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Sample records for ion chamber response

  1. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  2. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  3. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  4. Chamber wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Provencio, P. P.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Stolp, J. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Knowles, T. R.

    2005-12-01

    Candidate dry-wall materials for the reactor chambers of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants have been exposed to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. These pulses simulate the MeV-level ion pulses with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 that can be expected to impinge on the first wall of such future plants. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were subjected to up to 1600 pulses, usually while being heated to 600 °C. Other metals were exposed as well. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Powder-metallurgy (PM) tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. This roughening is worse than for other metals, and worse than for either tungsten alloyed with rhenium (W25Re), or for CVD and single-crystal forms of tungsten. Carbon, particularly the form used in composite material, appears to suffer material loss well below its sublimation point. Some engineered materials were also investigated. It appears that some modification to PM tungsten is required for its successful use in a reactor environment.

  5. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  6. The response of a Fermilab-designed ion chamber in pulsed photon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.S.; Hartman, B.; Krueger, F.; Larson, J.

    1988-01-26

    This note reports measurements of the response of a Fermilab-designed area monitor ionization chamber used in Chipmunk and Scarecrow detectors to pulsed photon fields of various intensities and durations. The measurements were made to better define the operating limits of the instruments and to understand the possible effects of recombination and space charge on the dose measured by the instruments in pulsed fields. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Detector Characterization Report, Response Related to Linear Movement and Radiation Levels for an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)-Developed Ion Chamber and a Commercial Ion Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, P.J.

    2001-01-11

    Recent activities regarding the safeguarding of radioactive material have indicated there is a need to use radiation sensors to monitor intentional or unintentional material movement. Existing radiation detection systems were not typically designed for this type of operation since most of their use accounted for monitoring material while the material is stationary. To ensure that a radiation monitoring system is capable of detecting the movement of radioactive material, a series of tests were needed. These tests would need to be performed in known radiological conditions, under controlled environmental conditions, and at known movement speeds. The Radiation Effects Facility (REF), located at the Radiation Calibration Laboratory, provided the necessary capabilities to perform these tests. This report provides a compilation of the results from a characterization of two different sensors--a simple, air ionization chamber-based sensor developed at ORNL that consists of an ion chamber connected to a separate amplifier, and an Eberline model RO-7-LD. The RO-7-LD is also an air ionization chamber-based sensor, but the electronics are in the same physical package.

  8. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  9. Monte Carlo modeling of ion chamber performance using MCNP.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J D

    2012-12-01

    Ion Chambers have a generally flat energy response with some deviations at very low (<100 keV) and very high (>2 MeV) energies. Some improvements in the low energy response can be achieved through use of high atomic number gases, such as argon and xenon, and higher chamber pressures. This work looks at the energy response of high pressure xenon-filled ion chambers using the MCNP Monte Carlo package to develop geometric models of a commercially available high pressure ion chamber (HPIC). The use of the F6 tally as an estimator of the energy deposited in a region of interest per unit mass, and the underlying assumptions associated with its use are described. The effect of gas composition, chamber gas pressure, chamber wall thickness, and chamber holder wall thicknesses on energy response are investigated and reported. The predicted energy response curve for the HPIC was found to be similar to that reported by other investigators. These investigations indicate that improvements to flatten the overall energy response of the HPIC down to 70 keV could be achieved through use of 3 mm-thick stainless steel walls for the ion chamber.

  10. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  11. Chamber propagation physics for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    Chamber transport is an important area of study for heavy ion fusion. Final focus and chamber-transport are high leverage areas providing opportunities to significantly decrease the cost of electricity from a heavy ion fusion power plant. Chamber transport in two basic regimes is under consideration. In the low chamber density regime ({approx_lt}0.003 torr), ballistic or nearly-ballistic transport is used. Partial beam neutralization has been studied to offset the effects of beam stripping. In the high chamber density regime ({approx_gt}.1 torr), two transport modes (pinched transport and channel transport) are under investigation. Both involve focusing the beam outside the chamber then transporting it at small radius ({approx} 2 mm). Both high chamber density modes relax the constraints on the beam quality needed from the accelerator which will reduce the driver cost and the cost of electricity.

  12. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  13. Ion chambers simplify absolute intensity measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. A. R.

    1966-01-01

    Single or double ion chamber technique measures absolute radiation intensities in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet region of the spectrum. The ion chambers use rare gases as the ion carrier. Photon absorbed by the gas creates one ion pair so a measure of these is a measure of the number of incident photons.

  14. Recombination characteristics of therapeutic ion beams on ion chamber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Matsuyama, Tetsuharu; Sato, Shinji; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In heavy ion radiotherapy, ionization chambers are regarded as a standard for determining the absorbed dose given to patients. In ion dosimetry, it is necessary to correct the radiation quality, which depends on the initial recombination effect. This study reveals for the radiation quality dependence of the initial recombination in air in ion dosimetry. Ionization charge was measured for the beams of protons at 40-160 MeV, carbon at 21-400 MeV/n, and iron at 23.5-500 MeV/n using two identical parallel-plate ionization chambers placed in series along the beam axis. The downstream chamber was used as a monitor operated with a constant applied voltage, while the other chamber was used for recombination measurement by changing the voltage. The ratio of the ionization charge measured by the two ionization chambers showed a linear relationship with the inverse of the voltage in the high-voltage region. The initial recombination factor was estimated by extrapolating the obtained linear relationship to infinite voltage. The extent of the initial recombination was found to increase with decreasing incident energy or increasing atomic number of the beam. This behavior can be explained with an amorphous track structure model: the increase of ionization density in the core region of the track due to decreasing kinetic energy or increasing atomic number leads to denser initial ion production and results in a higher recombination probability. For therapeutic carbon ion beams, the extent of the initial recombination was not constant but changed by 0.6% even in the target region. This tendency was quantitatively well reproduced with the track-structure based on the initial recombination model; however, the transitional change in the track structure is considered to play an important role in further understanding of the characteristics of the initial recombination.

  15. Vacuum chamber for ion manipulation device

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D; Anderson, Gordon A; Baker, Erin M

    2014-12-09

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area. A predetermined number of pairs of surfaces are disposed in one or more chambers, forming a multiple-layer ion mobility cyclotron device.

  16. SU-C-304-01: Investigation of Various Detector Response Functions and Their Geometry Dependence in a Novel Method to Address Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B; Lebron, S; Li, J; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel convolution-based approach has been proposed to address ion chamber (IC) volume averaging effect (VAE) for the commissioning of commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). We investigate the use of various convolution kernels and its impact on the accuracy of beam models. Methods: Our approach simulates the VAE by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with a detector response function (DRF) while optimizing the beam model. At convergence, the convolved profiles match the measured profiles, indicating the calculated profiles match the “true” beam profiles. To validate the approach, beam profiles of an Elekta LINAC were repeatedly collected with ICs of various volumes (CC04, CC13 and SNC 125) to obtain clinically acceptable beam models. The TPS-calculated profiles were convolved externally with the DRF of respective IC. The beam model parameters were reoptimized using Nelder-Mead method by forcing the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. We evaluated three types of DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic) and the impact of kernel dependence on field geometry (depth and field size). The profiles calculated with beam models were compared with SNC EDGE diode-measured profiles. Results: The method was successfully implemented with Pinnacle Scripting and Matlab. The reoptimization converged in ∼10 minutes. For all tested ICs and DRFs, penumbra widths of the TPS-calculated profiles and diode-measured profiles were within 1.0 mm. Gaussian function had the best performance with mean penumbra width difference within 0.5 mm. The use of geometry dependent DRFs showed marginal improvement, reducing the penumbra width differences to less than 0.3 mm. Significant increase in IMRT QA passing rates was achieved with the optimized beam model. Conclusion: The proposed approach significantly improved the accuracy of the TPS beam model. Gaussian functions as the convolution kernel performed consistently better than Lorentzian and

  17. A new method for measuring the response time of the high pressure ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentao; Shen, Yixiong; An, Jigang

    2012-08-01

    Time response is an important performance characteristic for gas-pressurized ionization chambers. To study the time response, it is especially crucial to measure the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. In this paper, a new approach is proposed to study the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. It is carried out with a short-pulsed X-ray source and a high-speed digitizer. The ion drift time in the chamber is then determined from the digitized data. By measuring the ion drift time of a 15 atm xenon testing chamber, the method has been proven to be effective in the time response studies of ionization chambers.

  18. SIMULATION OF CHAMBER TRANSPORT FOR HEAVY-ION FUSION DRIVERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Callahan, D A; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Rose, D V; Welch, D R

    2004-05-20

    The heavy-ion fusion (HIF) community recently developed a power-plant design that meets the various requirements of accelerators, final focus, chamber transport, and targets. The point design is intended to minimize physics risk and is certainly not optimal for the cost of electricity. Recent chamber-transport simulations, however, indicate that changes in the beam ion species, the convergence angle, and the emittance might allow more-economical designs.

  19. Development of ion chambers for the measurement of low energy synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahant, A. K.; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Panyam, Vinatha S.

    2009-04-01

    Measurement of radiation fields due to low energy synchrotron radiation (SR) needs special considerations. The photoelectric interactions, which are mainly responsible for signal generation in this case, result in electron emission in a direction nearly perpendicular to the direction of incident photon. A free air ionisation chamber was designed and used for measurement of intensity of SR in the beam line and a methodology has been developed to measure SR fields away from the beam line using large volume ion chambers. Studies with spherical and cylindrical ion chambers in X-ray beams obtained at a tube potential of 15 kV (3 mm Be inherent filtration) showed that the chamber sensitivity at low energy strongly depended on curvature of the chamber wall especially in thick walled chambers. Our studies further showed that large volume thin and plane walled (0.01 mm thick aluminium wall) chambers could be used for measurement of SR fields away from the beam lines, with reasonably good accuracy (±10%) by calibrating them against the free air ion chamber through a similar chamber of smaller dimensions.

  20. Chamber transport of ''foot'' pulses for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan-Miller, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.

    2002-02-20

    Indirect-drive targets for heavy-ion fusion must initially be heated by ''foot'' pulses that precede the main heating pulses by tens of nanoseconds. These pulses typically have a lower energy and perveance than the main pulses, and the fusion-chamber environment is different from that seen by later pulses. The preliminary particle-in-cell simulations of foot pulses here examine the sensitivity of the beam focusing to ion-beam perveance, background-gas density, and pre-neutralization by a plasma near the chamber entry port.

  1. Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Niller, D A C; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

    2002-08-02

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  2. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  3. Investigation of thermal and temporal responses of ionization chambers in radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    AlMasri, Hussein; Funyu, Akira; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2012-07-01

    The ionization chamber is a primary dosimeter that is used in radiation dosimetry. Generally, the ion chamber response requires temperature/pressure correction according to the ideal gas law. However, this correction does not consider the thermal volume effect of chambers. The temporal and thermal volume effects of various chambers (CC01, CC13, NACP parallel-plate, PTW) with different wall and electrode materials have been studied in a water phantom. Measurements were done after heating the water with a suitable heating system, and chambers were submerged for a sufficient time to allow for temperature equilibrium. Temporal results show that all chambers equilibrate quickly in water. The equilibration time was between 3 and 5 min for all chambers. Thermal results show that all chambers expanded in response to heating except for the PTW, which contracted. This might be explained by the differences in the volumes of all chambers and also by the difference in wall material composition of PTW from the other chambers. It was found that the smallest chamber, CC01, showed the greatest expansion. The magnitude of the expansion was ~1, 0.8, and 0.9% for CC01, CC13, and parallel-plate chambers, respectively, in the temperature range of 295-320 K. The magnitude of the detected contraction was <0.3% for PTW in the same temperature range. For absolute dosimetry, it is necessary to make corrections for the ion chamber response, especially for small ion chambers like the CC01. Otherwise, room and water phantom temperatures should remain within a close range. PMID:22467281

  4. Commissioning of a large segmented ion chamber for the FMA

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Davids, C.N.; Blumenthal, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    A large-area sectored ion chamber was built by a Yale-Daresbury (U.K.) - ANL collaboration to allow extensions of studies of N = Z (T = 0) nuclei. The ion chamber is a conventional DE-DE-E detector which is 20-cm deep, but each anode is segmented into eight pads to allow high count-rate capability and ray-trace reconstruction. With suitable electronics, the detector can become eight close-packed ion chambers, considerably reducing the count rate in each. A position-wire plane allows further raytracing which should permit the rejection of anomalous trajectories and improve Z-separation. A brief test run was scheduled shortly after delivery. Performance appeared promising, but issues of gain matching and cross talk need further exploration. We will study these features {open_quotes}off line{close_quotes} and hope to perform a full experiment on selenium isotopes in the summer. This detector appears to have many uses and is potentially more useful than previous detectors of its type. Similar detectors are being built for the HHRF at Oak Ridge and for Texas A&M University.

  5. Monte Carlo calculations of electron beam quality conversion factors for several ion chamber types

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive investigation of electron beam reference dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulations of the response of 10 plane-parallel and 18 cylindrical ion chamber types. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of the optimal shift of the chambers’ effective point of measurement (EPOM) and beam quality conversion factors. Methods: The EGSnrc system is used for calculations of the absorbed dose to gas in ion chamber models and the absorbed dose to water as a function of depth in a water phantom on which cobalt-60 and several electron beam source models are incident. The optimal EPOM shifts of the ion chambers are determined by comparing calculations of R{sub 50} converted from I{sub 50} (calculated using ion chamber simulations in phantom) to R{sub 50} calculated using simulations of the absorbed dose to water vs depth in water. Beam quality conversion factors are determined as the calculated ratio of the absorbed dose to water to the absorbed dose to air in the ion chamber at the reference depth in a cobalt-60 beam to that in electron beams. Results: For most plane-parallel chambers, the optimal EPOM shift is inside of the active cavity but different from the shift determined with water-equivalent scaling of the front window of the chamber. These optimal shifts for plane-parallel chambers also reduce the scatter of beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, as a function of R{sub 50}. The optimal shift of cylindrical chambers is found to be less than the 0.5 r{sub cav} recommended by current dosimetry protocols. In most cases, the values of the optimal shift are close to 0.3 r{sub cav}. Values of k{sub ecal} are calculated and compared to those from the TG-51 protocol and differences are explained using accurate individual correction factors for a subset of ion chambers investigated. High-precision fits to beam quality conversion factors normalized to unity in a beam with R{sub 50} = 7.5 cm (k{sub Q}{sup ′}) are provided. These

  6. Characterization of a multi-axis ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kozelka, Jakub; Simon, William E.; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Chihray

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to characterize a multi-axis ion chamber array (IC PROFILER; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL USA) that has the potential to simplify the acquisition of LINAC beam data. Methods: The IC PROFILER (or panel) measurement response was characterized with respect to radiation beam properties, including dose, dose per pulse, pulse rate frequency (PRF), and energy. Panel properties were also studied, including detector-calibration stability, power-on time, backscatter dependence, and the panel's agreement with water tank measurements [profiles, fractional depth dose (FDD), and output factors]. Results: The panel's relative deviation was typically within ({+-}) 1% of an independent (or nominal) response for all properties that were tested. Notable results were (a) a detectable relative field shape change of {approx}1% with linear accelerator PRF changes; (b) a large range in backscatter thickness had a minimal effect on the measured dose distribution (typically less than 1%); (c) the error spread in profile comparison between the panel and scanning water tank (Blue Phantom, CC13; IBA Schwarzenbruck, DE) was approximately ({+-}) 0.75%. Conclusions: The ability of the panel to accurately reproduce water tank profiles, FDDs, and output factors is an indication of its abilities as a dosimetry system. The benefits of using the panel versus a scanning water tank are less setup time and less error susceptibility. The same measurements (including device setup and breakdown) for both systems took 180 min with the water tank versus 30 min with the panel. The time-savings increase as the measurement load is increased.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF SURFACE ALPHA CONTAMINATION USING ELECTRET ION CHAMBERS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Electret ion chambers (EICs) are known to be inexpensive, reliable, passive, integrating devices used for measurement of ionizing radiation. Their application for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces was recently realized. This two-year project deals with the evaluation of electret ion chambers with different types of electrets and chambers for measurement of surface alpha contamination, their demonstration at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, a cost-benefit comparison with the existing methods, and the potential deployment at DOE sites. During the first year (FY98) of the project, evaluation of the EICS was completed. It was observed that EICS could be used for measurement of free release level of alpha contamination for transuranics (100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} fixed). DOE sites, where demonstration of EIC technology for surface alpha contamination measurements could be performed, were also identified. During FY99, demonstration and deployment of EICS at DOE sites are planned. A cost-benefit analysis of the EIC for surface alpha contamination measurement will also be performed.

  8. Indirect check of the stability of the reference ion chamber used for accelerator output calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Soah; Hwang, Taejin; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Bae, Hoonsik

    2014-11-01

    A linear accelerator's output is periodically checked by using a reference ion chamber which is also periodically calibrated at the accredited standard dosimetry laboratories. We suggest a simple procedure for checking the chamber's stability between calibrations by comparison with another ion chamber. To identify the long-term stability of chambers, we collected and assessed the dose-to-water conversion factors provided by standard laboratories for three chambers during a period of four years. To develop the chamber constancy check program, we used one Farmer-type reference ion chamber FC65-G, two ion chambers (CC13a and CC13b) and one CC01 ion chamber (IBA). Under the accelerator, each chamber was placed inside the solid phantom and irradiated; the experimental configurations were identical. To check the variation in charge collection of the reference chamber, we monitored the ratios of the FC65-G values over each chamber reading. Based on the error propagation of the two chamber ratios, we estimated the uncertainty of the output calibration from the chamber variation. The calibration factors provided for the three chambers showed 0.04 ˜ 0.12% standard deviations during four years. For procedure development, the reading ratios of FC65-G over CCxx showed very good stability; the ratios of FC65-G over CC13a, CC13b and CC01 varied less than 0.059, 0.087 and 0.248%, respectively, over five measurements. By ascribing possible uncertainties of the ratio to the reference chamber alone, we could conservatively check the stability of the reference chamber for treatment safety. An extension of the chamber calibration period was also evaluated. In conclusion, we designed a stability check procedure for the reference chamber based on a reading ratio of two chambers. This could help the user assess the chamber stability between periodic chamber calibration, and the associated patient treatment could be carried out with enhanced safety.

  9. Plasma generation near an Ion thruster disharge chamber hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Anderson, John R.; Goebel, Dan M.; Wirz, Richard; Sengupta, Anita

    2003-01-01

    In gridded electrostatic thrusters, ions are produced by electron bombardment in the discharge chamber. In most of these thrusters, a single, centrally located hollow cathode supplies the ionizing electrons. An applied magnetic field in the discharge chamber restricts the electrons leaving the hollow cathode to a very narrow channel. In this channel, the high electron current density ionizes both propellant gas flowing from the hollow cathode, and other neutrals from the main propellant flow from the plenum. The processes that occur just past the hollow cathode exit are very important. In recent engine tests, several cases of discharge cathode orifice place and keeper erosion have been reported. In this paper we present results from a new 1-D, variable area model of the plasma processes in the magnetized channel just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. The model predicts plasma densities, and temperatures consistent with those reported in the literature for the NSTAR engine, and preliminary results from the model show a potential maximum just downstream of the cathode.

  10. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, compared the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers to beams of 26Fe, 36Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z sq scaling.

  11. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50-100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  12. Post-flight Analysis of the Argon Filled Ion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Goldhagen, P.; Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is a complex mixture of primary galactic and solar cosmic rays and a multitude of secondary particles produced in collision with air nuclei. The first series of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurement flights on the NASA research aircraft ER-2 took place in June 1997. The ER-2 flight package consisted of fifteen instruments from six countries and were chosen to provide varying sensitivity to specific components. These AIR ER-2 flight measurements are to characterize the AIR environment during solar minimum to allow the continued development of environmental models of this complex mixture of ionizing radiation. This will enable scientists to study the ionizing radiation health hazard associated with the high-altitude operation of a commercial supersonic transport and to allow estimates of single event upsets for advanced avionics systems design. The argon filled ion chamber representing about 40 percent of the contributions to radiation risks are analyzed herein and model discrepancies for solar minimum environment are on the order of 5 percent and less. Other biologically significant components remain to be analyzed.

  13. Ion-chamber-based loss monitor system for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Brown, D.; Browman, A.; Macek, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    A new loss monitor system has been designed and installed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The detectors are ion chambers filled with N{sub 2} gas. The electronics modules have a threshold range of 1:100, and they can resolve changes in beam loss of about 2% of the threshold settings. They can generate a trip signal in 2 {mu}s if the beam loss is large enough; if the response time of the Fast Protect System is included the beam will be shut off in about 37 {mu}s.

  14. An experimental and computational investigation of the standard temperature-pressure correction factor for ion chambers in kilovoltage x rays

    SciTech Connect

    La Russa, Daniel J.; McEwen, Malcolm; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2007-12-15

    For ion chambers with cavities open to the surrounding atmosphere, the response measured at a given temperature and pressure must be corrected using the standard temperature-pressure correction factor (P{sub TP}). A previous paper based solely on Monte Carlo simulations [D. J. La Russa and D. W. O. Rogers, Med. Phys. 33, 4590-4599 (2006)] pointed out the shortcomings of the P{sub TP} correction factor when used to correct the response of non-air-equivalent chambers for low-energy x-ray beams. This work presents the results of several experiments that corroborate these calculations for a number of ion chambers. Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental setup revealed additional insight into the various factors affecting the extent of the breakdown of P{sub TP}, including the effect of impurities and the sensitivity to chamber dimensions. For an unfiltered 60 kV beam, the P{sub TP}-corrected response of an NE 2571 ion chamber measured at 0.7 atm was 2.5% below the response measured at reference conditions. In general, Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental setup using EGSnrc were within 0.5% of measured values. EGSnrc-calculated values of air kerma calibration coefficients (N{sub K}) at low x-ray energies are also provided as a means of estimating the level of impurities in the chambers investigated. Calculated values of N{sub K} normalized to the value measured for a 250 kV beam were obtained for three chambers and were within 1% of experiment with one exception, the Exradin A12 in a 50 kV beam.

  15. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a recent calibration at the LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers were compared to beams of 26Fe, 36 Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79 Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z squared scaling.

  16. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R; Rogers, D W O

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  17. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  18. Response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeter to beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munish; Gupta, Anil; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimate of the response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters (DRDs) to various beta sources was performed. It has been established that the ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters do not respond to beta particles having energy (Emax)<1 MeV and same was verified using (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (204)Tl beta sources. However, for beta particles having energy >1 MeV, the DRDs exhibit measureable response and the values are ~8%, ~14% and ~27% per mSv for natural uranium, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh beta sources respectively. As the energy of the beta particles increases, the response also increases. The response of DRDs to beta particles having energy>1 MeV arises due to the fact that the thickness of the chamber walls is less than the maximum range of beta particles. This may also be one of the reasons for disparity between doses measured with passive/legal dosimeters (TLDs) and DRDs in those situations in which radiation workers are exposed to mixed field of gamma photons and beta particles especially at uranium processing plants, nuclear (power and research) reactors, waste management facilities and fuel reprocessing plants etc. The paper provides the reason (technical) for disparity between the doses recorded by TLDs and DRDs in mixed field of photons and beta particles.

  19. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams.

  20. Imaging With A Multiplane Multiwire Proportional Chamber Using Heavy Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W. T.; Alonso, J. R.; Tobias, C. A...

    1982-11-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity pro files of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams.

  1. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W. T.; Alonso, J. R.; Tobias, C. A.

    A 16 plane multiwire proportional chamber was developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system was tested for reconstruction of 3 dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams.

  2. Heavy ion beam studies and imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W. T.; Alonso, J. R.; Tobias, C.

    1981-03-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber was used to accurately measure intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. An imaging capability was developed for the system, allowing for reconstruction of three dimensional representation of radiological objects using heavy ion beams.

  3. Implementing a New Ion Chamber Design for Neutron Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah; Anderson, Eamon; Fry, Jason; Holley, Adam; Snow, Mike

    2012-10-01

    The quark-quark weak interaction is difficult to measure due to the presence of the strong force. However, low energy neutrons passing through liquid Helium-4 can be used to probe the nucleon-nucleon weak interaction, which is induced by the quark-quark weak interaction. The neutron spin rotation experiment seeks to measure the spin rotation angle of neutrons due to their weak interaction with Helium-4 nuclei. This rotation angle is translated into a neutron flux asymmetry with a neutron polarizer/analyzer pair. A segmented Helium-3 gas ionization chamber was developed to measure the resultant neutron flux. We report on the design and initial tests of that ionization chamber. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation REU program and NSF grant #PHY-0969490.

  4. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-06-28

    Neutronics analysis has been performed to assess the shielding requirements for the insulators and final focusing magnets in a modified HYLIFE-II target chamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion beam transport. Using 65 cm thick Flibe jet assemblies provides adequate shielding for the electrical insulator units. Additional shielding is needed in front of the final focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets. A shield with a thickness varying between 45 and 90 cm needs to be provided in front of the quadrupole unit. The final laser mirrors located along the channel axis are in the direct line-of-sight of source neutrons. Neutronics calculations were performed to determine the constraints on the placement of these mirrors to be lifetime components.

  5. Effects of discharge chamber length on the negative ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Jung, Bong-Ki; An, YoungHwa; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    In a volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source, control of electron temperature is essential due to its close correlation with the generation of highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region as well as the generation of negative hydrogen ions by dissociative attachment in the extraction region. In this study, geometric effects of the cylindrical discharge chamber on negative ion generation via electron temperature changes are investigated in two discharge chambers with different lengths of 7.5 cm and 11 cm. Measurements with a radio-frequency-compensated Langmuir probe show that the electron temperature in the heating region is significantly increased by reducing the length of the discharge chamber due to the reduced effective plasma size. A particle balance model which is modified to consider the effects of discharge chamber configuration on the plasma parameters explains the variation of the electron temperature with the chamber geometry and gas pressure quite well. Accordingly, H{sup −} ion density measurement with laser photo-detachment in the short chamber shows a few times increase compared to the longer one at the same heating power depending on gas pressure. However, the increase drops significantly as operating gas pressure decreases, indicating increased electron temperatures in the extraction region degrade dissociative attachment significantly especially in the low pressure regime. It is concluded that the increase of electron temperature by adjusting the discharge chamber geometry is efficient to increase H{sup −} ion production as long as low electron temperatures are maintained in the extraction region in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  6. Convert Ten Foot Environmental Test Chamber into an Ion Engine Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanVelzer, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The 10 Foot Space Simulator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been used for the last 40 years to test numerous spacecraft, including the Ranger series, several Mariner class, among many others and finally, the Spirit and Opportunity Mars Rovers. The request was made to convert this facility to an Ion Engine test facility, with a possible long term life test. The Ion engine was to propel the Prometheus spacecraft to Jupiter's moons. This paper discusses the challenges that were met, both from a procedural and physical standpoint. The converted facility must operate unattended, support a 30 Kw Ion Engine, operate economically, and be easily converted back to former operation as a spacecraft test facility.

  7. An EGSnrc investigation of correction factors for ion chamber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Lesley A.

    Radiation dosimetry is used to quantify the dose delivered during radiation therapy by using ionization chambers with several correction factors. Knowledge of these factors is needed at well below the 1% level in order to maintain the overall uncertainty on the reference dosimetry near 1-2%. The small magnitude of the corrections renders measurements very difficult. Monte Carlo calculations are widely used for this purpose, however they require very low statistical uncertainties. A new user-code, CSnrc, for the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system is described. CSnrc uses a correlated sampling variance reduction technique to reduce the uncertainty for dose ratio calculations. Compared to an existing EGSnrc user-code from which it was developed, CSnrc shows gains in efficiency of up to a factor of 64 and achieves much lower statistical uncertainties on correction factors than previously published. CSnrc is used to compute the central electrode correction factor, Pcel, in a broader range of beams than previously used and at the depths relevant to modern protocols. For photon beams, the CSnrc values compare well with the values used in dosimetry protocols whereas for electron beams, CSnrc shows up to a 0.2% correction for a graphite electrode, a correction currently ignored by dosimetry protocols. The difference from currently used values is slightly less for an aluminum electrode. CSnrc is also used to compute the wall correction factor, P wall. For cylindrical chambers in photon beams, the CSnrc calculations are compared to the currently used Almond-Svensson formalism and differ from this formalism by as much as 0.8%. The CSnrc values are used to explain some previously published experiments showing problems with Pwall . For electron beams, where dosimetry protocols assume a Pwall of unity, CSnrc calculations show a correction as large as 0.6%. For parallel-plate chambers, there is little information available regarding Pwall in photon beams. CSnrc shows corrections of over 2

  8. Construction and Commissioning of a New Scattering Chamber at the Union College Ion Beam Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, Colin; Moore, Robert; Johnson, Christopher; Battaglia, Maria; Vineyard, Michael; Labrake, Scott

    2011-10-01

    We have constructed a new scattering chamber in the Union College Ion Beam Analysis Laboratory to improve our experimental capabilities. The new chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, conflat, multi-way cross. We fitted the chamber with an eight-inch, Leybold turbomolecular pump so that it can be evacuated quickly. A target manipulator with stepper motors that provide x, y, and z-positioning of the target with micron precision is mounted atop the chamber. A target ladder was constructed for the manipulator that allows us to analyze multiple samples without breaking the vacuum. The chamber has a door with an O-ring seal mounted on one of the ten-inch ports that provides easy access to the interior of the chamber. An Amptek silicon-drift X-ray detector is mounted close to the target ladder, inside the vacuum so that low-energy X-rays can be detected. A new Faraday cup was also installed to provide more accurate current measurements. Finally, a new collimator system was developed and installed in the beam-line to the scattering chamber to provide a well-defined beam spot. A proton induced X-ray emission analysis of aerosol samples has been performed as the commissioning experiment for the chamber. Here, we report on the construction and commissioning of this new chamber.

  9. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  10. Computational Model Tracking Primary Electrons, Secondary Electrons, and Ions in the Discharge Chamber of an Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Computational modeling of the plasma located in the discharge chamber of an ion engine is an important activity so that the development and design of the next generation of ion engines may be enhanced. In this work a computational tool called XOOPIC is used to model the primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions inside the discharge chamber. The details of this computational tool are discussed in this paper. Preliminary results from XOOPIC are presented. The results presented include particle number density distributions for the primary electrons, the secondary electrons, and the ions. In addition the total number of a particular particle in the discharge chamber as a function of time, electric potential maps and magnetic field maps are presented. A primary electron number density plot from PRIMA is given in this paper so that the results of XOOPIC can be compared to it. PRIMA is a computer code that the present investigators have used in much of their previous work that provides results that compare well to experimental results. PRIMA only models the primary electrons in the discharge chamber. Modeling ions and secondary electrons, as well as the primary electrons, will greatly increase our ability to predict different characteristics of the plasma discharge used in an ion engine.

  11. Distributed drift chamber design for rare particle detection in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bellwied, R.; Bennett, M.J.; Bernardo, V.; Caines, H.; Christie, W.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Debbe, R.; Dinnwiddie, R.; Engelage, J.; Flores, I.; Fuzesy, R.; Greiner, L.; Hallman, T.; Hoffmann, G.; Huang, H.Z.; Jensen, P.; Judd, E.G.; Kainz, K.; Kaplan, M.; Kelly, S.; Lindstrom, P.J; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; Longacre, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Mitchell, J.T.; Mitchell, J.W.; Mogavero, E.; Mutchler, G.; Paganis, S.; Platner, E.; Potenza, R.; Rotondo, F.; Russ, D.; Sakrejda, I.; Saulys, A.; Schambach, J.; Sheen, J.; Smirnoff, N.; Stokeley, C.; Tang, J.; Trattner, A.L.; Trentalange, S.; Visser, G.; Whitfield, J.P.; Witharm, F.; Witharm, R.; Wright, M.

    2001-10-02

    This report describes a multi-plane drift chamber that was designed and constructed to function as a topological detector for the BNL AGSE896 rare particle experiment. The chamber was optimized for good spatial resolution, two track separation, and a high uniform efficiency while operating in a 1.6 Tesla magnetic field and subjected to long term exposure from a 11.6 GeV/nucleon beam of 10**6 Au ions per second.

  12. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies. [ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate whether changes in performance are caused by changes in the loss rate of primary electrons to the anode or the loss rate of ions to discharge chamber walls or cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid; (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline; and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  13. Retention of Sputtered Molybdenum on Ion Engine Discharge Chamber Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Dever, Joyce A.; Power, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Grit-blasted anode surfaces are commonly used in ion engines to ensure adherence of sputtered coatings. Next generation ion engines will require higher power levels, longer operating times, and thus there will likely be thicker sputtered coatings on their anode surfaces than observed to date on 2.3 kW-class xenon ion engines. The thickness of coatings on the anode of a 10 kW, 40-centimeter diameter thruster, for example, may be 22 micrometers or more after extended operation. Grit-blasted wire mesh, titanium, and aluminum coupons were coated with molybdenum at accelerated rates to establish coating stability after the deposition process and after thermal cycling tests. These accelerated deposition rates are roughly three orders of magnitude more rapid than the rates at which the screen grid is sputtered in a 2.3 kW-class, 30-centimeter diameter ion engine. Using both RF and DC sputtering processes, the molybdenum coating thicknesses ranged from 8 to 130 micrometers, and deposition rates from 1.8 micrometers per hour to 5.1 micrometers per hour. In all cases, the molybdenum coatings were stable after the deposition process, and there was no evidence of spalling of the coatings after 20 cycles from about -60 to +320 C. The stable, 130 micrometer molybdenum coating on wire mesh is 26 times thicker than the thickest coating found on the anode of a 2.3 kW, xenon ion engine that was tested for 8200 hr. Additionally, this coating on wire mesh coupon is estimated to be a factor of greater than 4 thicker than one would expect to obtain on the anode of the next generation ion engine which may have xenon throughputs as high as 550 kg.

  14. Efficiency improvements for ion chamber calculations in high energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, J.; Zink, K.; Kawrakow, I.

    2008-04-15

    This article presents the implementation of several variance reduction techniques that dramatically improve the simulation efficiency of ion chamber dose and perturbation factor calculations. The cavity user code for the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system is extended by photon cross-section enhancement (XCSE), an intermediate phase-space storage (IPSS) technique, and a correlated sampling (CS) scheme. XCSE increases the density of photon interaction sites inside and in the vicinity of the chamber and results - in combination with a Russian Roulette game for electrons that cannot reach the cavity volume - in an increased efficiency of up to a factor of 350 for calculating dose in a Farmer type chamber placed at 10 cm depth in a water phantom. In combination with the IPSS and CS techniques, the efficiency for the calculation of the central electrode perturbation factor P{sub cel} can be increased by up to three orders of magnitude for a single chamber location and by nearly four orders of magnitude when considering the P{sub cel} variation with depth or with distance from the central axis in a large field photon beam. The intermediate storage of the phase-space properties of particles entering a volume that contains many possible chamber locations leads to efficiency improvements by a factor larger than 500 when computing a profile of chamber doses in the field of a linear accelerator photon beam. All techniques are combined in a new EGSnrc user code egs{sub c}hamber. Optimum settings for the variance reduction parameters are investigated and are reported for a Farmer type ion chamber. A few example calculations illustrating the capabilities of the egs{sub c}hamber code are presented.

  15. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, D. J.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wright, T. E.; Harty, P. D.; Lehmann, J.; Livingstone, J.; Crosbie, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response.

  16. Dose verification in carcinoma of uterine cervix patients undergoing 3D conformal radiotherapy with Farmer type ion chamber

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Challapalli; Kumar, P Suman; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Banerjee, S; Saxena, P.U; Kumar, E.S Arun; Pai, Dinesh K.

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for carcinoma of uterine cervix is a basic line of treatment with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in large number of patients. There is need for an established method for verification dosimetry. We tried to document absorbed doses in a group of carcinoma cervix patients by inserting a 0.6 cc Farmer type ion chamber in the vaginal cavity. A special long perspex sleeve cap is designed to cover the chamber for using in the patient's body. Response of ionization chamber is checked earlier in water phantom with and without cap. Treatment planning was carried out with X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan and with the chamber along with cap in inserted position, and with the images Xio treatment planning system. Three measurements on 3 days at 5-6 fraction intervals were recorded in 12 patients. Electrometer measured charges are converted to absorbed dose at the chamber center, in vivo. Our results show good agreement with planned dose within 3% against prescribed dose. This study, is a refinement over our previous studies with transmission dosimetry and chemicals in ampules. This preliminary work shows promise that this can be followed as a routine dose check with special relevance to new protocols in the treatment of carcinoma cervix with EBRT. PMID:25525313

  17. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  18. Design and development of a wide range ion chamber for reactor instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dighe, P. M.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2010-03-01

    An innovative design small size ion chamber has been developed that is capable of measuring gamma radiation below 100 mR/h and reaches saturation current even at less than 200 V operating voltage for 25,900 R/h gamma background. This wide ranging capability was achieved with a special combination of electrode arrangement and guard rings placed together with the support of radiation-resistant poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) spacers. The use of machinable PEEK material removed the dead spaces and accurately defined the sensitive volume to achieve nearly ideal performance. The ion chamber is made of stainless steel with 64 cm 3 sensitive volume and has 8.2 pA/100 mR/h gamma sensitivity. The chamber has been designed for reactor applications and therefore has been made rugged by separating and anchoring both the electrodes on both the ends to reduce any cantilever type vibrations with reduced noise pickup.

  19. Determination of ion recombination correction factors for a liquid ionization chamber in megavoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum-Bae; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Huh, Hyun Do

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ion recombination correction factor for a liquid ionization chamber in a high energy photon beam by using our experimental method. The ion recombination correction factors were determined by using our experimental method and were compared with theoretical and experimental methods proposed by using the theoretical method (Greening, Johansson) and the two-dose rate method in a cobalt beam and a high energy photon beam. In order to apply the liquid ionization chamber in a reference and small field dosimetry, we acquired the absorbed dose to water correction coefficient, the beam quality correction factor, and the influence quantities for the microLion chamber according to the TRS-398 protocol and applied the results to a high energy photon beam used in clinical fields. As a result, our experimental method for ion recombination in a cobalt beam agreed with the results from the heoretical method (Greening theory) better than it did with the results from the two-dose rate method. For high energy photon beams, the two-dose rate and our experimental methods were in good agreement, less than 2% deviation, while the theoretical general collection efficiency (Johansson et al.) deviated greatly from the experimental values. When we applied the factors for the absorbed dose to water measurement, the absorbed dose to water for the microLion chamber was in good agreement, within 1%, compared with the values for the PTW 30013 chamber in 6 and 10 MV Clinac iX and 6 and 15 MV Oncor impression. With these results, not only can the microLion ionization chamber be used to measure the absorbed dose to water in a reference condition, it can also be used to a the chamber for small, non-standard field dosimetry.

  20. SU-E-T-172: Evaluation of the Exradin A26 Ion Chamber in Megavoltage Photon Beams as a Reference Class Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Exradin A26 is a new design of micro-ionization ion chamber that externally resembles the Exradin A16 model but has significant internal changes to address measurement issues reported in the literature for the A16. This project involved the characterization of two versions of the A26 chamber in high energy x-rays with particular reference to the performance specification laid out in the imminent Addendum to TG-51. Methods: The Exradin A26 was investigated in a range of megavoltage photon beams (6–25 MV). Investigations looked at chamber settling, ion recombination and polarity. Since it has been previously shown that non-ideal performance is most easily identified through ion recombination measurements, the focus was on the determination of Pion. Results: i) Chamber settling - the chamber response stabilizes very quickly (within 3 minutes), even after a large change in the polarizing voltage.ii) The polarity correction was found to be small (within 0.2% of unity)iii) The chamber showed linear behavior for a Jaffe plot (1/reading vs 1/polarizing voltage) for applied voltages ≤ 200 V.iv) The recombination correction showed a linear variation with the doseper- pulse, was not significantly dependent on the polarity of the collecting voltage and was consistent with the chamber dimensions (i.e. agreed with Boag theory). Conclusion: An initial investigation of the Exradin A26 micro chamber suggests that although its performance exceeds the AAPM specification for a reference-class ion chamber for use in megavoltage photon beams it is a significant improvement over the previous A16 design. Further work is required to evaluate long-term stability and determine kQ factors.

  1. Plasma Emission Characteristics from a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  2. Detection and measurement of delay in the yield of negative ions from the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. G.; Khvostenko, O. G.; Tuimedov, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    The times of extraction of negative ions from the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer have been measured. The obtained values amount to several dozen microseconds or above—that is, significantly exceed the time of free ion escape from the chamber. It is established that ions are retained in the ionization chamber because of their adsorption on the inner surface. This leads to distortion of the experimentally measured lifetimes of negative ions that become unstable with respect to autodetachment of the excess electron.

  3. Computational Study of Primary Electrons in the Cusp Region of an Ion Engine's Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor); Deshpande, Shirin S.; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work a computer code called PRIMA is used to study the motion of primary electrons in the magnetic cusp region of the discharge chamber of an ion engine. Even though the amount of wall area covered by the cusps is very small, the cusp regions are important because prior computational analyses have indicated that most primary electrons leave the discharge chamber through the cusps. The analysis presented here focuses on the cusp region only. The affects of the shape and size of the cusp region on primary electron travel are studied as well as the angle and location at which the electron enters the cusp region. These affects are quantified using the confinement length and the number density distributions of the primary electrons. In addition to these results comparisons of the results from PRIMA are made to experimental results for a cylindrical discharge chamber with two magnetic rings. These comparisons indicate the validity of the computer code called PRIMA.

  4. An improved low-temperature equation of state model for integrated IFE target-chamber response simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltemes, Thad; Moses, Gregory

    2010-11-01

    A new quotidian equation of state model (QEOS) has been developed to perform integrated inertial fusion energy (IFE) target explosion-chamber response simulations. This QEOS model employs a scaled binding energy model for the ion EOS and utilizes both n- and l-splitting for determining the ionization state and electron EOS. This QEOS model, named BADGER, can perform both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS calculations. BADGER has been integrated with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY to simulate the chamber response of an exploding indirect-drive deuterium-tritium (DT) target, xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor. The simulated system is a prototypical configuration for the LIFE reactor study being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  5. A new approach for the evaluation of the effective electrode spacing in spherical ion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Shqair, Mohammed

    2016-10-01

    Proper determination of the effective electrode spacing (deff) of an ion chamber ensures proper determination of its collection efficiency either in continuous or in pulsed radiation in addition to the proper evaluation of the transit time. Boag's method for the determination of deff assumes the spherical shape of the internal electrode of the spherical ion chambers which is not always true, except for some cases, its common shape is cylindrical. Current work provides a new approach for the evaluation of the effective electrode spacing in spherical ion chambers considering the cylindrical shape of the internal electrode. Results indicated that deff values obtained through current work are less than those obtained using Boag's method by factors ranging from 12.1% to 26.9%. Current method also impacts the numerically evaluated collection efficiency (f) where values obtained differ by factors up to 3% at low potential (V) values while at high V values minor differences were noticed. Additionally, impacts on the evaluation of the transit time (τi) were obtained. It is concluded that approximating the internal electrode as a sphere may result in false values of deff, f, and τi.

  6. Input/output characteristics of a matrix ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Yin, F F; Schell, M C; Rubin, P

    1994-09-01

    The input/output characteristics of a matrix liquid ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device (EPID) are investigated to elucidate the imaging properties of EPIDs. The radiation input to the detector, represented by dose rate, and the pixel value output from the device are related by a characteristic curve. Various incident radiation intensities are obtained by changing the source-to-detector distance (SDD). For each incident radiation intensity, an electronic portal image is obtained using a field size of 5 x 5 cm2. The output pixel value of the EPID is represented by the average pixel value of a region of interest of 9 x 9 pixels centered at a selected point. The effects of various accelerator settings, such as the repetition-rate setting and photon energy, gantry angle, field size, SDD, and acquisition mode of the EPID on characteristic curves are investigated at the central axis. The off-axis response of the detector is also examined. The derivative of the pixel value with respect to the input dose rate is used to analyze the detector contrast. Results indicate that the output pixel value is not a linear function of the incident radiation intensity. The detector contrast is comparable between photon energies of 10 and 6 MV and increases at low dose rates. The response of the imaging device varies substantially with acquisition mode, but is less sensitive to the SDD used for calibration. Characteristic curves are consistent for different gantry angles at the central axis and with the off-axis locations when the gantry angle is used for imaging and calibration, but vary with off-axis locations when the gantry angle is not at the calibration direction. Characteristic curves are also found to vary with different field sizes, but are similar in shape.

  7. Methods and apparatus for cleaning objects in a chamber of an optical instrument by generating reactive ions using photon radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Delgado, Gildardo R.; Hollenshead, Jeromy T.; Umstadter, Karl R.; Starodub, Elena; Zhuang, Guorong V.

    2015-10-13

    An optical instrument, including a chamber, an object exposed to an interior of the chamber, a source of low-pressure gas, the gas comprising at least one of low-pressure molecular hydrogen gas, low-pressure molecular oxygen and a low-pressure noble gas, the source of low pressure gas being fluidly coupled to the chamber, a low voltage source electrically coupled between the object and a remaining portion of the instrument that is exposed to the interior of the chamber so as to maintain the object at a low voltage relative to the remaining portion, and an EUV/VUV light source adapted to direct EUV/VUV light through the low pressure gas in the chamber onto the object. In such a system, when the EUV/VUV light source is activated ions of the low-pressure gas are formed and directed to the object. The ions may be ions of Hydrogen, Oxygen or a noble gas.

  8. Evaluation of the applicability of pinpoint ion chambers for SRS dosimetric quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong Geun; Jang, Hyun Soo; Kim, Eng Chan; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the applicability of a Pinpoint ion chamber for the measurement of the absolute dose for dosimetric quality assurance (QA) under the same conditions as are used for actual stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). A PTW 31014 Pinpoint chamber with a active volume of 0.015 cm3 was used to measure the absolute doses of small beams. The PTW 60003 natural diamond detector was used as a reference dosimeter. A custom-made cylindrical acrylic phantom (15 cm diameter, 15 cm long) was produced to obtain measurements, and a noncoplanar arc plan was devised to deliver a prescription dose (15-25 Gy) to 80% of the maximum dose to the target in a single fraction by using the BrainLAB planning system. All irradiations were performed by using a Varian Clinac IX 6 MV equipped with a micro-multileaf-collimators (m3) designed by BrainLAB. The acceptability criterion used was a dose difference of less than 3%. The diameter of the target volume was considered the standard parameter in the present study and was used to divide the cases into two groups, that is, a ≤ 10 mm target diameter group (10 cases) and a > 10 mm target diameter group (13 cases). For the Pinpoint chamber and target diameters of ≤ 10 mm, dosimetric uncertainties of > 3% were seen in 4 of the 10 cases, and differences ranged widely from 0.7% to 4.85%. On the other hand, for the Pinpoint chamber and target diameters of > 10 mm all dose differences were less than 1.6%, and the mean discrepancy was 0.81%. A highly significant, but moderate, correlation between dosimetric uncertainties and all target diameters was observed for the Pinpoint chamber (R2 = 0.483, p 0.001). This result indicates that Pinpoint chambers exhibit a field-size dependency when used for SRS dosimetric QA. Based on the results of the present study, we conclude that the use of a Pinpoint chamber for verification of SRS dosimetric QA is unsuitable for all field sizes, but that it can be used to verify the

  9. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R. Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for

  10. Burst size distributions in the digitized data of the ion chambers t Mt. Norikura and sea level stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusunose, M.; Wada, M.; Kudo, S.; Chuang, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    A practical and simple method for burst rejection is applied to the digitized data of cosmic ray ion chambers at Mt. Norikura, Tokyo and Kochi. As a result of burst rejection, the burst size frequency distributions in the digitized data at mountain altitude and sea level ion chambers is obtained. Results show that there are no significant differences between the digital and analog data processing in burst rejection.

  11. New reaction chamber for transient field g-factor measurements with radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illana, A.; Perea, A.; Nácher, E.; Orlandi, R.; Jungclaus, A.

    2015-06-01

    A new reaction chamber has been designed and constructed to measure g-factors of short-lived excited states using the Transient Field technique in combination with Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics. In this paper we will discuss several important aspects which have to be considered in order to successfully carry out this type of measurement with radioactive ion beams, instead of the stable beams used in a wide range of experiments in the past. The technical solutions to the problems arising from the use of such radioactive beams will be exposed in detail and the first successful experiment using the new chamber in combination with MINIBALL cluster detectors at REX-ISOLDE (CERN) will be reported on.

