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Sample records for ion clusters

  1. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  2. Cluster Ions and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    We investigate the properties and possible roles of naturally occurring ions under at- mospheric conditions. Among other things, the formation of stable charged molecular clusters represents the initial stages of aerosol nucleation [e.g., Keesee and Castle- man, 1982], while the conversion of vapor to aggregates is the first step in certain atmospheric phase transitions [e.g. Hamill and Turco, 2000]. We analyze the stability and size distributions of common ionic clusters by solving the differential equations describing their growth and loss. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are deter- mined using kinetic and thermodynamic data. The latter are derived from direct labo- ratory measurements of equilibrium constants, from the classical charged liquid drop model applied to large aggregates (i.e., the Thomson model [Thomson, 1906]), and from quantum mechanical calculations of the thermodynamic potentials associated with the cluster structures. This approach allows us to characterize molecular clusters across the entire size range from true molecular species to larger aggregates exhibiting macroscopic behavior [D'Auria, 2001]. Cluster systems discussed in this talk include the proton hydrates (PHs) and nitrate-water and nitrate-nitric acid series [D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. These ions have frequently been detected in the stratosphere and tropo- sphere [e.g., Arnold et al., 1977; Viggiano and Arnold, 1981]. We show how the pro- posed hybrid cluster model can be extended to a wide range of ion systems, including non-proton hydrates (NPHs), mixed-ligand clusters such as nitrate-water-nitric acid and sulfate-sulfuric acid-water, as well as more exotic species containing ammonia, pyridine and other organic compounds found on ions [e.g., Eisele, 1988; Tanner and Eisele, 1991]. References: Arnold, F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of posi- tive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. D'Auria, R., A study of ionic

  3. Hydrated Ions: From Individual Ions to Ion Pairs to Ion Clusters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Houyang; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-10-01

    The structure of hydrated ions plays a central role in chemical and biological sciences. In the present paper, five ions, namely, Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-), are examined using molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to hydrated individual ions and ion pairs identified previously, hydrated ion clusters containing 3, 4, 5, or more ions are identified in the present paper. The dependence of hydration numbers and mole fractions of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters on the electrolyte concentration is determined. As the electrolyte concentration increases, the mole fraction of hydrated individual ions decreases, and the mole fraction of hydrated larger ion clusters increases. The results also reveal that the hydrogen bonding numbers of the H2O molecules of the first hydration shells of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters are insensitive to the electrolyte concentration, but sensitive to the nature and conformation of ions. PMID:26358093

  4. Hydrated Ions: From Individual Ions to Ion Pairs to Ion Clusters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Houyang; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-10-01

    The structure of hydrated ions plays a central role in chemical and biological sciences. In the present paper, five ions, namely, Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-), are examined using molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to hydrated individual ions and ion pairs identified previously, hydrated ion clusters containing 3, 4, 5, or more ions are identified in the present paper. The dependence of hydration numbers and mole fractions of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters on the electrolyte concentration is determined. As the electrolyte concentration increases, the mole fraction of hydrated individual ions decreases, and the mole fraction of hydrated larger ion clusters increases. The results also reveal that the hydrogen bonding numbers of the H2O molecules of the first hydration shells of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters are insensitive to the electrolyte concentration, but sensitive to the nature and conformation of ions.

  5. Some properties of ion and cluster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gudzenko, L.I.; Derzhiev, V.I.; Yakovlenko, S.I.

    1982-11-01

    The aggregate of problems connected with the physics of ion and cluster plasma is qualitatively considered. Such a plasma can exist when a dense gas is ionized by a hard ionizer. The conditions for the formation of an ion plasma and the difference between its characteristics and those of an ordinary electron plasma are discussed; a solvated-ion model and the distribution of the clusters with respect to the number of solvated molecules are considered. The recombination rate of the positively and negatively charged clusters is roughly estimated. The parameters of a ball-lightning plasma are estimated on the basis of the cluster model.

  6. Surface processing using water cluster ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, Gikan H.; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ichihashi, Gaku

    2013-07-01

    Vaporized water clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon, and various substrates such as Si(1 0 0), SiO2, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated by water cluster ion beams. The sputtered depth increased with increasing acceleration voltage, and the sputtering rate was much larger than that obtained using Ar monomer ion irradiation. The sputtering yield for PMMA was approximately 200 molecules per ion, at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that high-rate sputtering for the PMMA surface can be ascribed to the surface erosion by the water cluster ion irradiation. Furthermore, the micropatterning was demonstrated on the PMMA substrate. Thus, the surface irradiation by water cluster ion beams exhibited a chemical reaction based on OH radicals, as well as excited hydrogen atoms, which resulted in a high sputtering rate and low irradiation damage of the substrate surfaces.

  7. On Ion Clusters in the Interstellar Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, Bertram

    1960-01-01

    In a recent paper V.I. Krassovsky (1958) predicts the occurrence of clusters of large numbers of atoms and molecules around ions in the interstellar gas. He then proposes a number of physicochemical processes that would be considerably enhanced by the high particle density in such clusters. In particular, he suggests that absorption by negative ions formed in the clusters would account for the interstellar extinction without any necessity for the presence of grains. Because of the important consequences that ion clusters could have, it is necessary to examine their occurrence more fully. This note re-examines the formation of ion clusters in space and shows that even ion-molecule pairs are essentially non-existent. Ion clusters have been considered by Bloom and Margenau (1952) from the same point of view as that used by Krassovsky, whose basic reference (Joffe and Semenov 1933) unfortunately is not available. A different approach has been used by Eyring, Hirschfelder, and Taylor (1936) following the methods of chemical equilibrium. Both the references cited here enable one to conclude that clustering is negligible. Therefore, the treatment of Eyring et al. is more appropriate than the method of Bloom and Margenau, which depends on the statistical equilibrium of an atmosphere in a force field.

  8. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, H. Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.; Musumeci, F.

