  19. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  20. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1987-01-01

    A process for selectively neutralizing H.sup.- ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H.sup.- ions that are intersected by a beam of laser light. Photodetachment is effected in a uniform magnetic field that is provided around the beam of H.sup.- ions to spin polarize the H.sup.- ions and produce first and second populations or groups of ions, having their respective proton spin aligned either with the magnetic field or opposite to it. The intersecting beam of laser light is directed to selectively neutralize a majority of the ions in only one population, or given spin polarized group of H.sup.- ions, without neutralizing the ions in the other group thereby forming a population of H.sup.- ions each of which has its proton spin down, and a second group or population of H.sup.o atoms having proton spin up. Finally, the two groups of ions are separated from each other by magnetically bending the group of H.sup.- ions away from the group of neutralized ions, thereby to form an intense H.sup.- ion beam that is directed toward a predetermined objective.

  1. A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2008-10-01

    A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

  2. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L. R.

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  3. Influence of Conducting Plate Boundary Conditions on the Transverse Envelope Equations Describing Intense Ion Beam Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Bukh, B

    2003-07-23

    In typical diagnostic applications, intense ion beams are intercepted by a conducting plate associated with devices used to measure beam phase-space projections. This results in the transverse space-charge field near the plate being shorted out, rendering simple envelope models with constant space-charge strength inaccurate. Here we develop corrected envelope models based on analytical calculations to account for this effect on the space-charge term of the envelope equations, thereby removing a systematic source of error in the equations and enabling more accurate comparisons with experiment. For common intense beam parameters, we find that the correction occurs primarily in the envelope angles and that the effect can be large enough to degrade precision beam matching. Results are verified with 3D self-consistent PIC simulations based on intense beam experiments associated with driver developments for Heavy-Ion Fusion.

  4. Method for reduction of selected ion intensities in confined ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Eiden, G.C.; Barinaga, C.J.; Koppenaal, D.W.

    1998-06-16

    A method for producing an ion beam having an increased proportion of analyte ions compared to carrier gas ions is disclosed. Specifically, the method has the step of addition of a charge transfer gas to the carrier analyte combination that accepts charge from the carrier gas ions yet minimally accepts charge from the analyte ions thereby selectively neutralizing the carrier gas ions. Also disclosed is the method as employed in various analytical instruments including an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. 7 figs.

  5. Apparatus for reduction of selected ion intensities in confined ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Eiden, Gregory C.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for producing an ion beam having an increased proportion of analyte ions compared to carrier gas ions is disclosed. Specifically, the apparatus has an ion trap or a collision cell containing a reagent gas wherein the reagent gas accepts charge from the analyte ions thereby selectively neutralizing the carrier gas ions. Also disclosed is the collision cell as employed in various locations within analytical instruments including an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.

  6. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Z. C.; Lei, M. K.; Pushkarev, A. I.

    2016-01-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200–300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  7. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Z. C.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200-300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  8. Intense Pulsed Ion Beams: Their Generation and Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-03

    on the acceleration of ions within vacuum diode-like sources. The ions originate in a plasma which is produced on the surface of the ,inode and are... flashover discharges on the anode surfaces . Ions extracted from these plasmas are accelerated toward both the cathode and the virtual cathode. ThC ions... pulse generator. For most of these experiments , the ratio of the extracted proton current I to the total current I i.e., the proton generation effici,ncyp

  9. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  10. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  11. Generation of heavy ion beams using high-intensity short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, George; McGuffey, Chris; Thomas, Alec; Krushelnick, Karl; Beg, Farhat

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical study of ion acceleration from high-Z material irradiated by intense sub-picosecond lasers is presented. The underlying physics of beam formation and acceleration is similar for light and heavy ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the heavy ions more challenging. At least four technical hurdles have been identified: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration and poor energy coupling due to high reflectivity of the plasma. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we observed transitions from Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) to the Breakout Afterburner regime (BoA) and to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) akin to light ions. The numerical simulations predict gold ions beams with high directionality (<10 degrees half-angle), high fluxes (>1011 ions/sr) and energy (>10 MeV/nucleon) from laser systems delivering >20 J of energy on target.

  12. Effects on axial momentum spread on the electron-ion two-stream instability in high-intensity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    R. Davidso; H. Qin

    2000-06-15

    Use is made of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations to describe the electron-ion two-stream instability driven by the directed axial motion of a high-intensity ion beam propagating through a stationary population of (unwanted) background electrons. The ion beam is treated as continuous in the z-direction, and the electrons are electrostatically confined in the transverse direction by the space-charge potential produced by the excession charge. The analysis is carried out for arbitrary beam intensity, consistent with transverse confinement of the beam particles, and arbitrary fractional charge neutralization by the background electrons. For the case of overlapping step-function ion and electron density profiles, corresponding to monoenergetic electrons and ions in the transverse direction, detailed stability properties are calculated, including the important effects of an axial momentum spread, over a wide range of system parameters for dipole perturbations with azimuthal mode number l=1. The two-stream instability growth rate is found to increase with increasing beam intensity, increasing fractional charge neutralization, and decreasing proximity of the conducting wall. It is shown that Landau damping associated with a modest axial momentum spread of the beam ions and background electrons has a strong stabilizing influence on the instability.

  13. Plasma flows and fluctuations in intense ion-beam diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Litwin, C.; Maron, Y.; Sarid, E. )

    1994-03-01

    A possible source of electric field fluctuations in the anode plasma of a magnetically insulated ion diode which have been observed in recent experiments is discussed. It is suggested that these fluctuations are driven by the ion flow which destabilizes an electrostatic mode akin to two-stream instability. Evidence is presented for such a flow and its implications for the electric field polarization and magnitude are discussed.

  14. Density and potential measurements in an intense ion-beam-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, N.E.

    1982-05-01

    Neutral beams are created by intense large area ion beams which are neutralized in a gas cell. The interaction of the beam with the gas cell creates a plasma. Such a plasma is studied here. The basic plasma parameters, electron temperature, density, and plasma potential, are measured as a function of beam current and neutral gas pressure. These measurements are compared to a model based on the solution of Poisson's equation. Because of the cylindrical geometry the equation cannot be solved analytically. Details of the numerical method are presented.

  15. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKUa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Yan, S.; Zhou, Q. F.; Zhao, J.; Yuan, Z. X.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O+, H+, and D+ to N+, Ar+, and He+. Up to now, about 120 mA of H+, 83 mA of D+, 50 mA of O+, 63 mA of N+, 70 mA of Ar+, and 65 mA of He+ extracted at 50 kV through a ϕ 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 π mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H+ or He+ beam extracted from this ion source and H/He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H/He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He+ beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He+ beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He+ beam.

  16. Intense beams from gases generated by a permanent magnet ECR ion source at PKU

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, H. T.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Yan, S.; Zhou, Q. F.; Zhao, J.; Yuan, Z. X.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2012-02-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed for the production of high-current ion beams of various gaseous elements. At the Peking University (PKU), the primary study is focused on developing suitable permanent magnet ECR ion sources (PMECRs) for separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) accelerator and for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility. Recently, other kinds of high-intensity ion beams are required for new acceleration structure demonstration, simulation of fusion reactor material irradiation, aviation bearing modification, and other applications. So we expanded the ion beam category from O{sup +}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +} to N{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, and He{sup +}. Up to now, about 120 mA of H{sup +}, 83 mA of D{sup +}, 50 mA of O{sup +}, 63 mA of N{sup +}, 70 mA of Ar{sup +}, and 65 mA of He{sup +} extracted at 50 kV through a {phi} 6 mm aperture were produced by the PMECRs at PKU. Their rms emittances are less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. Tungsten samples were irradiated by H{sup +} or He{sup +} beam extracted from this ion source and H/He holes and bubbles have been observed on the samples. A method to produce a high intensity H/He mixed beam to study synergistic effect is developed for nuclear material irradiation. To design a He{sup +} beam injector for coupled radio frequency quadruple and SFRFQ cavity, He{sup +} beam transmission experiments were carried out on PKU low energy beam transport test bench and the transmission was less than 50%. It indicated that some electrode modifications must be done to decrease the divergence of He{sup +} beam.

  17. Device for providing high-intensity ion or electron beam

    DOEpatents

    McClanahan, Edwin D.; Moss, Ronald W.

    1977-01-01

    A thin film of a low-thermionic-work-function material is maintained on the cathode of a device for producing a high-current, low-pressure gas discharge by means of sputter deposition from an auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode includes a surface with a low-work-function material, such as thorium, uranium, plutonium or one of the rare earth elements, facing the cathode but at a disposition and electrical potential so as to extract ions from the gas discharge and sputter the low-work-function material onto the cathode. By continuously replenishing the cathode film, high thermionic emissions and ion plasmas can be realized and maintained over extended operating periods.

  18. Collimated multi-MeV ion beams from high-intensity laser interactions with underdense plasma.

    PubMed

    Willingale, L; Mangles, S P D; Nilson, P M; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E; Kaluza, M C; Karsch, S; Lancaster, K L; Mori, W B; Najmudin, Z; Schreiber, J; Thomas, A G R; Wei, M S; Krushelnick, K

    2006-06-23

    A beam of multi-MeV helium ions has been observed from the interaction of a short-pulse high-intensity laser pulse with underdense helium plasma. The ion beam was found to have a maximum energy for He2+ of (40(+3)(-8)) MeV and was directional along the laser propagation path, with the highest energy ions being collimated to a cone of less than 10 degrees. 2D particle-in-cell simulations show that the ions are accelerated by a sheath electric field that is produced at the back of the gas target. This electric field is generated by transfer of laser energy to a hot electron beam, which exits the target generating large space-charge fields normal to its boundary.

  19. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  20. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-05-15

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  1. Michigan state upgrade to produce intense radioactive ion beams by fragmentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lubkin, G.B.

    1997-05-01

    This article describes the planned upgrading of accelerator facilities to produce intense radioactive ion beams, by a fragmentation technique, for experimental simulation of nucleosynthesis in novas and supernovas. (AIP) {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.} {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics}

  2. Nonlinear Plasma Waves Excitation by Intense Ion Beams in Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-15

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma.

  3. New Capabilities for Modeling Intense Beams in Heavy Ion Fusion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Bieniosek, F M; Celata, C M; Cohen, R H; Davidson, R C; Grote, D P; Haber, I; Henestroza, E; Lee, E P; Lund, S M; Qin, H; Sharp, W M; Startsev, E; Vay, J L

    2003-09-09

    Significant advances have been made in modeling the intense beams of heavy-ion beam-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (Heavy Ion Fusion). In this paper, a roadmap for a validated, predictive driver simulation capability, building on improved codes and experimental diagnostics, is presented, as are examples of progress. The Mesh Refinement and Particle-in-Cell methods were integrated in the WARP code; this capability supported an injector experiment that determined the achievable current rise time, in good agreement with calculations. In a complementary effort, a new injector approach based on the merging of {approx}100 small beamlets was simulated, its basic feasibility established, and an experimental test designed. Time-dependent 3D simulations of the High Current Experiment (HCX) were performed, yielding voltage waveforms for an upcoming study of bunch-end control. Studies of collective beam modes which must be taken into account in driver designs were carried out. The value of using experimental data to tomographically ''synthesize'' a 4D beam particle distribution and so initialize a simulation was established; this work motivated further development of new diagnostics which yield 3D projections of the beam phase space. Other developments, including improved modeling of ion beam focusing and transport through the fusion chamber environment and onto the target, and of stray electrons and their effects on ion beams, are briefly noted.

  4. Approaches to develop targets for production of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W. L.; Drake, D. M.; Wilson, M. T.; Walker, J. J.; Lenz, J. W.

    1999-06-10

    Approaches to develop targets for production of intense radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been evaluated over the past five years. It is acknowledged that many desired physics objectives using RIBs can be met only by using production beams of energetic protons with currents up to 100 {mu}A. Such beams can be made available at future spallation neutron facilities. The production targets will require active cooling to control operational temperatures due to internal heating caused by the production beam. A target concept has been selected, and calculational analyses of the target concept have been performed to guide the design of a prototype target for an in-beam test of the actual thermal behavior. For this test, a high-power test facility is needed; fortunately, the beam currents required exist at the TRIUMF accelerator facility. An experimental proposal has been approved for such a test.

  5. Characterization of intense ion beam energy density and beam induced pressure on the target with acoustic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Yu. I.; Khailov, I. P.; Yu, Xiao

    2013-08-15

    We have developed the acoustic diagnostics based on a piezoelectric transducer for characterization of high-intensity pulsed ion beams. The diagnostics was tested using the TEMP-4M accelerator (150 ns, 250–300 kV). The beam is composed of C{sup +} ions (85%) and protons, the beam energy density is 0.5–5 J/cm{sup 2} (depending on diode geometry). A calibration dependence of the signal from a piezoelectric transducer on the ion beam energy density is obtained using thermal imaging diagnostics. It is shown that the acoustic diagnostics allows for measurement of the beam energy density in the range of 0.1–2 J/cm{sup 2}. The dependence of the beam generated pressure on the input energy density is also determined and compared with the data from literature. The developed acoustic diagnostics do not require sophisticated equipment and can be used for operational control of pulsed ion beam parameters with a repetition rate of 10{sup 3} pulses/s.

  6. Low-emittance monoenergetic electron and ion beams from ultra-intense laser-solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T E; Roth, M; Allen, M M; Johnson, J; Hatchett, S P; Le Sage, G P; Wilks, S C

    2000-03-03

    Recent experiments at the LLNL Petawatt Laser have demonstrated the generation of intense, high energy beams of electrons and ions from the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with solid targets. Focused laser intensities as high as 6 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} are achieved, at which point the quiver energies of the target electrons extend to {approx}10 MeV. In this new, fully relativistic regime of laser-plasma interactions, nuclear processes become important and nuclear techniques are required to diagnose the high-energy particle production. In recent experiments we have observed electrons accelerated to 100 MeV, up to 60 MeV brehmsstrahlung generation, photo-nuclear fission and positron-electron pair creation. We also have observed monoenergetic jets of electrons having sufficiently small emittance to be interesting as a laser-accelerated beam, if the production mechanism could be understood and controlled. The huge flux of multi-MeV ponderomotively accelerated electrons produced in the laser-solid interaction is also observed to accelerate contaminant ions from the rear surface of the solid target up to 50 MeV. We describe spectroscopic measurements which reveal intense monoenergetic beam features in the proton energy spectrum. The total spectrum contains >10{sup 13} protons, while the monoenergetic beam pulses contain {approx}1 nC of protons, and exhibits a longitudinal and transverse emittance smaller than conventional RF proton accelerator beams.

  7. Development of a high intensity 48Ca ion beam for the heavy element program

    SciTech Connect

    Wutte, Daniela; Leitner, Mattheus; Lyneis, Claude

    2002-02-02

    A high intensity {sup 48}Ca ion beam has been developed at the 88 Inch Cyclotron for the synthesis of {sup 283}112 using the reaction {sup 238}U({sup 48}Ca, 3n). An ion beam intensity of {approx} 700 pnA was delivered on target, resulting in a total dose of 2 x 10{sup 18} ions over a six day period. Since {sup 48}Ca is a very expensive and rare isotope minimal consumption is essential. Therefore a new oven [1] and special tantalum liner [2] have been developed for the AECR-U ion source during the last year to improve the metal ion beam efficiency. Both the LBL ECR and the AECR-U ion sources are built with radial access. Six radial slots between the sextupole magnet bars provide additional pumping and easy access to the plasma chamber for ovens and feedthroughs. Two types of radial ovens have been used at LBNL in the past, operating at temperatures up to 2100 C.

  8. Method of active charge and current neutralization of intense ion beams for ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Guiragossian, Z.G.T.; Orthel, J.L.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of generating the beam neutralization electrons with required properties are given in the context of a Light Ion Fusion Experiment (LIFE) designed accelerator. Recently derived envelope equations for neutralized and ballistically focused intense ion beams are applied to the LIFE geometry in which 10 MeV He/sup +/ multiple beamlets coalesce and undergo 45:1 radial compression while beam pulses experience a 20:1 axial compression in the propagation range of 10 m. Both active and auto-neutralization methods are examined and found to produce initial electron temperatures consistent with the requirement of the envelope equation for both radial and axial adiabatic beam pulse compressions. The stability of neutralized beam propagation is also examined concerning the Pierce type electrostatic instability and for the case of LIFE beams it is found to have insignificant effect. A scaled experimental setup is presented which can serve to perform near term tests on the ballistically focused propagation of neutralized light ion beams.

  9. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Ramos, D.; Suzuki, D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a 136Xe beam are presented.

  10. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  11. High intensity production of high and medium charge state uraniumand other heavy ion beams with VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Galloway, Michelle L.; Loew, Timothy J.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Rodriguez, Ingrid Castro; Todd, Damon S.

    2007-11-15

    The next generation, superconducting ECR ion source VENUS(Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) started operation with 28GHzmicrowave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world recordion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e mu A of O6+, 200 e mu A of U33+or U34+, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e mu A of Ar18+, 270e mu A of Ar16+, 28 e mu A of Xe35+ and 4.9 e mu A of U47+ have beenproduced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to theserecord intensities is given and the production of high intensity uraniumbeams is discussed in more detail.

  12. Rapid Melt and Resolidification of Surface Layers Using Intense, Pulsed Ion Beams Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy J. Turman, Bob Senft, Donna Sorensen, Neil R. Stinnett, Regan Greenly, John B. Thompson, Michael O. Buchheit, Rudolph G.

    1998-10-02

    The emerging technology of pulsed intense ion beams has been shown to lead to improvements in surface characteristics such as hardness and wear resistance, as well as mechanical smoothing. We report hereon the use of this technology to systematically study improvements to three types of metal alloys - aluminum, iron, and titanium. Ion beam tieatment produces a rapid melt and resolidification (RMR) of the surface layer. In the case of a predeposited thin-fihn layer, the beam mixes this layer into the substrate, Ieading to improvements that can exceed those produced by treatment of the alloy alone, In either case, RMR results in both crystal refinement and metastable state formation in the treated surface layer not accessible by conventional alloy production. Although more characterization is needed, we have begun the process of relating these microstructural changes to the surface improvements we discuss in this report.

  13. Intense laser-driven ion beams in the relativistic-transparency regime: acceleration, control and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Juan C.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interactions in the novel regime of relativistically-induced transparency have been harnessed to generate efficiently intense ion beams with average energies exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon (>100 MeV for protons) at ``table-top'' scales. We have discovered and utilized a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric ( 0.1 TV/m) and magnetic ( 104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion-energy (Ei) spread after the laser exits the plasma, thus separating acceleration from spread reduction. In this way we routinely generate aluminum and carbon beams with narrow spectral peaks at Ei up to 310 MeV and 220 MeV, respectively, with high efficiency ( 5%). The experimental demonstration has been done at the LANL Trident laser with 0.12 PW, high-contrast, 0.65 ps Gaussian laser pulses irradiating planar foils up to 250 nm thick. In this regime, Ei scales empirically with laser intensity (I) as I 1 / 2. Our progress is enabled by high-fidelity, massive computer simulations of the experiments. This work advances next-generation compact accelerators suitable for new applications. E . g ., a carbon beam with Ei 400 MeV and 10% energy spread is suitable for fast ignition (FI) of compressed DT. The observed scaling suggests that is feasible with existing target fabrication and PW-laser technologies, using a sub-ps laser pulse with I 2.5 ×1021 W/cm2. These beams have been used on Trident to generate warm-dense matter at solid-densities, enabling us to investigate its equation of state and mixing of heterogeneous interfaces purely by plasma effects distinct from hydrodynamics. They also drive an intense neutron-beam source with great promise for important applications such as active interrogation of shielded nuclear materials. Considerations on controlling ion-beam divergence for their increased utility are discussed. Funded by the LANL LDRD program.

  14. Plasma dynamics of the interaction of intense ion beams with ''sub'' and ''super'' range plane targets

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.A.; Tahir, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    Analytic and numerical solutions for the problem of the interaction of intense ion beams with matter in the form of plane targets are considered in this paper. The theory of the interaction of protons with matter at low energies is discussed and calculations are presented for the energy loss of protons in aluminum and gold. Zero- and one-dimensional models are developed and the results are compared to numerical simulations carried out with the one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code Medusa (Comp. Phys. Comm. 1, 271 (1974)), which has been extended to include the various physical effects needed to carry out realistic simulations of the interaction of ion beams with matter. The theory and simulation of the acceleration of foils by intense ion beams is also considered and representative results are given. The theoretical results are used to investigate the optimum conditions in which to carry out stopping power experiments for ions in hot, dense plasmas, so that the theory can be tested. These results are needed in order to perform more realistic pellet calculations for inertial fusion.

  15. Theoretical studies of defect formation and target heating by intense pulsed ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of three studies related to experiments on NDCX-II, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, a short-pulse (~ 1ns), high-current (~ 70A) linear accelerator for 1.2 MeV ions at LBNL. These include: (a) Coupled transverse and longitudinal envelope calculations of the final non-neutral ion beam transport, followed by neutralized drift and final focus, for a number of focus and drift lengths and with a series of ion species (Z =1-19). Predicted target fluences were obtained and target temperatures in the 1 eV range estimated. (b) HYDRA simulations of the target response for Li and He ions and for Al and Au targets at various ion fluences (up to 1012 ions/pulse/mm2) and pulse durations, benchmarking temperature estimates from the envelope calculations. (c) Crystal-Trim simulations of ion channeling through single-crystal lattices, with comparisons to ion transmission data as a function of orientation angle of the crystal foil and for different ion intensities and ion species. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and DE-AC02-76CH0307 (PPPL) and was supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. LLNL-ABS-67521.

  16. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  17. Current neutralization and focusing of intense ion beams with a plasma-filled solenoidal lens. I

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, B.V.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    The response of the magnetized plasma in an axisymmetric, plasma-filled, solenoidal magnetic lens, to intense light ion beam injection is studied. The lens plasma fill is modeled as an inertialess, resistive, electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) fluid since characteristic beam times {tau} satisfy 2{pi}/{omega}{sub {ital pe}},2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital e}}{lt}{tau}{le}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}} ({omega}{sub {ital pe}} is the electron plasma frequency and {Omega}{sub {ital e},{ital i}} are the electron, ion gyrofrequencies). When the electron collisionality satisfies {nu}{sub {ital e}}{lt}{Omega}{sub {ital e}}, the linear plasma response is determined by whistler wave dynamics. In this case, current neutralization of the beam is reduced on the time scale for whistler wave transit across the beam. The transit time is inversely proportional to the electron density and proportional to the angle of incidence of the beam with respect to the applied solenoidal field. In the collisional regime ({nu}{sub {ital e}}{gt}{Omega}{sub {ital e}}) the plasma return currents decay on the normal diffusive time scale determined by the conductivity. The analysis is supported by two-and-one-half dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-04-27

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

  19. Deflection of high-intensity pulsed ion beam in focusing magnetically insulated ion diode with a passive anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Q.; Ding, L.; Zhang, Z. C.; Yu, N.; Pushkarev, A.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    The focused high-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) of 100 ns order pulse is generated with respect to its spatial stability in two types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with geometrical focusing configuration using the passive anode, i.e., insulation of electrons with an external magnetic-field and a self-magnetic field, respectively. Anode plasma formation for the ion beam generation is based on different processes in the two types of MIDs, as the surface breakdown on the polymer-coated anode operated in the unipolar pulse mode for the external-magnetic field MID and the explosive electron emission on the graphite anode in the bipolar-pulse mode for the self-magnetic field MID. Typical energy density per pulse is in the range of 3-6 J/cm2, at an accelerating voltage of 200-300 kV with a pulse duration of 120-150 ns. The spatial deviations of the HIPIB is evaluated by measuring the energy density distribution by using an infrared diagnostic method considering neutralizing during the ion beam propagation to the focal plane with a spatial resolution of 1 mm. The ion beam deviation is about ±1.5 mm for the external-magnetic field MID and ±2.5 mm for the self-magnetic field MID, leading to a fluctuation in the energy density of 1%-12%, and 9%-27% within a 10 mm range at the focal point, respectively. It is revealed that the displacement of different parts of a beam spot occurs nonsynchronously, mainly attributable to the intrinsic diode processes of plasma generation and expansion, and ion beam extraction from the anode-cathode gap, while the influence of magnetic field in the transportation region is negligible. The ion beam spatial deviation has a major influence on the shot-to-shot stability of ion beam, and it is suggested that the stability can be enhanced via diode process improvement.

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

  1. High-intensity positive beams extracted from a compact double-chamber ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Huck, H.; Somacal, H.; Di Gregorio, D.E.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Igarzabal, M.; Di Paolo, H.; Reinoso, M.

    2005-06-15

    This work presents the design and development of a simple ion source, the associated ion extraction optics, and the beam transport of a low-energy and high-current proton accelerator. In its actual version, the ion source can deliver positive proton currents up to 100 mA. This rather high beam current is achieved by adding a small ionization chamber between the discharge chamber containing the filament and the extraction electrode of the ion source. Different parameters of the ion source and the injection beam line are evaluated by means of computer simulations to optimize the beam production and transmission.

  2. Intense ion beam generation, plasma radiation source and plasma opening switch research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, D. A.; Coleman, M. D.; Qi, N.; Similon, P. L.; Sudan, R. N.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes research on intense ion beam diodes, plasma opening switches and dense z-pinch plasma radiators. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to map the electrostatic potential profile in a plasma-prefilled magnetically insulated ion diode. In a simple planar diode, the measured profile is inconsistent with the electrons being confined in a sheath near the cathode by the magnetic field. Rather, the profile implies the presence of electrons throughout the accelerating gap. A theoretical model of the penetration of current and magnetic field into a plasma, and of the current-driven effective collision frequency has been developed. The snowplow action of the rising magnetic field causes a steep rise in the plasma density at the leading edge. The subsequent multistreaming of the ions caused by ion reflection at the current layer could lead to ion heating through collective effects. The two-dimensional electron flow in the plasma cathode vacuum gap is also treated. Dense z-pinch plasma radiation source experiments have been initiated on the LION accelerator using gas puff and fine wire loads. The x-pinch was found to be a more effective way to generate soft x-rays than a single wire pinch or a gas puff implosion. Plasma opening switch experiments being initiated, and plasma anode ion diode development work being terminated are also briefly described.

  3. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Kim, J B; Curry, C B; Aurand, B; Gamboa, E J; Göde, S; Goyon, C; Hazi, A; Kerr, S; Pak, A; Propp, A; Ramakrishna, B; Ruby, J; Willi, O; Williams, G J; Rödel, C; Glenzer, S H

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  4. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  5. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    DOE PAGES

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; ...

    2016-08-24

    Here, we report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetitionmore » rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.« less

  6. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-08-24

    Here, we report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  7. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Cohen, R. H.; Lund, S. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Lee, E. P.

    2002-05-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the approximately 4 kV ion beam potential. Diagnostics are being developed tto measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as their effect on the ion beam.

  8. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  9. High Energy Density Physics Research Using Intense Ion Beams: the HEDgeHOB Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Deutsch, C.

    2008-11-01

    Intense particle beams provide a novel tool to generate large samples of HED matter with uniform physical conditions [1]. Theoretical studies have shown that an ion beam can be employed using different experimental schemes to study HED states in matter. These include HIHEX [2,3] and LAPLAS [4,5]. The former involves isochoric and uniform heating of matter by an ion beam that is followed by isentropic expansion of the heated material. This allows one to access the entire phase diagram including those regions which can not be accessed by traditional methods of shock waves. The latter considers a multiple shock reflection technique that leads to a low-entropy compression of a test material like H or water which generates physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interior of giant planets. Interesting problems like Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities have also been investigated in detail.This work has provided the necessary basis for the HEDgeHOB proposal for future experiments at the FAIR facility at Darmstadt. [1] N.A. Tahir et al., PRE 60 (1999) 4715. [2] D.H.H. Hoffmann et al., PoP 9 (2002) 3652. [3] N.A. Tahir et al., PRL 95 (2005) 035001. [4] N.A. Tahir et al., PRE 62 (2001) 016402. [5] N.A. Tahir et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 577 (2007) 238.

  10. Formation of High Charge State Heavy Ion Beams with intense Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.

    2011-03-01

    High charge-state heavy-ion beams are of interest and used for a number of accelerator applications. Some accelerators produce the beams downstream of the ion source by stripping bound electrons from the ions as they pass through a foil or gas. Heavy-ion inertial fusion (HIF) would benefit from low-emittance, high current ion beams with charge state >1. For these accelerators, the desired dimensionless perveance upon extraction from the emitter is {approx}10{sup -3}, and the electrical current of the beam pulse is {approx}1 A. For accelerator applications where high charge state and very high current are desired, space charge effects present unique challenges. For example, in a stripper, the separation of charge states creates significant nonlinear space-charge forces that impact the beam brightness. We will report on the particle-in-cell simulation of the formation of such beams for HIF, using a thin stripper at low energy.

  11. Lifetime of anode polymer in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. P.; Dong, Z. H.; Han, X. G.; Xin, J. P.; Lei, M. K.

    2007-02-15

    Generation of high-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) has been studied experimentally using polyethylene as the anode polymer in magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with an external magnetic field. The HIPIB is extracted from the anode plasma produced during the surface discharging process on polyethylene under the electrical and magnetic fields in MIDs, i.e., high-voltage surface breakdown (flashover) with bombardments by electrons. The surface morphology and the microstructure of the anode polymer are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The surface roughening of the anode polymer results from the explosive release of trapped gases or newly formed gases under the high-voltage discharging, leaving fractured surfaces with bubble formation. The polyethylene in the surface layer degrades into low-molecular-weight polymers such as polyethylene wax and paraffin under the discharging process. Both the surface roughness and the fraction of low molecular polymers apparently increase as the discharging times are prolonged for multipulse HIPIB generation. The changes in the surface morphology and the composition of anode polymer lead to a noticeable decrease in the output of ion beam intensity, i.e., ion current density and diode voltage, accompanied with an increase in instability of the parameters with the prolonged discharge times. The diode voltage (or surface breakdown voltage of polymer) mainly depends on the surface morphology (or roughness) of anode polymers, and the ion current density on the composition of anode polymers, which account for the two stages of anode polymer degradation observed experimentally, i.e., stage I which has a steady decrease of the two parameters and stage II which shows a slow decrease, but with an enhanced fluctuation of the two parameters with increasing pulses of HIPIB generation.

  12. Absolute infrared vibrational band intensities of molecular ions determined by direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, E.R.; Polak, M.L.; Owrutsky, J.C.; Coe, J.V.; Saykally, R.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The technique of direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams has been employed for the determination of absolute integrated band intensities ({ital S}{sup 0}{sub {ital v}}) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}. In addition, the absolute band intensities for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental bands of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +} have been remeasured. The values obtained in units of cm{sup {minus}2} atm{sup {minus}1} at STP are 1880(290) and 580(90) for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamentals of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}, respectively; and 4000(800) and 1220(190) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamentals of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}, respectively. Comparisons with {ital ab} {ital initio} results are presented.

  13. Production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Verigin, A.A.; Volkov, S.N.; Krasik, Y.E.; Podkatov, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    An experimental study of the production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode is reported. The ions had various ratios Z/M. When the anode plasma is produced in a preliminary charging pulse of the accelerator, the plasma density is too low for operation under charge-limited emission conditions. In this case, an ion beam is observed to be produced from the plasma formed by the direct heating of the anode material by oscillating electrons. When an anode plasma resulting from the breakdown of a dielectric insert or of the vacuum gap of a composite andode by an external voltage source is used to produce an ion beam, the reflex triode operating conditions depend on delaying the operation of the accelerator with respect to the external source. The highest efficiency (approx. =20%) in the production of an ion beam is observed at t/sub d/ = 3--6 ..mu..s. In this case, the reflex triode operates under increasing or constant impedance conditions. It was shown in the course of the experiments that the ion beam which is produced is nonuniform. There are three groups of ions: H/sup +/, C/sup n//sup +/, and Cu/sup n//sup +/. The energy of the heavy ions depends on the applied anode potential. The different mass components of the ion beam do not appear at the same time. The macroscopic divergence of the beam is 4--6/sup 0/ at the periphery and drops off to approx. <1/sup 0/ at the center. The microscopic divergence of the beam is 3/sup 0/. The total energy of the ion beam which is produced is less than 120 J at an average current approx. =2.8 kA.