  12. Solutions for discharge chamber sputtering and anode deposit spalling in small mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.; Hiznay, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Proposed solutions to the problems of sputter erosion and sputtered material spalling in the discharge chamber of small mercury ion thrusters are presented. The accelerated life test evaluated three such proposed solutions: (1) the use of tantalum as a single low sputter yield material for the exposed surfaces of the discharge chamber components subject to sputtering, (2) the use of a severely roughened anode surface to improve the adhesion of the sputter-deposited coating, and (3) the use of a wire cloth anode surface in order to limit the size of any coating flakes which might spall from it. Because of the promising results obtained in the accelerated life test with anode surfaces roughened by grit-blasting, experiments were carried out to optimize the grit-blasting procedure. The experimental results and an optimal grit-blasting procedure are presented.

  13. Sputtering phenomena of discharge chamber components in a 30-cm diameter Hg ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.; Rawlin, V. K.

    1976-01-01

    Sputtering and deposition rates were measured for discharge chamber components of a 30-cm diameter mercury ion thruster. It was found that sputtering rates of the screen grid and cathode baffle were strongly affected by geometry of the baffle holder. Sputtering rates of the baffle and screen grid were reduced to 80 and 125 A/hr, respectively, by combination of appropriate geometry and materials selections. Sputtering rates such as these are commensurate with thruster lifetimes of 15,000 hours or more. A semiempirical sputtering model showed good agreement with the measured values.

  14. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Biri, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  15. Characterization of Ion-Acoustic Wave Reflection Off A Plasma Chamber Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Rogers, Anthony; Skiff, Fred

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental characterization of the ion acoustic wave reflection coefficient off a plasma chamber wall. The experiment is performed in a cylindrical, magnetized, singly-ionized Argon inductively-coupled gas discharge plasma that is weakly collisional with typical conditions: n ~ 1010cm-3 Te ~ 3 eV and B ~ 1 kG. The main diagnostics are laser-induced fluorescence and Langmuir probe measurements. A survey of the ion velocity distribution function's zeroth and first order as well as density fluctuations at different wave excitation frequencies is obtained. Analysis of the reflection coefficient's dependence on the phase velocity and frequency of the wave is done through the characterization of waves utilizing Case-Van Kampen modes and the use of Morrison's G-transform. This research is supported by the Department of Energy under grant No. DOE DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  16. Formation of metal nanoparticles by short-distance sputter deposition in a reactive ion etching chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nie Min; Meng, Dennis Desheng; Sun Kai

    2009-09-01

    A new method is reported to form metal nanoparticles by sputter deposition inside a reactive ion etching chamber with a very short target-substrate distance. The distribution and morphology of nanoparticles are found to be affected by the distance, the ion concentration, and the sputtering time. Densely distributed nanoparticles of various compositions were fabricated on the substrates that were kept at a distance of 130 mum or smaller from the target. When the distance was increased to 510 mum, island structures were formed, indicating the tendency to form continuous thin film with longer distance. The observed trend for nanoparticle formation is opposite to the previously reported mechanism for the formation of nanoparticles by sputtering. A new mechanism based on the seeding effect of the substrate is proposed to interpret the experimental results.

  17. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, S. A.; Das, K. J. Maria; Raj, D. Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams. PMID:26170552

  18. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams.

  19. A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) for measuring the charge of relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, W. B.; Romero, J. L.; Brady, F. P.; Tull, C. E.; Castaneda, C. M.; Barasch, E. F.; Webb, M. L.; Drummond, J. R.; Crawford, H. J.; Flores, I.; Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Sann, H.; Young, J. C.

    1987-04-01

    A large area (1 m × 2 m) multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) has been constructed and tested. The MUSIC detector makes multiple measurements of energy "loss", d E/d x, for a relativistic heavy ion. Given the velocity, the charge of the ion can be extracted from the energy loss distributions. The widths of the distributions we observe are much narrower than predicted by Vavilov's theory for energy loss while agreeing well with the theory of Badhwar which deals with the energy deposited. The versatile design of MUSIC allows a variety of anode configurations which results in a large dynamic range of charge. In our tests to date we have observed charge resolutions of 0.25e fwhm for 727 MeV/nucleon40A and 0.30e fwhm for 1.08 GeV/nucleon139La and139La fragments. Vertical position and multiple track determination are obtained by using time projection chamber electronics. Preliminary tests indicate that the position resolution is also very good with α ≅ 100 μm.

  20. Ion chamber absorbed dose calibration coefficients, N{sub D,w}, measured at ADCLs: Distribution analysis and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To analyze absorbed dose calibration coefficients, N{sub D,w}, measured at accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories (ADCLs) for client ionization chambers to study (i) variability among N{sub D,w} coefficients for chambers of the same type calibrated at each ADCL to investigate ion chamber volume fluctuations and chamber manufacturing tolerances; (ii) equivalency of ion chamber calibration coefficients measured at different ADCLs by intercomparing N{sub D,w} coefficients for chambers of the same type; and (iii) the long-term stability of N{sub D,w} coefficients for different chamber types by investigating repeated chamber calibrations. Methods: Large samples of N{sub D,w} coefficients for several chamber types measured over the time period between 1998 and 2014 were obtained from the three ADCLs operating in the United States. These are analyzed using various graphical and numerical statistical tests for the four chamber types with the largest samples of calibration coefficients to investigate (i) and (ii) above. Ratios of calibration coefficients for the same chamber, typically obtained two years apart, are calculated to investigate (iii) above and chambers with standard deviations of old/new ratios less than 0.3% meet stability requirements for accurate reference dosimetry recommended in dosimetry protocols. Results: It is found that N{sub D,w} coefficients for a given chamber type compared among different ADCLs may arise from differing probability distributions potentially due to slight differences in calibration procedures and/or the transfer of the primary standard. However, average N{sub D,w} coefficients from different ADCLs for given chamber types are very close with percent differences generally less than 0.2% for Farmer-type chambers and are well within reported uncertainties. Conclusions: The close agreement among calibrations performed at different ADCLs reaffirms the Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee process of ensuring

  1. Somatic insulin signaling regulates a germline starvation response in Drosophila egg chambers.

    PubMed

    Burn, K Mahala; Shimada, Yuko; Ayers, Kathleen; Lu, Feiyue; Hudson, Andrew M; Cooley, Lynn

    2015-02-15

    Egg chambers from starved Drosophila females contain large aggregates of processing (P) bodies and cortically enriched microtubules. As this response to starvation is rapidly reversed upon re-feeding females or culturing egg chambers with exogenous bovine insulin, we examined the role of endogenous insulin signaling in mediating the starvation response. We found that systemic Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) activate the insulin pathway in follicle cells, which then regulate both microtubule and P body organization in the underlying germline cells. This organization is modulated by the motor proteins Dynein and Kinesin. Dynein activity is required for microtubule and P body organization during starvation, while Kinesin activity is required during nutrient-rich conditions. Blocking the ability of egg chambers to form P body aggregates in response to starvation correlated with reduced progeny survival. These data suggest a potential mechanism to maximize fecundity even during periods of poor nutrient availability, by mounting a protective response in immature egg chambers.

  2. A multiple-cathode, high-power, rectangular ion thruster discharge chamber of increasing thruster lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovey, Joshua Lucas

    Ion thrusters are high-efficiency, high-specific impulse space propulsion systems proposed for deep space missions requiring thruster operational lifetimes of 7--14 years. One of the primary ion thruster components is the discharge cathode assembly (DCA). The DCA initiates and sustains ion thruster operation. Contemporary ion thrusters utilize one molybdenum keeper DCA that lasts only ˜30,000 hours (˜3 years), so single-DCA ion thrusters are incapable of satisfying the mission requirements. The aim of this work is to develop an ion thruster that sequentially operates multiple DCAs to increase thruster lifetime. If a single-DCA ion thruster can operate 3 years, then perhaps a triple-DCA thruster can operate 9 years. Initially, a multiple-cathode discharge chamber (MCDC) is designed and fabricated. Performance curves and grid-plane current uniformity indicate operation similar to other thrusters. Specifically, the configuration that balances both performance and uniformity provides a production cost of 194 W/A at 89% propellant efficiency with a flatness parameter of 0.55. One of the primary MCDC concerns is the effect an operating DCA has on the two dormant cathodes. Multiple experiments are conducted to determine plasma properties throughout the MCDC and near the dormant cathodes, including using "dummy" cathodes outfitted with plasma diagnostics and internal plasma property mapping. Results are utilized in an erosion analysis that suggests dormant cathodes suffer a maximum pre-operation erosion rate of 5--15 mum/khr (active DCA maximum erosion is 70 mum/khr). Lifetime predictions indicate that triple-DCA MCDC lifetime is approximately 2.5 times longer than a single-DCA thruster. Also, utilization of new keeper materials, such as carbon graphite, may significantly decrease both active and dormant cathode erosion, leading to a further increase in thruster lifetime. Finally, a theory based on the near-DCA plasma potential structure and propellant flow rate effects

  3. Ion response in a weakly ionized plasma with ion flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kompaneets, Roman; Tyshetskiy, Yuriy O.; Vladimirov, Sergey V.

    2013-04-15

    We study the ion response to an initial perturbation in a weakly ionized plasma with ion flow driven by a dc electric field. The analysis is made by extending the classical Landau work [J. Phys. (USSR) 10, 25 (1946)] to the ion kinetic equation including ion-neutral collisions and a dc electric field. We show, in particular, that the complex frequencies of ion waves can be directly found from a known expression for the ion susceptibility [A. V. Ivlev et al., Phys. Rev. E 71, 016405 (2005); V. A. Schweigert, Phys. Rep. 27, 997 (2001)]; this is not obvious from its original derivation, because it only aims to describe the ion response for real frequencies.

  4. Performance evaluation of multi sampling ionization chamber for heavy ion beams by comparison with GEANT4 simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanke, Yuki; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion accelerator facilities, multi sampling ionization chambers are often used for the identification of the atomic number Z by detecting the energy deposit in it. In the study at GSI, the picture of the escape of secondary electrons, δ rays, from the ionization chamber explains the experimental data of pulse-height resolution. If this picture is correct, the pulse-height resolution should depend on the effective area of the ionization chamber. The experiment have been performed at NIRS-HIMAC. The pulse-height resolutions of two ionization chambers with different effective area were compared by using a 400-MeV/u Ni beam and their fragments. The difference in the pulse-height resolutions was observed. By comparison with the GEANT4 simulation including the δ-rays emission, the performance of the ionization chamber have been evaluated.

  5. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, E.; Hansen, J.; Laurent, J.-M.; Madsen, N.

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow discharges, nonevaporable getter coating) are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO, Ar, and CO2. Unexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2×104 molecules/ion have been observed. The reduction of the ion-induced desorption yield due to continuous bombardment with lead ions (beam cleaning) has been investigated for five different stainless steel vacuum chambers. The implications of these results for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring and possible remedies to reduce the vacuum degradation are discussed.

  6. Photoelectron Track Length Distributions Measured in a Negative Ion Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieskorn, Z. R.; Hill, J. E.; Kaaret, P. E.; Black, J. K.

    2014-04-01

    We report photoelectron track length distributions between 3 and 8 keV in gas mixtures of Ne+CO2+CH3NO2 (260:80:10 Torr) and CO2+CH3NO2 (197.5: 15 Torr). The measurements were made using a negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). We report the first quantitative analysis of photoelectron track length distributions in a gas. The distribution of track lengths at a given energy is best fit by a lognormal distribution. A powerlaw distribution of the form, f(E)=a(E/Eo)n, is found to fit the relationship between mean track length and energy. We find n=1.29 +/- 0.07 for Ne+CO2+CH3NO2 and n=1.20 +/- 0.09 for CO2+CH3NO2. Understanding the distribution of photoelectron track lengths in proportional counter gases is important for optimizing the pixel size and the dimensions of the active region in electron-drift time projection chambers (TPCs) and NITPC X-ray polarimeters.

  7. Performance of single chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis with different types of ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Rozendal, René A; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Molenkamp, Redmar J; Buisman, Cees J N

    2007-05-01

    In this paper hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis was studied for the first time in a single chamber configuration. Single chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis was tested in two configurations: (i) with a cation exchange membrane (CEM) and (ii) with an anion exchange membrane (AEM). Both configurations performed comparably and produced over 0.3 m3 H2/m3 reactor liquid volume/day at 1.0 V applied voltage (overall hydrogen efficiencies around 23%). Analysis of the water that permeated through the membrane revealed that a large part of potential losses in the system were associated with a pH gradient across the membrane (CEM DeltapH=6.4; AEM DeltapH=4.4). These pH gradient associated potential losses were lower in the AEM configuration (CEM 0.38 V; AEM 0.26 V) as a result of its alternative ion transport properties. This benefit of the AEM, however, was counteracted by the higher cathode overpotentials occurring in the AEM configuration (CEM 0.12 V at 2.39 A/m2; AEM 0.27 V at 2.15 A/m2) as a result of a less effective electroless plating method for the AEM membrane electrode assembly (MEA).

  8. New recoil transfer chamber for thermalization of heavy ions produced in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, M. C.; Tereshatov, E. E.; DeVanzo, M. J.; Sefcik, J. A.; Bennett, M. E.; Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Folden, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    A new Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC) has been designed, fabricated, and characterized at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The design is based on a gas stopper that was previously in routine use at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. This new RTC uses He gas to stop ions, and a combination of a static electric field and gas flow to maximize the extraction efficiency. In offline experiments, a 228Th source was used to produce 216Po which was successfully extracted even though it has a short half-life. In online experiments using the products of the 118Sn(40Ar, 6n)152Er reaction, an efficiency of several tens of percent was measured.

  9. A new multi-strip ionization chamber used as online beam monitor for heavy ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiguo; Mao, Ruishi; Duan, Limin; She, Qianshun; Hu, Zhengguo; Li, He; Lu, Ziwei; Zhao, Qiecheng; Yang, Herun; Su, Hong; Lu, Chengui; Hu, Rongjiang; Zhang, Junwei

    2013-11-01

    A multi-strip ionization chamber has been built for precise and fast monitoring of the carbon beam spatial distribution at Heavy Ion Researched Facility of Lanzhou Cooling Storing Ring (HIRFL-CSR). All the detector's anode, cathode and sealed windows are made by 2 μm aluminized Mylar film in order to minimize the beam lateral deflection. The sensitive area of the detector is (100×100) mm2, with the anode segmented in 100 strips, and specialized front-end electronics has been developed for simplifying the data acquisition and quick feedback of the relevant parameters to beam control system. It can complete one single beam profile in 200 μs.

  10. Phantom dosimetric study of nondivergent aluminum tissue compensator using ion chamber, TLD, and gafchromic film.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Upreti, Ritu R; Patkar, Sachin; Patil, Kalpana; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2008-01-01

    Anatomic contour irregularity and tissue inhomogeneity in head-and-neck radiotherapy can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity due to the presence of hot and cold spots across the treatment volumes. Missing tissue compensators (TCs) can overcome this dose inhomogeneity. The current study examines the capacity of 2-dimensional (2D) custom aluminum TCs fabricated at our hospital to improve the dose homogeneity across the treatment volume. The dosimetry of the 2D custom TCs was carried out in a specially designed head-and-neck phantom for anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) fields with an ion chamber, thermoluminscence dosimeters (TLDs), and film. The results were compared for compensated and uncompensated plans generated from the Eclipse treatment planning system. On average, open-field plans contained peak doses of 117%, optimally wedged-plans contained peak doses of 113%, and custom-compensated plans contained peak doses of 105%. The dose variation between prescribed and measured dose at midplane of the phantom was observed as high as 17%, which was reduced to 3.2% for the customized TC during ionometric measurements. It was further confirmed with TLDs, in a sagittal plane, that the high-dose region of 13.3% was reduced to 2.3%. The measurements carried out with the ion chamber, TLDs, and film were found in good agreement with each other and with Eclipse. Thus, a custom-made 2D TC is capable of reducing hot spots to improve overall dose homogeneity across the treatment volume.

  11. Phantom Dosimetric Study of Nondivergent Aluminum Tissue Compensator Using Ion Chamber, TLD, and Gafchromic Film

    SciTech Connect

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A. Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Upreti, Ritu R.; Patkar, Sachin; Patil, Kalpana; Deshpande, Deepak D.

    2008-01-01

    Anatomic contour irregularity and tissue inhomogeneity in head-and-neck radiotherapy can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity due to the presence of hot and cold spots across the treatment volumes. Missing tissue compensators (TCs) can overcome this dose inhomogeneity. The current study examines the capacity of 2-dimensional (2D) custom aluminum TCs fabricated at our hospital to improve the dose homogeneity across the treatment volume. The dosimetry of the 2D custom TCs was carried out in a specially designed head-and-neck phantom for anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) fields with an ion chamber, thermoluminscence dosimeters (TLDs), and film. The results were compared for compensated and uncompensated plans generated from the Eclipse treatment planning system. On average, open-field plans contained peak doses of 117%, optimally wedged-plans contained peak doses of 113%, and custom-compensated plans contained peak doses of 105%. The dose variation between prescribed and measured dose at midplane of the phantom was observed as high as 17%, which was reduced to 3.2% for the customized TC during ionometric measurements. It was further confirmed with TLDs, in a sagittal plane, that the high-dose region of 13.3% was reduced to 2.3%. The measurements carried out with the ion chamber, TLDs, and film were found in good agreement with each other and with Eclipse. Thus, a custom-made 2D TC is capable of reducing hot spots to improve overall dose homogeneity across the treatment volume.

  12. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  13. Influence of pressurized anode chamber on ion transports and power generation of UF membrane microbial fuel cells (UF-MFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Yang, Euntae; Lee, Mi-Young; Kim, In S.

    2015-04-01

    Ultrafiltration membrane integrated microbial fuel cell (UF-MFC) has developed to produce high-quality effluents by integrating the membrane filtration process into the MFC system. During UF-MFC operation, however, unexpected power reductions were observed under different pressures that were applied in the anode chamber (22.0% and 25.5% at 0.7 bar and 2.1 bar, respectively). It was hypothesized that those of power reductions might occur due to the limitation of ion transport across the UF membrane- which could be caused by the pressurized anode chamber to filter the anode solution through the UF membrane. A test with a NaCl concentrated cathode solution showed few dissolved ions being transported from the cathode to anode chamber while the pressure was being applied in the anode chamber. This result clearly indicates that the limitation of ion transport from the cathode to the pressurized anode chamber is a significant factor affecting the power density of UF-MFCs, even more so than water permeation through the UF membrane.

  14. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, N.O.

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of {approximately}17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, {approximately}200 g/cm{sup 3} and {approximately}20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases {approximately}350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  15. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Mändl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-01

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton® windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  16. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-15

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  17. An Ion Chamber Dedicated to Carbon NEXAFS: Removal of High-Order X-Rays and Reliable Flux Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.-J.; Yang, Y.-W.; Lee, Kaidee

    2007-02-02

    The difficulty of performing a reliable carbon NEXAFS measurement for thin films and adsorbate systems has long been recognized. The difficulty is typically related to lower S/B, carbon buildup in beamline optics, dirty mesh, presence of the high-order x-rays, etc. To alleviate the experimental difficulty, we have constructed an intensity-monitoring ion chamber situated between the beamline and sample chamber. The ion chamber is filled with argon up to a working pressure of 10-3 Torr and terminated with 0.1 {mu}m thick Ti foils at both ends. Titanium foils and the filled argon gas effectively remove the high-order x-rays. Consequently, the data are acquired with predominant 1st-order x-rays and thus free of the aforementioned interference, leading to a more reliable data analysis.

  18. Novel control modes to improve the performance of rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer with dual pressure chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Xinming; Tang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaohua; Chen, Jin; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Cheng'an; Wang, Xiaohao

    2016-10-01

    The rectilinear ion trap (RIT) has gradually become one of the preferred mass analyzers for portable mass spectrometers because of its simple configuration. In order to enhance the performance, including sensitivity, quantitation capability, throughput, and resolution, a novel RIT mass spectrometer with dual pressure chambers was designed and characterized. The studied system constituted a quadrupole linear ion trap (QLIT) in the first chamber and a RIT in the second chamber. Two control modes are hereby proposed: Storage Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap-Rectilinear Ion Trap (SQLIT-RIT) mode, in which the QLIT was used at high pressure for ion storage and isolation, and the RIT was used for analysis; and Analysis Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap-Rectilinear Ion Trap (AQLIT-RIT) mode, in which the QLIT was used for ion storage and cooling. Subsequently, synchronous scanning and analysis were carried out by QLIT and RIT. In SQLIT-RIT mode, signal intensity was improved by a factor of 30; the limit of quantitation was reduced more than tenfold to 50 ng mL-1, and an optimal duty cycle of 96.4% was achieved. In AQLIT-RIT mode, the number of ions coexisting in the RIT was reduced, which weakened the space-charge effect and reduced the mass shift. Furthermore, the mass resolution was enhanced by a factor of 3. The results indicate that the novel control modes achieve satisfactory performance without adding any system complexity, which provides a viable pathway to guarantee good analytical performance in miniaturization of the mass spectrometer.

  19. Development and testing of a Monte Carlo code system for analysis of ionization chamber responses

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    To predict the perturbation of interactions between radiation and material by the presence of a detector, a differential Monte Carlo computer code system entitled MICAP was developed and tested. This code system determines the neutron, photon, and total response of an ionization chamber to mixed field radiation environments. To demonstrate the ability of MICAP in calculating an ionization chamber response function, a comparison was made to 05S, an established Monte Carlo code extensively used to accurately calibrate liquid organic scintillators. Both code systems modeled an organic scintillator with a parallel beam of monoenergetic neutrons incident on the scintillator. (LEW)

  20. Response of Materials to Single Ion Events

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2009-05-01

    Response of materials to single radiation events is fundamental to research and many technological applications that involve energetic particles. Ion-solid interactions lead to energy loss of ions, production of electron-hole pairs, and light emission from excitation-induced luminescence. Employing a unique time-of-flight system, material response to single ion irradiation has been utilized to measure electronic energy loss, and to evaluate materials performance for radiation detection. Measurements of electronic energy loss of single ions in a thin ZrO2 foil over a continuous energy range exhibit good agreement with SRIM predictions for He and Be ions. For O and F ions, slight over- and under-estimation of SRIM prediction is evident at energies around 250 (near the stopping maximum) and above 800 keV/nucleon, respectively. For a Si semiconductor detector, its response to single ion irradiation shows that pulse height defect is clear for elements heavier than Si, and nonlinear energy response is significant for all elements at energies below ~ 150 keV/nucleon. For a single crystal CsI:Tl scintillator, the response to H ion events is used to determine relative light yield and absolute energy resolution over a wide energy region, where energy resolution of ~ 5.3% is achieved at 2 MeV.

  1. Development of a Novel Contamination Resistant Ion Chamber for Process Tritium Measurement and Use in the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Worth, L.B.C.; Pearce, R.J.H.; Bruce, J.; Banks, J.; Scales, S.

    2005-07-15

    The accuracy of process measurements of tritium with conventional ion chambers is often affected by surface tritium contamination. The measurement of tritium in the exhaust of the JET torus is particularly difficult due to surface contamination with highly tritiated hydrocarbons. JET's first unsuccessful attempt to overcome the contamination problem was to use an ion chamber, with a heating element as the chamber wall so that it could be periodically decontaminated by baking. The newly developed ion chamber works on the principle of minimising the surface area within the boundary of the anode and cathode.This paper details the design of the ion chamber, which utilises a grid of 50-micron tungsten wire to define the ion chamber wall and the collector electrode. The effective surface area which, by contamination, is able to effect the measurement of tritium within the process gas has been reduced by a factor of {approx}200 over a conventional ion chamber. It is concluded that the new process ion chamber enables sensitive accurate tritium measurements free from contamination issues. It will be a powerful new tool for future tritium experiments both to improve tritium tracking and to help in the understanding of tritium retention issues.

  2. Experimental validation of a versatile system of CT dosimetry using a conventional ion chamber: Beyond CTDI{sub 100}

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Ballard, Adam C.

    2007-08-15

    This article is an experimental demonstration and authentication of a new method of computed tomography dosimetry [R. L. Dixon, Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)], which utilizes a short, conventional ion chamber rather than a pencil chamber, and which is more versatile than the latter. The value of CTDI{sub 100} correctly predicts the accumulated dose only for a total scan length L equal to 100 mm and underestimates the limiting equilibrium dose approached for longer, clinically relevant body scan lengths [R. L. Dixon, Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003); K. D. Nakonechny, B. G. Fallone, and S. Rathee, Med. Phys. 32, 98-109 (2005); S. Mori, M. Endo, K. Nishizawa, T. Tsunoo, T. Aoyama, H. Fujiwara, and K. Murase, Med. Phys. 32, 1061-1069 (2005); R. L. Dixon, M. T. Munley, and E. Bayram, Med. Phys. 32, 3712-3728 (2005); R. L. Dixon, Med. Phys. 33, 3973-3976 (2006)]. Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)] originally proposed an alternative using a short ion chamber and a helical scan acquisition to collect the same integral for any scan length L (and not limited 100 mm). The primary purpose of this work is to demonstrate experimentally the implementation, robustness, and versatility of this small ion chamber method in measuring the accumulated dose in the body phantom for any desired scan length L (up to the available phantom length) including the limiting equilibrium dose (symbolically CTDI{sub {infinity}}), and validation of the method against the pencil chamber methodology. Additionally, a simple and robust method for independently verifying the active length of a pencil chamber is described. The results of measurements made in a 400 mm long, 32 cm diameter polymethylmethacrylate body phantom using a small Farmer-type ion chamber and two pencil chambers of lengths l=100 and 150 mm confirm that the two methodologies provide the same dose values at the corresponding scan lengths L=l. The measured equilibrium doses obtained for GE MDCT scanners at 120 kVp are CTDI

  3. Monte Carlo calculated correction factors for diodes and ion chambers in small photon fields.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, D; Zink, K

    2013-04-21

    The application of small photon fields in modern radiotherapy requires the determination of total scatter factors Scp or field factors Ω(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) with high precision. Both quantities require the knowledge of the field-size-dependent and detector-dependent correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)). The aim of this study is the determination of the correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) for different types of detectors in a clinical 6 MV photon beam of a Siemens KD linear accelerator. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose to water and the dose to different detectors to determine the field factor as well as the mentioned correction factor for different small square field sizes. Besides this, the mean water to air stopping power ratio as well as the ratio of the mean energy absorption coefficients for the relevant materials was calculated for different small field sizes. As the beam source, a Monte Carlo based model of a Siemens KD linear accelerator was used. The results show that in the case of ionization chambers the detector volume has the largest impact on the correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)); this perturbation may contribute up to 50% to the correction factor. Field-dependent changes in stopping-power ratios are negligible. The magnitude of k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) is of the order of 1.2 at a field size of 1 × 1 cm(2) for the large volume ion chamber PTW31010 and is still in the range of 1.05-1.07 for the PinPoint chambers PTW31014 and PTW31016. For the diode detectors included in this study (PTW60016, PTW 60017), the correction factor deviates no more than 2% from unity in field sizes between 10 × 10 and 1 × 1 cm(2), but below this field size there is a steep decrease of k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) below unity, i.e. a strong overestimation of dose. Besides the field size and detector dependence, the results reveal a clear dependence of the

  4. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ann van; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2007-10-15

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  5. Testing of multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for Electron Ion Collider Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Hannah; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Despite decades of research on the subject, some details of the spin structure of the nucleon continues to be unknown. To improve our knowledge of the nucleon spin structure, the construction of a new collider is needed. This is one of the primary goals of the proposed Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Planned EIC spectrometers will require good particle identification. This can be provided by time of flight (TOF) detectors with excellent timing resolutions of 10 ps. A potential TOF detector that could meet this requirement is a glass multigap resistive plate chamber (mRPC). These mRPCs can provide excellent timing resolution at a low cost. The current glass mRPC prototypes have a total of twenty 0.1 mm thick gas gaps. In order to test the feasibility of this design, a cosmic test stand was assembled. This stand used the coincidence of scintillators as a trigger, and contains fast electronics. The construction, the method of testing, and the test results of the mRPCs will be presented.

  6. Radon exhalation rates from building materials using electret ion chamber radon monitors in accumulators.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, Payasada; Stieff, Frederick

    2009-08-01

    An electret ion chamber (EIC) radon monitor in a sealed accumulator measures the integrated average radon concentration at the end of the accumulation duration. Theoretical equations have been derived to relate such radon concentrations (Bq m(-3) ) to the radon emanation rate (Bq d(-1)) from building materials enclosed in the accumulator. As an illustration, a 4-L sealable glass jar has been used as an accumulator to calculate the radon emanation rate from different granite samples. The radon emanation rate was converted into radon flux (Bq mm(-2) d(-1)) by dividing the emanation rate by surface area of the sample. Fluxes measured on typical, commercially available granites ranged from 20-30 Bq m(-2) d(-1). These results are similar to the results reported in the literature. The lower limit of detection for a 2-d measurement works out to be 7 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Equations derived can also be used for other sealable accumulators and other integrating detectors, such as alpha track detectors.

  7. Enhanced thermal emittance of space radiators by ion-discharge chamber texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Kussmaul, Michael T.

    1987-01-01

    The discharge chamber of a 30-cm argon ion source was successfully used to texture potential space radiator materials for the purpose of obtaining values of thermal emittance greater than 0.85 at 700 and 900 K. Some samples were also treated in acid prior to texturing. To evaluate the durability of the textured materials to atomic oxygen, samples were exposed to an RF air plasma environment. The spectral emittance between 2.0 anf 15.0 microns was measured before and after the textured materials were exposed to the plasma asher. The results indicate that copper with extremely high values of emittance after texturing (0.978 and 0.983) at 700 and 900 K, respectively,did not change its values of emittance after ashing, whereas the emittance of stainless steel fell below 0.85 after ashing. These data, along with scanning electron photomicrographs, and the results of texturing and ashing titanium and Nb(1)Zr are presented .

  8. Verification measurements of an eMC algorithm using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Wanklyn, Mark D; Kidane, Ghirmay; Crees, Liz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of the Im'RT MatriXX 2D ion chamber array for performing verification measurements on the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for a range of clinical energies (6, 12, and 20 MeV) on a Varian 2100iX linear accelerator. Firstly, the suitability of the MatriXX for measuring percentage depth doses (PDD) in water was assessed, including characterization of the inherent buildup found in the MatriXX. Secondly the suitability of the MatriXX for measuring dose distributions in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms was assessed using gamma analysis at 3%/3 mm. It was found that after adjusting the PDD curves for the inherent buildup, that the position of R50,D measured using the MatriXX agreed to within 1 mm to the PDDs generated using the eMC algorithm for all energies used in this study. Gamma analysis at 3%/3mm showed very good agreement (> 95%) for all cases in both homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. It was concluded that the Im'RT MatriXX is a suitable device for performing eMC verification and could potentially be used for routine energy checks of electron beams. PMID:27685111

  9. Measurement of response of leaf litter respiration to rainfall using the automatic chamber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataka, M.; Kosugi, Y.; Kominami, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Soil respiration is sum of CO2 efflux from various components (e.g. root for autotrophic respiration; leaf and root litter, and SOM for heterotrophic respiration). Each respiration process has specific characteristics responding to environmental conditions (e.g. water condition, temperature). Especially, heterotrophic respiration is highly affected by wetting and drying event during and after rainfall event. The greatest temporal variability in water condition may occur in or near the leaf litter layer, and this will affect the variation in leaf litter respiration (RLL) and therefore soil respiration. We measured RLL using automated chamber system to examine response of RLL to wetting and drying event due to rainfall and compared with the response of soil respiration. Observations were performed at Kiryu Experimental Watershed (KEW) located in central Japan from March to December 2011. To examine temporal changes in RLL, we used automated dynamic chamber system. We used four chambers to respectively measure RLL, soil respiration and CO2 efflux from mineral soil. For leaf litter and mineral soil chamber, we replaced organic soil inside chamber with weathered granite soil of an equal depth, and the acrylic board was buried just below the base of chamber to prevent from other CO2 efflux sources (e.g. root and soil organic matter). During non-rainy day, RLL showed a diurnal pattern, which is corresponding to the diurnal changes in temperature. RLL was beginning to increase within a few hours from starting time of rainfall and showed peak values during rainfall. The rate of increase and decrease of RLL during rainfall were higher than that of soil respiration. The responses of each component of soil respiration to rainfall would be different.

  10. Stability of A-150 plastic ionization chamber response over a ~30 year period

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Lennox, Arlene J.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    At the NIU Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab, the clinical tissue-equivalent ionization chamber response is measured every treatment day using a cesium source that was configured to match readings obtained at the National Bureau of Standards. Daily measurements are performed in air using the air-to-tissue dose conversion factors given in AAPM Report no. 7. The measured exposure calibration factors have been tabulated and graphed as a function of time from 1978 to present. For A-150 plastic ionization chambers, these factors exhibit a sinusoidal variation with a period of approximately one year and amplitude of {+-} 1%. This variation, attributable to the hygroscopic nature of A-150 plastic, is correlated with the relative humidity of the facility, and is greater than the humidity corrections for gas described in the literature. Our data suggest that chamber calibration should be performed at least weekly to accommodate these variations.

  11. Long term changes in cosmic ray diurnal variations observed by ion chambers in Hong Kong and Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, L. S.; Kusunose, M.; Wada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Yearly average solar diurnal variations of cosmic ray ion chamber data are inspected from a view point of the eleven and the 22 year solar activity cycle modulations. Ion chamber data and neutron data from various stations are added. From an inspection of observed data, a simple approximation that the 11 year and the 22 year variations of the solar diurnal variation are along 18-hour and 12-hour axes, respectively is proposed. The 18-hour component of diurnal variation in the 11 year cycle increases toward the solar active years. The 12-hour component is enhanced when the solar general magnetic field is parallel to the rotation vector, and is almost zero for the other state. The transition occurs when the amplitude of the 18-hour component is greater owing to the transition of the field during the maximum phase of solar activity. The 22 year shift is consistent with the drift modulation model in heliosphere.

  12. Characterization of Downstream Ion Energy Distributions From a High Current Hollow Cathode in a Ring Cusp Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 10 Angstroms) has been documented in the literature. As part of an ongoing effort to uncover the underlying physics of the formation of these ions, ion efflux from a high current hollow cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber was investigated. Using a spherical sector electrostatic energy analyzer located downstream of the discharge cathode, the ion energy distribution over a 0 to 60 eV energy range was measured. The sensitivity of the ion energy distribution function to zenith angle was also assessed at 3 different positions: 0, 15, and 25 degrees. The measurements suggest that the majority of the ion current at the measuring point falls into the analyzer with an energy approximately equal to the discharge voltage. The ion distribution, however, was found to be quite broad. The high energy tail of the distribution function tended to grow with increasing discharge current. Sensitivity of the profiles to flow rate at fixed discharge current was also investigated. A simple model is presented that provides a potential mechanism for the production of ions with energies above the discharge voltage.

  13. Physical and chemical analysis of lithium-ion battery cell-to-cell failure events inside custom fire chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinner, Neil S.; Field, Christopher R.; Hammond, Mark H.; Williams, Bradley A.; Myers, Kristina M.; Lubrano, Adam L.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Tuttle, Steven G.

    2015-04-01

    A 5-cubic meter decompression chamber was re-purposed as a fire test chamber to conduct failure and abuse experiments on lithium-ion batteries. Various modifications were performed to enable remote control and monitoring of chamber functions, along with collection of data from instrumentation during tests including high speed and infrared cameras, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, real-time gas analyzers, and compact reconfigurable input and output devices. Single- and multi-cell packages of LiCoO2 chemistry 18650 lithium-ion batteries were constructed and data was obtained and analyzed for abuse and failure tests. Surrogate 18650 cells were designed and fabricated for multi-cell packages that mimicked the thermal behavior of real cells without using any active components, enabling internal temperature monitoring of cells adjacent to the active cell undergoing failure. Heat propagation and video recordings before, during, and after energetic failure events revealed a high degree of heterogeneity; some batteries exhibited short burst of sparks while others experienced a longer, sustained flame during failure. Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, dimethyl carbonate, and ethylene carbonate were detected via gas analysis, and the presence of these species was consistent throughout all failure events. These results highlight the inherent danger in large format lithium-ion battery packs with regards to cell-to-cell failure, and illustrate the need for effective safety features.

  14. Monte Carlo-based correction factors for ion chamber dosimetry in heterogeneous phantoms for megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Araki, Fujio

    2012-11-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perturbation correction factors and inhomogeneity correction factors (ICFs) for a thin-walled cylindrical ion chamber in a heterogeneous phantom including solid water, lung and bone plastic materials. The perturbation factors due to the replacement of the air cavity, non-water equivalence of the wall and the stem, non-air equivalence of the central electrode and the overall perturbation factor, P(Q), for a cylindrical chamber, in the heterogeneous phantom were calculated with the EGSnrc/Cavity Monte Carlo code for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The PTW31010 (0.125 cm(3)) chamber was modeled with Monte Carlo simulations, and was used for measurements and calculations of percentage depth ionization (PDI) or percentage depth dose (PDD). ICFs were calculated from the ratio of the product of the stopping power ratios (SPRs) and P(Q) of lung or bone to solid water. Finally, the measured PDIs were converted to PDDs by using ICFs and were compared with those calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The perturbation effect for the ion chamber in lung material is insignificant at 5 × 5 and 10 × 10 cm(2) fields, but the effect needs to be considered under conditions of lateral electron disequilibrium with a 3 × 3 cm(2) field. ICFs in lung varied up to 2% and 4% depending on the field size for 6 and 15 MV, respectively. For bone material, the perturbation effects due to the chamber wall and the stem were more significant at up to 3.5% and 1.6% for 6 MV, respectively. ICFs for bone material were approximately 0.945 and 0.940 for 6 and 15 MV, respectively. The converted PDDs by using ICFs were in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculated PDDs. The chamber perturbation correction and SPRs should strictly be considered for ion chamber dosimetry in heterogeneous media. This is more important for small field dosimetry in lung and bone materials. PMID:23103477

  15. Measurement of electron temperature and density in the DIII-D neutral beam ion source arc chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, D.H.; Busath, J.; Hong, R.

    1993-10-01

    A swept-bias Langmuir probe diagnostic was employed with the DIII-D neutral beam ion source in an effort to study the effects of filament temperature, arc power, and backstreaming energetic electrons on the electron temperature and density of the arc discharge inside the ion source arc chamber. The arc chamber contains six Langmuir probes biased with a negative dc voltage. These probes provide a feedback signal for regulation of the arc power supply, and give a relative indication of plasma uniformity within the arc chamber. For this study, one probe was reconnected to a voltage-sweeping power supply, and probe current versus voltage characteristics were generated. These characteristics provided the information necessary to calculate electron temperature and density. With arc discharge only, the results demonstrated that an filament temperature increases, so does electron density. Electron temperature decreases at a faster rate, however, as required to maintain constant ion maturation current (regulated by the arc power supply). The results also demonstrated that increasing arc power (through control of the arc power supply) results in higher electron temperature and density. Experiments were also performed with probe voltage sweeps during beam extraction, at various accelerator voltage levels and at different delay times after beam turn-on with a fixed acceleration voltage. These results indicated an increase in electron temperature and density as acceleration voltage is increased. However, nearly identical trends result when arc discharges are produced at the same parameter settings as during these beams, but without beam extraction. This indicates minimal influence of backstreaming energetic electrons on electron temperature and density in the arc chamber. Temperature and density also remain fairly constant over time during a long beam pulse.

  16. Technical Note: Influence of Compton currents on profile measurements in small-volume ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, Sean; Sperling, Nicholas; Parsai, E. Ishmael; Holmes, Shannon

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This work is to evaluate the effects of Compton current generation in three small-volume ionization chambers on measured beam characteristics for electron fields. Methods: Beam scans were performed using Exradin A16, A26, and PTW 31014 microchambers. Scans with varying chamber components shielded were performed. Static point measurements, output factors, and cable only irradiations were performed to determine the contribution of Compton currents to various components of the chamber. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate why one microchamber showed a significant reduction in Compton current generation. Results: Beam profiles demonstrated significant distortion for two of the three chambers when scanned parallel to the chamber axis, produced by electron deposition within the wire. Measurements of ionization produced within the cable identified Compton current generation as the cause of these distortions. The size of the central collecting wire was found to have the greatest influence on the magnitude of Compton current generation. Conclusions: Microchambers can demonstrate significant (>5%) deviations from properties as measured with larger volume chambers (0.125 cm{sup 3} and above). These deviations can be substantially reduced by averaging measurements conducted at opposite polarities.

  17. Chamber-confined silicon-carbon nanofiber composites for prolonged cycling life of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Kun; Lu, Yao; Dirican, Mahmut; Chen, Chen; Yanilmaz, Meltem; Shi, Quan; Bradford, Philip D.; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2014-06-01

    Silicon is a promising high capacity (4200 mA h g-1) anode material for lithium ion batteries but the significant volume change (over 300%) of silicon during lithiation/delithiation remains a challenge in terms of silicon pulverization and solid-electrolyte-interphase (SEI) accumulation in the silicon composite electrode. To alleviate the volumetric change of silicon, we built a flexible and self-supporting carbon-enhanced carbon nanofiber (CNF) structure with vacant chamber to encapsulate Si nanoparticles (vacant Si@CNF@C). This composite was tested directly without any polymer and current collector. The confined vacant chamber allowed the increasing volume of silicon and SEI accumulates to be well retained for a long cycle life. This chamber-confined silicon-carbon nanofiber composite exhibited an improved performance in terms of good cycling performance (620 mA h g-1), high coulombic efficiency (99%), and good capacity retention (80%) after 200 cycles. This self-supported silicon-carbon nanofiber structure showed high flexibility and good electrochemical performance for the potential as flexible electrode for lithium-ion batteries.

  18. Chamber-confined silicon-carbon nanofiber composites for prolonged cycling life of Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Lu, Yao; Dirican, Mahmut; Chen, Chen; Yanilmaz, Meltem; Shi, Quan; Bradford, Philip D; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2014-07-01

    Silicon is a promising high capacity (4200 mA h g(-1)) anode material for lithium ion batteries but the significant volume change (over 300%) of silicon during lithiation/delithiation remains a challenge in terms of silicon pulverization and solid-electrolyte-interphase (SEI) accumulation in the silicon composite electrode. To alleviate the volumetric change of silicon, we built a flexible and self-supporting carbon-enhanced carbon nanofiber (CNF) structure with vacant chamber to encapsulate Si nanoparticles (vacant Si@CNF@C). This composite was tested directly without any polymer and current collector. The confined vacant chamber allowed the increasing volume of silicon and SEI accumulates to be well retained for a long cycle life. This chamber-confined silicon-carbon nanofiber composite exhibited an improved performance in terms of good cycling performance (620 mA h g(-1)), high coulombic efficiency (99%), and good capacity retention (80%) after 200 cycles. This self-supported silicon-carbon nanofiber structure showed high flexibility and good electrochemical performance for the potential as flexible electrode for lithium-ion batteries.

  19. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, S.; Sharma, S. D.

    2010-01-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference 137Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference 137Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference 137Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the 137Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within ±0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than ±0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years. PMID:20589119

  20. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Vandana, S; Sharma, S D

    2010-04-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference (137)Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the (137)Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within +/-0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than +/-0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  1. The Chamber for Studying Rice Response to Elevated Nighttime Temperature in Field

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Zheng, Xi; Wang, Dangying; Xu, Chunmei; Laza, Ma. Rebecca C.; Zhang, Xiufu

    2013-01-01

    An in situ temperature-controlled field chamber was developed for studying a large population of rice plant under different nighttime temperature treatments while maintaining conditions similar to those in the field during daytime. The system consists of a pipe hoop shed-type chamber with manually removable covers manipulated to provide a natural environment at daytime and a relatively stable and accurate temperature at night. Average air temperatures of 22.4 ± 0.3°C at setting of 22°C, 27.6 ± 0.4°C at 27°C, and 23.8 ± 0.7°C ambient conditions were maintained with the system. No significant horizontal and vertical differences in temperature were found and only slight changes in water temperatures were observed between the chambers and ambient conditions at 36 days after transplanting. A slight variation in CO2 concentration was observed at the end of the treatment during the day, but the 10-μmol CO2 mol−1 difference was too small to alter plant response. The present utilitarian system, which only utilizes an air conditioner/heater, is suitable for studying the effect of nighttime temperature on plant physiological responses with minimal perturbation of other environmental factors. At the same time, it will enable in situ screening of many rice genotypes. PMID:24089603

  2. The chamber for studying rice response to elevated nighttime temperature in field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Zheng, Xi; Wang, Dangying; Xu, Chunmei; Laza, Ma Rebecca C; Zhang, Xiufu

    2013-01-01

    An in situ temperature-controlled field chamber was developed for studying a large population of rice plant under different nighttime temperature treatments while maintaining conditions similar to those in the field during daytime. The system consists of a pipe hoop shed-type chamber with manually removable covers manipulated to provide a natural environment at daytime and a relatively stable and accurate temperature at night. Average air temperatures of 22.4 ± 0.3°C at setting of 22°C, 27.6 ± 0.4°C at 27°C, and 23.8 ± 0.7°C ambient conditions were maintained with the system. No significant horizontal and vertical differences in temperature were found and only slight changes in water temperatures were observed between the chambers and ambient conditions at 36 days after transplanting. A slight variation in CO₂ concentration was observed at the end of the treatment during the day, but the 10-μmol CO₂ mol⁻¹ difference was too small to alter plant response. The present utilitarian system, which only utilizes an air conditioner/heater, is suitable for studying the effect of nighttime temperature on plant physiological responses with minimal perturbation of other environmental factors. At the same time, it will enable in situ screening of many rice genotypes. PMID:24089603

  3. The time response of glass Resistive Plate Chambers to heavily ionizing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Booth, C.; Borghi, S.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera–Villanueva, A.; Chimenti, P.; Dumarchez, J.; Gastaldi, U.; Giani, S.; Gómez–Cadenas, J. J.; Graulich, J. S.; Grégoire, G.; Grossheim, A.; Guglielmi, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kolev, D.; Meurer, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Panman, J.; Piperov, S.; Popov, B.; Radicioni, E.; Schroeter, R.; Temnikov, P.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsenov, R.; Tsukerman, I.; Wiebusch, C.

    2007-10-01

    The HARP system of resistive plate chambers (RPCs) was designed to perform particle identification by the measurement of the difference in the time-of-flight of different particles. In previous papers an apparent discrepancy was shown between the response of the RPCs to minimum ionizing pions and heavily ionizing protons. Using the kinematics of elastic scattering off a hydrogen target a controlled beam of low momentum recoil protons was directed onto the RPC chambers. With this method the trajectory and momentum, and hence the time-of-flight of the protons can be precisely predicted without need for a measurement of momentum of the protons. It is demonstrated that the measurement of the time-of-arrival of particles by the thin gas-gap glass RPC system of the HARP experiment depends on the primary ionization deposited by the particle in the detector.

  4. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  5. Peripheral nerve regeneration through a silicone chamber implanted with negative carbon ions: Possibility to clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether a tube with its inner surface implanted with negative-charged carbon ions (C- ions) would enable axons to extend over a distance greater than 10 mm. The tube was found to support nerves regenerating across a 15-mm-long inter-stump gap. We also investigated whether a C- ion-implanted tube pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. The C- ion implanted tube accelerated nerve regeneration, and this effect was enhanced by bFGF. Silicone treated with C- ions showed increased hydrophilic properties and cellular affinity, and axon regeneration was promoted with this increased biocompatibility.