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  9. Spiking synchronization of ion channel clusters on an axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shangyou; Tang, Yi; Jung, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Ion channels are distributed in clusters in squid giant axons, rat retinal nerve fiber layers, pyramidal cell dendrites of Apteronotus, etc. Ion channel clusters along the unmyelinated axon generate spontaneous spiking due to ion channel noise. Ion channel clusters are coupled by the axonal cable, and spontaneous spiking of each ion channel cluster can be synchronized. This paper considers the spiking synchronization of two ion channel clusters coupled by an axon. It is shown that axonal parameters affect the spiking synchronization exponentially and ion channel clusters have maximal spiking synchronization when they have the same size. It is further shown that there is an optimal length of the ion channel clusters with maximal spiking synchronization and the optimal length accords with the length of the node of Ranvier in the myelinated axon.

  10. Acetone cluster ion beam irradiation on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuto, H.; Kakumoto, Y.; Itozaki, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.

    2013-11-01

    Acetone cluster ions were produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using a support gas. The acceleration voltage of the acetone cluster ion beam was from 3 to 9 kV. The sputter depths of silicon irradiated with acetone cluster ion beams increased with acceleration voltage and fluence of the acetone cluster ion beams. The sputter depth was close to that induced by the ethanol cluster ion beam accelerated at the same acceleration voltage. The sputtering yield of silicon by the acetone cluster ion beam at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV was approximately 100 times larger than that for an argon monomer ion beam at 9 keV. The sputter depths of silicon dioxide irradiated with the acetone cluster ion beams were smaller than those of silicon, but larger than those induced by ethanol cluster ion beams. The XPS analysis of silicon surface indicated that the silicon surface was more strongly oxidized by the irradiation of acetone cluster ion beam than ethanol cluster ion beam.

  11. Collective effects in electronic sputtering of organic molecular ions by fast incident cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Salehpour, M.; Fishel, D.L.; Hunt, J.E.

    1988-07-15

    The collective sputtering effect of fast primary cluster ions on the yield of secondary molecular ions has been demonstrated for the first time. Results show that the sputtering yield of valine negative molecular ions per incident carbon atom, in a C/sup +//sub n/ incident cluster ion, increases with increasing n. The yield results are interpreted as a direct effect of the enhancement in the electronic stopping power per atom in cluster ions compared to atomic ions.

  12. Desorption of cluster ions from solid Ne by low-energy ion impact.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, T; Fukai, K; Koizumi, T; Hirayama, T

    2010-12-01

    We investigated Ne(+) ions and Ne(n)(+) (n = 2-20) cluster ions desorbed from the surface of solid Ne by 1.0 keV Ar(+) ion impact. Kinetic energy analysis shows a considerably narrower energy distribution for Ne(n)(+) (n ≥ 3) ions than for Ne(n)(+) (n = 1, 2) ions. The dependence of ion yields on Ne film thickness indicates that cluster ions (n ≥ 3) are desorbed only from relatively thick films. We conclude that desorbed ions grow into large cluster ions during the outflow of deep bulk atoms to the vacuum.

  13. Interaction between water cluster ions and mica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, Hiromichi Ohmura, Yuki; Nakagawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2014-03-15

    Water cluster ion beams were irradiated on mica surfaces to investigate the interaction between molecular cluster ions and a mica surface. The contact angle of the mica surface increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, but the increase in the contact angle was smaller than that induced by an ethanol cluster ion beam. The surface roughness also increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, whereas the intensity of K 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peaks decreased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam. The decrease in the number of potassium atoms together with the increase in the surface roughness may be the causes of the increase in the contact angle.

  14. Surface Smoothing and etching by gas cluster ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J. H.; Choi, W. K.

    2003-08-01

    Ar and CO2 gas cluster ion beam with a few nm size were generated by an adiabatic expansion through Laval nozzle. The existence and the mean size distribution of the cluster were analyzed by time-of-flight measurement. Crater induced by Ar cluster ion beam and crown-like hillock by CO2 cluster ion impact on Si(100) were observed by an atomic force microcopy. CO2 cluster ion was irradiated on Si at 25 kV with the variations of ion dose from 1010 to 1013 cluster ions(CI)/cm2, at the flux of 109/cm2 s. Through this isolated cluster ion impact, the interaction mechanism between cluster ion with solid surface was suggested to be made of three steps: surface embossment, surface sputtering and smoothing, and surface etching. Another surface smoothing and etching experiment using CO2 cluster ion beam were carried out over ITO/glass and Cr-masked Si3N4 thin film surfaces at 25 kV.

  15. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-28

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O–D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shift of S{sup 13}CN{sup −} in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  16. Fundamental characteristics of liquid cluster ion source for surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, G. H.; Noguchi, H.; Nakayama, K.; Hironaka, Y.; Kawashita, M.

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a cluster ion source using liquid organic materials, which has several advantages for surface modification based on the different properties of liquid cluster ions. When vapors of liquid materials such as ethanol were ejected through a nozzle into a high-vacuum region, clusters were produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon. The clusters produced were ionized by an electron bombardment method, and the cluster ion current increased with increase of an electron current for ionization. In order to achieve the effective transport of cluster ion beams, a unipotential or einzel lens was used. The current density was much larger than that without using the lens. Furthermore, the beam diameter could be controlled by adjusting the lens voltage, and it was changed between 5 mm and 20 mm. In addition, several kinds of substrates such as Si, SiO2, PC substrates were irradiated at different acceleration voltages with ethanol cluster ion beams, and chemical and physical sputtering with a high sputtering yield was achieved. The sputtered surfaces were very smooth at an atomic level. The liquid cluster ion beams have a high potential for surface etching with the atomic level flatness, which is not obtained by a conventional wet process.

  17. Positive and negative cluster ions from liquid ethanol by fast ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, M; Shimizu, M; Hayakawa, T; Iriki, Y; Tsuchida, H; Itoh, A

    2010-04-14

    Secondary ion mass spectra have been measured for the first time for a liquid ethanol target bombarded by 2.0 MeV He(+) ions. Positive and negative ion spectra exhibit evidently a series of cluster ions of the forms [(EtOH)(n)H](+) and [(EtOH)(n)-H](-), respectively, in addition to light fragment ions from intact parent molecules. It was found that these cluster ions are produced only from liquid phase ethanol. Both positive and negative secondary ion spectra show similar cluster size distributions with almost the same decay slope. We also present for the first time the cluster ion distribution emitted from the liquid at different liquid temperatures.