  14. Cratering behavior in single- and poly-crystalline copper irradiated by an intense pulsed ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Bitteker, L.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Perry, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    When treated with intense pulsed ion beams (IPIB), many materials exhibit increased wear resistance, fatigue life, and hardness. However, this treatment often results in cratering and roughening of the surface. In this work, high purity single crystal and polycrystalline copper samples were irradiated with pulses from an IPIB to gain insight into the causes of this cratering behavior. Samples were treated with 1,2,5, and 10 shots at 2 J/cm{sup 2} and 5 J/cm{sup 2} average energy fluence per shot. Shots were about 400 ns in duration and consisted of a mixture of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen ions at 300 keV. It was found that the single crystal copper cratered far less than the polycrystalline copper at the lower energy fluence. At the higher energy fluence, cratering was replaced by other forms of surface damage, and the single crystal copper sustained less damage at all but the largest number of shots. Molten debris from the Lucite anode (the ion source) was removed and redeposited on the samples with each shot.

  15. High intensity production of high and medium charge state uranium and other heavy ion beams with VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Galloway, M. L.; Loew, T. J.; Lyneis, C. M.; Castro Rodriguez, I.; Todd, D. S.

    2008-02-15

    The next generation, superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source VENUS (versatile ECR ion source for nuclear science) started operation with 28 GHz microwave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world record ion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e {mu}A of O{sup 6+}, 200 e {mu}A of U{sup 33+} or U{sup 34+}, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e {mu}A of Ar{sup 18+}, 270 e {mu}A of Ar{sup 16+}, 28 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 35+}, and 4.9 e {mu}A of U{sup 47+} have been produced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to these record intensities is given and the production of high intensity uranium beams is discussed in more detail.

  16. Studies of high density baryon matter with high intensity heavy-ion beams at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, H.; Harada, H.; Sakaguchi, T.; Chujo, T.; Esumi, S.; Gunji, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Hwang, S. H.; Ichikawa, Y.; Imai, K.; Itakura, K.; Kaneta, M.; Kim, B. C.; Kinsho, M.; Kitazawa, M.; Liu, Y.; Masui, H.; Nagamiya, S.; Nishio, K.; Okamura, M.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Saha, P. K.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sato, S.; Shigaki, K.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Tamura, J.; Tamura, H.; Nara, Y.; Saito, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    In J-PARC heavy-ion project, we aim at studies of QCD phase structures and hadron properties in high baryon density close to the neutron star core. We have developed a heavy-ion acceleration scheme with a new linac and a new booster with existing two synchrotrons with the goal beam rate of about 1011 Hz. We have also designed a large acceptance spectrometer based on a toroidal magnet. We have evaluated the spectrometer performance, and demonstrated reconstructing dielectron and dimuon spectra with full detector simulations. Finally, we designed a hypernuclear spectrometer which can utilize the full intensity ion beams.

  17. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Lund, S M; Bieniosek, F M; Lee, E P; Prost, L R; Seidl, P A; Vay, P-A

    2002-05-23

    Heavy-ion accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long durations. (Injected currents of order 1 A and 20 {micro}s at a few MeV for each of {approx}100 beams, will be compressed to the order of 100 A and 0.2 {micro}s, reaching GeV energies in a power plant driver.) This will be accompanied by beam ions impacting walls, liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation, the {approx}10% electron population predicted for driver-scale experiments will affect beam transport; but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron velocity is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles. We will also measure the depth of trapping of electrons, their axial and radial transport, and the effects of electrons on the ion beam.

  18. Simulations of the effects of mobile ions on the relativistic beam-plasma instability for intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Lee, H.

    1983-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of the beam-plasma instability for intense relativistic electron beams in dense plasmas show rapid heating of the electrons to multi-kilovolt temperatures. The resulting hydrodynamic motion of the plasma results in density gradients that degrade the interaction. Heat flow out of the plasma is found in some instances to limit the gradient formation process.

  19. Comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with intensity modulated particle therapy (IMPT) using fixed beams or an ion gantry for the treatment of patients with skull base meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To examine the potential improvement in treatment planning for patients with skull base meningioma using IMRT compared to carbon ion or proton beams with and without a gantry. Methods Five patients originally treated with photon IMRT were selected for the study. Ion beams were chosen using a horizontal beam or an ion gantry. Intensity controlled raster scanning and the intensity modulated particle therapy mode were used for plan optimization. The evaluation included analysis of dose-volume histograms of the target volumes and organs at risk. Results In comparison with carbon and proton beams only with horizontal beams, carbon ion treatment plans could spare the OARs more and concentrated on the target volumes more than proton and photon IMRT treatment plans. Using only a horizontal fixed beam, satisfactory plans could be achieved for skull base tumors. Conclusion The results of the case studies showed that using IMPT has the potential to overcome the lack of a gantry for skull base tumors. Carbon ion plans offered slightly better dose distributions than proton plans, but the differences were not clinically significant with established dose prescription concepts. PMID:22439607

  20. Amorphous formation on metal surfaces by an intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsuzuka, M.; Yamasaki, T.; Uchida, H.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, intense pulsed ion beams (PIBs) have been interested as a tool for surface modification of metals, because irradiation of PIBs to metals leads to rapid heating of the near surface which is immediately followed by rapid cooling and resolidification. In this paper formation of an amorphous layer on a Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy by a PIB irradiation is successfully demonstrated. A shot of the mixed carbon and fluorine PIB was irradiated on a Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy to make amorphous structure. The amorphous nature of the PIB-processed surface was examined by the X-ray diffractometry. The diffraction pattern of the non-processed substrate reveals the crystalline phase which is characterized by the narrow spectrum. On the other hand, the PIB-processed Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy surface exhibit the typical diffraction pattern of the amorphous structure, when the maximum X-ray diffraction depth is within 0.66 {micro}m. Assuming that a single species of carbon of fluorine ions is injected into the nickel target, ion range, heating temperature and cooling rate for a nickel substrate are estimated to be 0.23 {micro}m, 3,150 K and 3.8 {times} 10{sup 5}K/sec, respectively. The cooling rate estimated above is enough for producing amorphous structure of nickel alloys.

  1. Use of thermal barriers in conceptual studies of high-temperature, high-intensity targets for producing radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, W.L. |; Hodges, T.A.; Hsu, H.; Fikani, M.M.

    1997-08-01

    Thermal analyses are presented of a cylindrical target concept for the production of radioactive beams by intense, high-energy proton production beams. The basic principle is to extract heat generated internally by the production beam interactions with the target material through appropriate thermal barriers. This approach allows the target material to be operated at an elevated temperature to enhance the release of radioactivities produced by the production beam bombardment, yet remove the heat generated initially. Three classes of targets are considered: high temperature and moderate heat generation; moderate temperature and low heat generation; and low temperature and high heat generation. Various thermal barriers approaches appropriate to the combined temperature and heat removal constraints are included, such as contact thermal resistance, refractory material interfaces, and porous metal interfaces. It is shown that suitable thermal barrier approaches exist to encompass the range of target conditions expected for the production of intense beams of radioactive ions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Simulations of high intensity ion beam RFQ cooler for DESIR/SPIRAL 2: SHIRaC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaid, R.; Ban, G.; Cam, J. F.; Vandamme, C.

    2014-07-01

    SHIRaC is a buffer gas radiofrequency quadrupole cooler, part of SPIRAL 2 facility, at GANIL in France. It is designed to cool low energy ion beams with emittances up to 80 π.mm.mrad and currents up to 1 μA. It is devoted to reduce the beam parameters; less than 3 π.mm.mrad of emittance and around 1 eV of spread energy, and to transmit more than 60% of ions. However, to achieve the least possible emittance, spread energy and ion transmission, the space charge has been overcome using high confining RF amplitude. Numerical simulations have been developed in order to study and evaluate the space charge effects on the beam parameters and the ion transmission. The simulation results have shown that the main degradations of these parameters stem from this effect. The ion transmission decreases progressively with the beam current and it nevertheless remains above 65%. The emittance and the spread energy increase with the beam current while staying below 2.4 π.mm.mrad and 5.9 eV respectively.

  3. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2012-05-31

    In this study, the design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B~100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasmaelectrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electrondynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  4. Electron cloud effects on an intense ion beam in a four solenoid lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley,; 4155 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA-94720, USA.; University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3511, USA.; Lawrence Liveremore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA.; Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA.; Coleman, Josh; Coleman, J.E.; Seidl, P.A.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Vay, J.L.; Haber, I.; Molvik, A.W.; Sharp, W.M.; Welch, D.R.

    2007-07-01

    The Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at LBNL successfully demonstrated the transport of a space-charge dominated ion beam in a two-solenoid lattice. Initial experiments showed a strong dependence of electron cloud effects on solenoid field strength. A current-reducing aperture, two solenoids and in-bore diagnostics were added to the two-solenoid lattice in order to study electron cloud effects more closely. Experiments were conducted with a 10 {micro}s, singly charged potassium ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV and currents of 26 mA and 45 mA. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including a comparison of the effects of manipulating electrons on the beam dynamics, quantifying beam-induced gas desorption, ionization, and electron effects.

  5. The Development of High-Intensity Negative Ion Sources and Beams in the USSR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    beam current density in 0.4-un-wide slit as function of arc current ... 12 i z 3. Planotron-geometry source with elongated emission slit ...... 13 4...transport o......so.......................o..... .............. 47 33. Oscillograms showing beam potential a3 function of z with p 2.5 x 106 Torr...press.ure with z 50 cm (slow scan on left, fast scan oh- -right:) .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 9 35. Radial positive ion current (I+) as

  6. Spontaneous excitation of waves by an intense ion beam on the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shreekrishna; van Compernolle, Bart; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Heidbrink, William

    2016-10-01

    A hydrogen ion beam (15 keV, 10 A) has been injected into a large magnetized plasma (n 1010 -1013 cm-3, Te = 5.0 - 15.0 eV, B = 0.6 - 1.8 kG, He+ and H+ ions, 19 m long, 0.6 m diameter) for performing fast-ion studies on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The beam forms a helical orbit (pitch-angle 7° -55°), propagates with an Alfvénic speed (beam-speed/Alfvén-speed = 0.2 - 3.0), and significantly enhances the electron temperature and density when injected during the plasma afterglow. We report results on spontaneous generation of Alfvén waves and electrostatic waves in the lower-hybrid range of frequencies by the beam. Roles of normal and anomalous Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonances in destabilizing the Alfvén waves were examined by measuring the phase-speed of waves and relevant parameters of the plasma using a variety of diagnostic tools (retarding-field energy analyzer, three-axis magnetic-loop, Dipole, and Langmuir probes). Conditions for the maximum growth of these waves were determined by varying the parameters of the beam and ambient plasma and examining the mode-structures in the fluctuation-spectra. Work jointly supported by US DOE and NSF and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, UCLA.

  7. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  8. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; ...

    2012-05-31

    In this study, the design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ionmore » driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B~100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasmaelectrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electrondynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.« less

  9. Electron cloud effects in intense, ion beam linacs theory and experimental planning for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Lund, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lee, E.P.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-05-21

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation a large fractional electron population ({approx}>1%) is predicted in the High-Current Experiment (HCX), but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron flow is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as the their effect on the ion beam.

  10. Effect of frequency tuning on bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensity, and shape in the 10 GHz NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Mal, Kedar; Kumar, Narender; Lakshmy, P. S.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, P.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    Studies on the effect of the frequency tuning on the bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensities, and beam shape of various ions have been carried out in the 10 GHz NANOGAN ECR ion source. The warm and cold components of the electrons were found to be directly correlated with beam intensity enhancement in case of Ar{sup 9+} but not so for O{sup 5+}. The warm electron component was, however, much smaller compared to the cold component. The effect of the fine tuning of the frequency on the bremsstrahlung spectrum, beam intensities and beam shape is presented.

  11. High intensity beams from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: A study of efficient extraction and transport system (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Andò, L.; Passarello, S.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Spädtke, P.; Winkler, M.

    2004-05-01

    A study of the design of extraction and transport system for high intensity beams that will be produced by the next generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was carried out in the frame of a European collaboration devoted to the definition of the main parameters of third generation ECRIS. High intensity production tests carried out in the previous years at INFN-LNS have shown evidence for the need to review the main concepts of the beam analysis and transport when high currents of low energy highly charged ions are extracted from the source. The transport of such low energy beams becomes critical as soon as the total current exceeds a few mA. The study reported here is based on the calculated parameters for the GyroSERSE source and the computer simulations have been carried out to obtain low emittance beams. The design of the extraction system was carried out by means of the KOBRA (three dimensional) code. The study of the beam line has been carried out with the codes GIOS, GICO, and TRANSPORT by taking into account both the phase space growth due to space charge and to the aberrations inside the magnets. The description of some different beam line options will be also given.

  12. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhan, W. L.; Xie, D.

    2016-02-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O7+, 620 eμA of Ar11+, 430 eμA of Ar12+, 430 eμA of Xe20+, and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper.

  13. High intensity high charge state ion beam production with an evaporative cooling magnet ECRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W. Qian, C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhan, W. L.; Fang, X.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Xie, D.

    2016-02-15

    LECR4 (Lanzhou ECR ion source No. 4) is a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ion beams for the SSC-LINAC injector (a new injector for sector separated cyclotron) at the Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 also serves as a PoP machine for the application of evaporative cooling technology in accelerator field. To achieve those goals, LECR4 ECR ion source has been optimized for the operation at 18 GHz. During 2014, LECR4 ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz microwave of 1.6 kW. To further study the influence of injection stage to the production of medium and high charge state ion beams, in March 2015, the injection stage with pumping system was installed, and some optimum results were produced, such as 560 eμA of O{sup 7+}, 620 eμA of Ar{sup 11+}, 430 eμA of Ar{sup 12+}, 430 eμA of Xe{sup 20+}, and so on. The comparison will be discussed in the paper.

  14. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Becker, R.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged {sup 238}U{sup 40+} (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  15. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G.; Becker, R.; Hamm, R. W.; Baskaran, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged 238U40+ (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  16. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Becker, R; Hamm, R W; Baskaran, R; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged (238)U(40+) (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  17. Generation of plane shocks using intense heavy ion beams: Application to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, N. A.; Stoehlker, Th.; Shutov, A.; Zharkov, A. P.; Piriz, A. R.

    2011-03-15

    A design of a novel experiment that allows the generation of a well defined, steady, and strong plane shock wave employing an intense uranium ion beam that is incident on a wedge shaped compound target is presented. This technique will open up the possibility of carrying out unique high energy density physics experiments using these shock waves. One such experiment is to study the growth of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in fluids as well as in solids, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes, as shown by detailed numerical simulations presented in this paper. The ion beam parameters used in this study correspond to those that will be available at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt.

  18. Note: {sup 6}Li III light intensity observation for {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} ion beam operation at Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kotaka, Yasuteru; Nishimura, Makoto; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-15

    The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum at λ = 516.7 nm was observed during {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam tuning at the Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process. However, {sup 6}Li III line intensity observation conducted in this study gives new insights into its simplification of this process. The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum from the ECR plasma was found to have a strong correlation with the extracted {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam intensity from the RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron.

  19. Diagnosis of high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam generated by a novel magnetically insulated diode with gas puff plasma gun.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Miyake, H; Masugata, K

    2008-10-01

    Intense pulsed heavy ion beam is expected to be applied to materials processing including surface modification and ion implantation. For those applications, it is very important to generate high-purity ion beams with various ion species. For this purpose, we have developed a new type of a magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun. When the ion diode was operated at a diode voltage of about 190 kV, a diode current of about 15 kA, and a pulse duration of about 100 ns, the ion beam with an ion current density of 54 A/cm(2) was obtained at 50 mm downstream from the anode. By evaluating the ion species and the energy spectrum of the ion beam via a Thomson parabola spectrometer, it was confirmed that the ion beam consists of nitrogen ions (N(+) and N(2+)) of energy of 100-400 keV and the proton impurities of energy of 90-200 keV. The purity of the beam was evaluated to be 94%. The high-purity pulsed nitrogen ion beam was successfully obtained by the developed ion diode system.

  20. Focusing Intense Charged Particle Beams with Achromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrani, James; Kaganovich, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Final focusing systems designed to minimize the effects of chromatic aberrations in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) are described. NDCX-II is a linear induction accelerator, designed to accelerate short bunches at high current. Previous experiments showed that neutralized drift compression significantly compresses the beam longitudinally (˜60x) in the z-direction, resulting in a narrow distribution in z-space, but a wide distribution in pz-space. Using simple lenses (e.g., solenoids, quadrupoles) to focus beam bunches with wide distributions in pz-space results in chromatic aberrations, leading to lower beam intensities (J/cm^2). Therefore, the final focusing system must be designed to compensate for chromatic aberrations. The paraxial ray equations and beam envelope equations are numerically solved for parameters appropriate to NDCX-II. Based on these results, conceptual designs for final focusing systems using a combination of solenoids and/or quadrupoles are optimized to compensate for chromatic aberrations. Lens aberrations and emittance growth will be investigated, and analytical results will be compared with results from numerical particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation codes.

  1. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  2. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams: Final report, 1 July 1987--30 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1989-08-03

    This paper discusses the following experiments: ion diode experiments at 0.5 /times/ 10/sup 12/ W on the LION accelerator; spectroscopic studies of ion diodes; ion beam-plasma channel transport research; and plasma opening switch experiments.

  3. High Energy Density Physics Research Using Intense Heavy Ion Beam at FAIR: The HEDgeHOB Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.; Deutsch, C.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-03-01

    International project, Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR), has entered in its construction phase at Darmstadt. It is expected that the new powerful heavy ion synchrotron, SIS100 will deliver a strongly bunched intense beam of energetic uranium ions that will provide the scientists with an efficient and novel tool to research High Energy Density (HED) Physics in the laboratory. Over the past 15 years, substantial theoretical work has been done to design numerous experiments that can be done at this facility in this field. This work has resulted in an extensive scientific proposal named HEDgeHOB, that includes experiment proposals addressing various aspects of HED matter, for example, planetary physics, equation of state, hydrodynamic instabilities and others. In this paper we present a summary of this work.

  4. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  5. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  6. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  7. Intense electron-beam transport in the ion-focused regime through the collision-dominated regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Welch, D.R.; Mock, R.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper reviews the transport of the 19-MeV, 700-kA, 25-ns Hermes-III electron beam in long gas cells filled with N{sub 2} gas spanning six decades in pressure from 10{sup 3} to {approximately}10{sup 3} Torr. We show through measurements and theoretical analyses that the beam has two windows of stable transport: a low-pressure window (between {approximately}1 and {approximately}100 mTorr) that is dominated by propagation in the semi-collisionless IFR (ion-focused regime), and a high-pressure window (between {approximately}1 and {approximately}100 Torr) that is dominated by propagation in the resistive CDR (collision-dominated regime). In the CDR, 79{plus_minus}1.5% of the beam energy is transported over 11 m at 20 Torr. In the IFR, we show that intense radiation fields with controllable rise times and pulse widths can be generated on axis at a bremsstrahlung target. In summary, the measurements and analyses presented here provide a quantitative description of the Hermes-III beam transport over six decades in pressure.

  8. Two-dimensional thermal simulations of aluminum and carbon ion strippers for experiments at SPIRAL2 using the highest beam intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Kim, V.; Lamour, E.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Rozet, J. P.; Stöhlker, Th.; Sultanov, V.; Vernhet, D.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we report on two-dimensional numerical simulations of heating of a rotating, wheel shaped target impacted by the full intensity of the ion beam that will be delivered by the SPIRAL2 facility at Caen, France. The purpose of this work is to study heating of solid targets that will be used to strip the fast ions of SPIRAL2 to the required high charge state for the FISIC (Fast Ion-Slow Ion Collision) experiments. Strippers of aluminum with different emissivities and of carbon are exposed to high beam current of different ion species as oxygen, neon and argon. These studies show that carbon, due to its much higher sublimation temperature and much higher emissivity, is more favorable compared to aluminum. For the highest beam intensities, an aluminum stripper does not survive. However, problem of the induced thermal stresses and long term material fatigue needs to be investigated before a final conclusion can be drawn.

  9. Theory of laser acceleration of light-ion beams from interaction of ultrahigh-intensity lasers with layered targets.

    PubMed

    Albright, B J; Yin, L; Hegelich, B M; Bowers, Kevin J; Kwan, T J T; Fernández, J C

    2006-09-15

    Experiments at the LANL Trident facility demonstrated the production of monoenergetic ion beams from the interaction of an ultraintense laser with a target comprising a heavy ion substrate and thin layer of light ions. An analytic model is obtained that predicts how the mean energy and quality of monoenergetic ion beams and the energy of substrate ions vary with substrate material and light-ion layer composition and thickness. Dimensionless parameters controlling the dynamics are derived and the model is validated with particle-in-cell simulations and experimental data.

  10. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  11. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  12. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  13. Emittance improvement of the electron cyclotron resonance high intensity light ion source proton beam by gas injection in the low energy beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Gobin, R.; Lagniel, J. M.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Pottin, B.; Sherman, J.

    2000-03-01

    SILHI is the ECR high intensity light ion source studied in France at C.E.A. Saclay. This is the source for the injector of the high intensity proton injector prototype developed by a CNRS-IN2P3 collaboration. 80 mA at 95 keV beams with a rms normalized r-r' emittance lower than 0.3 π mm mrad and a proton fraction better than 85% are currently produced. Recently, it has been found that the injection in the low energy beam transport of a buffer gas had a strong effect on the emittance measured 1 m downstream of the focusing solenoid. By adding several gases (H2, N2, Ar, Kr), improvements as great as a factor of 3 have been observed. The emittance has been measured by means of an r-r' emittance measurement unit equipped with a sampling hole and a wire profile monitor, both moving across the beam. Simultaneously, the space charge compensation factor is measured using a four-grid analyzer unit. In this article all results of these experiments are presented and discussed. A first explanation of the emittance reduction phenomenon and possible consequences on the injector operation is given.

  14. Broad, intense, quiescent beam of singly charged metal ions obtained by extraction from self-sputtering plasma far above the runaway threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim

    2009-05-19

    Dense metal plasmas obtained by self-sputtering far above the runway threshold are well suited to generate intense quiescent ion beams. The dilemma of high current density and charge state purity can be solved when using target materials of low surface binding energy by utilizing non-resonant exchange reactions before ion extraction. Space-charge-limited quiescent beams of Cu+, Zn+, and Bi+ with ~;;10 mA/cm2 have been obtained through multi-aperture gridded ion extraction up to 45 kV from self-sputtering plasmas.

  15. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic heavy ion beams via staged shock wave acceleration driven by intense laser pulses in near-critical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Huang, T. W.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration potentially offers a compact, cost-effective alternative to conventional accelerators for scientific, technological, and health-care applications. A novel scheme for heavy ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas via staged shock waves driven by intense laser pulses is proposed, where, in front of the heavy ion target, a light ion layer is used for launching a high-speed electrostatic shock wave. This shock is enhanced at the interface before it is transmitted into the heavy ion plasmas. Monoenergetic heavy ion beam with much higher energy can be generated by the transmitted shock, comparing to the shock wave acceleration in pure heavy ion target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic {{{C}}}6+ ion beams with peak energy 168 MeV and considerable particle number 2.1 × {10}11 are obtained by laser pulses at intensity of 1.66 × {10}20 {{W}} {{cm}}-2 in such staged shock wave acceleration scheme. Similarly a high-quality {{Al}}10+ ion beam with a well-defined peak with energy 250 MeV and spread δ E/{E}0=30 % can also be obtained in this scheme.

  16. Traverse Focusing of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Chromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Mitrani, Igor D. Kaganovich, Ronald C. Davidson

    2013-01-28

    A fi nal focusing scheme designed to minimize chromatic effects is discussed. The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) will apply a velocity tilt for longitudinal bunch compression, and a fi nal focusing solenoid (FFS) for transverse bunch compression. In the beam frame, neutralized drift compression causes a suffi ciently large spread in axial momentum, pz , resulting in chromatic effects to the fi nal focal spot during transverse bunch compression. Placing a weaker solenoid upstream of a stronger fi nal focusing solenoid (FFS) mitigates chromatic effects and improves transverse focusing by a factor of approximately 2-4 for appropriate NDCX-II parameters.

  17. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved magnetically-confined anode plasma pulsed ion beam source. Beam rotation effects and power efficiency are improved by a magnetic design which places the separatrix between the fast field flux structure and the slow field structure near the anode of the ion beam source, by a gas port design which localizes the gas delivery into the gap between the fast coil and the anode, by a pre-ionizer ringing circuit connected to the fast coil, and by a bias field means which optimally adjusts the plasma formation position in the ion beam source.

  18. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  19. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  20. Intense Ion Beam Generation, Plasma Radiation Source and Plasma Opening Switch Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    ion source on the 150 kV, ls pulse , ifl LONG- SHOT pulsed power generator under NRL support. The completion of this task 2 will demonstrate both higher...following paragraph. This research is continuing under a new NRL-supported grant. 3 The POS system is pulsed by a 1.9MAF Scyllac capacitor charged to 50 kV...electric field measurements made in a surface flashover MID using emission spectroscopy by Maron et al.’ This LIF potential measuring technique could

  1. Intense Relativistic Electron Beam Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    flashover and other undetermined physical processes which create a plasma at the liner surface . The ions are drawn toward the Uiner axis by the...dielectric wall and causing surface flashover and the liberation of ions. These ions provide sufficient charge neutralization for the beam to propagate a...beam-induced surface flashover process which produces the ions to be accelerated. Alternative methods are proposed in Section III for next year’s

  2. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H- beam formation and transport (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R.

    2010-02-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as dc discharge-driven and rf-driven multicusp sources, Penning-type, and electron cyclotron resonance-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber, and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed, ionization mechanism, beam formation, and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  3. Two-stream stability properties of the return-current layer for intense ion beam propagation through background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail

    2009-09-15

    When an ion beam with sharp edge propagates through a background plasma, its current is neutralized by the plasma return current everywhere except at the beam edge over a characteristic transverse distance {delta}x{sub perpendicular}{approx}{delta}{sub pe}, where {delta}{sub pe}=c/{omega}{sub pe} is the collisionless skin depth and {omega}{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. Because the background plasma electrons neutralizing the ion beam current inside the beam are streaming relative to the background plasma electrons outside the beam, the background plasma can support a two-stream surface-mode excitation. Such surface modes have been studied previously assuming complete charge and current neutralization, and have been shown to be strongly unstable. In this paper we study the detailed stability properties of this two-stream surface mode for an electron flow velocity profile self-consistently driven by the ion beam. In particular, it is shown that the self-magnetic field generated inside the unneutralized current layer, which has not been taken into account previously, completely eliminates the instability.

  4. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Yu. Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-15

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm{sup 2}, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm{sup 2}), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  5. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm².

    PubMed

    Isakova, Yu; Pushkarev, A; Khailov, I; Zhong, H

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm(2), and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm(2)), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  6. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, Yu.; Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm2, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm2), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  7. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li + ion beam-driven hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R. J.; Moats, A. R.; Leeper, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li+ ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (⩽100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  8. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  9. Development of a fast cyclotron gas stopper for intense rare isotope beams from projectile fragmentation: Study of ion extraction with a radiofrequency carpet

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Georg; Morrissey, David

    2011-01-16

    Research and development has been performed in support of the design of a future rare isotope beam facility in the US. An important aspect of plans for earlier RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) and a requirement of FRIB (Facility of Rare Isotope Beams) to be built at Michigan State University are the availability of so-called “stopped beams” for research that contributes to answering questions like how elements in the universe are created and to provide better insight into the nature of Fundamental Interactions. In order to create “stopped beams” techniques are required that transform fast rare isotopes beams as they are available directly after addresses questions like the origin of that will allow and High priority is given to the evaluation of intensity limitations and the efficiency of stopping of fast fragment beams in gas cells and to the exploration of options to increase the efficiency and the reduction of space charge effects. Systematic studies performed at MSU as part of the RIA R&D with a linear gas cell under conditions close to those expected at RIA and related simulations confirm that the efficiency of stopping and extracting ions decreases with increasing beam intensity. Similar results have also been observed at RIKEN in Japan. These results indicate the concepts presently under study will not be able to cover the full range of intensities of fast beams expected at RIA without major losses. The development of a more robust concept is therefore critical to the RIA concept. Recent new beam simulation studies performed at the NSCL show that the stopping of heavy ions in a weakly focusing gas-filled magnetic field can overcome the intensity limitation of present systems while simultaneously providing a much faster ion extraction. We propose to design and build such a cyclotron gas stopper and to test it at the NSCL under conditions as close as possible to those found at RIA.

  10. Use of a radial self-field diode geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation at 6 MeV on Hermes III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Mikkelson, K. A.; Ginn, W. C.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the generation of intense pulsed focused ion beams at the 6 MeV level using an inductive voltage adder (IVA) pulsed-power generator, which employs a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Such IVA machines typical run at an impedance of few tens of Ohms. Previous successful intense ion beam generation experiments have often featured an "axial" pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with an axial anode-cathode gap) and operated on a conventional Marx generator/water line driver with an impedance of a few Ohms and no need for an MITL. The goals of these experiments are to develop a pinch-reflex ion diode geometry that has an impedance to efficiently match to an IVA, produces a reasonably high ion current fraction, captures the vacuum electron current flowing forward in the MITL, and focuses the resulting ion beam to small spot size. A new "radial" pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with a radial anode-cathode gap) is found to best demonstrate these properties. Operation in both positive and negative polarities was undertaken, although the negative polarity experiments are emphasized. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are consistent with experimental results indicating that, for diode impedances less than the self-limited impedance of the MITL, almost all of the forward-going IVA vacuum electron flow current is incorporated into the diode current. PIC results also provide understanding of the diode-impedance and ion-focusing properties of the diode. In addition, a substantial high-energy ion population is also identified propagating in the "reverse" direction, i.e., from the back side of the anode foil in the electron beam dump.

  11. Use of a radial self-field diode geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation at 6 MeV on Hermes III

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, T. J. Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Mikkelson, K. A.; Ginn, W. C.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the generation of intense pulsed focused ion beams at the 6 MeV level using an inductive voltage adder (IVA) pulsed-power generator, which employs a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Such IVA machines typical run at an impedance of few tens of Ohms. Previous successful intense ion beam generation experiments have often featured an “axial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with an axial anode-cathode gap) and operated on a conventional Marx generator/water line driver with an impedance of a few Ohms and no need for an MITL. The goals of these experiments are to develop a pinch-reflex ion diode geometry that has an impedance to efficiently match to an IVA, produces a reasonably high ion current fraction, captures the vacuum electron current flowing forward in the MITL, and focuses the resulting ion beam to small spot size. A new “radial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with a radial anode-cathode gap) is found to best demonstrate these properties. Operation in both positive and negative polarities was undertaken, although the negative polarity experiments are emphasized. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are consistent with experimental results indicating that, for diode impedances less than the self-limited impedance of the MITL, almost all of the forward-going IVA vacuum electron flow current is incorporated into the diode current. PIC results also provide understanding of the diode-impedance and ion-focusing properties of the diode. In addition, a substantial high-energy ion population is also identified propagating in the “reverse” direction, i.e., from the back side of the anode foil in the electron beam dump.

  12. Use of a radial self-field diode geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation at 6 MeV on Hermes III

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Ginn, W. C.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the generation of intense pulsed focused ion beams at the 6 MeV level using an inductive voltage adder (IVA) pulsed-power generator, which employs a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Such IVA machines typical run at an impedance of few tens of Ohms. Previous successful intense ion beam generation experiments have often featured an “axial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with an axial anode-cathode gap) and operated on a conventional Marx generator/water line driver with an impedance of a few Ohms and no need for an MITL. The goals of these experiments are to develop a pinch-reflex ion diode geometry that has an impedance to efficiently match to an IVA, produces a reasonably high ion current fraction, captures the vacuum electron current flowing forward in the MITL, and focuses the resulting ion beam to small spot size. Furthermore, a new “radial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with a radial anode-cathode gap) is found to best demonstrate these properties. Operation in both positive and negative polarities was undertaken, although the negative polarity experiments are emphasized. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are consistent with experimental results indicating that, for diode impedances less than the self-limited impedance of the MITL, almost all of the forward-going IVA vacuum electron flow current is incorporated into the diode current. PIC results also provide understanding of the diode-impedance and ion-focusing properties of the diode. Additionally, a substantial high-energy ion population is also identified propagating in the “reverse” direction, i.e., from the back side of the anode foil in the electron beam dump.