  6. The replacement correction factor for the BIPM flat cavity ion chamber and the value of W/e

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. L. W.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-10-15

    A graphite flat cavity ionization chamber is used at the BIPM in France to determine the absorbed dose to graphite in a {sup 60}Co photon beam and thereby used to determine the product of the value of W/e, the average energy required to produce an ion pair in dry air, and the value of (L{sub {Delta}}/{rho}){sub a}{sup C}, the mean restricted mass collision stopping-power ratio for graphite to air in a {sup 60}Co beam. The accuracy of the (W/e) (L{sub {Delta}}/{rho}){sub a}{sup C} value thus determined depends upon the accuracy of the perturbation correction factors adopted for this chamber. The perturbation effect of this chamber was accounted for by the replacement correction factor whose value was calculated by an analytical method and confirmed by an EGS4 Monte Carlo calculation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of the analytical and the EGS4 calculations by using recently established methods and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, a much improved version of EGS4, to calculate the replacement correction factors for the graphite chamber. It is found that the replacement correction factors used for the BIPM chamber are not correct: the values used are smaller than they should be by about 1%. This leads to a 1% overestimation of the (W/e) (L{sub {Delta}}/{rho}){sub a}{sup C} value determined by using this chamber. This implies that {sup 60}Co air kerma standards that are directly proportional to this product need to be reduced by 1%. Based on the values of the replacement correction factors calculated in this study, and on the value of (L{sub {Delta}}/{rho}){sub a}{sup C} evaluated from ICRU Report No. 37 stopping power for graphite, the value of W/e determined by using the BIPM chamber should be 33.61{+-}0.08 J/C. If a more recent value of mean excitation energy for graphite (86.8 eV) and grain density are used to evaluate the graphite stopping power, then the value obtained for W/e is 34.15{+-}0.08 J/C.

  7. A telescope with microstrip gas chambers for the detection of charged products in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Abbondanno, U.; Andreano, A.; Bassini, R.; Bonutti, F.; Bruno, M.; Casini, G.; D'Agostino, M.; Manzin, G.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Mastinu, P. F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moroni, A.; Squarcini, M.; Tonetto, F.; Vannini, G.; Vannucci, L.

    1997-02-01

    Prototypes of a ΔE-E telescope, designed to detect and identify with low-energy threshold both light charged particles and heavy fragments, are described. They are based on a gas drift chamber which conveys primary ionization electrons on gas microstrip devices where multiplication occurs and the energy loss signals are generated. Silicon detectors or CsI(T1) crystals operate as residual energy detectors. The prototypes were tested both with a source and heavy ion beams. Performances, mainly related to energy resolution, charge identification and angle resolution, are reported.

  8. Modeling of life limiting phenomena in the discharge chamber of an electron bombardment ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handoo, Arvind K.; Ray, Pradosh K.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental facility to study the low energy sputtering of metal surfaces with ions produced by an ion gun is described. The energy of the ions ranged from 10 to 500 eV. Cesium ions with energies from 100 to 500 eV were used initially to characterize the operation of the ion gun. Next, argon and xenon ions were used to measure the sputtering yields of cobalt (Co), Cadmium (Cd), and Chromium (Cr) at an operating temperature of 2x10(exp -5) Torr. The ion current ranged from 0.0135 micro-A at 500 eV. The targets were electroplated on a copper substrate. The surface density of the electroplated material was approx. 50 micro-g/sq cm. The sputtered atoms were collected on an aluminum foil surrounding the target. Radioactive tracers were used to measure the sputtering yields. The sputtering yields of Cr were found to be much higher than those of Co and Cd. The yields of Co and Cd were comparable, with Co providing the higher yields. Co and Cd targets were observed to sputter at energies as low as 10 eV for both argon and xenon ions. The Cr yields could not be measured below 20 eV for argon ions and 15 eV for xenon ions. On a linear scale the yield energy curves near the threshold energies exhibit a concave nature.

  9. Influence of field size on a PTW type 23342 plane-parallel ionization chamber's response

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Villar, H.P.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2004-12-01

    The response of a PTW type 23342 plane-parallel ionization chamber, both in air and in phantom, was evaluated for x-ray tube potentials between 30 and 100 kV and radiation field diameters ranging from 30 to 70 mm. The experiments were performed with a calibrated Pantak x-ray machine and made use of the same set of x-ray qualities adopted by the PTB primary laboratory for the calibration of such chambers. A Plexiglas registered phantom (1.18 g cm{sup -3}) 110 mm long, 110 mm wide, and 80 mm deep was used for phantom measurements. X-ray qualities were characterized by using 99.99% pure aluminum filters. On the basis of the IAEA's TRS 398, the article discusses the dependence of the plane-parallel ionization chamber readings with field size in air and in phantom, its implication with regard to clinical dosimetry, cross-calibration, and dissemination of calibration factors.

  10. Signal generator exciting an electromagnetic field for ion beam transport to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.; Kogan, V. T.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Antonov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    A high-voltage high-frequency signal generator is described that excites an electric field for ion beam transport from an ion source to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. Excitation signals to the number of two are high-frequency sine-wave out-of-phase signals with the same amplitudes. The amplitude and phase of the signals vary from 20 to 100 V and from 10 kHz to 1 MHz, respectively. The generator also produces a controlled bias voltage in the interval 50-200 V. The frequency and amplitude of the signals, as well as the bias voltage, are computer-controlled via the USB interface.

  11. Characterization of a new ionization chamber in radiotherapy beams: angular dependence and variation of response with distance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonas O; Linda V E, Caldas

    2012-10-01

    A new double faced ionization chamber was constructed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. It has different collecting electrode materials: aluminum and graphite. It was irradiated in standard radiotherapy beams ((60)Co and X-rays). The response variation with distance and the angular dependence of this ionization chamber were evaluated. It was verified that the chamber response follows the inverse square law within a maximum variation of 11.2% in relation to the reference value. For the angular dependence it showed good agreement with international standards.

  12. Ion Chambers for Monitoring the NuMI Neutrino Beam at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Indurthy, Dharmaraj; Keisler, Ryan; Kopp, Sacha; Mendoza, Steven; Proga, Marek; Pavlovich, Zarko; Zwaska, Robert; Harris, Deborah; Marchionni, Alberto; Morfin, Jorge; Erwin, Albert; Ping Huicana; Velissaris, Christos; Naples, Donna; Northacker, Dave; McDonald, Jeff; Diwan, Milind; Viren, Brett

    2004-11-10

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. The beam must be steered with 1-mRad angular accuracy toward the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays. We review how the monitors will be used to make beam quality measurements, and as well review chamber construction details, radiation damage testing, calibration, and test beam results.

  13. Pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Steveninck, William

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to +/- 3 center-dot 10(sup - 16) A over the environmental range of temperature (- 40 to + 40 C). Using a single 10(sup 11) Omega feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 center-dot 10(sup - 15) A to 3 center-dot 10(sup - 11) A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 mu R h(sup - 1)), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically approximately 27 pA at 1 mR h(sup - 1). A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale(sup TM) Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards.

  14. Kurtosis of room impulse responses as a diffuseness measure for reverberation chambers.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a kurtosis analysis of room impulse responses as a potential room diffuseness measure. The early part of an impulse response contains a direct sound and strong reflections. As these reflections are sparse and strong, the sound field is unlikely to be diffuse. Such deterministic reflections are extreme events, which prevent the pressure samples from being distributed Gaussianly, leading to a high kurtosis. This indicates that the kurtosis can be used as a diffuseness measure. Two rooms are analyzed. A non-uniform surface absorption distribution tends to increase the kurtosis significantly in a small room. A full scale reverberation chamber is tested with different diffuser settings, which shows that the kurtosis calculated from broadband impulse responses from 125 Hz to 4 kHz has a good correlation with the Sabine absorption coefficient according to ISO 354 (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2003). PMID:27250175

  15. Measurement of changes in linear accelerator photon energy through flatness variation using an ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Song; Balter, Peter A.; Rose, Mark; Simon, William E.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To compare the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for determining changes in photon beam energy for a megavoltage linear accelerator. Methods: Energy changes were accomplished by adjusting the bending magnet current by up to {+-}15% in 5% increments away from the value used clinically. Two metrics for flatness, relative flatness in the central 80% of the field (Flat) and average maximum dose along the diagonals normalized by central axis dose (F{sub DN}), were measured using a commercially available planner ionization chamber array. PDD was measured in water at depths of 5 and 10 cm in 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} fields using a cylindrical chamber. Results: PDD was more sensitive to changes in energy when the beam energy was increased than when it was decreased. For the 18-MV beam in particular, PDD was not sensitive to energy reductions below the nominal energy. The value of Flat was found to be more sensitive to decreases in energy than to increases, with little sensitivity to energy increases above the nominal energy for 18-MV beams. F{sub DN} was the only metric that was found to be sensitive to both increases and reductions of energy for both the 6- and 18-MV beams. Conclusions: Flatness based metrics were found to be more sensitive to energy changes than PDD, In particular, F{sub DN} was found to be the most sensitive metric to energy changes for photon beams of 6 and 18 MV. The ionization chamber array allows this metric to be conveniently measured as part of routine accelerator quality assurance.

  16. Sputter erosion and deposition in the discharge chamber of a small mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    A 5 cm diameter mercury ion thruster similar to one tested for 9715 hours was operated approximately 400 hrs each at discharge voltages of 36.6, 39.6, and 42.6 V, with corresponding discharge propellant utilizations of 58, 68, and 70 percent. The observed sputter erosion rates of the internal thruster parts and the anode weight gain rate all rose rapidly with discharge voltage and were roughly in the ratio of 1:3:5 for the three voltages. The combined weight loss of the internal thruster parts nearly balanced the anode weight gain. Hg(+2) ion apparently caused most of the observed erosion.

  17. The Octavius1500 2D ion chamber array and its associated phantoms: Dosimetric characterization of a new prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Van Esch, Ann Huyskens, Dominique P.; Basta, Katarzyna; Evrard, Marie; Ghislain, Michel; Sergent, Francois

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to characterize the prototype of the new Octavius1500 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) 2D ion chamber array, covering its use in different phantom setups, from the most basic solid water sandwich setup to the more complex cylindrical Octavius{sup ®} 4D (Oct4D) (PTW) phantom/detector combination. The new detector houses nearly twice the amount of ion chambers as its predecessors (Seven29 and Octavius729), thereby tackling one of the most important limitations of ion chamber (or diode) arrays, namely the limited detector density. The 0.06 cm{sup 3} cubic ion chambers are now arranged in a checkerboard pattern, leaving no lines (neither longitudinally nor laterally) without detectors. Methods: All measurements were performed on a dual energy (6 MV and 18 MV) iX Clinac (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and all calculations were done in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian) with the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm. First, the basic characteristics of the 2D array, such as measurement stability, dose rate dependence and dose linearity were investigated in the solid water sandwich setup. Second, the directional dependence was assessed to allow the evaluation of the new Octavius2D phantom (Oct2D{sup 1500}) for planar verification measurements of composite plans. Third, measurements were performed in the Oct4D phantom to evaluate the impact of the increased detector density on the accuracy of the volumetric dose reconstruction. Results: While showing equally good dose linearity and dose rate independence, the Octavius1500 outperforms the previous models because of its instantaneous measurement stability and its twofold active area coverage. Orthogonal field-by-field measurements immediately benefit from the increased detector density. The 3.9 cm wide compensation cavity in the new Oct2D{sup 1500} phantom prototype adequately corrects for directional dependence from the rear, resulting in good agreement within the target dose

  18. An ion thruster internal discharge chamber electrostatic probe diagnostic technique using a high-speed probe positioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2008-01-15

    Extensive resources have been allocated to diagnose and minimize lifetime-limiting factors in gridded ion thrusters. While most of this effort has focused on grid erosion, results from wear tests indicate that discharge cathode erosion may also play an important role in limiting the lifetime of ring-cusp ion thrusters proposed for future large flagship missions. The detailed characterization of the near-cathode discharge plasma is essential for mitigating discharge cathode erosion. However, severe difficulty is encountered when attempting to measure internal discharge plasma parameters during thruster operation with conventional probing techniques. These difficulties stem from the high-voltage, high-density discharge cathode plume, which is a hostile environment for probes. A method for interrogating the discharge chamber plasma of a working ion thruster over a two-dimensional grid is demonstrated. The high-speed axial reciprocating probe positioning system is used to minimize thruster perturbation during probe insertion and to reduce heating of the probe. Electrostatic probe measurements from a symmetric double Langmuir probe are presented over a two-dimensional spatial array in the near-discharge cathode assembly region of a 30-cm-diameter ring-cusp ion thruster. Electron temperatures, 2-5 eV, and number density contours, with a maximum of 8x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} on centerline, are measured. These data provide detailed electron temperature and number density contours which, when combined with plasma potential measurements, may shed light on discharge cathode erosion processes and the effect of thruster operating conditions on erosion rates.

  19. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  20. Super-resolution non-parametric deconvolution in modelling the radial response function of a parallel plate ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, A; Tenhunen, M

    2012-11-01

    The signal of the dosimetric detector is generally dependent on the shape and size of the sensitive volume of the detector. In order to optimize the performance of the detector and reliability of the output signal the effect of the detector size should be corrected or, at least, taken into account. The response of the detector can be modelled using the convolution theorem that connects the system input (actual dose), output (measured result) and the effect of the detector (response function) by a linear convolution operator. We have developed the super-resolution and non-parametric deconvolution method for determination of the cylinder symmetric ionization chamber radial response function. We have demonstrated that the presented deconvolution method is able to determine the radial response for the Roos parallel plate ionization chamber with a better than 0.5 mm correspondence with the physical measures of the chamber. In addition, the performance of the method was proved by the excellent agreement between the output factors of the stereotactic conical collimators (4-20 mm diameter) measured by the Roos chamber, where the detector size is larger than the measured field, and the reference detector (diode). The presented deconvolution method has a potential in providing reference data for more accurate physical models of the ionization chamber as well as for improving and enhancing the performance of the detectors in specific dosimetric problems.

  1. Variation of spectral response curves of GaAs photocathodes in activation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jijun; Chang, Benkang; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Hui; Gao, Pin

    2006-09-01

    The spectral response curves of reflection-mode GaAs (100) photocathodes are measured in activation chamber by multi-information measurement system at RT, and by applying quantum efficiency formula, the variation of spectral response curves have been studied. Reflection-mode GaAs photocathodes materials are grown over GaAs wafer (100) by MBE with p-type beryllium doping, doping concentration is 1×10 19 cm -3 and the active layer thickness is 1.6μm. During the high-temperature activation process, the spectral response curves varied with activation time are measured. After the low-temperature activation, the photocathode is illuminated by a white light source, and the spectral response curves varied with illumination time are measured every other hour. Experimental results of both high-temperature and low-temperature activations show that the spectral response curve shape of photocathodes is a function of time. We use traditional quantum efficiency formulas of photocathodes, in which only the Γ photoemission is considered, to fit experimental spectral response curves, and find the theoretical curves are not in agreement with the experimental curves, the reason is other valley and hot-electron yields are necessary to be included in yields of reflection-mode photocathodes. Based on the two-minima diffusion model and the fit of escape probability, we modified the quantum efficiency formula of reflection-mode photocathodes, the modified formula can be used to explain the variation of yield curves of reflection-mode photocathodes very well.

  2. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber used with TwinSol radioactive-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Becchetti, F. D.; Bradt, J.; Brodeur, M.; Carpenter, L.; Chajecki, Z.; Cortesi, M.; Fritsch, A.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Jensen, L.; Kolata, J. J.; Lynch, W.; Mittig, W.; O'Malley, P.; Suzuki, D.

    2016-06-01

    The study of low-energy reactions with radioactive-ion beams has been greatly enhanced by the recent use of active-target detectors, which have high efficiency and low thresholds to detect low-energy charged-particle decays. Both of these features have been used in experiments with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber to study α -cluster structure in unstable nuclei and 3-body charged-particle decays after implantation. Predicted α -cluster structures in 14 C were probed using resonant α scattering and the nature of the 3- α breakup of the 02+ Hoyle state in 12 C after the beta decay of 12 N and 12 B was studied. These experiments used in-flight radioactive-ion beams that were produced using the dual superconducting solenoid magnets TwinSol at the University of Notre Dame. Preliminary results from these experiments as well as the development of future radioactive beams to be used in conjunction with the PAT-TPC are presented.

  3. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-03-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels.

  4. Discharge Chamber Plasma Structure of a 30-cm NSTAR-Type Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-01

    Single Langmuir probe measurements are presented over a two-dimensional array of locations in the near Discharge Cathode Assembly (DCA) region of a 30-cm diameter ring cusp ion thruster over a range of thruster operating conditions encompassing the high-power half of the NASA throttling table. The Langmuir probe data were analyzed with two separate methods. All data were analyzed initially assuming an electron population consisting of Maxwellian electrons only. The on-axis data were then analyzed assuming both Maxwellian and primary electrons. Discharge plasma data taken with beam extraction exhibit a broadening of the higher electron temperature plume boundary compared to similar discharge conditions without beam extraction. The opposite effect is evident with the electron/ion number density as the data without began, extraction appears to be more collimated than the corresponding data with beam extraction. Primary electron energy and number densities are presented for one operating condition giving an order of magnitude of their value and the error associated with this calculation.

  5. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    PubMed Central

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels. PMID:24663394

  6. Chamber-specific differences in human cardiac fibroblast proliferation and responsiveness toward simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Farhan; DeFranco, Alessandra; Siddiqui, Ramail; Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Emelyanova, Larisa; Holmuhamedov, Alisher; Ross, Gracious; Shi, Yang; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Kress, David; Tajik, A Jamil; Jahangir, Arshad

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblasts, the most abundant cells in the heart, contribute to cardiac fibrosis, the substrate for the development of arrythmogenesis, and therefore are potential targets for preventing arrhythmic cardiac remodeling. A chamber-specific difference in the responsiveness of fibroblasts from the atria and ventricles toward cytokine and growth factors has been described in animal models, but it is unclear whether similar differences exist in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs) and whether drugs affect their proliferation differentially. Using cardiac fibroblasts from humans, differences between atrial and ventricular fibroblasts in serum-induced proliferation, DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, cyclin gene expression, and their inhibition by simvastatin were determined. The serum-induced proliferation rate of human atrial fibroblasts was more than threefold greater than ventricular fibroblasts with faster DNA synthesis and higher mRNA levels of cyclin genes. Simvastatin predominantly decreased the rate of proliferation of atrial fibroblasts, with inhibition of cell cycle progression and an increase in the G0/G1 phase in atrial fibroblasts with a higher sensitivity toward inhibition compared with ventricular fibroblasts. The DNA synthesis and mRNA levels of cyclin A, D, and E were significantly reduced by simvastatin in atrial but not in ventricular fibroblasts. The inhibitory effect of simvastatin on atrial fibroblasts was abrogated by mevalonic acid (500 μM) that bypasses 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition. Chamber-specific differences exist in the human heart because atrial fibroblasts have a higher proliferative capacity and are more sensitive to simvastatin-mediated inhibition through HMG-CoA reductase pathway. This mechanism may be useful in selectively preventing excessive atrial fibrosis without inhibiting adaptive ventricular remodeling during cardiac injury.

  7. Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

    1998-04-01

    Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles close-in to the target

  8. SU-D-BRE-04: Evaluating the Dose Accuracy of a 2D Ion Chamber Array in High Dose Rate Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Perles, L; Mascia, A; Piskulich, F; Lepage, R; Zhang, Y; Giebeler, A; Dong, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the absolute dose accuracy of the PTW Octavius 729 XDR 2D ion chamber array at a high dose rate pencil beam scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: A set of 18 plans were created in our treatment planning system, each of which comprising a unique combination of field sizes (FS), length of spread out of Bragg peaks (SOBP) and depths. The parameters used were: FS of 5×5cm{sup 2}, 10×10cm{sup 2} and 15×15cm{sup 2}; flat SOBP of 5cm and 10cm; and isocenter depths of 10cm, 15cm and 20cm, which coincides with the center of the SOBP. The 2D array detector was positioned at the machine isocenter and the appropriate amount of solid water was used to match the planned depths of 10, 15 and 20 cm water equivalent depth. Subsequently, we measured the absolute dose at isocenter using a CC04 ion chamber in a 1D water tank. Both 2D array and CC04 were previously cross calibrated. We also collected the MU rates used by our proton machine from the log files. Results: The relative differences between the CC04 and the 2D array can be summarized into two groups, one with 5 cm SOBP and another with 10 cm SOBP. Plotting these datasets against FS shows that the 2D array response for high dose rate fields (FS of 5×5cm{sup 2} and 5cm SOBP) can be up to 2% lower. Similarly, plotting them against isocenter depths reveals the detector's response can be up to 2% lower for higher energy beams (about 200MeV nominal). The MU rate found in the machine log files for 5cm SOBP's were as high as twice the MU rate for the 10cm SOBP. Conclusion: The 2D array dose response showed a dose rate effect in scanning pencil beam delivery, which needs to be corrected to achieve a better dose accuracy.

  9. Scaled impulse loading for liquid hydraulic response in IFE thick-liquid chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantzen, C.; Peterson, P. F.

    2001-05-01

    In an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target chamber using thick-liquid protection, placing liquid surfaces close to the fusion target helps to reduce pumping cost and final-focus stand-off distance. The impulse loading generated by the target on the adjacent jet surfaces provides the most important boundary condition for the subsequent liquid hydraulic response, pocket disruption, droplet generation, and pocket clearing and regeneration. However, liquid jets are difficult to use in current X-ray facilities that can simulate the X-ray ablation process. Instead, it is desirable to study liquid hydraulic response using water jets, employing scaled impulse loads delivered by chemical detonations or shock tubes. Because the pressure load generated by IFE targets is extremely short compared to the time required for significant liquid motion, only the time integrated impulse load is important to the liquid motion, not the detailed pressure history from ablation and venting. In this work, this impulse loading is determined using the 2-D gas dynamic code, TSUNAMI, and a comparison made between the impulse loads generated by IFE targets and by scaled chemical detonations.

  10. A 2D ion chamber array audit of wedged and asymmetric fields in an inhomogeneous lung phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Jessica; Dunn, Leon Alves, Andrew; Kenny, John; Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan; Kron, Tomas; Cole, Andrew

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) has implemented a new method of a nonreference condition Level II type dosimetric audit of radiotherapy services to increase measurement accuracy and patient safety within Australia. The aim of this work is to describe the methodology, tolerances, and outcomes from the new audit. Methods: The ACDS Level II audit measures the dose delivered in 2D planes using an ionization chamber based array positioned at multiple depths. Measurements are made in rectilinear homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms composed of slabs of solid water and lung. Computer generated computed tomography data sets of the rectilinear phantoms are supplied to the facility prior to audit for planning of a range of cases including reference fields, asymmetric fields, and wedged fields. The audit assesses 3D planning with 6 MV photons with a static (zero degree) gantry. Scoring is performed using local dose differences between the planned and measured dose within 80% of the field width. The overall audit result is determined by the maximum dose difference over all scoring points, cases, and planes. Pass (Optimal Level) is defined as maximum dose difference ≤3.3%, Pass (Action Level) is ≤5.0%, and Fail (Out of Tolerance) is >5.0%. Results: At close of 2013, the ACDS had performed 24 Level II audits. 63% of the audits passed, 33% failed, and the remaining audit was not assessable. Of the 15 audits that passed, 3 were at Pass (Action Level). The high fail rate is largely due to a systemic issue with modeling asymmetric 60° wedges which caused a delivered overdose of 5%–8%. Conclusions: The ACDS has implemented a nonreference condition Level II type audit, based on ion chamber 2D array measurements in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. The powerful diagnostic ability of this audit has allowed the ACDS to rigorously test the treatment planning systems implemented in Australian radiotherapy facilities. Recommendations from audits have led to

  11. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M.; Gazdic-Santic, Maja

    2013-12-15

    changes in the weather conditions may produce significant density corrections, and that effect should be taken into account. This effect is chamber-dependent, indicating that a specific calibration is necessary for each particular chamber. To our knowledge, this correction has not been considered so far for SourceCheck ionization chambers, but its magnitude cannot be neglected in clinical practice. The atmospheric pressure and temperature at which the chamber was calibrated need to be taken into account, and they should be reported in the calibration certificate. In addition, each institution should analyze the particular response of its SourceCheck ionization chamber and compute the adequate correction factors. In the absence of a suitable pressure chamber, a possibility for this assessment is to take measurements at different altitudes, spanning a wide enough air density range.

  12. Heavy ion beam degradation from stripping in near vacuum reactor chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1981-07-21

    With the use of a particle simulation code we have investigated the ballistic transport of heavy ion beams through a gas-filled reactor for inertial confinement fusion. The background gas pressure has been taken to be 10/sup -4/ torr - 10/sup -3/ torr of Lithium vapor as is appropriate to the HYLIFE reactor concept. During transport to the pellet, Coulomb collisions of beam particles with the background gas will convert a fraction of the beam to charges states higher than the initial value. Collisons will also produce an associated swarm of knock-on electrons. As the beam approaches the pellet, anharmonic components of the space charges forces will lead to a distortion of the phase space of the beam and a consequent degradation of the focal properties of the beam. This degradation can be described in terms of an increase in the rms emittance of the beam. The degree of emittance growth depends sensitivity upon the initial spatial distribution of particles in the beam. For this study we have modified a single-disk particle simulation code, DESTIN (2), to follow two species of particles, the number of which varies in a prescribed fashion dependent upon reactor temperature as the beam converges toward the pellet.

  13. SU-E-T-382: Influence of Compton Currents On Profile Measurements in Small- Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, S; Parsai, E; Holmes, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Ionization chambers in electron radiation fields are known to exhibit polarity effects due to Compton currents. Previously we have presented a unique manifestation of this effect observed with a microionization chamber. We have expanded that investigation to include three micro-ionization chambers commonly used in radiation therapy. The purpose of this project is to determine what factors influence this polarity effect for micro-chambers and how it might be mitigated. Methods: Three chambers were utilized: a PTW 31016, an Exradin A-16, and an Exradin A- 26. Beam profile scans were obtained on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator in combination with a Wellhofer water phantom for 6, 9, and 12 MeV electrons. Profiles were obtained parallel and perpendicular to the chamber's long axis, with both positive and negative collecting bias. Profiles were obtained with various chamber components shielded by 5 mm of Pb at 6 MeV to determine their relative contributions to this polarity effect. Results: The polarity effect was observed for all three chambers, and the ratio of the polarity effect for the Exradin chambers is proportional to the ratio of chamber volumes. Shielding the stem of both Exradin chambers diminished, but did not remove the polarity effect. However, they demonstrated no out-of-field effect when the cable was shielded with Pb. The PTW chamber demonstrated a significantly reduced polarity effect without any shielding despite its comparable volume with the A-26. Conclusions: The sensitive volume of these micro-chambers is relatively insensitive to collecting polarity. However, charge deposition within the cable can dramatically alter measured ionization profiles. This is demonstrated by the removal of the out-of-field ionization when the cable is shielded for the Exradin chambers. We strongly recommend analyzing any polarity dependence for small-volume chambers used in characterization of electron fields.

  14. THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF PROSTATIC AND VESICULAR TRANSPLANTS IN THE ANTERIOR CHAMBER OF THE EYE

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Robert A.; Melchionna, Robert H.; Tolins, S. H.; Rosenblum, H. B.

    1937-01-01

    1. With a photographic method for the determination of the size of prostatic and vesicular transplants in the anterior chamber of the eye, it has been possible to follow continuously the response to an injection of a hormone. 2. The results may be briefly summarized as follows: (a) One injection of the gonadotropic substance of pregnancy urine produces a moderate increase in size; (b) subsequent injections of this same substance for a period of at least 3 months are without effect; (c) an alkaline extract of the whole anterior pituitary gland produces a similar increase; (d) all pituitary derivatives are ineffective in the castrated animal; (e) castration brings about a decrease in size that gradually loses velocity; (f) the male sex hormone produces a slight increase in intact, and a variable, at times conspicuous, increase in castrated animals; (g) the female sex hormone provokes a conspicuous increase in both intact and castrated animals; (h) the hormone of the corpus luteum has no effect; and (i) there is no evidence of synergism of the pituitary and male sex hormones nor of antagonism of the male and female sex hormones in adult rabbits. PMID:19870661

  15. THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF PROSTATIC AND VESICULAR TRANSPLANTS IN THE ANTERIOR CHAMBER OF THE EYE.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; Melchionna, R H; Tolins, S H; Rosenblum, H B

    1937-08-31

    1. With a photographic method for the determination of the size of prostatic and vesicular transplants in the anterior chamber of the eye, it has been possible to follow continuously the response to an injection of a hormone. 2. The results may be briefly summarized as follows: (a) One injection of the gonadotropic substance of pregnancy urine produces a moderate increase in size; (b) subsequent injections of this same substance for a period of at least 3 months are without effect; (c) an alkaline extract of the whole anterior pituitary gland produces a similar increase; (d) all pituitary derivatives are ineffective in the castrated animal; (e) castration brings about a decrease in size that gradually loses velocity; (f) the male sex hormone produces a slight increase in intact, and a variable, at times conspicuous, increase in castrated animals; (g) the female sex hormone provokes a conspicuous increase in both intact and castrated animals; (h) the hormone of the corpus luteum has no effect; and (i) there is no evidence of synergism of the pituitary and male sex hormones nor of antagonism of the male and female sex hormones in adult rabbits. PMID:19870661

  16. The use of multi-gap resistive plate chambers for in-beam PET in proton and carbon ion therapy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, David; Borghi, Giacomo; Sauli, Fabio; Amaldi, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    On-line verification of the delivered dose during proton and carbon ion radiotherapy is currently a very desirable goal for quality assurance of hadron therapy treatment plans. In-beam positron emission tomography (ibPET), which can provide an image of the β+ activity induced in the patient during irradiation, which in turn is correlated to the range of the ion beam, is one of the modalities for achieving this goal. Application to hadron therapy requires that the scanner geometry be modified from that which is used in nuclear medicine. In particular, PET detectors that allow a sub-nanosecond time-of-flight (TOF) registration of the collinear photons have been proposed. Inclusion of the TOF information in PET data leads to more effective PET sensitivity. Considering the challenges inherent in the ibPET technique, namely limited β+ activity and the effect of biological washout due to blood flow, TOF-PET technologies are very attractive. In this context, the TERA Foundation is investigating the use of resistive plate chambers (RPC) for an ibPET application because of their excellent timing properties and low cost. In this paper we present a novel compact multi-gap RPC (MRPC) module design and construction method, which considering the large number of modules that would be needed to practically implement a high-sensitivity RPC-PET scanner, could be advantageous. Moreover, we give an overview of the efficiency and timing measurements that have been obtained in the laboratory using such single-gap and multi-gap RPC modules. PMID:23824118

  17. Note: Fabrication of a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber for atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Han, Tingting; Song, Xiaoxue; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario

    2015-10-15

    The atomic force microscope is one of the most widespread tools in science, but many suppliers do not provide a competitive solution to make experiments in controlled atmospheres. Here, we provide a solution to this problem by fabricating a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber. We corroborate the correct functioning of the chamber by studying the formation of local anodic oxidation on a silicon sample (biased under opposite polarities), an effect that can be suppressed by measuring in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. The usefulness of this chamber goes beyond the example here presented, and it could be used in many other fields of science, including physics, mechanics, microelectronics, nanotechnology, medicine, and biology.

  18. Note: Fabrication of a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Han, Tingting; Song, Xiaoxue; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The atomic force microscope is one of the most widespread tools in science, but many suppliers do not provide a competitive solution to make experiments in controlled atmospheres. Here, we provide a solution to this problem by fabricating a fast-response and user-friendly environmental chamber. We corroborate the correct functioning of the chamber by studying the formation of local anodic oxidation on a silicon sample (biased under opposite polarities), an effect that can be suppressed by measuring in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. The usefulness of this chamber goes beyond the example here presented, and it could be used in many other fields of science, including physics, mechanics, microelectronics, nanotechnology, medicine, and biology.

  19. The application of Ussing chambers for determining the impact of microbes and probiotics on intestinal ion transport.

    PubMed

    Lomasney, Kevin W; Hyland, Niall P

    2013-09-01

    Host-microbe interactions have gained considerable attention in recent years with regards to their role in various organic disorders and diseases. In particular, research efforts have focused on the intestinal microbiota, where the largest and most diverse populations not only co-exist with the host, but also directly influence the state and function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Moreover, both human and animal studies alike are now beginning to show a positive influence of probiotic bacteria on GI disorders associated with diarrhoea or constipation. Diarrheagenic GI diseases, such as those caused by Vibreo cholera or enterpathogenic Eschericia coli, have well-characterised interactions with the host that explain much of the observed symptoms, in particular severe diarrhoea. However, the mechanisms of action of nonpathogenic bacteria or probiotics on host physiology are less clearly understood. In the context of defining the mechanisms of action of probiotics in vitro, the Ussing chamber has proven to be a particularly useful tool. Here, we will present data from several studies that have defined molecular targets for microbes and putative probiotics in the regulation of intestinal secretory and absorptive function, and we will discuss these in the context of their application in pathogen- or inflammation-induced alterations in intestinal ion transport.

  20. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  1. Dermal exudate macrophages. Induction in dermal chambers and response to lymphokines.

    PubMed Central

    Goihman-Yahr, M; Ulrich, M; Noya-León, A; Rojas, A; Convit, J

    1975-01-01

    Chambers were implanted in the dorsum of guinea-pigs at the dermal-subcutaneous junction. Exudates were induced and harvested. Macrophages obtained were able to migrate in vitro. If procured from sensitized donors, macrophage migration was inhibited by the corresponding antigen. Dermal exudate macrophages are therefore subject to the effect of lymphokines. The chamber model may be useful for in vivo studies of cell to cell and cell-parasite interactions. PMID:1212821

  2. Chamber propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, B.

    1991-01-16

    Propagation of a heavy ion beam to the target appears possible under conditions thought to be realizable by several reactor designs. Beam quality at the lens is believed to provide adequate intensity at the target -- but the beam must pass through chamber debris and its self fields along the way. This paper reviews present consensus on propagation modes and presents recent results on the effects of photoionization of the beam ions by thermal x-rays from the heated target. Ballistic propagation through very low densities is a conservative mode. The more-speculative self-pinched mode, at 1 to 10 Torr, offers reactor advantages and is being re-examined by others. 13 refs.

  3. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  4. Characterization of a two-dimensional liquid-filled ion chamber detector array used for verification of the treatments in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Markovic, Miljenko Stathakis, Sotirios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Jurkovic, Ines-Ana; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to investigate the characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled ion chamber detector array, which is used for the verification of radiotherapy treatment plans that use small field sizes of up to 10 × 10 cm. Methods: The device used in this study was Octavius 1000 SRS model (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Its 2D array of detectors consists of 977 liquid-filled ion chambers arranged over an area of 11 × 11 cm. The size of the detectors is 2.3 × 2.3 × 0.5 mm (volume of 0.003 cm{sup 3}) and their spacing in the inner area of 5.5 × 5.5 cm is 2.5 mm center-to-center, whereas in the outer area it is 5 mm center-to-center. The detector reproducibility, dose linearity, and sensitivity to positional changes of the collimator were tested. Also, the output factors of field sizes ranging from 0.5 × 0.5 to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} both for open and wedged fields have been measured and compared against those measured by a pin-point ionization chamber, liquid filled microchamber, SRS diode, and EDR2 film. Results: Its short-term reproducibility was within 0.2% and its medium and long-term reproducibility was within 0.5% (verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements), which is an excellent result taking into account the daily fluctuation of the linear accelerator and the errors in the device setup reproducibility. The dose linearity and dose rate dependence were measured in the range of 0.5–85 Gy and 0.5–10 Gy min{sup −1}, respectively, and were verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements was within 3%. The measurements of the sensitivity showed that the 2D Array could detect millimetric collimator positional changes. The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 0.3% with the pinpoint chamber and microliquid filled chamber for the field sizes between 3 × 3 and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. For field sizes down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}, the agreement with SRS diode and microliquid filled

  5. Ion-stimulated gas desorption yields of electropolished, chemically etched, and coated (Au, Ag, Pd, TiZrV) stainless steel vacuum chambers and St707 getter strips irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahner, E.; Hansen, J.; Küchler, D.; Malabaila, M.; Taborelli, M.

    2005-05-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to measure molecular desorption yields for 4.2 MeV/u lead ions impacting under grazing incidence on different accelerator-type vacuum chambers. Desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO, and CO2, which are of fundamental interest for future accelerator applications, are reported for different stainless steel surface treatments. In order to study the effect of the surface oxide layer on the gas desorption, gold-, silver-, palladium-, and getter-coated 316 LN stainless steel chambers and similarly prepared samples were tested for desorption at LINAC 3 and analyzed for chemical composition by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The large effective desorption yield of 2×104 molecules /Pb53+ ion, previously measured for uncoated, vacuum fired stainless steel, was reduced after noble-metal coating by up to 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, pressure rise measurements, the effectiveness of beam scrubbing with lead ions, and the consequence of a subsequent venting on the desorption yields of a beam-scrubbed vacuum chamber are described. Practical consequences for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring are discussed.

  6. Liquid chromatography-flame ionisation detection using a nebuliser/spray chamber interface. Part 2. Comparison of functional group responses.

    PubMed

    Young, Erepamowei; Smith, Roger M; Sharp, Barry L; Bone, Joanne R

    2012-05-01

    The application of a LC-nebuliser/spray chamber interface-flame ionisation detection has been demonstrated for the superheated water liquid chromatography of a wide range of aliphatic and aromatic analytes. The linearity and sensitivity of the response of volatile and involatile analytes have been compared. The response of the detector toward different analytes is similar to that in GC-FID and for volatile analytes was comparable to UV detection. However, the responses from involatile analytes, such as amino acids and carbohydrates, were poor and often lower than for a refractive index detector. PMID:22420954

  7. Theoretical calculation on CR-39 response for radon measurements and optimum diffusion chambers dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, H. R.; Ghandi, Kh.; Rahimi, M.; Negarestani, A.

    2008-11-01

    One method to measure radon gas concentration in the air with a long time of radiation is trace chemical etching technique. There is a direct proportion between the number of traces on solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) and activity concentration of radon. In this paper, calibration constant for a cylindrical chamber with CR-39 detector has been measured analytically. Using this measurement, trace curves on the base of concentration for chambers with different heights and radii have been drawn. The results show that to measure radon gas concentration, the optimum chamber should have a height between 3.5 and 4 cm and a radius between 2.5 and 3.2 cm.

  8. Response and Monte Carlo evaluation of a reference ionization chamber for radioprotection level at calibration laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Vivolo, Vitor; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2015-07-01

    A special parallel plate ionization chamber, inserted in a slab phantom for the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) determination, was developed and characterized in this work. This ionization chamber has collecting electrodes and window made of graphite, and the walls and phantom made of PMMA. The tests comprise experimental evaluation following international standards and Monte Carlo simulations, employing the PENELOPE code to evaluate the design of this new dosimeter. The experimental tests were conducted employing the radioprotection level quality N-60 established at the IPEN, and all results were within the recommended standards.

  9. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  10. Robotic radiosurgery system patient-specific QA for extracranial treatments using the planar ion chamber array and the cylindrical diode array.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Han; Veltchev, Iavor; Koren, Sion; Ma, Charlie; Li, Jinsgeng

    2015-07-08

    Robotic radiosurgery system has been increasingly employed for extracranial treatments. This work is aimed to study the feasibility of a cylindrical diode array and a planar ion chamber array for patient-specific QA with this robotic radiosurgery system and compare their performance. Fiducial markers were implanted in both systems to enable image-based setup. An in-house program was developed to postprocess the movie file of the measurements and apply the beam-by-beam angular corrections for both systems. The impact of noncoplanar delivery was then assessed by evaluating the angles created by the incident beams with respect to the two detector arrangements and cross-comparing the planned dose distribution to the measured ones with/without the angular corrections. The sensitivity of detecting the translational (1-3 mm) and the rotational (1°-3°) delivery errors were also evaluated for both systems. Six extracranial patient plans (PTV 7-137 cm³) were measured with these two systems and compared with the calculated doses. The plan dose distributions were calculated with ray-tracing and the Monte Carlo (MC) method, respectively. With 0.8 by 0.8 mm² diodes, the output factors measured with the cylindrical diode array agree better with the commissioning data. The maximum angular correction for a given beam is 8.2% for the planar ion chamber array and 2.4% for the cylindrical diode array. The two systems demonstrate a comparable sensitivity of detecting the translational targeting errors, while the cylindrical diode array is more sensitive to the rotational targeting error. The MC method is necessary for dose calculations in the cylindrical diode array phantom because the ray-tracing algorithm fails to handle the high-Z diodes and the acrylic phantom. For all the patient plans, the cylindrical diode array/ planar ion chamber array demonstrate 100% / > 92% (3%/3 mm) and > 96% / ~ 80% (2%/2 mm) passing rates. The feasibility of using both systems for robotic

  11. SU-E-T-242: Monte Carlo Simulations Used to Test the Perturbation of a Reference Ion Chamber Prototype Used for Small Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez Quino, L; Calvo, O; Huerta, C; DeWeese, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the perturbation due to the use of a novel Reference Ion Chamber designed to measure small field dosimetry (KermaX Plus C by IBA). Methods: Using the Phase-space files for TrueBeam photon beams available by Varian in IAEA-compliant format for 6 and 15 MV. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc to investigate the perturbation introduced by a reference chamber into the PDDs and profiles measured in water tank. Field sizes ranging from 1×1, 2×2,3×3, 5×5 cm2 were simulated for both energies with and without a 0.5 mm foil of Aluminum which is equivalent to the attenuation equivalent of the reference chamber specifications in a water phantom of 30×30×30 cm3 and a pixel resolution of 2 mm. The PDDs, profiles, and gamma analysis of the simulations were performed as well as a energy spectrum analysis of the phase-space files generated during the simulation. Results: Examination of the energy spectrum analysis performed shown a very small increment of the energy spectrum at the build-up region but no difference is appreciated after dmax. The PDD, profiles and gamma analysis had shown a very good agreement among the simulations with and without the Al foil, with a gamma analysis with a criterion of 2% and 2mm resulting in 99.9% of the points passing this criterion. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential benefits of using the KermaX Plus C as reference chamber in the measurement of PDD and Profiles for small fields since the perturbation due to in the presence of the chamber the perturbation is minimal and the chamber can be considered transparent to the photon beam.

  12. Thermal conditions in freezing chambers and prediction of the thermophysiological responses of workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimundo, A. M.; Oliveira, A. V. M.; Gaspar, A. R.; Quintela, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    The present work is dedicated to the assessment of the cold thermal strain of human beings working within freezing chambers. To obtain the present results, both field measurements and a numerical procedure based on a modified version of the Stolwijk thermoregulation model were used. Eighteen freezing chambers were considered. A wide range of physical parameters of the cold stores, the workers clothing insulation, and the working and recovering periods were observed. The combination of these environmental and individual parameters lead to different levels of thermal stress, which were grouped under three categories. Some good practices were observed in the field evaluations, namely situations with appropriate level of clothing protection and limited duration of exposure to cold avoiding unacceptable level of hypothermia. However, the clothing ensembles normally used by the workers do not provide the minimum required insulation, which suggests the possibility of the whole body cooling for levels higher than admissible. The numerical predictions corroborate the main conclusions of the field survey. The results obtained with both methodologies clearly show that, for the low temperature of the freezing chambers, the clothing insulation is insufficient, the exposure periods are too long, and the recovering periods are inadequate. Thus, high levels of physiological strain can indeed be reached by human beings under such working environments.

  13. Thermal conditions in freezing chambers and prediction of the thermophysiological responses of workers.

    PubMed

    Raimundo, A M; Oliveira, A V M; Gaspar, A R; Quintela, D A

    2015-11-01

    The present work is dedicated to the assessment of the cold thermal strain of human beings working within freezing chambers. To obtain the present results, both field measurements and a numerical procedure based on a modified version of the Stolwijk thermoregulation model were used. Eighteen freezing chambers were considered. A wide range of physical parameters of the cold stores, the workers clothing insulation, and the working and recovering periods were observed. The combination of these environmental and individual parameters lead to different levels of thermal stress, which were grouped under three categories. Some good practices were observed in the field evaluations, namely situations with appropriate level of clothing protection and limited duration of exposure to cold avoiding unacceptable level of hypothermia. However, the clothing ensembles normally used by the workers do not provide the minimum required insulation, which suggests the possibility of the whole body cooling for levels higher than admissible. The numerical predictions corroborate the main conclusions of the field survey. The results obtained with both methodologies clearly show that, for the low temperature of the freezing chambers, the clothing insulation is insufficient, the exposure periods are too long, and the recovering periods are inadequate. Thus, high levels of physiological strain can indeed be reached by human beings under such working environments.

  14. Verifying Sensor Response to Difficult Chemicals with a New Test Chamber Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, A. D.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Probasco, Kathleen M.

    2004-06-01

    In this article we discuss the application of technology innovations to optimize detection of hard-to-measure (less- or semi-volatile) compounds. These chemicals are found all around us: in pesticides and herbicides, the higher boiling polyaromatic hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust, and linked polyurethane foams in products ranging from hiking boots to acoustic ceilings. They appear in low concentrations and evaporate very slowly. These heavier chemicals are rarely measured accurately because they stick to surfaces and sampling equipment and, consequently, are not reliably sampled or delivered to analytical detectors. It’s like trying to identify cold, sticky honey by getting it to flow in through a sampling tube to a detector –it will hardly move. Honey generally coats out on surfaces and sample lines to the extent that even if it is detected, the amount present is vastly underestimated. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) addressed the problem by developing a chamber facility with instrumentation that can overcome the under-reporting of these ubiquitous chemical compounds. The atmospheric chemistry chamber provides a controlled environment in which to certify the accuracy of and conditions under which sensors can best respond to volatile and semi-volatile chemicals. The facility is designed to handle and measure chemicals at the levels at which they are found in nature. Test environments can be created in which atmospheric concentrations are at low part-per-trillion concentrations. These concentrations are equivalent to an herbicide off-gassing from a commercially grown apple. The chamber can be set up to simulate releases ranging from industrial vents with high concentrations to releases from surfaces, soils, and/or vegetation where the concentrations are low.

  15. Preliminary studies of a new monitor ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    A new monitor ionization chamber was developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) in order to monitor X-ray beams. The main difference of this monitor ionization chamber in relation to other monitor chambers is its geometry, which consists of a ring-shaped sensitive volume. Because of this geometry, the monitor chamber has a central hole through which the direct radiation beam passes. The operational characteristics of the monitor chamber were evaluated: saturation, ion collection efficiency and polarity effect. Besides these tests, the short- and medium-term stabilities of its response were also evaluated. During the tests the leakage current was always negligible. All results showed values within those recommended internationally (IEC, 1997. Medical electrical equipment-dosimeters with ionization chambers and/or semi-conductor detectors as used in X-ray diagnostic imaging. IEC 61674. International Electrotechnical Commission, Genève).

  16. Detection of Amines and Ammonia with an Ambient Pressure Mass Spectrometer using a Corona Discharge Ion Source, in an Urban Atmosphere and in a Teflon Film Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M.; Hanson, D. R.; Grieves, C.; Ortega, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Amines and ammonia are an important group of molecules that can greatly affect atmospheric particle formation that can go on to impact cloud formation and their scattering of thermal and solar radiation, and as a result human health and ecosystems. In this study, an Ambient Pressure Mass Spectrometer (AmPMS) that is selective and sensitive to molecules with a high proton affinity, such as amines, was coupled with a newly built corona discharge ion source. AmPMS was used to monitor many different nitrogenous compound that are found in an urban atmosphere (July 2015, Minneapolis), down to the single digit pmol/mol level. Simultaneous to this, a proton transfer mass spectrometer also sampled the atmosphere through an inlet within 20 m of the AmPMS inlet. In another set of studies, a similar AmPMS was attached to a large Teflon film chamber at the Atmospheric Chemistry Division at NCAR (August 2015, Boulder). Exploratory studies are planned on the sticking of amines to the chamber walls as well as oxidizing the amine and monitoring products. Depending on the success of these studies, results will be presented on the reversability of amine partitioning and mass balance for these species in the chamber.