  18. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  19. Significant enhancement of negative secondary ion yields by cluster ion bombardment combined with cesium flooding.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Patrick; Angerer, Tina B; Sämfors, Sanna; Blenkinsopp, Paul; Fletcher, John S; Wirtz, Tom

    2015-10-01

    In secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the beneficial effect of cesium implantation or flooding on the enhancement of negative secondary ion yields has been investigated in detail for various semiconductor and metal samples. All results have been obtained for monatomic ion bombardment. Recent progress in SIMS is based to a large extent on the development and use of cluster primary ions. In this work we show that the enhancement of negative secondary ions induced by the combination of ion bombardment with simultaneous cesium flooding is valid not only for monatomic ion bombardment but also for cluster primary ions. Experiments carried out using C60+ and Ar4000+ bombardment on silicon show that yields of negative secondary silicon ions can be optimized in the same way as by Ga+ and Cs+ bombardment. Both for monatomic and cluster ion bombardment, the optimization does not depend on the primary ion species. Hence, it can be assumed that the silicon results are also valid for other cluster primary ions and that results obtained for monatomic ion bombardment on other semiconductor and metal samples are also valid for cluster ion bombardment. In SIMS, cluster primary ions are also largely used for the analysis of organic matter. For polycarbonate, our results show that Ar4000+ bombardment combined with cesium flooding enhances secondary ion signals by a factor of 6. This can be attributed to the removal of charging effects and/or reduced fragmentation, but no major influence on ionization processes can be observed. The use of cesium flooding for the imaging of cells was also investigated and a significant enhancement of secondary ion yields was observed. Hence, cesium flooding has also a vast potential for SIMS analyses with cluster ion bombardment.

  20. The energetics and dynamics of free radicals, ions, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.

    1992-03-01

    The structure and energetics of free radicals, ions, and clusters have been investigated by photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) and analyzed with ab initio molecular orbital and statistical theory RRKM calculations. In these experiments, molecules are prepared in a molecular beam so that their internal as well as translational energies are cooled to near O K. The coincidence condition between energy analyzed electrons and their corresponding ions insures that the ions are energy selected. The primary experimental information includes ionization and fragment ion appearance energies, and the ion time of flight (TOF) distributions. The latter are obtained by using the energy selected electron as a start signal and the ion as the stop signal. These types of experiments allow us to measure the ion dissociation rates in the 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} sec {sup {minus}1} range. Such ions are commonly referred to a metastable ions. In addition, the TOF peak widths are related to the release of translational energy in the ion dissociation process. Perhaps the most important advance during the past year has been in the study of cluster photoionization. We have developed an experimental method for differentiating similar mass cluster ions based on the kinetic energy of the ions measured by TOF.

  1. Method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.; Beuhler, R.J.

    A method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions, and preferably isotopic hydrogen cluster ions is disclosed. A gas, preferably comprising a carrier gas and a substrate gas, is cooled to about its boiling point and expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a region maintained at a low pressure. Means are provided for the generation of a plasma in the gas before or just as it enters the nozzle.

  2. Method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Lewis; Beuhler, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions, and preferably isotopic hydrogen cluster ions is disclosed. A gas, preferably comprising a carrier gas and a substrate gas, is cooled to about its boiling point and expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a region maintained at a low pressure. Means are provided for the generation of a plasma in the gas before or just as it enters the nozzle.

  3. The decay dynamics of photoexcited rare gas cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. B.; Jukes, P. R.; Stace, A. J.

    1999-07-01

    The kinetic energies of fast neutrals ejected from photoexcited rare gas cluster ions have been measured for the following systems: Arn+, Krn+, Xen+ at two photon wavelengths: 355 and 532 nm, and for n in the range 2-19. New data are presented for xenon at both wavelengths, and for argon and krypton cluster ions at 355 nm. For argon and krypton cluster ions at 532 nm, new data have been recorded which are more accurate than those presented previously. A Monte Carlo model of the experiment has been used to simulate the kinetic energy releases and also to investigate variations in the scattering anisotropy parameter (β) as a function of photon energy and cluster composition and size. Significant fluctuations in β are observed, and these are attributed to a combination of structural variation and changes to the nature of the central chromophore. For small cluster ions the kinetic energy release data show evidence of being influenced by the final spin-orbit state of the atomic ion. Overall, there is a gradual decline in kinetic energy release as a function of increasing cluster size; however, there are marked variations within this trend. For all three rare gas systems the results show that the primary response to photoexcitation is the ejection of a single atom with a high kinetic energy on a time scale that is short compared with the rotational period of a cluster.

  4. Formation and photodetachment of cold metal cluster negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.-S.; Brucat, P. J.; Pettiette, C. L.; Yang, S.; Smalley, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    A general method is described for the formation of cold metal cluser negative ion beams which serve as excellent sources for photodetachment experiments. The method involves the pulsed laser vaporization of a metal target at the throat of a pulsed supersonic helium expansion. By the optimization of source conditions, intense beams (greater than 105 ions/pulse) of both positive and negative ions are produced routinely. Ionization of the metal cluster molecules, either during vaporization or by irradiation with 193 nm light, occurs prior to supersonic expansion and produces a cold plasma entrained in the neural flow that is renitent to stray electric and magnetic fields, unlike photoions produced in the collisionless downstream molecular beam. The enhancement of the negative ion flux by 193 nm irradiation is believed to be evidence for efficient electron attachment of low energy photoelectrons generated in the nozzle region. This attachment process, however, is apparently not effective for molecules containing less than ˜4 metal atoms. Laser irradition of mass-selected cluster anions extracted from these cold ion beams reveal that photodetachment of the metal cluster negative ion is always the preferred pathway, even when fragmentation of the ion is possible. This new negative ion production technique should therefore permit measurement of both electron affinities and photoelectron spectra as a function of cluster size and composition.