  13. Use of a radial self-field diode geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation at 6 MeV on Hermes III

    DOE PAGES

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; ...

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the generation of intense pulsed focused ion beams at the 6 MeV level using an inductive voltage adder (IVA) pulsed-power generator, which employs a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). Such IVA machines typical run at an impedance of few tens of Ohms. Previous successful intense ion beam generation experiments have often featured an “axial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with an axial anode-cathode gap) and operated on a conventional Marx generator/water line driver with an impedance of a few Ohms and no need for an MITL. The goals of these experiments are to develop a pinch-reflex ion diode geometrymore » that has an impedance to efficiently match to an IVA, produces a reasonably high ion current fraction, captures the vacuum electron current flowing forward in the MITL, and focuses the resulting ion beam to small spot size. Furthermore, a new “radial” pinch-reflex ion diode (i.e., with a radial anode-cathode gap) is found to best demonstrate these properties. Operation in both positive and negative polarities was undertaken, although the negative polarity experiments are emphasized. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are consistent with experimental results indicating that, for diode impedances less than the self-limited impedance of the MITL, almost all of the forward-going IVA vacuum electron flow current is incorporated into the diode current. PIC results also provide understanding of the diode-impedance and ion-focusing properties of the diode. Additionally, a substantial high-energy ion population is also identified propagating in the “reverse” direction, i.e., from the back side of the anode foil in the electron beam dump.« less

  14. Acceleration of plasma electrons by intense nonrelativistic ion and electron beams propagating in background plasma due to two-stream instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the effects of the two-stream instability on the propagation of intense nonrelativistic ion and electron beams in background plasma. Development of the two-stream instability between the beam ions and plasma electrons leads to beam breakup, a slowing down of the beam particles, acceleration of the plasma particles, and transfer of the beam energy to the plasma particles and wave excitations. Making use of the particle-in-cell codes EDIPIC and LSP, and analytic theory we have simulated the effects of the two-stream instability on beam propagation over a wide range of beam and plasma parameters. Because of the two-stream instability the plasma electrons can be accelerated to velocities as high as twice the beam velocity. The resulting return current of the accelerated electrons may completely change the structure of the beam self - magnetic field, thereby changing its effect on the beam from focusing to defocusing. Therefore, previous theories of beam self-electromagnetic fields that did not take into account the effects of the two-stream instability must be significantly modified. This effect can be observed on the National Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) facility by measuring the spot size of the extracted beamlet propagating through several meters of plasma. Particle-in-cell, fluid simulations, and analytical theory also reveal the rich complexity of beam- plasma interaction phenomena: intermittency and multiple regimes of the two-stream instability in dc discharges; band structure of the growth rate of the two-stream instability of an electron beam propagating in a bounded plasma and repeated acceleration of electrons in a finite system. In collaboration with E. Tokluoglu, D. Sydorenko, E. A. Startsev, J. Carlsson, and R. C. Davidson. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  16. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  17. Focused ion beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  18. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  19. Two-color above-threshold ionization of atoms and ions in XUV Bessel beams and intense laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seipt, D.; Müller, R. A.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-11-01

    The two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI) of atoms and ions is investigated for a vortex Bessel beam in the presence of a strong near-infrared (NIR) light field. While the photoionization is caused by the photons from the weak but extreme ultraviolet (XUV) vortex Bessel beam, the energy and angular distribution of the photoelectrons and their sideband structure are affected by the plane-wave NIR field. We here explore the energy spectra and angular emission of the photoelectrons in such two-color fields as a function of the size and location of the target atoms with regard to the beam axis. In addition, analog to the circular dichroism in typical two-color ATI experiments with circularly polarized light, we define and discuss seven different dichroism signals for such vortex Bessel beams that arise from the various combinations of the orbital and spin angular momenta of the two light fields. For localized targets, it is found that these dichroism signals strongly depend on the size and position of the atoms relative to the beam. For macroscopically extended targets, in contrast, three of these dichroism signals tend to zero, while the other four just coincide with the standard circular dichroism, similar as for Bessel beams with a small opening angle. Detailed computations of the dichroism are performed and discussed for the 4 s valence-shell photoionization of Ca+ ions.

  20. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Foosland, D. W.; Smith, C. W.; Lee, M. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic instabilities driven by an energetic ion beam streaming parallel to a magnetic field in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is considered. Numerical solutions of the full dispersion equation are presented. At propagation parallel to the magnetic field, there are four distinct instabilities. A sufficiently energetic beam gives rise to two unstable modes with right-hand polarization, one resonant with the beam, the other nonresonant. A beam with sufficiently large T (perpendicular to B)/T (parallel to B) gives rise to the left-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability at relatively small beam velocities, and a sufficiently hot beam drives unstable a left-hand beam resonant mode. The parametric dependences of the growth rates for the three high beam velocity instabilities are presented here. In addition, some properties at oblique propagation are examined. It is demonstrated that, as the beam drift velocity is increased, relative maxima in growth rates can arise at harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance for both right and left elliptically polarized modes.

  1. The Influence of High-Power Ion Beams and High-Intensity Short-Pulse Implantation of Ions on the Properties of Ceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabyshev, A. V.; Konusov, F. V.; Pavlov, S. K.; Remnev, G. E.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is focused on the study of the structural, electrical and optical characteristics of the ceramic silicon carbide before and after irradiation in the regimes of the high-power ion beams (HPIB) and high-intensity short-pulse implantation (HISPI) of carbon ions. The dominant mechanism of transport of charge carriers, their type and the energy spectrum of localized states (LS) of defects determining the properties of SiC were established. Electrical and optical characteristics of ceramic before and after irradiation are determined by the biographical and radiation defects whose band gap (BG) energy levels have a continuous energetic distribution. A dominant p-type activation component of conduction with participation of shallow acceptor levels 0.05-0.16 eV is complemented by hopping mechanism of conduction involving the defects LS with a density of 1.2T017-2.4T018 eV-Am-3 distributed near the Fermi level.The effect of radiation defects with deep levels in the BG on properties change dominates after HISPI. A new material with the changed electronic structure and properties is formed in the near surface layer of SiC after the impact of the HPIB.

  2. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  3. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; Galvin, James

    1987-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  4. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  5. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  6. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  7. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  8. Low energy ion beam dynamics of NANOGAN ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) has been developed for providing the mass analyzed highly charged intense ion beams of energy ranging from a few tens of keV to a few MeV for atomic, molecular and materials sciences research. The new facility consists of an all permanent magnet 10 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (NANOGAN) installed on a high voltage platform (400 kV) which provides large currents of multiply charged ion beams. Higher emittance at low energy of intense ion beam puts a tremendous challenge to the beam optical design of this facility. The beam line consists of mainly the electrostatic quadrupoles, an accelerating section, analyzing cum switching magnet and suitable beam diagnostics including vacuum components. The accelerated ion beam is analyzed for a particular mass to charge (m/q) ratio as well as guided to three different lines along 75°, 90° and 105° using a large acceptance analyzing cum switching magnet. The details of transverse beam optics to all the beam lines with TRANSPORT and GICOSY beam optics codes are being described. Field computation code, OPERA 3D has been utilized to design the magnets and electrostatic quadrupoles. A theoretical estimation of emittance for optimized geometry of ion source is given so as to form the basis of beam optics calculations. The method of quadrupole scan of the beam is used to characterize the emittance of the final beam on the target. The measured beam emittance increases with m/q ratios of various ion beams similar to the trend observed theoretically.

  9. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  10. Ion Beam Therapy in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    At present, seven facilities in Europe treat deep-seated tumors with particle beams, six with proton beams and one with carbon ions. Three of these facilities are in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Dubna, Russia. Other facilities include the TSL Uppsala, Sweden, CPO Orsay, France, and PSI Villigen, Switzerland, all for proton therapy, and GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, which utilizes carbon ions only. But only two of these facilities irradiate with scanned ion beams: the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI), Villigen (protons) and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt. These two facilities are experimental units within physics laboratories and have developed the technique of intensity-modulated beam scanning in order to produce irradiation conforming to a 3-D target. There are three proton centers presently under construction in Munich, Essen and Orsay, and the proton facility at PSI has added a superconducting accelerator connected to an isocentric gantry in order to become independent of the accelerator shared with the physics research program. The excellent clinical results using carbon ions at National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in Chiba and GSI have triggered the construction of four new heavy-ion therapy projects (carbon ions and protons), located in Heidelberg, Pavia, Marburg and Kiel. The projects in Heidelberg and Pavia will begin patient treatment in 2009, and the Marburg and Kiel projects will begin in 2010 and 2011, respectively. These centers use different accelerator designs but have the same kind of treatment planning system and use the same approach for the calculation of the biological effectiveness of the carbon ions as developed at GSI [1]. There are many other planned projects in the works. Do not replace the word "abstract," but do replace the rest of this text. If you must insert a hard line break, please use Shift+Enter rather than just tapping your "Enter" key. You may want to print this page and refer to it as a style

  11. Features of Fast Ion Instability of Partly Compensated Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2000-10-01

    Compensation of a space charge of particle beams by ions have some significant features very different of the electrons compensation. Heavier ions have longer lifetime in the beam and it is possible to reach overcompensation with transformation of repulse forces to the focusing. This feature help to the long distance beam transportation inside a small apertures. But, an ability of heavy ions to keep coherent motion can be a reason of strong coherent instabilities of particle beams with a space charge compensation by ions. A strong coherent focusing of ions in space charge potential of the beam during accumulation can create very high local density of compensating ions with a very picked distribution (Christmas tree distribution). "Fast ion instability" have been observed recently in some storage rings.Very fast development of transverse instability have been observed during a first production of high intense negative ion beam from surface-plasma sources. This instability was observed as oscillation of the local current density of negative ion beam with low fluctuation of beam intensity.

  12. Introduction to Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martisikova, Maria

    2010-01-05

    Presently, ion beam therapy reaches an increasing interest within the field of radiation therapy, which is caused by the promising clinical results obtained in the last decades. Ion beams enable higher dose conformation to the tumor and increased sparing of the surrounding tissue in comparison to the standard therapy using high energy photons. Heavy ions, like carbon, offer in addition increased biological effectiveness, which makes them suitable for treatment of radioresistant tumors. This contribution gives an overview over the physical and biological properties of ion beams. Common fundamental principles of ion beam therapy are summarized and differences between standard therapy with high energy photons, proton and carbon ion therapy are discussed. The technologies used for the beam production and delivery are introduced, with emphasis to the differences between passive and active beam delivery systems. The last part concentrates on the quality assurance in ion therapy. Specialties of dosimetry in medical ion beams are discussed.

  13. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  14. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-05-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  15. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I. ); Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics)

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  16. Ion beam analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    A new ion beam analysis facility has recently been installed at a Van de Graaff accelerator. Its use is expected to support many energy and environmental research projects. Material composition and spatial distribution analyses at the facility are based upon Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, particle-induced X-ray emission, and particle-induced gamma-ray emission analysis. An overview of these three techniques is presented in this article.

  17. Dependence of relative intensity of L 1 sub-shell X-rays on ion beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, P. C.; Reis, M. A.; Barradas, N. P.; Kavčič, Matjaž

    2007-08-01

    In a previous work, it was shown that L shell X-ray yields relative to the Lα transition depend on the irradiation ion beam energy and the chemical species being irradiated [M.A. Reis, P.C. Chaves, J.C. Soares, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 239 (2005) 413]. Further studies give rise to the possibility that this dependence persists for transitions to the same sub-shell, where the ionization process is expected to play no role [P.C. Chaves, M.A. Reis, in: Miloš Budnar, Matjaž Kavčič (Eds.), Proceedings (CD) of the Tenth International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission and its Analytical Application, 4-8 June, Portorož - Slovenia, J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, 2004, p. 810]. In the present work, very high counting statistics (>4 × 106 counts in the peak) W-L spectra collected using a Si(Li) detector and Mo-L spectra obtained using the high resolution Johanson type crystal spectrometer from the Josef Stefan Institute were studied. In the case of Mo, an ultra pure Mo metal foil was used to avoid any possible target contamination and spectra were obtained for proton beam energies between 0.4 and 2.0 MeV. In the case of the W spectra, proton beam energies between 1.40 and 2.38 MeV were used. Normalizing to the theoretical yield ratios and plotting results as a function of the reduced velocity allows a single curve to be drawn for both cases. In this communication the results obtained are presented and discussed.

  18. Stability of colliding ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, E.A.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1980-11-01

    We determine conditions for stability of two identical colliding ion beams in the presence of neutralizing electrons, but no background ions. Such a situation is envisioned for the Counterstreaming Ion Torus. The ion beams are taken to be Maxwellian in their frames of reference. The approximation of electrostatic and electromagnetic modes is made. The stability of the electrostatic modes depends on the relation between the ion electron temperature ratio and the relative beam velocities. The stability of the electromagnetic mode depends on the relation between the ion plasma ..beta.. and the relative beam velocities.

  19. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  20. Ion sources and targets for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    A high-intensity ISOL-type radioactive beam facility depends critically on the performance of the target/ion source system. We developed a concept for producing high-intensity secondary beams of fission fragments, such as {sup 132}Sn, using a two-part target and ion source combination. The idea involves stopping a 1000-kW beam of 200-MeV deuterons in a target of Be or U to produce a secondary beam of neutrons. Just behind the neutron production target is a second target, typically a porous form of UC, coupled to an ISOL-type ion source. In December 1994, we tested this concept with 200-MeV deuterons at low intensity in an experiment at the NSCL. The yields of characteristic gamma rays were measured and confirmed our predictions.

  1. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  2. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-11-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  3. Ion source research and development at University of Jyväskylä: Studies of different plasma processes and towards the higher beam intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, H. Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Laulainen, J.; Kronholm, R.; Ranttila, K.; Tuunanen, J.; Thuillier, T.; Machicoane, G.

    2016-02-15

    Several ion source related research and development projects are in progress at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). The work can be divided into investigation of the ion source plasma and development of ion sources, ion beams, and diagnostics. The investigation covers the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma instabilities, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and visible light emission, photon induced electron emission, and the development of plasma diagnostics. The ion source development covers the work performed for radiofrequency-driven negative ion source, RADIS, beam line upgrade of the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS, and the development of a new room-temperature-magnet 18 GHz ECRIS, HIISI.

  4. Ion source research and development at University of Jyväskylä: Studies of different plasma processes and towards the higher beam intensities.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, H; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Komppula, J; Laulainen, J; Kronholm, R; Ranttila, K; Tuunanen, J; Thuillier, T; Xie, D; Machicoane, G

    2016-02-01

    Several ion source related research and development projects are in progress at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). The work can be divided into investigation of the ion source plasma and development of ion sources, ion beams, and diagnostics. The investigation covers the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma instabilities, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and visible light emission, photon induced electron emission, and the development of plasma diagnostics. The ion source development covers the work performed for radiofrequency-driven negative ion source, RADIS, beam line upgrade of the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS, and the development of a new room-temperature-magnet 18 GHz ECRIS, HIISI.

  5. Ion source research and development at University of Jyväskylä: Studies of different plasma processes and towards the higher beam intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Laulainen, J.; Kronholm, R.; Ranttila, K.; Tuunanen, J.; Thuillier, T.; Xie, D.; Machicoane, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several ion source related research and development projects are in progress at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). The work can be divided into investigation of the ion source plasma and development of ion sources, ion beams, and diagnostics. The investigation covers the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma instabilities, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and visible light emission, photon induced electron emission, and the development of plasma diagnostics. The ion source development covers the work performed for radiofrequency-driven negative ion source, RADIS, beam line upgrade of the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS, and the development of a new room-temperature-magnet 18 GHz ECRIS, HIISI.

  6. Future Directions in Ion Beam Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl, Daniel; Combs, Stephanie; Debus, Jürgen

    There is a growing interest in ion beam therapy (IBT) worldwide which has led to an increasing number of new treatment facilities. This development is accompanied by intensive radiobiological, physical and clinical research of both proton therapy (PT) and carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT). Current developments in IBT with high impact for future challenges will be summarized in this chapter.

  7. Plasma and ion beam processing at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Henins, I.

    1994-07-01

    Efforts are underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to utilize plasma and intense ion beam science and technology of the processing of advanced materials. A major theme involves surface modification of materials, e.g., etching, deposition, alloying, and implantation. In this paper, we concentrate on two programs, plasma source ion implantation and high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition.

  8. Pulsed laser beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, C.M.; Jones, R.W.

    1982-07-13

    A pulsed laser beam intensity monitor measures the peak power within a selectable cross section of a test laser beam and measures integrated energy of the beam during the pulse period of a test laser. A continuous wave laser and a pulsed ruby laser are coaxially arranged for simultaneously transmitting optical output energy through a crystal flat during the time a test laser pulse is transmitted through the flat. Due to stress birefringence in the crystal, the ruby laser pulse transmitted through the flat is recorded and analyzed to provide peak power information about the test laser output pulse, and the continuous wave laser output reflected from the crystal flat provides a measurement of energy during the test laser pulse.

  9. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al⁺ ion beam.

    PubMed

    Weichsel, T; Hartung, U; Kopte, T; Zschornack, G; Kreller, M; Philipp, A

    2015-09-01

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology-a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al(+) ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm(2) is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10(9) cm(-3) to 6 × 10(10) cm(-3) and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  10. Ion Beam Modification of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, B; de la Rubia, T D; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Rehn, L E

    2005-10-10

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier-Science Publishers as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil, and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists, and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English. IBMM 2004 was held on September 5-10, 2004. The focus was on materials science involving both basic ion-solid interaction processes and property changes occurring either during or subsequent to ion bombardment and ion beam processing in relation to materials and device applications. Areas of research included Nanostructures, Multiscale Modeling, Patterning of Surfaces, Focused Ion Beams, Defects in Semiconductors, Insulators and Metals, Cluster Beams, Radiation Effects in Materials, Photonic Devices, Ion Implantation, Ion Beams in Biology and Medicine including New Materials, Imaging, and Treatment.

  11. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatum, B. A.; Alton, G. D.; Auble, R. L.; Beene, J. R.; Dowling, D. T.; Haynes, D. L.; Juras, R. C.; Meigs, M. J.; Mills, G. D.; Mosko, S. W.; Mueller, P. E.; Olsen, D. K.; Shapira, D.; Sinclair, J. W.; Carter, H. K.; Welton, R. F.; Williams, C. E.; Bailey, J. D.; Stracener, D. W.

    1997-05-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility's radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. The HRIBF was formally dedicated on December 12, 1996, and approved for high intensity operation as a National User Facility, the first of its kind in North America. This paper describes facility development to date.

  12. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-02-15

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  13. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al{sup +} ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weichsel, T. Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Philipp, A.

    2015-09-15

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology—a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al{sup +} ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm{sup 2} is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  14. Method of enhancing cyclotron beam intensity

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, Ed D.; Mallory, Merrit L.

    1977-01-01

    When an easily ionized support gas such as xenon is added to the cold cathode in sources of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, large beam enhancements are produced. For example, .sup.20 Ne.sup.7+ is increased from 0.05 enA to 27 enA, and .sup.16 O.sup.5+ intensities in excess of 35 e.mu.A have been extracted for periods up to 30 minutes. Approximately 0.15 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas feed line and the primary gas flow is reduced by about 30%.

  15. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited).

    PubMed

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not "sorcery" but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  16. Ion beam sputtering of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Etching and deposition of fluoropolymers are of considerable industrial interest for applications dealing with adhesion, chemical inertness, hydrophobicity, and dielectric properties. This paper describes ion beam sputter processing rates as well as pertinent characteristics of etched targets and films. An argon ion beam source was used to sputter etch and deposit the fluoropolymers PTFE, FEP, and CTFE. Ion beam energy, current density, and target temperature were varied to examine effects on etch and deposition rates. The ion etched fluoropolymers yield cone or spire-like surface structures which vary depending upon the type of polymer, ion beam power density, etch time, and target temperature. Also presented are sputter target and film characteristics which were documented by spectral transmittance measurements, X-ray diffraction, ESCA, and SEM photomicrographs.

  17. Ion beam driven warm dense matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Ni, P. A.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P. K.; More, R.; Barnard, J. J.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A. W.; Yoneda, H.

    2007-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments at LBNL are at 0.3-1 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak), increasing toward the Bragg peak in future versions of the accelerator. The WDM conditions are envisioned to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. Initial experiments include an experiment to study transient darkening at LBNL; and a porous target experiment at GSI heated by intense heavy-ion beams from the SIS 18 storage ring. Further experiments will explore target temperature and other properties such as electrical conductivity to investigate phase transitions and the critical point.

  18. Studies on the Application of High Voltage Discharge Ionization and Ablation in Supersonic-Jets for the Generation of Intense Cluster Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Ansgar

    Glow discharge and pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in supersonic expansions were investigated for the production of intense beams of molecular cluster ions from seeded and ablated compounds. A low cost high voltage high current pulser based on a triggered spark gap switch is described as a mean for ionization and ablation. Besides, details of the molecular beam apparatus and modified pulsed valve are given. Cluster cations rm (Ar)_ {n}^+, rm (CO_2) _{n}^{+}, rm (C_6H_6)_{n}^+ and rm (H_2O)_{n }^+ were produced by pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in the expansion region of a seeded free-jet. The observed cluster mass spectra (CMS) for Ar, rm C_6H_6 and H _2O show the characteristic features (magic numbers) of electron beam and photo ionized clusters under molecular flow conditions. Indications for the presence of magic numbers in the CMS of {(CO _2)_{n}^+} cluster ions at n = 20, 26, 30 and 34 similar to those found for rare gas clusters have been found. Cationic metal ligand complexes Cu(Toluene) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Acetone) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Methanol)_{rm n}^+ , Cu(Ethylether)_{rm n }^+, Cu(Water)_{ rm n}^+, Al(Water)_ {rm n}^+ were synthesized by ablation of the metal from metallic discharge electrodes in a discharge gas mixture of helium seeded with the ligand of choice. The CMS of the expanded plasmas show little background ion signal besides the metal-ligand species. Charge exchange processes in the expansion guarantee high ionization yields of the desired species and account for low backgrounds. Changes in the successive binding energy of Cu(Water)_ {rm n}^+ clusters n = 1-4 are clearly observed in the CMS as step formation. A similar pattern found in the Cu(Acetone)_{ rm n}^+ CMS suggests the same trend in the successive binding energy as known for water. Ablation from a Cr(acac)_3 in a copper matrix was employed for the synthesis of Cr(Acetone) _{rm n}^+ and Cr(Benzene)^+ complexes demonstrating the ability to use nonconducting compounds as a metal source

  19. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Technical progress report, 20 August 1981-30 September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1983-07-01

    The progress on this contract is described in two parts. The first deals with the technical operation of the LION accelerator which is the exact equivalent to one line of PBFA-I. The second part is concerned with the experimental results on the ion diode mounted at the front end of the LION accelerator.

  20. Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2012-05-20

    Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

  1. Intense electron beam propagation across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Striffler, C.D.; Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Reiser, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we consider the propagation of an intense electron-ion beam across an applied magnetic field. In the absence of the applied field, the beam system is in a Bennett equilibrium state that involves electrons with both large axial and thermal velocities and a cold stationary space-charge neutralizing ion species. Typical parameters under consideration are V{sub o} {approximately} 1 MV, I {approximately} 5 kA, T{sub e} {approximately} 100 keV, and beam radii {approximately} 1 cm. We find that in the intense beam regime, the propagation is limited due to space-charge depression caused by the deflection of the electron beam by the transverse field. This critical field is of the order of the peak self-magnetic field of the electron beam which is substantially higher than the single particle cut-off field. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelerinter, E.; Spielberg, N.

    1980-01-01

    Wire adhesion in steel belted radial tires; carbon fibers and composite; cold welding, brazing, and fabrication; hydrogen production, separation, and storage; membrane use; catalysis; sputtering and texture; and ion beam implantation are discussed.

  3. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility`s radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date.

  4. Beam Control for Ion Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T.C.; Ahle, L.

    2000-02-17

    Coordinated bending and acceleration of an intense space-charge-dominated ion beam has been achieved for the first time. This required the development of a variable waveform, precision, bi-polar high voltage pulser and a precision, high repetition rate induction core modulator. Waveforms applied to the induction cores accelerate the beam as the bi-polar high voltage pulser delivers a voltage ramp to electrostatic dipoles which bend the beam through a 90 degree permanent magnet quadrupole lattice. Further work on emittance minimization is also reported.

  5. Direct plasma injection scheme with various ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.

    2010-09-15

    The laser ion source is one of the most powerful heavy ion sources. However, it is difficult to obtain good stability and to control its intense current. To overcome these difficulties, we proposed a new beam injection scheme called 'direct plasma injection scheme'. Following this it was established to provide various species with desired charge state as an intense accelerated beam. Carbon, aluminum and iron beams have been tested.

  6. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  7. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1 and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 107 A m-2 sr-1 eV-1. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  8. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  10. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  11. Beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.

    1995-04-01

    A standard design for heavy ion fusion drivers under study in the US is an induction linac with electrostatic focusing at low energy and magnetic focusing at higher energy. The need to focus the intense beam to a few-millimeter size spot at the deuterium-tritium target establishes the emittance budget for the accelerator. Economic and technological considerations favor a larger number of beams in the low-energy, electrostatic-focusing section than in the high-energy, magnetic-focusing section. Combining four beams into a single focusing channel is a viable option, depending on the growth in emittance due to the combining process. Several significant beam dynamics issues that are, or have been, under active study are discussed: large space charge and image forces, beam wall clearances, halos, alignment, longitudinal instability, and bunch length control.

  12. Ion Beam Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-13

    ure are only those which had the greatest effect . Several features of this periodic chart are worth not- ing: i) some elements improve more than one...from nearly all the groups of the periodic table can have beneficial effects on a given property. iv) Ions which improve properties are highlighted...here, but ions which have deleterious effects may also be implanted which facilitates the study of mechanisms of wear and corrosion. v) Elements to

  13. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  14. Beam Splitter Intensities Are Preselected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.; Owen, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    New beam splitter is a block of optically clear material with two parallel polish faces. Some of area of one surface is coated with totally reflecting layer, which may be metal or dielectric. On opposite surface, a metal coating of stepped thickness offers a different reflectivity at each step. Width and spacing of reflecting zones are chosen to accommodate angle of spacing of incidence of input beam and desired spacing of ouput beams.

  15. Laser ion acceleration toward future ion beam cancer therapy - Numerical simulation study -

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Shigeo; Izumiyama, Takeshi; Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Barada, Daisuke; Kong, Qing; Gu, Yan Jun; Wang, Ping Xiao; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Min

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ion beam has been used in cancer treatment, and has a unique preferable feature to deposit its main energy inside a human body so that cancer cell could be killed by the ion beam. However, conventional ion accelerator tends to be huge in its size and its cost. In this paper a future intense-laser ion accelerator is proposed to make the ion accelerator compact. Subjects and methods: An intense femtosecond pulsed laser was employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching and the ion particle energy control. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. Results: When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions are accelerated. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions was improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or by a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation was realized by holes behind the solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching were successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. Conclusions: The present study proposed a novel concept for a future compact laser ion accelerator, based on each component study required to control the ion beam quality and parameters. PMID:24155555

  16. Intense beams: The past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, G.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1998-06-01

    Nobody could have predicted the circuitous course of the last 30 years of progress in intense beams and pulsed power. There were many discoveries and twists and turns along the way, but the steady flow of understanding and technological advances has sustained the field. Pulsed power research began in the early 1960s with the development of the technology to test the reliability of nuclear weapons in a pulsed radiation environment. Because of the effort in the 1970s on an electron beam approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) at Sandia National Laboratories and at the Kurchatov Institute, simulation codes, diagnostics, and innovative pulsed power techniques such as self-magnetic insulation were developed. The electron approach ended in 1979, and the more promising ion approach continued. At the same time, z pinches, used since the early 1970s to evaluate the response of materials to keV X rays, were considered as an alternative to drive ICF capsules. The use of z pinches for ICF was discontinued in 1984 because of budget cuts and the belief that ions offered a route to the standoff requirement for energy applications. Now, in 1998, because of budget limitations and the 1995 discovery that the soft x-ray power achievable in a z-pinch implosion can be greatly enhanced, the ion approach has been suspended, and a new facility, X-1, proposed to achieve high yield in the laboratory with z pinches. In this paper the authors review the research paths that led to these changes, describe the present status of z pinches, and predict what the future holds. Although nobody can predict the future, the past 30 years have taught us some lessons that can be applied to the next 30 years. The paper concludes with some of these lessons learned.

  17. Fermilab HINS Proton Ion Source Beam Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, W.M.; Apollinari, G.; Chaurize, S.; Hays, S.; Romanov, G.; Scarpine, V.; Schmidt, C.; Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The proton ion source for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac front-end at Fermilab has been successfully commissioned. It produces a 50 keV, 3 msec beam pulse with a peak current greater than 20mA at 2.5Hz. The beam is transported to the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) by a low energy beam transport (LEBT) that consists of two focusing solenoids, four steering dipole magnets and a beam current transformer. To understand beam transmission through the RFQ, it is important to characterize the 50 keV beam before connecting the LEBT to the RFQ. A wire scanner and a Faraday cup are temporarily installed at the exit of the LEBT to study the beam parameters. Beam profile measurements are made for different LEBT settings and results are compared to those from computer simulations. In lieu of direct emittance measurements, solenoid variation method based on profile measurements is used to reconstruct the beam emittance.

  18. ITEP MEVVA ion beam for rhenium silicide production

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T.; Seleznev, D.; Kropachev, G.; Kozlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Yakushin, P.; Petrenko, S.; Gerasimenko, N.; Medetov, N.; Zaporozhan, O.

    2010-02-15

    The rhenium silicides are very attractive materials for semiconductor industry. In the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) at the ion source test bench the research program of rhenium silicide production by ion beam implantation are going on. The investigation of silicon wafer after implantation of rhenium ion beam with different energy and with different total dose were carried out by secondary ions mass spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis, and x-ray diffraction analysis. The first promising results of rhenium silicide film production by high intensity ion beam implantation are presented.

  19. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Qing

    2003-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O2+, BF2+, P+ etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF2+, over 90% of O2+ and P+ have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He+ beam is as high as 440 A/cm2 • Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O2+ ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O2+ ions with the dose of 1015 cm-2. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The

  20. Production of molecular ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Draganić, I. N.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Vane, C. R.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    An all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is tuned to create a variety of intense molecular ion beams for basic energy research. Based on simultaneous injection of several gases with spectroscopic high purity or enriched isotope content (e.g., H2, D2, N2, O2, or CO) and lower power microwave heating, the ECR ion source produces diatomic molecular ion beams of H2+, D2+, HD+, HO+, DO+, NH+, ND+, and more complex polyatomic molecular ions such as H3+, D3+, HD2+, H2O+, D2O+, H3O+, D3O+, and NHn+, NDn+ with n=2,3,4 and possibly higher. Molecular ion beams have been produced with very high current intensities compared to other molecular beam sources. The recorded molecular ion beam spectra are discussed.

  1. Emittance Growth in Intense Non-Circular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. A.

    1997-05-01

    The electrostatic energy of intense beams in linear uniform focusing channels is minimized when the initial beam configuration is both uniform and round.(In the case of quadrupole focusing, this means round on the average.) Deviations from either uniformity or roundness produce free energy and emittance growth. Over the past 25 years, the consequences of beam nonuniformity have been thoroughly investigated for the case of round beams. Recently, there has been interest in more complex beam configurations such as those that occur in Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) combiners or splitters. We discuss free energy and emittance growth for a variety of cases: (a) square beams, (b) hexagonal beams, (c) beams bounded by a quadrant or sextant of a circle, (d) rectangular beams, (e) elliptical beams, (f) pairs of beamlets, and (g) arrays of many beamlets. Cases (a) and (b) are approximations for large arrays of beamlets as proposed for HIF combiners or for negative-ion sources. Beam splitting, suggested for a particular HIF final focus scheme, leads to (c). The large emittance growth in cases (d)-(f), calculated by a new method,(O.A. Anderson, Proceedings of EPAC 96 conference.) illustrates the importance of maintaining symmetry. Practical examples are given for several cases.