  17. Metal ions potentiate microglia responsiveness to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Alsalem, Inás W A; Amor, Sandra; Bontkes, Hetty J; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2016-02-15

    Oral metal exposure has been associated with diverse adverse reactions, including neurotoxicity. We showed previously that dentally applied metals activate dendritic cells (MoDC) via TLR4 (Ni, Co, Pd) and TLR3 (Au). It is still unknown whether the low levels of dental metals reaching the brain can trigger local innate cells or prime them to become more responsive. Here we tested whether dentally applied metals (Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Au, Hg) activate primary human microglia in vitro and, as a model, monocytic THP-1-cells, in high non-toxic as well as near-physiological concentrations. In addition the effects of 'near-physiological' metal exposure on endotoxin (LPS) responsiveness of these cells were evaluated. IL-8 and IL-6 production after 24h was used as read out. In high, non-toxic concentrations all transition metals except Cr induced IL-8 and IL-6 production in microglia, with Ni and Co providing the strongest stimulation. When using near-physiological doses (up to 10× the normal plasma concentration), only Zn and Cu induced significant IL-8 production. Of note, the latter metals also markedly potentiated LPS responsiveness of microglia and THP-1 cells. In conclusion, transition metals activate microglia similar to MoDCs. In near-physiological concentrations Zn and Cu are the most effective mediators of innate immune activation. A clear synergism between innate responses to Zn/Cu and LPS was observed, shedding new light on the possible relation between oral metal exposure and neurotoxicity.

  18. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  19. Magnetospheric modulation effects on solar cosmic rays from simultaneous OGO 1 and 3 ion chamber data in 1968 and 1969

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by identical ionization chambers aboard the satellites OGO-1 and OGO-3 are utilized to investigate spatial variations in particle intensity near and inside the magnetosphere during the solar cosmic ray events of September 1966. Cross-correlation of the absolute proton flux computed from the chamber rate during three solar particle events shows good agreement with the measurements by the IMP-F Solar Proton Monitor during the same events. The chamber has a dynamic range of over six orders of magnitude. Before launch it was calibrated in the laboratory with radiation dosages in the range 1 R/hr-6000 R/hr. The OGO-1 and OGO-3 chambers, which were normalized in the laboratory prior to the launch, are found to maintain their normalization within approximately equal to 1 per cent during their flight. The high sensitivity and absolute inter-comparability of the instruments allow small intensity differences to be detected and it is established that the observed differences can be explained by a magnetospheric screening effect when an anisotropic beam of particles is present in space. Evidence is presented to show that the screening is at times complete for a duration of as much as 110 min in the tail of the magnetosphere so that during this period the solar cosmic rays (E approximately equal to 15 MeV) have virtually no access to that region of the magnetosphere. Small intensity fluctuations of a temporal nature observed and found to be subjected to a damping effect inside the magnetosphere.

  20. Development and Application of a Novel Environmental Preference Chamber for Assessing Responses of Laboratory Mice to Atmospheric Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Green, Angela R; Wathes, Christopher M; Demmers, Theo GM; Clark, Judy MacArthur; Xin, Hongwei

    2008-01-01

    A novel environmental preference chamber (EPC) was developed and used to assess responses of laboratory mice to atmospheric ammonia. The EPC features 1) a test chamber with 4 individually ventilated, mutually accessible compartments; b) automated tracking of mouse movements by using paired infrared sensors; c) identification of individual mice by using photosensors; d) monitoring and regulation of the NH3 concentration in each compartment; and e) personal-computer–based data acquisition. In an initial preference study with the EPC, 4 groups of 4 laboratory mice (BALB/c/Bkl; body weight, 13.4 to 18.4 g) were each given a choice among 4 NH3 concentrations (mean ± SE) of 4 ± 2, 30 ± 2, 56 ± 4, and 110 ± 6 ppm for 2 d after a 2-d familiarization period. Once trained to use the intercompartment tunnels, the mice made extensive use of the EPC, with each group making more than 2000 intercompartment movements during 48 h. Video recording verified the results of the automatic tracking system, which detected and correctly determined mouse location for 79% of the moves. The use of photosensors proved to be ineffective in recognizing individual mice. Although the EPC would benefit from refinement and further development, it simplified analysis of locomotion behavioral data. Results of the preference study indicated that the mice exhibited no clear preference for, or aversion to, any of the experimental concentrations of ammonia and that the mice clearly preferred the upper 2 compartments of the chamber over the lower 2 compartments. Further investigation should be conducted to verify these preliminary results and explore other preferences of laboratory mice for environmental conditions and resources. PMID:18351722

  1. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  2. Effect of a metal-dielectric structure introduced in the plasma chamber of the Frankfurt 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schächter, L.; Stiebing, K. E.; Dobrescu, S.; Badescu-Singureanu, Al. I.; Schmidt, L.; Hohn, O.; Runkel, S.

    1999-02-01

    A new approach of the possibility to significantly increase the high charge state ion beams delivered by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources by using metal-dielectric (MD) structures characterized by high secondary electron emission properties is presented. The intensities of argon ion beams extracted from the 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the Institut für Kernphysik (IKF) der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt/Main were measured when a 26 mm diam disk of a specially treated MD structure (Al-Al2O3) was introduced axially close to the ECR plasma. The Ar beam intensities and charge-state distributions obtained with this disk are compared to measurements with disks of iron and pure aluminum at the same position relative to the plasma. All measurements were performed with the disk at the plasma chamber potential. The results with the MD structure show a net shift of the beam intensity towards higher charge states as compared with the other disk materials. Enhancement factors of the beam current of up to 10 (for Ar12+) when using a MD disk compared to the output when using an aluminum disk and up to 40 (for Ar11+) when using an iron disk were measured.

  3. Power generation response to readily biodegradable COD in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongsuck; Kim, Byunggoon; Yu, Jaecheul

    2015-06-01

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) using domestic wastewater (DWW) and milk processing wastewater (MWW) were operated at different organic loading rates (OLRs). The maximum power density (PDmax) and OLR (readily biodegradable COD [RBCOD] and soluble COD [SCOD]) followed the Lineweaver-Burk equation in all influents. The coefficients of determination were 0.9209 and 0.9975 for SCOD and RBCOD, respectively. OLR based on RBCOD showed better power generation function than that based on SCOD. PDmax (2.9-12.2 W/m(3)) in DWW was lower than that (6.9-24.9 W/m(3)) in MWW but the net energy recovery (kWh/kg-SCOD(removed)) in DWW (0.542-1.108) was larger than that in MWW (0.322-0.602). This was attributed to the higher ratio of RBCOD/SCOD (0.44) and the lower values of RBCOD (40 mg/L) in DWW, compared to RBOCD/SCOD (0.11) and RBCOD (110 mg/L) in MWW. Therefore, RBCOD is an important indicator for estimating power generation.

  4. Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intense heavy ions beams inside a HIF reactor chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, A. F.; Maynard, G.; Vay, J.-L.; Lenglet, A.

    2006-06-01

    The efficiency of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on the maximum value for the density of energy (DoE) that can be deposited by the ion beams. In order to reduce the final radius, and thus to increase the DoE inside the target, the beam spatial charge has to be neutralized. Therefore the dynamics of the neutralizing electrons (DNE) play a central role in optimizing the DoE deposited in solid targets by high current of high energy heavy ion beams. We present results on some aspects of the DNE, which was performed using the Monte-Carlo 2D1/2 PIC code BPIC.

  5. Response of ozone to changes in hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide concentrations in outdoor smog chambers filled with Los Angeles air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Nelson A.; Gunst, Richard F.

    During the summer portion of the 1987 Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS), outdoor smog chamber experiments were performed on Los Angeles air to determine the response of maximum ozone levels, O 3(max), to changes in the initial concentrations of hydrocarbons, HC, and nitrogen oxides, NO x. These captive-air experiments were conducted in downtown Los Angeles and in the downwind suburb of Claremont. Typically, eight chambers were filled with LA air in the morning. In some chambers the initial HC and/or NO x concentrations were changed by 25% to 50% by adding various combinations of a mixture of HC, clean air, or NO x. The O 3 concentration in each chamber was monitored throughout the day to determine O 3(max). An empirical mathematical model for O 3(max) was developed from regression fits to the initial HC and NO x concentrations and to the average daily temperature at both sites. This is the first time that a mathematical expression for the O 3-precursor relationship and the positive effect of temperature on O 3(max) have been quantified using captive-air experiments. An ozone isopleth diagram prepared from the empirical model was qualitatively similar to those prepared from photochemical mechanisms. This constitutes the first solely empirical corroboration of the O 3 contour shape for Los Angeles. To comply with the Federal Ozone Standard in LA, O 3(max) must be reduced by approximately 50%. Several strategies for reducing O 3(max) by 50% were evaluated using the empirical model. For the average initial conditions that we measured in LA, the most efficient strategy is one that reduces HC by 55-75%, depending on the ambient HC/NO x ratio. Any accompanying reduction in NO x would be counter-productive to the benefits of HC reductions. In fact, reducing HC and NO x simultaneously requires larger percentage reductions for both than the reduction required when HC alone is reduced. The HC-reduction strategy is the most efficient on average, but no single

  6. The change of response of ionization chambers in the penumbra and transmission regions: impact for IMRT verification.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, D; Pena, J; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Hartmann, G H; Gómez, F; Leal, A

    2008-04-01

    Significant deviations from the expected dose have been reported in the absolute dosimetry validation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment when individual segments are analyzed. However, when full treatment is considered and all segment doses are added together, these discrepancies fade out, leading to overall dose deviations below a 5% action level. This contradictory behavior may be caused by a partial compensation between detector over-responding and under-responding for measurement conditions far from radiation equilibrium. We consider three treatment verification scenarios that may lead to ionization chamber miss-responding, namely: narrow beam irradiation, field penumbra location and multi-leaf collimator transmission contribution. In this work we have analyzed the response of three different ionization chambers with different active volume under these conditions by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods. Correction factors needed to convert the detector readout into actual dose to water were calculated by inserting the specific detector geometry (carefully modeled) into the simulations. This procedure required extensive use of parallel computing resources in order to achieve the desired level of uncertainty in the final results. The analysis of the simulations shows the relative contribution of each of the three previously mentioned miss-responding scenarios. Additionally, we provide some evidence on dose deviation compensation in multi-segment radiotherapy treatment verification.

  7. Response of GaN to energetic ion irradiation: conditions for ion track formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlušić, M.; Kozubek, R.; Lebius, H.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Buljan, M.; Siketić, Z.; Scholz, F.; Meisch, T.; Jakšić, M.; Bernstorff, S.; Schleberger, M.; Šantić, B.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the response of wurzite GaN thin films to energetic ion irradiation. Both swift heavy ions (92 MeV Xe23+, 23 MeV I6+) and highly charged ions (100 keV Xe40+) were used. After irradiation, the samples were investigated using atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in channelling orientation and time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis. Only grazing incidence swift heavy ion irradiation induced changes on the surface of the GaN, when the appearance of nanoholes is accompanied by a notable loss of nitrogen. The results are discussed in the framework of the thermal spike model.

  8. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions.

  9. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions. PMID:20656104

  10. Under-response of a PTW-60019 microDiamond detector in the Bragg peak of a 62 MeV/n carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rossomme, S; Hopfgartner, J; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2016-06-21

    To investigate the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of the response of a PTW-60019 Freiburg microDiamond detector, its response was compared to the response of a plane-parallel Markus chamber in a 62 MeV/n mono-energetic carbon ion beam. Results obtained with two different experimental setups are in agreement. As recommended by IAEA TRS-398, the response of the Markus chamber was corrected for temperature, pressure, polarity effects and ion recombination. No correction was applied to the response of the microDiamond detector. The ratio of the response of the Markus chamber to the response of the microDiamond is close to unity in the plateau region. In the Bragg peak region, a significant increase of the ratio is observed, which increases to 1.2 in the distal edge region. Results indicate a correlation between the under-response of the microDiamond detector and high LET values. The combined relative standard uncertainty of the results is estimated to be 2.38% in the plateau region and 12% in the distal edge region. These values are dominated by the uncertainty of alignment in the non-uniform beam and the uncertainty of range determination. PMID:27224547

  11. Under-response of a PTW-60019 microDiamond detector in the Bragg peak of a 62 MeV/n carbon ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossomme, S.; Hopfgartner, J.; Vynckier, S.; Palmans, H.

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of the response of a PTW-60019 Freiburg microDiamond detector, its response was compared to the response of a plane-parallel Markus chamber in a 62 MeV/n mono-energetic carbon ion beam. Results obtained with two different experimental setups are in agreement. As recommended by IAEA TRS-398, the response of the Markus chamber was corrected for temperature, pressure, polarity effects and ion recombination. No correction was applied to the response of the microDiamond detector. The ratio of the response of the Markus chamber to the response of the microDiamond is close to unity in the plateau region. In the Bragg peak region, a significant increase of the ratio is observed, which increases to 1.2 in the distal edge region. Results indicate a correlation between the under-response of the microDiamond detector and high LET values. The combined relative standard uncertainty of the results is estimated to be 2.38% in the plateau region and 12% in the distal edge region. These values are dominated by the uncertainty of alignment in the non-uniform beam and the uncertainty of range determination.

  12. Physiological, Behavioral, and Histological Responses of Male C57BL/6N Mice to Different CO2 Chamber Replacement Rates.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Gregory P; Bottomley, Michael A; Dudley, Emily S; Schiml, Patricia A; Wyatt, Christopher N; Grobe, Nadja

    2016-01-01

    Rodent euthanasia with CO2 by using gradual displacement of 10% to 30% of the chamber volume per minute is considered acceptable by the AVMA Panel on Euthanasia. However, whether a 50% to 100% chamber replacement rate (CRR) of CO2 is more painful or distressful than 10% to 30% CRR is unclear. Therefore, we examined physiological and behavioral parameters, corticosterone and ACTH levels, and lung histology of mice euthanized at CRR of 15%, 30%, 50%, or 100%. Adult male C57BL/6N mice were euthanized at different CO2 CRR as physiological parameters were recorded telemetrically. Video recordings were reviewed to determine when the mouse first became ataxic, when it was fully recumbent (characterized by the mouse's nose resting on the cage floor), and when breathing stopped. Overall, CO2 euthanasia increased cardiovascular parameters and activity. Specific significant differences that were associated with 50% to 100% compared with 15% to 30% CO2 CRR included an increase in systolic blood pressure per second from initiation of CO2 until ataxia, a decrease in total diastolic blood pressure until ataxia, and a decrease in total heart rate until ataxia, immobility, and death. All physiological responses occurred more rapidly with higher CRR. Activity levels, behavioral responses, plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels, and lung pathology were not different between groups. We found no physiological, behavioral, or histologic evidence that 15% or 30% CO2 CRR is less painful or distressful than is 50% or 100% CO2 CRR. We conclude that 50% to 100% CO2 CRR is acceptable for euthanizing adult male C57BL/6N mice. PMID:27423153

  13. Role of calcium ions in phytochrome responses: an update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.; Wayne, R. O.; Datta, N.

    1986-01-01

    Recent findings related to the role of calcium ions in phytochrome responses are reviewed and summarized. Hypotheses tested are the activation of calmodulin by light-regulated Ca2+ transport in cells and the photoinduction of calmodulin-activated enzyme activities. Discussion focuses on evidence that Ca2+ helps to regulate phytochrome responses, calcium requirements for photoinduced spore germination in the fern Onoclea, Ca2+ fluxes and phytochrome function in the alga Mougeotia, calmodulin antagonist blocking of red-light stimulated chloroplast rotation, the role of phosphorylation in calmodulin-regulated responses, and phytochrome regulation of nuclear protein phosphorylation.

  14. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  15. A smog chamber study coupling a photoionization aerosol electron/ion spectrometer to VUV synchrotron radiation: organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosol analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza-Romero, María Teresa; Gaie-Levrel, Francois; Mahjoub, Ahmed; López-Arza, Vicente; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    A reaction chamber was coupled to a photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on an electron/ion coincidence scheme and applied for on-line analysis of organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosols using synchrotron tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons as the ionization source. In this proof of principle study, both aerosol and gas phase were detected simultaneously but could be differentiated. Present results and perspectives for improvement for this set-up are shown in the study of ozonolysis ([O3] = 0.13-3 ppm) of α-pinene (2-3 ppm), and the uptake of glyoxal upon ammonium sulphate. In this work the ozone concentration was monitored in real time, together with the particle size distributions and chemical composition, the latter taking advantage of the coincidence spectrometer and the tuneability of the synchrotron radiation as a soft VUV ionization source.

  16. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  17. The response of scintillators to heavy ions: 1, Plastics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    The response of various scintillator detectors to ions of A = 1-84 and energies E/A = 5 to 30 MeV have been measured, and are found to be linear above an energy of 100 MeV. Results are presented for a typical organic plastic scintillator including parametrizations of the data as a function of Z, A, and energy. These results can be used by anyone using scintillators as heavy ion detectors, with one calibration point giving a normalization that allows use of the whole set of curves. The response functions are compared to previous parametrizations at lower energies and discussed in terms of the theory of delta-ray formation in the scintillator.

  18. Inflammatory Response of Human Gestational Membranes to Ureaplasma parvum Using a Novel Dual-Chamber Tissue Explant System.

    PubMed

    Potts, Lauren C; Feng, Liping; Seed, Patrick C; Jayes, Friederike L; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Antczak, Brian; Nazzal, Matthew K; Murtha, Amy P

    2016-05-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is often associated with intra-amniotic inflammation and infection. Current understanding of the pathogenesis of PPROM includes activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteolytic enzymes leading to compromise of membrane integrity. The impact of exposure to bacterial pathogens, including Ureaplasma parvum, on gestational membranes is poorly understood. Our objective was to develop a dual-chamber system to characterize the inflammatory response of gestational membranes to U. parvum in a directional nature. Full-thickness human gestational membrane explants, with either choriodecidua or amnion oriented superiorly, were suspended between two washers in a cylindrical device, creating two distinct compartments. Brilliant green dye was introduced into the top chamber to assess the integrity of the system. Tissue viability was evaluated after 72 h using a colorimetric cell proliferation assay. Choriodecidua or amnion was exposed to three doses of U. parvum and incubated for 24 h. Following treatment, media from each compartment were used for quantification of U. parvum (quantitative PCR), interleukin (IL)-8 (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 activity (zymography). We observed that system integrity and explant viability were maintained over 72 h. Dose-dependent increases in recovered U. parvum, IL-8 concentration, and MMP-2 activity were detected in both compartments. Significant differences in IL-8 concentration and MMP-9 activity were found between the choriodecidua and amnion. This tissue explant system can be used to investigate the inflammatory consequences of directional bacterial exposure for gestational membranes and provides insight into the pathogenesis of PPROM and infectious complications of pregnancy. PMID:27009041

  19. Inverse combustion force estimation based on response measurements outside the combustion chamber and signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Mohd. Nor, Mohd. Jailani; Kamal Ariffin, Ahmad; Abdullah, Shahrir

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to vibration has various physiological effects on vehicle passengers. Engine is one of the main sources of vehicle vibration. The major causes of engine vibration are combustion forces transmitted through the pistons and connection rods. Evaluation of sources is the first step to attenuate this vibration. Assessment of these sources is not an easy task because internal parts of machinery are not accessible. Often, instrumentation for such systems is costly, time consuming and some modifications would be necessary. Aim of the first part of this paper was to validate an inverse technique and carry out mobility analysis on a vehicle crankshaft to achieve matrix of Frequency Response Functions (FRFs). Outcomes were implemented to reconstruct the applied force for single and multiple-input systems. In the second part, the validated inverse technique and FRFs were used to estimate piston forces of an operating engine. Bearings of crankshaft were chosen as nearest accessible parts to piston connecting rods. Accelerometers were connected to the bearings for response measurement during an ideal engine operation. These responses together with FRFs, which were estimated in the previous part, were utilised in the inverse technique. Tikhonov regularization was used to solve the ill-conditioned inverse system. Two methods, namely L-curve criterion and Generalized Cross Validation (GCV), were employed to find the regularization parameter for the Tikhonov method. The inverse problem was solved and piston forces applied to crankpins were estimated. Results were validated by pressure measurement inside a cylinder and estimating the corresponding combustion force. This validation showed that inverse technique and measurement outcomes were roughly in agreement. In presence of various noise, L-curve criterion conduces to more robust results compared to the GCV method. But in the absence of high correlation between sources ( f>600 HzHz), the GCV technique leads to more accurate

  20. Ionization chamber volume determination and quality assurance using micro-CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNiven, Andrea L.; Umoh, Joseph; Kron, Tomas; Holdsworth, David W.; Battista, Jerry J.

    2008-09-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry requires a high degree of precision, at all steps within the dosimetric process, in order to ensure accurate dose measurements. This work presents a novel technique for ion chamber volume determination and quality assurance, using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Four nominally identical Exradin A1SL chambers (0.056 cm3) (Standard Imaging, WI, USA) were imaged using a micro-CT system (GE Locus, GE Healthcare, London, Ontario) and irradiated in a 6 MV x-ray reference field. Air volumes were calculated from the CT datasets using 3D analysis software (Microview 2.1.1, General Electric Healthcare, London, Ontario). Differences in the volumes of each chamber determined using micro-CT images agreed with differences in the ionization response within 1% for each chamber. Calibration coefficients were then compared through cross-calibration with a calibrated ion chamber and from the CT-measured volumes. The average ratio of these values was found to be 0.958 ± 0.009 indicating good correlation. The results demonstrate the promise of using micro-CT imaging for the absolute volumetric characterization of ion chambers. The images have the potential to be an important clinical tool for quality assurance of ion chamber construction and integrity after routine clinical usage.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  2. Chamber dynamic research with pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSON,ROBERT R.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; RENK,TIMOTHY J.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; SWEENEY,MARY ANN

    2000-05-15

    In Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), Target Chamber Dynamics (TCD) is an integral part of the target chamber design and performance. TCD includes target output deposition of target x-rays, ions and neutrons in target chamber gases and structures, vaporization and melting of target chamber materials, radiation-hydrodynamics in target chamber vapors and gases, and chamber conditions at the time of target and beam injections. Pulsed power provides a unique environment for IFE-TCD validation experiments in two important ways: they do not require the very clean conditions which lasers need and they currently provide large x-ray and ion energies.

  3. Dose response of alanine detectors irradiated with carbon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jaekel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Bassler, Niels

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behavior of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results to model predictions. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track structure based alanine response model developed by Hansen and Olsen has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and calculations were compared to experimental results. Results: Calculations of the relative effectiveness deviate less than 5% from the measured values for monoenergetic beams. Measured depth-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasimonoenergetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties of the detector geometry implemented in the Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Monte Carlo computed machine-specific correction factors for reference dosimetry of TomoTherapy static beam for several ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Mackie, T. R.; Vynckier, S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine k{sub Q{sub m{sub s{sub r,Q{sub o}{sup f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r},f{sub o}}}}}} correction factors for machine-specific reference (msr) conditions by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for reference dosimetry of TomoTherapy static beams for ion chambers Exradin A1SL, A12; PTW 30006, 31010 Semiflex, 31014 PinPoint, 31018 microLion; NE 2571. Methods: For the calibration of TomoTherapy units, reference conditions specified in current codes of practice like IAEA/TRS-398 and AAPM/TG-51 cannot be realized. To cope with this issue, Alfonso et al. [Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] described a new formalism introducing msr factors k{sub Q{sub m{sub s{sub r,Q{sub o}{sup f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r},f{sub o}}}}}} for reference dosimetry, applicable to static TomoTherapy beams. In this study, those factors were computed directly using MC simulations for Q{sub 0} corresponding to a simplified {sup 60}Co beam in TRS-398 reference conditions (at 10 cm depth). The msr conditions were a 10 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 2} TomoTherapy beam, source-surface distance of 85 cm and 10 cm depth. The chambers were modeled according to technical drawings using the egs++ package and the MC simulations were run with the egs{sub c}hamber user code. Phase-space files used as the source input were produced using PENELOPE after simulation of a simplified {sup 60}Co beam and the TomoTherapy treatment head modeled according to technical drawings. Correlated sampling, intermediate phase-space storage, and photon cross-section enhancement variance reduction techniques were used. The simulations were stopped when the combined standard uncertainty was below 0.2%. Results: Computed k{sub Q{sub m{sub s{sub r,Q{sub o}{sup f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r},f{sub o}}}}}} values were all close to one, in a range from 0.991 for the PinPoint chamber to 1.000 for the Exradin A12 with a statistical uncertainty below 0.2%. Considering a beam quality Q defined as the TPR{sub 20,10} for a 6 MV Elekta photon beam (0

  5. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  6. IFE Chamber Technology - Status and Future Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Raffrary, A R; Abdel-Khalik, S; Kulcinski, G; Latkowski, J F; Najmabadi, F; Olson, C L; Peterson, P F; Ying, A; Yoda, M

    2002-11-15

    Significant progress has been made on addressing critical issues for inertial fusion energy (IFE) chambers for heavy-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry-wall (currently favored for laser IFE), wetted-wall (applicable to both laser and ion drivers), and thick-liquid-wall favored by heavy ion and z-pinch drivers. Recent progress and remaining challenges in developing IFE chambers are reviewed.

  7. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  8. Active osmoregulatory ion uptake across the pleopods of the isopod Idotea baltica (Pallas): electrophysiological measurements on isolated split endo- and exopodites mounted in a micro-ussing chamber.

    PubMed

    Postel, U; Becker, W; Brandt, A; Luck-Kopp, S; Riestenpatt, S; Weihrauch, D; Siebers, D

    2000-04-01

    The mechanism of active, osmoregulatory ion uptake was investigated in the pleopods of the marine isopod Idotea baltica (Pallas). Using isolated split half-podites of isopods acclimated to brackish water (20 salinity) mounted in a micro-Ussing chamber and symmetrically superfused with identical haemolymph-like salines, a mean short-circuit current I(sc) of -445 microA cm(-)(2) was measured in endopodites 3-5, corresponding to an inwardly directed transcellular movement of negative charge. Application of ouabain (5 mmol l(-)(1)) to the basolateral superfusate resulted in the almost total abolition of the I(sc) (reduced from -531 to -47 microA cm(-)(2)), suggesting that the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is the driving force for active, electrogenic uptake of NaCl. In contrast, mean I(sc) values close to zero were found in preparations of all exopodites and in endopodites 1 and 2. The specific activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase corresponded with these results. Specific activities were highest in posterior endopodites 3-5 and depended on ambient salinity. In all other rami, the activities were much lower and independent of ambient salinity. Activities in posterior endopodites 3-5 were lowest in isopods acclimated to 30 salinity (2-4 micromol P(i )mg(-)(1 )protein h(-)(1)), increased in individuals kept in 20 salinity (8.4 micromol P(i )mg(-)(1 )protein h(-)(1)) and were highest in isopods acclimated to 15 salinity (18.2 micromol P(i )mg(-)(1 )protein h(-)(1)). When specimens were transferred from 30 to 40 salinity, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity increased in the posterior endopodites. The electrophysiological and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity measurements show that active electrogenic ion transport in this species occurs almost exclusively in posterior endopodites 3-5. The endopodite of the fifth pleopod of I. baltica exhibited a microscopic structure remarkably similar to that described for the lamellae of the phyllobranchiae of brachyurans. It is composed of two opposed epithelial

  9. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  10. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  11. Dosimetry for the MRI accelerator: the impact of a magnetic field on the response of a Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Meijsing, I; Raaymakers, B W; Raaijmakers, A J E; Kok, J G M; Hogeweg, L; Liu, B; Lagendijk, J J W

    2009-05-21

    The UMC Utrecht is constructing a 1.5 T MRI scanner integrated with a linear accelerator (Lagendijk et al 2008 Radiother. Oncol. 86 25-9). The goal of this device is to facilitate soft-tissue contrast based image-guided radiotherapy, in order to escalate the dose to the tumour while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Dosimetry for the MRI accelerator has to be performed in the presence of a magnetic field. This paper investigates the feasibility of using a Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber for absolute dosimetry. The impact of the mcagnetic field on the response of this ionization chamber has been measured and simulated using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. Two orientations of the ionization chamber with respect to the incident beam and the magnetic field which are feasible in the MRI accelerator configuration are taken into account. Measurements are performed using a laboratory magnet ranging from 0 to 1.2 T. In the simulations a range from 0 to 2 T is used. For both orientations, the measurements and simulations agreed within the uncertainty of the measurements and simulations. In conclusion, the response of the ionization chamber as a function of the magnetic field is understood and can be simulated using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. The response of visco-elastic crust and mantle to the inflation/deflation of magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to quantitatively evaluate how magmatic activities at depth are reflected in geodetically (GPS and/or InSAR) observed surface deformation in order to distinguish magma-induced crustal deformation. This study employs 3-D finite element model to examine response of the linear Maxwell visco-elastic crust and mantle to a development of sill. Models with instantaneous and/or time-dependent inflation/deflation of sill at various depths in the crust have predicted geodetically detectable surface deformation, providing important constraints on spatio-temporal-scale of magmatic activities. Instantaneous inflation of sill in the crust causes the surface uplift. The amplitude and wavelength of the uplift are amplified for shallower and deeper inflations, respectively. The inflation occurred over a greater horizontal extent intensify both the amplitude and wavelength. The inflation-induced surface uplift would however abate with time by visco-elastic relaxation. Any signature of sill would disappear in ~ 50 - 100 times Maxwell relaxation time of the crust unless the inflation occurred within the uppermost layer that effectively acts as elastic layer. Time-dependent inflation accompanies with visco-elastic relaxation, and the inflation having occurred over the time-scale of ~ 50 - 100 times crustal relaxation time would provide insignificant signature at the surface, which in turn tells us that crustal deformation would reflect the development of magma chamber only if it has occurred in that time-scale. This study also has found that an ascent of magma into shallower depth may be recognised by an observation such that a horizontal extent over which the surface uplift is progressively intensified focusses into a narrower region.

  13. Cost-effective pediatric head and body phantoms for computed tomography dosimetry and its evaluation using pencil ion chamber and CT dose profiler.

    PubMed

    Saravanakumar, A; Vaideki, K; Govindarajan, K N; Jayakumar, S; Devanand, B

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a pediatric head and body phantom was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at a low cost when compared to commercially available phantoms for the purpose of computed tomography (CT) dosimetry. The dimensions of head and body phantoms were 10 cm diameter, 15 cm length and 16 cm diameter, 15 cm length, respectively. The dose from a 128-slice CT machine received by the head and body phantom at the center and periphery were measured using a 100 mm pencil ion chamber and 150 mm CT dose profiler (CTDP). Using these values, the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) and in turn the volumetric CTDI (CTDIv) were calculated for various combinations of tube voltage and current-time product. A similar study was carried out using standard calibrated phantom and the results have been compared with the fabricated ones to ascertain that the performance of the latter is equivalent to that of the former. Finally, CTDIv measured using fabricated and standard phantoms were compared with respective values displayed on the console. The difference between the values was well within the limits specified by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), India. These results indicate that the cost-effective pediatric phantom can be employed for CT dosimetry.

  14. Cost-effective pediatric head and body phantoms for computed tomography dosimetry and its evaluation using pencil ion chamber and CT dose profiler

    PubMed Central

    Saravanakumar, A.; Vaideki, K.; Govindarajan, K. N.; Jayakumar, S.; Devanand, B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a pediatric head and body phantom was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at a low cost when compared to commercially available phantoms for the purpose of computed tomography (CT) dosimetry. The dimensions of head and body phantoms were 10 cm diameter, 15 cm length and 16 cm diameter, 15 cm length, respectively. The dose from a 128-slice CT machine received by the head and body phantom at the center and periphery were measured using a 100 mm pencil ion chamber and 150 mm CT dose profiler (CTDP). Using these values, the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) and in turn the volumetric CTDI (CTDIv) were calculated for various combinations of tube voltage and current-time product. A similar study was carried out using standard calibrated phantom and the results have been compared with the fabricated ones to ascertain that the performance of the latter is equivalent to that of the former. Finally, CTDIv measured using fabricated and standard phantoms were compared with respective values displayed on the console. The difference between the values was well within the limits specified by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), India. These results indicate that the cost-effective pediatric phantom can be employed for CT dosimetry. PMID:26500404

  15. SU-E-T-448: On the Perturbation Factor P-cav of the Markus Parallel Plate Ion Chambers in Clinical Electron Beams, Monte Carlo Based Reintegration of An Historical Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Zink, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: All present dosimetry protocols recommend well-guarded parallel-plate ion chambers for electron dosimetry. For the guard-less Markus chamber an energy dependent fluence perturbation correction pcav is given. This perturbation correction was experimentally determined by van der Plaetsen by comparison of the read-out of a Markus and a NACP chamber, which was assumed to be “perturbation-free”. Aim of the present study is a Monte Carlo based reiteration of this experiment. Methods: Detailed models of four parallel-plate chambers (Roos, Markus, NACP and Advanced Markus) were designed using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc and placed in a water phantom. For all chambers the dose to the active volume filled with low density water was calculated for 13 clinical electron spectra (E{sub 0}=6-21 MeV) at the depth of maximum and at the reference depth under reference conditions. In all cases the chamber's reference point was positioned at the depth of measurement. Moreover, the dose to water DW was calculated in a small water voxel positioned at the same depth. Results: The calculated dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus}, which according to van der Plaetsen reflects the fluence perturbation correction of the Markus chamber, deviates less from unity than the values given by van der Plaetsen's but exhibits a similar energy dependence. The same holds for the dose ratios of the other well guarded chambers. But, in comparison to water, the Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation correction which is nearly energy independent at both investigated depths. Conclusion: The simulations principally confirm the energy dependence of the dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus} as published by van der Plaetsen. But, as shown by our simulations of the ratio D{sub W}/D{sub Markus}, the conclusion drawn in all dosimetry protocols is questionable: in contrast to all well-guarded chambers the guard-less Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation correction and

  16. Study of the single cluster response of a helium-isobutane drift chamber prototype using 8 keV X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoto, G.; Dabagov, S.; Hampai, D.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Voena, C.; Zullo, A.

    2015-03-01

    The identification of single clusters in the electronic signals produced by ionizing particles within a drift chamber is expected to significantly improve the performances of this kind of detectors in terms of particle identification capabilities and space resolution. In order to develop refined cluster recognition algorithms, it is essential to measure the response of the chamber and its electronics to single ionization clusters. This can be done by irradiating the chamber with X-rays. We report here on the studies performed on a drift chamber prototype for the MEG-II experiment at the X-ray facility of the INFN Frascati's National Laboratories ``XLab Frascati''. The prototype is operated with a helium-isobutane mixture and instrumented with high bandwidth custom pre-amplifiers. The results of this study have been used to develop an innovative method for cluster recognition, based on the Wiener filter technique, which has been tested on data collected at the Frascati's Beam Test Facility. As a side measurement, we also performed a study of the gas gain in a configuration which is similar to that of the MEG-II experiment.

  17. Roles of Ion Channels in the Environmental Responses of Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, Takuya; Kawano, Tomonori; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Sokabe, Masahiro

    When plant cells are exposed to environmental stresses or perceive internal signal molecules involved in growth and development, ion channels are transiently activated to convert these stimuli into intracellular signals. Among the ions taken up by plant cells, Ca2+ plays an essential role as an intracellular second messenger in plants; the cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) is therefore strictly regulated. Signal transduction pathways mediated by changes in [Ca2+]c - termed Ca2+ signaling - are initiated by the activation of Ca2+-permeable channels in many cases. To date, a large body of electrophysiological and recent molecular biological studies have revealed that plants possess Ca2+ channels belonging to distinct types with different gating mechanisms, and a variety of genes for Ca2+-permeable channels have been isolated and functionally characterized. Topics in this chapter focus on long-distance signal translocation in plants and the characteristics of a variety of plant Ca2+-permeable channels including voltage-dependent Ca2+-permeable channels, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels, ionotropic glutamate receptors and mechanosensitive channels. We discuss their roles in environmental responses and in the regulation of growth and development.

  18. Responses of soybeans and wheat to elevated CO2 in free-air and open top chamber systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing demand for agricultural products, more confidence is needed concerning impacts of rising atmospheric CO2 on crop yields. Despite debate about the merits of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) and open top chamber (OTC) systems, there has been only one reported experiment directly compari...

  19. TH-C-19A-01: Analytic Design Method to Make a 2D Planar, Segmented Ion Chamber Water-Equivalent for Proton Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W; Hollebeek, R; Teo, B; Maughan, R; Dolney, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quality Assurance (QA) measurements of proton therapy fields must accurately measure steep longitudinal dose gradients as well as characterize the dose distribution laterally. Currently, available devices for two-dimensional field measurements perturb the dose distribution such that routine QA measurements performed at multiple depths require multiple field deliveries and are time consuming. Methods: A design procedure for a two-dimensional detector array is introduced whereby the proton energy loss and scatter are adjusted so that the downstream dose distribution is maintained to be equivalent to that which would occur in uniform water. Starting with the design for an existing, functional two-dimensional segmented ion chamber prototype, a compensating material is introduced downstream of the detector to simultaneously equate the energy loss and lateral scatter in the detector assembly to the values in water. An analytic formalism and procedure is demonstrated to calculate the properties of the compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. The resulting design is validated with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: With respect to the specific prototype design considered, the results indicate that a graphite compensating layer of the proper dimensions can yield proton beam range perturbation less than 0.1mm and beam sigma perturbation less than 2% across the energy range of therapeutic proton beams. Conclusion: We have shown that, for a 2D gas-filled detector array, a graphite-compensating layer can balance the energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering relative to uniform water. We have demonstrated an analytic formalism and procedure to determine a compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-04-2-0022. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations

  20. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  1. Calibration and performance of a secondary emission chamber as a beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sivertz, M.; Chiang, I-H,; Rusek, A.

    2011-03-28

    We report on a study of the behavior of a secondary emission chamber (SEC). We show the dependence of the SEC signal on the charge and velocity of the primary beam for beams of protons, and heavy ions including Helium, Neon, Chlorine and Iron. We fill the SEC with a selection of different gases including Hydrogen, Helium, Nitrogen, Argon, and air, studying the SEC response when it is acting as an ion chamber. We also investigate the behavior of the SEC at intermediate pressures between 10{sup -8} torr and atmospheric pressure. The SEC uses thin conducting foils as the source and collector of electrons in a vacuum chamber. When charged particles traverse the vacuum chamber, they pass through a series of thin conducting foils, alternating anode and cathode. Ionization produced in the cathode foils travels across the intervening gap due to an applied high voltage and is collected on the anode foils. Electron production is very inefficient because most of the ionization in the foils remains trapped within the foil due to the short range of most delta-rays and the work function of the foil. It is this inefficiency that allows the SEC to operate at high dose rates and short pulse duration where the standard ion chambers cannot function reliably. The SEC was placed in the NSRL ion beam to receive a variety of heavy ion beams under different beam conditions. We used these ion beams to study the response of the SEC to different species of heavy ion, comparing with proton beams. We studied the response to beam of different energies, and as a function of different counting rate. We compared the behaviour of the SEC when operating under positive and negative high voltage. The SEC can operate as an ion chamber if it is filled with gas. We measured the response of the SEC when filled with a variety of gases, from Hydrogen to Helium, Nitrogen, Argon and air. The performance of the SEC as an ion chamber is compared with the standard NSRL ion chamber, QC3. By evacuating the SEC and

  2. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  3. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used

  4. Oxygen ion response to proton bursty bulk flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Hans; Hamrin, Maria; Pitkänen, Timo; Karlsson, Tomas; Slapak, Rikard; Andersson, Laila; Gunell, Herbert; Schillings, Audrey; Vaivads, Andris

    2016-08-01

    We have used Cluster spacecraft data from the years 2001 to 2005 to study how oxygen ions respond to bursty bulk flows (BBFs) as identified from proton data. We here define bursty bulk flows as periods of proton perpendicular velocities more than 100 km/s and a peak perpendicular velocity in the structure of more than 200 km/s, observed in a region with plasma beta above 1 in the near-Earth central tail region. We find that during proton BBFs only a minor increase in the O+ velocity is seen. The different behavior of the two ion species is further shown by statistics of H+ and O+ flow also outside BBFs: For perpendicular earthward velocities of H+ above about 100 km/s, the O+ perpendicular velocity is consistently lower, most commonly being a few tens of kilometers per second earthward. In summary, O+ ions in the plasma sheet experience less acceleration than H+ ions and are not fully frozen in to the magnetic field. Therefore, H+ and O+ motion is decoupled, and O+ ions have a slower earthward motion. This is particularly clear during BBFs. This may add further to the increased relative abundance of O+ ions in the plasma sheet during magnetic storms. The data indicate that O+ is typically less accelerated in association with plasma sheet X lines as compared to H+.

  5. ION SOURCE FOR A CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1959-04-14

    This patcnt relates to calutron devices and deals particularly with the mechanism used to produce the beam of ions wherein a charge material which is a vapor at room temperature is used. A charge container located outside the tank is connected through several conduits to various points along the arc chamber of the ion source. In addition, the rate of flow of the vapor to the arc chamber is controlled by a throttle valve in each conduit. By this arrangement the arc can be regulated accurately and without appreciable time lag, inasmuch as the rate of vapor flow is immediately responsive to the manipulation of the throttle valves.

  6. Ionospheric Plasma Outflow in Response to Transverse Ion Heating: Self-Consistent Macroscopic Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1995-01-01

    During the grant period starting July 1, 1994, our major effort has been on the following two problems: (1) Temporal behavior of heavy Oxygen ion outflow in response to a transverse heating event; and (2) Continued effort on ion heating by lower hybrid waves. We briefly describe here the research performed under these topics.

  7. Non-Targeted Effects and the Dose Response for Heavy Ion Tumorigenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    There is no human epidemiology data available to estimate the heavy ion cancer risks experienced by astronauts in space. Studies of tumor induction in mice are a necessary step to estimate risks to astronauts. Previous experimental data can be better utilized to model dose response for heavy ion tumorigenesis and plan future low dose studies.

  8. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  9. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-10-01

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions in a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.

  10. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    DOE PAGES

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-08-15

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions inmore » a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Lastly, simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.« less

  11. Effect of nebulizer/spray chamber interfaces on simultaneous, axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the direct determination of As and Se species separated by ion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettar, Raquel T.; Smichowski, Patricia; Garavaglia, Ricardo N.; Farías, Silvia; Batistoni, Daniel A.

    2005-06-01

    Different nebulizer/expansion chamber combinations were evaluated to assess their performance for sample introduction in the direct coupling with an axial view inductively coupled plasma multielement spectrometer for on-line determination of As and Se species previously separated by ion exchange-high performance liquid chromatography. The column effluents were injected into the plasma without prior derivatization. The instrument operation software was adapted for data acquisition and processing to allow multi-wavelength recording of the transient chromatographic peaks. After optimization of the chromatographic operating conditions, separation of mixtures of inorganic As and Se species, and of inorganic and two organic As species (monomethylarsonic and dimethylarsinic acids), was achieved with excellent resolution. Species discrimination from mixtures of As and Se oxyanions was further improved by the simultaneous element detection at specific analytical wavelengths. Three nebulizers and three spray chambers, employed in seven combinations, were tested as interfaces. Concentric nebulizers associated to a glass cyclonic chamber appear most suitable regarding sensitivity and signal to noise ratio. Measured element detection limits (3 σ) were around 10 ng ml - 1 for all the species considered, making the method a viable alternative to similar procedures that employ volatile hydride generation previous to sample injection into the plasma. Analytical recoveries both for inorganic and organic species ranged between 92 and 107%. The method was demonstrated to be apt for the analysis of surface waters potentially subjected to natural contamination with arsenic.

  12. Time response of O to a weak transverse ion heating event in the polar ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1996-03-01

    Time response of O+ ions to transverse ion heating in the polar ionosphere is studied by means of a particle code. Here we deal with relatively low levels of heating over a few minutes yielding superthermal ions energized up to a few eV. Under the influence of the upward mirror and downward gravitational forces, most of the heated ions are trapped between the topside ionosphere and some high altitude depending on their perpendicular energies. A few ions with sufficiently large perpendicular energy escape the gravitational pull, and the flux of such ions increases with the heating level. The trapped ions bounce back and forth. During the first upward transit of the heated ions, the transient outflux from the topside ionosphere is as large as 107 ionscm-2s-1 and it subsequently decays to quite small values in a few tens of minutes. A large transient outflux (~3×108 ionscm-2s-1) consisting of unheated ions develops even below the heating region, lasting over just a few minutes. As the ions having relatively large energies continue their upward journey, and the less energetic ones begin to fall down, the O+ drift velocity ranges from a relatively large negative value (downward) just above the dense O+ plasma in the topside ionosphere to a large positive value at high altitudes. Substantial flux of downward moving ions is also seen. During subsequent upward motions, the bouncing ions form a well-defined, quite sharp expansion front. The bounce motion generates a succession of plateau formation over a period of several hours in response to a brief heating period of just a few minutes. This leads to nearly periodic oscillations in local densities, with the oscillation period increasing with altitude. In a time of about one day, the oscillations in the density cease due to the spatial dispersion of the heated ions having differing initial energies. Eventually the O+ density profile becomes nearly stable but remains extended with significantly enhanced O+ density at high

  13. In vivo photodynamic effects of phthalocyanines in a skin-fold observation chamber model: role of central metal ion and degree of sulfonation.

    PubMed

    van Leengoed, H L; van der Veen, N; Versteeg, A A; Ouellet, R; van Lier, J E; Star, W M

    1993-10-01

    Six sulfonated metallophthalocyanines, chelated with either aluminum or zinc and sulfonated to different degrees, were studied in vivo for their photodynamic activity in a rat skin-fold chamber model. The chamber, located on the back of female WAG/Rij rats, contained a syngeneic mammary carcinoma implanted into a layer of subcutaneous tissue. Twenty-four hours after intravenous administration of 2.5 mumol/kg of one of the dyes, the chambers received a treatment light dose of 600 J/cm2 with monochromatic light of 675 nm at a power density of 100 mW/cm2. During light delivery and up to a period of 7 days after treatment, vascular effects of tumor and normal tissue were scored. Tumor cell viability was determined by histology and by reimplantation of the chamber contents into the skin of the same animal, either 2 h after treatment or after the 7 day observation period. Vascular effects of both tumor and subcutaneous tissue were strongest with dyes with the lowest degree of sulfonation and decreased with increasing degree of sulfonation. Tumor regrowth did not occur with aluminum phthalocyanine mono- and disulfonate and with zinc phthalocyanine monosulfonate. With the protocol that was used, complete necrosis without recovery was only observed when reimplantation took place at the end of the 7 day follow-up period. Reimplantation 2 h after treatment always resulted in tumor regrowth. At this interval, the presence of viable tumor cells was confirmed histologically. In general tumor tissue vasculature was more susceptible to photodynamic damage than vasculature of the normal tissue. The effect on the circulation of both tumor and normal tissue increased with decreasing degree of sulfonation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the blowout regime of laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Popov, K I; Rozmus, W; Bychenkov, V Yu; Naseri, N; Capjack, C E; Brantov, A V

    2010-11-01

    The ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the so called bubble or blowout regime of a laser-plasma accelerator is discussed. In response to the strong fields of the accelerated electrons the ions form a central filament along the laser axis that can be compressed to densities 2 orders of magnitude higher than the initial particle density. A theory of the filament formation and a model of ion self-compression are proposed. It is also shown that in the case of a sharp rear plasma-vacuum interface the ions can be accelerated by a combination of three basic mechanisms. The long time ion evolution that results from the strong electrostatic fields of an electron bunch provides a unique diagnostic of laser-plasma accelerators.

  15. Responses of a direct ion storage dosimeter (DIS-1) to heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H

    2001-12-01

    The responses of a direct ion storage dosimeter (DIS-1) to energetic heavy charged particles were examined using (4)He, (12)C, (40)Ar and (56)Fe ion beams at the HIMAC at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The efficiency of the DIS-1 on the basis of absorbed dose was almost unity for the helium and carbon ions and was slightly decreased for the argon and iron ions. The linearity in the dose response and the angular independence for these heavy ions were fairly good. Although further studies are necessary, these results suggest that the DIS-1 would be a suitable passive dosimeter for measurements of absorbed dose in a field dominated by heavy charged particles such as the space environment. PMID:11741505

  16. Portable Hyperbaric Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, James P. (Inventor); DeLaFuente, Horacio (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A portable, collapsible hyperbaric chamber was developed. A toroidal inflatable skeleton provides initial structural support for the chamber, allowing the attendant and/or patient to enter the chamber. Oval hatches mate against bulkhead rings, and the hyperbaric chamber is pressurized. The hatches seal against an o-ring, and the internal pressure of the chamber provides the required pressure against the hatch to maintain an airtight seal. In the preferred embodiment, the hyperbaric chamber has an airlock to allow the attendant to enter and exit the patient chamber during treatment. Visual communication is provided through portholes in the patient and/or airlock chamber. Life monitoring and support systems are in communication with the interior of the hyperbaric chamber and/or airlock chamber through conduits and/or sealed feed-through connectors into the hyperbaric chamber.