  5. Thermochemistry and Reactivity of Transition Metal Cluster Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armentrout, P. B.; Griffin, J. B.; Conceićão, J.

    Reactions of transition metal cluster cations with several small molecules have been examined using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. This technique allows the kinetic energy dependence of the reactions to be measured, thereby allowing thermodynamic information to be extracted. Reactions of iron, chromium, and vanadium clusters with D2, O2, and CO2 are described. Reactions with D2 are endothermic and yield only two types of products. Oxidation of metal clusters by O2 proceeds is very efficient, proceeding at the collision limit, and forms many different products. The CO2 systems exhibit interesting dynamics that appears to be related to interactions of two surfaces of different spin. Bond energies for cluster monodeuterides, monoxides, and dioxides are derived from these studies. The deuteride bond energies appear to be sensitive to the cluster geometry while little variation in oxide bond energies is observed as a function of cluster size. Comparison of these cluster bond energies to bulk phase values finds similar thermochemistry.

  6. Clustered DNA damage induced by heavy ion particles.

    PubMed

    Terato, Hiroaki; Ide, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    Clustered DNA damage (locally multiply damaged site) is thought to be a critical lesion caused by ionizing radiation, and high LET radiation such as heavy ion particles is believed to produce high yields of such damage. Since heavy ion particles are major components of ionizing radiation in a space environment, it is important to clarify the chemical nature and biological consequences of clustered DNA damage and its relationship to the health effects of exposure to high LET particles in humans. The concept of clustered DNA damage emerged around 1980, but only recently has become the subject of experimental studies. In this article, we review methods used to detect clustered DNA damage, and the current status of our understanding of the chemical nature and repair of clustered DNA damage. PMID:15858387

  7. Ion-pair evaporation from ionic liquid clusters.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Christopher J; Fernandez de la Mora, Juan

    2010-08-01

    A differential mobility analyzer (DMA) is used in atmospheric pressure N(2) to select a narrow range of electrical mobilities from a complex mix of cluster ions of composition (CA)(n)(C(+))(z). The clusters are introduced into the N(2) gas by electrospraying concentrated (approximately 20 mM) acetonitrile solutions of ionic liquids (molten salts) of composition CA (C(+) = cation, A(-) = anion). Mass analysis of these mobility-selected ions reveals the occurrence of individual neutral ion-pair evaporation events from the smallest singly charged clusters: (CA)(n)C(+)-->(CA)(n-1)C(+)+CA. Although bulk ionic liquids are effectively involatile at room temperature, up to six sequential evaporation events are observed. Because this requires far more internal energy than available in the original clusters, substantial heating (approximately 10 eV) must take place in the ion guides leading to the mass analyzer. The observed increase in IL evaporation rate with decreasing size is drastic, in qualitative agreement with the exponential vapor pressure dependence predicted by Kelvin's formula. A single evaporation event is barely detectable at n = 13, while two or more are prominent for n < or = 9. Magic number clusters (CA)(4)C(+) with singularly low volatilities are found in three of the four ionic liquids studied. Like their recently reported liquid phase prenucleation cluster analogs, these magic number clusters could play a key role as gas-phase nucleation seeds. All the singularly involatile clusters seen are cations, which may help understand commonly observed sign effects in ion-induced nucleation. No other charge-sign asymmetry is seen on cluster evaporation. PMID:20447834

  8. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1991-06-28

    Scientific results are summarized from a three year research program on multiphoton ionization in aromatic molecules, clusters, and their ions. As originally proposed, the studies elucidated a new cluster ionization mechanism, characterized properties of long range intermolecular interactions, and investigated electronic transitions of aromatic cations cooled in a supersonic beam. The studies indicate that the new cluster ionization mechanism is highly efficient and dominates conventional 1 + 1 resonant ionization. In the case of the dimer of the large aromatic molecule fluorene, the results suggest that excimer formation competes with a direct ionization process. Highly selective excitonic spectra have been identified for several cluster species.

  9. Lithium Formate Ion Clusters Formation during Electrospray Ionization: Evidence of Magic Number Clusters by Mass Spectrometry and ab initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-10

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry. Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi+, (HCOOLi)nLimm+, (HCOOLi)nHCOO- and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)mm-. Several magic number cluster ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li+ being the most abundant and stable cluster ions. Fragmentations of singly charged clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by sequential loss of monomer units (HCOOLi). In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li+ at higher collision energies which later fragments to dimer and monomer ions in lower abundance. Quantum mechanical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  10. Molecular imaging of biological tissue using gas cluster ions

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    An Arn+ (n = 1–6000) gas cluster ion source has been utilized to map the chemical distribution of lipids in a mouse brain tissue section. We also show that the signal from high mass species can be further enhanced by doping a small amount of CH4 into the Ar cluster to enhance the ionization of several biologically important molecules. Coupled with secondary ion mass spectrometry instrumentation which utilizes a continuous Ar cluster ion projectile, maximum spatial resolution and maximum mass resolution can be achieved at the same time. With this arrangement, it is possible to achieve chemically resolved molecular ion images at the 4-µm resolution level. The focused Arn+/[Arx(CH4)y]+ beams (4–10 µm) have been applied to the study of untreated mouse brain tissue. A high signal level of molecular ions and salt adducts, mainly from various phosphocholine lipids, has been seen and directly used to map the chemical distribution. The signal intensity obtained using the pure Ar cluster source, the CH4-doped cluster source and C60 is also presented. PMID:26207076

  11. Anisotropic negative-ion emission from cluster nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, R.; Dalui, Malay; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Rishad, K. P. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that the enhanced charge transfer by Rydberg excited clusters (ECTREC) reduces the highly charged ions very efficiently to neutral atoms and negative ions with little loss of momentum. Neutral-atom emission is anisotropic with respect to the laser polarization and the anisotropy is larger than that of the ion emission from Coulomb explosion of isolated single clusters. In such a scenario, it is expected that the negative-ion emission (like neutrals) should be anisotropic and have larger propensity along the laser polarization than in the perpendicular direction. Further, it may be anticipated that negative-ion emission is more anisotropic than neutral-atom emission if ECTREC is taken in to account. We demonstrate that the negative-ion emission is anisotropic. Contrary to expectations, the negative-ion emission anisotropy is not more than that of the neutral-atom emission. We show that this can be rationalized if low-energy (about 10 eV) electron collisional detachment of the negative ions is taken into account. Electron collisional detachment depletes the negative-ion yield preferentially along the laser polarization direction and reduces the negative-ion emission anisotropy.