  2. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  3. Facility for intense diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) development

    SciTech Connect

    Kasik, R.J.; Hinckley, W.B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1993-08-01

    An intense, pulsed neutral beam source is under development for use as a probe beam on hot, burning plasmas such as in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) which is presently in the planning stage. A pulsed, neutral hydrogen beam of 10s of kilo amperes of current can have an alpha particle, charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy (alpha-CHERS) signal-to-noise ratio of {approximately} 10. This beam would allow the measurement, on a single pulse of a few hundred nanoseconds duration, of the local alpha particle distribution function as well as other features of the tokamak plasma such as current density profile, impurity density, and microturbulence spectrum. The cross-sections for the CHERS diagnostic dictate operation with proton energies greater than {approximately}50keV. A pulsed neutral hydrogen source of this voltage and intensity can be achieved by neutralizing the ion flux from a magnetized ion-diode. The cross-sections for attachment and stripping, when coupled with scaling from Child-Langmiur, space-charge-limited, ion-current flow imply operation below - 100keV for maximum neutral fluence. The development of a flashover-anode, ion source for forthcoming evaluation of a neutralizing section is described below. This source operates in the accelerator voltage range 70 to 100keV. Eventually, the flashover-anode, magnetized ion-diode will be replaced with a plasma-anode, magnetized ion-diode.

  4. ION BEAM FOCUSING MEANS FOR CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1959-06-01

    An ion beam focusing arrangement for calutrons is described. It provides a virtual focus of origin for the ion beam so that the ions may be withdrawn from an arc plasma of considerable width providing greater beam current and accuracy. (T.R.H.)

  5. Ion beam deposited protective films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Single or dual ion beam sources were used to deposit thin films for different applications. Metal and metal oxide films were evaluated as protective coatings for the materials. Film adherence was measured and the most promising films were then tested under environments similar to operating conditions. It was shown that some materials do protect die material (H-13 steel) and do reduce thermal fatigue. Diamondlike films have many useful applications. A series of experiments were conducted to define and optimize new approaches to the manufacture of such films. A dual beam system using argon and methane gases was developed to generate these films.

  6. Radioactive Ion Beams and Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Morton, A. C.; Schaffer, P.

    2014-02-01

    Experiments performed at radioactive ion beam facilities shed new light on nuclear physics and nuclear structure, as well as nuclear astrophysics, materials science and medical science. The many existing facilities, as well as the new generation of facilities being built and those proposed for the future, are a testament to the high interest in this rapidly expanding field. The opportunities inherent in radioactive beam facilities have enabled the search for radioisotopes suitable for medical diagnosis or therapy. In this article, an overview of the production techniques and the current status of RIB facilities and proposals will be presented. In addition, accelerator-generated radiopharmaceuticals will be reviewed.

  7. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  8. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  9. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon

    1991-01-01

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  10. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  11. Ion beam microtexturing of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Some recent work in surface microtecturing by ion beam sputtering is described. The texturing is accomplished by deposition of an impurity onto a substrate while simultaneously bombarding it with an ion beam. A summary of the theory regarding surface diffusion of impurities and the initiation of cone formation is provided. A detailed experimental study of the time-development of individual sputter cones is described. A quasi-liquid coating was observed that apparently reduces the sputter rate of the body of a cone compared to the bulk material. Experimental measurements of surface diffusion activation energies are presented for a variety of substrate-seed combinations and range from about 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. Observations of apparent crystal structure in sputter cones are discussed. Measurements of the critical temperature for cone formation are also given along with a correlation of critical temperature with substrate sputter rate.

  12. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  13. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Numerical study on the thermo-stress of ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings by high-intensity pulsed ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Liu, Chen; Zhu Xiao, Peng; Lei, Kai Ming

    2009-11-01

    This paper studies numerically the thermo-mechanical effects of ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) irradiated by a high-intensity pulsed ion beam in consideration of the surface structure. Taking the deposited energy of ion beams in TBCs as the source term in the thermal conduction equation, the distribution of temperature in TBCs was simulated. Then, based on the distribution, the evolution of thermal stress was calculated by the finite element method. The results show that tensile radial stress formed at the valley of TBC surfaces after irradiation by HIPIB. Therefore, if cracks happen, they must be at valleys instead of peaks. As for the stress waves, no matter whether through peak or valley position, tensile and compressive stresses are present alternately inside TBCs along the depth direction, and the strength of stress decreases with time.

  15. Analytical Solutions for the Nonlinear Longitudinal Drift Compression (Expansion) of Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-09

    To achieve high focal spot intensities in heavy ion fusion, the ion beam must be compressed longitudinally by factors of ten to one hundred before it is focused onto the target. The longitudinal compression is achieved by imposing an initial velocity profile tilt on the drifting beam. In this paper, the problem of longitudinal drift compression of intense charged particle beams is solved analytically for the two important cases corresponding to a cold beam, and a pressure-dominated beam, using a one-dimensional warm-fluid model describing the longitudinal beam dynamics.

  16. Neurosurgical applications of ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Jacob I.; Levy, Richard P.; Phillips, Mark H.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Lyman, John T.

    1989-04-01

    The program at Donner Pavilion has applied nuclear medicine research to the diagnosis and radiosurgical treatment of life-threatening intracranial vascular disorders that affect more than half a million Americans. Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery, using narrow beams of heavy ions, demonstrates superior biological and physical characteristics in brain over X-and γ-rays, viz., improved dose distribution in the Bragg peak and sharp lateral and distal borders and less scattering of the beam. Examination of CNS tissue response and alteration of cerebral blood-flow dynamics related to heavy-ion Bragg peak radiosurgery is carried out using three-dimensional treatment planning and quantitative imaging utilizing cerebral angiography, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cine-CT, xenon X-ray CT and positron emission tomography (PET). Also under examination are the physical properties of narrow heavy-ion beams for improving methods of dose delivery and dose distribution and for establishing clinical RBE/LET and dose-response relationships for human CNS tissues. Based on the evaluation and treatment with stereotactically directed narrow beams of heavy charged particles of over 300 patients, with cerebral angiography, CT scanning and MRI and PET scanning of selected patients, plus extensive clinical and neuroradiological followup, it appears that Stereotactic charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery obliterates intracranial arteriovenous malformations or protects against rebleeding with reduced morbidity and no mortality. Discussion will include the method of evaluation, the clinical research protocol, the Stereotactic neuroradiological preparation, treatment planning, the radiosurgery procedure and the protocol for followup. Emphasis will be placed on the neurological results, including the neuroradiological and clinical response and early and late delayed injury in brain leading to complications (including vasogenic edema

  17. Laser-driven shock acceleration of monoenergetic ion beams.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, F; Stockem, A; Boella, E; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Haberberger, D; Tochitsky, S; Gong, C; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2012-11-21

    We show that monoenergetic ion beams can be accelerated by moderate Mach number collisionless, electrostatic shocks propagating in a long scale-length exponentially decaying plasma profile. Strong plasma heating and density steepening produced by an intense laser pulse near the critical density can launch such shocks that propagate in the extended plasma at high velocities. The generation of a monoenergetic ion beam is possible due to the small and constant sheath electric field associated with the slowly decreasing density profile. The conditions for the acceleration of high-quality, energetic ion beams are identified through theory and multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The scaling of the ion energy with laser intensity shows that it is possible to generate ~200 MeV proton beams with state-of-the-art 100 TW class laser systems.

  18. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  19. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Kovarik, Vincent J.; Prelec, Krsto

    1990-01-01

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source.

  20. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  1. Delivering the world's most intense muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S.; D'Arcy, R.; Edmonds, A.; Fukuda, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Hino, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Lancaster, M.; Mori, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Tran, N. H.; Truong, N. M.; Wing, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2017-03-01

    A new muon beam line, the muon science innovative channel, was set up at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, in Osaka, Japan, using the 392 MeV proton beam impinging on a target. The production of an intense muon beam relies on the efficient capture of pions, which subsequently decay to muons, using a novel superconducting solenoid magnet system. After the pion-capture solenoid, the first 36° of the curved muon transport line was commissioned and the muon flux was measured. In order to detect muons, a target of either copper or magnesium was placed to stop muons at the end of the muon beam line. Two stations of plastic scintillators located upstream and downstream from the muon target were used to reconstruct the decay spectrum of muons. In a complementary method to detect negatively charged muons, the x-ray spectrum yielded by muonic atoms in the target was measured in a germanium detector. Measurements, at a proton beam current of 6 pA, yielded (10.4 ±2.7 )×1 05 muons per watt of proton beam power (μ+ and μ-), far in excess of other facilities. At full beam power (400 W), this implies a rate of muons of (4.2 ±1.1 )×1 08 muons s-1 , among the highest in the world. The number of μ- measured was about a factor of 10 lower, again by far the most efficient muon beam produced. The setup is a prototype for future experiments requiring a high-intensity muon beam, such as a muon collider or neutrino factory, or the search for rare muon decays which would be a signature for phenomena beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Such a muon beam can also be used in other branches of physics, nuclear and condensed matter, as well as other areas of scientific research.

  2. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  3. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  4. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  5. Nanofabrication by Focused Ion Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-28

    MASTER COPY KEEP THIS COPY FOR REPRODUCTION PURPOSES AD-A271 290 )N PAGE orhan Sand .01fMI.,r re ~’.nq tn., Oiurda N0o.me 0& Of .018l 04v~~t P - .L...Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; N, S c; . DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED u..d.. `. B y .. . . . . . .. Dist A-jr I...defined sidewalls indicate that much finer lithography would be possible with a1 more optimum beam. b ) Preferential Oxide growth after ion exposure. (In

  6. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-01

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) {sup 252}Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) {ge} 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 10{sup 7} ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 10{sup 9} ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  7. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-01

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) 252Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) >= 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 107 ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 109 ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  8. EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.; Alessi, J.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2010-07-20

    The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) {sup 252}Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) {ge} 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 10{sup 7} ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 10{sup 9} ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

  9. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  10. The electromagnetic ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter Gary, S.; Schriver, David

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities driven by an anisotropic, relatively cool ion beam are studied for the case in which both the beam and the instabilities propagate parallel or antiparallel to a uniform magnetic field. At modest beam-core relative drift speeds, sufficiently large perpendicular-to-parallel beam temperature ratios and sufficiently large plasma beta, the mode of fastest growth rate is the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability. Because the right-hand polarized waves observed upstream of slow shocks in the earth's magnetotail can lead to the appropriate beam anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability may be present and account for the left-hand polarized magnetic waves observed there. Also, because of its relatively low phase speed, the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability may provide the scattering necessary for ion Fermi acceleration at slow shocks of sufficiently high plasma beta.

  11. Negative Ion Beam Extraction and Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Andrew J. T.

    2007-08-10

    The use of magnetic fields to both aid the production of negative ions and suppress the co-extracted electrons causes the emittance and hence the divergence of the negative ion beam to increase significantly due to the plasma non-uniformity from jxB drift. This drift distorts the beam-plasma meniscus and experimental results of the beam emittance are presented, which show that non-uniformity causes the square of the emittance to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the extracted current density. This can cause the divergence of the negative ion beam to be significantly larger than its positive ion counterpart. By comparing results from positive and negative ion beam emittances from the same source, it is also possible to draw conclusions about their vulnerability to magnetic effects. Finally emittances of caesiated and un-caesiated negative ion beams are compared to show how the surface and volume modes of production interact.

  12. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. But, we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. Furthermore, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2014. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  13. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    DOE PAGES

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. But, we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. Furthermore, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2014. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion sourcemore » for regular operation.« less

  14. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  15. Plasma formed ion beam projection lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette; Ngo, Vinh; Zahir, Nastaran

    2002-01-01

    A plasma-formed ion-beam projection lithography (IPL) system eliminates the acceleration stage between the ion source and stencil mask of a conventional IPL system. Instead a much thicker mask is used as a beam forming or extraction electrode, positioned next to the plasma in the ion source. Thus the entire beam forming electrode or mask is illuminated uniformly with the source plasma. The extracted beam passes through an acceleration and reduction stage onto the resist coated wafer. Low energy ions, about 30 eV, pass through the mask, minimizing heating, scattering, and sputtering.

  16. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  17. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  18. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-06-09

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  19. Ohmic heated sheet for the Ca ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A.; Bogomolov, S.; Kazarinov, N.; Kochagov, O.; Loginov, V.

    2008-02-15

    The production of intense accelerated {sup 48}Ca ion beams is the key problem in the experiments on the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. For this purpose in the FLNR (JINR), an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used at the U-400 cyclotron. The combination of a micro oven with a hot tantalum sheet inside the discharge chamber allowed the production of the intense {sup 48}Ca{sup 5+} ion beam at the {sup 48}Ca consumption of about 0.5 mg/h. In this case, the tantalum sheet is heated by microwaves and plasma electrons. The microwave power of up to 500 W is required to heat the sheet to the temperature of about 500 deg. C. To decrease the required microwave power, a new sheet with a direct Ohmic heating was designed. The present paper describes the method, technique, and preliminary experimental results on the production of the Ca ion beam.

  20. Plating Processes Utilizing High Intensity Acoustic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor); Denofrio, Charles (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and a method for selective plating processes are disclosed which use directed beams of high intensity acoustic waves to create non-linear effects that alter and improve the plating process. The directed beams are focused on the surface of an object, which in one embodiment is immersed in a plating solution, and in another embodiment is suspended above a plating solution. The plating processes provide precise control of the thickness of the layers of the plating, while at the same time, in at least some incidents, eliminates the need for masking.

  1. Ion Beam Bombardment of Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Vilaithong, T.; Phanchaisri, B.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Brown, I. G.

    2003-10-01

    While ion implantation has become a well-established technique for the surface modification of inorganic materials, the ion bombardment of cellular tissue has received little research attention. A program in ion beam bioengineering has been initiated at Chiang Mai University, and the ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (E. coli) has been demonstrated. Subsequent work has been directed toward exploration of ion beam bombardment of plant cells in an effort to understand the possible mechanisms involved in the DNA transfer. In particular, ion beam bombardment of onion cells was carried out and the effects investigated. Among the novel features observed is the formation of "microcraters" - sub-micron surface features that could provide a pathway for the transfer of large molecules into the interior cell region. Here we describe our onion skin ion bombardment investigations.

  2. Ion beam texturing of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Textured surfaces, typically with conical structures, have been produced previously by simultaneously etching a surface and seeding that surface with another material. A theory based on surface diffusion predicts a variation in cone spacing with surface temperature, as well as a critical temperature below which cones will not form. Substantial agreement with theory has been found for several combinations of seed and surface materials, including one with a high sputter yield seed on a low sputter yield surface (gold on aluminum). Coning with this last combination was predicted by the theory for a sufficiently mobile seed material. The existence of a minimum temperature for the formation of cones should also be important to those interested in ion-beam machining smooth surfaces. Elements contained in the environmental contaminants or in the sputtered alloys or compounds may serve as seed material.

  3. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is <2.5 eV [2]. Using a simple Einzel lens with magnification of about 0.1, a focused current density of about 40 mAcm-2 is obtained. It is estimated that an additional magnification of about 0.1 can yield a focused current density of > 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  4. Coherent light in intense spatiospectral twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřina, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Intense spatio-spectral twin beams generated in the regime with pump depletion are analyzed applying a suggested quantum model that treats the signal, idler, and pump fields in the same way. The model assumes the signal and idler fields in the form of the generalized superposition of signal and noise and reveals nonzero signal coherent components in both fields, contrary to the models developed earlier. The influence of coherent components on the properties of intense twin beams is elucidated. The interference pattern formed in the process of sum-frequency generation and that of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer are shown to be able to experimentally confirm the presence of coherent components.

  5. HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUAL NATIONAL LABORATORY 3nd QUARTER 2009 MILESTONE REPORT: Upgrade plasma source configuration and carry out initial experiments. Characterize improvements in focal spot beam intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.; Anders, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Dorf, M.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.; Greenway, W.; Grote, D.; Jung, J.Y.; Katayanagi, T.; Logan, B.G.; Lee, C.W.; Leitner, M.; Ni, P.; Pekedis, A.; Regis, M. J.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W.

    2009-06-30

    Simulations suggest that the plasma density must exceed the beam density throughout the drift compression and focusing section in order to inhibit the space charge forces that would limit the spot size and beam intensity on the target. WDM experiments will therefore require plasma densities up to 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 3}, with the highest density in the last few centimeters before the target. This work was guided by the simulations performed for the FY09 Q1 milestone. This milestone has been met and we report results of modifications made to the NDCX beamline to improve the longitudinal and radial distribution of the neutralizing plasma in the region near the target plane. In Section 2, we review pertinent simulation results from the FY09 Q1 milestone. Section 3 describes the design, and beam measurements following installation, of a biased, self-supporting metal grid that produces neutralizing electrons from glancing interception of beam ions. Section 4 describes the design and initial testing of a compact Ferro-Electric Plasma Source (FEPS) that will remove the remaining 'exclusion zone' in the neutralizing plasma close to the target plane. Section 5 describes the modification of the beamline to decrease the gap between the FEPS section exit and the final focus solenoid (FFS). Section 6 presents a summary and conclusions.

  6. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Lykke, Keith R.; Lill, Thorsten B.

    2000-01-01

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  7. Positron microanalysis with high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more common applications for a high intensity slow positron facility will be microanalysis of solid materials. In the first section of this paper some examples are given of procedures that can be developed. Since most of the attendees of this workshop are experts in positron spectroscopy, comprehensive descriptions will be omitted. With the exception of positron emission microscopy, most of the procedures will be based on those already in common use with broad beams. The utility of the methods have all been demonstrated, but material scientists use very few of them because positron microbeams are not generally available. A high intensity positron facility will make microbeams easier to obtain and partially alleviate this situation. All microanalysis techniques listed below will have a common requirement, which is the ability to locate the microscopic detail or area of interest and to focus the positron beam exclusively on it. The last section of this paper is a suggestion of how a high intensity positron facility might be designed so as to have this capability built in. The method will involve locating the specimen by scanning it with the microbeam of positrons and inducing a secondary electron image that will immediately reveal whether or not the positron beam is striking the proper portion of the specimen. This scanning positron microscope' will be a somewhat prosaic analog of the conventional SEM. It will, however, be an indispensable utility that will enhance the practicality of positron microanalysis techniques. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Beam instrumentation for the BNL Heavy Ion Transfer Line

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.L.; Buxton, W.; Castillo, V.; Feigenbaum, I.; Lazos, A.; Li, Z.G.; Smith, G.; Stoehr, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Transfer Line (HITL) was constructed to transport beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff (TVDG) to be injected into the AGS. Because the beam line is approximately 2000 feet long and the particle rigidity is so low, 20 beam monitor boxes were placed along the line. The intensity ranges from 1 to 100 nanoAmps for the dc trace beam used for line set-up, to over 100 ..mu..A for the pulsed beam to be injected into the AGS. Profiles are measured using multiwire arrays (HARPS) while Faraday cups and beam transformers monitor the intensity. The electronics stations are operated through 3 Instrumentation Controllers networked to Apollo workstations in the TVDG and AGS control rooms. Details of the detectors and electronics designs and performance will be given.

  9. High-intensity sources for light ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1995-10-01

    The use of the multicusp plasma generator as a source of light ions is described. By employing radio-frequency induction discharge, the performance of the multicusp source is greatly improved, both in lifetime and in high brightness H{sup +} and H{sup {minus}} beam production. A new technique for generating multiply-charged ions in this type of ion source is also presented.

  10. Ion beam microtexturing and enhanced surface diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed with particular emphasis on microtexturing induced by the deliberate deposition of controllable amounts of an impurity material onto a solid surface while simultaneously sputtering the surface with an ion beam. Experimental study of the optical properties of microtextured surfaces is described. Measurements of both absorptance as a function of wavelength and emissivity are presented. A computer code is described that models the sputtering and ion reflection processes involved in microtexture formation.

  11. Electrical shielding box measurement of the negative hydrogen beam from Penning ion gauge ion source.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Yang, Z; Dong, P; long, J D; He, X Z; Wang, X; Zhang, K Z; Zhang, L W

    2012-06-01

    The cold-cathode Penning ion gauge (PIG) type ion source has been used for generation of negative hydrogen (H(-)) ions as the internal ion source of a compact cyclotron. A novel method called electrical shielding box dc beam measurement is described in this paper, and the beam intensity was measured under dc extraction inside an electrical shielding box. The results of the trajectory simulation and dc H(-) beam extraction measurement were presented. The effect of gas flow rate, magnetic field strength, arc current, and extraction voltage were also discussed. In conclusion, the dc H(-) beam current of about 4 mA from the PIG ion source with the puller voltage of 40 kV and arc current of 1.31 A was extrapolated from the measurement at low extraction dc voltages.

  12. Carbon ion beam triggers both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathway of apoptosis in HeLa and status of PARP-1 controls intensity of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Atanu; Sarma, Asitikantha; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P; Ghosh, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) carbon ion beam (CIB) is becoming very promising tool for various cancer treatments and is more efficient than conventional low LET gamma or X-rays to kill malignant or radio-resistant cells, although detailed mechanism of cell death is still unknown. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a key player in DNA repair and its inhibitors are well-known as radio-sensitizer for low LET radiation. The objective of our study was to find mechanism(s) of induction of apoptosis by CIB and role of PARP-1 in CIB-induced apoptosis. We observed overall higher apoptosis in PARP-1 knocked down HeLa cells (HsiI) compared with negative control H-vector cells after irradiation with CIB (0-4 Gy). CIB activated both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via caspase-9 and caspase-8 activation respectively, followed by caspase-3 activation, apoptotic body, nucleosomal ladder formation and sub-G1 accumulation. Apoptosis inducing factor translocation into nucleus in H-vector but not in HsiI cells after CIB irradiation contributed caspase-independent apoptosis. Higher p53 expression was observed in HsiI cells compared with H-vector after exposure with CIB. Notably, we observed about 37 % fall of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and mild activation of caspase-8 without any detectable apoptotic body formation in un-irradiated HsiI cells. We conclude that reduction of PARP-1 expression activates apoptotic signals via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in un-irradiated cells. CIB irradiation further intensified both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis synergistically along with up-regulation of p53 in HsiI cells resulting overall higher apoptosis in HsiI than H-vector.

  13. Beam ion confinement on NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hao, G. Z.; Podesta, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.

    2016-10-01

    A second and more tangential neutral beam line is a major upgrade component of the National Spherical Torus Experiment - Upgrade (NSTX-U) with the purpose of improving neutral beam current drive efficiency and providing more flexibility in current/pressure profile control. Good beam ion confinement is essential to achieve the anticipated improvements in performance. In the planned beam ion confinement experiment, various short and long (relative to fast ion slowing-down time) neutral beam (NB) pulses from six neutral beam sources will be injected into center-stack limited L-mode plasmas to characterize the beam ion confinement and distribution function produced by the new and the existing NBI lines. The neutron rate decay after the turn-off of short NB pulses will be used to estimate the beam ion confinement time and to investigate its dependence on NB source/geometry, injection energy, and plasma current. The tangential and vertical Fast-Ion D-Alpha (FIDA) diagnostics and multi-view Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) arrays will be used to measure beam ion slowing-down distribution function and spatial profile during the injection of relatively long NB pulses. Beam ion prompt losses will be monitored with a scintillator Fast Lost Ion Probe (sFLIP) diagnostic. The experimental data and comparisons with classical predictions from NUBEAM modeling will be presented. Work supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC0209CH11466, DE-FG02-06ER54867, and DE-FG03-02ER54681.

  14. Beam structure and transverse emittance studies of high-energy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Schneider, J. D.

    1991-05-01

    A visual diagnostic technique was developed to monitor and study ion beam structure shape and size along a transport line. In this technique, a commercially available fluorescent screen is utilized in conjunction with a video camera. This visual representation of the beam structure is digitized and enhanced through use of false color coding and displayed on a TV monitor for on-line viewing. Digitized information is stored for further off-line processing (e.g., extraction of beam profiles). An optional wire grid placed upstream of the fluor screen adds the capability of transverse emittance (or angular spread) measurement to this technique. This diagnostic allows real time observation of the beam response to parameter changes (e.g., evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position).

  15. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivens, R.; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  16. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, R. Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  17. Ion-beam assisted, electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.

    1996-12-01

    Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) is a relatively new technology that has overcome some of the difficulties associated with chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and thermal spray processes. In the EB-PVD process, focused high-energy electron beams generated from electron guns are directed to melt and evaporate ingots, as well as preheat the substrate inside a vacuum chamber. By adding the assistance of ion beams to the process, coating density and adhesion are improved, while costs are reduced. This article describes physical vapor deposition and ion-beam processes, explains the advantages of EB-PVD, shows how ion beams optimize the benefits of EB-PVD, and enumerates a variety of applications.

  18. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Joshua (Inventor); Hubbell, Theodore E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A surface of a steel substrate is nitrided without external heating by exposing it to a beam of nitrogen ions under low pressure, a pressure much lower than that employed for ion-nitriding. An ion source is used instead of a glow discharge. Both of these features reduce the introduction of impurities into the substrate surface.

  19. Suppression of Beam-Ion Instability in Electron Rings with Multi-Bunch Train Beam Fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Fukuma, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-08-18

    The ion-caused beam instability in the future light sources and electron damping rings can be serious due to the high beam current and ultra-small emittance of picometer level. One simple and effective mitigation of the instability is a multi-bunch train beam filling pattern which can significantly reduce the ion density near the beam, and therefore reduce the instability growth rate up to two orders of magnitude. The suppression is more effective for high intensity beams with low emittance. The distribution and the field of trapped ions are benchmarked to validate the model used in the paper. The wake field of ion-cloud and the beam-ion instability is investigated both analytically and numerically. We derived a simple formula for the build-up of ion-cloud and instability growth rate with the multi-bunch-train filling pattern. The ion instabilities in ILC damping ring, SuperKEKB and SPEAR3 are used to compare with our analyses. The analyses in this paper agree well with simulations.

  20. Laser ion source for low charge heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura,M.; Pikin, A.; Zajic, V.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.

    2008-08-03

    For heavy ion inertial fusion application, a combination of a laser ion source and direct plasma injection scheme into an RFQ is proposed. The combination might provide more than 100 mA of singly charged heavy ion beam from a single laser shot. A planned feasibility test with moderate current is also discussed.

  1. Adaptive Vlasov Simulations of Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnendruecker, Eric; Gutnic, Michael; Haefele, Matthieu; Lemaire, Jean-Louis

    2005-06-08

    Most simulations of intense particle beams are performed nowadays using Particle In Cell (PIC) techniques. Direct grid based Vlasov methods have also been used but mostly for 1D simulations as they become very costly in higher dimensions when using uniform phase space grids. We have recently introduced adaptive mesh refinement techniques that allow us to automatically concentrate the grid points at places where the distribution function is varying most. In this paper we shall introduce this technique and show how it can be used to improve the efficiency of grid based Vlasov solvers.

  2. Confined ion beam sputtering device and method

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A hollow cylindrical target, lined internally with a sputter deposit material and open at both ends, surrounds a substrate on which sputtered deposition is to be obtained. An ion beam received through either one or both ends of the open cylindrical target is forced by a negative bias applied to the target to diverge so that ions impinge at acute angles at different points of the cylindrical target surface. The ion impingement results in a radially inward and downstream directed flux of sputter deposit particles that are received by the substrate. A positive bias applied to the substrate enhances divergence of the approaching ion beams to generate a higher sputtered deposition flux rate. Alternatively, a negative bias applied to the substrate induces the core portion of the ion beams to reach the substrate and provide ion polishing of the sputtered deposit thereon.

  3. Confined ion beam sputtering device and method

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, D.J.

    1986-03-25

    A hollow cylindrical target, lined internally with a sputter deposit material and open at both ends, surrounds a substrate on which sputtered deposition is to be obtained. An ion beam received through either one or both ends of the open cylindrical target is forced by a negative bias applied to the target to diverge so that ions impinge at acute angles at different points of the cylindrical target surface. The ion impingement results in a radially inward and downstream directed flux of sputter deposit particles that are received by the substrate. A positive bias applied to the substrate enhances divergence of the approaching ion beams to generate a higher sputtered deposition flux rate. Alternatively, a negative bias applied to the substrate induces the core portion of the ion beams to reach the substrate and provide ion polishing of the sputtered deposit thereon.

  4. Charge breeding simulations for radioactive ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Variale, V.; Raino, A. C.; Clauser, T.

    2012-02-15

    The charge breeding technique is used for radioactive ion beam (RIB) production in order of optimizing the re-acceleration of the radioactive element ions produced by a primary beam in a thick target. Charge breeding is achieved by means of a device capable of increasing the ion charge state from 1+ to a desired value n+. In order to get high intensity RIB, experiments with charge breeding of very high efficiency could be required. To reach this goal, the charge breeding simulation could help to optimize the high charge state production efficiency by finding more proper parameters for the radioactive 1+ ions. In this paper a device based on an electron beam ion source (EBIS) is considered. In order to study that problem, a code already developed for studying the ion selective containment in an EBIS with RF quadrupoles, BRICTEST, has been modified to simulate the ion charge state breeding rate for different 1+ ion injection conditions. Particularly, the charge breeding simulations for an EBIS with a hollow electron beam have been studied.

  5. Advancement of highly charged ion beam production by superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L. Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Qian, C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Fang, X.

    2016-02-15

    At Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source SECRAL (Superconducting ECR ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) has been put into operation for about 10 years now. It has been the main working horse to deliver intense highly charged heavy ion beams for the accelerators. Since its first plasma at 18 GHz, R&D work towards more intense highly charged ion beam production as well as the beam quality investigation has never been stopped. When SECRAL was upgraded to its typical operation frequency 24 GHz, it had already showed its promising capacity of very intense highly charged ion beam production. And it has also provided the strong experimental support for the so called scaling laws of microwave frequency effect. However, compared to the microwave power heating efficiency at 18 GHz, 24 GHz microwave heating does not show the ω{sup 2} scale at the same power level, which indicates that microwave power coupling at gyrotron frequency needs better understanding. In this paper, after a review of the operation status of SECRAL with regard to the beam availability and stability, the recent study of the extracted ion beam transverse coupling issues will be discussed, and the test results of the both TE{sub 01} and HE{sub 11} modes will be presented. A general comparison of the performance working with the two injection modes will be given, and a preliminary analysis will be introduced. The latest results of the production of very intense highly charged ion beams, such as 1.42 emA Ar{sup 12+}, 0.92 emA Xe{sup 27+}, and so on, will be presented.

  6. Advancement of highly charged ion beam production by superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Yang, Y.; Qian, C.; Fang, X.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    At Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source SECRAL (Superconducting ECR ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) has been put into operation for about 10 years now. It has been the main working horse to deliver intense highly charged heavy ion beams for the accelerators. Since its first plasma at 18 GHz, R&D work towards more intense highly charged ion beam production as well as the beam quality investigation has never been stopped. When SECRAL was upgraded to its typical operation frequency 24 GHz, it had already showed its promising capacity of very intense highly charged ion beam production. And it has also provided the strong experimental support for the so called scaling laws of microwave frequency effect. However, compared to the microwave power heating efficiency at 18 GHz, 24 GHz microwave heating does not show the ω2 scale at the same power level, which indicates that microwave power coupling at gyrotron frequency needs better understanding. In this paper, after a review of the operation status of SECRAL with regard to the beam availability and stability, the recent study of the extracted ion beam transverse coupling issues will be discussed, and the test results of the both TE01 and HE11 modes will be presented. A general comparison of the performance working with the two injection modes will be given, and a preliminary analysis will be introduced. The latest results of the production of very intense highly charged ion beams, such as 1.42 emA Ar12+, 0.92 emA Xe27+, and so on, will be presented.