  17. Interaction of (12)C ions with the mouse retinal response to light.

    PubMed

    Carozzo, Simone; Ball, Sherry L; Narici, Livio; Schardt, Dieter; Sannita, Walter G

    2015-06-26

    Astronauts in orbit reported phosphenes varying in shape and orientation across the visual field; incidence was correlated with the radiation flux. Patients with skull tumors treated by (12)C ions and volunteers whose posterior portion of the eye was exposed to highly ionizing particles in early studies reported comparable percepts. An origin in radiation activating the visual system is suggested. Bursts (∼ 4 ms) of (12)C ions evoked electrophysiological mass responses comparable to those to light in the retina of anesthetized wild-type mice at threshold flux intensities consistent with the incidence observed in humans. The retinal response amplitude increased in mice with ion intensity to a maximum at ∼ 2000 ions/burst, to decline at higher intensities; the inverted-U relationship suggests complex effects on retinal structures. Here, we show that bursts of (12)C ions presented simultaneously to white light stimuli reduced the presynaptic mass response to light in the mouse retina, while increasing the postsynaptic retinal and cortical responses amplitude and the phase-locking to stimulus of cortical low frequency and gamma (∼ 25-45 Hz) responses. These findings suggest (12)C ions to interfere with, rather than mimicking the light action on photoreceptors; a parallel action on other retinal structures/mechanisms resulting in cortical activation is conceivable. Electrophysiological visual testing appears applicable to monitor the radiation effects and in designing countermeasures to prevent functional visual impairment during operations in space. PMID:25956035

  18. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  19. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-02-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  20. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams.

  1. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  2. Control Effect of a Large Geological Discontinuity on the Seismic Response and Stability of Underground Rock Caverns: A Case Study of the Baihetan #1 Surge Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhen; Sheng, Qian; Leng, Xianlun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the seismic stability of the #1 surge chamber of the Baihetan hydropower plant, which is influenced by a large dominating geological discontinuity [the interlayer shear weakness zone (ISWZ) C2)], is studied. An advanced, nonlinear, continuously yielding (CY) model was adopted to describe the complex mechanical properties of ISWZ C2. This model considers a power function type, normal stress dependent behavior and the progressive damage that occurred during shear tests. The applicability of the CY model is proved via a comparison with field test results and the theoretical solution. Verification work was conducted in 3DEC code to show that the 3DEC software is suitable for implementing this model. Three ground motion waveforms were utilized to conduct a seismic analysis of the #1 surge chamber after a special response spectrum matching process. The seismic analysis confirmed the control effect of ISWZ C2 on the seismic stability of the cavern. The majority of the cavern's seismic displacement consists of elastic body movement, while the plastic deformation is relatively limited. Further, most of the deformations were caused by the contact deformation of C2. For the contact deformation of C2, the magnitude of permanent shear deformation is larger than that of the normal deformation. The magnitude of permanent shear deformation is more notable along the strike direction of C2, and the permanent normal displacement n of C2 mainly occurs along the dip direction of C2. Finally, the seismic stability of the cavern is assessed via the overload method. The seismic safety factor of the cavern is approximately 2-3.

  3. Osteoblastic cell response and bone formation of phosphate ion coated on plasma polymerized Ti surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seong-Won; Lee, Kang; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the bone formation ability and cell response on a phosphate (PO3(4-)) ion exchanged amine plasma polymerized titanium (Ti) surface. The enhanced bone-like apatite (hydroxyapatite, HAp)-forming ability was attributed to the PO3(4-) ion exchanged amine plasma polymerized Ti (P/NH2/Ti) surface, which was formed by the reduction of PO3(4-) ions. PO3(4-) ions promote HAp nucleation and growth on Ti in SBF, and PO3(4-) ions improve the crystallinity of the HAp deposited layer. The cell viability tests revealed significantly greater cell viability on the P/NH2/Ti surfaces than on the other surfaces.

  4. Protein-responsive assemblies from catechol-metal ion supramolecular coordination.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C; Chen, J; Yu, S; Chang, Y; Mao, J; Xu, Y; Luo, W; Zeng, B; Dai, L

    2015-03-21

    Supramolecular self-assembly driven by catechol-metal ion coordination has gained great success in the fabrication of functional materials including adhesives, capsules, coatings and hydrogels. However, this route has encountered a great challenge in the construction of nanoarchitectures in the absence of removable templates, because of the uncontrollable crosslinking of catechol-metal ion coordination. Herein, we show that a supramolecular approach, combining both catechol-metal ion coordination and polymer self-assembly together, can organize polymers into hybrid nanoassemblies ranging from solid particles, homogeneous vesicles to Janus vesicles. Without the introduction of a specific binding ligand or complicated molecular design, these assemblies can totally disassemble in response to proteins. UV/vis absorption, fluorescence quenching and recovery investigations have confirmed that proteins can seize metal ions from the hybrid nanoassemblies, thus causing the degradation of catechol-metal ion coordination networks.

  5. Caging Metal Ions with Visible Light-Responsive Nanopolymersomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polymersomes are bilayer vesicles that self-assemble from amphiphilic diblock copolymers, and provide an attractive system for the delivery of biological and nonbiological molecules due to their environmental compatibility, mechanical stability, synthetic tunability, large aqueous core, and hyperthick hydrophobic membrane. Herein, we report a nanoscale photoresponsive polymersome system featuring a meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged bis[(porphinato)zinc] (PZn2) fluorophore hydrophobic membrane solute and dextran in the aqueous core. Upon 488 nm irradiation in solution or in microinjected zebrafish embryos, the polymersomes underwent deformation, as monitored by a characteristic red-shifted PZn2 emission spectrum and confirmed by cryo-TEM. The versatility of this system was demonstrated through the encapsulation and photorelease of a fluorophore (FITC), as well as two different metal ions, Zn2+ and Ca2+. PMID:25518002

  6. Caging metal ions with visible light-responsive nanopolymersomes.

    PubMed

    Griepenburg, Julianne C; Sood, Nimil; Vargo, Kevin B; Williams, Dewight; Rawson, Jeff; Therien, Michael J; Hammer, Daniel A; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2015-01-20

    Polymersomes are bilayer vesicles that self-assemble from amphiphilic diblock copolymers, and provide an attractive system for the delivery of biological and nonbiological molecules due to their environmental compatibility, mechanical stability, synthetic tunability, large aqueous core, and hyperthick hydrophobic membrane. Herein, we report a nanoscale photoresponsive polymersome system featuring a meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged bis[(porphinato)zinc] (PZn2) fluorophore hydrophobic membrane solute and dextran in the aqueous core. Upon 488 nm irradiation in solution or in microinjected zebrafish embryos, the polymersomes underwent deformation, as monitored by a characteristic red-shifted PZn2 emission spectrum and confirmed by cryo-TEM. The versatility of this system was demonstrated through the encapsulation and photorelease of a fluorophore (FITC), as well as two different metal ions, Zn(2+) and Ca(2+).

  7. Interaction of heavy ions with nuclear chromatin: Spatiotemporal investigations of biological responses in a cellular environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, B.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2006-04-01

    Ion beams offer the possibility to generate strictly localized DNA lesions within subregions of a cell nucleus. The distribution of the ion-induced damage can be indirectly visualized by immunocytochemical detection of repair-related proteins as radiation-induced foci. The proteins analyzed here were the double-strand break marker γ-H2AX, the excision repair and replication protein PCNA and the cell cycle regulator CDKN1A. A newly developed adjustable sample holder is now used to apply an irradiation geometry characterized by a small angle between the plane of the cellular monolayer and the incoming ion beam. This allows the spatial analysis of protein accumulations along ion trajectories, revealing an unexpected clustering after irradiation with low-energy zinc ions. The patterns of protein aggregation observed show considerable intrinsic variability, but similar patterns of protein clustering were obtained for functionally different proteins irrespective of the type of ion beam applied, confirming previous observations for lower and higher LET beams. Foci sizes within ion tracks were found to be larger for γ-H2AX foci in comparison to CDKN1A foci, in agreement with the known histone H2AX phosphorylation response. The results suggest that not the pattern of dose deposition but the underlying chromatin structure determines the distribution of protein clusters along tracks. Therefore, the requirement of time-lapse studies using live cells is emphasized for future studies on chromatin movement as a potential component of the DNA damage response.

  8. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  9. Calibration of BAS-TR image plate response to high energy (3-300 MeV) carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, D.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Fernandez, J.; Cerchez, M.; Gray, R. J.; Hanton, F.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Neely, D.; Romagnani, L.; Ruiz, J. A.; Sarri, G.; Scullion, C.; Streeter, M.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the calibration of Fuji BAS-TR image plate (IP) response to high energy carbon ions of different charge states by employing an intense laser-driven ion source, which allowed access to carbon energies up to 270 MeV. The calibration method consists of employing a Thomson parabola spectrometer to separate and spectrally resolve different ion species, and a slotted CR-39 solid state detector overlayed onto an image plate for an absolute calibration of the IP signal. An empirical response function was obtained which can be reasonably extrapolated to higher ion energies. The experimental data also show that the IP response is independent of ion charge states.

  10. A numerical model of initial recombination for high-LET irradiation: Application to liquid-filled ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model of initial recombination in media irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) ions, which relies on an amorphous track model of ionization of high LET particles, and diffusion, drift and recombination of ionized charge carriers. The model has fundamental applications for the study of recombination in non-polar liquids, as well as practical ones, like in modelling hadrontherapy dosimetry with ionization chambers. We have used it to study the response of liquid-filled ionization chambers to hadrontherapy beams: dependence of initial recombination on ion species, energy and applied external electric field.

  11. Intrinsic slow charge response in the perovskite solar cells: Electron and ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jiangjian; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Huiyin; Luo, Yanhong; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo

    2015-10-19

    The intrinsic charge response and hysteresis characteristic in the perovskite solar cell has been investigated by an electrically modulated transient photocurrent technology. An ultraslow charge response process in the timescale of seconds is observed, which can be well explained by the ion migration in the perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} film driven by multiple electric fields derived from the heterojunction depletion charge, the external modulation, and the accumulated ion charge. Furthermore, theoretical calculation of charge transport reveals that the hysteresis behavior is also significantly influenced by the interfacial charge extraction velocity and the carrier transport properties inside the cell.

  12. The responses of Petunia to simulated pollutants in chamber conditions and its uses as bioindicator of pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguntimehin, I. I.; Kondo, H.; Sakugawa, H. H.

    2010-12-01

    Plants damage that results from air pollution are often confused with plant diseases, nutritional deficiency or natural senescence. Bio-indicating plants are used to obtain the direct identification of air pollutants on plants and determine the geographical distribution of pollutants. The responses of two varieties of Petunia (purple and white) to ten treatments including fumigated ozone (‘O’AOT40 28.2 ppm h), 10 µM fluoranthene ‘F’ and H2SO4 (‘A’ pH 3) mist, MQ water sprayed on plants as control ‘C’ with other mixtures were investigated in 30 d under controlled conditions. Also, a 1:1 mixture of Na2S2O3 and 1mM NaOOCCC6H5 form part of the treatments and was used as scavenging solution ‘S’ against Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Eco-physiological traits are leaf chlorophyll, carotenoids contents and chlorophyll fluorescence. Metal analysis was by ICP-AES, Histochemical analysis using 3’3-diaminobenzidine (DAB)-HCl, combined with Evans blue staining procedure for hydrogen peroxide deposition and dead cell portion of leaves. Plants health determined as SPAD chlorophyll values at 7, 14, 21 and 28 d of treatments (DOT) were significantly reduced after 28 DOT for the petunia . Chlorophyll depreciation ‘CD’ was > 40% in purple petunia for the ‘O’ containing treatments, < 25% for other treatments and ≈ 10% for ‘C’ whereas it ranged from 25-28% in ‘O’ containing treatments, < 20% for other treatments and 10% for ‘C’. A derivative to assess plant health status by the variation of the ratio (total chlorophyll content: carotenoids) against CD was obtained. Higher R2 value for this derivative in the white petunia suggested that though the leaf of purple petunia indicated higher sensitivity to ozone than the white, white petunia is a better bio-indicator of the stresses examined from the present study. Also, the leaf chlorophyll fluorescence showed higher significant values in the ‘O’ containing and the other treatments in the

  13. Sensitive detection of copper ions via ion-responsive fluorescence quenching of engineered porous silicon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jangsun; Hwang, Mintai P.; Choi, Moonhyun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Hong, Jinkee; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been a problem since the advent of modern transportation, which despite efforts to curb emissions, continues to play a critical role in environmental pollution. Copper ions (Cu2+), in particular, are one of the more prevalent metals that have widespread detrimental ramifications. From this perspective, a simple and inexpensive method of detecting Cu2+ at the micromolar level would be highly desirable. In this study, we use porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs), obtained via anodic etching of Si wafers, as a basis for undecylenic acid (UDA)- or acrylic acid (AA)-mediated hydrosilylation. The resulting alkyl-terminated porous silicon nanoparticles (APS NPs) have enhanced fluorescence stability and intensity, and importantly, exhibit [Cu2+]-dependent quenching of fluorescence. After determining various aqueous sensing conditions for Cu2+, we demonstrate the use of APS NPs in two separate applications – a standard well-based paper kit and a portable layer-by-layer stick kit. Collectively, we demonstrate the potential of APS NPs in sensors for the effective detection of Cu2+. PMID:27752120

  14. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  15. Utilizing Chamber Data for Developing and Validating Climate Change Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Controlled environment chambers (e.g. growth chambers, SPAR chambers, or open-top chambers) are useful for measuring plant ecosystem responses to climatic variables and CO2 that affect plant water relations. However, data from chambers was found to overestimate responses of C fluxes to CO2 enrichment. Chamber data may be confounded by numerous artifacts (e.g. sidelighting, edge effects, increased temperature and VPD, etc) and this limits what can be measured accurately. Chambers can be used to measure canopy level energy balance under controlled conditions and plant transpiration responses to CO2 concentration can be elucidated. However, these measurements cannot be used directly in model development or validation. The response of stomatal conductance to CO2 will be the same as in the field, but the measured response must be recalculated in such a manner to account for differences in aerodynamic conductance, temperature and VPD between the chamber and the field.

  16. Anomalous cyclic voltammetric response from pores smaller than ion size by voltage-induced force.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheol-Min; Jung, Hwan Jung; Kim, Yong Jung

    2015-05-15

    Nanoporous carbons, with different micropore size distributions, were prepared based on waste coffee grounds by a chemical activation process in order to elucidate the correlation between desolvated ions and pores smaller than the sizes of ions using an organic electrolyte. The pore structure of the coffee-based nanoporous carbon was strongly dependent on the heat-treatment temperature prior to the activation process. Cyclic voltammograms of the nanoporous carbons mainly dominated by the smaller pore relative to that of the bare ion size clearly showed deviation from an ideal feature of the current response. It was clearly envisaged that even a bare ion of a size larger than the pore size can penetrate into the pore by voltage-induced force. PMID:25668782

  17. Transport properties and electroanalytical response characteristics of drotaverine ion-selective sensors.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, Sergey V

    2005-08-01

    The construction and electroanalytical response characteristics of poly(vinyl chloride) matrix ion-selective sensors (ISSs) for drotaverine hydrochloride are described. The membranes incorporate ion-association complexes of drotaverine with tetraphenylborate, picrate, tetraiodomercurate, tetraiodobismuthate, Reinecke salt, and heteropolycompounds of Keggin structure-molybdophosphoric acid, tungstophosphoric acid, molybdosiliconic acid and tungstosiliconic acid as electroactive materials for ionometric sensor controls. These ISSs have a linear response to drotaverine hydrochloride over the range 8 x 10(-6) to 5 x 10(-2) mol L(-1) with cationic slopes from 51 to 58 mV per concentration decade. These ISSs have a fast response time (up to 1 min), a low determination limit (down to 4.3 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)), good stability (3-5 weeks), and reasonable selectivity. Permeabilities and ion fluxes through a membrane were calculated for major and interfering ions. Dependences of the transport properties of the membranes on the concentrations of the ion exchanger and near-membrane solution and their electrochemical characteristics are presented. The ISSs were used for direct potentiometry and potentiometric titration (sodium tetraphenylborate) of drotaverine hydrochloride. Results with mean accuracy of 99.1+/-1.0% of nominal were obtained which corresponded well to data obtained by use of high-performance liquid chromatography.

  18. Importance of ion bombardment during coverage of Au nanoparticles on their structural features and optical response

    SciTech Connect

    Resta, V.; Peláez, R. J.; Afonso, C. N.

    2014-03-28

    This work studies the changes in the optical response and morphological features of 6 ± 1 nm diameter Au nanoparticles (NPs) when covered by a layer of a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The laser fluence used for ablating the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} target is varied in order to modify the kinetic energy (KE) of the species bombarding the NPs during their coverage. When the ion KE < 200 eV, the structural features and optical properties of the NPs are close to those of uncovered ones. Otherwise, a shift to the blue and a strong damping of the surface plasmon resonance is observed as fluence is increased. There are two processes responsible for these changes, both related to aluminum ions arriving to the substrate during the coverage process, i.e., sputtering of the metal and implantation of aluminum species in the metal. Both processes have been simulated using standard models for ion bombardment, the calculated effective implanted depths allow explaining the observed changes in the optical response, and the use of a size-dependent sputtering coefficient for the Au NPs predicts the experimental sputtering fractions. In spite of the work is based on PLD, the concepts investigated and conclusions can straightforwardly be extrapolated to other physical vapor deposition techniques or processes involving ion bombardment of metal NPs by ions having KE > 200 eV.

  19. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  20. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  1. RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

    1964-01-21

    This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

  2. In vivo fluorescence kinetics of phthalocyanines in a skin-fold observation chamber model: role of central metal ion and degree of sulfonation.

    PubMed

    van Leengoed, H L; van der Veen, N; Versteeg, A A; Ouellet, R; van Lier, J E; Star, W M

    1993-08-01

    The fluorescence pharmacokinetics of a series of metallosulfophthalocyanines, chelated with either aluminum or zinc and sulfonated to different degrees, was studied by fluorescence measurements in vivo. Dyes were administered systemically to female WAG/RIJ rats with an isogeneic mammary carcinoma transplanted into the subcutis in a transparent observation chamber located on their backs. Following an intravenous injection of 2.5 mumol/kg of the dye, fluorescence dynamics was observed up to 7 h postinjection. The phthalocyanines were excited at 610 nm with a power density of 0.1 mW/cm2 without causing photodynamic damage to the vasculature. Fluorescence was detected above 665 nm using a fluorescence imaging system based on an image intensifier. Dye retention in the blood vessels and tumor tissue was expressed as ratios relative to the fluorescence signal of the surrounding subcutaneous tissue. Phthalocyanines chelated with aluminum gave the highest fluorescence signal with tumor-over-subcutis ratios of up to a value of 4. The zinc complexes exhibited the highest vascular-over-subcutis ratios with maximum values exceeding a value of 6. They also displayed the longest retention times in the vascular system of well over 7 h. Overall, decreasing the degree of sulfonation of the metallophthalocyanines results in lower tumor-over-normal tissue fluorescence ratios, and furthermore aluminum-based dyes seem superior tumor localizers over zinc-based dyes. The advantages of phthalocyanines over porphyrins with respect to tumor localization and photodynamic therapy are discussed.

  3. Performance of three pencil-type ionization chambers (10 cm) in computed tomography standard beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Maysa C.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2016-07-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) has increased over the years, thus generating a concern about the doses received by patients undergoing this procedure. Therefore, it is necessary to perform routinely beam dosimetry with the use of a pencil-type ionization chamber. This detector is the most utilized in the procedures of quality control tests on this kind of equipment. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests in standard CT beams, as the saturation curve, polarity effect, ion collection efficiency and linearity of response, using three ionization chambers, one commercial and two developed at the IPEN.

  4. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of ~700,000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  5. The blockade of GABA mediated responses in the frog spinal cord by ammonium ions and furosemide.

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, R A

    1978-01-01

    1. A variety of compounds which are known to block chloride transport in a variety of systems have been examined for their effects on amino acid and synaptic responses in the frog spinal cord in vitro. 2. A number of monocarboxylic aromatic acids, copper sulphate, and acetazolamide had no effect on any of the responses. 3. Ammonium ions blocked the motoneurone hyperpolarizing responses to all the neutral amino acids. In addition it selectively blocked dorsal root potentials and the action of GABA and beta-alanine on primary afferents. 5. Intracellular recording from dorsal root ganglion cells demonstrated that furosemide had little effect on the reversal potential for the GABA response. These results suggest that furosemide acts primarily by blocking the conductance increase elicited by GABA. 6. The results with furosemide provide indirect evidence that chloride ions are involved in generating the GABA depolarizations of primary afferent terminals and dorsal root potentials. PMID:722571

  6. Stream mesocosm response sensitivities to simulated ion stress in produced waters from resource extraction activities

    EPA Science Inventory

    To increase the ecological relevance of laboratory exposures intent on determining species sensitivity to ion stress from resource extraction activities we have conducted several stream mesocosm dosing studies that pair single-species and community-level responses in-situ and all...

  7. Mesocosm Community Response Sensitivities to Specific Conductivity Comprised of Different Major Ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional toxicity test assays have been used to evaluate the relative sensitivity to different major ion mixtures as a proxy for understanding what the response of aquatic species growing in their natural environment would be during exposure to specific conductivity stress ema...

  8. Studying Phototropism Using a Small Growth Chamber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maryanna, F.; Llewellyn, Gerald C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive way to construct two small growth chambers for studying phototropism in the science classroom. One chamber is designed to illustrate how plants grow around obstacles to reach light and the other to illustrate directional light responses. (HM)

  9. Tumor-tracking radiotherapy of moving targets; verification using 3D polymer gel, 2D ion-chamber array and biplanar diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberg, Sofie; Falk, Marianne; Rosenschöld, Per Munck Af; Cattell, Herbert; Gustafsson, Helen; Keall, Paul; Korreman, Stine S.; Medin, Joakim; Nordström, Fredrik; Persson, Gitte; Sawant, Amit; Svatos, Michelle; Zimmerman, Jens; Bäck, Sven ÅJ

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a dosimetric verification of a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC)-based tumor-tracking delivery during respiratory-like motion. The advantage of tumor-tracking radiation delivery is the ability to allow a tighter margin around the target by continuously following and adapting the dose delivery to its motion. However, there are geometric and dosimetric uncertainties associated with beam delivery system constraints and output variations, and several investigations have to be accomplished before a clinical integration of this tracking technique. Two types of delivery were investigated in this study I) a single beam perpendicular to a target with a one dimensional motion parallel to the MLC moving direction, and II) an intensity modulated arc delivery (RapidArc®) with a target motion diagonal to the MLC moving direction. The feasibility study (I) was made using an 2D ionisation chamber array and a true 3D polymer gel. The arc delivery (II) was verified using polymer gel and a biplanar diode array. Good agreement in absorbed dose was found between delivery to a static target and to a moving target with DMLC tracking using all three detector systems. However, due to the limited spatial resolution of the 2D array a detailed comparison was not possible. The RapidArc® plan delivery was successfully verified using the biplanar diode array and true 3D polymer gel, and both detector systems could verify that the DMLC-based tumor-tracking delivery system has a very good ability to account for respiratory target motion.

  10. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  11. Stove with multiple chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Black, A.

    1987-04-21

    A stove is described for burning a solid fuel such as wood. The wall means defines a main air inlet, a combustion gas outlet, and four chambers through which gas passes sequentially from the main air inlet to the combustion gas outlet. The chambers comprises a pre-heat plenum chamber into which the main air inlet opens. A main combustion chamber contains solid fuel to be burned into which gas passes from the pre-heat plenum chamber, a second combustion chamber which is downstream of the main combustion chamber with respect to the flow of gas from the main air inlet to the combustion gas outlet, and a third combustion chamber from which the combustion gas outlet opens. The stove also comprises a plate having a restricted opening for providing communication between the second and third combustion chambers. And a catalytic converter comprises a body of solid material formed with passageways, the body of solid material being fitted in the restricted opening so that gas passes from the second combustion chamber to the third combustion chamber by way of the passageways in the body.

  12. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  13. Thermomechanical response of Large Hadron Collider collimators to proton and ion beam impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Lari, L.; Redaelli, S.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-04-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to accelerate and bring into collision high-energy protons as well as heavy ions. Accidents involving direct beam impacts on collimators can happen in both cases. The LHC collimation system is designed to handle the demanding requirements of high-intensity proton beams. Although proton beams have 100 times higher beam power than the nominal LHC lead ion beams, specific problems might arise in case of ion losses due to different particle-collimator interaction mechanisms when compared to protons. This paper investigates and compares direct ion and proton beam impacts on collimators, in particular tertiary collimators (TCTs), made of the tungsten heavy alloy INERMET® 180. Recent measurements of the mechanical behavior of this alloy under static and dynamic loading conditions at different temperatures have been done and used for realistic estimates of the collimator response to beam impact. Using these new measurements, a numerical finite element method (FEM) approach is presented in this paper. Sequential fast-transient thermostructural analyses are performed in the elastic-plastic domain in order to evaluate and compare the thermomechanical response of TCTs in case of critical beam load cases involving proton and heavy ion beam impacts.

  14. Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niklas, Martin; Abdollahi, Amir; Akselrod, Mark S.; Debus, Jürgen; Jäkel, Oliver; and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u{sup −1}, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 μm and −1.72 μm in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 μm. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions.

  15. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  16. Role of Local Response in Ion Solvation: Born Theory and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Remsing, Richard C; Weeks, John D

    2016-07-01

    The nature of ion solvation has drawn the interest of scientists for over a century, yet a thorough theoretical understanding is still lacking. In this work, we focus on the microscopic origins underlying ionic charge asymmetric and nonlinear response contributions to ion solvation free energies. We first derive an exact expression for the charging component of the ionic free energy, the free energy change when the Coulomb interactions between a fixed ion and the solvent are gradually "turned on". We then introduce the concept of a Gaussian test charge distribution, a generalization of the classical electrostatic point test charge that can be used to probe dielectric response in atomically detailed models. This enables the study of a thermodynamic cycle that isolates a linear and charge-symmetric contribution to the free energy that is well-described by Born-model-like dielectric continuum theories. We give a simple physical derivation of the classic Born model that locally relates the induced charge density in a linear dielectric model to the applied ionic charge distribution. The nonlinear response and charge asymmetric contributions to the ion solvation free energy are then examined in the remaining steps of the cycle and compared to classic thermodynamic cycles for this process using computer simulations. The insights provided by this work will aid the development of quantitative theories for the solvation of charged solutes. PMID:27183036

  17. Covariance images of the primary response from rare gas cluster ions to photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukes, P.; Buxey, A.; Jones, A. B.; Stace, A.

    1997-01-01

    The photoexcitation and fragmentation of rare gas cluster ions can yield large numbers of neutral products which, in turn, exhibit considerable variation in their kinetic energies. In order to interpret such events, a coincidence technique has been used to correlate the arrival times of neutral photofragments at a detector following the photoexcitation of Arn+ and Krn+, for n⩽10. By collecting data from approximately 105 photodissociation events for each type of cluster ion, covariance images have been derived which clearly demonstrate that the initial response to photoexcitation, is the ejection of a single rare gas atom which carries with it between 30% and 60% of the excess energy.

  18. Quantised transistor response to ion channels revealed by nonstationary noise analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Freyseng, C.; Fromherz, P.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the quantised response of a field-effect transistor to molecular ion channels in a biomembrane. HEK293-type cells overexpressing the Shaker B potassium channel were cultured on a silicon chip. An enhanced noise of the transistor is observed when the ion channels are activated. The analysis of the fluctuations in terms of binomial statistics identifies voltage quanta of about 1 μV on the gate. They are attributed to the channel currents that affect the gate voltage according to the Green's function of the cell-chip junction.

  19. Response of potato to discontinuous exposures of atmospheric ethylene: results of a long-term experiment in open-top chambers and crop growth modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueck, Th. A.; Van Dijk, C. J.; Grashoff, C.; Groenwold, J.; Schapendonk, A. H. C. M.; Tonneijck, A. E. G.

    A field experiment in open-top chambers (OTCs) was performed to quantitatively assess the growth and yield response of potato to discontinuous exposures to atmospheric ethylene (200, 400 and 800 ppb, applied twice weekly and 200 and 400 ppb applied 4 times weekly, each for 3 h/event). To evaluate the effect of ethylene on potato tuber yield, a module was developed for an existing crop growth simulation model by incorporating the effects of ethylene on epinasty and photosynthesis. Explorations with the model showed that in a worst case scenario, ethylene-induced epinasty had only a marginal effect on tuber yield. Short-term exposures to ethylene under laboratory conditions inhibited photosynthesis, but it recovered within 48 h. When exposed to ethylene for longer than 12 h, irreversible damage of the photosynthesis apparatus occurred. Exposure to ethylene in the OTCs resulted in epinasty and reduced flowering. The number of flowers on potato decreased with increasing concentrations of ethylene, irrespective of the exposure frequency. Calculations showed that the number of flowers was significantly reduced at ca. 170 ppb ethylene, averaged over the hours of exposure. Ethylene concentrations up to 800 ppb, administered 4 times weekly for 3 h during the growing season, did not affect vegetative growth and yield in fumigated potatoes. Under these experimental conditions, the modified simulation model incorporating the effects of ethylene on epinasty and photosynthesis forecasts a 5% effect on tuber yield at concentrations of 1600 ppb. All results indicate that ethylene concentrations higher than 800 ppb are required to adversely affect tuber yield of potato.

  20. [Open-top Chamber for in situ Research on Response of Mercury Enrichment in Rice to the Rising Gaseous Elemental Mercury in the Atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Wang, Zhang-wei; Zhang, Xiao-shan; Qin, Pu-feng; Lu, Hai-jun

    2015-08-01

    In situ research was conducted on the response of mercury enrichment in rice organs to elevated gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) with open-top chambers (OTCs) fumigation experiment and soil Hg enriched experiment. The results showed that Hg concentrations in roots were generally correlated with soil Hg concentrations (R = 0.9988, P < 0.05) but insignificantly correlated with air Hg concentrations (P > 0.05), indicating that Hg in rice roots was mainly from soil. Hg concentrations in stems increased linearly (R(B) = 0.9646, R(U) = 0.9831, P < 0.05) with elevated GEM, and Hg concentrations in upper stems were usually higher than those in bottom stems in OTCs experiment. Hg concentrations in bottom stems were generally correlated with soil Hg concentrations (R = 0.9901, P < 0.05) and second-order polynomial (R = 0.9989, P < 0.05) was fitted for Hg concentrations in upper stems to soil Hg concentrations, and Hg concentrations in bottom stems were usually higher than those in upper stems in soil Hg enriched experiment, indicating the combining impact of Hg from air and soil on the accumulation of mercury in stems. Hg concentrations in foliage were significantly correlated (P < 0.05) with air Hg and linearly correlated with soil Hg (R = 0.9983, P = 0.0585), implying that mercury in foliage was mainly from air and some of Hg in root from soil was transferred to foliage through stem. Based on the function in these filed experiments, it was estimated that at least 60%-94% and 56%-77% of mercury in foliage and upper-stem of rice was from the atmosphere respectively, and yet only 8%-56% of mercury in bottom-stem was attributed to air. Therefore, mercury in rice aboveground biomass was mainly from the atmosphere, and these results will provide theoretical basis for the regional atmospheric mercury budgets and the model of mercury cycling.

  1. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  2. Magnetic response of magnetic ion-doped nanocrystals: Effects of single Mn2+ impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shun-Jen

    2005-12-01

    We theoretically study the effects of single spin- 5/2 magnetic impurity (Mn2+) on the magnetic response of nanocrystals containing interacting electrons. The energy spectrum and magnetic susceptibility of II-VI spherical nanocrystals as a function of the electron number (Ne=1-8) and the location of Mn2+ ion are calculated by using the configuration interaction method. It is found that the sp-d coupling between the carriers and Mn2+ ion significantly affects the low-field paramagnetism, depending on electron number and the location of the ion. The competition between electron-electron interaction and the sp-d coupling leads to the pronounced anisotropy of magnetic properties, ground state transitions in magnetic field, and the violation of Hund’s second rule.

  3. Small SRS photon field profile dosimetry performed using a PinPoint air ion chamber, a diamond detector, a novel silicon-diode array (DOSI), and polymer gel dosimetry. Analysis and intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Pappas, E; Maris, T G; Zacharopoulou, F; Papadakis, A; Manolopoulos, S; Green, S; Wojnecki, C

    2008-10-01

    Small photon fields are increasingly used in modern radiotherapy and especially in IMRT and SRS/SRT treatments. The uncertainties related to small field profile measurements can introduce significant systematic errors to the overall treatment process. These measurements are challenging mainly due to the absence of charged particle equilibrium conditions, detector size and composition effects, and positioning problems. In this work four different dosimetric methods have been used to measure the profiles of three small 6 MV circular fields having diameters of 7.5, 15.0, and 30.0 mm: a small sensitive volume air ion chamber, a diamond detector, a novel silicon-diode array (DOSI), and vinyl-pyrrolidone based polymer gel dosimeter. The results of this work support the validity of previous findings, suggesting that (a) air ion chambers are not suitable for small field dosimetry since they result in penumbra broadening and require significant corrections due to severe charged particle transport alterations; (b) diamond detectors provide high resolution and rather accurate small field profile measurements, as long as positioning problems can be addressed and the necessary dose rate corrections are correctly applied; and (c) the novel silicon-diode array (DOSI) used in this study seems to be adequate for small field profile measurements overcoming positioning problems. Polymer gel data were assumed as reference data to which the other measurement data were compared both qualitatively and quantitatively using the gamma-index concept. Polymer gels are both phantom and dosimeter, hence there are no beam perturbation effects. In addition, polymer gels are tissue equivalent and can provide high-spatial density and high-spatial resolution measurements without positioning problems, which makes them useful for small field dosimetry measurements. This work emphasizes the need to perform beam profile measurements of small fields (for acceptance, commissioning, treatment planning

  4. Morphological and biochemical responses of Oryza sativa L. (cultivar MR219) to ion beam irradiation*

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Anna Pick Kiong; Ung, Ying Chian; Hussein, Sobri; Harun, Abdul Rahim; Tanaka, Atsushi; Yoshihiro, Hase

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Heavy ion beam, which has emerged as a new mutagen in the mutation breeding of crops and ornamental plants, is expected to result in the induction of novel mutations. This study investigates the morphological and biochemical responses of Oryza sativa toward different doses of carbon ion beam irradiation. Methods: In this study, the dry seeds of O. sativa were irradiated at 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 Gy, followed by in-vitro germination under controlled conditions. Morphological and biochemical studies were conducted to investigate the morphological and physiological responses of O. sativa towards ion beam irradiation. Results: The study demonstrated that low doses (10 Gy) of ion beam have a stimulating effect on the height, root length, and fresh weight of the plantlets but not on the number of leaves. Meanwhile, doses higher than 10 Gy caused reductions in all the morphological parameters studied as compared to the control samples. The highest total soluble protein content [(2.11±0.47) mg/g FW] was observed in plantlets irradiated at 20 Gy. All irradiated plantlets were found to have 0.85% to 58.32% higher specific activity of peroxidase as compared to the control samples. The present study also revealed that low doses of ion beam (10 and 20 Gy) had negligible effect on the total chlorophyll content of O. sativa plantlets while 40 Gy had a stimulating effect on the chlorophyll content. Plantlets irradiated between 40 to 120 Gy were shown to be 0.38% to 9.98% higher in total soluble nitrogen content which, however, was not significantly different from the control samples. Conclusions: Carbon ion beam irradiation administered at low to moderate doses of 10 to 40 Gy may induce O. sativa mutants with superior characteristics. PMID:24302713

  5. Fibroblast Response to Lanthanoid Metal Ion Stimulation: Potential Contribution to Fibrotic Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, William; Perone, Patricia; Walker, Kyle; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; DaSilva, Marissa; Dame, Michael K.; Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare each of the 14 naturally occurring lanthanoid metal ions for ability to stimulate pro-fibrotic responses in human dermal fibroblasts. When fibroblasts were exposed to individual lanthanoids over the concentration range of 1–100 μM, increased proliferation was observed with each of the agents as compared with control cells that were already proliferating rapidly in a growth factor-enriched culture medium. Dose-response differences were observed among the individual metal ions. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels were also increased in response to lanthanoid exposure but type I procollagen production was not. A dose–response relationship between induction of proliferation and increased MMP-1 was observed. Non-lanthanoid transition metal ions (aluminum, copper, cobalt, iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and zinc) were examined in the same assays; there was little stimulation with any of these metals. When epidermal keratinocytes were examined in place of dermal fibroblasts, there was no growth stimulation with any of the lanthanoids. Several of the lanthanoid metals inhibited keratinocyte proliferation at higher concentrations (50–100 μM). PMID:21484406

  6. Accuracy of the electron transport in mcnp5 and its suitability for ionization chamber response simulations: A comparison with the egsnrc and penelope codes

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Siiskonen, Teemu; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Hippelaeinen, Eero; Savolainen, Sauli

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, accuracy of the mcnp5 code in the electron transport calculations and its suitability for ionization chamber (IC) response simulations in photon beams are studied in comparison to egsnrc and penelope codes. Methods: The electron transport is studied by comparing the depth dose distributions in a water phantom subdivided into thin layers using incident energies (0.05, 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) for the broad parallel electron beams. The IC response simulations are studied in water phantom in three dosimetric gas materials (air, argon, and methane based tissue equivalent gas) for photon beams ({sup 60}Co source, 6 MV linear medical accelerator, and mono-energetic 2 MeV photon source). Two optional electron transport models of mcnp5 are evaluated: the ITS-based electron energy indexing (mcnp5{sub ITS}) and the new detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic (mcnp5{sub new}). The electron substep length (ESTEP parameter) dependency in mcnp5 is investigated as well. Results: For the electron beam studies, large discrepancies (>3%) are observed between the mcnp5 dose distributions and the reference codes at 1 MeV and lower energies. The discrepancy is especially notable for 0.1 and 0.05 MeV electron beams. The boundary crossing artifacts, which are well known for the mcnp5{sub ITS}, are observed for the mcnp5{sub new} only at 0.1 and 0.05 MeV beam energies. If the excessive boundary crossing is eliminated by using single scoring cells, the mcnp5{sub ITS} provides dose distributions that agree better with the reference codes than mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5 dose estimates for the gas cavity agree within 1% with the reference codes, if the mcnp5{sub ITS} is applied or electron substep length is set adequately for the gas in the cavity using the mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5{sub new} results are found highly dependent on the chosen electron substep length and might lead up to 15% underestimation of the absorbed dose. Conclusions: Since the mcnp5 electron

  7. Growth, Yield, and Nutritional Responses of Chamber-Grown Sweet Potato to Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels Expected Across the Next 200 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeck, B. C.; Jahren, H.; Deenik, J. L.; Crow, S. E.; Schubert, B.; Stewart, M.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the effects of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations on crops will be critical to assuring that sufficient food is available to the world's growing population. Previous work has shown that slightly elevated CO2 levels (CO2 = 550-700 ppm) increase the economic yield of most crops by ~33%, on average. The majority of these studies have focused on rice, wheat, and soybean; however, climate change is expected to have greatest impact on regions of the world that rely heavily on root crops, such as sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). Sweet potato is cultivated in more than 100 developing countries; it is ranked seventh in world crop statistics and can produce more edible energy per hectare and per day than wheat, rice or cassava. In order to quantify the effect that rising CO2 levels will have on sweet potato, we grew a total of 64 sweet potato plants to maturity in large controlled growth chambers at ambient, 760, 1,140, and 1,520-ppm CO2 levels. At planting, initial measurements (of mass, length, and number of nodes) for each plant were recorded. Throughout the duration of the experiment (90 days) measurements (of stem length, and number of leaves) were recorded every 7 to 14 days. To ensure optimum growing conditions moisture content was monitored using soil tensiometers; temperature, relative humidity and CO2 concentrations were recorded every ten minutes. Half the plants were supplemented with an inorganic fertilizer and the other half with an organic fertilizer to test the effect of nutrient availability on biomass production under elevated CO2 levels. After 3 months of growth, we measured fresh and dry biomass of all above- and below-ground tissues. Results showed a substantial increase in both above- and below-ground biomass at elevated levels of CO2. For the organic treatment, a 43% increase in aboveground dry biomass at the highest CO2 concentration (1520ppm) was found; the inorganic treatment showed a 31% increase. The

  8. Effects of ionization chamber construction on dose measurements in a heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Mauceri, T.; Kase, K.

    1987-07-01

    Traditionally, measurements have been made in heterogeneous phantoms to determine the factors which should be applied to dose calculations, when calculating a dose to a heterogeneous medium. Almost all measurements have relied on relatively thin-walled ion chambers, with no attempt to match ion chamber wall material to the measuring medium. The recent AAPM dosimetry protocol has established that a mismatch between ion chamber wall and phantom material can have an effect on dose measurement. To investigate the affect of this mismatch of ion chamber wall material to phantom material, two parallel-plate ion chambers were constructed. One ion chamber from solid water, for measurements in a solid water phantom and the other from plastic lung material, for measurements in a plastic lung material phantom. Correction factors measured by matching ion chamber to media were compared to correction factors measured by using a thin-walled cavity ion chamber with no regard for matching wall and media for cobalt-60, 6-, 10- and 20-MV photon beams. The results demonstrated that the matching of ion chamber to measuring media can be ignored, provided that a small, approximately tissue-equivalent, thin-walled ion chamber is used for measuring the correction factors.

  9. The effects of depth-dependent crustal viscosity variation on visco-elastic response to inflation/deflation of magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    Development of the satellite observations (GPS and/or InSAR) has allowed us to precisely measure surface deformation. However any geodetic observation by itself does not tell us a mechanism of the deformation. All we can do the most is to compare such an observation to some quantitative predictions, only from which we can deduce a possible deformation mechanism. We therefore need to understand characteristic deformation pattern for a given source mechanism. This study particularly pays attention to magmatic activity in depth as the source, aiming to distinguish magma-induced crustal deformation by better knowing how the activity can be reflected in geodetically observable surface deformation. A parallelized 3-D finite element code, OREGANO_VE [e.g., Yamasaki and Houseman, 2015, J. Geodyn., 88, 80-89], is used to solve the linear Maxwell visco-elastic response to an applied internal inflation/deflation of magma chamber. The rectangular finite element model is composed with a visco-elastic layer overlaid by an elastic layer with thickness of H, and the visco-elastic layer extends over the rest of crust and the uppermost mantle. The visco-elastic crust has a depth-dependent viscosity (DDV) as an exponential function of depth due to temperature-dependent viscosity: hc = h0 exp[c(1 - z/L0)], where h0 is the viscosity at the bottom of the crust, c is a constant; c > 0 for DDV model and c = 0 for uniform viscosity (UNV) model, z is the depth, and L0 is a reference length-scale. The visco-elastic mantle has a spatially uniform viscosity hm. The inflation and/or deflation of sill-like magma chamber is implemented by using the split node method developed by Melosh and Raefsky [1981, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 71, 1391-1400]. UNV model with c = 0 employed in this study shows that the inflation-induced surface uplift would abate with time by visco-elastic relaxation. The post-inflation subsidence would erase the uplift in ~ 50 - 100 times Maxwell relaxation time of the crust

  10. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  11. Inorganic backbone ionomers: Design and dielectric response of single-ion conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Joshua

    analysis of the static dielectric constant and show excellent agreement with x-ray scattering and DFT calculations, each ionomer strongly favoring the formation of quadrupoles. Finally a polysiloxane ionomer was considered and was mixed with three anion and/or cation solvating additives, tetraglyme, tetraethylene glycol, and branched poly(ethylenimine). The EP model of the dielectric response gives the conducting ion concentration and the mobility of conducting ions and shows an increase in conducting ion concentration with both anion solvating and cation solvating additives. The static dielectric constant indicates an increased preference for ion pairs when anion receptors are present. Most interestingly, the additive that best decreased the glass transition temperature and increased the static dielectric constant did not result in the best dc conductivity. The best dc conductivity resulted from tetraglyme because it solvated cations without interacting with the polymer. High ion conductivities have not been observed in polymer systems that decouple charge transport from polymer motion, and therefore low Tg ionomers are the natural path forward for commercially viable ionomers. Inorganic backbone polymers impart a low Tg without bringing any strong disadvantage to ionomers. These materials are very important for developing superior ion conductors and should be pursued in future ionomer research.

  12. High accuracy position response calibration method for a micro-channel plate ion detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, R.; Leredde, A.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Fléchard, X.; García, A.; Müller, P.; Knecht, A.; Liénard, E.; Kossin, M.; Sternberg, M. G.; Swanson, H. E.; Zumwalt, D. W.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a position response calibration method for a micro-channel plate (MCP) detector with a delay-line anode position readout scheme. Using an in situ calibration mask, an accuracy of 8 μm and a resolution of 85 μm (FWHM) have been achieved for MeV-scale α particles and ions with energies of ∼10 keV. At this level of accuracy, the difference between the MCP position responses to high-energy α particles and low-energy ions is significant. The improved performance of the MCP detector can find applications in many fields of AMO and nuclear physics. In our case, it helps reducing systematic uncertainties in a high-precision nuclear β-decay experiment.

  13. Dose Effects of Ion Beam Exposure on Deinococcus Radiodurans: Survival and Dose Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dao-jun; Wu, Li-fang; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2001-02-01

    To explore the survival and dose response of organism for different radiation sources is of great importance in the research of radiobiology. In this study, the survival-dose response of Deinococcus radiodurans (E.coli, as the control) for ultra-violet (UV), γ-rays radiation and ion beam exposure was investigated. The shoulder type of survival curves were found for both UV and γ-ray ionizing radiation, but the saddle type of survival curves were shown for H+, N+(20keV and 30keV) and Ar+ beam exposure. This dose effect of the survival initially decreased with the increase in dose and then increased in the high dose range and finally decreased again in the higher dose range. Our experimental results suggest that D. radiodurans, which is considerably radio-resistant to UV and x-ray and γ-ray ionizing radiation, do not resist ion beam exposure.

  14. A dynamic model for the p53 stress response networks under ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Qi, J-P; Shao, S-H; Li, D-D; Zhou, G-P

    2007-07-01

    P53 controls the cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis through interaction with the downstream genes and their signal pathways. To stimulate the investigation into the complicated responses of p53 under the circumstance of ion radiation (IR) in the cellular level, a dynamic model for the p53 stress response networks is proposed. The model can be successfully used to simulate the dynamic processes of generating the double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their repairing, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, as well as the oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop. PMID:17072789

  15. Effects of separator breakdown on abuse response of 18650 Li-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, E. P.; Doughty, D. H.; Pile, D. L.

    The thermal abuse tolerance of Li-ion cells depends not only on the stability of the active materials in the anode and cathode but also on the stability of the separator which prevents direct interaction between these electrodes. Separator response has been measured as a function of temperature and high voltage both for isolated materials and in full 18650 cells. Separators with different compositions and properties were measured to determine the effect of separator melt integrity on cell response under abusive conditions. These studies were performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program.

  16. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  17. A soundproof pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    For neurotological research we designed a soundproof pressure chamber in which pressure can be adjusted +/- 1000 mmH2O at the rate of less than 100 mmH2O per second. Noise in the chamber can be maintained under 30-35 dB while pressure is kept at a given level.

  18. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  19. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P. Chergui, Majed; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A.