  12. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N{sub 2}). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sup +}, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sub m}{sup m+}, (HCOOLi){sub n}HCOO{sup −}, and (HCOOLi){sub n}(HCOO){sub m}{sup m−}. Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations of singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi){sub 2}) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  13. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data Archiving in the CAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Blagau, A.; Facsko, G.; Kronberg, E.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions and 2-D pitch-angle distributions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. Instrument cross-calibration has been an important activity in preparing the data for archival. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. In addition, data quality indexes are under preparation, to help the user. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  14. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ewing, R G; Eiceman, G A; Stone, J A

    1999-10-28

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  15. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  16. The energetics and dynamics of free radicals, ions, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.

    1993-04-01

    Structure and energetics of free radicals, ions, and clusters are being investigated by photoelectron photoion coincidence and analyzed using ab initio molecular orbital and statistical theory (RRKM). Molecules or free radicals are prepared in a molecular beam. Translational temperature is found from measured time of flight peakwidth; the vibrational temperature, from shift in dissociation onset. Free radicals are produced by pyrolysis in the nozzle; their subsequent cooling is demonstrated. Ion dissociation rates in the range from 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 7] s[sup [minus]1] are measured from the asymmetric TOF distribution; this method was used to measure the dissociation rates of cold and warm butene ions. 2 figs.

  17. Correspondence between ion-cluster and bulk thermodynamics: on the validity of the cluster pair approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Vlcek, Lukas; Chialvo, Ariel; Simonson, J Michael {Mike}

    2013-01-01

    Molecular models and experimental estimates based on the cluster pair approximation (CPA) provide inconsistent predictions of absolute single-ion hydration properties. To understand the origin of this discrepancy we used molecular simulations to study the transition between hydration of alkali metal and halide ions in small aqueous clusters and bulk water. The results demonstrate that the assumptions underlying the CPA are not generally valid as a result of a significant shift in the ion hydration free energies (~15 kJ/mol) and enthalpies (~47 kJ/mol) in the intermediate range of cluster sizes. When this effect is accounted for, the systematic differences between models and experimental predictions disappear, and the value of absolute proton hydration enthalpy based on the CPA gets in closer agreement with other estimates.

  18. Generation and reactivity of yttrium-carbon cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, S.Z.; Lee, S.A.; Freiser, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, Castleman and coworkers reported the production of the ionic transition metal-carbon clusters, M{sub 8}C{sub 12}{sup +} (M=Ti,V, Zr and Hf). Like the observations of pure carbon clusters such as C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}, these metal-carbon clusters were observed as {open_quotes}magic{close_quotes} peaks in the mass spectra obtained from a supersonic expansion ion source. These intense peaks are indicative of the high stability of these clusters which are proposed to have symmetrical, cagelike structures with the geometry of a pentagonal dodecahedron. M{sub 8}C{sub 12}{sup +} species are thus termed metallo-carbohedrenes, or met-cars for short. Like fullerenes, met-cars are of both fundamental interest and hold promise as a new class of important materials and, hence, have become the focus of both theoretical and experimental investigations. Along with these species, metal-carbon clusters of other stoichiometries such as Ti{sub 8}C{sub 11}{sup +}, Ti{sub 8}C{sub 13}{sup +}, Ti{sub 7}C{sub 12}, V{sub 14}C{sub 13}{sup +}, V{sub 14}C{sub 12}{sup +}, and Nb{sub 4}C{sub 4}{sup +} have also been examined. Here, the authors report on the yttrium-carb system in which a broad range of metal-carbon cluster ions are observed.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopy of cluster ions: Two novel methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, L.I.; Okumura, M.; Myers, J.D.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-07-01

    Two sensitive techniques are discussed for obtaining vibrational spectra of cluster ions. The first approach is to attach a H/sub 2/ molecule to the hydrated hydronium ions. Because the original goal was to study the hydrated hydronium ions, the attached H/sub 2/ is hoped to have only a small effect on the spectrum. After an O-H stretch of the cluster ion has been excited, it vibrationally predissociates, losing the H/sub 2/. By monitoring the dissociation product as a function of laser frequency, the absorption spectra of these H/sub 3/O/sup +/ . (H/sub 2/O)/sub n/ . H/sub 2/ (n = 1,2,3) ions have been found. The second approach is to detect the vibrationally excited H/sub 3/O/sup +/ . (H/sub 2/O)/sub n/ (n = 1,2,3) ions using an infrared multiphoton dissociation process. The procedure is to first excite from v = 0 to v = 1 in the O-H stretch using a tunable ir laser. We then make use of the fact that the density of states near v = 0 and v = 1 are very different, and the vibrationally excited ionic clusters, which contain many low frequency vibrations, are likely to be in the quasicontinuum region for the sequential excitation by a fixed frequency laser. This means that one can distinguish between ground state and vibrationally excited H/sub 3/O/sup +/ . (H/sub 2/O)/sub n/ by using a multiphoton dissociation (MPD) process to selectively dissociate the latter using a CO/sub 2/ laser. Once again, we monitor the dissociation product ion signal as a function of the excitation frequency of the first laser to get the absorption spectra of the H/sub 3/O/sup +/ . (H/sub 2/O)/sub n/ ions. 5 refs.