  7. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 μm-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25

  8. Time Resolved Imaging of Longitudinal Modulations in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    2007-11-01

    The longitudinal evolution of high intensity beams is not well understood despite its importance to the success of such applications as free electron lasers and light sources, heavy ion inertial fusion, and high energy colliders. For example any amplification of current modulations in an FEL photoinjector can lead to unwanted coherent synchrotron radiation further downstream in compression chicanes or bends. A significant factor usually neglected is the coupling to the transverse dynamics which can strongly affect the longitudinal evolution. Previous experiments at the University of Maryland have revealed much about the longitudinal physics of space-charge dominated beams by monitoring the evolution of longitudinal perturbations. For the first time, experimental results are presented here which reveal the effect of longitudinal perturbations on the transverse beam distribution, with the aid of several new diagnostics that capture detailed time-resolved density images. A longitudinal modulation of the particle density is deliberately generated at the source, and its evolution is tracked downstream using a number of diagnostics such as current monitors, high-resolution energy analyzers, as well as the transverse imaging devices. The latter consist of a high-resolution 16-bit gated camera coupled with very fast emitters such as prompt optical transition radiation (OTR) from an alumina screen, or fast Phosphor screens with 3-ns time resolution. Simulations using the particle-in-cell code WARP are applied to cross-check the experimental results. These experiments and especially the comparisons to simulation represent significant progress towards understanding the longitudinal physics of intense beams.

  9. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Babbush, C. A.; Vankampen, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic pros-thesis fixtion, and dental implants.

  10. Ion-beam technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Robson, R. R.; Sovey, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Ion propulsion research and development yields a mature technology that is transferable to a wide range of nonpropulsive applications, including terrestrial and space manufacturing. A xenon ion source was used for an investigation into potential ion-beam applications. The results of cathode tests and discharge-chamber experiments are presented. A series of experiments encompassing a wide range of potential applications is discussed. Two types of processes, sputter deposition, and erosion were studied. Some of the potential applications are thin-film Teflon capacitor fabrication, lubrication applications, ion-beam cleaning and polishing, and surface texturing.

  11. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Van Kampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters used as ion sources have demonstrated a unique capability to vary the surface morphology of surgical implant materials. The microscopically rough surface texture produced by ion beam sputtering of these materials may result in improvements in the biological response and/or performance of implanted devices. Control of surface roughness may result in improved attachment of the implant to soft tissue, hard tissue, bone cement, or components deposited from blood. Potential biomedical applications of ion beam texturing discussed include: vascular prostheses, artificial heart pump diaphragms, pacemaker fixation, percutaneous connectors, orthopedic prosthesis fixation, and dental implants.

  12. Ion Beam Scattering by Background Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Anne; Hughes, Thomas; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-11-01

    The presence of background gases can cause charged particle beams to become more diffuse due to scattering. Calculations for the transport of an ion beam have been performed using Aleph, a particle-in-cell plasma modeling code, and verified against a general envelop equation for charged particle beams. We have investigated the influence of background helium on the coherence and transmitted current of the ion beam. Collisions between ions and neutral particles were calculated assuming isotropic elastic scattering. Since this tends to predict larger scattering angles than are expected at high energies, these are conservative estimates for beam scattering. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  13. GISAXS analysis of ion beam modified films and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buljan, Maja; Karlušić, Marko; Nekić, Nikolina; Jerčinović, Marko; Bogdanović-Radović, Iva; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Radić, Nikola; Mekterović, Igor

    2017-03-01

    Simple and efficient methods for the accurate structural characterization of ion-beam modified materials are important due to their interesting properties and many applications. Here we demonstrate the application of the Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) method on the structural analysis of swift heavy ion-beam modified materials. Passing through a material, an accelerated ion usually modifies its surrounding causing the formation of nano-objects along its trajectory, called ion track. We show that GISAXS can be used to determine the structural properties of the nano-objects formed along the ion tracks, as well as their ordering properties. We have developed theoretical models describing GISAXS intensity distributions of the systems having different ordering types. The efficiencies of the models are tested on experimental examples.

  14. Tuning ferromagnetism by varying ion beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariwal, Rajesh V.; Malik, Hitendra K.; Asokan, K.

    2017-02-01

    Present study demonstrates a novel technique to tune the ferromagnetism at room temperature by varying the ion beam profiles from 3 to 7 mm during Carbon ion implantation in ZnO matrix and keeping other beam parameters constant. The interaction of implanted C ions with host ZnO matrix at different profiles result in variable ferromagnetism from 0.75 to 3.0  ×  10‑4 emu gm‑1 due to difference in the induced radiation pressure. Similar variation is also observed in the optical bandgap from 3.35 to 3.24 eV for different beam profiles. This study shows that the material properties can be tuned and controlled by the variation of beam profiles during the ion implantation.

  15. Biomedical applications of ion-beam technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Gibbons, D. F.; Vankampen, C. L.; Babbush, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Microscopically-rough surface texture of various biocompatible alloys and polymers produced by ion-beam sputtering may result in improvements in response of hard or soft tissue to various surgical implants.

  16. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  17. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  18. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  19. TXRF spectrometry at ion beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, V.; Egorov, E.; Afanas’ef, M.

    2017-02-01

    The work presents short discussion of TXRF and PIXE methods peculiarities. Taking into account of these peculiarities we elaborate the experimental scheme for TXRF measurements at ion beam excitation of characteristical fluorescence. The scheme is built on base of the planar X-ray waveguide-resonator with specific design. Features of the new experimental method and possibilities of Sokol-3 ion beam analytical complex were used for the method application in real measurements.

  20. Radioactive-ion-beam research at Livermore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, R. C.; Mathews, G. J.; Ward, R. A.; Woosley, S. E.

    1983-06-01

    The ability to produce secondary radioactive heavy ion beams which can be isolated, focused, and transported to a secondary target can enable reaction studies and other research with the approximately more than 1300 nuclei with decay lifetimes approximately more than 1 microsec. Current research in secondary beam production and future applications in astrophysics, nuclear structure, heavy ion physics, and radiotherapy are examined as well as associated spin off and technology transfer in applied physics.

  1. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  2. A future, intense source of negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefken, Hugh; Stein, Charles

    1994-01-01

    By directly heating lithium hydride in a vacuum, up to 18 micro-A/sq cm of negative hydrogen has been obtained from the crystal lattice. The amount of ion current extracted and analyzed is closely related to the temperature of the sample and to the rate at which the temperature is changed. The ion current appears to be emission limited and saturates with extraction voltage. For a fixed extraction voltage, the ion current could be maximized by placing a grid between the sample surface and the extraction electrode. Electrons accompanying the negative ions were removed by a magnetic trap. A Wein velocity filter was designed and built to provide definitive mass analysis of the extracted ion species. This technique when applied to other alkali hydrides may produce even higher intensity beams possessing low values of emittance.

  3. Heavy ion cocktail beams at the 88 inch Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; McMahan, Margaret A.; Argento, David; Gimpel, Thomas; Guy, Aran; Morel, James; Siero, Christine; Thatcher, Ray; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2002-09-03

    Cyclotrons in combination with ECR ion sources provide the ability to accelerate ''cocktails'' of ions. A cocktail is a mixture of ions of near-identical mass-to-charge (m/q) ratio. The different ions cannot be separated by the injector mass-analyzing magnet and are tuned out of the ion source together. The cyclotron then is utilized as a mass analyzer by shifting the accelerating frequency. This concept was developed soon after the first ECR ion source became operational at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and has since become a powerful tool in the field of heavy ion radiation effects testing. Several different ''cocktails'' at various energies are available at the 88-Inch cyclotron for radiation effect testing, covering a broad range of linear energy transfer and penetration depth. Two standard heavy ion cocktails at 4.5 MeV/nucleon and 10 MeV/nucleon have been developed over the years containing ions from boron to bismuth. Recently, following requests for higher penetration depths, a 15MeV/nucleon heavy ion cocktail has been developed. Up to nine different metal and gaseous ion beams at low to very high charge states are tuned out of the ion source simultaneously and injected together into the cyclotron. It is therefore crucial to balance the ion source very carefully to provide sufficient intensities throughout the cocktail. The paper describes the set-up and tuning of the ion source for the various heavy ion cocktails.

  4. Production of highly charged ion beams with SECRAL.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Zhao, H W; Lu, W; Zhang, X Z; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Cao, Y; Guo, X H; Ma, H Y; Zhao, H Y; Shang, Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Li, X X; Jin, T; Xie, D Z

    2010-02-01

    Superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an all-superconducting-magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged ion beams to meet the requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). To further enhance the performance of SECRAL, an aluminum chamber has been installed inside a 1.5 mm thick Ta liner used for the reduction of x-ray irradiation at the high voltage insulator. With double-frequency (18+14.5 GHz) heating and at maximum total microwave power of 2.0 kW, SECRAL has successfully produced quite a few very highly charged Xe ion beams, such as 10 e microA of Xe(37+), 1 e microA of Xe(43+), and 0.16 e microA of Ne-like Xe(44+). To further explore the capability of the SECRAL in the production of highly charged heavy metal ion beams, a first test run on bismuth has been carried out recently. The main goal is to produce an intense Bi(31+) beam for HIRFL accelerator and to have a feel how well the SECRAL can do in the production of very highly charged Bi beams. During the test, though at microwave power less than 3 kW, more than 150 e microA of Bi(31+), 22 e microA of Bi(41+), and 1.5 e microA of Bi(50+) have been produced. All of these results have again demonstrated the great capability of the SECRAL source. This article will present the detailed results and brief discussions to the production of highly charged ion beams with SECRAL.

  5. High Intensity Beam and X-Ray Converter Target Interactions and Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan; McCarrick, James F.; Guethlein, Gary; Caporaso, George J.; Chambers, Frank; Falabella, Steven; Lauer, Eugene; Richardson, Roger; Sampayan, Steve; Weir, John

    2002-12-01

    Ions extracted from a solid surface or plasma by impact of an high intensity and high current electron beam can partially neutralize the beam space charge and change the focusing system. We have investigated ion emission computationally and experimentally. By matching PIC simulation results with available experimental data, our finding suggests that if a mix of ion species is available at the emitting surface, protons dominate the backstreaming ion effects, and that, unless there is surface flashover, ion emission is source limited. We have also investigated mitigation, such as e-beam cleaning, laser cleaning and ion trapping with a foil barrier. The temporal behavior of beam spot size with a foil barrier and a focusing scheme to improve foil barrier performance are discussed.

  6. High Intensity Beam and X-Ray Converter Target Interactions and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Chem, Y-J; McCarrick, J F; Guethlein, G; Chambers, F; Falabella, S; Lauer, E; Richardson, R; Weir, J

    2002-07-31

    Ions extracted from a solid surface or plasma by impact of an high intensity and high current electron beam can partially neutralize the beam space charge and change the focusing system. We have investigated ion emission computationally and experimentally. By matching PIC simulation results with available experimental data, our finding suggests that if a mix of ion species is available at the emitting surface, protons dominate the backstreaming ion effects, and that, unless there is surface flashover, ion emission is source limited. We have also investigated mitigation, such as e-beam cleaning, laser cleaning and ion trapping with a foil barrier. The temporal behavior of beam spot size with a foil barrier and a focusing scheme to improve foil barrier performance are discussed.

  7. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the

  8. The effect of the dc bias voltage on the x-ray bremsstrahlung and beam intensities of medium and highly charged ions of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G.; Lakshmy, P. S.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2010-02-15

    X-ray bremsstrahlung measurements from the 18 GHz High Temperature Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source, Pantechnik-Delhi Ion Source were measured as a function of negative dc bias voltage, keeping all other source operating parameters fixed and the extraction voltage in the off condition. The optimization of medium and highly charged ions of argon with similar source operating parameters is described. It is observed that the high temperature component of the electron is altered significantly with the help of bias voltage, and the electron population has to be maximized for obtaining higher current.

  9. The effect of the dc bias voltage on the x-ray bremsstrahlung and beam intensities of medium and highly charged ions of argon.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Lakshmy, P S; Baskaran, R; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2010-02-01

    X-ray bremsstrahlung measurements from the 18 GHz High Temperature Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source, Pantechnik-Delhi Ion Source were measured as a function of negative dc bias voltage, keeping all other source operating parameters fixed and the extraction voltage in the off condition. The optimization of medium and highly charged ions of argon with similar source operating parameters is described. It is observed that the high temperature component of the electron is altered significantly with the help of bias voltage, and the electron population has to be maximized for obtaining higher current.

  10. The ADRIA project for high intensity radioactive beams production

    SciTech Connect

    Bisoffi, G.; Cavenago, M.; Dainelli, A.; Facco, A.; Fortuna, G.; Lombardi, A.; Moisio, M.F.; Pisent, A.; Spolaore, P.; Tiveron, B. ); Ruggiero, A.G. ); Tecchio, L. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Turin )

    1992-01-01

    A proposal of an accelerator complex (ADRIA) for the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) is described in this report. The main components of the complex are a Heavy Ion Injection system and two rings, a Booster and a Decelerator, both with a maximum rigidity of 22.25 Tm, connected by a Transfer Line where exotic proposal has two main goals consisting in the isotopes are produced and selected. The proposal has two main goals consisting in the acceleration of stable ion species up to kinetic energies of the order of few GeV/u, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with intensities of about 10[sup 12] ions per second, for fixed target experiments in nuclear physics and for the production of fully stripped radioactive beams, using particle fragmentation method for nuclear spectroscopy experiments. Fragments are accumulated in the Decelerator, with intensities 10[sup 8] [divided by] 10[sup 9] ions/s, cooled and delivered at the production energies or decelerated down to energies of few MeV/u, in proximity of the Coulomb barrier.

  11. The ADRIA project for high intensity radioactive beams production

    SciTech Connect

    Bisoffi, G.; Cavenago, M.; Dainelli, A.; Facco, A.; Fortuna, G.; Lombardi, A.; Moisio, M.F.; Pisent, A.; Spolaore, P.; Tiveron, B.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Tecchio, L. |

    1992-12-31

    A proposal of an accelerator complex (ADRIA) for the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) is described in this report. The main components of the complex are a Heavy Ion Injection system and two rings, a Booster and a Decelerator, both with a maximum rigidity of 22.25 Tm, connected by a Transfer Line where exotic proposal has two main goals consisting in the isotopes are produced and selected. The proposal has two main goals consisting in the acceleration of stable ion species up to kinetic energies of the order of few GeV/u, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with intensities of about 10{sup 12} ions per second, for fixed target experiments in nuclear physics and for the production of fully stripped radioactive beams, using particle fragmentation method for nuclear spectroscopy experiments. Fragments are accumulated in the Decelerator, with intensities 10{sup 8} {divided_by} 10{sup 9} ions/s, cooled and delivered at the production energies or decelerated down to energies of few MeV/u, in proximity of the Coulomb barrier.

  12. (211)Rn/(211)At and (209)At production with intense mass separated Fr ion beams for preclinical (211)At-based α-therapy research.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jason R; Kunz, Peter; Yang, Hua; Schaffer, Paul; Ruth, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Mass-separated francium beams ((211)Fr or (213)Fr) were implanted into solid targets for producing (211)Rn (14.6h half-life) or (209)At (5.41h), in situ. (211)Rn was transferred to dodecane and isolated from contaminants, providing sources for (211)At (7.21h) production by (211)Rn decay (73%). (209)At was recovered with high radionuclidic purity in aqueous solutions, directly. These experiments demonstrated Fr beam implantations as a novel method for producing preclinical quantities of (211)Rn/(211)At (for therapy) and (209)At (for imaging).

  13. Electrostatic lens to focus an ion beam to uniform density

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Cleland H.

    1977-01-11

    A focusing lens for an ion beam having a gaussian or similar density profile is provided. The lens is constructed to provide an inner zero electrostatic field, and an outer electrostatic field such that ions entering this outer field are deflected by an amount that is a function of their distance from the edge of the inner field. The result is a beam that focuses to a uniform density in a manner analogous to that of an optical ring lens. In one embodiment, a conically-shaped network of fine wires is enclosed within a cylindrical anode. The wire net together with the anode produces a voltage field that re-directs the outer particles of the beam while the axial particles pass undeflected through a zero field inside the wire net. The result is a focused beam having a uniform intensity over a given target area and at a given distance from the lens.

  14. Intense Microsecond Electron Beam Interactions with Low-Pressure Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    Gilgenbach, J. E. Tucker, and C. L. Enloe, Laser and Particle Beams, 6 687 (1988). 4) "Undulation of a Magnetized Electron Beam by a Periodic Ion...Excitation by Relativistic Electrons: I. Collisions Cross Sections and Deposition Efficiencies", Laser and Particle Beams 8 493 (1990) 11) D.B...McGarrah and M.L. Brake, Argon Ion Excitation by Relativistic Electrons: II. Chemical Kinetics", Laser and Particle Beams 8 507 (1990) 9 T-PS/18/3//35709

  15. Graphene engineering by neon ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Iberi, Vighter; Ievlev, Anton V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; ...

    2016-02-18

    Achieving the ultimate limits of materials and device performance necessitates the engineering of matter with atomic, molecular, and mesoscale fidelity. While common for organic and macromolecular chemistry, these capabilities are virtually absent for 2D materials. In contrast to the undesired effect of ion implantation from focused ion beam (FIB) lithography with gallium ions, and proximity effects in standard e-beam lithography techniques, the shorter mean free path and interaction volumes of helium and neon ions offer a new route for clean, resist free nanofabrication. Furthermore, with the advent of scanning helium ion microscopy, maskless He+ and Ne+ beam lithography of graphenemore » based nanoelectronics is coming to the forefront. Here, we will discuss the use of energetic Ne ions in engineering graphene devices and explore the mechanical, electromechanical and chemical properties of the ion-milled devices using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). By using SPM-based techniques such as band excitation (BE) force modulation microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the exact same devices can be quantitatively extracted. Additionally, the effect of defects inherent in ion beam direct-write lithography, on the overall performance of the fabricated devices is elucidated.« less

  16. Graphene engineering by neon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Iberi, Vighter; Ievlev, Anton V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Joy, David C.; Rondinone, Adam J.; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-02-18

    Achieving the ultimate limits of materials and device performance necessitates the engineering of matter with atomic, molecular, and mesoscale fidelity. While common for organic and macromolecular chemistry, these capabilities are virtually absent for 2D materials. In contrast to the undesired effect of ion implantation from focused ion beam (FIB) lithography with gallium ions, and proximity effects in standard e-beam lithography techniques, the shorter mean free path and interaction volumes of helium and neon ions offer a new route for clean, resist free nanofabrication. Furthermore, with the advent of scanning helium ion microscopy, maskless He+ and Ne+ beam lithography of graphene based nanoelectronics is coming to the forefront. Here, we will discuss the use of energetic Ne ions in engineering graphene devices and explore the mechanical, electromechanical and chemical properties of the ion-milled devices using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). By using SPM-based techniques such as band excitation (BE) force modulation microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the exact same devices can be quantitatively extracted. Additionally, the effect of defects inherent in ion beam direct-write lithography, on the overall performance of the fabricated devices is elucidated.

  17. Mass spectrometer and methods of increasing dispersion between ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.; Delmore, James E.

    2006-01-10

    A mass spectrometer includes a magnetic sector configured to separate a plurality of ion beams, and an electrostatic sector configured to receive the plurality of ion beams from the magnetic sector and increase separation between the ion beams, the electrostatic sector being used as a dispersive element following magnetic separation of the plurality of ion beams. Other apparatus and methods are provided.

  18. Particle radiotherapy with carbon ion beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy offers superior dose conformity in the treatment of deep-seated malignant tumours compared with conventional X-ray therapy. In addition, carbon ion beams have a higher relative biological effectiveness compared with protons or X-ray beams. The algorithm of treatment planning and beam delivery system is tailored to the individual parameters of the patient. The present article reviews the available literatures for various disease sites including the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer as well as physical and biological properties. PMID:23497542

  19. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  20. Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    2000-10-05

    High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings ({mu}SR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included.

  1. Laser-cooled continuous ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Hangst, J.S.; Nielsen, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    A collaboration with a group in Arhus, Denmark, using their storage ring ASTRID, brought about better understanding of ion beams cooled to very low temperatures. The longitudinal Schottky fluctuation noise signals from a cooled beam were studied. The fluctuation signals are distorted by the effects of space charge as was observed in earlier measurements at other facilities. However, the signal also exhibits previously unobserved coherent components. The ions` velocity distribution, measured by a laser fluorescence technique suggests that the coherence is due to suppression of Landau damping. The observed behavior has important implications for the eventual attainment of a crystalline ion beam in a storage ring. A significant issue is the transverse temperature of the beam -- where no direct diagnostics are available and where molecular dynamics simulations raise interesting questions about equilibrium.

  2. Ions beams and ferroelectric plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Anton

    Near-perfect space-charge neutralization is required for the transverse compression of high perveance ion beams for ion-beam-driven warm dense matter experiments, such as the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX). Neutralization can be accomplished by introducing a plasma in the beam path, which provides free electrons that compensate the positive space charge of the ion beam. In this thesis, charge neutralization of a 40 keV, perveance-dominated Ar+ beam by a Ferroelectric Plasma Source (FEPS) is investigated. First, the parameters of the ion beam, such as divergence due to the extraction optics, charge neutralization fraction, and emittance were measured. The ion beam was propagated through the FEPS plasma, and the effects of charge neutralization were inferred from time-resolved measurements of the transverse beam profile. In addition, the dependence of FEPS plasma parameters on the configuration of the driving pulser circuit was studied to optimize pulser design. An ion accelerator was constructed that produced a 30-50 keV Ar + beam with pulse duration <300 mus and dimensionless perveance Q up to 8 x 10-4. Transverse profile measurements 33 cm downstream of the ion source showed that the dependence of beam radius on Q was consistent with space charge expansion. It was concluded that the beam was perveance-dominated with a charge neutralization fraction of approximately zero in the absence of neutralizing plasma. Since beam expansion occurred primarily due to space charge, the decrease in effective perveance due to neutralization by FEPS plasma can be inferred from the reduction in beam radius. Results on propagation of the ion beam through FEPS plasma demonstrate that after the FEPS is triggered, the beam radius decreases to its neutralized value in about 5 mus. The duration of neutralization was about 10 mus at a charging voltage VFEPS = 5.5 kV and 35 mus at VFEPS = 6.5 kV. With VFEPS = 6.5 kV, the transverse current density profile 33 cm downstream

  3. Ion Beam Analysis applied to laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Macková, A.; Havranek, V.; Malinsky, P.; Torrisi, L.; Kormunda, M.; Barchuk, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudzak, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the research activity on Ion Beam Analysis methods performed at Tandetron Laboratory (LT) of the Institute of Nuclear Physics AS CR, Rez, Czech Republic. Recently, many groups are paying attention to implantation by laser generated plasma. This process allows to insert a controllable amount of energetic ions into the surface layers of different materials modifying the physical and chemical properties of the surface material. Different substrates are implanted by accelerated ions from plasma through terawatt iodine laser, at nominal intensity of 1015 W/cm2, at the PALS Research Infrastructure AS CR, in the Czech Republic. This regime of the laser matter interaction generates, multi-MeV proton beams, and multi-charged ions that are tightly confined in time (hundreds ps) and space (source radius of a few microns). These ion beams have a much lower transverse temperature, a much shorter duration and a much higher current than those obtainable from conventional accelerators. The implementation of protons and ions acceleration driven by ultra-short high intensity lasers is exhibited by adopting suitable irradiation conditions as well as tailored targets. An overview of implanted targets and their morphological and structural characterizations is presented and discussed.

  4. Transverse Beam Shape Measurements of Intense Proton Beams Using Optical Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpine, Victor E.

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  5. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  6. Ion beams from laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. H.; Anderson, R. J.; Gray, L. G.; Rosenfeld, J. P.; Manka, C. K.; Carruth, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the space-charge-limited beams produced by the plasma blowoffs generated by 20-MW bursts of 1.06-micron radiation from an active Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Laser power densities near 10 to the 11th/sq cm on solid targets generate thermalized plasma plumes which drift to a 15-kV gridded extraction gap where the ions are extracted, accelerated, and electrostatically focused; the spatially defined ion beams are then magnetically analyzed to determine the charge state content in the beams formed from carbon, aluminum, copper, and lead targets. This technique preserves time-of-flight (TOF) information in the plasma drift region, which permits plasma ion temperatures and mass flow velocities to be determined from the Maxwellian ion curve TOF shapes for the individual charge species.

  7. Fundamental Concepts of Ion-Beam Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averback, R. S.; Bellon, P.

    The basic concepts underlying the response of materials to ion-beam irradiation are outlined. These include the slowing of energetic ions, the creation of defects, sputtering, ion-beam mixing, the acceleration of kinetic processes, and phase transformations. Several examples are cited to illustrate how each of these concepts can be exploited to modify materials in ways not easily achieved, or not even possible, by more conventional processing methods. The chapter attempts to provide a physical understanding of the basic effects of ion-beam irradiation on materials, to enable readers in other areas of research to better understand the more technical chapters that follow, and to develop ideas relevant to their own disciplines. We provide references to more quantitative treatments of the topics covered here.

  8. Surface modification using ionic liquid ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, Gikan H.; Hamaguchi, Takuya; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ryuto, Hiromichi

    2014-12-01

    We developed an ionic liquid (IL) ion source using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6) and produced IL ion beams by applying a high electric field between the tip and the extractor. Time-of-flight measurements showed that small cluster and fragment ions were contained in the positive and negative ion beams. The positive and negative cluster ions were deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that the composition of the deposited layers was similar to that of an IL solvent. This suggests that a cation (A+) or an anion (B-) was attached to an IL cluster (AB)n, resulting in the formation of positive cluster ions (AB)nA+ or negative cluster ions (AB)nB-, respectively. The surfaces of the IL layers deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates were flat at an atomic level for positive and negative cluster ion irradiation. Moreover, the contact angles of the deposited layers were similar to that of the IL solvent. Thus, surface modification of Si(1 0 0) substrates was successfully demonstrated with BMIM-PF6 cluster ion beams.

  9. Far-field intensity of Lorentz related beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xi; Chen, Chidao; Chen, Bo; Peng, Yulian; Zhou, Meiling; Zhang, Liping; Li, Dongdong; Deng, Dongmei

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a sufficient condition under which the Lorentz beam convolution with other beams constitutes valid cross-spectral densities. Two examples are given to show how the Lorentz related beam can be used for generation of a far field being a modulated version of another one. The far-field intensity patterns in the Cartesian symmetries by the convolution operation of the Lorentz beams with multi-sinc beams, and the convolution operation of the Lorentz beams with multi-sinc Gaussian beams, are shown respectively. We find that different beam order can result distinct far field changes.

  10. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanism and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  11. Rhenium ion beam for implantation into semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Seleznev, D. N.; Alyoshin, M. E.; Kraevsky, S. V.; Yakushin, P. E.; Khoroshilov, V. V.; Gerasimenko, N. N.; Smirnov, D. I.; Fedorov, P. A.; Temirov, A. A.

    2012-02-15

    At the ion source test bench in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics the program of ion source development for semiconductor industry is in progress. In framework of the program the Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc ion source for germanium and rhenium ion beam generation was developed and investigated. It was shown that at special conditions of ion beam implantation it is possible to fabricate not only homogenous layers of rhenium silicides solid solutions but also clusters of this compound with properties of quantum dots. At the present moment the compound is very interesting for semiconductor industry, especially for nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, but there is no very developed technology for production of nanostructures (for example quantum sized structures) with required parameters. The results of materials synthesis and exploration are presented.

  12. Heavy ion beam studies and imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1981-03-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber is used to accurately measure intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. An imaging capability has now been developed for the system, allowing for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of radiological objects using heavy ion beams.

  13. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams.

  14. Fast ion beam-plasma interaction system.

    PubMed

    Breun, R A; Ferron, J R

    1979-07-01

    A device has been constructed for the study of the interaction between a fast ion beam and a target plasma of separately controllable parameters. The beam of either hydrogen or helium ions has an energy of 1-4 keV and a total current of 0.5-2 A. The beam energy and beam current can be varied separately. The ion source plasma is created by a pulsed (0.2-10-ms pulse length) discharge in neutral gas at up to 3 x 10(-3) Torr. The neutrals are pulsed into the source chamber, allowing the neutral pressure in the target region to remain less than 5 x 10(-5) Torr at a 2-Hz repetition rate. The creation of the source plasma can be described by a simple set of equations which predict optimum source design parameters. The target plasma is also produced by a pulsed discharge. Between the target and source chambers the beam is neutralized by electrons drawn from a set of hot filaments. Currently under study is an unstable wave in a field-free plasma excited when the beam velocity is nearly equal to the target electron thermal velocity (v(beam) approximately 3.5 x 10(7) cm/s, Te = 0.5 eV).

  15. Development of a radio-frequency ion beam source for fast-ion studies on the large plasma device.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, S K P; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W

    2011-09-01

    A helium ion beam source (23 kV/2.0 A) has been constructed for studying fast-ion physics in the cylindrical magnetized plasma of the large plasma device (LAPD). An inductive RF source produces a 10(19) m(-3) density plasma in a ceramic dome. A multi-aperture, rectangular (8 cm × 8 cm) three-grid system extracts the ion beam from the RF plasma. The ion beam is injected at a variety of pitch angles with Alfvénic speeds in the LAPD. The beam current is intense enough to excite magnetic perturbations in the ambient plasma. Measurements of the ion beam profile were made to achieve an optimum beam performance and a reliable source operation was demonstrated on the LAPD.

  16. Longitudinal Density Modulation and Energy Conversion in Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J; Neumann, J; Tian, K; O'Shea, P

    2006-02-17

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may under some circumstances be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams, and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams.

  17. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for

  18. First atomic physics experiments with cooled stored ion beams at the Heidelberg heavy-ion ring TSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Balykin, V.; Baumann, W.; Berger, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Blatt, P.; Blum, M.; Faulstich, A.; Friedrich, A.; Gerhard, M.; Geyer, C.; Grieser, M.; Grieser, R.; Habs, D.; Heyng, H.W.; Hochadel, B.; Holzer, B.; Huber, G.; Jaeschke, E.; Jung, M.; Karafillidis, A.; Kilgus, G.; Klein, R.; Kraemer, D.; Krause, P.; Krieg, M.; Kuehl, T.; Matl, K.; Mueller, A.; Music, M.; Neumann, R.; Neureither, G.; Ott, W.; Petrich, W.; Povh, B.; Repnow, R.; Schroeder, S.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Sigray, P.; Steck, M.; Stokstad, R.; Szmola, E.; Wagner, M.; Wanner, B.; Welti, K.; Zwickler, S. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg Manne Siegbahn Institute , Stockholm Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung , Darmstadt (Fed

    1990-06-01

    An overview of atomic physics experiments at the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) is given. Highly charged ions up to fully stripped silicon have been stored at energies between 4 and 12 MeV/u. The enhancement of the beam intensity by stacking, the beam lifetime, and electron cooling of these ion beams are discussed. Radiative and state-selective dielectronic recombination rates of hydrogen-like oxygen ions with free electrons from the electron cooler were measured. Beam noise spectra are being investigated with regard to collective effects caused by the Coulomb interaction in the cold ion beams. Resonance fluorescence from stored single-charged ions was observed using tunable narrow-band lasers. First indications of laser cooling in a storage ring were seen.

  19. The SPES Radioactive-Ion Beam Facility of INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.; Calabretta, L.

    2015-11-01

    A new radioactive-ion beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using a UCx direct target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam will be provided by a high-current cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions will be produced by proton-induced fission on a uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes will be re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107-109 pps. The aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high-intensity radioactive-ion beams of neutron-rich nuclei for nuclear physics research, as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radioisotope production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  20. The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility of INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Spes Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-02-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 40 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  1. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modeling for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mikkelsen; D.S. Darrow; L. Grisham; R. Akers; S. Kaye

    1999-06-01

    A numerical model, EIGOL, has been developed to calculate the loss rate of neutral beam ions from NSTX and the resultant power density on the plasma facing components. This model follows the full gyro-orbit of the beam ions, which can be a significant fraction of the minor radius. It also includes the three-dimensional structure of the plasma facing components inside NSTX. Beam ion losses from two plasma conditions have been compared: {beta} = 23%, q{sub 0} = 0.8, and {beta} = 40%, q{sub 0} = 2.6. Global losses are computed to be 4% and 19%, respectively, and the power density on the rf antenna is near the maximum tolerable levels in the latter case.

  2. Ion beam and laser induced surface modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    The capabilities of energetic ion beam and laser processing of surfaces are reviewed. Ion implantation doping, ion beam mixing, and laser and electron beam processing techniques are capable of producing new and often unique surface properties. The inherent control of these techniques has led to significant advances in our ability to tailor the properties of solids for a wide range of technological applications. Equally important, these techniques have allowed tests of fundamental materials interactions under conditions not heretofore achievable and have resulted in increased understanding of a broad range of materials phenomena. These include new metastable phase formation, rapid nucleation and crystal growth kinetics, amorphous metals and metaglasses, supersaturated solid solutions and substitutional alloys, interface interactions, solute trapping, laser-assisted chemical modifications, and a host of other.