    2015-10-15

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  1. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOEpatents

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  2. Large-format, high-speed, X-ray pnCCDs combined with electron and ion imaging spectrometers in a multipurpose chamber for experiments at 4th generation light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strüder, Lothar; Epp, Sascha; Rolles, Daniel; Hartmann, Robert; Holl, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Soltau, Heike; Eckart, Rouven; Reich, Christian; Heinzinger, Klaus; Thamm, Christian; Rudenko, Artem; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Bauer, Christian; Schröter, Claus-Dieter; Moshammer, Robert; Techert, Simone; Miessner, Danilo; Porro, Matteo; Hälker, Olaf; Meidinger, Norbert; Kimmel, Nils; Andritschke, Robert; Schopper, Florian; Weidenspointner, Georg; Ziegler, Alexander; Pietschner, Daniel; Herrmann, Sven; Pietsch, Ullrich; Walenta, Albert; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Graafsma, Heinz; Hirsemann, Helmut; Gärtner, Klaus; Richter, Rainer; Foucar, Lutz; Shoeman, Robert L.; Schlichting, Ilme; Ullrich, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Fourth generation accelerator-based light sources, such as VUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FEL), deliver ultra-brilliant (˜10 12-10 13 photons per bunch) coherent radiation in femtosecond (˜10-100 fs) pulses and, thus, require novel focal plane instrumentation in order to fully exploit their unique capabilities. As an additional challenge for detection devices, existing (FLASH, Hamburg) and future FELs (LCLS, Menlo Park; SCSS, Hyogo and the European XFEL, Hamburg) cover a broad range of photon energies from the EUV to the X-ray regime with significantly different bandwidths and pulse structures reaching up to MHz micro-bunch repetition rates. Moreover, hundreds up to trillions of fragment particles, ions, electrons or scattered photons can emerge when a single light flash impinges on matter with intensities up to 10 22 W/cm 2. In order to meet these challenges, the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) within the Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has designed the CFEL-ASG MultiPurpose (CAMP) chamber. It is equipped with specially developed photon and charged particle detection devices dedicated to cover large solid-angles. A variety of different targets are supported, such as atomic, (aligned) molecular and cluster jets, particle injectors for bio-samples or fixed target arrangements. CAMP houses 4π solid-angle ion and electron momentum imaging spectrometers ("reaction microscope", REMI, or "velocity map imaging", VMI) in a unique combination with novel, large-area, broadband (50 eV-25 keV), high-dynamic-range, single-photon-counting and imaging X-ray detectors based on the pnCCDs. This instrumentation allows a new class of coherent diffraction experiments in which both electron and ion emission from the target may be simultaneously monitored. This permits the investigation of dynamic processes in this new regime of ultra-intense, high-energy radiation—matter interaction. After an introduction into the salient features of the CAMP chamber and

  3. Ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, Andrew M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  4. Calibration of BAS-TR image plate response to high energy (3-300 MeV) carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Doria, D; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Alejo, A; Fernandez, J; Cerchez, M; Gray, R J; Hanton, F; MacLellan, D A; McKenna, P; Najmudin, Z; Neely, D; Romagnani, L; Ruiz, J A; Sarri, G; Scullion, C; Streeter, M; Swantusch, M; Willi, O; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the calibration of Fuji BAS-TR image plate (IP) response to high energy carbon ions of different charge states by employing an intense laser-driven ion source, which allowed access to carbon energies up to 270 MeV. The calibration method consists of employing a Thomson parabola spectrometer to separate and spectrally resolve different ion species, and a slotted CR-39 solid state detector overlayed onto an image plate for an absolute calibration of the IP signal. An empirical response function was obtained which can be reasonably extrapolated to higher ion energies. The experimental data also show that the IP response is independent of ion charge states. PMID:26724017

  5. Physical response of gold nanoparticles to single self-ion bombardment

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Hattar, Khalid

    2014-09-23

    The reliability of nanomaterials depends on maintaining their specific sizes and structures. However, the stability of many nanomaterials in radiation environments remains uncertain due to the lack of a fully developed fundamental understanding of the radiation response on the nanoscale. To provide an insight into the dynamic aspects of single ion effects in nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles (NPs) with nominal diameters of 5, 20, and 60 nm were subjected to self-ion irradiation at energies of 46 keV, 2.8 MeV, and 10 MeV in situ inside of a transmission electron microscope. Ion interactions created a variety of far-from-equilibrium structures including small (~1more » nm) sputtered nanoclusters from the parent NPs of all sizes. Single ions created surface bumps and elongated nanofilaments in the 60 nm NPs. As a result, similar shape changes were observed in the 20 nm nanoparticles, while the 5 nm nanoparticles were transiently melted or explosively broken apart.« less

  6. Physical response of gold nanoparticles to single self-ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Hattar, Khalid

    2014-09-23

    The reliability of nanomaterials depends on maintaining their specific sizes and structures. However, the stability of many nanomaterials in radiation environments remains uncertain due to the lack of a fully developed fundamental understanding of the radiation response on the nanoscale. To provide an insight into the dynamic aspects of single ion effects in nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles (NPs) with nominal diameters of 5, 20, and 60 nm were subjected to self-ion irradiation at energies of 46 keV, 2.8 MeV, and 10 MeV in situ inside of a transmission electron microscope. Ion interactions created a variety of far-from-equilibrium structures including small (~1 nm) sputtered nanoclusters from the parent NPs of all sizes. Single ions created surface bumps and elongated nanofilaments in the 60 nm NPs. As a result, similar shape changes were observed in the 20 nm nanoparticles, while the 5 nm nanoparticles were transiently melted or explosively broken apart.

  7. 45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), VIEW LOOKING EAST. LEAD ENCLOSED PIPING IS DRAIN FROM BOILER CHAMBER No. 1 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  8. Colorimetric Fluorescent Nanosensor Based on Hexamethylene Diisocyanate for Fluorescent Responses and Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaohui; Zhou, Yang; Li, Ruixing

    2016-03-01

    An inorganic-organic hybrid material based on magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles was synthesized for fluorescent responses and removal of heavy metal ions, in which superparamagnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles were firstly prepared and modified with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) instead of 3-isocyanatopropyltriethoxysilane (IPTES) as the organic coupling agent, and then a rhodamine derivative with spirolactam structure (Rho-en) was conjugated on the HDI functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles through isocyanate groups. Both of functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles based on IPTES and HDI were characterized by FT-IR and XPS, and the results indicated that HDI was a good alternative as chemical bridge for surface modification on the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles. The inorganic-organic hybrid composites synthesized based HDI showed naked-eye color changes and fluorescent responses towards Zn2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Pb2+, Hg2+ and Fe3+, which could serve as the available proofs for the qualitative analysis. Moreover, the as-obtained composites not only had excellent adsorption capability for Pb2+ and Hg2+, but also showed strong magnetic sensitivity, which could help to the removal and separation of functionalized magnetic nanocomposites after capturing the heavy metal ions. In addition, the plausible interaction mode of functionalized Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles with heavy metal ions was discussed. PMID:27455720

  9. Biphasic responses of human vascular smooth muscle cells to magnesium ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium-based alloys are promising in biodegradable cardiovascular stent applications. The degradation products of magnesium stents may have significant impacts on the surrounding vascular cells. However, knowledge on the interactions between magnesium ion and vascular cells at the molecular and cellular levels is still largely missing. Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of restenosis and wound healing after stent implantation. This study evaluated the short-term effects of extracellular magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) on the cellular behaviors of SMCs. Cellular responses to Mg(2+) were biphasic and in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10 mM) of Mg(2+) increased cell viability, cell proliferation rate, cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell migration rate, and actin expression. In contrast, higher concentrations (40-60 mM) of Mg(2+) had deleterious effects on cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that Mg(2+) altered the expressions of genes mostly related to cell adhesion, cell injury, angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation, and cell growth. Finding from this study provides some valuable information on SMC responses toward magnesium ions at the cellular and molecular levels, and guidance for future controlled release of magnesium from the stent material.

  10. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time. PMID:27796370

  11. The Japanese Radon and Thoron Reference Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    Passive detectors used for large-scale and long-term surveys are generally calibrated in a well-controlled environment such as a radon chamber. It has been also pointed out that some of them are sensitive to thoron. Thus it is necessary to check the thoron contribution to the detector response with the proposed or similar test before practical use. The NIRS accommodates radon/aerosol and thoron chambers for quality assurance and quality control of radon measurements. Thus both chambers work so well that they can supply us with the calibration technique and consequently, a good level of knowledge of the radon and thoron issue.

  12. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  13. The PEP Quark Search Proportional Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. I.; Harris, F.; Karliner, I.; Yount, D.; Ely, R.; Hamilton, R.; Pun, T.; Guryn, W.; Miller, D.; Fries, R.

    1981-04-01

    Proportional chambers are used in the PEP Free Quark Search to identify and remove possible background sources such as particles traversing the edges of counters, to permit geometric corrections to the dE/dx and TOF information from the scintillator and Cerenkov counters, and to look for possible high cross section quarks. The present beam pipe has a thickness of 0.007 interaction lengths (λi) and is followed in both arms (each with 45° <= θ <= 135°. Δphi = 90°) by 5 proportional chambers, each 0.0008 λi thick with 32 channels of pulse height readout, and by 3 thin scintillator planes, each 0.003 λi thick. Following this thin front end, each arm of the detector has 8 layers of scintillator (one with scintillating light pipes) interspersed with 4 proportional chambers and a layer of lucite Cerenkov counters. Both the calculated ion statistics and measurements using He-CH4 gas in a test chamber indicate that the chamber efficiencies should be > 98% for q = 1/3. The Landau spread measured in the test was equal to that observed for normal q = 1 traversals. One scintillator plane and thin chamber in each arm will have an extra set of ADC's with a wide gate bracketing the normal one so timing errors and tails of earlier pulses should not produce fake quarks.

  14. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  15. The Mars Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars chamber is a box about the size of a refrigerator that re-creates the temperatures, pressures, and atmosphere of the Martian surface, essentially creating a Mars environment on Earth! Scie...

  16. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  17. Metal ion, light, and redox responsive interaction of vesicles by a supramolecular switch.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Avik; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-04-22

    Chemical, photochemical and electrical stimuli are versatile possibilities to exert external control on self-assembled materials. Here, a trifunctional molecule that switches between an "adhesive" and a "non-adhesive" state in response to metal ions, or light, or oxidation is presented. To this end, an azobenzene-ferrocene conjugate with a flexible N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethylenediamine spacer was designed as a multistimuli-responsive guest molecule that can form inclusion complexes with β-cyclodextrin. In the absence of any stimulus the guest molecule induces reversible aggregation of host vesicles composed of amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin due to the formation of intervesicular inclusion complexes. In this case, the guest molecule operates as a noncovalent cross-linker for the host vesicles. In response to any of three external stimuli (metal ions, UV irradiation, or oxidation), the conformation of the guest molecule changes and its affinity for the host vesicles is strongly reduced, which results in the dissociation of intervesicular complexes. Upon elimination or reversal of the stimuli (sequestration of metal ion, visible irradiation, or reduction) the affinity of the guest molecules for the host vesicles is restored. The reversible cross-linking and aggregation of the cyclodextrin vesicles in dilute aqueous solution was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600 ), dynamic light scattering (DLS), ζ-potential measurements and cyclic voltammetry (CV). To the best of our knowledge, a dynamic supramolecular system based on a molecular switch that responds orthogonally to three different stimuli is unprecedented.

  18. Studies on the application of temperature-responsive ion exchange polymers with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Pankaj; Campi, Eva M; De Silva, Kirthi; Woonton, Brad W; Jackson, W Roy; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-03-18

    Several new types of temperature-responsive ion exchange resins of different polymer composition have been prepared by grafting the products from the co-polymerisation of N-phenylacrylamide, N-iso-propylacrylamide and acrylic acid derivatives onto cross-linked agarose. Analysis of the binding isotherms for these different resins obtained under batch adsorption conditions indicated that the resin based on N-iso-propylacrylamide containing 5% (w/w) N-phenylacrylamide and 5% (w/w) acrylic acid resulted in the highest adsorption capacity, Bmax, for the whey protein, bovine lactoferrin, e.g. 14 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 4 °C and 62 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 40 °C, respectively. Under dynamic loading conditions at 40 °C, 94% of the loaded bovine lactoferrin on a normalised mg protein per mL resin basis was adsorbed by this new temperature-responsive ion-exchanger, and 76% was eluted by a single cycle temperature shift to 4 °C without varying the composition of the 10mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, or the flow rate. The binding characteristics of these different ion exchange resins with bovine lactoferrin were also compared to results obtained using other resins based on N-isopropylacrylamide but contained N-tert-butylacrylamide rather than N-phenylacrylamide, where the corresponding dynamic capture and release properties for bovine lactoferrin required different temperature conditions of 20 °C and 50 °C, respectively for optimal desorption/adsorption. The cationic protein, bovine lactoperoxidase, was also adsorbed and desorbed with these temperature-responsive resins under similar conditions of changing temperature, whereas the anionic protein, bovine β-lactoglobulin, was not adsorbed under this regime of temperature conditions but instead eluted in the flow-through.

  19. Metal ion, light, and redox responsive interaction of vesicles by a supramolecular switch.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Avik; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-04-22

    Chemical, photochemical and electrical stimuli are versatile possibilities to exert external control on self-assembled materials. Here, a trifunctional molecule that switches between an "adhesive" and a "non-adhesive" state in response to metal ions, or light, or oxidation is presented. To this end, an azobenzene-ferrocene conjugate with a flexible N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethylenediamine spacer was designed as a multistimuli-responsive guest molecule that can form inclusion complexes with β-cyclodextrin. In the absence of any stimulus the guest molecule induces reversible aggregation of host vesicles composed of amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin due to the formation of intervesicular inclusion complexes. In this case, the guest molecule operates as a noncovalent cross-linker for the host vesicles. In response to any of three external stimuli (metal ions, UV irradiation, or oxidation), the conformation of the guest molecule changes and its affinity for the host vesicles is strongly reduced, which results in the dissociation of intervesicular complexes. Upon elimination or reversal of the stimuli (sequestration of metal ion, visible irradiation, or reduction) the affinity of the guest molecules for the host vesicles is restored. The reversible cross-linking and aggregation of the cyclodextrin vesicles in dilute aqueous solution was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600 ), dynamic light scattering (DLS), ζ-potential measurements and cyclic voltammetry (CV). To the best of our knowledge, a dynamic supramolecular system based on a molecular switch that responds orthogonally to three different stimuli is unprecedented. PMID:24643990

  20. Thin-film silica sol-gels doped with ion responsive fluorescent lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, D.Y.; Shea, L.E.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1999-01-12

    A metal ion sensitive, fluorescent lipid-b i layer material (5oA PSIDA/DSPC) was successfully immobilized in a silica matrix using a tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) sol-gel procedure. The sol-gel immobilization method was quantitative in the entrapment of seif-assembled Iipid-bilayers and yielded thin films for facile configuration to optical fiber piatforms. The silica matrix was compatible with the solvent sensitive lipid bilayers and provided physical stabilization as well as biological protection. Immobilization in the silica sol-gel produced an added benefit of improving the bilayer's metal ion sensitivity by up to two orders of magnitude. This enhanced performance was attributed to a preconcentrator effect from the anionic surface of the silica matrix. Thin gels (193 micron thickness) were coupled to a bifurcated fiber optic bundle to produce a metal ion sensor probe. Response times of 10 - 15 minutes to 0.1 M CUCIZ were realized with complete regeneration of the sensor using an ethylenediarninetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution.

  1. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  2. The NF-kB pathway: LET dependence of the biological response to heavy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Arenz, Andrea; Reitz, Guenther; Schmitz, Claudia; Spitta, Luis F.; Ruscher, Roland; Lau, Patrick; Meier, Matthias M.; Testard, Isabelle

    Radiation is an acknowledged primary concern for manned spaceflight and is a potentially limiting factor for long term orbital and interplanetary missions. A solar flare can threaten the astronauts' life, and long-term exposure to galactic cosmic rays may shorten the healthy life-span after return to Earth due to cancer induction. Understanding of the cellular and molecular processes underlying these phenomena may allow better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures. A central factor in the cellular stress response is the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). As an antiapoptotic factor, if activated in human cells by ion beam exposure, it could influence the cancer risk of astronauts exposed to cosmic radiation and improve cellular survival after exposure to high radiation doses. In previous studies using a screening assay for the detection of NF-κB-dependent gene induction (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells), the activation of this transcription factor by heavy ions was shown (Radiat. Res. 164: 527-530, 2005). In this work, the dependency of NF-κB activation on LET was examined. Accelerated argon ions (36 Ar, 95 MeV/u, LET 232 keV/` ım) activate the NF-κB pathway already at low particle densities (1-2 particle hits per nucleus), which result in as less as 5-50 induced double strand breaks per cell. Accelerated carbon ions (13 C, 75 MeV/u, LET 30 keV/µm) induce NF-κB-dependent gene expression at higher particle densities (50-500 particle hits per nucleus), but to a lower extent than the argon ions. Intermediate NF-κB activation is initiated by exposure of human cells with carbon ions with an LET of 70 keV/µm. Sparsely ionizing radiation such as X-rays activates the NF-κB pathway at high doses (> 4 Gy), neutrons at doses > 3 Gy. These results suggest a LET dependency of NF-κB activation: high LET radiation activates NF-κB - dependent on initial nuclear DNA damage followed by cytoplasmic signalling events - more efficiently

  3. Discharge Chamber Primary Electron Modeling Activities in Three-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steuber, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Designing discharge chambers for ion thrusters involves many geometric configuration decisions. Various decisions will impact discharge chamber performance with respect to propellant utilization efficiency, ion production costs, and grid lifetime. These hardware design decisions can benefit from the assistance of computational modeling. Computational modeling for discharge chambers has been limited to two-dimensional codes that leveraged symmetry for interpretation into three-dimensional analysis. This paper presents model development activities towards a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation to aid discharge chamber design decisions. Specifically, of the many geometric configuration decisions toward attainment of a worthy discharge chamber, this paper focuses on addressing magnetic circuit considerations with a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation as a tool. With this tool, candidate discharge chamber magnetic circuit designs can be analyzed computationally to gain insight into factors that may influence discharge chamber performance such as: primary electron loss width in magnetic cusps, cathode tip position with respect to the low magnetic field volume, definition of a low magnetic field region, and maintenance of a low magnetic field region across the grid span. Corroborating experimental data will be obtained from mockup hardware tests. Initially, simulated candidate magnetic circuit designs will resemble previous successful thruster designs. To provide opportunity to improve beyond previous performance benchmarks, off-design modifications will be simulated and experimentally tested.

  4. Chamber B Thermal/Vacuum Chamber: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montz, Mike E.

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of Chamber B. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  5. Ectoenzyme activity in coastal marine waters: response to temperature and metal ion availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, J. K.; Neino, V.; Allison, S. D.; Martiny, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ectoenzymes in the ocean are vital for the breakdown of complex organic substrates and for the uptake of nutrients by marine organisms. The activity levels of these enzymes affect the turnover rate of nutrient pools within the ocean, and thus have a significant impact on global biogeochemical nutrient cycles. This study measured the activity of extracellular enzymes from seawater samples under different environmental conditions. Samples were collected daily from coastal waters in the subtropical North Pacific (Lat.: 33°). Ambient seawater temperatures were between 18° and 20° C for the duration of the study. The activity response of four enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, β-glucosidase, β-N-acetyl glucosaminidase, and leucine aminopeptidase) was measured over a range of temperatures (4° to 40° C). The optimal temperatures of all four enzymes were above the ambient seawater temperature of the samples: optimal temperatures of β-glucosidase, β-N-acetyl glucosaminidase, and leucine aminopeptidase in the seawater samples were between 28° and 34° C, while alkaline phosphatase activity increased with the temperature over the range tested. Enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase was further investigated under several metal ion conditions. Activity was highest in the presence of Co2+ ions, while the availability of other ions (Ca2+ and Mg2+/Zn2+) had a lesser effect. The influence of Co2+ on alkaline phosphatase activity indicates the presence of a Co2+-dependent alkaline phosphatase in coastal marine waters. These results suggest that variations in environmental conditions (such as temperature and ion concentration) have discernable effects on enzyme activity, and thus affect turnover rates of nutrient pools in the ocean.

  6. Ion-Responsive Channels of Zwitterion-Carbon Nanotube Membrane for Rapid Water Permeation and Ultrahigh Mono-/Multivalent Ion Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Yin; Yuan, Hao-Ge; Li, Qian; Tang, Yuan-Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Qian, Weizhong; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-07-28

    The rational combination of polymer matrix and nanostructured building blocks leads to the formation of composite membranes with unexpected capability of selectivity of monovalent electrolytes and water, which affords the feasibility to effeciently remove harmful ions and neutral molecules from the environment of concentrated salines. However, the multivalent ion rejection in salined water of routine nanocomposite membranes was less than 98% when ion strength is high, resulting in a poor ion selectivity far below the acceptable value. In this contribution, the ion-responsive membrane with zwitterion-carbon nanotube (ZCNT) entrances at the surface and nanochannels inside membrane has been proposed to obtain ultrahigh multivalent ion rejection. The mean effective pore diameter of ZCNT membrane was dedicated tuned from 1.24 to 0.54 nm with the rise in Na2SO4 concentration from 0 to 70 mol m(-3) as contrary to the conventional rejection drop in carbon nanotube (CNT) membrane. The ultrahigh selective permeabilities of monovalent anions against divalent anions of 93 and against glucose of 5.5 were obtained on ZCNT membrane, while such selectivities were only 20 and 1.6 for the pristine CNT membrane, respectively. The ZCNT membranes have potential applications in treatment of salined water with general NaCl concentration from 100 to 600 mol m(-3), which are widely applicable in desalination, food, and biological separation processes. PMID:26153719

  7. Ion-Responsive Channels of Zwitterion-Carbon Nanotube Membrane for Rapid Water Permeation and Ultrahigh Mono-/Multivalent Ion Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Yin; Yuan, Hao-Ge; Li, Qian; Tang, Yuan-Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Qian, Weizhong; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-07-28

    The rational combination of polymer matrix and nanostructured building blocks leads to the formation of composite membranes with unexpected capability of selectivity of monovalent electrolytes and water, which affords the feasibility to effeciently remove harmful ions and neutral molecules from the environment of concentrated salines. However, the multivalent ion rejection in salined water of routine nanocomposite membranes was less than 98% when ion strength is high, resulting in a poor ion selectivity far below the acceptable value. In this contribution, the ion-responsive membrane with zwitterion-carbon nanotube (ZCNT) entrances at the surface and nanochannels inside membrane has been proposed to obtain ultrahigh multivalent ion rejection. The mean effective pore diameter of ZCNT membrane was dedicated tuned from 1.24 to 0.54 nm with the rise in Na2SO4 concentration from 0 to 70 mol m(-3) as contrary to the conventional rejection drop in carbon nanotube (CNT) membrane. The ultrahigh selective permeabilities of monovalent anions against divalent anions of 93 and against glucose of 5.5 were obtained on ZCNT membrane, while such selectivities were only 20 and 1.6 for the pristine CNT membrane, respectively. The ZCNT membranes have potential applications in treatment of salined water with general NaCl concentration from 100 to 600 mol m(-3), which are widely applicable in desalination, food, and biological separation processes.

  8. A Fast Ionization Chamber for GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, R. T.; Lipman, A. S.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Pain, S. D.; Kozub, R. L.

    2014-09-01

    Transfer reactions are among the main methods used in nuclear physics to probe the structure of nuclei. Such information is needed to constrain nuclear models and to understand various nucleosynthesis processes. In many cases, the nuclear level densities are too high to be resolved in transfer reactions via charged particle detection alone. This problem and issues arising from contaminants in radioactive beams can be addressed by using particle- γ coincidence techniques along with heavy recoil identification in inverse kinematics. A device to accomplish these tasks is Gammasphere ORRUBA: Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS), currently being commissioned for the ATLAS facility at ANL. We are currently building a compact, tilted grid ionization chamber for GODDESS to detect and identify beam-like recoils near zero degrees in the lab. The tilt (30 degrees off normal to the beam) helps the ion pairs to be detected quickly, after drifting only a short distance away from the beam axis. This reduces the response time, allowing counting rates of ~500,000/s. The design and current status of the project will be presented. Research supported by the U. S. DOE.

  9. Solar thermal plasma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonometti, Joseph; Buchele, Donald R.; Castle, Charles H.; Gregory, Don A.

    2001-11-01

    A unique solar thermal chamber has been designed and fabricated to produce the maximum concentration of solar energy and highest temperature possible. Its primary purpose was for solar plasma propulsion experiments and related material specimen testing above 3000 Kelvin. The design not only maximized solar concentration, but also, minimized infrared heat loss. This paper provides the underlining theory and operation of the chamber and initial optical correlation to the actual fabricated hardware. The chamber is placed at the focal point of an existing primary concentrator with a 2.74-meter (9 foot) focal length. A quartz lens focuses a smaller sun image at the inlet hole of the mirrored cavity. The lens focuses two image planes at prescribed positions; the sun at the cavity's entrance hole, and the primary concentrator at the junction plane of two surfaces that form the cavity chamber. The back half is an ellipsoid reflector that produces a 1.27 cm diameter final sun image. The image is 'suspended in space' 7.1cm away from the nearest cavity surface, to minimize thermal and contaminate damage to the mirror surfaces. A hemisphere mirror makes up the front chamber and has its center of curvature at the target image, where rays leaving the target are reflected back upon themselves, minimizing radiation losses.

  10. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  11. Non-Targeted Effects and the Dose Response for Heavy Ion Tumorigenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelli, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no human epidemiology data available to estimate the heavy ion cancer risks experienced by astronauts in space. Studies of tumor induction in mice are a necessary step to estimate risks to astronauts. Previous experimental data can be better utilized to model dose response for heavy ion tumorigenesis and plan future low dose studies. DOSE RESPONSE MODELS: The Harderian Gland data of Alpen et al.[1-3] was re-analyzed [4] using non-linear least square regression. The data set measured the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice by high-energy protons, helium, neon, iron, niobium and lanthanum with LET s ranging from 0.4 to 950 keV/micron. We were able to strengthen the individual ion models by combining data for all ions into a model that relates both radiation dose and LET for the ion to tumor prevalence. We compared models based on Targeted Effects (TE) to one motivated by Non-targeted Effects (NTE) that included a bystander term that increased tumor induction at low doses non-linearly. When comparing fitted models to the experimental data, we considered the adjusted R2, the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), and the Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC) to test for Goodness of fit.In the adjusted R2test, the model with the highest R2values provides a better fit to the available data. In the AIC and BIC tests, the model with the smaller values of the summary value provides the better fit. The non-linear NTE models fit the combined data better than the TE models that are linear at low doses. We evaluated the differences in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and found the NTE model provides a higher RBE at low dose compared to the TE model. POWER ANALYSIS: The final NTE model estimates were used to simulate example data to consider the design of new experiments to detect NTE at low dose for validation. Power and sample sizes were calculated for a variety of radiation qualities including some not considered in the Harderian Gland data

  12. Membrane response model for ion-selective electrodes operated by controlled-potential thin-layer coulometry.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Eric

    2011-01-15

    The electrochemical response behavior of controlled-potential thin-layer coulometric sensors based on solvent polymeric membranes doped with ionophores is elucidated by numerical simulation. This treatment forms the theoretical basis for the design of potentially recalibration-free ion-selective chemical sensors that operate by exhaustive coulometry. Mass transport is assumed to occur primarily by diffusion in each bulk phase, and interfacial ion exchange with interfering ions is described with modern ion-selective electrode theory. The ion-selective membrane is assumed to contain an ion exchanger that can form concentration gradients as a result of transmembrane ion fluxes. It is shown that the diffusion of ions in the membrane phase will become rate limiting for membrane components with diffusion coefficients of 10(-8) cm(2) s(-1) that are typical for traditional ion-selective electrode formulations. This characteristic may be advantageous for sample thicknesses of 20 μm or less, where otherwise exhaustive depletion occurs too quickly to be distinguishable from nonfaradic processes. In most other cases, however, it will be necessary to formulate membrane materials that permit much faster diffusion characteristics. Indeed, the simulations give guidance on sensor design for sample concentrations that approach millimolar levels. The treatment also considers interferences from ions of the same charge sign as the analyte ion, and it is shown that the required selectivity for a given analysis must be about 1 order of magnitude higher than in direct potentiometry. This is because the coulometric exhaustive depletion process occurs only for the analyte ion, not for the interfering one, and to avoid interference, the required selectivity must be maintained even if the sample contains a fraction of the original analyte levels.

  13. Drift Chamber Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walenta, A. H.; ćonka Nurdan, T.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes a laboratory course held at ICFA 2002 Regional Instrumentation School in Morelia, Mexico. This course intends to introduce drift chambers, which play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. The experimental setup consists of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber, a plastic scintillator detector and a collimated 90Sr source. The measurements on the drift velocity of electrons, its change as a function of a drift field, gas gain and diffusion are performed at this laboratory course.

  14. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  15. Internal combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, D.L.

    1988-03-08

    In combination with a high-powered reciprocating piston internal combustion engine, an internal combustion cylinder assembly is described comprising: a cylinder head made of weldable material; a cylinder liner for containing and guiding a reciprocating piston of the engine, a coolant jacket adapted to receive a cooling fluid, mounted on and surrounding the cylinder liner, the jacket being attached to the cylinder head and detachably supported by the cylinder liner, and forming a cooling chamber around the cylinder liner; means to supply the cooling fluid to the cooling chamber and to discharge the cooling fluid therefrom.

  16. Sputtering erosion in ion and plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental set-up to measure low-energy (below 1 keV) sputtering of materials is described. The materials to be bombarded represent ion thruster components as well as insulators used in the stationary plasma thruster. The sputtering takes place in a 9 inch diameter spherical vacuum chamber. Ions of argon, krypton and xenon are used to bombard the target materials. The sputtered neutral atoms are detected by a secondary neutral mass spectrometer (SNMS). Samples of copper, nickel, aluminum, silver and molybdenum are being sputtered initially to calibrate the spectrometer. The base pressure of the chamber is approximately 2 x 10(exp -9) Torr. the primary ion beam is generated by an ion gun which is capable of delivering ion currents in the range of 20 to 500 nA. The ion beam can be focused to a size approximately 1 mm in diameter. The mass spectrometer is positioned 10 mm from the target and at 90 deg angle to the primary ion beam direction. The ion beam impinges on the target at 45 deg. For sputtering of insulators, charge neutralization is performed by flooding the sample with electrons generated from an electron gun. Preliminary sputtering results, methods of calculating the instrument response function of the spectrometer and the relative sensitivity factors of the sputtered elements will be discussed.

  17. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  18. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  19. Chamber, Target and Final Focus Integrated Design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W

    2000-03-22

    Liquid wall protection, which challenges chamber clearing, has such advantages it's Heavy Ion Fusion's (HIF) main line chamber design. Thin liquid protection from x rays is necessary to avoid erosion of structural surfaces and thick liquid makes structures behind 0.5 m of Flibe (7 mean free paths for 14 MeV neutrons), last the life of the plant. Liquid wall protection holds the promise of greatly increased economic competitiveness. Driver designers require {approx}200 beams to illuminate recent target designs from two sides. The illumination must be compatible with liquid wall protection. The ''best'' values for driver energy, gain, yield and pulse rate comes out of well-known trade-off studies. An integrated chamber design, yet to be made, depends on several key assumptions, which are to be proven before HIF can be shown to be feasible. The chamber R&D needed to reduce the unknowns and risks depend on resolving a few technical issues such as jet surface smoothness and rapid chamber clearing.

  20. Chamber, Target and Final Focus Integrated Design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    2000-03-03

    Liquid wall protection, which challenges chamber clearing, has such advantages it's Heavy Ion Fusion's (HIF) main line chamber design. Thin liquid protection from x rays is necessary to avoid erosion of structural surfaces and thick liquid makes structures behind 0.5 m of Flibe (7 mean free paths for 14 MeV neutrons), last the life of the plant. Liquid wall protection holds the promise of greatly increased economic competitiveness. Driver designers require {approx}200 beams to illuminate recent target designs from two sides. The illumination must be compatible with liquid wall protection. The ''best'' values for driver energy, gain, yield and pulse rate comes out of well-known trade-off studies. The chamber design is based on several key assumptions, which are to be proven before HIF can be shown to be feasible. The chamber R&D needed to reduce the unknowns and risks depend on resolving a few technical issues such as jet surface smoothness and rapid chamber clearing.

  1. Comparison of dosimeter response: ionization chamber, TLD, and Gafchromic EBT2 film in 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT techniques for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitriandini, A.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    This research was conducted by measuring point dose in the target area (lungs), heart, and spine using four dosimeters (PTW N30013, Exradin A16, TLD, and the Gafchromic EBT2 film). The measurement was performed in CIRS 002LFC thorax phantom. The main objective of this study was to compare the dosimetry of those different systems. Dose measurements performed only in a single fraction of irradiation. The measurements result shown that TLD has the least accuracy and precision. As the effect of volume averaging, ionization chamber reaches the discrepancy value up to -13.30% in the target area. EBT2 film has discrepancy value of <1% in the 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. This dosimeter is proposed to be an appropriate alternative dosimeter to be used at point dose verification.

  2. Selective ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  3. Selective ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  4. Asymmetrical response of dayside ion precipitation to a large rotation of the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchem, J.; Richard, R. L.; Escoubet, C. P.; Wing, S.; Pitout, F.

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations together with large-scale kinetic simulations to investigate the response of the dayside magnetospheric ion precipitation to a large rotation (135°) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The study uses simplified global MHD model (no dipole tilt and constant ionospheric conductance) and idealized solar wind conditions where the IMF rotates smoothly from a southward toward a northward direction (BX = 0) to clearly identify the effects of the impact of the discontinuity on the magnetopause. Results of the global simulations reveal that a strong north-south asymmetry develops in the pattern of precipitating ions during the interaction of the IMF rotation with the magnetopause. For a counterclockwise IMF rotation from its original southward direction (BY < 0), a spot of high-energy particle injections occurs in the Northern Hemisphere but not in the Southern Hemisphere. The spot moves poleward and dawnward as the interacting field rotates. In that case, reconnection is found close to the poleward edge of the northern cusp, while it occurs farther tailward in the Southern Hemisphere. Tracing magnetic field lines shows an asymmetry in the tilt of the cusps and indicates that the draping and subsequent double reconnection of newly opened field lines from the Southern Hemisphere over the dayside magnetosphere cause the symmetry breaking. The reverse north-south asymmetry is found for a clockwise IMF rotation from its original southward direction (BY > 0). Trends observed in the ion dispersions predicted from the simulations are in good agreement with Cluster observations of the midaltitude northern cusp, which motivated the study.

  5. Ultrasonic Drying Processing Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Bon, J.; Riera, E.; Pinto, A.

    The design of a high intensity ultrasonic chamber for drying process was investigated. The acoustic pressure distribution in the ultrasonic drying chamber was simulated solving linear elastic models with attenuation for the acoustic-structure interaction. Together with the government equations, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions, mesh refinement, and configuration parameters of the calculation methods, which is of great importance to simulate adequately the process, were considered. Numerical solution, applying the finite element method (FEM), of acoustic-structure interactions involves to couple structural and fluid elements (with different degrees of freedom), whose solution implies several problems of hardware requirements and software configuration, which were solved. To design the drying chamber, the influence of the directivity of the drying open camera and the staggered reflectors over the acoustic pressure distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, to optimize the influence of the acoustic energy on the drying process, the average value of the acoustic energy distribution in the drying chamber was studied. This would determine the adequate position of the food samples to be dried. For this purpose, the acoustic power absorbed by the samples will be analyzed in later studies.

  6. Flame-Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental chamber provides controlled environment for observation and measurement of flames propagating in expanding plume of flammable air/fuel mixture under atmospheric conditions. Designed to evaluate quenching capability of screen-type flame arresters in atmospheric vents of fuel cargo tanks aboard marine cargo vessels.

  7. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  8. Review of straw chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.H.

    1990-03-01

    This is a review of straw chambers used in the HRS, MAC, Mark III, CLEO, AMY, and TPC e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments. The straws are 6--8 mm in diameter, operate at 1--4 atmospheres and obtain resolutions of 45--100 microns. The designs and constructions are summarized and possible improvements discussed.

  9. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/..mu..m to over 1000 keV/..mu..m. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/..mu..m. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  10. Polymersomes with engineered ion selective permeability as stimuli-responsive nanocompartments with preserved architecture.

    PubMed

    Lomora, Mihai; Garni, Martina; Itel, Fabian; Tanner, Pascal; Spulber, Mariana; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2015-01-01

    Following a biomimetic approach, we present here polymer vesicles (polymersomes) with ion selective permeability, achieved by inserting gramicidin (gA) biopores in their membrane. Encapsulation of pH-, Na(+)- and K(+)- sensitive dyes inside the polymersome cavity was used to assess the proper insertion and functionality of gA inside the synthetic membrane. A combination of light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy was used to show that neither the size, nor the morphology of the polymersomes was affected by successful insertion of gA in the polymer membrane. Interestingly, proper insertion and functionality of gA were demonstrated for membranes with thicknesses in the range 9.2-12.1 nm, which are significantly greater than membrane lipid counterparts. Both polymersomes with sizes around 100 nm and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) with inserted gA exhibited efficient time response to pH- and ions and therefore are ideal candidates for designing nanoreactors or biosensors for a variety of applications in which changes in the environment, such as variations of ionic concentration or pH, are required.

  11. Low-conductance HCN1 ion channels augment the frequency response of rod and cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Andrew J; Wu, Samuel M

    2009-05-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels are expressed in several tissues throughout the body, including the heart, the CNS, and the retina. HCN channels are found in many neurons in the retina, but their most established role is in generating the hyperpolarization-activated current, I(h), in photoreceptors. This current makes the light response of rod and cone photoreceptors more transient, an effect similar to that of a high-pass filter. A unique property of HCN channels is their small single-channel current, which is below the thermal noise threshold of measuring electronics. We use nonstationary fluctuation analysis (NSFA) in the intact retina to estimate the conductance of single HCN channels, revealing a conductance of approximately 650 fS in both rod and cone photoreceptors. We also analyze the properties of HCN channels in salamander rods and cones, from the biophysical to the functional level, showing that HCN1 is the predominant isoform in both cells, and demonstrate how HCN1 channels speed up the light response of both rods and cones under distinct adaptational conditions. We show that in rods and cones, HCN channels increase the natural frequency response of single cells by modifying the photocurrent input, which is limited in its frequency response by the speed of a molecular signaling cascade. In doing so, HCN channels form the first of several systems in the retina that augment the speed of the visual response, allowing an animal to perceive visual stimuli that change more quickly than the underlying photocurrent. PMID:19420251

  12. Response of aqueous dichromate and nanoclay dichromate gel dosimeters to carbon ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeyama, T.; Fukunishi, N.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Fukasaku, K.; Furuta, T.; Takagi, S.; Noda, S.; Himeno, R.; Fukuda, S.

    2013-06-01

    We have recently reported the significant reduction of radiation product diffusion by the incorporation of clay nanoparticles into dichromate gel (DCG) dosimeters. In this work, we investigate the influence of the nanoclay addition and gelation on the MRI R1 (1/T1) image response of the dichromate dosimeter to the therapeutic carbon ion beam (12C6+ 290 MeV/u). The MRI R1 distribution in the aqueous dichromate solution well reproduces physical dose-depth distribution with a high linear-energy-transfer (LET) efficiency. The nanoclay DCG dosimeters, on the other hand, exhibit composition-dependent LET efficiency degradation, while a sharp Bragg peak can still be detected. These results indicate that the nanocomposite gel addition may induce change in the radiation-induced reaction mechanism.

  13. Nonlinear luminescence response of CaF2:Eu and YAlO3:Ce to single-ion excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Xiao, Haiyan; Xiang, Xia; Wang, Xuelin; Weber, William J.

    2014-01-21

    Pulse-height of CaF2:Eu and YAlO3:Ce scintillators to single H+, He+ and O3+ ions are measured over a continuous energy range using a time-of-flight (TOF) - scintillator - photoelectric multiplier tube (PMT) apparatus. A nonlinear response of the scintillators under ionizing ion irradiation is quantitatively evaluated by considering energy partitioning process. The results show that, in a differential energy deposition region with negligible displacement damage, the low, medium and high excitation energy deposition density (Dexci) produced by H+, He+ and O3+ ions irradiation, respectively, have significantly different impacts on the response characteristics of these two benchmark scintillators. For CaF2:Eu, the scintillation efficiency under ion irradiation monotonically decreases with increasing excitation-energy density. In contrast, the response efficiency of YAlO3:Ce scintillation initially increases with excitation-energy density at low excitation-energy densities, goes through a maximum, and then decreases with further increasing excitation-energy density. The fundamental mechanism causing these different response behaviours in the scintillators is based on the competition between the scintillation response and the nonradiative quenching process under different excitation densities, which is also the main origin of the nonlinear response of scintillators to irradiation.

  14. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver; Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  15. TL response of Eu activated LiF nanocubes irradiated by 85 MeV carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Numan; Alharbi, Najlaa D.; Habib, Sami S.; Lochab, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon ions were found to be effective for cancer treatment. These heavy ions have a high relative biological effectiveness compared to those of photons. They have higher linear energy transfer and sharper Bragg peak with a very excellent local tumor control. However, the dose of these swift heavy ions needs to be measured with great accuracy. Lithium fluoride (LiF) is a highly sensitive phosphor widely used for radiation dosimetry. In this work Eu activated LiF nanocubes were exposed to 85 MeV C6+ ion beam and evaluated for their thermoluminescence (TL) response. Pellet forms of this nanomaterial were exposed to these ions in the fluence range 109-1013 ions/cm2. The obtained result shows a prominent TL glow peak at around 320 °C, which is different than that induced by gamma rays. This glow peak exhibits a linear response in the range 109-1012 ions/cm2, corresponding to the equivalent absorbed doses 0.273-273 kGy. The absorbed doses, penetration depths and main energy loss were calculated using TRIM code based on the Monte Carlo simulation. The supralinearity function and stopping power in this nanomaterial were also studied. The modification induced in the glow curve structure as a result of changing irradiation type might be utilized to use LiF:Eu nanocubes as a dosimeter for mixed filed radiations. Moreover, the wide linear response of LiF:Eu nanocubes along with the low fading are another imperative results suggesting that this nanomaterial might be a good candidate for carbon ions dosimetry.

  16. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  17. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  18. 44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING DRAIN PIPE FROM SUMP - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  19. 61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION PPP) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  20. 41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER (LOCATION AAA) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  1. 50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ENCLOSURE (LOCATION III) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  2. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  3. The Analysis of Ionization Chambers Used for Detecting Smoke Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlej, Z. (Bish).

    Ionization type cells using a radioactive source of primary ions have been used as fire detectors for many years. They have proven sufficiently sensitive to give an alarm when exposed to the relatively small concentration of smoke particles that occur during the early stages of combustion when control of a fire is still possible. In this work the charging of smoke particles in ionization chambers such as typically employed in ionization smoke detectors are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The ionization chambers investigated in this work have parallel plate and spherical electrode geometries. In the absence of smoke particles, the ionization chambers were operated at some ambient electrode current, which depends upon the ion generation rate, the electrode geometries, the potential difference between the electrodes, and the thermodynamic properties of the gas within the chamber volume. When smoke particles are introduced into the ionization chamber they act as an additional sink for the ions, so that the ion current is reduced. The smoke particles in the experiment performed in this work were transferred from the particle generator to the volume surrounding the ionization chamber and allowed to diffuse inside the ionization chamber. An Aitken nuclei counter was employed to measure the concentration of smoke particles inside the ionization chamber. The electric current flowing through the ionization chamber was recorded as a function of time and concentration of the smoke particles inside the chamber. The current loss due to the particles present inside the chamber was calculated and compared with the experimental results. It was found that at the certain level of ambient electrode current, the current loss due to the smoke particles assumes a maximum value. This optimum operating electrode current was predicted by the mathematical model employed in this work. In the light of this model experimental ionization chambers of both parallel and spherical

  4. Modulation of gene expression in endothelial cells in response to high LET nickel ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michaël; Rombouts, Charlotte; Moreels, Marjan; Aerts, An; Quintens, Roel; Tabury, Kevin; Michaux, Arlette; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Ernst, Eric; Dieriks, Birger; Lee, Ryonfa; De Vos, Winnok H; Lambert, Charles; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    Ionizing radiation can elicit harmful effects on the cardiovascular system at high doses. Endothelial cells are critical targets in radiation-induced cardiovascular damage. Astronauts performing a long-term deep space mission are exposed to consistently higher fluences of ionizing radiation that may accumulate to reach high effective doses. In addition, cosmic radiation contains high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation that is known to produce high values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE). The aim of this study was to broaden the understanding of the molecular response to high LET radiation by investigating the changes in gene expression in endothelial cells. For this purpose, a human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926) was irradiated with accelerated nickel ions (Ni) (LET, 183 keV/µm) at doses of 0.5, 2 and 5 Gy. DNA damage was measured 2 and 24 h following irradiation by γ-H2AX foci detection by fluorescence microscopy and gene expression changes were measured by microarrays at 8 and 24 h following irradiation. We found that exposure to accelerated nickel particles induced a persistent DNA damage response up to 24 h after treatment. This was accompanied by a downregulation in the expression of a multitude of genes involved in the regulation of the cell cycle and an upregulation in the expression of genes involved in cell cycle checkpoints. In addition, genes involved in DNA damage response, oxidative stress, apoptosis and cell-cell signaling (cytokines) were found to be upregulated. An in silico analysis of the involved genes suggested that the transcription factors, E2F and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, may be involved in these cellular responses. PMID:25118949

  5. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  6. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  7. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  8. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  9. Electrostatic Levitator Vaccum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  10. Spectrum response and analysis of 77 GHz band collective Thomson scattering diagnostic for bulk and fast ions in LHD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Kubo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Seki, R.; Ogasawara, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Okada, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Mutoh, T.; Kawahata, K.; Watari, T.; LHD Experiment Group; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Korsholm, S. B.; Salewski, M.

    2014-02-01

    A collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic was developed and used to measure the bulk and fast ions originating from 180 keV neutral beams in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Electromagnetic waves from a gyrotron at 77 GHz with 1 MW power output function as both the probe and electron cyclotron heating beam. To clarify the diagnostic applicability of the gyrotron in the 77 GHz frequency band, we investigated the dependence of the probe and receiver beam trajectories in plasmas with high electron densities of (4-5) × 1019 m-3 and low electron densities of (1-2) × 1019 m-3. At high density, a stray radiation component was observed in the CTS spectrum whereas it was negligibly small at low density. The CTS spectrum was measured and analysed after the in situ beam alignment using a beam scan. Qualitatively, the CTS spectrogram shows consistent response to ion temperatures of 1-2 keV for electron densities of (1-2) × 1019 m-3 and electron temperatures of 2-4 keV. The measured CTS spectrum shows an asymmetric shape at the foot of the bulk-ion region during the injection of 180 keV fast ions. This shape is explained by the fast-ion distribution in the velocity space (v‖, v⊥) based on Monte Carlo simulation results. The analysis method of the CTS spectra is used to evaluate the ion temperature and fast-ion velocity distribution from the measured CTS data.

  11. Dielectric response of polyethersulphone (PES) polymer irradiated with 145 MeV Ne{sup 6+} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S. Asad; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, A. H.; Kumar, Rajesh; Prasad, R.

    2013-02-05

    Heavy ion irradiation produces modifications in polymers and adapts their electrical, chemical and optical properties in the form of rearrangement of bonding, cross-linking, chain scission and formation of carbon rich clusters. Modification depends on the ion, its energy and fluence and the polymeric material. In the present work, a study of the dielectric response of pristine and heavy ion irradiated Polyethersulphone (PES) polymer film is carried out. 250 {mu}m thick PES films were irradiated to the fluences of 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} with Ne{sup 6+} ions of 145 MeV energy from Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata On irradiation with heavy ions dielectric constant ({epsilon} Prime ) decreases at higher frequencies and increases with fluences. Variation of loss factor (tan {delta}) with frequency for pristine and irradiated with Si ions reveals that tan {delta} increases as the frequency increases. The tan{delta} also increases with fluence. Tan {delta} has positive values indicating the dominance of inductive behavior.