  20. Dynamic Reactive Ionization with Cluster Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    Gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) have been tuned to enhance secondary ion yields by doping small gas molecules such as CH4, CO2, and O2 into an Ar cluster projectile, Arn  + (n = 1000–10,000) to form a mixed cluster. The ‘tailored beam’ has the potential to expand the application of secondary ion mass spectrometry for two- and three-dimensional molecular specific imaging. Here, we examine the possibility of further enhancing the ionization by doping HCl into the Ar cluster. Water deposited on the target surface facilitates the dissociation of HCl. This concerted effect, occurring only at the impact site of the cluster, arises since the HCl is chemically induced to ionize to H+ and Cl– , allowing improved protonation of neutral molecular species. This hypothesis is confirmed by depth profiling through a trehalose thin film exposed to D2O vapor, resulting in ~20-fold increase in protonated molecules. The results show that it is possible to dynamically maintain optimum ionization conditions during depth profiling by proper adjustment of the water vapor pressure. H–D exchange in the trehalose molecule M was monitored upon deposition of D2O on the target surface, leading to the observation of [Mn* + H]+ or [Mn* + D]+ ions, where n = 1–8 hydrogen atoms in the trehalose molecule M have been replaced by deuterium. In general, we discuss the role of surface chemistry and dynamic reactive ionization of organic molecules in increasing the secondary ion yield.

  1. Ion/molecule reactions of arsenic and phosphorus cluster ions: Ionization potentials and novel reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.A.; Bach, S.B.H.; Watson, C.H.; Eyler, J.R. )

    1991-01-10

    Ionization potentials (IP's) for arsenic and phosphorus clusters (As{sub n}, n = 1-5; P{sub n}, n = 1-4) have been determined by gas-phase charge-transfer reactions. Arsenic and phosphorus cluster ions were generated by pulsed CO{sub 2} laser desorption from GaAs and InP substrates, mass-selected, thermalized, and allowed to react with compounds of known ionization potential in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The IP's for As{sub 3} and As{sub 5} previously unreported, as well as more accurate IP values for several of the other clusters, have been determined. Products and rate coefficients of some interesting reactions of the cluster ions with the charge-transfer agents are also reported.

  2. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure.

  3. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Application of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry to the Study of Ionic Clusters: Investigation of Cluster Ions with Stable Sizes and Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Komukai, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Tohru; Norimasa, Naoya; Wu, Jenna Wen Ju; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Koyasu, Kiichirou; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2014-01-01

    Stable cluster sizes and compositions have been investigated for cations and anions of ionic bond clusters such as alkali halides and transition metal oxides by ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Usually structural information of ions can be obtained from collision cross sections determined in IM-MS. In addition, we have found that stable ion sizes or compositions were predominantly produced in a total ion mass spectrum, which was constructed from the IM-MS measurement. These stable species were produced as a result of collision induced dissociations of the ions in a drift cell. We have confirmed this result in the sodium fluoride cluster ions, in which cuboid magic number cluster ions were predominantly observed. Next the stable compositions, which were obtained for the oxide systems of the first row transition metals, Ti, Fe, and Co, are characteristic for each of the metal oxide cluster ions. PMID:26819887

  5. Intracluster ion-molecule reactions of Ti+ with ether clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Young-Mi; Kim, Min-Kyung; Jung, Kwang-Woo

    2005-05-01

    The intracluster ion-molecule reactions of Ti+(CH3OR)n (R = CH3, n-C3H7, n-C4H9, t-C4H9) complexes produced by the mixing of laser-vaporized plasmas and pulsed supersonic beams were investigated using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS). The reactions of Ti+ with dimethyl ether clusters were found to be dominated by the CH3 elimination reaction, which produces Ti+(OCH3)m(CH3OCH3)n clusters (m = 1-3). The mass spectra resulting from the reactions of Ti+ with the other ether clusters indicate the formation of major sequences of heterocluster ions with the formula Ti+(OCH3)x(OR)y(CH3OR)n, where x = 1-3 and y = 0-2. These sequences are attributed to the insertion of Ti+ ions into the CO bonds of the ether molecules within the heteroclusters, followed by alkyl radical elimination. The prevalence of radical elimination of longer alkyl groups rather than of CH3 radicals suggests that R elimination from the [CH3OTi+R] intermediate is the preferred decomposition pathway after the selective insertion of a Ti+ ion into the CO bond of an OR group. Our results also indicate that consecutive insertions of a Ti+ ion can occur for up to three precursor molecules. The experiments also show that the molecular eliminations of H2 and alkanes, resulting from CH and CC bond insertion, respectively, play an increasingly important role as the size of the alkyl group (R) in the ether molecule increases. The reaction energetics and the formation mechanisms of the observed heterocluster ions are also discussed.

  6. Determination of ion track radii in amorphous matrices via formation of nano-clusters by ion-beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, M.; Karlusic, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Jaksic, M.; Radic, N.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.

    2012-09-03

    We report on a method for the determination of ion track radii, formed in amorphous materials by ion-beam irradiation. The method is based on the addition to an amorphous matrix of a small amount of foreign atoms, which easily diffuse and form clusters when the temperature is sufficiently increased. The irradiation causes clustering of these atoms, and the final separations of the formed clusters are dependent on the parameters of the ion-beam. Comparison of the separations between the clusters that are formed by ions with different properties in the same type of material enables the determination of ion-track radii.

  7. Cluster Size Dependence of Etching by Reactive Gas Cluster Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Iaso

    2008-11-03

    Mass-selected reactive gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) were formed using a permanent magnetic filter. Irradiations of CO{sub 2} GCIB on amorphous carbon films and irradiations of SF{sub 6} and SF{sub 6}/Ar mixed GCIB on Si surfaces were performed to study the cluster size dependence on etching yields by reactive GCIB. The reactive sputtering yield of carbon by CO{sub 2} GCIB was almost ten times higher than that by Ar GCIB. In the case of (CO{sub 2}){sub 20000} GCIB with energy of 20 keV (1 eV/atom), it showed the high sputtering yield of 200 atoms/ion, however, there was little crater formation on the carbon surface. It is thought that very soft etching without crater formation would take place in this condition. In the case of SF{sub 6} GCIB on Si, the etching depth of Si showed maximum value when the fraction of SF{sub 6} to Ar was around 50%. As the etching yield was higher than pure SF{sub 6} GCIB, there was a strong ion assisted etching effects in the case of Ar/SF{sub 6} mixed cluster ion irradiations.