  3. Radiotherapy with beams of carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Kraft, Gerhard

    2005-08-01

    In cancer treatment, the introduction of MeV bremsstrahlung photons has been instrumental in delivering higher doses to deep-seated tumours, while reducing the doses absorbed by the surrounding healthy tissues. Beams of protons and carbon ions have a much more favourable dose-depth distribution than photons (called 'x-rays' by medical doctors) and are the new frontiers of cancer radiation therapy. Section 2 presents the status of the first form of hadrontherapy which uses beams of 200-250 MeV protons. The central part of this review is devoted to the discussion of the physical, radiobiological and clinical bases of the use of 400 MeV µ-1 carbon ions in the treatment of radio-resistant tumours. These resist irradiation with photon as well as proton beams. The following section describes the carbon ion facilities that are either running or under construction. Finally, the projects recently approved or proposed are reviewed here.

  4. Scanning He+ Ion Beam Microscopy and Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2011-11-10

    The CD-SEM has been the tool of choice for the imaging and metrology of semiconductor devices for the past three decades but now, with critical dimensions at the nanometer scale, electron beam instruments can no longer deliver adequate performance. A scanning microscope using a He+ ion beam offers superior resolution and depth of field, and provides enhanced imaging contrast. Device metrology performed using ion beam imaging produces data which is comparable to or better than that from a conventional CD-SEM although there are significant differences in the experimental conditions required and in the details of image formation. The charging generated by a He+ beam, and the sample damage that it can cause, require care in operation but are not major problems.

  5. Development of an external beam ion milliprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, Stephan A.

    1990-05-01

    The goals of this Trident Project were the design, construction, testing, and initial application of an external beam ion milliprobe. The ion milliprobe is a tool for elemental analysis that employs the 1.7 million volt tandem electrostatic accelerator in Michelson C-7 to provide a beam of charged particles. The mechanism used for the analysis of elemental concentration is particle induced x ray emission (PIXE). This technique involves detecting and counting the x rays produced when the focused beam of charged particles strikes the sample to be analyzed. The design and construction of several essential specialized devices is described including an electrostatic quadrupole triplet lens, a current measuring collimator, an exit tip, and a sample enclosure. The procedures necessary to align, focus, and determine the size of the beam are discussed. Finally, the results of the initial analysis are evaluated and presented.

  6. Simulation study of LEBT for transversely coupled beam from an ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Dou, W. P.; Sun, L. T.; Yao, Q. G.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, Y. J.; He, Y.; Zh, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    A Low-Energy intense-highly charged ion Accelerator Facility (LEAF) program has been launched at Institute of Modern Physics. This accelerator facility consists of a superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system, and a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). It is especially of interest for the extracted ion beam from the ECR ion source, which is transversely coupled, and this property will significantly affect the beam transmission in the LEBT line and the matching with the downstream RFQ. In the beam transport design of LEAF, beam decoupling in the LEBT is considered to lower down the projection emittances and the feasibility of the design has been verified by beam simulation with a transversely coupled beam from the ECR ion source.

  7. Simulation study of LEBT for transversely coupled beam from an ECR ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Dou, W. P.; Sun, L. T.; Yao, Q. G.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, Y. J.; He, Y.; Zh, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-15

    A Low-Energy intense-highly charged ion Accelerator Facility (LEAF) program has been launched at Institute of Modern Physics. This accelerator facility consists of a superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system, and a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). It is especially of interest for the extracted ion beam from the ECR ion source, which is transversely coupled, and this property will significantly affect the beam transmission in the LEBT line and the matching with the downstream RFQ. In the beam transport design of LEAF, beam decoupling in the LEBT is considered to lower down the projection emittances and the feasibility of the design has been verified by beam simulation with a transversely coupled beam from the ECR ion source.

  8. Focused-Ion-Beam Material Removal Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    AD-A270 852 SIll II 111111111 lillI I ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Focused -Ion-Beam Material Removal Rates by Bruce GeOl ARL-MR-1 14 September 1993 93...DATES COVERED September 1993 Summary, January 1991-present 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Focused -Ion-Beam Material Removal Rates PE: 91A 6...AUTHOR( S ) Bruce Geil 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION U.S. Army Research Laboratory REPORT NUMBER Attn

  9. Plasma effects of active ion beam injections in the ionosphere at rocket altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Kintner, P. M.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Data from ARCS rocket ion beam injection experiments are primarily discussed. There are three results from this series of active experiments that are of particular interest in space plasma physics. These are the transverse acceleration of ambient ions in the large beam volume, the scattering of beam ions near the release payload, and the possible acceleration of electrons very close to the plasma generator which produce intense high frequency waves. The ability of 100 ma ion beam injections into the upper E and F regions of the ionosphere to produce these phenomena appear to be related solely to the process by which the plasma release payload and the ion beam are neutralized. Since the electrons in the plasma release do not convect with the plasma ions, the neutralization of both the payload and beam must be accomplished by large field-aligned currents (milliamperes/square meter) which are very unstable to wave growth of various modes.

  10. Beam Extraction from Laser Driven Multi-Charged Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O A; Logan, B G

    2001-03-19

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. They discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1-MV beam of Xe{sup 16+} ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. The design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from the initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. They conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 amperes.

  11. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  12. Ion beam sculpting molecular scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Derek Martin

    We envision solid-state nanopores at the heart of a device capable of detecting, manipulating, and ultimately sequencing individual DNA molecules. To reliably fabricate holes whose diameter is commensurate with that of the DNA molecule (˜2nm), low energy ion beams are employed to tailor the size of holes in solid-state membranes by a new technique we call "ion beam sculpting". The transmission rate of ions through the hole is monitored to provide a direct, real-time measure of the hole area that is used as a feedback signal to trigger the termination of the ion irradiation process when the desired hole size is obtained. The sensitivity of the transmitted ion count rate to atomic-scale material rearrangements at the perimeter of a hole led to a surprising discovery: Low-energy ion beams stimulate the lateral transport of matter when incident on a surface, resulting in the growth of a thin film from the boundary of a hole that closes the hole. The net flow of matter is determined by a competition between sputter erosion, which opens the hole, and a hole closing process that dominates at high temperature and low flux. The timescale for lateral matter transport under ion irradiation is surprisingly long---on the order of a second. Two physical models are proposed to account for the surprising ion-stimulated transport of matter. One model is based on the viscous flow of a stressed surface layer, while the other is based on the diffusion of mobile, ion-stimulated species at the surface of the material into the hole. The predictions of the latter are compared to ion beam sculpting experiments. We exploit ion beam sculpting to fabricate solid-state nanopores used as electronic detectors of individual DNA molecules. In ionic solution, negatively charged DNA molecules are drawn to the nanopore by an applied electrochemical potential, resulting in a detectable characteristic ionic current blockade when a molecules occludes the nanopore. The applicability of the ion sculpting

  13. Dynamics of the ion-ion acoustic instability in the thermalization of ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.H.; Horton, W.; Leboeuf, J.N.

    1992-07-01

    Particle simulation using a nonlinear adiabatic electron response with two streaming ion species and nonlinear theory are used to study the collisionless thermalization of ion beams in a hot electron plasma. The slow beam or subsonic regime is investigated and the criterion for the transition from predominantly light ion to predominantly heavy ion heating is developed. Long-lived ion hole structures a-re observed in the final state.

  14. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  15. ALLIGATOR - An apparatus for ion beam assisted deposition with a broad-beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wituschek, H.; Barth, M.; Ensinger, W.; Frech, G.; Rück, D. M.; Leible, K. D.; Wolf, G. K.

    1992-04-01

    Ion beam assisted deposition is a versatile technique for preparing thin films and coatings for various applications. Up to now a prototype setup for research purposes has been used in our laboratory. Processing of industrial standard workpieces requires a high current ion source with broad beam and high uniformity for homogeneous bombardment. In this contribution a new apparatus for large area samples will be described. It is named ALLIGATOR (German acronym of facility for ion assisted evaporation on transverse movable or rotary targets). In order to have a wide energy range available two ion sources are used. One delivers a beam energy up to 1.3 keV. The other is suitable for energies from 5 keV up to 40 keV. The ``high-energy'' ion source is a multicusp multiaperture source with 180-mA total current and a beam diameter of 280 mm at the target position.

  16. Extraction design and low energy beam transport optimization of space charge dominated multispecies ion beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delferrière, O.; De Menezes, D.

    2004-05-01

    In all accelerator projects, the low energy part of the accelerator has to be carefully optimized to match the beam characteristic requirements of the higher energy parts. Since 1994 with the beginning of the Injector of Protons for High Intensity (IPHI) project and Source of Light Ions with High Intensities (SILHI) electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source development at CEA/Saclay, we are using a set of two-dimensional (2D) codes for extraction system optimization (AXCEL, OPERA-2D) and beam transport (MULTIPART). The 95 keV SILHI extraction system optimization has largely increased the extracted current, and improved the beam line transmission. From these good results, a 130 mA D+ extraction system for the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility project has been designed in the same way as SILHI one. We are also now involved in the SPIRAL 2 project for the building of a 40 keV D+ ECR ion source, continuously tunable from 0.1 to 5 mA, for which a special four-electrode extraction system has been studied. In this article we will describe the 2D design process and present the different extraction geometries and beam characteristics. Simulation results of SILHI H+ beam emittance will be compared with experimental measurements.

  17. Pulsed-electron-beam annealing of ion-implantation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, A. C.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Little, R. G.; Minnucci, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Short-duration high-intensity pulsed electron beams have been used to anneal ion-implantation damage in silicon and to electrically activate the dopant species. Lattice regrowth and dopant activation were determined using He(+)-4 backscattering, SEM, TEM, and device performance characteristics as diagnostic techniques. The annealing mechanism is believed to be liquid-phase epitaxial regrowth initiating from the substrate. The high-temperature transient pulse produced by the electron beam causes the dopant to diffuse rapidly in the region where the liquid state is achieved.

  18. Reversal ion source - A new source of negative ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new type of ion source utilizing beams of electrons and target molecules, rather than a diffuse, volume plasma, is described. The source utilizes an electrostatic electron 'mirror' which reverses trajectories in an electron beam, producing electrons at their turning point having a distribution of velocities centered at zero velocity. A gas which attaches zero-velocity electrons is introduced at this turning point. Negative ions are produced by an attachment or dissociative attachment process. For many of the thermal electron-attaching molecules the cross sections can be quite large, varying as the inverse square root of the electron energy or just the s-wave threshold law. The efficiency and current density of the ion source for production of Cl(-) through the large, thermal energy attachment process is estimated. It is argued that the source can be used for the production of negative ions through attachment resonances located at higher energies as well.

  19. Key elements of space charge compensation on a low energy high intensity beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Shixiang; Lu Pengnan; Ren Haitao; Zhao Jie; Chen Jia; Xu Yuan; Guo Zhiyu; Chen Jia'er; Zhao Hongwei; Sun Liangting

    2013-03-15

    Space charge effect (SCE) along the beam line will decrease beam quality. Space charge compensation (SCC) with extra gas injection is a high-efficiency method to reduce SCE. In this paper, we will report the experimental results on the beam profile, potential distribution, beam emittance, and beam transmission efficiency of a 35 keV/90 mA H{sup +} beam and a 40 keV/10 mA He{sup +} beam compensated by Ar/Kr. The influence of gas type, gas flow, and injection location will be discussed. Emphasis is laid on the consideration of SCC when designing and commissioning a high intensity ion beam injector. Based on measured data, a new definition of space charge compensation degree is proposed.

  20. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  1. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  2. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  3. Graphene engineering by neon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberi, Vighter; Ievlev, Anton V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Joy, David C.; Rondinone, Adam J.; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving the ultimate limits of lithographic resolution and material performance necessitates engineering of matter with atomic, molecular, and mesoscale fidelity. With the advent of scanning helium ion microscopy, maskless He+ and Ne+ beam lithography of 2D materials, such as graphene-based nanoelectronics, is coming to the forefront as a tool for fabrication and surface manipulation. However, the effects of using a Ne focused-ion-beam on the fidelity of structures created out of 2D materials have yet to be explored. Here, we will discuss the use of energetic Ne ions in engineering graphene nanostructures and explore their mechanical, electromechanical and chemical properties using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). By using SPM-based techniques such as band excitation (BE) force modulation microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we are able to ascertain changes in the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of Ne+ beam milled graphene nanostructures and surrounding regions. Additionally, we are able to link localized defects around the milled graphene to ion milling parameters such as dwell time and number of beam passes in order to characterize the induced changes in mechanical and electromechanical properties of the graphene surface.

  4. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.; Stutz, Roger A.

    1998-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

  5. Ion beam analysis techniques in interdisciplinary applications

    SciTech Connect

    Respaldiza, Miguel A.; Ager, Francisco J.

    1999-11-16

    The ion beam analysis techniques emerge in the last years as one of the main applications of electrostatic accelerators. A short summary of the most used IBA techniques will be given as well as some examples of applications in interdisciplinary sciences.

  6. Ion Beam Analysis Techniques in Interdisciplinary Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Respaldiza, Miguel A.; Ager, Francisco J.

    1999-12-31

    The ion beam analysis techniques emerge in the last years as one of the main applications of electrostatic accelerators. A short summary of the most used IBA techniques will be given as well as some examples of applications in interdisciplinary sciences.

  7. Metal assisted focused-ion beam nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannegulla, Akash; Cheng, Li-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Focused-ion beam milling is a versatile technique for maskless nanofabrication. However, the nonuniform ion beam profile and material redeposition tend to disfigure the surface morphology near the milling areas and degrade the fidelity of nanoscale pattern transfer, limiting the applicability of the technique. The ion-beam induced damage can deteriorate the performance of photonic devices and hinders the precision of template fabrication for nanoimprint lithography. To solve the issue, we present a metal assisted focused-ion beam (MAFIB) process in which a removable sacrificial aluminum layer is utilized to protect the working material. The new technique ensures smooth surfaces and fine milling edges; in addition, it permits direct formation of v-shaped grooves with tunable angles on dielectric substrates or metal films, silver for instance, which are rarely achieved by using traditional nanolithography followed by anisotropic etching processes. MAFIB was successfully demonstrated to directly create nanopatterns on different types of substrates with high fidelity and reproducibility. The technique provides the capability and flexibility necessary to fabricate nanophotonic devices and nanoimprint templates.

  8. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

    1998-06-30

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

  9. Nuclear astrophysics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Jeff C.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions involving radioactive nuclei play an important role in explosive stellar events such as novae, supernovae, and X-ray bursts. The development of accelerated, proton-rich radioactive ion beams provides a tool for directly studying many of the reactions that fuel explosive hydrogen burning. The experimental nuclear astrophysics program at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is centered on absolute cross section measurements of these reactions with radioactive ion beams. Beams of F-17 and F-18, important nuclei in the hot-CNO cycle, are currently under development at HRIBF. Progress in the production of intense radioactive fluorine beams is reported. The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been installed at HRIBF as the primary experimental station for nuclear astrophysics experiments. The DRS will be used to measure reactions in inverse kinematics with the techniques of direct recoil detection, delayed-activity recoil detection, and recoil-gamma coincidence measurements. The first astrophysics experiments to be performed at HRIBF, mA the application of the recoil separator in these measurements, are discussed.

  10. Nuclear Structure Studies with Stable and Radioactive Beams: The SPES radioactive ion beam project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; SPES Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2015-04-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  11. Fast wire scanner for intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Agladze, N. I.; Bazarov, I. V.; Bartnik, A.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Full, S.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Savino, J.; Smolenski, K.

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a cost-effective, fast rotating wire scanner for use in accelerators where high beam currents would otherwise melt even carbon wires. This new design uses a simple planetary gear setup to rotate a carbon wire, fixed at one end, through the beam at speeds in excess of 20 m/s. We present results from bench tests, as well as transverse beam profile measurements taken at Cornell's high-brightness energy recovery linac photoinjector, for beam currents up to 35 mA.

  12. Laser-cooled bunched ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Hangst, J.S.; Nielsen, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    In collaboration with the Arhus group, the laser cooling of a beam bunched by an rf electrode was investigated at the ASTRID storage ring. A single laser is used for unidirectional cooling, since the longitudinal velocity of the beam will undergo {open_quotes}synchrotron oscillations{close_quotes} and the ions are trapped in velocity space. As the cooling proceeds the velocity spread of the beam, as well as the bunch length is measured. The bunch length decreases to the point where it is limited only by the Coulomb repulsion between ions. The measured length is slightly (20-30%) smaller than the calculated limit for a cold beam. This may be the accuracy of the measurement, or may indicate that the beam still has a large transverse temperature so that the longitudinal repulsion is less than would be expected from an absolutely cold beam. Simulations suggest that the coupling between transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom is strong -- but this issue will have to be resolved by further measurements.

  13. MULTIPLE ELECTRON BEAM ION PUMP AND SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, R.E.

    1962-02-27

    A vacuum pump is designed which operates by ionizing incoming air and by withdrawing the ions from the system by means of electrical fields. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical housing communicable with the vessel to be evacuated and having a thin wall section in one end. Suitable coils provide a longitudinal magnetic field within the cylinder. A broad cathode and an anode structure is provided to establish a plurality of adjacent electron beams which are parallel to the cylinder axis. Electron reflector means are provided so that each of the beams constitutes a PIG or reflex discharge. Such structure provides a large region in which incoming gas molecules may be ionized by electron bombardment. A charged electrode assembly accelerates the ions through the thin window, thereby removing the gas from the system. The invention may also be utilized as a highly efficient ion source. (AEC)

  14. Texture coefficient analysis of ion beam irradiated copper nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Pallavi; Chaudhary, Ritika; Chauhan, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    Radiation may deteriorate physical properties of the materials and leave negative as well as positive impacts especially on crystalline materials. The energy deposited by ions to the grains and grain boundaries could also influence other properties of grains like: strain, reflection of charge carriers from grain boundaries, in addition to their grain size and orientation. The intensity of a peak in the XRD spectra is the direct reflection of orientation of a miller plane in the crystal. The increased intensity symbolizes the crystalline behavior due to defects annealing, while decreased intensity portray the defects formation and slender amorphisation. Orientation distribution function is a probability distribution function that quantified the texture of a polycrystalline material. The coefficients of harmonic expansion of orientation distribution function is the measurement of the texture coefficient `TC'. This study focused on the investigation of effect of ion beam irradiation on the preffered orientation of the planes of copper nanowires.

  15. Spectroscopy of ions using fast beams and ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnington, E H; Trabert, E

    2004-10-01

    A knowledge of the spectra of ionized atoms is of importance in many fields. They can be studied in a wide variety of light sources. In recent years techniques coming under the broad heatings of fast beams and ion traps have been used extensively for such investigations. This article considers the advantages that various techniques have for particular applications.

  16. Multi-slit triode ion optical system with ballistic beam focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V. Amirov, V.; Gorbovsky, A.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.; Kapitonov, V.; Mishagin, V.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Karpushov, A. N.; Smirnov, A.; Uhlemann, R.

    2016-02-15

    Multi-slit triode ion-optical systems with spherical electrodes are of interest for formation of intense focused neutral beams for plasma heating. At present, two versions of focusing multi-slit triode ion optical system are developed. The first ion optical system forms the proton beam with 15 keV energy, 140 A current, and 30 ms duration. The second ion optical system is intended for heating neutral beam injector of Tokamak Configuration Variable (TCV). The injector produces focused deuterium neutral beam with 35 keV energy, 1 MW power, and 2 s duration. In the later case, the angular beam divergence of the neutral beam is 20-22 mrad in the direction across the slits of the ion optical system and 12 mrad in the direction along the slits.

  17. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 {mu}s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within {plus_minus} 100 {mu}m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  18. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 [mu]s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within [plus minus] 100 [mu]m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  19. Fast Ion Beam Microscopy of Whole Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Ce-Belle; Udalagama, Chammika Nb; Ren, Minqin; Pastorin, G.; Bettiol, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    The way in which biological cells function is of prime importance, and the determination of such knowledge is highly dependent on probes that can extract information from within the cell. Probing deep inside the cell at high resolutions however is not easy: optical microscopy is limited by fundamental diffraction limits, electron microscopy is not able to maintain spatial resolutions inside a whole cell without slicing the cell into thin sections, and many other new and novel high resolution techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) are essentially surface probes. In this paper we show that microscopy using fast ions has the potential to extract information from inside whole cells in a unique way. This novel fast ion probe utilises the unique characteristic of MeV ion beams, which is the ability to pass through a whole cell while maintaining high spatial resolutions. This paper first addresses the fundamental difference between several types of charged particle probes, more specifically focused beams of electrons and fast ions, as they penetrate organic material. Simulations show that whereas electrons scatter as they penetrate the sample, ions travel in a straight path and therefore maintain spatial resolutions. Also described is a preliminary experiment in which a whole cell is scanned using a low energy (45 keV) helium ion microscope, and the results compared to images obtained using a focused beam of fast (1.2 MeV) helium ions. The results demonstrate the complementarity between imaging using low energy ions, which essentially produce a high resolution image of the cell surface, and high energy ions, which produce an image of the cell interior. The characteristics of the fast ion probe appear to be ideally suited for imaging gold nanoparticles in whole cells. Using scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) to image the cell interior, forward scattering transmission ion microscopy (FSTIM) to improve the

  20. High sensitivity charge amplifier for ion beam uniformity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  1. Intensity ratio measurements of EUV spectra from Fe ions relevant to solar corona diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Safdar; Shimizu, Erina; Tsuda, Takashi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We performed laboratory measurements to observe extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of highly charged Fe ions using a compact electron beam ion trap. A high resolution flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer was employed to record spectra in the wavelength range of 160-230 Å. The intensity ratios were obtained as a function of electron density, which was experimentally determined from the spatial distribution of the ion cloud and the size of the electron beam. The results are compared with the SERTS 95 active region data and present model calculations. Our measured data points show rather good agreement with the observational data of SERTS 95 and calculated intensity ratios.

  2. Development of a beam ion velocity detector for the heavy ion beam probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fimognari, P. J.; Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.

    2016-11-01

    In an axisymmetric plasma, the conservation of canonical angular momentum constrains heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) trajectories such that measurement of the toroidal velocity component of secondary ions provides a localized determination of the poloidal flux at the volume where they originated. We have developed a prototype detector which is designed to determine the beam angle in one dimension through the detection of ion current landing on two parallel planes of detecting elements. A set of apertures creates a pattern of ion current on wires in the first plane and solid metal plates behind them; the relative amounts detected by the wires and plates determine the angle which beam ions enter the detector, which is used to infer the toroidal velocity component. The design evolved from a series of simulations within which we modeled ion beam velocity changes due to equilibrium and fluctuating magnetic fields, along with the ion beam profile and velocity dispersion, and studied how these and characteristics such as the size, cross section, and spacing of the detector elements affect performance.

  3. Ion energy distribution near a plasma meniscus with beam extraction for multi element focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Paul, Samit; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2010-05-15

    An earlier study of the axial ion energy distribution in the extraction region (plasma meniscus) of a compact microwave plasma ion source showed that the axial ion energy spread near the meniscus is small ({approx}5 eV) and comparable to that of a liquid metal ion source, making it a promising candidate for focused ion beam (FIB) applications [J. V. Mathew and S. Bhattacharjee, J. Appl. Phys. 105, 96101 (2009)]. In the present work we have investigated the radial ion energy distribution (IED) under the influence of beam extraction. Initially a single Einzel lens system has been used for beam extraction with potentials up to -6 kV for obtaining parallel beams. In situ measurements of IED with extraction voltages upto -5 kV indicates that beam extraction has a weak influence on the energy spread ({+-}0.5 eV) which is of significance from the point of view of FIB applications. It is found that by reducing the geometrical acceptance angle at the ion energy analyzer probe, close to unidirectional distribution can be obtained with a spread that is smaller by at least 1 eV.

  4. Silicon ion irradiation effects on the magnetic properties of ion beam synthesized CoPt phase

    SciTech Connect

    Balaji, S.; Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Mangamma, G.; Kalavathi, S.; Gupta, Ajay; Nair, K. G. M.

    2012-06-05

    Ion beam mixing of Pt/Co bilayers using self ion (Pt{sup +}) beam results in formation of CoPt phase. Upon ion beam annealing the ion mixed samples using 4 MeV Si{sup +} ions at 300 deg. C, diffusion of Co towards the Pt/Co interface is observed. The Si{sup +} ion beam rotates the magnetization of the CoPt phase from in plane to out of plane of the film.

  5. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that neutral beam injection (NBI), i.e. the injection of high energy, high power, beams of H or D atoms, is a flexible and reliable system that has been the main heating system on a large variety of fusion devices, and NBI has been chosen as one of the three heating schemes of the International Tokomak Reactor (ITER). To date, all the NBI systems but two have been based on the neutralization (in a simple gas target) of positive hydrogen or deuterium ions accelerated to <100 keV/nucleon. Above that energy the neutralization of positive ions falls to unacceptably low values, and higher energy neutral beams have to be created by the neutralization of accelerated negative ions (in a simple gas target), as this remains high (approx60%) up to >1 MeV/nucleon. Unfortunately H- and D- are difficult to create, and the very characteristic that makes them attractive, the ease with which the electron is detached from the ion, means that it is difficult to create high concentrations or fluxes of them, and it is difficult to avoid substantial, collisional, losses in the extraction and acceleration processes. However, there has been impressive progress in negative ion sources and accelerators over the past decade, as demonstrated by the two pioneering, operational, multi-megawatt, negative ion based, NBI systems at LHD (180 keV, H0) and JT-60U (500 keV, D0), both in Japan. Nevertheless, the system proposed for ITER represents a substantial technological challenge as an increase is required in beam energy, to 1 MeV, D0, accelerated ion (D-) current, to 40 A, accelerated current density, 200 A m-2 of D-, and pulse length, to 1 h. At the Fourth IAEA Technical Meeting on Negative Ion Based Neutral Beam Injectors, hosted by the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy, 9-11 May 2005, the status of the R&D aimed at the realization of the injectors for ITER was presented. Because of the importance of this development to the success of the ITER project, participants at that

  6. Channeling technique to make nanoscale ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, V. M.; Bellucci, S.; Guidi, V.

    2005-04-01

    Particle channeling in a bent crystal lattice has led to an efficient instrument for beam steering at accelerators [Biryukov et al., Crystal Channeling and its Application at High Energy Accelerators, Springer, Berlin, 1997], demonstrated from MeV to TeV energies. In particular, crystal focusing of high-energy protons to micron size has been demonstrated at IHEP with the results well in match with Lindhard (critical angle) prediction. Channeling in crystal microstructures has been proposed as a unique source of a microbeam of high-energy particles [Bellucci et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6 (2003) 033502]. Channeling in nanostructures (single-wall and multi-wall nanotubes) offers the opportunities to produce ion beams on nanoscale. Particles channeled in a nanotube (with typical diameter of about 1 nm) are trapped in two dimensions and can be steered (deflected, focused) with the efficiency similar to that of crystal channeling or better. This technique has been a subject of computer simulations, with experimental efforts under way in several high-energy labs, including IHEP. We present the theoretical outlook for making channeling-based nanoscale ion beams and report the experience with crystal-focused microscale proton beams.

  7. Ion beam emittance from an ECRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, P. Lang, R.; Mäder, J.; Maimone, F.; Schlei, B. R.; Tinschert, K.; Biri, S.; Rácz, R.

    2016-02-15

    Simulation of ion beam extraction from an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) is a fully 3 dimensional problem, even if the extraction geometry has cylindrical symmetry. Because of the strong magnetic flux density, not only the electrons are magnetized but also the Larmor radius of ions is much smaller than the geometrical dimension of the plasma chamber (Ø 64 × 179 mm). If we assume that the influence of collisions is small on the path of particles, we can do particle tracking through the plasma if the initial coordinates of particles are known. We generated starting coordinates of plasma ions by simulation of the plasma electrons, accelerated stochastically by the 14.5 GHz radio frequency power fed to the plasma. With that we were able to investigate the influence of different electron energies on the extracted beam. Using these assumptions, we can reproduce the experimental results obtained 10 years ago, where we monitored the beam profile with the help of viewing targets. Additionally, methods have been developed to investigate arbitrary 2D cuts of the 6D phase space. To this date, we are able to discuss full 4D information. Currently, we extend our analysis tool towards 5D and 6D, respectively.

  8. Heteroepitaxial growth of single-domain cubic boron nitride films by ion-beam-assisted MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirama, Kazuyuki; Taniyasu, Yoshitaka; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kumakura, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were grown on diamond (001) substrates by a new ion-beam-assisted molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) method with the irradiation of Ar+ ions and atomic nitrogen radicals (N*). From X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images, we confirmed the heteroepitaxial growth of single-domain c-BN(001) films on the diamond (001) substrates. Additionally, we revealed the growth phase diagram of BN films in the ion-beam-assisted MBE. This diagram indicates that the flux intensity of Ar+ ions should be higher than that of boron atoms for epitaxial c-BN growth.

  9. Ion source studies for particle beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bieg, K.W.; Burns, E.J.T.; Olsen, J.N.; Dorrell, L.R.

    1985-05-01

    High power particle beam accelerators are being developed for use in inertial confinement fusion applications. These pulsed power accelerators require sources of low atomic number ions (e.g., protons, deuterons, carbon, or lithium). The sources must be of high purity for efficient accelerator operation and proper target coupling, must have a rapid ''turn-on,'' and must be compatible with ion diode configurations under development. A particular type of source presently being investigated is the flashover ion source which generates ions by means of the vacuum flashover of an insulating anode material when the high voltage pulse arrives at the diode. We have developed an applied-magnetic-field, extraction ion diode for the 0.03 TW Nereus accelerator specifically to investigate these sources. Extracted ion species are measured by means of a Thomson-parabola ion analyzer, dB/dt current monitors, and Faraday cups. Experiments have been performed to investigate the surface flashover mechanism and the effects of various dielectric source materials, anode preparation methods (including rf glow discharge cleaning), and vacuum conditions on ion species and diode operation.

  10. Fast ion behavior during neutral beam injection in ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Colchin, R.J.; Rome, J.A.; England, A.C.; Fowler, R.H.; Aceto, S.C.

    1993-09-01

    In stellarators, single-particle confinement properties can be more complex than in their tokamak counterparts. Fast-ion behavior in tokamaks has been well characterized through an abundance of measurements on various devices and in general has been shown to be consistent with classical slowing-down theory, although anomalous ion behavior has been observed during intense beam injection in ISX-B, during fishbone instabilities in PDX, and in experiments on TFR. In contrast, fast ion behavior in stellarators is not as wel established experimentally with the primary experiments to date focusing o near-perpendicular or perpendicular neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Wendelstein 7-A stellarator (91 and Heliotron-E. This paper addresses fast-ion confinement properties in a large-aspect-ratio, moderate-shear stellarator, the Advanced Toroidal Facility, during tangential NBI. The primary data used in this study are the experimentally measured energy spectra of charge-exchange neutrals escaping from the plasma, using a two-dimensional scanning neutral particle analyzer. This diagnostic method is well established, having been used on several devices since the early 1970`s. Various aspects of fast-ion behavior are investigated by comparing these data with computed theoretical spectra based on energeticion distributions derived from the fastion Fokker-Planck equation. Ion orbits are studied by computer orbit following, by the computation of J* surfaces, and by Monte Carlo calculations.

  11. Ion beam modification of aromatic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukushima, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Shinya; Matsumoto, Yasuyo; Hibino, Yutaka

    1993-06-01

    We studied the optical, mechanical and thermal properties of aromatic polymer films which had been irradiated with 1 MeV H +, H 2+ and He + ions. The examined aromatic polymers were polyetherether ketone (PEEK), polyetherimide (PEI), polycther sulfon (PES), polysulfon (PSF), and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS). The optical densities at 300 nm of PES greatly increased after the irradiation. The optical densities at 400 nm of all the examined polymer linearly increased with the irradiation dose. Elongations of all the polymers at room temperature were reduced after irradiation. The PEEK film which had been irradiated with 1 MeV H + was not deformed above the melting point. This demonstrates that cross-linking occurs in PEEK films by ion beam irradiation. As for the effects, depending on the mass of the irradiated ions, it was found that the ions with a high mass induced larger effects on the arematic polymers for the same absorption energy.