  12. A smart temperature and magnetic-responsive gating carbon nanotube membrane for ion and protein transportation.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Yu, Bing; Yang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoporous membranes based on pre-aligned CNTs have superior nano-transportation properties in biological science. Herein, we report a smart temperature- and temperature-magnetic-responsive CNT nanoporous membrane (CNM) by grafting thermal-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) on the open ends of pre-aligned CNTs with a diameter around 15 nm via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) method. The inner cavity of the modified CNTs in the membrane is designed to be the only path for ion and protein transportation, and its effective diameter with a variation from ~5.7 nm to ~12.4 nm can be reversible tuned by temperature and magnetic field. The PNIPAM modified CNM (PNIPAM-CNM) and PNIPAM magnetic nanoparticles modified CNM (PNIPAM-MAG-CNM) exhibit excellent temperature- or temperature-magnetic-responsive gating property to separate proteins of different sizes. The PNIPAM-CNMs and PNIPAM-MAG-CNMs have potential applications in making artificial cells, biosensors, bioseparation and purification filters. PMID:27535103

  13. A smart temperature and magnetic-responsive gating carbon nanotube membrane for ion and protein transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Yu, Bing; Yang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoporous membranes based on pre-aligned CNTs have superior nano-transportation properties in biological science. Herein, we report a smart temperature- and temperature-magnetic-responsive CNT nanoporous membrane (CNM) by grafting thermal-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) on the open ends of pre-aligned CNTs with a diameter around 15 nm via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) method. The inner cavity of the modified CNTs in the membrane is designed to be the only path for ion and protein transportation, and its effective diameter with a variation from ~5.7 nm to ~12.4 nm can be reversible tuned by temperature and magnetic field. The PNIPAM modified CNM (PNIPAM-CNM) and PNIPAM magnetic nanoparticles modified CNM (PNIPAM-MAG-CNM) exhibit excellent temperature- or temperature-magnetic-responsive gating property to separate proteins of different sizes. The PNIPAM-CNMs and PNIPAM-MAG-CNMs have potential applications in making artificial cells, biosensors, bioseparation and purification filters.

  14. A smart temperature and magnetic-responsive gating carbon nanotube membrane for ion and protein transportation

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Yu, Bing; Yang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoporous membranes based on pre-aligned CNTs have superior nano-transportation properties in biological science. Herein, we report a smart temperature- and temperature-magnetic-responsive CNT nanoporous membrane (CNM) by grafting thermal-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) on the open ends of pre-aligned CNTs with a diameter around 15 nm via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) method. The inner cavity of the modified CNTs in the membrane is designed to be the only path for ion and protein transportation, and its effective diameter with a variation from ~5.7 nm to ~12.4 nm can be reversible tuned by temperature and magnetic field. The PNIPAM modified CNM (PNIPAM-CNM) and PNIPAM magnetic nanoparticles modified CNM (PNIPAM-MAG-CNM) exhibit excellent temperature- or temperature-magnetic-responsive gating property to separate proteins of different sizes. The PNIPAM-CNMs and PNIPAM-MAG-CNMs have potential applications in making artificial cells, biosensors, bioseparation and purification filters. PMID:27535103

  15. WE-E-BRE-06: High-Dose Microbeam Radiation Induces Different Responses in Tumor Microenvironment Compared to Conventional Seamless Radiation in Window Chamber Tumor Models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S; Zhang, J; Hadsell, M; Fontanella, A; Schroeder, T; Palmer, G; Dewhirst, M; Boss, M; Berman, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy are different forms of Spatially-Fractioned Radiation Therapy (SFRT) that is fundamentally different from the conventional seamless and temporally fractionated radiation therapy. SFRT is characterized by a ultra-high dose (10s –100s Gy) dose single treatment with drastic inhomogeneity pattern of given spatial frequencies. Preclinical and limited clinical studies have shown that the SFRT treatments may offer significant improvements in reducing treatment toxicity, especially for those patients who have not benefited from the state-of-the-art radiation therapy approaches. This preliminary study aims to elucidate the underlying working mechanisms of SFRT, which currently remains poorly understood. Methods: A genetically engineered 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma cell line and nude mice skin fold window chamber were used. A nanotechnology-based 160kV x-ray irradiator delivered 50Gy (entrance dose) single treatments of microbeam or seamless radiation. Animals were in 3 groups: mock, seamless radiation, and 300μm microbeam radiation. The windows were imaged using a hyperspectral system to capture total hemoglobin/saturation, GFP fluorescence emission, RFP fluorescence emission, and vessel density at 9 time points up to 7 days post radiation. Results: We found unique physiologic changes in different tumor/normal tissue regions and differential effects between seamless and microbeam treatments. They include 1) compared to microbeam and mock radiation seamless radiation damaged more microvasculature in tumor-surrounding normal tissue, 2) a pronounced angiogenic effect was observed with vascular proliferation in the microbeam irradiated portion of the tumor days post treatment (no such effect observed in seamless and mock groups), and 3) a notable change in tumor vascular orientation was observed where vessels initially oriented parallel to the beam length were replaced by vessels running perpendicular to the irradiation

  16. Multistimuli-Responsive, Moldable Supramolecular Hydrogels Cross-Linked by Ultrafast Complexation of Metal Ions and Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhifang; Lv, Fucong; Cao, Lujie; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Lu, Zhouguang

    2015-06-26

    A new type of multistimuli-responsive hydrogels cross-linked by metal ions and biopolymers is reported. By mixing the biopolymer chitosan (CS) with a variety of metal ions at the appropriate pH values, we obtained a series of transparent and stable hydrogels within a few seconds through supramolecular complexation. In particular, the CS-Ag hydrogel was chosen as the model and the gelation mechanism was revealed by various measurements. It was found that the facile association of Ag(+) ions with amino and hydroxy groups in CS chains promoted rapid gel-network formation. Interestingly, the CS-Ag hydrogel exhibits sharp phase transitions in response to multiple external stimuli, including pH value, chemical redox reactions, cations, anions, and neutral species. Furthermore, this soft matter showed a remarkable moldability to form shape-persistent, free-standing objects by a fast in situ gelation procedure.

  17. Near-LTE linear response calculations with a collisional-radiative model for He-like Al ions

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.; Kato, T.

    1998-01-06

    We investigate the non-equilibrium atomic kinetics using a collisional-radiative (CR) model modified to include line absorption. Steady-state emission is calculated for He-like aluminum ions immersed in a specified radiation field having fixed deviations from a Planck spectrum. The net emission is interpreted in terms of NLTE population changes. The calculation provides an NLTE response matrix, and in agreement with a general relation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the response matrix is symmetric. We compute the response matrix for 1% and 50% changes in the photon temperature and find linear response over a surprisingly large range.

  18. Vibrating-chamber levitation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Systems are described for the acoustic levitation of objects, which enable the use of a sealed rigid chamber to avoid contamination of the levitated object. The apparatus includes a housing forming a substantially closed chamber, and means for vibrating the entire housing at a frequency that produces an acoustic standing wave pattern within the chamber.

  19. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  20. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  1. Vibrating-chamber levitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-10-01

    Systems are described for the acoustic levitation of objects, which enable the use of a sealed rigid chamber to avoid contamination of the levitated object. The apparatus includes a housing forming a substantially closed chamber, and means for vibrating the entire housing at a frequency that produces an acoustic standing wave pattern within the chamber.

  2. Microstrip gas chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and micro gap chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.G.; Harris, J.W.; Wieman, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors report developments of the Microstrip Gas Chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and the Micro Gap Chamber. By coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics), they built MSGCs of high gain stability and low leakage current. They were tested in Ar-CH{sub 4} (10%) and He-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of 17-20% were measured for 6keV x-rays. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material. Micro Gap Chamber was successfully tested in He-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (50%) and Ar-C{sub 2}H{sub 6}(50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of about 20% were obtained. Both detectors are expected to have high rate capability.

  3. Segmented ionization chambers for beam monitoring in hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio; Cirio, Roberto; Donetti, Marco; Marchetto, Flavio; Pittà, Giuseppe; Lavagno, Marco; La Rosa, Vanessa

    2015-05-01

    Segmented ionization chambers represent a good solution to monitor the position, the intensity and the shape of ion beams in hadrontherapy. Pixel and strip chambers have been developed for both passive scattering and active scanning dose delivery systems. In particular, strip chambers are optimal for pencil beam scanning, allowing for spatial and time resolutions below 0.1 mm and 1 ms, respectively. The MATRIX pixel and the Strip Accurate Monitor for Beam Applications (SAMBA) detectors are described in this paper together with the results of several beam tests and industrial developments based on these prototypes.

  4. Comparing Single species Toxicity Tests to Mesocosm Community-Level Responses to Total Dissolved Solids Comprised of Different Major Ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) dosing studies representing different sources of ions were conducted from 2011-2015. Emergence responses in stream mesocosms were compared to single-species exposures using a whole effluent testing (WET) format and an ex-situ method (single species te...

  5. Global response of the upper thermospheric winds to large ion drifts in the Jovian ovals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, T.; Bougher, S. W.; Ridley, A. J.; Waite, J. H.; Gladstone, G. R.; Bell, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    We use our fully coupled 3-D Jupiter Thermosphere General Circulation Model (JTGCM) to quantify processes which are responsible for generating neutral winds in Jupiter's oval thermosphere from 20 µbar to 10-4 nbar self-consistently with the thermal structure and composition. The heat sources in the JTGCM that drive the global circulation of neutral flow are substantial Joule heating produced in the Jovian ovals by imposing high-speed anticorotational ion drifts (~3.5 km s-1) and charged particle heating from auroral processes responsible for bright oval emissions. We find that the zonal flow of neutral winds in the auroral ovals of both hemispheres is primarily driven by competition between accelerations resulting from Coriolis forcing and ion drag processes near the ionospheric peak. However, above the ionospheric peak (<0.01 µbar), the acceleration of neutral flow due to pressure gradients is found to be the most effective parameter impacting zonal winds, competing mainly with acceleration due to advection with minor contributions from curvature and Coriolis forces in the southern oval, while in the northern oval it competes alone with considerable Coriolis forcing. The meridional flow of neutral winds in both ovals in the JTGCM is determined by competition between meridional accelerations due to Coriolis forcing and pressure gradients. We find that meridional flow in the lower thermosphere, near the peak of the auroral ionosphere, is poleward, with peak wind speeds of ~0.6 km s-1 and ~0.1 km s-1 in the southern and northern oval, respectively. The corresponding subsiding flow of neutral motion is ~5 m s-1 in the southern oval, while this flow is rising in the northern oval with reduced speed of ~2 m s-1. We also find that the strength of meridional flow in both auroral ovals is gradually weakened and turned equatorward near 0.08 µbar with wind speeds up to ~250 m s-1 (southern oval) and ~75 m s-1 (northern oval). The corresponding neutral motion in this

  6. The Other Shoe: An Early Operant Conditioning Chamber for Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Takayuki; Lattal, Kennon A

    2016-05-01

    We describe an early operant conditioning chamber fabricated by Harvard University instrument maker Ralph Gerbrands and shipped to Japan in 1952 in response to a request of Professor B. F. Skinner by Japanese psychologists. It is a rare example, perhaps the earliest still physically existing, of such a chamber for use with pigeons. Although the overall structure and many of the components are similar to contemporary pigeon chambers, several differences are noted and contrasted to evolutionary changes in this most important laboratory tool in the experimental analysis of behavior. The chamber also is testimony to the early internationalization of behavior analysis.

  7. The Other Shoe: An Early Operant Conditioning Chamber for Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Takayuki; Lattal, Kennon A

    2016-05-01

    We describe an early operant conditioning chamber fabricated by Harvard University instrument maker Ralph Gerbrands and shipped to Japan in 1952 in response to a request of Professor B. F. Skinner by Japanese psychologists. It is a rare example, perhaps the earliest still physically existing, of such a chamber for use with pigeons. Although the overall structure and many of the components are similar to contemporary pigeon chambers, several differences are noted and contrasted to evolutionary changes in this most important laboratory tool in the experimental analysis of behavior. The chamber also is testimony to the early internationalization of behavior analysis. PMID:27606188

  8. Idea Bank: Chamber Music within the Large Ensemble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidlinger, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Many music educators incorporate chamber music in their ensemble programs--an excellent way to promote musical independence. However, they rarely think of the large ensemble as myriad chamber interactions. Rehearsals become more productive when greater responsibility for music-making is placed on the individual student. This article presents some…

  9. Investigation and performance tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with double sensitive volume for measuring diagnostic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, B.; Zamani Zeinali, H.; Soltani, J.; Negarestani, A.; Shahvar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical diagnostic equipment, like diagnostic radiology and mammography require a dosimeter with high accuracy for dosimetry of the diagnostic X-ray beam. Ionization chambers are suitable instruments for dosimetry of diagnostic-range X-ray beams because of their appropriate response and high reliability. This work introduces the design and fabrication of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with a PMMA body, graphite-coated PMMA windows (0.5 mm thick) and a graphite-foil central electrode (0.1 mm thick, 0.7 g/cm3 dense). This design improves upon the response characteristics of existing designs through the specific choice of materials as well as the appropriate size and arrangement of the ionization chamber components. The results of performance tests conducted at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry laboratory in Karaj-Iran demonstrated the short and long-term stability, the low leakage current, the low directional dependence, and the high ion collection efficiency of the design. Furthermore, the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the low effect of central electrode on this new ionization chamber response. The response characteristics of the parallel plate ionization chamber presented in this work makes the instrument suitable for use as a standard dosimeter in laboratories.

  10. Review of wire chamber aging

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Potentiation by the lithium ion of morphogenetic responses to a Xenopus inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Cooke, J; Symes, K; Smith, E J

    1989-03-01

    We have cultured explants of Xenopus blastular animal cap tissue from embryos that had received an earlier treatment with LiCl and from their untreated siblings, in various concentrations of XTC-cell-derived mesoderm-inducing factor (XTC-MIF, Smith, 1987; Smith et al. 1988). The pretreatment with lithium that we used transforms later morphogenesis in the whole embryo to give radialized body forms with anterior/dorsal levels of structure grossly over-represented. In addition, animal caps from 'Li+' embryos were allowed to develop without exposure to in vitro MIF (Li+ controls) and compared with normal uninduced control explants, and explants were made from normal early blastulae but given various initial treatments with LiCl in culture. The results confirm that the lithium ion itself will not induce mesoderm in competent, animal cap tissue of Xenopus. It does, however, enhance the responsiveness of this tissue to XTC-MIF, in a way that parallels its recently reported effect in the case of another mesoderm inducer of different character, bFGF (Slack et al. 1988). The effects observed are sufficient to imply that the altered body pattern that follows lithium treatment, in whole embryos, could be caused by modulation of the responses to an unaltered pattern of in situ inductive stimuli. We also observe evidence that appreciable inductive signals reach animal pole tissue beyond the limits of mesoderm formation in normal development. Relatively low concentrations of MIF prevent the development of an epidermis-specific marker in dissociated blastular animal cap cells (Symes et al. 1988). When such experiments are repeated in relation to the lithium pretreatment of embryos, such treatment is seen to have sensitized the cell population, so that the MIF concentration range that assures complete suppression of the marker is reduced. The results are discussed in relation to induction considered as pattern formation.

  12. INCREASES IN CYTOSOLIC CALCIUM ION LEVELS IN HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS IN RESPONSE TO BUTYLTIN EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Rhonda; Ghazi, Sabah O.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether exposures to butyltins (BTs), tributylin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) were able to alter cytosolic calcium levels in human natural killer (NK) cells. Additionally, the effects of cytosolic calcium ion increases on the activation state of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in NK cells were also investigated. NK cells are an intital immune defense against the development of tumors or viral infections. TBT and DBT are widespread environmental contaminants, due to their various industrial applications. Both TBT and DBT have been shown to decrease the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells (lytic function). TBT has also been shown to activate MAPKs in NK cells. The results of this study indicated that TBT increased cytosolic calcium levels by as much as 100% after a 60 min exposure to 500 nM TBT while DBT increased cytosolic calcium levels to a much smaller extent (and required higher concentrations). The results also indicated that increases in cytosolic calcium could activate MAPKs but only for a short period of time (5 min), while previous studies showed that activation of MAPKs by TBT last for at least 6 hours. Thus, it appears that TBT stimulated increases in cytosolic calcium may contribute to, but are not fully responsible for, TBT-induced activation of MAPKs. PMID:19365649

  13. Ion-responsive liquid crystals of cellulose nanowhiskers grafted with acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Daiyong; Yang, Jie

    2015-12-10

    In order to develop a novel application for cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) produced from the sulfuric acid hydrolysis of cotton, acrylamide (AM) was grafted onto the CNW. The graft reaction of the acrylamide-grafted CNW (AM-g-CNW) was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The carbon and nitrogen contents of the AM-g-CNW were measured by elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The grafting ratios and average degrees of β-1,4-linked anhydro-D-glucose unit substitution were measured. The thermochemical properties of the AM-g-CNW were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TG). The glass transition temperatures were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The degrees of crystallinity were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The liquid crystalline properties of AM-g-CNW were observed by polarizing optical microscopy (POM). AM-g-CNW had the best grafting ratio, 12.77%, when the AM/CNW molar ratio was 3, c(K2S2O8)/n(CNW) was 0.15, the reaction temperature was 70 °C, and the reaction time was 60 min. The birefringence of AM-g-CNW was responsive to hydroxide ions, which might be useful in applications that benefit from sensitivity towards different ionic species.

  14. A comprehensive secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of ZnO nanowalls: Correlation to photocatalytic responses

    SciTech Connect

    Bayan, Sayan Satpati, Biswarup; Chakraborty, Purushottam

    2015-03-07

    We report on the visible light induced photocatalytic responses of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures in the form of nanowires and nanowalls grown on aluminum substrates. Morphological and microstructural characteristics of these nanostructures have been analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). The presence of surface-adsorbed H{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup −}, and OH{sup −} species on ZnO nanostructures has been established through secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The relative change in substrate coverage under varying reaction time has also been evidenced through SIMS and is in agreement with SEM observation. Compared to nanowires, oxygen adsorption on ZnO surfaces and subsequent oxygen in-diffusion are found to be prominent for the nanowall-like structures and are seen to be highest for nanowalls grown in lower reaction time. In contrast to nanowires, nanowalls are found to exhibit higher photocatalytic activity and this can be attributed to higher adsorption of oxygen. The photocatalytic activity of the samples under visible light is originated from the native defect-states and the photocatalytic efficiency is largely influenced by the surface-adsorbants. Control of surface adsorption characteristics of the nanowalls upon tuning wall thicknesses can lead to the development of futuristic efficient photocatalytic devices.

  15. Intracellular accumulation of indium ions released from nanoparticles induces oxidative stress, proinflammatory response and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Sonoda, Akinari; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Makita, Yoji; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Horie, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Due to the widespread use of indium tin oxide (ITO), it is important to investigate its effect on human health. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of ITO nanoparticles (NPs), indium chloride (InCl3) and tin chloride (SnCl3) using human lung epithelial A549 cells. Transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were employed to study cellular ITO NP uptake. Interestingly, greater uptake of ITO NPs was observed, as compared with soluble salts. ITO NP species released could be divided into two types: 'indium release ITO' or 'tin release ITO'. We incubated A549 cells with indium release ITO, tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2 and investigated oxidative stress, proinflammatory response, cytotoxicity and DNA damage. We found that intracellular reactive oxygen species were increased in cells incubated with indium release ITO, but not tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2. Messenger RNA and protein levels of the inflammatory marker, interleukin-8, also increased following exposure to indium release ITO. Furthermore, the alkaline comet assay revealed that intracellular accumulation of indium ions induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that the accumulation of ionic indium, but not ionic tin, from ITO NPs in the intracellular matrix has extensive cellular effects.

  16. Ion-responsive liquid crystals of cellulose nanowhiskers grafted with acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Daiyong; Yang, Jie

    2015-12-10

    In order to develop a novel application for cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) produced from the sulfuric acid hydrolysis of cotton, acrylamide (AM) was grafted onto the CNW. The graft reaction of the acrylamide-grafted CNW (AM-g-CNW) was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The carbon and nitrogen contents of the AM-g-CNW were measured by elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The grafting ratios and average degrees of β-1,4-linked anhydro-D-glucose unit substitution were measured. The thermochemical properties of the AM-g-CNW were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TG). The glass transition temperatures were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The degrees of crystallinity were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The liquid crystalline properties of AM-g-CNW were observed by polarizing optical microscopy (POM). AM-g-CNW had the best grafting ratio, 12.77%, when the AM/CNW molar ratio was 3, c(K2S2O8)/n(CNW) was 0.15, the reaction temperature was 70 °C, and the reaction time was 60 min. The birefringence of AM-g-CNW was responsive to hydroxide ions, which might be useful in applications that benefit from sensitivity towards different ionic species. PMID:26428147

  17. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn2+) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn2+ are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn2+ on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn2+ was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn2+ had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn2+ displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn2+ concentrations (80–120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  18. Facile purification of colloidal NIR-responsive gold nanorods using ions assisted self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianke; Guo, Zhirui; Xu, Lina; Xu, Ruizhi; Lu, Xiang

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropic metal nanoparticles have been paid much attention because the broken symmetry of these nanoparticles often leads to novel properties. Anisotropic gold nanoparticles obtained by wet chemical methods inevitably accompany spherical ones due to the intrinsically high symmetry of face-centred cubic metal. Therefore, it is essential for the purification of anisotropic gold nanoparticles. This work presents a facile, low cost while effective solution to the challenging issue of high-purity separation of seed-mediated grown NIR-responsive gold nanorods from co-produced spherical and cubic nanoparticles in solution. The key point of our strategy lies in different shape-dependent solution stability between anisotropic nanoparticles and symmetric ones and selective self-assembly and subsequent precipitation can be induced by introducing ions to the as-made nanorod solution. As a result, gold nanorods of excellent purity (97% in number density) have been obtained within a short time, which has been confirmed by SEM observation and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy respectively. Based on the experimental facts, a possible shape separation mechanism was also proposed.

  19. Response of a delta-doped charge-coupled device to low energy protons and nitrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, S.T.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Jones, T.; Blacksberg, J.; Zurbuchen, T.H.

    2006-05-15

    We present the results of a study of the response of a delta-doped charge-coupled device (CCD) exposed to ions with energies less than 10 keV. The study of ions in the solar wind, the majority having energies in the 1-5 keV range, has proven to be vital in understanding the solar atmosphere and the near Earth space environment. Delta-doped CCD technology has essentially removed the dead layer of the silicon detector. Using the delta-doped detector, we are able to detect H{sup +} and N{sup +} ions with energies ranging from 1 to 10 keV in the laboratory. This is a remarkable improvement in the low energy detection threshold over conventional solid-state detectors, such as those used in space sensors, one example being the solar wind ion composition spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft, which can only detect ions with energies greater than 30 keV because of the solid-state detector's minimum energy threshold. Because this threshold is much higher than the average energy of the solar wind ions, the SWICS instrument employs a bulky high voltage postacceleration stage that accelerates ions above the 30 keV detection threshold. This stage is massive, exposes the instrument to hazardous high voltages, and is therefore problematic both in terms of price and its impact on spacecraft resources. Adaptation of delta-doping technology in future space missions may be successful in reducing the need for heavy postacceleration stages allowing for miniaturization of space-borne ion detectors.

  20. Focal-surface detector for heavy ions

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, John R.; Braid, Thomas H.; Stoltzfus, Joseph C.

    1979-01-01

    A detector of the properties of individual charged particles in a beam includes a gridded ionization chamber, a cathode, a plurality of resistive-wire proportional counters, a plurality of anode sections, and means for controlling the composition and pressure of gas in the chamber. Signals generated in response to the passage of charged particles can be processed to identify the energy of the particles, their loss of energy per unit distance in an absorber, and their angle of incidence. In conjunction with a magnetic spectrograph, the signals can be used to identify particles and their state of charge. The detector is especially useful for analyzing beams of heavy ions, defined as ions of atomic mass greater than 10 atomic mass units.

  1. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  2. Ion transfer across a liquid membrane. General solution for the current-potential response of any voltammetric technique.

    PubMed

    Molina, A; Serna, C; Gonzalez, J; Ortuño, J A; Torralba, E

    2009-02-28

    An explicit analytical equation applicable to the study of reversible ion transfer at systems with two liquid/liquid polarizable interfaces is presented. This expression is valid for any multipotential step technique, which are all very adequate for the determination of standard transfer potentials and transport parameters of ions. The expression of the I/E response for linear sweep voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry can also be deduced as a particular case of this equation. The general solution given here is formally similar to that obtained for the application of any multipotential step sequence to a system with a single polarizable interface, since the method followed here is based on the same premises.

  3. Dynamical response of helium bubble motion to irradiation with high-energy self-ions in aluminum at high temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Arakawa, K.; Birtcher, R. C.; Materials Science Division; Shimane Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2009-02-21

    Brownian-type motion of helium bubbles in aluminum and its dynamical response to irradiation with 100-keV Al{sup +} ions at high temperatures has been studied using in situ irradiation and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that, for most bubbles, the Brownian-type motion is retarded under irradiation, while the mobility returns when the irradiation is stopped. In contrast, under irradiation, a small number of bubbles display exceptionally rapid motion associated with the change in bubble size. These effects are discussed in terms of the dynamical interaction of helium bubbles with cascade damage formed by the high-energy self-ion irradiation.

  4. Air ion exposure system for plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    A system was developed for subjecting plants to elevated air ion levels. This system consisted of a rectangular Plexiglas chamber lined with a Faraday cage. Air ions were generated by corona discharge from frayed stainless steel fibers placed at one end of the chamber. This source was capable of producing varying levels of either positive or negative air ions. During plant exposures, environmental conditions were controlled by operating the unit in a growth chamber.

  5. Global Response of the Upper Thermosphere to Large Ion Drifts in the Jovian Ovals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, T.; Bougher, S. W.; Ridley, A. J.; Gladstone, R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Bell, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We use our fully coupled 3-D Jupiter Thermosphere General Circulation Model (JTGCM) to quantify wind processes that are responsible for generating neutral winds in the auroral thermosphere from 20 μbar to 10-4 nbar self-consistently with the thermal structure and compositions. The heat sources in the JTGCM that drive the global circulation of neutral flow are charge particle heating from particle impact of extreme auroral conditions and large amount of Joule heating produced in the Jovian ovals by imposing high speed anticorotational ion drifts up to ~3.5 kms-1. These sources are strongly related to the current system in the equatorial plasma sheet that allows plasma to flow outward from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere in the inner part and return from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere in the outer part. We find that strong pressure gradients are developed in the auroral regions, affecting zonal and meridional winds in addition to local temperature distributions. We also find that the zonal flow of neutral winds in the ovals of both hemispheres is primarily driven by competition between Coriolis forcing and ion drag processes near the ionospheric peak. However, above the ionospheric peak, the acceleration of neutral flow due to pressure gradients is found to be the most effective parameter impacting zonal winds. One of the most important findings of this investigation is that the meridional flow of neutral winds in the Jovian ovals is poleward near the peak of the auroral ionosphere. The strength of this flow is gradually weakened and turned equatorward at the sub-nanobar levels with wind speeds up to ~250 ms-1 in the southern oval and ~75 ms-1 in the northern oval. The corresponding neutral motion in this region is upward with wind speeds up to 4 ms-1 in both ovals. We will discuss the model assumptions, numerical framework and several parameterizations of inputs quantities. Comparisons of key model outputs (e.g. neutral temperatures and wind components

  6. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  7. Environmental calibration chamber operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal vacuum capabilities are provided for the development, calibration, and functional operation checks of flight sensors, sources, and laboratory and field instruments. Two systems are available. The first is a 46 cm diameter diffusion pumped vacuum chambler of the bell jar variety. It has an internal thermal shroud, LN2 old trap, two viewing ports, and various electrical and fluid feedthroughs. The other, also an oil diffusion pumped system, consists of a 1.8 m diameter by 2.5 m long stainless steel vacuum tank, associated pumping and control equipment, a liquid nitrogen storage and transfer system and internal IR/visible calibration sources. This is a two story system with the chamber located on one floor and the pumping/cryogenic systems located on the floor below.

  8. The role of ion pairs in the second-order NLO response of 4-X-1-methylpiridinium salts.

    PubMed

    Tessore, Francesca; Cariati, Elena; Cariati, Franco; Roberto, Dominique; Ugo, Renato; Mussini, Patrizia; Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Macchioni, Alceo

    2010-02-01

    A series of 4-X-1-methylpyridinium cationic nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores (X = (E)-CH=CHC(6)H(5); (E)-CH=CHC(6)H(4)-4'-C(CH(3))(3); (E)-CH=CHC(6)H(4)-4'-N(CH(3))(2); (E)-CH=CHC(6)H(4)-4'-N(C(4)H(9))(2); (E,E)-(CH=CH)(2)C(6)H(4)-4'-N(CH(3))(2)) with various organic (CF(3)SO(3)(-), p-CH(3)C(6)H(4)SO(3)(-)), inorganic (I(-), ClO(4)(-), SCN(-), [Hg(2)I(6)](2-)) and organometallic (cis-[Ir(CO)(2)I(2)](-)) counter anions are studied with the aim of investigating the role of ion pairing and of ionic dissociation or aggregation of ion pairs in controlling their second-order NLO response in anhydrous chloroform solution. The combined use of electronic absorption spectra, conductimetric measurements and pulsed field gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR experiments show that the second-order NLO response, investigated by the electric-field-induced second harmonic generation (EFISH) technique, of the salts of the cationic NLO chromophores strongly depends upon the nature of the counter anion and concentration. The ion pairs are the major species at concentration around 10(-3) M, and their dipole moments were determined. Generally, below 5x10(-4) M, ion pairs start to dissociate into ions with parallel increase of the second-order NLO response, due to the increased concentration of purely cationic NLO chromophores with improved NLO response. At concentration higher than 10(-3) M, some multipolar aggregates, probably of H type, are formed, with parallel slight decrease of the second-order NLO response. Ion pairing is dependent upon the nature of the counter anion and on the electronic structure of the cationic NLO chromophore. It is very strong for the thiocyanate anion in particular and, albeit to a lesser extent, for the sulfonated anions. The latter show increased tendency to self-aggregate.

  9. Production of N.sup.+ ions from a multicusp ion beam apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kunkel, Wulf B.; Walther, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    A method of generating a high purity (at least 98%) N.sup.+ ion beam using a multicusp ion source (10) having a chamber (11) formed by a cylindrical chamber wall (12) surrounded by a plurality of magnets (13), a filament (57) centrally disposed in said chamber, a plasma electrode (36) having an extraction orifice (41) at one end of the chamber, a magnetic filter having two parallel magnets (21, 22) spaced from said plasma electrode (36) and dividing the chamber (11) into arc discharge and extraction regions. The method includes ionizing nitrogen gas in the arc discharge region of the chamber (11), maintaining the chamber wall (12) at a positive voltage relative to the filament (57) and at a magnitude for an optimum percentage of N.sup.+ ions in the extracted ion beams, disposing a hot liner (45) within the chamber and near the chamber wall (12) to limit recombination of N.sup.+ ions into the N.sub.2.sup.+ ions, spacing the magnets (21, 22) of the magnetic filter from each other for optimum percentage of N.sup.3 ions in the extracted ion beams, and maintaining a relatively low pressure downstream of the extraction orifice and of a magnitude (preferably within the range of 3-8.times.10.sup.-4 torr) for an optimum percentage of N.sup.+ ions in the extracted ion beam.

  10. Production of N[sup +] ions from a multicusp ion beam apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kango Leung; Kunkel, W.B.; Walther, S.R.

    1993-03-30

    A method of generating a high purity (at least 98%) N[sup +] ion beam using a multicusp ion source having a chamber formed by a cylindrical chamber wall surrounded by a plurality of magnets, a filament centrally disposed in said chamber, a plasma electrode having an extraction orifice at one end of the chamber, a magnetic filter having two parallel magnets spaced from said plasma electrode and dividing the chamber into arc discharge and extraction regions. The method includes ionizing nitrogen gas in the arc discharge region of the chamber, maintaining the chamber wall at a positive voltage relative to the filament and at a magnitude for an optimum percentage of N[sup +] ions in the extracted ion beams, disposing a hot liner within the chamber and near the chamber wall to limit recombination of N[sup +] ions into the N[sub 2][sup +] ions, spacing the magnets of the magnetic filter from each other for optimum percentage of N[sup 3] ions in the extracted ion beams, and maintaining a relatively low pressure downstream of the extraction orifice and of a magnitude (preferably within the range of 3-8[times]10[sup [minus]4] torr) for an optimum percentage of N[sup +] ions in the extracted ion beam.

  11. TU-F-BRE-03: Application of a Novel Mass-Density Compensation Optimization Method to Improve the Response of a Liquid-Filled Ionization Chamber in Nonstandard Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kamio, Y; Bouchard, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the response of the microLion detector (PTW 31018) in small field conditions by optimizing the density of the detector's non-sensitive components using a novel method based on the detector's dose response function. Methods: The central values h(0,0) of the perturbation functions for the microLion detector and a volume of water equivalent to its sensitive volume were calculated using the Monte Carlo user code egs-chamber by scoring the dose absorbed by a 6 MV photon pencil beam incident on their centroids. Values of h(0,0) were plotted as a function of the density of the microLion's graphite electrode with the detector placed in the axial orientation. The optimized density was found by finding the minimal value of h(0,0). Results: A density of 1.37 g/cm3 was found to minimize the perturbation function of the microLion detector. The modified microLion's response was then evaluated in small square fields with sides in the range of 5 – 40 mm and found to be consistent with highly watere-quivalent detectors such as a scintillating detector (Exradin W1) and a generic alanine detector in both axial and radial orientations. Conclusion: This work illustrates a novel method which can used to optimize the design of radiation detectors in small fields. This method should also work with other optimization parameters (e.g. thickness of electrode). Density-compensated detectors have the potential to eliminate the need to evaluate nonstandard field correction factors as described by the IAEA-AAPM formalism (Alfonso et al.) and simplify future dosimetry protocols for SRS/SBRT modalities. Finally, we also expect an improvement in the response of density-compensated detectors for composite IMRT fields.

  12. Kinetic response of ionospheric ions to onset of auroral electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Kan, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    By examining the exact analytic solution of a kinetic model of collisional interaction of ionospheric ions with atmospheric neutrals in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation, we show that the onset of intense auroral electric fields in the topside ionosphere can produce the following kinetic effects: (1) heat the bulk ionospheric ions to approximately 2 eV, thus driving them up to higher altitudes where they can be subjected to collisionless plasma processes; (2) produce a non-Maxwellian superthermal tail in the distribution function; and (3) cause the ion distribution function to be anisotropic with respect to the magnetic field with the perpendicular average thermal energy exceeding the parallel thermal energy.

  13. HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF PLENUM WITH ATTACHED DRAFT REGULATOR. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  14. The Mechanism Responsible for Extraordinary Cs-ion Selectivity in Crystalline Silicotitanate

    SciTech Connect

    Celestian,A.; Kubicki, J.; Hanson, J.; Clearfield, A.; Parise, J.

    2008-01-01

    Combining information from time-resolved X-ray and neutron scattering with theoretical calculations has revealed the elegant mechanism whereby hydrogen crystalline silicotitanate (H-CST; H2Ti2SiO7{center_dot}1.5H2O) achieves its remarkable ion-exchange selectivity for cesium. Rather than a simple ion-for-ion displacement reaction into favorable sites, which has been suggested by static structural studies of ion-exchanged variants of CST, Cs+ exchange proceeds via a two-step process mediated by conformational changes in the framework. Similar to the case of ion channels in proteins, occupancy of the most favorable site does not occur until the first lever, cooperative repulsive interactions between water and the initial Cs-exchange site, repels a hydrogen lever on the silicotitanate framework. Here we show that these interactions induce a subtle conformational rearrangement in CST that unlocks the preferred Cs site and increases the overall capacity and selectivity for ion exchange.

  15. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. H.; Tang, S. W.; Ma, P.; Lu, C. G.; Yang, H. R.; Wang, S. T.; Yu, Y. H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Yan, D.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z. Y.; Duan, L. M.; Sun, B. H.

    2015-09-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a 239Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4-0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of 18O at 400 AMeV.

  16. Dose--response of initial G2-chromatid breaks induced in normal human fibroblasts by heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Takai, N.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Dicello, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate initial chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed G2 chromosomes following exposure to heavy ions of different LET. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exponentially growing human fibroblast cells AG1522 were irradiated with gamma-rays, energetic carbon (13 keV/ microm, 80 keV/microm), silicon (55 keV/microm) and iron (140 keV/microm, 185keV/microm, 440keV/microm) ions. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A. Initial chromatid-type and isochromatid breaks in G2 cells were scored. RESULTS: The dose response curves for total chromatid breaks were linear regardless of radiation type. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) showed a LET-dependent increase, peaking around 2.7 at 55-80keV/microm and decreasing at higher LET. The dose response curves for isochromatid-type breaks were linear for high-LET radiations, but linear-quadratic for gamma-rays and 13 keV/microm carbon ions. The RBE for the induction of isochromatid breaks obtained from linear components increased rapidly between 13keV/microm (about 7) and 80keV/microm carbon (about 71), and decreased gradually until 440 keV/microm iron ions (about 66). CONCLUSIONS: High-LET radiations are more effective at inducing isochromatid breaks, while low-LET radiations are more effective at inducing chromatid-type breaks. The densely ionizing track structures of heavy ions and the proximity of sister chromatids in G2 cells result in an increase in isochromatid breaks.

  17. Response of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (> 50 nm) to changes in ion-nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, J. O.; Enghoff, M. B.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-12-01

    The role of ionization in the formation of clouds and aerosols has been debated for many years. A body of evidence exists that correlates cloud properties to galactic cosmic ray ionization; however these results are still contested. In recent years experimental evidence has also been produced showing that ionization can promote the nucleation of small aerosols at atmospheric conditions. The experiments showed that an increase in ionization leads to an increase in the formation of ultrafine aerosols (~3 nm), but in the real atmosphere such small particles have to grow by coagulation and condensation to become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in order to have an effect on clouds. However, numerical studies predict that variations in the count of ultra-fine aerosols will lead only to an insignificant change in the count of CCN. This is due to 1) the competition between the additional ultra-fine aerosols for the limited supply of condensable gases leading to a slower growth and 2) the increased loss rates of the additional particles during the longer growth-time. We investigated the growth of aerosols to CCN sizes using an 8 m3 reaction chamber made from electro-polished stainless steel. One side was fitted with a Teflon foil to allow ultraviolet light to illuminate the chamber, which was continuously flushed with dry purified air. Variable concentrations of water vapor, ozone, and sulfur dioxide could be added to the chamber. UV-lamps initiated photochemistry producing sulfuric acid. Ionization could be enhanced with two Cs-137 gamma sources (30 MBq), mounted on each side of the chamber. Figure 1 shows the evolution of the aerosols, following a nucleation event induced by the gamma sources. Previous to the event the aerosols were in steady state. Each curve represents a size bin: 3-10 nm (dark purple), 10-20 nm (purple), 20-30 nm (blue), 30-40 nm (light blue), 40-50 nm (green), 50-60 nm (yellow), and 60-68 nm (red). Black curves show a ~1 hour smoothing. The initial

  18. CFD Code Survey for Thrust Chamber Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Klaus W.

    1990-01-01

    In the quest fo find analytical reference codes, responses from a questionnaire are presented which portray the current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program status and capability at various organizations, characterizing liquid rocket thrust chamber flow fields. Sample cases are identified to examine the ability, operational condition, and accuracy of the codes. To select the best suited programs for accelerated improvements, evaluation criteria are being proposed.

  19. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  20. Chamber Music: Skills and Teamwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarrubia, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the benefits of participating in chamber music ensembles, such as the development of a heightened level of awareness, and considers the role of the music educator/conductor. Provides tools and exercises that teachers can introduce to chamber music players to improve their rehearsals and performances. (CMK)

  1. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  2. Calibration of PICO Bubble Chamber Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Miaotianzi; PICO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PICO Collaboration builds bubble chambers for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. I will present the suite of calibration experiments performed to measure the sensitivity of these chambers to nuclear recoils (the expected WIMP signal) and to gamma rays (a common background to the WIMP signal). These calibrations include measurements with a 10-ml C3F8 bubble chamber at Northwestern University and with a 30-ml C3F8 bubble chamber deployed in the University of Montreal's tandem Van de Graaf facility, giving the bubble chamber response to a variety of gamma rays, broad-spectrum neutron sources, and mono-energetic low energy neutrons. I will compare our measured sensitivities to those predicted by a simple thermodynamic model and will show how the results impact our ability to detect dark matter, with a focus on light WIMP searches. Supported by DOE Grant: DE-SC0012161.

  3. Number-conserving linear-response study of low-velocity ion stopping in a collisional magnetized classical plasma.

    PubMed

    Nersisyan, Hrachya B; Deutsch, Claude; Das, Amal K

    2011-03-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of the low-velocity stopping power of ions in a magnetized collisional and classical plasma are reported. The stopping power for an ion is calculated through the linear-response (LR) theory. The collisions, which lead to a damping of the excitations in the plasma, are taken into account through a number-conserving relaxation time approximation in the LR function. In order to highlight the effects of collisions and magnetic field, we present a comparison of our analytical and numerical results obtained for nonzero damping or magnetic field with those for vanishing damping or magnetic field. It is shown that the collisions remove the anomalous friction obtained previously [Nersisyan et al., Phys. Rev. E 61, 7022 (2000)] for the collisionless magnetized plasmas at low ion velocities. One of the major objectives of this paper is to compare and to contrast our theoretical results with those obtained through a diffusion coefficient formulation based on the Dufty-Berkovsky relation evaluated for a magnetized one-component plasma modeled with target ions and electrons. PMID:21517600

  4. Multiple ionization of neon atoms in collisions with bare and dressed ions: A mean-field description considering target response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Gerald; Kirchner, Tom

    2015-05-01

    We investigate projectile-charge-state-differential electron removal from neon atoms by impact of He2+, Li3+, B2+, and C3+ ions at intermediate projectile energies (25 keV/u to 1 MeV/u ). The many-electron problem is described with an independent electron model in which active electrons at both collision centers are propagated in a common mean-field potential. Response to electron removal is taken into account in terms of a time-dependent screening potential, and a Slater-determinant-based method is used for the final-state analysis. Total cross sections for net recoil ion production, multiple ionization, and capture channels are mostly in good agreement with published experimental data. Results from equicharged bare and dressed ions are compared and the net recoil ion production cross section is broken down into contributions associated with different final projectile charge states in order to shed light on the role of the projectile electrons.

  5. Application of relativistic coupled cluster linear response theory to helium-like ions embedded in plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Madhulita; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sinha Mahapatra, Uttam; Mukherjee, P. K.

    2011-08-01

    Ionization potential and low lying 1S0\\longrightarrow1P1 excitation energies (EE) of highly stripped He-like ions C4 +, Al11 +, and Ar16 + embedded in plasma environment are calculated for the first time using the state-of-the-art coupled cluster (CC)-based linear response theory (LRT) with the four-component relativistic spinors and compared with available experimental data from laser plasma experiments. Debye's screening model is used to estimate the effect of plasma on the ions within the relativistic and non-relativistic framework. The transition energies computed at the CCLRT level using the Debye model agree well with experiment and with other available theoretical data. To our knowledge, no prior CCLRT calculations within the Dirac-Fock framework are available for these systems. Our calculated transition energies for helium-like ions are in accord with experiment; we trust that our predicted EE might be acceptably good for the systems considered. Our preliminary result indicates that CCLRT with the four-component relativistic spinors appears to be a valuable tool for studying the atomic systems where accurate treatments of correlation effects play a crucial role in shaping the spectral lines of ions subjected to plasma environment.

  6. A theoretical F region study of ion compositional and temperature variations in response to magnetospheric storm inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The response of the high-latitude F region to magnetospheric storm inputs is modelled. During the 'storm', the spatial extent of the auroral oval, the intensity of the precipitating auroral electron energy flux, and the plasma convection pattern were varied with time. During the storm growth phase, the auroral oval expanded, the precipitating electron energy flux increased, and the magnetospheric convection pattern changed from a symmetric two-cell pattern with a 20 kV cross-tail potential to an asymmetric two-cell pattern with a total cross-tail potential of 90 kV. During the storm, there were significant changes in the ion temperature, ion composition, and molecular/atomic ion transition height. The storm time asymmetric convection pattern produced an ion temperature hot spot at the location of the dusk convection cell that contained significantly enhanced NO(+) densities. During the storm recovery phase, the decay of these densities closely followed the decrease in the plasma convection speed.

  7. Number-conserving linear-response study of low-velocity ion stopping in a collisional magnetized classical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nersisyan, Hrachya B.; Deutsch, Claude; Das, Amal K.

    2011-03-15

    The results of a theoretical investigation of the low-velocity stopping power of ions in a magnetized collisional and classical plasma are reported. The stopping power for an ion is calculated through the linear-response (LR) theory. The collisions, which lead to a damping of the excitations in the plasma, are taken into account through a number-conserving relaxation time approximation in the LR function. In order to highlight the effects of collisions and magnetic field, we present a comparison of our analytical and numerical results obtained for nonzero damping or magnetic field with those for vanishing damping or magnetic field. It is shown that the collisions remove the anomalous friction obtained previously [Nersisyan et al., Phys. Rev. E 61, 7022 (2000)] for the collisionless magnetized plasmas at low ion velocities. One of the major objectives of this paper is to compare and to contrast our theoretical results with those obtained through a diffusion coefficient formulation based on the Dufty-Berkovsky relation evaluated for a magnetized one-component plasma modeled with target ions and electrons.

  8. Dose response and mutation induction by ion beam irradiation in buckwheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, T.; Yamaguchi, H.; Degi, K.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Abe, T.

    2003-05-01

    The biological effects of ion beams were investigated to pursue the development of a method for breeding by mutation in buckwheat. Common buckwheat (Botansoba, Bot) and tartary buckwheat (Rotundatiem, Rot) seeds were exposed to various ions in linear energy transfer (LET) at 9-630 keV/μm. The lethal dose 50 (LD 50) of ion beams were 10-300 Gy (Bot) and 30-500 Gy (Rot). It was indicated that a penetrating depth in excess of 1.7 mm is necessary to thoroughly saturate the target, and ions with a penetrating depth of less than 2.2 mm were affected by the presence of hulls. The maximum values of the relative biological effectiveness were 17.7 (Rot) and 22.5 (Bot) at 305 keV/μm. The effective cross sections increased with the LET, and the maximum values were 2.7 (Rot) and 3.0 μm 2 (Bot). The mutation induction effects of He and C ions were higher than those of gamma rays.

  9. Experimental investigation of the effect of polymer matrices on polymer fibre optic oxygen sensors and their time response characteristics using a vacuum testing chamber and a liquid flow apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongsheng; Formenti, Federico; McPeak, Hanne; Obeid, Andrew N.; Hahn, Clive; Farmery, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Very fast sensors that are able to track rapid changes in oxygen partial pressure (PO2) in the gas and liquid phases are increasingly required in scientific research – particularly in the life sciences. Recent interest in monitoring very fast changes in the PO2 of arterial blood in some respiratory failure conditions is one such example. Previous attempts to design fast intravascular electrochemical oxygen sensors for use in physiology and medicine have failed to meet the criteria that are now required in modern investigations. However, miniature photonic devices are capable of meeting this need. In this article, we present an inexpensive polymer type fibre-optic, oxygen sensor that is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional electrochemical oxygen sensors. It is constructed with biologically inert polymer materials and is both sufficiently small and robust for direct insertion in to a human artery. The sensors were tested and evaluated in both a gas testing chamber and in a flowing liquid test system. The results showed a very fast T90 response time, typically circa 20 ms when tested in the gas phase, and circa 100 ms in flowing liquid. PMID:26726286

  10. Comparison of the Effects of Carbon Ion and Photon Irradiation on the Angiogenic Response in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlah, Florentine; Haenze, Joerg; Arenz, Andrea; Seay, Ulrike; Hasan, Diya; Gottschald, Oana R.; Seeger, Werner; Rose, Frank

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy resistance is a commonly encountered problem in cancer treatment. In this regard, stabilization of endothelial cells and release of angiogenic factors by cancer cells contribute to this problem. In this study, we used human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells to compare the effects of carbon ion and X-ray irradiation on the cells' angiogenic response. Methods and Materials: A549 cells were irradiated with biologically equivalent doses for cell survival of either carbon ions (linear energy transfer, 170 keV/{mu}m; energy of 9.8 MeV/u on target) or X-rays and injected with basement membrane matrix into BALB/c nu/nu mice to generate a plug, allowing quantification of angiogenesis by blood vessel enumeration. The expression of angiogenic factors (VEGF, PlGF, SDF-1, and SCF) was assessed at the mRNA and secreted protein levels by using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Signal transduction mediated by stem cell factor (SCF) was assessed by phosphorylation of its receptor c-Kit. For inhibition of SCF/c-Kit signaling, a specific SCF/c-Kit inhibitor (ISCK03) was used. Results: Irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays (6 Gy) but not carbon ions (2 Gy) resulted in a significant increase in blood vessel density (control, 20.71 {+-} 1.55; X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; carbon ion, 16.33 {+-} 1.03; number per microscopic field). Concordantly, irradiation with X-rays but not with carbon ions increased the expression of SCF and subsequently caused phosphorylation of c-Kit in endothelial cells. ISCK03 treatment of A549 cells irradiated with X-rays (6 Gy) resulted in a significant decrease in blood vessel density (X-ray, 36.44 {+-} 3.44; X-ray and ISCK03, 4.33 {+-} 0.71; number of microscopic field). These data indicate that irradiation of A549 cells with X-rays but not with carbon ions promotes angiogenesis. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that SCF is an X-ray-induced mediator of angiogenesis in A549 cells, a

  11. Ion thruster performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A model of ion thruster performance is developed for high flux density, cusped magnetic field thruster designs. This model is formulated in terms of the average energy required to produce an ion in the discharge chamber plasma and the fraction of these ions that are extracted to form the beam. The direct loss of high energy (primary) electrons from the plasma to the anode is shown to have a major effect on thruster performance. The model provides simple algebraic equations enabling one to calculate the beam ion energy cost, the average discharge chamber plasma ion energy cost, the primary electron density, the primary-to-Maxwellian electron density ratio and the Maxwellian electron temperature. Experiments indicate that the model correctly predicts the variation in plasma ion energy cost for changes in propellant gas (Ar, Kr and Xe), grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam extraction area, discharge voltage, and discharge chamber wall temperature. The model and experiments indicate that thruster performance may be described in terms of only four thruster configuration dependent parameters and two operating parameters. The model also suggests that improved performance should be exhibited by thruster designs which extract a large fraction of the ions produced in the discharge chamber, which have good primary electron and neutral atom containment and which operate at high propellant flow rates.