  8. Crater annihilation on silver by cluster ion impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, K. O. E.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.

    2007-02-01

    Using the MD/MC-CEM potential we have investigated the impacts of 20 keV Ag 13 cluster ions on (0 0 1) silver surfaces having one initial crater. This one was made in the zeroth ion impact. The degree of annihilation of the initial crater was investigated as a function of the lateral distance ri between the crater and the ion. The impact points were selected randomly inside a circular area with a radius of 75 Å centered on the crater. To reduce the total number of simulations, the circular area was divided into annuli. The initial and final atomic positions in the impact simulations were analyzed and the degree of annihilation of the initial crater was determined. The results indicate that for r ≲ 60 Å there is a net growth of the initial crater, and for distances r ∈ (60, 80) Å there is a small net filling of the crater.

  9. Characteristics of acetone cluster ion beam for surface processing and modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuto, H.; Kakumoto, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.

    2014-02-01

    An acetone cluster ion beam was produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using helium as a support gas. The cluster source for the production of ethanol clusters was replaced with that sealed with metal gaskets. The Laval nozzle for the production of ethanol clusters was also replaced with a stainless steel conical nozzle. The cluster size distributions of the acetone cluster ion beams had mean values approximately at 2 × 103 molecules and increased with source pressure. The typical beam current density of the acetone cluster ion beam was approximately 0.5 μA/cm2.

  10. Characteristics of acetone cluster ion beam for surface processing and modification.

    PubMed

    Ryuto, H; Kakumoto, Y; Takeuchi, M; Takaoka, G H

    2014-02-01

    An acetone cluster ion beam was produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using helium as a support gas. The cluster source for the production of ethanol clusters was replaced with that sealed with metal gaskets. The Laval nozzle for the production of ethanol clusters was also replaced with a stainless steel conical nozzle. The cluster size distributions of the acetone cluster ion beams had mean values approximately at 2 × 10(3) molecules and increased with source pressure. The typical beam current density of the acetone cluster ion beam was approximately 0.5 μA/cm(2).

  11. Buffer Gas Modifiers Effect Resolution in Ion Mobility Spectrometry through Selective Ion-Molecule Clustering Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE When polar molecules (modifiers) are introduced into the buffer gas of an ion mobility spectrometer, most ion mobilities decrease due to the formation of ion-modifier clusters. METHODS We used ethyl lactate, nitrobenzene, 2-butanol, and tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile as buffer gas modifiers and electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometry. Ethyl lactate, nitrobenzene, and tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile had not been tested as buffer gas modifiers and 2-butanol had not been used with basic amino acids. RESULTS The ion mobilities of several diamines (arginine, histidine, lysine, and atenolol) were not affected or only slightly reduced when these modifiers were introduced into the buffer gas (3.4% average reduction in an analyte's mobility for the three modifiers). Intramolecular bridges caused limited change in the ion mobilities of diamines when modifiers were added to the buffer gas; these bridges hindered the attachment of modifier molecules to the positive charge of ions and delocalized the charge, which deterred clustering. There was also a tendency towards large changes in ion mobility when the mass of the analyte decreased; ethanolamine, the smallest compound tested, had the largest reduction in ion mobility with the introduction of modifiers into the buffer gas (61%). These differences in mobilities, together with the lack of shift in bridge-forming ions, were used to separate ions that overlapped in IMS, such as isoleucine and lysine, and arginine and phenylalanine, and made possible the prediction of separation or not of overlapping ions. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of modifiers into the buffer gas in IMS can selectively alter the mobilities of analytes to aid in compound identification and/or enable the separation of overlapping analyte peaks. PMID:22956312

  12. Vibrational relaxation in infrared excited SF6.Arn+ cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrill, S.; Stace, A. J.

    1998-02-01

    An attempt is made to characterize the increase in internal temperature that should accompany the partitioning of a single quantum of vibrational energy within a small SF6ṡArn+ cluster ion. For each value of n, the kinetic energy release associated with unimolecular (metastable) decay is used to establish an initial temperature for the cluster ion; ˜950 cm-1 of vibrational energy is then deposited into the ν3 vibrational mode of the SF6 moiety (using a CO2 laser). This step promotes additional dissociation which is accompanied by an increase in kinetic energy. From a model due to Klots [J. Chem. Phys. 58, 5364 (1973)] photofragment kinetic energies are predicted on the assumption that energy from the photon is partitioned statistically and leads to an overall increase in the temperature of each ion. Comparisons of experimental and calculated results clearly show that the infrared photoexcitation of SF6 in the ν3 mode leads to incomplete energy randomization. An improved description of the energy relaxation process is provided on the assumption that SF6 undergoes partial vibrational relaxation to either the ν2 or ν4 mode. The energy difference (˜300 cm-1) is then randomized throughout each cluster ion, and is reflected in the magnitude of the measured kinetic energy release accompanying the loss of a single argon atom. The estimated time scale for this process is an order of magnitude faster than the experimentally measured time for the total relaxation of SF6 (ν3=1) in an argon matrix.

  13. Ionization of large homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters generated in acetylene-Ar expansions: Cluster ion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kocisek, J.; Lengyel, J.; Farnik, M.