  12. Transfer Casting From Ion-Beam-Textured Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Textured surfaces created on metals, ceramics, and polymers. Electron-bombardment ion thrustor used as neutralized-ion-beam source. Beam of directed, energetic ions alter surface chemistry and/or morphology of many materials. By adjusting ion energy and ion-beam current density impinging upon target, precise surface modifications obtained without risk of targetmaterial melting or bulk decomposition. Technique developed to generate precise, controllable, surface microstructures on metals, ceramics, and polymers.

  13. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  14. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  15. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  16. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, H. Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.; Musumeci, F.

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  17. Recombination characteristics of therapeutic ion beams on ion chamber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Matsuyama, Tetsuharu; Sato, Shinji; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In heavy ion radiotherapy, ionization chambers are regarded as a standard for determining the absorbed dose given to patients. In ion dosimetry, it is necessary to correct the radiation quality, which depends on the initial recombination effect. This study reveals for the radiation quality dependence of the initial recombination in air in ion dosimetry. Ionization charge was measured for the beams of protons at 40-160 MeV, carbon at 21-400 MeV/n, and iron at 23.5-500 MeV/n using two identical parallel-plate ionization chambers placed in series along the beam axis. The downstream chamber was used as a monitor operated with a constant applied voltage, while the other chamber was used for recombination measurement by changing the voltage. The ratio of the ionization charge measured by the two ionization chambers showed a linear relationship with the inverse of the voltage in the high-voltage region. The initial recombination factor was estimated by extrapolating the obtained linear relationship to infinite voltage. The extent of the initial recombination was found to increase with decreasing incident energy or increasing atomic number of the beam. This behavior can be explained with an amorphous track structure model: the increase of ionization density in the core region of the track due to decreasing kinetic energy or increasing atomic number leads to denser initial ion production and results in a higher recombination probability. For therapeutic carbon ion beams, the extent of the initial recombination was not constant but changed by 0.6% even in the target region. This tendency was quantitatively well reproduced with the track-structure based on the initial recombination model; however, the transitional change in the track structure is considered to play an important role in further understanding of the characteristics of the initial recombination.

  18. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  19. An intense polarized beam by a laser ionization injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Chihiro; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Nakamura, Takeshi

    1990-12-01

    Accumulation of protons and polarized protons by photo-ionization injection are described. This method consists of: (1) producing the neutral hydrogen beam by Lorentz stripping; (2) excitation of the neutral hydrogen beam with a laser; and (3) ionization of the hydrogen beam in the 2P excited state with another laser. When the laser for the excitation is circularly polarized, we can get a polarized proton beam. An ionization efficiency of 98 percent and a polarization of 80 percent can be expected by an intense laser beam from a free electron laser (FEL).

  20. Gridded Electron Guns and Modulation of Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; O'Shea, P G

    2006-05-02

    Gridded guns are useful for producing modulated electron beams. This modulation is generally limited to simple gating of the beam, but may be used to apply structure to the beam pulse shape. In intense beams, this structure spawns space charge waves whose dynamics depend in part on the relative strengths of the velocity and density variations which comprise the initial current modulation. In this paper, we calculate the strengths of beam current and velocity modulation produced in a gridded electron gun, and show that under normal conditions the initial modulation is dominated by density variation rather than velocity variation.

  1. Ion-beam-assisted etching of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Flanders, D. C.; Lincoln, G. A.; Economou, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity, low RF loss, and inertness of diamond make it useful in traveling wave tubes operating in excess of 500 GHz. Such use requires the controlled etching of type IIA diamond to produce grating like structures tens of micrometers deep. Previous work on reactive ion etching with O2 gave etching rates on the order of 20 nm/min and poor etch selectivity between the masking material (Ni or Cr) and the diamond. An alternative approach which uses a Xe(+) beam and a reactive gas flux of NO2 in an ion-beam-assisted etching system is reported. An etching rate of 200 nm/min was obtained with an etching rate ratio of 20 between the diamond and an aluminum mask.

  2. Dispensing targets for ion beam particle generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A target for dispensing high energy protons or neutrons or ionized atoms or ionized molecules is provided which comprises a container for the target gas, which is at atmospheric or higher pressure. The container material can release the target gas in the spot where the container is heated above a predetermined temperature by the impact of an ion beam where protons or neutrons are desired, or by electrons where ionized atoms or molecules are desired. On the outside of the container, except for the region where the beam is to impact, there is deposited a layer of a metal which is imperious to gaseous diffusion. A further protective coating of a material is placed over the layer of metal, except at the region of the ion impact area in order to adsorb any unreacted gas in the vacuum in which the target is placed, to thereby prevent reduction of the high vacuum, as well as contamination of the interior of the vacuum chamber.

  3. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  4. Simulation of ion beam injection and extraction in an EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L. Kim, J. S.

    2016-02-15

    An example simulation of Au+ charge breeding using FAR-TECH’s integrated EBIS (electron beam ion source) modeling toolset is presented with the emphasis on ion beam injection and extraction. The trajectories of injected ions are calculated with PBGUNS (particle beam gun simulation) self-consistently by including the space charges from both ions and electrons. The ion beam, starting with initial conditions within the 100% acceptance of the electron beam, is then tracked by EBIS-PIC (particle-in-cell EBIS simulation code). In the trap, the evolution of the ion charge state distribution is estimated by charge state estimator. The extraction of charge bred ions is simulated with PBGUNS. The simulations of the ion injections show significant ion space charge effects on beam capture efficiency and the ionization efficiency.

  5. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  6. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  7. Ion beam analysis of sialon ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickridge, I. C.; Brown, I. W. M.; Ekström, T. C.; Trompetter, W. J.

    1996-09-01

    Sialons, or silicon-aluminium-oxy-nitrides, are a family of materials that have exceptional high temperature mechanical and tribological properties, but which are susceptible to oxidation. Ion beam analysis is an ideal tool to study the composition of the altered surface layer of sialons after oxidation. In particular simultaneous detection of gamma rays, charged particles, and X-rays induced by 1.4 MeV deuterons allows an almost complete picture of the composition to be obtained.

  8. Radioactive Ion Beams at INFN Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Calabretta, L.; Celona, L.; Chines, F.; Cosentino, L.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maggiore, M.; Pappalardo, A.; Piazza, L.; Re, M.; Rifuggiato, D.; Rovelli, A.; Pappalardo, A.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.; Biasetto, L.; Manzolaro, M.; Sarchiapone, L.; Galata, A.; Lombardi, A.

    2010-04-30

    The LNS and the LNL are the two laboratories of INFN devoted to the research on nuclear physics. Since the 1995 the LNS are involved in the design and construction of the Radioactive Ion Beam facilities called EXCYT. In the early of 2000 the LNL starts a project for second generation RIB facilities called SPES. In the 2004 at the LNS we start also the production of RIB by in flight fragmentation. Here the status and perspective of these three projects are presented.

  9. Anisotropy-driven collective instability in intense charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-12-01

    The classical electrostatic Harris instability is generalized to the case of a one-component intense charged particle beam with anisotropic temperature including the important effects of finite transverse geometry and beam space charge. For a long, coasting beam, the eigenmode code bEASt have been used to determine detailed 3D stability properties over a wide range of temperature anisotropy and beam intensity. A simple theoretical model is developed which describes the essential features of the linear stage of the instability. Both the simulations and the analytical theory clearly show that moderately intense beams are linearly unstable to short-wavelength perturbations provided the ratio of the longitudinal temperature to the transverse temperature is smaller than some threshold value. The delta-f particle-in-cell code BEST has been used to study the detailed nonlinear evolution and saturation of the instability.

  10. Beam Dynamics Considerations in Electron Ion Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear physics community is converging on the idea that the next large project after FRIB should be an electron-ion collider. Both Brookhaven National Lab and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have developed accelerator designs, both of which need novel solutions to accelerator physics problems. In this talk we discuss some of the problems that must be solved and their solutions. Examples in novel beam optics systems, beam cooling, and beam polarization control will be presented. Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  11. Hysteresis effects in the formation of a neutralizing beam plasma at low ion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the PEGASES II thruster prototype is used as an ion source generating low-energy (<300\\ \\text{eV}) positive Ar ion beam, extracted without an external neutralizer. The ions are extracted and accelerated from the source using a two-grid system. The extracted positive ion beam current is measured on a large beam target that can be translated along the acceleration axis. The ion beam current shows a stepwise transition from a low-current to a high-current extraction regime with hysteresis. The hysteresis region depends strongly upon the beam target position. Langmuir probe measurements in the plume show high plasma potentials and low plasma densities in the low-current mode, while the plasma potential drops and the density increases in the high-current mode. The ion energy distribution functions of the beam are measured for different regimes of ion extraction. The ion beam extracted in the high-current mode is indicated by the presence of an additional low-energy peak corresponding to ions from an ion-beam plasma created in the downstream chamber, as well as 10-20 times higher intensity of the primary ion beam peak. The hysteresis behavior is explained by the formation of a downstream neutralizing beam plasma, that depends on the target position and pressure in agreement with a Paschen-like breakdown by secondary electrons. The obtained results are of high relevance for further development of the PEGASES thruster, as well as for improving existing neutralizer-free concepts of the broad-beam ion sources.

  12. Ion beam figuring of small optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drueding, Thomas W.; Fawcett, Steven C.; Wilson, Scott R.; Bifano, Thomas G.

    1995-12-01

    Ion beam figuring provides a highly deterministic method for the final precision figuring of optical components with advantages over conventional methods. The process involves bombarding a component with a stable beam of accelerated particles that selectively removes material from the surface. Figure corrections are achieved by rastering the fixed-current beam across the workplace at appropriate, time-varying velocities. Unlike conventional methods, ion figuring is a noncontact technique and thus avoids such problems as edge rolloff effects, tool wear, and force loading of the workpiece. This work is directed toward the development of the precision ion machining system at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. This system is designed for processing small (approximately equals 10-cm diam) optical components. Initial experiments were successful in figuring 8-cm-diam fused silica and chemical-vapor-deposited SiC samples. The experiments, procedures, and results of figuring the sample workpieces to shallow spherical, parabolic (concave and convex), and non-axially-symmetric shapes are discussed. Several difficulties and limitations encountered with the current system are discussed. The use of a 1-cm aperture for making finer corrections on optical components is also reported.

  13. Centroid and Envelope Dynamics of High-intensity Charged Particle Beams in an External Focusing Lattice and Oscillating Wobbler

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.; Logan, B. Grant

    2010-04-28

    The centroid and envelope dynamics of a high-intensity charged particle beam are investigated as a beam smoothing technique to achieve uniform illumination over a suitably chosen region of the target for applications to ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion. The motion of the beam centroid projected onto the target follows a smooth pattern to achieve the desired illumination, for improved stability properties during the beam-target interaction. The centroid dynamics is controlled by an oscillating "wobbler", a set of electrically-biased plates driven by RF voltage. __________________________________________________

  14. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H. Y. Zhang, J. J.; Jin, Q. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Liu, W.; Wang, G. C.

    2016-02-15

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 10{sup 13} W cm{sup −2} in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  15. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited).

    PubMed

    Zhao, H Y; Zhang, J J; Jin, Q Y; Liu, W; Wang, G C; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2016-02-01

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 10(13) W cm(-2) in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  16. New development of laser ion source for highly charged ion beam production at Institute of Modern Physics (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Jin, Q. Y.; Liu, W.; Wang, G. C.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    A laser ion source based on Nd:YAG laser has been being studied at the Institute of Modern Physics for the production of high intensity high charge state heavy ion beams in the past ten years, for possible applications both in a future accelerator complex and in heavy ion cancer therapy facilities. Based on the previous results for the production of multiple-charged ions from a wide range of heavy elements with a 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser [Zhao et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02B910 (2014)], higher laser energy and intensity in the focal spot are necessary for the production of highly charged ions from the elements heavier than aluminum. Therefore, the laser ion source was upgraded with a new Nd:YAG laser, the maximum energy of which is 8 J and the pulse duration can be adjusted from 8 to 18 ns. Since then, the charge state distributions of ions from various elements generated by the 8 J Nd:YAG laser were investigated for different experimental conditions, such as laser energy, pulse duration, power density in the focal spot, and incidence angle. It was shown that the incidence angle is one of the most important parameters for the production of highly charged ions. The capability of producing highly charged ions from the elements lighter than silver was demonstrated with the incidence angle of 10° and laser power density of 8 × 1013 W cm-2 in the focal spot, which makes a laser ion source complementary to the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the future accelerator complex especially in terms of the ion beam production from some refractory elements. Nevertheless, great efforts with regard to the extraction of intense ion beams, modification of the ion beam pulse duration, and reliability of the ion source still need to be made for practical applications.

  17. Energy Loss of High Intensity Focused Proton Beams Penetrating Metal Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Evans, M.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Shortpulse-laser-driven intense ion beams are appealing for applications in probing and creating high energy density plasmas. Such a beam isochorically heats and rapidly ionizes any target it enters into warm dense matter with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we present experimental measurements taken with the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL shortpulse laser of the proton and carbon spectra after passing through metal foils. The laser irradiated spherically curved C targets with intensity 4×1018 W/cm2, producing proton beams with 3 MeV slope temperature and a sharp low energy cutoff at 5 MeV which has not been observed on lower energy, shorter pulse intense lasers. The beam either diverged freely or was focused to estimated 1016 p +/cm2 ps by a surrounding structure before entering the metal foils (Al or Ag and a Cu tracer layer). The proton and ion spectra were altered by the foil depending on material and whether or not the beam was focused. Transverse proton radiography probed the target with ps temporal and 10 micron spatial resolution, indicating an electrostatic field on the foil may also have affected the beam. We present complementary particle-in-cell simulations of the beam generation and transport to the foils. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA National Laser User Facility program, Contract DE-SC0001265.

  18. Intense e-beam interaction with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.H.; Crawford, O.H.

    1984-01-01

    This document describes work done in this period on certain nonlinear processes of potential importance at high energy densities in condensed matter, and on the theory of the electron slowing-down-cascade spectrum engendered in solids by e-beams.

  19. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  20. Improving Plating by Use of Intense Acoustic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Denofrio, Charles

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of selective plating of metals and possibly other materials involves the use of directed high-intensity acoustic beams. The beams, typically in the ultrasonic frequency range, can be generated by fixed-focus transducers (see figure) or by phased arrays of transducers excited, variously, by continuous waves, tone bursts, or single pulses. The nonlinear effects produced by these beams are used to alter plating processes in ways that are advantageous.

  1. Low Intensity Beam Imaging - Position Sensitive Avalanche Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Mas, J.; Shapira, D; T.A. Lewis

    1998-11-04

    Monitors of this type are mostly intended for the lowest intensity beams at the HRIBF at ORNL. They are used to aid the accelerator operator in focusing and steering the beam and by the experimenters at the focal plane of the spectrometers.

  2. Ion energy distribution functions of low energy beams formed by wire extraction electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tokumura, S.; Kasuya, T.; Vasquez, M. Jr.; Maeno, S.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    The two-electrode extractor system made of 0.1 mm diameter tungsten wires separated by 0.7 mm has formed an argon ion beam with 50 V extraction potential. Energy spreads of the extracted beams were typically less than 2 eV when the beam current density was low. The beam intensity rapidly decreased as the distance between the extractor and the beam detector increased, indicating space charge limited transport of the beam. Problems associated with the emittance measurements are also discussed.

  3. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K.; Johnson, H. T.; Freund, J. B.

    2015-05-15

    Focused ion beams provide a means of nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, which is used for applications such as forming nanometer-scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. We investigate such a configuration with Ga{sup +} bombardment of a Si thin-film target using molecular dynamics simulation. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A flow model with Marangoni forcing, based upon the temperature gradient and geometry from the atomistic simulation, indeed reproduces the flow and thus could be used to anticipate such flows and their influence in applications.

  4. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.; Arnold, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  5. Quantitative low-energy ion beam characterization by beam profiling and imaging via scintillation screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, S.; Pietag, F.; Polak, J.; Arnold, T.

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the imaging and characterization of low-current ion beams in the neutralized state monitored via single crystal YAG:Ce (Y3Al5O12) scintillators. To validate the presented beam diagnostic tool, Faraday cup measurements and test etchings were performed. Argon ions with a typical energy of 1.0 keV were emitted from an inductively coupled radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) ion beam source with total currents of some mA. Different beam properties, such as, lateral ion current density, beam divergence angle, and current density in pulsed ion beams have been studied to obtain information about the spatial beam profile and the material removal rate distribution. We observed excellent imaging properties with the scintillation screen and achieved a detailed characterization of the neutralized ion beam. A strong correlation between the scintillator light output, the ion current density, and the material removal rate could be observed.

  6. Persistent ion beam induced conductivity in zinc oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Johannes, Andreas; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-12-19

    We report persistently increased conduction in ZnO nanowires irradiated by ion beam with various ion energies and species. This effect is shown to be related to the already known persistent photo conduction in ZnO and dubbed persistent ion beam induced conduction. Both effects show similar excitation efficiency, decay rates, and chemical sensitivity. Persistent ion beam induced conduction will potentially allow countable (i.e., single dopant) implantation in ZnO nanostructures and other materials showing persistent photo conduction.

  7. Persistent ion beam induced conductivity in zinc oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Andreas; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-12-01

    We report persistently increased conduction in ZnO nanowires irradiated by ion beam with various ion energies and species. This effect is shown to be related to the already known persistent photo conduction in ZnO and dubbed persistent ion beam induced conduction. Both effects show similar excitation efficiency, decay rates, and chemical sensitivity. Persistent ion beam induced conduction will potentially allow countable (i.e., single dopant) implantation in ZnO nanostructures and other materials showing persistent photo conduction.

  8. Raman conversion in intense femtosecond Bessel beams in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Maik; Chen, Xi; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Born, Norman; Moloney, Jerome; Kolesik, Miroslav; Polynkin, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that bright and nearly collimated radiation can be efficiently generated in air pumped by an intense femtosecond Bessel beam. We show that this nonlinear conversion process is driven by the rotational Raman response of air molecules. Under optimum conditions, the conversion efficiency from the Bessel pump into the on-axis propagating beam exceeds 15% and is limited by the onset of intensity clamping and plasma refraction on the beam axis. Our experimental findings are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations based on the standard model for the ultrafast nonlinear response of air.

  9. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2004-09-25

    A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  10. Ion beam control in laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2016-03-01

    By a two-stage successive acceleration in laser ion acceleration, our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by a few hundreds of MeV; the maximum proton energy reaches about 250MeV. The ions are accelerated by the inductive continuous post-acceleration in a laser plasma interaction together with the target normal sheath acceleration and the breakout afterburner mechanism. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when an intense short- pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in the plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field strength, the moving longitudinal inductive electric field is induced by the Faraday law, and accelerates the forward-moving ions continously. The multi-stage acceleration provides a unique controllability in the ion energy and its quality.

  11. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  12. Pulsed-ion-beam nitriding and smoothing of titanium surface in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.P.; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Lei, M.K.

    2005-08-29

    Both nitriding and smoothing of titanium have been achieved under irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam in a vacuum of 2x10{sup -2} Pa. Applying a screening method, we find that medium ion-beam intensity and multi-shot irradiation are effective for the processing, where repetitive surface melting with limited ablation favored Ti nitride formation as well as surface smoothing. The present results demonstrate that ambient gas atoms/molecules can be efficiently incorporated in metal matrices to form compounds under the ion-beam irradiation. The finding is of great significance for extending application scope of the ion-beam technique in materials research and processing, combined with the recent success in introducing ambient gas into the processing chamber.

  13. Ion beam modification of injection moulded polymere materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, G. K.; Kersten, H. J.

    1998-05-01

    Ion beam based treatments and processes are an ecologically friendly alternative for the metallization of polymers. Nowadays mainly chemical and electrochemical and plasma assisted techniques are used. In this contribution the copper metallization of high temperature thermoplasts using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) was studied. The applications in mind were magnetic shielding of cases for sensors. The influence of ion beam intensity and energy, deposition rate, preconditioning and substrate material on the Cu adhesion was investigated. As materials PPS (Polyphenylene sulfide) and LCP (Liquid Crystal Polymer) with different filling materials were used. It could be shown that the adhesion reacts very critical to the type of polymer and the type and concentration of filling material. The IBAD parameters giving best results are I/A ratios of 0.005-0.01 and energies of 0.5-2 keV. The highest adhesion force (≈27 N/mm 2) was measured on PPS. For LCP thin Ti interlayers increased the adhesion force ≈50% up to values above 10 N/mm 2.

  14. Experimental Studies of Electrons in a Heavy-Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Seidl, P A; Bieniosek, F M; Cohen, R H; Faltens, A; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Prost, L

    2004-06-23

    Electron cloud effects, ECEs, are normally a problem only in ring accelerators. However, heavy-ion induction linacs for inertial fusion energy have an economic incentive to fit beam tubes tightly to intense beams. This places them at risk from electron clouds produced by emission of electrons and gas from walls. We have measured electron and gas emission from 1 MeV K{sup +} impact on surfaces near grazing incidence on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. Electron emission coefficients reach *values of 130, whereas gas desorption coefficients are near 10{sup 4}. Mitigation techniques are being studied: A bead-blasted rough surface reduces electron emission by a factor of 10 and gas desorption by a factor of 2. Diagnostics are installed on HCX, between and within quadrupole magnets, to measure the beam halo loss, net charge and expelled ions, from which we infer gas density, electron trapping, and the effects of mitigation techniques. Here we discuss a new diagnostic technique that measures gas pressure and electron ionization rates within quadrupole magnets during the beam transit.

  15. Stopping intense beams of internally cold molecules via centrifugal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xing; Gantner, Thomas; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Chervenkov, Sotir; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Cryogenic buffer-gas cooling produces intense beams of internally cold molecules. It offers a versatile source for studying collision dynamics and reaction pathways in the cold regime, and could open new avenues for controlled chemistry, precision spectroscopy, and exploration of fundamental physics. However, an efficient deceleration of these beams still presents a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that intense and continuous beams of electrically guided molecules produced by a cryogenic buffer-gas cell can be brought to a halt by the centrifugal force in a rotating frame. Various molecules (e.g. CH3F and CF3CCH) are decelerated to below 20m /s at a corresponding output intensity of ~ 6 ×109mm-2 .s-1 . In addition, our RF-resonant depletion detection shows that up to 90 % rotational-state purity can be achieved in the so-produced slow molecular beams.

  16. Applications with Intense OTR Images II: Microbunched Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Dejus, R. J.; Rule, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    In this second application for intense images we take advantage of the coherent enhancement of optical transition radiation (OTR) due to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL)-induced microbunching of the beam. A much smaller number of total particles is involved, but the microbunched fraction (NB) gives a NB2 enhancement. We report measurements on the z-dependent growth of the coherent OTR (COTR) and the effects of beam size and electron beam/photon beam coalignment in the COTR interferograms.

  17. Limiting current of intense electron beams in a decelerating gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Beaudoin, B. L.; Thompson, C.; Karakkad, J. A.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    For numerous applications, it is desirable to develop electron beam driven efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation that are capable of producing the required power at beam voltages as low as possible. This trend is limited by space charge effects that cause the reduction of electron kinetic energy and can lead to electron reflection. So far, this effect was analyzed for intense beams propagating in uniform metallic pipes. In the present study, the limiting currents of intense electron beams are analyzed for the case of beam propagation in the tubes with gaps. A general treatment is illustrated by an example evaluating the limiting current in a high-power, tunable 1-10 MHz inductive output tube (IOT), which is currently under development for ionospheric modification. Results of the analytical theory are compared to results of numerical simulations. The results obtained allow one to estimate the interaction efficiency of IOTs.

  18. New techniques in hadrontherapy: intensity modulated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Cella, L; Lomax, A; Miralbell, R

    2001-01-01

    Inverse planning and intensity modulated (IM) X-ray beam treatment techniques can achieve significant improvements in dose distributions comparable to those obtained with forward planned proton beams. However, intensity modulation can also be applied to proton beams and further optimization in dose distribution can reasonably be expected. A comparative planning exercise between IM X-rays and IM proton beams was carried out on two different tumor cases: a pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma and a prostate cancer. Both IM X-rays and IM protons achieved equally homogenous coverage of the target volume in the two tumor sites. Predicted NTCPs were equally low for both treatment techniques. Nevertheless, a reduced low-to-medium dose to the organs at risk and a lesser integral non-target mean dose for IM protons in the two cases favored the use of IM proton beams.

  19. Ion Beam Collimation For Improved Resolution In Associated Particle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sy, Amy; Ji, Qing

    2011-06-01

    Beam spot size on target for a Penning ion source has been measured under different source operating pressures as a function of the extraction channel length and beam energy. A beam halo/core structure was observed for ion extraction at low extraction voltages, and was greatly reduced at higher beam energy. Collimation through use of longer extraction channels results in reduced ion current on target; the resultant reduction in neutron yield for an API system driven by such an ion source can be compensated for by use of even higher beam energies.

  20. Targets for ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is based on the use of the well-known on-line isotope separator (ISOL) technique in which radioactive nuclei are produced by fusion type reactions in selectively chosen target materials by high-energy proton, deuteron, or He ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of radioactive ion beams (RIBs), selection of the most appropriate target material for production of the species of interest is, perhaps, the most difficult. In this report, we briefly review present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect maximum diffusion release rates of the short-lived species that can be realized at the temperature limits of specific target materials. We also describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the HRIBF as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications.

  1. Spectroscopic investigations of beam-plasma interactions in an ion plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.; Friedly, V. J.; Peng, X.; Celenza, J. A.; Keefer, D.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of spectroscopic investigations of beam-plasma interactions in the plume from a 3 cm ion source operated on argon. Ion-electron, ion-neutral, and electron-neutral scattering are identified by studying the dependence of neutral and ion emission intensities on chamber pressure and mass flow rate, and by analyzing the emission lineshapes at a non-orthogonal angle to the plume axis. Through the Doppler shift, we are able to separate contributions from fast beam ions and fast charge-exchange neutrals on the one hand, and of slow neutrals and slow ions on the other. We discuss the application of this new technique to the characterization of beam plasma interactions in the downstream region of ion thruster engines, and its potential for identifying the processes which lead to grid erosion.

  2. The SPIRAL2 Project and experiments with high-intensity rare isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewitowicz, Marek

    2011-09-01

    The SPIRAL2 facility at GANIL, which entered recently in the construction phase consists of a new superconducting linear accelerator delivering high intensity, up to 40 MeV, light (proton, deuteron, 3-4He) beams as well as a large variety of 14.5 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion beams and the associated Rare Isotope Beam facility. Using a dedicated converter and the 5 mA deuteron beam, a neutron-induced fission rate is expected to approach 1014 fissions/s for high-density UCx target. The energies of accelerated RIBs will reach 5-10 MeV/nucleon for fission fragments and 20 MeV/nucleon for neutron-deficient nuclei. The physics case of SPIRAL2 is based on the use of high intensity RIBs & stable-ion beams and on possibilities to perform several experiments simultaneously. A use of these beams at a new low-energy ISOL facility (DESIR) and their acceleration to several MeV/nucleon will open new possibilities in nuclear structure physics, nuclear astrophysics and reaction dynamics studies. The high intensities (up to 1011pps) and a high cost of RIBs impose a use of the most efficient and innovative detection systems like ACTAR, FAZIA, GASPARD, HELIOS, NEDA, PARIS and a new separator/spectrometer S3.

  3. The Neutralization of Ion-Rocket Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Harold R.

    1961-01-01

    The experimental ion-beam behavior obtained without neutralizers is compared with both simple collision theory and plasma-wave theory. This comparison indicates that plasma waves play an important part in beam behavior, although the present state of plasma-wave theory does not permit more than a qualitative comparison. The theories of immersed-emitter and electron-trap neutralizer operation are discussed; and, to the extent permitted by experimental data, the theory is compared with experimental results. Experimental data are lacking completely at the present time for operation in space. The results that might be expected in space and the means of simulating such operation in Earth-bound facilities, however, are discussed.

  4. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-27

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established similar to –5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-mu s surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of mu s after the high voltage pulse is applied. Lastly, it is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  5. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    DOE PAGES

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; ...

    2016-04-27

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15V before neutralization to 0.3 V,more » implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established similar to –5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-mu s surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of mu s after the high voltage pulse is applied. Lastly, it is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.« less

  6. Lithium ion beam impact on selenium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Suresh; Chauhan, R. P.

    2017-03-01

    This study is structured on Li3+ ion irradiation effect on the different properties of selenium (Se) nanowires (NW's) (80 nm). Template technique was employed for the synthesis of Se nanowires. Exploration of the effect of 10 MeV Li3+ ions on Se NW's was done for structural and electrical analysis with the help of characterization tools. X-ray diffraction revealed the variation in peak intensity only, with no peak shifting. The grain size and texture coefficients of various planes were also found to vary. Current-Voltage characteristics (IVC) show an increment in the conductivity up to a fluence of 1×1012 ions/cm2 and a decrease at the next two fluences. The effects of irradiation are presented in this paper and possible reasons for the variation in properties are also discussed in this study.

  7. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F; Dudnikova, Galina

    2010-01-01

    Spallation neutron source user facilities require reliable, intense beams of protons. The technique of H- charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron can provide the needed beam currents, but may be limited by the ion sources that have currents and reliability that do not meet future requirements and emittances that are too large for efficient acceleration. In this project we are developing an H- source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, small emittance, good lifetime, high reliability, and power efficiency. We describe planned modifications to the present external antenna source at SNS that involve: 1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 60 MHz saddle-type antenna and 2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnet with a weaker electromagnet, in order to increase the plasma density near the outlet aperture. The SNS test stand will then be used to verify simulations of this approach that indicate significant improvements in H- output current and efficiency, where lower RF power will allow higher duty factor, longer source lifetime, and/or better reliability.

  8. Development of a focused ion beam micromachining system

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, J.G.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    Focused ion beams are currently being investigated for many submicron fabrication and analytical purposes. An FIB micromachining system consisting of a UHV vacuum system, a liquid metal ion gun, and a control and data acquisition computer has been constructed. This system is being used to develop nanofabrication and nanomachining techniques involving focused ion beams and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  9. Edge envelope equation for a ballistically focused neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1980-11-01

    An envelope equation for a cold ion beam with overall charge and current neutralization provided by a coflowing electron gas obeying an adiabatic equation of state is derived. The derivation assumes the beam evolves self-similarly with the ion at the edge of a uniform density ion profile. Numerical and approximate analytical solutions are calculated.

  10. Special diffractive elements for optical trapping fabricated on optical fiber tips using the focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Guerreiro, A.; Viegas, J.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, spiral phase lenses and Fresnel zone lenses for beam tailoring, fabricated on the tip of optical fibers, are reported. The spiral phase lenses allow tailoring the fundamental guided mode, a Gaussian beam, into a Laguerre - Gaussian profile without using additional optical elements. Whereas, the Fresnel lenses are used as focusing systems. The lenses are fabricated using Focused Ion Beam milling, enabling high resolution in the manufacturing process. The output optical intensity profiles matching the numerical simulations are presented and analyzed.

  11. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kallol; Johnson, Harley; Freund, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Focused ion beams (FIB) offer an attractive tool for nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, particularly because they can be focused to a few nanometer diameter spot. This motivates their use for many applications, such as sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), forming nanometer scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. Despite its widespread use, the specific mechanisms of FIB milling, especially at high ion fluxes for which significant phase change might occur, remains incompletely understood. Here we investigate the process of nanopore fabrication in thin Si films using molecular dynamics simulation where Ga+ ions are used as the focused ions. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it is driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A continuum flow model with Marangoni forcing reproduces the flow.

  12. Proton Beam Intensity Upgrades for the Neutrino Program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C. M.

    2016-12-15

    Fermilab is committed to upgrading its accelerator complex towards the intensity frontier to pursue HEP research in the neutrino sector and beyond. The upgrade has two steps: 1) the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP), which is underway, has its primary goal to start providing 700 kW beam power on NOvA target by the end of 2017 and 2) the foreseen PIP–II will replace the existing LINAC, a 400 MeV injector to the Booster, by an 800 MeV superconducting LINAC by the middle of next decade, with output beam intensity from the Booster increased significantly and the beam power on the NOvA target increased to <1.2 MW. In any case, the Fermilab Booster is going to play a very significant role for the next two decades. In this context, we have recently developed and commissioned an innovative beam injection scheme for the Booster called "early injection scheme". This scheme is already in operation and has a potential to increase the Booster beam intensity from the PIP design goal by a considerable amount with a reduced beam emittance and beam loss. In this paper, we will present results from our experience from the new scheme in operation, current status and future plans.