  12. Modified agricultural waste biomass with enhanced responsive properties for metal-ion remediation: a green approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Garima; Sud, Dhiraj

    2012-12-01

    Dalbergia sissoo pods, a lignocellulosic nitrogenous waste biomass, was evaluated for sequestering of Cr(VI) from synthetic wastewater. Dalbergia sissoo pods (DSP) were used in three different forms, viz. natural (DSPN), impregnated in the form of hydrated beads (DSPB), and in carbonized form (DSPC) for comparative studies. Batch experiments were performed for the removal of hexavalent chromium. Effects of pH adsorbent dose, initial metal-ion concentration, stirring speed, and contact time were investigated. The removal of metal ions was dependent on the physico-chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, adsorbate concentration, and other studied process parameters. Maximum metal removal for Cr(VI) was observed at pH 2.0. The experimental data were analyzed based on Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms. Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of metal ions followed a pseudo-second-order equation.

  13. Structural and thermal response of 30 cm diameter ion thruster optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, G. S.; Zavesky, R. J.; Gooder, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    Tabular and graphical data are presented which are intended for use in calibrating and validating structural and thermal models of ion thruster optics. A 30 cm diameter, two electrode, mercury ion thruster was operated using two different electrode assembly designs. With no beam extraction, the transient and steady state temperature profiles and center electrode gaps were measured for three discharge powers. The data showed that the electrode mount design had little effect on the temperatures, but significantly impacted the motion of the electrode center. Equilibrium electrode gaps increased with one design and decreased with the other. Equilibrium displacements in excess of 0.5 mm and gap changes of 0.08 mm were measured at 450 W discharge power. Variations in equilibrium gaps were also found among assemblies of the same design. The presented data illustrate the necessity for high fidelity ion optics models and development of experimental techniques to allow their validation.

  14. Transparent aluminium nanowire electrodes with optical and electrical anisotropic response fabricated by defocused ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Diego; Giordano, Maria Caterina; Martella, Christian; Buatier de Mongeot, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Self-organized Al nanowire (NW) electrodes have been obtained by defocused Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS) of polycrystalline Al films grown by sputter deposition. The electrical sheet resistance of the electrode has been acquired in situ during ion bombardment of the samples, evidencing an increase of the electronic transport anisotropy as a function of ion fluence between the two directions parallel and orthogonal to the NWs axis. Optical spectra in transmission also show a large dichroism between the two directions, suggesting the role of localized plasmons in the UV spectral range. The results show that Al NW electrodes, prepared under experimental conditions which are compatible with those of conventional industrial coaters and implanters, could represent a low cost alternative to the transparent conductive oxides employed in optoelectronic devices.

  15. ION ACCELERATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.; Martin, J.A.

    1960-02-23

    Well focused, intense ion beams are obtained by providing a multi- apertured source grid in front of an ion source chamber and an accelerating multi- apertured grid closely spaced from and in alignment with the source grid. The longest dimensions of the elongated apertures in the grids are normal to the direction of the magnetic field used with the device. Large ion currents may be withdrawn from the source, since they do not pass through any small focal region between the grids.

  16. Variation in ion leakage parameters of two wheat genotypes with different Rht-B1 alleles in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Kocheva, Konstantina V; Landjeva, Svetlana P; Georgiev, Georgi I

    2014-12-01

    The reaction to soil drying was evaluated in two Triticum aestivum near-isogenic lines carrying different alleles of the height-reducing gene Rht-B1 based on an improved method for assessment of electrolyte leakage. The two lines were previously shown to differ in their physiological responses to induced water deficit stress. Drought was imposed for 6 days on 10-day-old seedlings. Ion efflux from leaves was measured conductometrically in multiple time points during the 24 h incubation period, and the obtained biphasic kinetics was interpreted according to a previously developed theoretical model proposing different leakage rates through the apoplast and the symplast. Most of the model parameters were able to properly differentiate the two closely related genotypes. The mutant Rht-B1c displayed lower and slower electrolyte leakage in comparison with the wild-type Rht-B1a. It was speculated that the Rht genes expressing defective DELLA proteins might be involved in water stress response through modulation of cell wall stiffness, which influences its capacity for ions retention, and also by their contribution to ROS detoxification, thus indirectly stabilizing cellular membranes. The presented analytical approach relating processes of ion and water flow in and out of the cell could be used for characterization of membrane and cell wall properties of different genotypes under normal and stress conditions.

  17. Response to “Comment on ‘The ion-kinetic D'Angelo mode’” [Phys. Plasmas 22, 044703 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Chibisov, D. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.

    2015-04-15

    A response to “Comment on ‘The ion-kinetic D'Angelo mode’” by Aman-ur-Rehman, Shaukat Ali Shan, and Hamid Saleem is given. We find that all Comments are grounded on the misinterpretations of the results of our paper “The ion-kinetic D'Angelo mode” and are erroneous.

  18. Roos and NACP-02 ion chamber perturbations and water-air stopping-power ratios for clinical electron beams for energies from 4 to 22 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M.; Shipley, D. R.; Manning, J. W.

    2015-02-01

    Empirical fits are developed for depth-compensated wall- and cavity-replacement perturbations in the PTW Roos 34001 and IBA / Scanditronix NACP-02 parallel-plate ionisation chambers, for electron beam qualities from 4 to 22 MeV for depths up to approximately 1.1 × R50,D. These are based on calculations using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code EGSnrc and its user codes with a full simulation of the linac treatment head modelled using BEAMnrc. These fits are used with calculated restricted stopping-power ratios between air and water to match measured depth-dose distributions in water from an Elekta Synergy clinical linear accelerator at the UK National Physical Laboratory. Results compare well with those from recent publications and from the IPEM 2003 electron beam radiotherapy Code of Practice.

  19. Kinetic response of ionospheric ions to onset of auroral electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Kan, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the exact analytic solution of a kinetic model of collisional interaction of ionospheric fions with atmospheric neutrals in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation, shows that the onset of intense auroral electric fields in the topside ionosphere can produce the following kinetic effects: (1) heat the bulk ionospheric ions to approximately 2 eV, thus driving them up to higher altitudes where they can be subjected to collisionless plasma processes; (2) produce a nonMaxwellian superthermal tail in the distribution function; and (3) cause the ion distribution function to be anisotropic with respect to the magnetic field with the perpendicular average thermal energy exceeding the parallel thermal energy.

  20. DUAL HEATED ION SOURCE STRUCTURE HAVING ARC SHIFTING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.

    1959-04-14

    An ion source is presented for calutrons, particularly an electrode arrangement for the ion generator of a calutron ion source. The ion source arc chamber is heated and an exit opening with thermally conductive plates defines the margins of the opening. These plates are electrically insulated from the body of the ion source and are connected to a suitable source of voltage to serve as electrodes for shaping the ion beam egressing from the arc chamber.

  1. Starting a High School Chamber Music Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Presents ideas on how to begin a chamber music ensemble. Discusses how to find time to accomplish chamber music playing in and around the school day. Presents short descriptions of chamber music that can be used with ensembles. Includes chamber music resources and additional chamber works. (CMK)

  2. Modeling, Calibration, and Verification of a Fission Chamber for ACRR Experimentersa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Jonathan; Luker, S. Michael; Parma, Edward J.; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    When performing research at a reactor facility, experimenters often need to determine the neutron fluence achieved during an operation. Facilities typically provide guidance in the form of neutron fluence per megajoule (MJ) or through passive dosimetry results. After experiment completion, there is sometimes a delay of several days (or weeks) before the passive dosimetry results are available. In the interim, an experimenter does not have confirmation that the desired irradiation levels were reached. Active dosimetry may provide an estimate of neutron fluxes, but few active detectors are available that have been calibrated to measure neutron fluxes obtained inside the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity environment. For past experiments at the ACRR, the neutron fluence was calculated by integrating the response of a fission chamber rate detection signal and then normalizing this integral to fluence determined from passive dosimetry. An alternative method of directly measuring neutron flux is desired; the new methodology described provides a complete neutron flux profile after a reactor pulse, utilizing fission chamber physics in combination with a compensating ion chamber to extract and convert a current signal to neutron flux as a function of time. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Development of ``Static'' In-Situ Implanter Chamber Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedave, Sharad; Sweeney, Joe; Byl, Oleg; Letaj, Shkelqim; Wodjenski, Mike; Hilgarth, Monica; Marganski, Paul; Bishop, Steve; Eldridge, David; Kaim, Robert

    2008-11-01

    Since the introduction of XeF2 in-situ cleaning, its use in production implanters has been mainly focused on cleaning ion sources by flowing the cleaning vapor through the source arc chamber. This has been called "Dynamic" in-situ cleaning. "Static" in-situ cleaning is a different method under development at ATMI which allows an entire vacuum chamber and its contents to be cleaned. The chamber is filled to a pressure of 1-3 Torr of XeF2 vapor, which reacts with deposited material on all internal surfaces, and the reaction by-products are then pumped away. When applied to the source vacuum chamber, the Static cleaning method allows cleaning vapor to contact components, such as the HV bushing and the manipulator assembly, which may not be adequately cleaned with the Dynamic method. Recently, ATMI has installed a prototype Static in-situ cleaning system on an in-house Ion Source Test Stand in Danbury, CT. This paper will describe the prototype cleaning system and process and its applicability to production implant systems. We will also present experimental data showing removal of various dopant residues and the cleaning effectiveness for different components and surfaces inside the source vacuum chamber.

  4. A microperfusion chamber for study of mammalian spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Burkman, L J

    1988-01-01

    The design of a microperfusion chamber is presented for use with spermatozoa or other cell suspensions. This chamber allows perfusion of a small number of spermatozoa during simultaneous observation of cell behavior at the microscope. The chamber is made from a flat glass capillary tube that is fitted at both ends with a filter unit containing Millipore filter discs. The entire assembly is designed to fit the stage of an inverted microscope. A population containing as few as several hundred sperm cells may be observed in the chamber during successive changes of the suspending medium as controlled by a perfusion pump. Several experiments are presented demonstrating sperm survival in the sealed chamber and the response of rabbit and human sperm motility after the washing process. For these manipulations, the percentage of motile cells, linear swimming speed and incidence of hyperactivated motility are reported. Simple incubation in the chamber for 1 hour was not deleterious to the motility of rabbit spermatozoa. Human seminal spermatozoa showed no decline in vigorous motility after the washing procedure. Compared with in vitro capacitated spermatozoa, however, washing of rabbit seminal spermatozoa showed a variable response. Finally, partially capacitated human spermatozoa were examined for any alteration of motility during chamber incubation with a subsequent wash. When small numbers of spermatozoa or other cell types must be manipulated, the methodology can be effectively substituted for the standard washing procedure that uses repeated centrifugation and resuspension.

  5. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1958-08-19

    A novel ion source is described for use in a calutron which has the prime adwantage of reducing the nunnber of unwanted ions in the ion generating mechamism.An important feature of the invention resides In an arc chamber having a lining of the polyisotopic material to be treated In the calutron and bombardment of the linirg with positive ions of a light gas to induce sputtering and ionization of the lining. With the reduction of unwanted ions in the source beam provided by the described source, the calutron operation may be more accurately controlled.

  6. A metal–ion-responsive adhesive material via switching of molecular recognition properties

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Common adhesives stick to a wide range of materials immediately after they are applied to the surfaces. To prevent indiscriminate sticking, smart adhesive materials that adhere to a specific target surface only under particular conditions are desired. Here we report a polymer hydrogel modified with both β-cyclodextrin (βCD) and 2,2′-bipyridyl (bpy) moieties (βCD–bpy gel) as a functional adhesive material responding to metal ions as chemical stimuli. The adhesive property of βCD–bpy gel based on interfacial molecular recognition is expressed by complexation of metal ions to bpy that controlled dissociation of supramolecular cross-linking of βCD–bpy. Moreover, adhesion of βCD–bpy gel exhibits selectivity on the kinds of metal ions, depending on the efficiency of metal–bpy complexes in cross-linking. Transduction of two independent chemical signals (metal ions and host–guest interactions) is achieved in this adhesion system, which leads to the development of highly orthogonal macroscopic joining of multiple objects. PMID:25099995

  7. PULSED ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.E.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1958-06-17

    An ion source is described for producing very short high density pulses of ions without bcam scattering. The ions are created by an oscillating electron discharge within a magnetic field. After the ions are drawn from the ionization chamber by an accelerating electrode the ion beam is under the influence of the magnetic field for separation of the ions according to mass and, at the same time, passes between two neutralizing plntes maintained nt equal negative potentials. As the plates are formed of a material having a high ratio of secondary electrons to impinging ions, the ion bombardment of the plntes emits electrons which neutralize the frirge space-charge of the beam and tend to prevent widening of the beam cross section due to the mutual repulsion of the ions.

  8. A borinic acid polymer with fluoride ion- and thermo-responsive properties that are tunable over a wide temperature range.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wen-Ming; Cheng, Fei; Jäkle, Frieder

    2014-08-18

    A new type of smart borinic acid polymer with luminescence and multiple stimuli-responsive properties is reported. In DMSO with small amounts of water, the homopolymer PBA shows a tunable upper critical solution temperature (UCST). As the amount of water increases from 0 to 2.5 % (v/v), the UCST rises linearly from 20 °C to 100 °C (boiling point of water). Thus, the thermal responsive behavior can be tuned over a wide temperature range. Furthermore, polymer solutions in DMSO show a reversible response to fluoride ions, which can be correlated to the presence of the Lewis acidic borinic acid groups. Upon addition of fluoride, the polymer becomes soluble because the functional R2BOH groups are converted into ionic [R2BF2](-) groups, but turns insoluble again upon addition of H2O, which reverses this process.

  9. Conformational Dynamics in the Selectivity Filter of KcsA in Response to Potassium Ion Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Tian, Lin; McDermott, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    The conformational change in the selectivity filter of KcsA as a function of ambient potassium concentration is studied with solid state NMR. This highly conserved region of the protein is known to chelate potassium ions selectively. We report solid-state NMR chemical shift fingerprints of two distinct conformations of the selectivity filter; significant changes are observed in the chemical shifts of key residues in the filter as the buffer potassium ion concentration is changed from 50 mM to 1 µM. Potassium ion titration studies reveal that the site-specific Kd for K+ binding at the key pore residue Val 76, is on the order of ∼7 µM and that relatively high sample hydration is necessary to observe the low K+ conformer. Simultaneous detection of both conformers at low ambient potassium concentration suggests that the high K+ and low K+ states are in slow exchange on the NMR timescale (kex < 500 s−1). The slow rate and tight binding for evacuating both inner sites simultaneously, differ from prior observations in detergents in solution, but agree well with measurements by electrophysiology, and appear to result from our use of a hydrated bilayer environment. These characteristics rule out participation of the low K+ state on the timescale of ion transmission, which has been assumed to involve interchange of states where one of the inner binding sites is always occupied. On the other hand, these kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of evacuation of the inner sites certainly could be compatible with participation in a control mechanism at low ion concentration, such as C-type inactivation, a process that is coupled to activation and involves closing of the outer mouth of the channel. PMID:20600123

  10. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  11. Study of the PTW microLion chamber temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Gómez, F; González-Castaño, D; Díaz-Botana, P; Pardo-Montero, J

    2014-06-01

    The use of liquid ionization chambers in radiotherapy has grown during the past few years. While for air ionization chambers the k(TP) correction for air mass density due to pressure and temperature variations is well known, less work has been done on the case of liquid ionization chambers, where there is still the need to take into account the influence of temperature in the free ion yield. We have measured the PTW microLion isooctane-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence in a ~ ±10 °C interval around the standard 20 °C room temperature for three operation voltages, including the manufacturer recommended voltage, and two beam qualities, (60)Co and 50 kV x-rays. Within the measured temperature range, the microLion signal exhibits a positive linear dependence, which is around 0.24% K(-1) at 800 V with (60)Co irradiation. This effect is of the same order of magnitude as the T dependence found in air ionization chambers, but its nature is completely different and its sign opposite to that of an air chamber. Onsager theory has been used to model the results and is consistent with this linear behaviour. However, some inconsistencies in the modelling of the 50 kV x-ray results have been found that are attributed to the failure of Onsager's isolated pair assumption for such radiation quality.

  12. IRIS Leaves Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the transportation of the IRIS observatory from the thermal vacuum chamber back to the clean tent for final testing and preparations for delivery to the launch site at Vandenberg A...

  13. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zeballos, E. Cerron; Crotty, I.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Valverde, J. Lamas; Neupane, S.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zichichi, A.

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  14. Improved ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, A.M.

    1986-01-30

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber type comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  15. ECR ion source with electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Z.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1993-10-26

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source having an electron gun for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber of the ion source is described. The ion source has a injection enclosure and a plasma chamber tank. The plasma chamber is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets. The electron gun injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber such that ionization within the plasma chamber occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun. The electron gun has a cathode for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply. A concentric inner conductor and outer conductor carry heating current to a carbon chuck and carbon pusher which hold the cathode in place and also heat the cathode. In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, the electron gun replaces the conventional first stage used in prior electron cyclotron resonance ion generators. 5 figures.

  16. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  17. Characterization of hollow cathode, ring cusp discharge chambers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study into the effects of changes in such physical design parameters as hollow cathode position, anode position and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance, is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction and ion beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate specific means by which changes in these design parameters induce changes in performance, i.e., through changes in the loss rates of primary electrons to the anode, of ions to discharge chamber walls or of ions to cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid, (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density on the discharge chamber centerline, and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface and so there are no steep magnetic flux density gradients near the walls through which ions can be lost by Bohm diffusion. The uniformity of the plasma density at the grids can also be improved by moving the point of primary electron injection into the discharge chamber off of the chamber centerline. Other results show the discharge chamber losses decrease when a filament cathode is substituted for a hollow cathode to the extent of the hollow cathode operating power. When plasma ion energy cost is determined in such a way that the cost of operating the hollow cathode is subtracted out, the performance using either electron source is similar.

  18. Ionospheric plasma outflow in response to transverse ion heating: Self-consistent macroscopic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the various likely processes for creating the cavities and found that the mirror force acting on the transversely heated ions is the most likely mechanism. The pondermotive force causing the wave collapse was found to be a much weaker force than the mirror force on the transversely heated ions observed inside the cavities along with the lower hybrid waves. Using a hydrodynamic model for the polar wind we modeled the cavity formation and found that for the heating rate obtained from the observed waves, the mirror force does create cavities with depletions as observed. Some initial results from this study were published in a recent Geophysical Research Letters and were reported in the Fall AGU meeting in San Francisco. We have continued this investigation using a large-scale semikinetic model.

  19. Response of reduced activation ferritic steels to high-fluence ion-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.; Katoh, Y.; Hirose, T.; Sakasegawa, H.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kohyama, A.; Iwai, T.

    2001-09-01

    Effects of high-fluence irradiation in fusion-relevant helium production condition on defect cluster formation and swelling of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs), JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-V-Ta) and F82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), have been investigated. Dual-ion (nickel plus helium ions) irradiation using electrostatic accelerators was adopted to simulate fusion neutron environment. The irradiation has been carried out up to a damage level of 100 displacement per atom (dpa) at around 723 K, at the HIT facility in the University of Tokyo. Thin foils for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB) microsampling system. The system enabled not only the broad cross-sectional TEM observation, but also the detailed study of irradiated microstructure, since unfavorable effects of ferromagnetism of a ferritic steel specimen were completely suppressed with this system by sampling a small volume in interests from the irradiated material.

  20. Laser inertial fusion dry-wall materials response to pulsed ions at power-plant level fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Tanaka, T. J.; Olson, C. L.; Peterson, R. R.; Knowles, T. R.

    2004-08-01

    Pulses of MeV-level ions with fluences of up to 20 J/cm 2 can be expected to impinge on the first-wall of future laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plants. To simulate the effect of these ions, we have exposed candidate dry-wall materials to ion pulses from RHEPP-1, located at Sandia National Laboratories. Various forms of tungsten and tungsten alloy were exposed to up to 1000 pulses, with some samples heated to 600 °C. Thresholds for roughening and material removal, and evolution of surface morphology were measured and compared with code predictions for materials response. Tungsten is observed to undergo surface roughening and subsurface crack formation that evolves over hundreds of pulses, and which can occur both below and above the melt threshold. Heating and Re-alloying mitigate, but do not eliminate, these apparently thermomechanically-caused effects. Use of a 3-D geometry, and/or use of the tungsten in thin-film form may offer improved survivability compared to bulk tungsten.

  1. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:27451112

  2. Avidin-biotin capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles as an ion-responsive release system to determine lead(II).

    PubMed

    Song, Weiling; Li, Jingyu; Li, Qing; Ding, Wenyao; Yang, Xiaoyan

    2015-02-15

    We have developed DNAzyme-functionalized silica nanoparticles for the rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of lead ion (Pb(2+)). The specific binding between avidin and biotinylated DNAzymes was used to cap the pore of dye-trapped silica nanoparticles. In the presence of Pb(2+), DNAzymes were catalytically cleaved to uncap the pore, releasing the dye cargo with detectable enhancements of fluorescence signal. This method enables rapid (15 min) and sensitive (limit of detection=8.0 nM) detection. Moreover, the Pb(2+)-responsive behavior shows high selectivity with other metal ions. The superior properties of the as-designed DNAzyme-functionalized silica nanoparticles can be attributed to the large loading capacity and highly ordered pore structure of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as well as the catalytical cleaving of DNAzymes with Pb(2+). The recoveries obtained by standard Pb(II) addition to real samples-tap water, commercial mineral water, and lake water-were all from 98 to 101%. Our design serves as a new prototype for metal-ion sensing systems, and it also has promising potential for detection of various targets in stimulus-release systems. PMID:25447495

  3. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions.

  4. Design of the plasma chamber and beam extraction system for SC ECRIS of RAON accelerator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Choi, S; Hong, I S

    2014-02-01

    The RAON accelerator is the heavy ion accelerator being built in Korea. It contains a 3rd generation SC ECRIS which uses 28 GHz/18 GHz microwave power to extract 12 puA uranium ion beams. A plasma chamber for that ECRIS is made of aluminum machined from bulk Al. That chamber contains cooling channels to remove dumped power and another access port for microwave introduction and plasma diagnostics. Beam extraction electrodes were designed considering the engineering issues and preliminary beam extraction analysis was done. That plasma chamber will be assembled with a cryostat, and beam extraction experiment will be done.

  5. Advanced ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    A simple model describing the discharge chamber performance of high strength, cusped magnetic field ion thrusters is developed. The model is formulated in terms of the energy cost of producing ions in the discharge chamber and the fraction of ions produced in the discharge chamber that are extracted to form the ion beam. The accuracy of the model is verified experimentally in a series of tests wherein the discharge voltage, propellant, grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam diameter and discharge chamber wall temperature are varied. The model is exercised to demonstrate what variations in performance might be expected by varying discharge chamber parameters. The results of a study of xenon and argon orificed hollow cathodes are reported. These results suggest that a hollow cathode model developed from research conducted on mercury cathodes can also be applied to xenon and argon. Primary electron mean free paths observed in argon and xenon cathodes that are larger than those found in mercury cathodes are identified as a cause of performance differences between mercury and inert gas cathodes. Data required as inputs to the inert gas cathode model are presented so it can be used as an aid in cathode design.

  6. Low frequency noise and radiation response in the partially depleted SOI MOSFETs with ion implanted buried oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Hai-Bo; Liu, Yu-Rong; Wang, Xin; En, Yun-Fei; Li, Bin; Lu, Yu-Dong

    2015-08-01

    Low frequency noise behaviors of partially depleted silicon-on-insulator (PDSOI) n-channel metal-oxide semiconductors (MOS) transistors with and without ion implantation into the buried oxide are investigated in this paper. Owing to ion implantation-induced electron traps in the buried oxide and back interface states, back gate threshold voltage increases from 44.48 V to 51.47 V and sub-threshold swing increases from 2.47 V/dec to 3.37 V/dec, while electron field effect mobility decreases from 475.44 cm2/V·s to 363.65 cm2/V·s. In addition, the magnitude of normalized low frequency noise also greatly increases, which indicates that the intrinsic electronic performances are degenerated after ion implantation processing. According to carrier number fluctuation theory, the extracted flat-band voltage noise power spectral densities in the PDSOI devices with and without ion implantation are equal to 7×10-10 V2·Hz-1 and 2.7×10-8 V2·Hz-1, respectively, while the extracted average trap density in the buried oxide increases from 1.42×1017 cm-3·eV-1 to 6.16×1018 cm-3·eV-1. Based on carrier mobility fluctuation theory, the extracted average Hooge’s parameter in these devices increases from 3.92×10-5 to 1.34×10-2 after ion implantation processing. Finally, radiation responses in the PDSOI devices are investigated. Owing to radiation-induced positive buried oxide trapped charges, back gate threshold voltage decreases with the increase of the total dose. After radiation reaches up to a total dose of 1 M·rad(si), the shifts of back gate threshold voltage in the SOI devices with and without ion implantation are -10.82 V and -31.84 V, respectively. The low frequency noise behaviors in these devices before and after radiation are also compared and discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61204112 and 61204116).

  7. Characterization tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber for use in electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonato, Fernanda B. C.; Sakuraba, Roberto K.; da Cruz, José Carlos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    Linear accelerators with electron beams are used in several Brazilian hospitals. Consequently, there is an increasing demand for parallel-plate ionization chambers, to be utilized for dosimetry of electron beams. In Brazil, the commercial ionization chambers utilized are imported. The ionization chambers have usually a simple construction, using different materials and geometries. A homemade ionization chamber was developed to be used in electron beams of linear accelerator. The ionization chamber body is made of acrylic and the collecting electrode is painted with graphite powder mixed with nail polish. Several tests were applied, and the results showed values better than the limits established by the international recommendations, except for the polarity effect test, but the response of the developed ionization chamber, for this test, is similar in relation to the response of other commercial ionization chambers from the literature.

  8. Design, synthesis and characterization of ion-responsive microgels: Effect of structure and composition on properties and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenbaum, Gary Marc

    The overall goal of this dissertation was to design, synthesize and characterize ion responsive microgels, focussing on the effect of their composition and structure on their properties and performance. The ability to use ionic microgels in chemical and biomedical applications requires a thorough understanding of these parameters. In pursuit of this understanding, poly(methacrylic acid-co-nitrophenyl acrylate) microgels (1--20 mum diameter) were synthesized by free radical precipitation polymerization and modified in post-polymerization reactions. The microgels were characterized with respect to their pH and ion swelling response, apparent pKa, density, capacity, drug and protein loading and metal binding properties. Systematic changes were made to the microgels' crosslink density and functional group composition with the goal of creating new microgels, which have distinctly different swelling and drug loading properties. The following methods were applied in this work. A micropipet manipulation technique was applied to measure the swelling response of individual microgels. Bulk titrations were performed to measure the apparent pKa's and capacities of the microgels. UV/VIS spectraphotometry was used to measure the drug and protein loading. Titration calorimetry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were applied to measure the metal binding properties of the microgels. The swelling ratio of the microgels increased linearly from 2 to 12 when the mole fraction of crosslinking monomer decreased from 0.25 to 0.10 (at pH's > 5.3). The pH range of the swelling response for the five different microgel compositions (containing ethanol, carboxylic, glutamic, hydroxamic and sulfonic acid functional groups) shifted by an amount that was proportional to the solution pKa's of their functional groups. The microgels' capacity and drug loading increased in proportion to the number of functional groups per repeat unit. The degree of drug loading was found to correlate

  9. The effect of ambient humidity on the electrical response of ion-migration-based polymer sensor with various cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Kruusamäe, Karl; Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-05-01

    A water-based ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) sensor, induced by ion migration, is a promising alternative to natural sensing systems. Focusing on water effects, this paper investigated the voltage responses of Au-Nafion IPMC at multiple fixed levels of ambient humidity under a small step bending deformation. The voltage includes two processes: a fast rising and a subsequent slow decay. As the relative ambient humidity decreases, the peak voltage first increases and then decreases because the mass storage capacity of IPMC, related to the compressed state of a polymer network, reaches the optimum at a moderate water content (30 ˜ 90%RH), whereas the proportion of decay related to hydration effect decreases as the level of relative humidity is decreased. The detailed physics has been revealed qualitatively based on transport theory, and a fitting equation has been proposed to approximate the general electrical response.

  10. Response mechanism of a neutral carrier Hg(II) polymeric membrane ion-selective electrode. SEM and EDAX study.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Marín, L; López-Valdivia, H; Avila-Pérez, P; Otazo-Sánchez, E; Macedo-Miranda, G; Gutiérrez-Lozano, O; Alonzo Chamaro, J; De la Torres-Orozco, J; Carapia-Morales, L

    2001-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive atomic X-ray spectrometry (EDAX) were used to study the response mechanism of a previously reported new Hg membrane ion-selective electrode (ISE) based on 1,3-diphenylthiourea. These techniques allowed the study of the membrane surface characteristics, such as the morphological homogeneity and chemical composition. A 'twice Nernstian' response at pH > or = 7 was explained by the detection of the Hg(OH)+ cation. A normal Nernstian response was found at acidic pH values. Using these techniques, both coordination compounds, [Ligand-Hg-OH] at pH 7 and [Ligand-Hg-Ligand] at pH 4.5, were confirmed on the electrode membrane surface activated with Hg(NO3)2 solution at both pH values. These methods provide results which are independent of the potential measurement data and in agreement with them. A successful response model has explained both independent and unbiased sets of results. These conclusions confirm the proposed response mechanisms for this new Hg membrane sensor.

  11. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate

  12. CALUTRON ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1959-02-17

    An improvement is described in ion source mechanisms whereby the source structure is better adapted to withstanid the ravages of heat, erosion, and deterioration concomitant with operation of an ion source of the calutron type. A pair of molybdenum plates define the exit opening of the arc chamber and are in thermal contact with the walls of the chamber. These plates are maintained at a reduced temperature by a pair of copper blocks in thermal conducting contact therewith to form subsequent diverging margins for the exit opening.

  13. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and particularly describes a novel ion source. The unique feature of this source lies in the shaping of the ionizing electron stream to conform to the arc plasma boundary at the exit slit of the ionization chamber, thereby increasing the ion density produced at the plasma boundary. The particular structure consists of an electron source disposed at onc end of an elongated ionization chambcr and a coilimating electrode positioned to trim the electron stream to a crescent shape before entering the ionization chamber.

  14. Ion-responsive Intramolecular Charge-transfer Absorption Using a Pyridinium Benzocrown Ether Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Tetsuo; Tao, Xuanyi; Guo, Haocheng; Katsumata, Masayo; Ueta, Ikuo; Takahashi, Masaki; Suzuki, Yasutada

    2015-01-01

    A pyridinium benzocrown ether conjugated compound, 1, and its analogue with a non-crown ether unit, 2, have been prepared. Both compounds showed similar absorption spectra with two absorption bands at around 260 and 330 nm in acetonitrile. The bands at the longer wavelength side are associated with intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) absorption, in which the dialkoxyphenyl unit in benzocrown ether and the pyridinium unit act as the donor and acceptor, respectively. The addition of a guest, such as Li(+) or Mg(2+), caused a blue shift in the ICT absorption band for 1, but not for 2. This is explained by the formation of a 1:1 host-guest inclusion complex of 1 with the guest. The guest-induced absorption variation of 1 can be used for alkali and alkaline metal ion sensing. Compound 1 could detect divalent cations, especially for Mg(2+), rather than univalent ones (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+)), although Li(+) was detected with high sensitivity among the alkali metal ions. Compound 3, which has a pyridyl unit at the para position on the pyridinium of 1, showed a similar trend to that of 1 with lower sensitivity than that of 1. The fact that the Mg(2+)/Li(+) sensitivity ratio of 1 and 3 was estimated to be 8.63 and 5.08, respectively, suggests a higher Mg(2+)-preference of 1 rather than 3, while the Ca(2+)/Na(+) ones were 4.98 and 4.85, respectively, when compared ions with similar ionic radii. The sensitivity values of 1 were roughly proportional to their binding constants, as shown by the binding constants with Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) with values of 2100, 910, 11500, and 2000 M(-1) for 1, respectively. The binding constants of 3 were estimated to be 1710, 650, 3000, and 1400 M(-1) for Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), respectively, but could not be obtained for alkaline metal ions. The limit concentration for the detection of 1 for Mg(2+) was estimated to be 0.0156 mM, which was the smallest value in this system.

  15. Analysis of physical processes in ICF target chambers

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, J.J.; Peterson, R.R.; Moses, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    When a high-gain inertial fusion target explodes, roughly one third of the energy is released in the form of x-rays and energetic ions, which can damage the wall of the chamber. One method of protecting the wall is to place a gas in the chamber cavity. The authors use a 1-D Lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics code (CONRAD) to study the target energy deposition in this cavity gas and first surface material, the growth of and radiative emission from the microfireball, the expansion of the shock front, the vaporization and hydromotion of the first surface material, and the recondensation of that material back onto the wall. The authors describe recent improvements to CONRAD, and present results for two target chamber designs currently being considered by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  16. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  17. Effects of coating rectangular microscopic electrophoresis chamber with methylcellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    One of the biggest problems in obtaining high accuracy in microscopic electrophoresis is the parabolic flow of liquid in the chamber due to electroosmotic backflow during application of the electric field. In chambers with glass walls the source of polarization leading to electroosmosis is the negative charge of the silicare and other ions that form the wall structure. It was found by Hjerten, who used a rotating 3.0 mm capillary tube for free zone electrophoresis, that precisely neutralizing this charge was extremely difficult, but if a neutral polymer matrix (formaldehyde fixed methylcellulose) was formed over the glass (quartz) wall the double layer was displaced and the viscosity at the shear plane increased so that electroosmotic flow could be eliminated. Experiments were designed to determine the reliability with which methylcellulose coating of the Zeiss Cytopherometer chamber reduced electroosmotic backflow and the effect of coating on the accuracy of cell electrophoretic mobility (EPN) determinations. Fixed rat erythrocytes (RBC) were used as test particles.

  18. 63. Interior view, kitchen chamber, north elevation. The kitchen chamber ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Interior view, kitchen chamber, north elevation. The kitchen chamber was completed in the first stages of phase III construction. The paneled wall to the fireplace's right displays a phase III molding profile. The mark between the cabinet doors and on the large lower panel indicates the former position of a partition wall. The chimney-breast paneling bears a phase I profile and might have been moved to the room when the fireplace mass in the hall was reduced. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. In situ study of heavy ion irradiation response of immiscible Cu/Fe multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, N.; Bufford, D. C.; Li, J.; Hattar, K.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies show that immiscible metallic multilayers with incoherent interfaces can effectively reduce defect density in ion irradiated metals by providing active defect sinks that capture and annihilate radiation induced defect clusters. Although it is anticipated that defect density within the layers should vary as a function of distance to the layer interface, there is, to date, little in situ TEM evidence to validate this hypothesis. In this study monolithic Cu films and Cu/Fe multilayers with individual layer thickness, h, of 100 and 5 nm were subjected to in situ Cu ion irradiation at room temperature to nominally 1 displacement-per-atom inside a transmission electron microscope. Rapid formation and propagation of defect clusters were observed in monolithic Cu, whereas fewer defects with smaller dimensions were generated in Cu/Fe multilayers with smaller h. Furthermore in situ video shows that the cumulative defect density in Cu/Fe 100 nm multilayers indeed varies, as a function of distance to the layer interfaces, supporting a long postulated hypothesis.

  20. Response of nanostructured ferritic alloys to high-dose heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; White, Ryan M.; LeBeau, James M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-02-01

    A latest-generation aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to study heavy-ion-irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Results are presented for STEM X-ray mapping of NFA 14YWT irradiated with 10 MeV Pt to 16 or 160 dpa at -100°C and 750°C, as well as pre-irradiation reference material. Irradiation at -100°C results in ballistic destruction of the beneficial microstructural features present in the pre-irradiated reference material, such as Ti-Y-O nanoclusters (NCs) and grain boundary (GB) segregation. Irradiation at 750°C retains these beneficial features, but indicates some coarsening of the NCs, diffusion of Al to the NCs, and a reduction of the Cr-W GB segregation (or solute excess) content. Ion irradiation combined with the latest-generation STEM hardware allows for rapid screening of fusion candidate materials and improved understanding of irradiation-induced microstructural changes in NFAs.

  1. Plant growth chamber M design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Crop production is just one of the many processes involved in establishing long term survival of man in space. The benefits of integrating higher plants into the overall plan was recognized early by NASA through the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. The first step is to design, construct, and operate a sealed (gas, liquid, and solid) plant growth chamber. A 3.6 m diameter by 6.7 m high closed cylinder (previously used as a hypobaric vessel during the Mercury program) is being modified for this purpose. The chamber is mounted on legs with the central axis vertical. Entrance to the chamber is through an airlock. This chamber will be devoted entirely to higher plant experimentation. Any waste treatment, food processing or product storage studies will be carried on outside of this chamber. Its primary purpose is to provide input and output data on solids, liquids, and gases for single crop species and multiple species production using different nutrient delivery systems.

  2. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  3. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  4. Expression of NF-kappaB dependent genes in human cells in response to heavy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Ruland, Rebecca; Schmitz, Claudia; Lau, Patrick; Testard, Isabelle; Reitz, Guenther

    Space radiation is a primary concern for manned spaceflight and is a potentially limiting factor for long term orbital and interplanetary missions. Understanding of the cellular and molecular processes underlying cell death and transformation related events by space radiation may allow better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures. The pathway leading to activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and increased transcription of its target gene might modulate cellular radiation response. Previous studies suggest a linear energy transfer (LET) dependency of transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation: high LET radiation activates NF-κB more efficiently than low LET radiation. In this work, the relative expressions of several NF-κB regulated genes (Gadd45β, NFKBIA encoding the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα, and the anti-apoptotic genes XIAP, bcl-2, and bcl-xL) were examined by quantitative real-time Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Human embryonic cells with neuronal differentiation potential (HEK/293) were exposed to accelerated heavy ions or to X-rays (200 kV) or incubated in presence of the strong NF-κB activator tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Target gene expression data were normalized to the expression index of several unregulated reference genes (B2M, GAPDH, PBGD, HPRT). NFKBIA expression is enhanced for 24 h after TNF-α treatment, while Gadd45β expression was only temporarily up-regulated. High doses of X-rays (8 and 16 Gy) and of 13 C ions (75 MeV/n, LET 33 keV/µm, 4.7 Gy) up-regulate NFKBIA and Gadd45β expression temporarily. 13 C ion with higher LET (35 MeV/n, 73 keV/µm) enhance NFKBIA expression already after 1 Gy, and a passing up-regulation of Bcl-2, bcl-xL and XIAP expression was observed 2 h after 0.5 Gy. 20 Ne (95 MeV/A, 80 keV/µm) and 36 Ar ions (95 MeV/A, 271 keV/µm) were the strongest inducers of Gadd45β, NFKBIA, and XIAP with doses from 0.5 to 3.8 Gy

  5. Regulation of Cellular Response Pattern to Phosphorus Ion is a New Target for the Design of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Wang, Fangjuan; Zeng, Wen; Sun, Jun; Li, Li; Yang, Mingcan; Sun, Jiansen; Wu, Yangxiao; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zhu, Chuhong

    2015-05-01

    Regulation of cellular response pattern to phosphorus ion (PI) is a new target for the design of tissue-engineered materials. Changing cellular response pattern to high PI can maintain monocyte/macrophage survival in TEBV and the signal of increasing PI can be converted by klotho to the adenosine signals through the regulation of energy metabolism in monocytes/macrophages. PMID:25694105

  6. Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of an Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Ryan Foster

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is carried out using the 1-D BUCKY radiation hydrodynamics code for a variety of differing chamber fills, radii, chamber obstructions and first wall materials. Discussion of the first wall temperature rise, x-ray spectrum incident on the wall, shock timing and maximum overpressure are presented. An additional discussion of the impact of different gas opacities and their effect on overall chamber dynamics, including the formation of two shock fronts, is also presented. This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Fusion Technology Institute.

  7. Radiation Hydrodynamic Parameter Study of Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Ryan; Moses, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is performed with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY. Simulation with differing chamber parameters are implemented to study the effect of gas fill, gas mixtures and chamber radii. Xenon and argon gases are of particular interest as shielding for the first wall due to their high opacity values and ready availability. Mixing of the two gases is an attempt to engineer a gas cocktail to provide the maximum amount of shielding with the least amount of cost. A parameter study of different chamber radii shows a consistent relationship with that of first wall temperature (~1/r2) and overpressure (~1/r3). This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  8. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  9. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.

  10. Nonlinear Luminescence Response of CaF2:Eu and YAlO3:Ce to Single-Ion Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Xiang, Xia; Wang, Xuelin; Weber, William J.

    2014-01-17

    Understanding scintillation physics and nonproportionality is essential to accelerate materials discovery that has been restricted due to the difficulties inherent to large crystal growth and complex nature of gamma-solid interaction. Taking advantage of less restrictive growth and deposition techniques for smaller crystal sizes or thin films and better fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions, a unique ion approach is demonstrated to effectively screen candidate scintillators with relatively small size and evaluate their nonlinear scintillation response. Response of CaF2:Eu and YAlO3:Ce scintillators to single ions of Hþ, Heþ, and O3þ are measured by the corresponding pulse height over a continuous energy range using a time-of-flight–scintillator–photoelectric multiplier tube apparatus. Nonlinear response of the scintillators under ionizing ion irradiation is quantitatively evaluated by considering the energy partitioning process. In a differential energy deposition region with negligible displacement damage, the low, medium and high excitation energy deposition density (Dexci) can be produced by energetic Hþ, Heþ and O3þ ions, respectively, and significantly different impacts on the response characteristics of these two benchmark scintillators are observed. For CaF2:Eu, the scintillation efficiency under ion irradiation monotonically decreases with increasing excitation-energy density. In contrast, the response efficiency of YAlO3:Ce scintillation initially increases with excitation-energy density at low excitation-energy densities, goes through a maximum, and then decreases with further increasing excitation-energy density. The fundamental mechanism causing these different response behaviours in the scintillators is based on the competition between the scintillation response and the nonradiative quenching process under different excitation densities, which is also the main

  11. Nonlinear luminescence response of CaF{sub 2}:Eu and YAlO{sub 3}:Ce to single-ion excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen Weber, William J.; Xiao, Haiyan; Xiang, Xia; Wang, Xuelin

    2014-01-21

    Understanding scintillation physics and nonproportionality is essential to accelerate materials discovery that has been restricted due to the difficulties inherent to large crystal growth and complex nature of gamma-solid interaction. Taking advantage of less restrictive growth and deposition techniques for smaller crystal sizes or thin films and better fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions, a unique ion approach is demonstrated to effectively screen candidate scintillators with relatively small size and evaluate their nonlinear scintillation response. Response of CaF{sub 2}:Eu and YAlO{sub 3}:Ce scintillators to single ions of H{sup +}, He{sup +}, and O{sup 3+} are measured by the corresponding pulse height over a continuous energy range using a time-of-flight–scintillator–photoelectric multiplier tube apparatus. Nonlinear response of the scintillators under ionizing ion irradiation is quantitatively evaluated by considering the energy partitioning process. In a differential energy deposition region with negligible displacement damage, the low, medium and high excitation energy deposition density (D{sub exci}) can be produced by energetic H{sup +}, He{sup +} and O{sup 3+} ions, respectively, and significantly different impacts on the response characteristics of these two benchmark scintillators are observed. For CaF{sub 2}:Eu, the scintillation efficiency under ion irradiation monotonically decreases with increasing excitation-energy density. In contrast, the response efficiency of YAlO{sub 3}:Ce scintillation initially increases with excitation-energy density at low excitation-energy densities, goes through a maximum, and then decreases with further increasing excitation-energy density. The fundamental mechanism causing these different response behaviours in the scintillators is based on the competition between the scintillation response and the nonradiative quenching process under different excitation densities, which is also the main origin of

  12. The CLAS drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B.

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  13. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  14. A 1.3-Å resolution crystal structure of the HIV-1 trans-activation response region RNA stem reveals a metal ion-dependent bulge conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Joseph A.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of an HIV-1 trans-activation response region (TAR) RNA fragment containing the binding site for the trans-activation protein Tat has been determined to 1.3-Å resolution. In this crystal structure, the characteristic UCU bulge of TAR adopts a conformation that is stabilized by three divalent calcium ions and differs from those determined previously by solution NMR. One metal ion, crucial to the loop conformation, binds directly to three phosphates in the loop region. The structure emphasizes the influence of metal ion binding on RNA structure and, given the abundance of divalent metal ion in the cell, raises the question of whether metal ions play a role in the conformation of TAR RNA and the interaction of TAR with Tat and cyclin T in vivo. PMID:9707559

  15. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the

  16. Novel indole based dual responsive 'turn-on' chemosensor for fluoride ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyanthi, Dharmaraj; Iniya, Murugan; Krishnaveni, Karuppiah; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2015-02-01

    An efficient new dual channel chemosensor 2,3-bis((E)-(1H-indole-3-yl)methyleneamino)maleonitrile (DN) which exhibits selective sensing of F- ions in DMSO, was synthesized by a facile one step condensation reaction of indole-3-carboxaldehyde with diaminomaleonitrile. The probe DN was characterized by elemental analysis, 1H, 13C-NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectral techniques. Upon addition of F-, DN induces remarkable changes in both absorption and fluorescence spectra on the basis of charge transfer mechanism. The receptor DN serves for highly selective, sensitive detection of F- without the interference of other relevant anions. The Job's plot analysis indicates the binding stoichiometry to be 1:1 (host/guest).

  17. ION SOURCE (R.F. INDUCTION TYPE)

    DOEpatents

    Mills, C.B.

    1963-04-01

    A method is given for producing energetic ions by ionizing a gas with an oscillating electric field which is parallel to a confining magnetic field, then reorienting the fields perpendicular to each other to accelerate the ions to higher energies. An ion source is described wherein a secondary coil threads the bottom of a rectangular ionization chamber and induces an oscillating field parallel to a fixed intense magnetic field through the chamber. (AEC)

  18. Open-chamber combustion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, D. P.; Meyer, R. C.

    1994-04-01

    The test program was undertaken to research trade-offs between engine design and operational parameters on open-chamber, premixed spark-ignited gas engines, with a primary focus on combustion effects. This included combustion chamber designs which are conceptually diametrically opposed -- a high squish design typical of diesel engines and a virtually quiescent design. The reader should note that these data are somewhat abstract compared to conventional engines, because the Labeco test engine has exceptionally high friction and the lean-burn data were run unboosted.

  19. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  20. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.