  13. High intensity ECR ion source (H+, D+, H-) developments at CEA/Saclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, R.; Beauvais, P.-Y.; Bogard, D.; Charruau, G.; Delferrière, O.; Menezes, D. De; France, A.; Ferdinand, R.; Gauthier, Y.; Harrault, F.; Jannin, J.-L.; Lagniel, J.-M.; Leroy, P.-A.; Mattéi, P.; Sherman, J.; Sinanna, A.; Ausset, P.; Bousson, S.; Pottin, B.

    2002-02-01

    Source of light ions with high intensities The (SILHI) source has been producing proton beams since 1996. The first aim is to produce up to 100 mA cw beams at 95 keV for the injector of protons for high intensity demonstrator. This prototype is developed by a CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 collaboration for applications such as accelerator driven systems for nuclear waste transmutation, production of radioactive ion beams, or secondary particles. To measure installation reliability, continuous 5 day long runs have been performed. In October 1999, a 99.96% availability was achieved with a single short beam off and a 103 H uninterrupted beam. A new extraction system leads to lower beam losses and higher LEBT transparency. SILHI now produces a 95 keV-130 mA total beam with a proton fraction higher than 80%. Up to a 157 mA (247 mA/cm2) total cw beam has been extracted. The new EPICS control system, electromagnetic interference hardened devices and automatic control procedures now allow us to do longer runs. To analyze the reliability of these upgrades, a 4 week test was planned. In the framework of the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility project CEA participation, 135 mA-95 kV deuteron pulsed beams were produced. Extraction simulations and recent SILHI results are also presented. In addition, a new test bench has been recently developed to analyze H- beam production.

  14. Series-field-coil ion beam diode experiment and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Quintenz, J.P.; Zagar, D.M.; Johnson, P.R.; Anderson, R.J.; Widner, M.M.

    1984-08-01

    An experiment with a series-field-coil intense ion beam diode operating at the 1.6-MV, 0.8-TW level is described. The diode operates in the extraction mode with a 20-cm focal length. The diode design procedure is described together with some of the essential ion diode theory used in this design process. The experiment produced a well-focused ion beam while verifying some of the theoretical assumptions about ion diodes of this type. The experimental results are compared with numerical computer simulations and excellent agreement is obtained.

  15. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  16. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; ...

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted onmore » the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.« less

  17. Positive and negative ion beam merging system for neutral beam production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2005-12-13

    The positive and negative ion beam merging system extracts positive and negative ions of the same species and of the same energy from two separate ion sources. The positive and negative ions from both sources pass through a bending magnetic field region between the pole faces of an electromagnet. Since the positive and negative ions come from mirror image positions on opposite sides of a beam axis, and the positive and negative ions are identical, the trajectories will be symmetrical and the positive and negative ion beams will merge into a single neutral beam as they leave the pole face of the electromagnet. The ion sources are preferably multicusp plasma ion sources. The ion sources may include a multi-aperture extraction system for increasing ion current from the sources.

  18. Development of a pepper pot emittance probe and its application for ECR ion beam studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashev, S.; Barcikowski, A.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Vinogradov, N.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2009-07-21

    A pepper pot-scintillator screen system has been developed and used to measure the emittance of DC ion beams extracted from a high-intensity permanent magnet ECR ion source. The system includes a fast beam shutter with a minimum dwell time of 18 ms to reduce the degradation of the CsI(Tl) scintillator by DC ion beam irradiation and a CCD camera with a variable shutter speed in the range of 1 {micro}s-65 s. On-line emittance measurements are performed by an application code developed on a LabVIEW platform. The sensitivity of the device is sufficient to measure the emittance of DC ion beams with current densities down to about 100 nA/cm{sup 2}. The emittance of all ion species extracted from the ECR ion source and post-accelerated to an energy of 75-90 keV/charge have been measured downstream of the LEBT. As the mass-to-charge ratio of ion species increases, the normalized RMS emittances in both transverse phase planes decrease from 0.5-1.0 {pi} mm mrad for light ions to 0.05-0.09 {pi} mm mrad for highly charged {sup 209}Bi ions. The dependence of the emittance on ion's mass-to-charge ratio follows very well the dependence expected from beam rotation induced by decreasing ECR axial magnetic field. The measured emittance values cannot be explained by only ion beam rotation for all ion species and the contribution to emittance of ion temperature in plasma, non-linear electric fields and non-linear space charge is comparable or even higher than the contribution of ion beam rotation.

  19. Ion beam probing of electrostatic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persson, H.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of a cylindrically symmetric, time-independent electrostatic potential V in a magnetic field B with the same symmetry by measurements of the deflection of a primary beam of ions is analyzed and substantiated by examples. Special attention is given to the requirements on canonical angular momentum and total energy set by an arbitrary, nonmonotone V, to scaling laws obtained by normalization, and to the analogy with ionospheric sounding. The inversion procedure with the Abel analysis of an equivalent problem with a one-dimensional fictitious potential is used in a numerical experiment with application to the NASA Lewis Modified Penning Discharge. The determination of V from a study of secondary beams of ions with increased charge produced by hot plasma electrons is also analyzed, both from a general point of view and with application to the NASA Lewis SUMMA experiment. Simple formulas and geometrical constructions are given for the minimum energy necessary to reach the axis, the whole plasma, and any point in the magnetic field. The common, simplifying assumption that V is a small perturbation is critically and constructively analyzed; an iteration scheme for successively correcting the orbits and points of ionization for the electrostatic potential is suggested.

  20. Population Inversions in Ablation Plasmas Generated by Intense Electron Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    light weight design, and moderate cost. The Soviets have investigated intense proton beam pumped plasma lasers , however, the University of Michigan...interpretations have been verified by moving the position of the probe laser beam away from the surface of the anode (from 0.1 cm to 0.4 cm) and noting the changes...Properties Effects on Ultraviolet Laser induced Flashover of Angled Plastic insulators in Vacuum", C.L. Ensloe and R. M. Gilgenbach, IEEE 3 Trans. on

  1. A CW radiofrequency ion source for production of negative hydrogen ion beams for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J.; Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. P.

    2015-04-08

    A CW 13.56 MHz radiofrequency-driven ion source RADIS for production of H{sup −} and D{sup −} beams is under development for replacing the filament-driven ion source of the MCC30/15 cyclotron. The RF ion source has a 16-pole multicusp plasma chamber, an electromagnet-based magnetic filter and an external planar spiral RF antenna behind an AlN window. The extraction is a 5-electrode system with an adjustable puller electrode voltage for optimizing the beam formation, a water-cooled electron dump electrode and an accelerating einzel lens. At 2650 W of RF power, the source produces 1 mA of H{sup −} (2.6 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is the intensity needed at injection for production of 200 µA H{sup +} with the filament-driven ion source. A simple pepperpot device has been developed for characterizing the beam emittance. Plans for improving the power efficiency with the use of a new permanent magnet front plate is discussed.

  2. The prospects of a subnanometer focused neon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rahman, F H M; McVey, Shawn; Farkas, Louis; Notte, John A; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    The success of the helium ion microscope has encouraged extensions of this technology to produce beams of other ion species. A review of the various candidate ion beams and their technical prospects suggest that a neon beam might be the most readily achieved. Such a neon beam would provide a sputtering yield that exceeds helium by an order of magnitude while still offering a theoretical probe size less than 1-nm. This article outlines the motivation for a neon gas field ion source, the expected performance through simulations, and provides an update of our experimental progress.

  3. Spacecraft charging during ion beam emissions in sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, S. T.; Mcneil, W. J.; Aggson, T. L.

    1990-01-01

    During ion beam emissions from the SCATHA satellite, the potential of the negatively charged satellite body shows a sinusoidal oscillation frequency of once-per-spin of the satellite. The minimum occurs when the ion beam is sunward. The processes that may be responsible for the voltage modulation are considered. Neutralization of ion beam space charge by photoelectrons is examined. The photoelectrons are accelerated by the negative potential of the satellite. Effects of electron impact ionization, excitation of metastable states, and photoionization of xenon neutral atoms in the ion beam are studied in detail. Critical ionization velocity interaction is unlikely under the condition considered.

  4. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  6. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Renal Cell Carcinoma with Electrospray Droplet Ion Beams

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Chen, Lee Chuin; Takeda, Sen; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2017-01-01

    Tissue samples from renal cell carcinoma patients were analyzed by electrospray droplet ion beam-induced secondary ion mass spectrometry (EDI/SIMS). Positively- and negatively-charged secondary ions were measured for the cancerous and noncancerous regions of the tissue samples. Although specific cancerous species could not be found in both the positive and negative secondary ion spectra, the spectra of the cancerous and noncancerous tissues presented different trends. For instance, in the m/z range of 500–800 of the positive secondary ion spectra for the cancerous tissues, the intensities for several m/z values were lower than those of the m/z+2 peaks (indicating one double bond loss for the species), whereas, for the noncancerous tissues, the inverse trend was obtained. The tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was also performed on the tissue samples using probe electrospray ionization (PESI), and some molecular ions produced by PESI were found to be fragmented into the ions observed in EDI/SIMS analysis. When the positive secondary ion spectra produced by EDI/SIMS were analyzed by principal component analysis, the results for cancerous and noncancerous tissues were separated. The EDI/SIMS method can be applied to distinguish between a cancerous and a noncancerous area with high probability. PMID:28149705

  7. Simulation of target response due to uranium ion beam impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, H.; Noah, E.; Aiginger, H.; Poljanc, K.

    2009-12-01

    Metal targets were irradiated at GSI with a highly focused uranium ion beam with a kinetic energy of 350MeV/u. Out of these targets two copper samples, that had been irradiated multiple times with a maximum intensity of 2.36 · 109 , were chosen for simulations. In order to characterize the behavior of the target under the load of the ion beam, FLUKA was used to generate the initial distribution of deposited energy which was in turn used as an input for ANSYS AUTODYN to calculate the dynamic response of the target. In the simulations of the first sample a good approximation of the so-called hydrodynamic tensile limit, the crucial parameter for target failure, was found to be -1.08 GPa. This acquired value was used for the simulation of the second sample which had been irradiated with two high-intensity shots. These simulations resulted in the full penetration of the sample which was in agreement with metallurgical examinations. This paper presents the performed simulations.

  8. Performance of positive ion based high power ion source of EAST neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Jiang, Caichao; Li, Jun; Liu, Zhimin

    2016-02-15

    The positive ion based source with a hot cathode based arc chamber and a tetrode accelerator was employed for a neutral beam injector on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Four ion sources were developed and each ion source has produced 4 MW @ 80 keV hydrogen beam on the test bed. 100 s long pulse operation with modulated beam has also been tested on the test bed. The accelerator was upgraded from circular shaped to diamond shaped in the latest two ion sources. In the latest campaign of EAST experiment, four ion sources injected more than 4 MW deuterium beam with beam energy of 60 keV into EAST.

  9. Dynamics of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Ji, Qing; Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter A.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams. Here we present experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a FEPS plasma. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Near-complete charge neutralization is established 5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS, and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub- μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS suggest that plasma can be generated for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. This is confirmed by fast photography of the plasma in the 1-meter long FEPS on NDCX-II, where effective charge neutralization of the beam was achieved with the optimized FEPS timing. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy under contracts DE-AC0209CH11466 (PPPL) and DE-AC0205CH11231 (LBNL).

  10. Analytical and simulation studies for diode and triode ion beam extraction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Abdelrahman, M.; I. Basal, N.; G. Zakhary, S.

    2012-04-01

    This work is concerned with ion beam dynamics and compares the emittance to aberration ratios of two-and three-electrode extraction systems. The study is conducted with the aid of Version 7 of SIMION 3D ray-tracing software. The beam dependence on various parameters of the extraction systems is studied and the numerical results lead to qualitative conclusions. Ion beam characteristics using diode and triode extraction systems are investigated with the aid of the computer code SIMION 3 D, Version 7.0. The diode (two electrode extraction system) and triode (three-electrode extraction, acceleration-deceleration system) extraction systems are designed and optimized with different geometric parameters of the electrode system, voltage applied to the extraction electrode, and plasma parameters inside the ion source chamber, as well as by the ion beam space charge. This work attempts to describe the importance of the acceleration-deceleration extraction system. It shows that besides an increase of the beam energy, the ion beam has lower emittance than the two-electrode extraction system. Ion beams of the highest quality are extracted whenever the half-angular divergence is minimum for which the perveance current intensity and the extraction gap have optimum value. Knowing the electron temperature of the plasma is necessary to determine plasma potential and the exact beam energy.

  11. Microdosimetry in ion-beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrin, Giulio; Mayer, Ramona

    2015-05-01

    The information of the dose is not sufficiently describing the biological effects of ions on tissue since it does not express the radiation quality, i.e. the heterogeneity of the processes due to the slowing-down and the fragmentation of the particles when crossing a target. Depending on different circumstances, the radiation quality can be determined using measurements, calculations, or simulations. Microdosimeters are the primary tools used to provide the experimental information of the radiation quality and their role is becoming crucial for the recent clinical developments in particular with carbon ion therapy. Microdosimetry is strongly linked to the biological effectiveness of the radiation since it provides the physical parameters which explicitly distinguish the radiation for its capability of damaging cells. In the framework of ion-beam therapy microdosimetry can be used in the preparation of the treatment to complement radiobiological experiments and to analyze the modification of the radiation quality in phantoms. A more ambitious goal is to perform the measurements during the irradiation procedure to determine the non-targeted radiation and, more importantly, to monitor the modification of the radiation quality inside the patient. These procedures provide the feedback of the treatment directly beneficial for the single patient but also for the characterization of the biological effectiveness in general with advantages for all future treatment. Traditional and innovative tools are currently under study and an outlook of present experience and future development is presented here.

  12. New method of beam bunching in free-ion lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bessonov, E.G.

    1995-12-31

    An effective ion beam bunching method is suggested. This method is based on a selective interaction of line spectrum laser light (e.g. axial mode structure light) with non-fully stripped ion beam cooled in a storage rings, arranging the ion beam in layers in radial direction of an energy-longitudinal coordinate plane and following rotation of the beam at the right angle after switching on the RF cavity or undulator grouper/buncher. Laser cooling of the ion beam can be used at this position after switching off the resonator to decrease the energy spread caused by accelerating field of the resonator. A relativistic multilayer ion mirror will be produced this way. Both monochromatic laser beams and intermediate monochromaticity and bandwidth light sources of spontaneous incoherent radiation can be used for production of hard and high power electromagnetic radiation by reflection from this mirror. The reflectivity of the mirror is rather high because of the cross-section of the backward Rayleigh scattering of photon light by non-fully stripped relativistic ions ({approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) is much greater ({approximately} 10{divided_by}15 orders) then Thompson one ({approximately} r{sub e}{sup 2}). This position is valid even in the case of non-monochromatic laser light ({Delta}{omega}/{omega} {approximately} 10{sup -4}). Ion cooling both in longitudinal plane and three-dimensional radiation ion cooling had been proposed based on this observation. The using of these cooling techniques will permit to store high current and low emittance relativistic ion beams in storage rings. The bunched ion beam can be used in ordinary Free-Ion Lasers as well. After bunching the ion beam can be extracted from the storage ring in this case. Storage rings with zero momentum compaction function will permit to keep bunching of the ion beam for a long time.

  13. Experimental measurement of the 4-d transverse phase space map of a heavy ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, H S

    1997-12-01

    The development and employment of a new diagnostic instrument for characterizing intense, heavy ion beams is reported on. This instrument, the ''Gated Beam Imager'' or ''GBI'' was designed for use on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Project's ''Small Recirculator'', an integrated, scaled physics experiment and engineering development project for studying the transport and control of intense heavy ion beams as inertial fusion drivers in the production of electric power. The GBI allows rapid measurement and calculation of a heavy ion beam's characteristics to include all the first and second moments of the transverse phase space distribution, transverse emittance, envelope parameters and beam centroid. The GBI, with appropriate gating produces a time history of the beam resulting in a 4-D phase-space and time ''map'' of the beam. A unique capability of the GBI over existing diagnostic instruments is its ability to measure the ''cross'' moments between the two transverse orthogonal directions. Non-zero ''cross'' moments in the alternating gradient lattice of the Small Recirculator are indicative of focusing element rotational misalignments contributing to beam emittance growth. This emittance growth, while having the same effect on the ability to focus a beam as emittance growth caused by non-linear effects, is in principle removable by an appropriate number of focusing elements. The instrument uses the pepperpot method of introducing a plate with many pinholes into the beam and observing the images of the resulting beamlets as they interact with a detector after an appropriate drift distance. In order to produce adequate optical signal and repeatability, the detector was chosen to be a microchannel plate (MCP) with a phosphor readout screen. The heavy ions in the pepperpot beamlets are stopped in the MCP's thin front metal anode and the resulting secondary electron signal is amplified and proximity-focused onto the phosphor while maintaining

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed.

  15. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    DOE PAGES

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; ...

    2015-11-11

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics tomore » be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Finally, we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.« less

  16. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-11

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Finally, we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  17. Short Intense Ion Pulses for Materials and Warm Dense Matter Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter; Ji, Q.; Lidia, S. M.; Persaud, A.; Stettler, M.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2015-11-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r <1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li + ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. We will describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminium perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components (arXiv:1506.05839). This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  18. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius r<1 mm within 2 ns FWHM and approximately 1010 ions/pulse. To enable the short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV Li+ ion beam is neutralized in a 1.6-meter drift compression section located after the last accelerator magnet. An 8-Tesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Here we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  19. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  20. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration for ion-driven fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chengkun; Albright, Brian J

    2010-07-16

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion requires ion beams of 100s of MeV energy and < 10% energy spread. An overdense run-scale foil target driven by a high intensity laser pulse can produce an ion beam that has attractive properties for this application. The Break Out Afterburner (BOA) is one laser-ion acceleration mechanism proposed to generate such beams, however the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. The spectral and spatial qualities of the beam quickly evolve as the ion beam and co-moving electrons continue to interact with the laser. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the co-moving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread. Particle-In-Cell simulations reveal the dynamics of the ion beam under control. Optimal conditions for improving the spectral and spatial spread of the ion beam is explored for current laser and target parameters, leading to generation of ion beams of energy 100s of MeV and 6% energy spread, a vital step for realizing ion-driven fast ignition.

  1. Observation of Beam ION Instability in Spear3

    SciTech Connect

    Teytelman, D.; Cai, Y.; Corbett, W.J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Safranek, J.A.; Schmerge, J.F.; Sebek, J.J.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    Weak vertical coupled bunch instability with oscillation amplitude at {mu}m level has been observed in SPEAR3. The instability becomes stronger when there is a vacuum pressure rise by partially turning off vacuum pumps and it becomes weaker when the vertical beam emittance is increased by turning off the skew quadrupole magnets. These confirmed that the instability was driven by ions in the vacuum. The threshold of the beam ion instability when running with a single bunch train is just under 200 mA. This paper presents the comprehensive observations of the beam ion instability in SPEAR3. The effects of vacuum pressure, beam current, beam filling pattern, chromaticity, beam emittance and bunch-by-bunch feedback are investigated in great detail. In an electron accelerator, ions generated from the residual gas molecules can be trapped by the beam. Then these trapped ions interact resonantly with the beam and cause beam instability and emittance blow-up. Most existing light sources use a long single bunch train filling pattern, followed by a long gap to avoid multi-turn ion trapping. However, such a gap does not preclude ions from accumulating during one passage of the single bunch train beam, and those ions can still cause a Fast Ion Instability (FII) as predicted by Raubenheimer and Zimmermann. FII has been observed in ALS, and PLS by artificially increasing the vacuum pressure by injecting helium gas into the vacuum chamber or by turning off the ion pumps in order to observe the beam ion instability. In some existing rings, for instance B factory, the beam ion instability was observed at the beginning of the machine operation after a long period of shutdown and then it automatically disappeared when the vacuum was better. However, when the beam emittance becomes smaller, the FII can occur at nominal conditions as observed in PLS, SOLEIL and SSRF. This paper reports the observations of beam ion instabilities in SPEAR3 under different condition during a period of one

  2. Improving the intensity of a focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Sofiane; Fromager, Michael; Louhibi, Djelloul; Hasnaoui, Abdelkrim; Harfouche, Ali; Cagniot, Emmanuel; ńit-Ameur, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Let us consider the family of symmetrical Laguerre-Gaus modes of zero azimuthal order which will be denoted as LGp0 . The latter is made up of central lobe surrounded by p concentric rings of light. The fundamental mode LG00 is a Gaussian beam of width W. The focusing of a LGp0 beam of power P by a converging lens of focal length f produces a focal spot keeping the LGp0 -shape and having a central intensity I0= 2PW2/(λf)2 whatever the value of the radial order p. Many applications of lasers (laser marking, laser ablation, …) seek nowadays for a focal laser spot with the highest as possible intensity. For a given power P, increasing intensity I0 can be achieved by increasing W and reducing the focal length f. However, this way of doing is in fact limited because the ratio W/f cannot increase indefinitely at the risk of introducing a huge truncation upon the edge of the lens. In fact, it is possible to produce a single-lobed focal spot with a central intensity of about p times the intensity I0. This result has been obtained by reshaping (rectification) a LGp0 beam thanks to a proper Binary Diffractive Optical Element (BDOE). In addition, forcing a laser cavity to oscillate upon a LGp0 can improve the power extract due to a mode volume increasing with the mode order p. This could allow envisaging an economy of scale in term of laser pumping power for producing a given intensity I0. In addition, we have demonstrated that a rectified LGp0 beam better stand the lens spherical aberration than the usual Gaussian beam.

  3. Ion-beam machining of millimeter scale optics.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, P M; Feinberg, M R; Sandri, G; Horenstein, M N; Bifano, T G

    2000-02-01

    An ion-beam microcontouring process is developed and implemented for figuring millimeter scale optics. Ion figuring is a noncontact machining technique in which a beam of high-energy ions is directed toward a target substrate to remove material in a predetermined and controlled fashion. Owing to this noncontact mode of material removal, problems associated with tool wear and edge effects, which are common in conventional machining processes, are avoided. Ion-beam figuring is presented as an alternative for the final figuring of small (<1-mm) optical components. The depth of the material removed by an ion beam is a convolution between the ion-beam shape and an ion-beam dwell function, defined over a two-dimensional area of interest. Therefore determination of the beam dwell function from a desired material removal map and a known steady beam shape is a deconvolution process. A wavelet-based algorithm has been developed to model the deconvolution process in which the desired removal contours and ion-beam shapes are synthesized numerically as wavelet expansions. We then mathematically combined these expansions to compute the dwell function or the tool path for controlling the figuring process. Various models have been developed to test the stability of the algorithm and to understand the critical parameters of the figuring process. The figuring system primarily consists of a duo-plasmatron ion source that ionizes argon to generate a focused (approximately 200-microm FWHM) ion beam. This beam is rastered over the removal surface with a perpendicular set of electrostatic plates controlled by a computer guidance system. Experimental confirmation of ion figuring is demonstrated by machining a one-dimensional sinusoidal depth profile in a prepolished silicon substrate. This profile was figured to within a rms error of 25 nm in one iteration.

  4. Solar wind double ions beams and the heliospheric current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, C. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Phillips, J. L.; Goldstein, B. E.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    Double ion beams are often observed in the solar wind, but little work has been done in relating these beams to structures within the solar wind. Double ion beams are observed as beams of a given ion species and charge state occurring at two different energies. We use the three-dimensional ion plasma instrument on board the Ulysses spacecraft to look for evidence of such beams associated with the heliospheric current sheet. In a subset chosen independently of plasma parameters consisting of 8 of cover 47 crossings of the current sheet made during the inecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission we find that these double ion beams are always present on either side of the current sheet. The double beams are present in both the proton and helium species. The secondary beam typically has a higher helium abundance, which suggests that these beams are formed in the helium-rich corona rather than in interplanetary space. The double beams are not present in the interior of the current sheet. Neither collisions nor effects of plasma beta can account for the disappearance of the double beams inside the current sheet in all eight cases. We postulate that these beams are formed by reconnection occurring near the Sun in the boundary region between the open field lines of the coronal holes and the closed field line region of the heliospheric current sheet. Such a scenario would be consistent with previous X ray measurements which suggect that reconnection is occurring in this region.

  5. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  6. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  7. Energetic Ion Beam Production by a Low-Pressure Plasma Focus Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L. K.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2011-03-30

    Energetic ion beam emissions in a 3 kJ Mather type plasma focus operating at low-pressure regime are investigated. Deuterium gas is used and the discharge is operated in a low-pressure regime of below 1 mbar. Formation of the current sheath during the breakdown phase at the back wall is assisted by a set delayed trigger pulse. Energetic and intense ion beams with good reproducibility have been obtained for the operating pressure ranging from 0.05 mbar to 0.5 mbar. Deuteron beam is determined by time resolved measurement by making use of three biased ion collectors placed at the end on direction. The average energies of deuteron beams are resolved by using time-of flight method. Correlation between the ion emissions and the current sheath dynamics is also discussed.

  8. Pulsed ion beam surface treatment for preparing rapidly solidified corrosion resistant steel and aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; McIntyre, D.C.; Stinnett, R.W.; Greenly, J.B.

    1995-03-01

    Intense, pulsed ion beams were used to melt and rapidly resolidify Types 316F, 316L and sensitized 304 stainless steel surfaces to eliminate the negative effects of microstructural heterogeneity on localized corrosion resistance. Anodic polarization curves determined for 316F and 316L showed that passive current densities were reduced and pitting potentials were increased due to ion beam treatment. Type 304 samples sensitized at 600 C for 100 h showed no evidence of grain boundary attack when surfaces were ion beam treated. Equivalent ion beam treatments were conducted with a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Electrochemical impedance experiments conducted with this alloy exposed to an aerated chloride solution showed that the onset of pitting was delayed compared to untreated control samples.

  9. Optics of ion beams for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, G. Q.; Lei, G. J.; Cao, J. Y.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-07-15

    The ion beam optics for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak is studied by two- dimensional numerical simulation program firstly, where the emitting surface is taken at 100 Debye lengths from the plasma electrode. The mathematical formulation, computation techniques are described. Typical ion orbits, equipotential contours, and emittance diagram are shown. For a fixed geometry electrode, the effect of plasma density, plasma potential and plasma electron temperature on ion beam optics is examined, and the calculation reliability is confirmed by experimental results. In order to improve ion beam optics, the application of a small pre-acceleration voltage ({approx}100 V) between the plasma electrode and the arc discharge anode is reasonable, and a lower plasma electron temperature is desired. The results allow optimization of the ion beam optics in the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak and provide guidelines for designing future neutral beam injection system on HL-2M Tokomak.

  10. Three-dimensional numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-05-01

    In neutral plasmas with a uniform magnetic field and strongly anisotropic distribution function (T∥/T⊥≪1) an electrostatic Harris-type collective instability may develop if the plasma is sufficiently dense. Such anisotropies develop naturally in accelerators, and a similar instability may lead to a deterioration of the beam quality in a one-component nonneutral charged particle beam. The instability may also lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which would make the focusing of the beam difficult and impose a limit on the minimum spot size achievable in heavy ion fusion experiments. This paper reports the results of recent numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability using the newly developed Beam Eigenmodes And Spectra (bEASt) code for space-charge-dominated, low-emittance beams with large tune depression (ν/ν0≪1). Such high-intensity beams are relevant to next-step experiments such as the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), which would serve as proof-of-principal experiment for heavy-ion fusion.

  11. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  12. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Hyojae Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  13. Ion Beam Sputtered Coatings of Bioglass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hench, Larry L.; Wilson, J.; Ruzakowski, Patricia Henrietta Anne

    1982-01-01

    The ion beam sputtering technique available at the NASA-Lewis was used to apply coatings of bioglass to ceramic, metallic, and polymeric substrates. Experiments in vivo and in vitro described investigate these coatings. Some degree of substrate masking was obtained in all samples although stability and reactivity equivalent to bulk bioglass was not observed in all coated samples. Some degree of stability was seen in all coated samples that were reacted in vitro. Both metallic and ceramic substrates coated in this manner failed to show significantly improved coatings over those obtained with existing techniques. Implantation of the coated ceramic substrate samples in bone gave no definite bonding as seen with bulk glass; however, partial and patchy bonding was seen. Polymeric substrates in these studies showed promise of success. The coatings applied were sufficient to mask the underlying reactive test surface and tissue adhesion of collagen to bioglass was seen. Hydrophilic, hydrophobic, charged, and uncharged polymeric surfaces were successfully coated.

  14. Internal dynamics of intense twin beams and their coherence

    PubMed Central

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of intense twin beams in pump-depleted parametric down-conversion is studied. A generalized parametric approximation is suggested to solve the quantum model. Its comparison with a semiclassical model valid for larger twin-beam intensities confirms its applicability. The experimentally observed maxima in the spectral and spatial intensity auto- and cross- correlation functions depending on pump power are explained in terms of different speeds of the (back-) flow of energy between the individual down-converted modes and the corresponding pump modes. This effect is also responsible for the gradual replacement of the initial exponential growth of the down-converted fields by the linear one. Furthermore, it forms a minimum in the curve giving the effective number of twin-beam modes. These effects manifest a tight relation between the twin-beam coherence and its internal structure, as clearly visible in the model. Multiple maxima in the intensity correlation functions originating in the oscillations of energy flow between the pump and down-converted modes are theoretically predicted. PMID:26924749

  15. Experimental and numerical study of high intensity argon cluster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korobeishchikov, N. G.; Kalyada, V. V.; Shmakov, A. A.; Zarvin, A. E.; Skovorodko, P. A.

    2014-12-09

    Experimental and numerical investigations of expansion of argon with homogeneous condensation in supersonic conical nozzle and in free jet behind it were carried out. Optimal parameters (stagnation pressure, nozzle-skimmer distance) for the formation of cluster beam with maximum intensity were determined. Two available models for nonequilibrium nucleation were tested. The numerical results are in satisfactory agreement with the measured data.

  16. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland Paul; Dudnikov, Vadim

    2015-02-20

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm2 per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency, reliability and availability for pulsed operation as used in the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source . At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power 1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with 4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H- beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the aluminum nitride (AlN) discharge chamber for 32 days at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. While this project demonstrated the advantages of the pulsed version of the SA RF SPS as an upgrade to the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source, it led to a possibility for upgrades to CW machines like the many cyclotrons used for commercial applications. Four appendices contain important details of the work carried out under this grant.

  17. Deflection of a Reflected Intense Vortex Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Huang, Shan; Shi, Yin; Liu, Chen; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    An interesting deflection effect deviating the optical reflection law is revealed in the relativistic regime of intense vortex laser plasma interaction. When an intense vortex laser obliquely impinges onto an overdense plasma target, the reflected beam deflects out of the plane of incidence with an experimentally observable deflection angle. The mechanism is demonstrated by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical modeling using the Maxwell stress tensor. The deflection results from the rotational symmetry breaking of the foil driven by the unsymmetrical shear stress of the vortex beam. The l -dependent shear stress, where l is the topological charge, as an intrinsic characteristic to the vortex beam, plays an important role as the ponderomotive force in relativistic vortex laser matter interaction.

  18. Effects of a dielectric material in an ion source on the ion beam current density and ion beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Sakakita, H.; Nakamiya, A.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.

    2016-02-15

    To understand a strong focusing phenomenon that occurs in a low-energy hydrogen ion beam, the electron temperature, the electron density, and the space potential in an ion source with cusped magnetic fields are measured before and after the transition to the focusing state using an electrostatic probe. The experimental results show that no significant changes are observed before or after the transition. However, we found unique phenomena that are characterized by the position of the electrostatic probe in the ion source chamber. Specifically, the extracted ion beam current density and energy are obviously enhanced in the case where the electrostatic probe, which is covered by a dielectric material, is placed close to an acceleration electrode.

  19. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter depoairion are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq. cm. resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x to to the -6/ohm. cm. for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm. cm. for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  20. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter deposition are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq cm resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x 10 to the -6th/ohm cm for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm cm for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.