    2013-03-28

    Pure acetylene and mixed Ar-acetylene clusters are formed in supersonic expansions of acetylene/argon mixtures and analysed using reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with variable electron energy ionization source. Acetylene clusters composed of more than a hundred acetylene molecules are generated at the acetylene concentration of Almost-Equal-To 8%, while mixed species are produced at low concentrations ( Almost-Equal-To 0.7%). The electron energy dependence of the mass spectra revealed the ionization process mechanisms in clusters. The ionization above the threshold for acetylene molecule of 11.5 eV results in the main ionic fragment progression (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}{sup +}. At the electron energies Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 21.5 eV above the CH+CH{sup +} dissociative ionization limit of acetylene the fragment ions nominally labelled as (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}CH{sup +}, n Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 2, are observed. For n Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 7 these fragments correspond to covalently bound ionic structures as suggested by the observed strong dehydrogenation [(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}-k Multiplication-Sign H]{sup +} and [(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}CH -k Multiplication-Sign H]{sup +}. The dehydrogenation is significantly reduced in the mixed clusters where evaporation of Ar instead of hydrogen can stabilize the nascent molecular ion. The C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} ion was previously assigned to originate from the benzene molecular ion; however, the low appearance energy of Almost-Equal-To 13.7 eV indicates that a less rigid covalently bound structure of C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +} ion must also be formed upon the acetylene cluster electron ionization. The appearance energy of Ar{sub n}(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sup +} fragments above Almost-Equal-To 15.1 eV indicates that the argon ionization is the first step in the fragment ion production, and the appearance energy of Ar{sub n{>=}2}(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub m{>=}2}{sup +} at Almost-Equal-To 13

  14. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  15. Low frequency waves associated with PSBL ion beams. Cluster observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, Elena; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Zeleniy, Lev; Burinskaya, T.

    The processes of non-adiabatic ion acceleration occurring in the Current Sheet of the Earth's magnetotail produce highly accelerated (up to 2500km/s) field-aligned ion beams (beamlets) with transient appearance streaming earthward in the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL). Multipoint Cluster observations have led to a new understanding of these phenomena with a spatial rather than a temporal structure. Comparison of data from different Cluster spacecraft allows to evaluate the duration of beamlets to be, at least, 5-15 min and confirms their welldefined localization along Y and/or Z directions, i.e. across the lobe magnetic field. Earlier results reporting shorter duration of beamlet observations could be understood by the invoking of an additional effect revealed by Cluster: earthward propagation of magnetic perturbations along the beamlet filaments. Phase velocity of these perturbations is of the order of the local Alfven velocity (V 600-1000km/s) and related fast flappings of localized beamlet structures in Y-Z direction significantly decreases the time of their observation at a given spacecraft. Statistical studies of 90 beamlets have shown that the typical wave length of the related disturbances is about tens RE and typical period is about several minutes. Such Alfvenic-type disturbances may be caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability triggered by a flow shear between the highvelocity plasma beam streaming at the PSBL boundary and the slowly moving plasma of the outer lobe. Our analysis revealed that for the majority of accelerated ion beams observed in the PSBL of magnetotail the conditions for the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are satisfied. This work was supported by RFBR grants 07-02-00319; 06-02-72561

  16. Production and appearance size of multiply charged stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric SO/sub 2/ cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scheier, P.; Walder, G.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    1989-01-15

    We report the first well resolved SO/sub 2/ cluster ion spectrum showing doubly charged parent and fragment ions. The critical appearance size deduced for doubly charged SO/sub 2/ clusters is n/sub 2/ = 21 and for triply charged SO/sub 2/ clusters n/sub 3/ = 49. This result is compared with theoretical predictions.

  17. Photo- and collision-induced dissociation of Ar cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondow, Tamotsu; Nagata, Takeshi; Nonose, Shinji

    1992-04-01

    Photo- and collision- induced dissociation of an argon cluster ion, Arn+, were investigated by use of mass spectrometry. The kinetic and angular distributions of the ionic and neutral photofragments revealed two reaction pathways; dissociation of the trimeric core ion and evaporation from its solvation shell. In the Kr and Ne collisions with Arn+, the size- and collision energy- dependences of the dissociation cross sections were explained in the scheme of the charge - induced dipole, and induced dipole - induced dipole scatterings. Conversion efficiency of the collision energy into the internal energy of Arn+ was found to be proportional to the internal degrees of freedom. The upper limit of the conversion efficiency was estimated to be about 60 % in the collision energy of 0.2 eV.

  18. Method of precisely modifying predetermined surface layers of a workpiece by cluster ion impact therewith

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Lewis; Buehler, Robert J.; Matthew, Michael W.; Ledbetter, Myron

    1985-01-01

    A method of precisely modifying a selected area of a workpiece by producing a beam of charged cluster ions that is narrowly mass selected to a predetermined mean size of cluster ions within a range of 25 to 10.sup.6 atoms per cluster ion, and accelerated in a beam to a critical velocity. The accelerated beam is used to impact a selected area of an outer surface of the workpiece at a preselected rate of impacts of cluster ions/cm.sup.2 /sec. in order to effect a precise modification in that selected area of the workpiece.

  19. Method of precisely modifying predetermined surface layers of a workpiece by cluster ion impact therewith

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.; Beuhler, R.J.; Matthew, M.W.; Ledbetter, M.

    1984-06-25

    A method of precisely modifying a selected area of a workpiece by producing a beam of charged cluster ions that is narrowly mass selected to a predetermined mean size of cluster ions within a range of 25 to 10/sup 6/ atoms per cluster ion, and accelerated in a beam to a critical velocity. The accelerated beam is used to impact a selected area of an outer surface of the workpiece at a preselected rate of impacts of cluster ions/cm/sup 2//sec in order to effect a precise modification in that selected area of the workpiece.

  20. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters, metal-organic clusters, metal oxides, and metal-doped silicon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weijun

    The techniques of time-of-flight mass spectrometry and negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy were utilized to study metal clusters (Mgn -, Znn-, Can -, Mnn-, CuAln -, LiAln-, and NmSn n-), metal-organic complexes (Tin(benzene) m-, Fn(benzene)m- , Nin(benzene)m-), metal oxides(AuO-, PtO-, TaOn -, HfO2-, and MnnO -), and metal-doped semiconductor clusters (CrSin -, GdmSin- and HoSi n-). The study of magnesium and zinc cluster anions shows that they have magic numbers at size 9, 19 and 34, and the closures and reopenings of the s-p band gap are related to the mass spectra magic numbers. The evolution of electronic structure in Can clusters resembles that of Mgn - and Znn- with band gap closure and reopening. However, the electronic structures Can- clusters are more complicated and the magic numbers are different from those of Mgn- and Znn -. That might due to the involvement of calcium's empty d orbitals. In Mn clusters, a dramatic change of electronic structure was observed at Mn5-. The transition of metallic and magnetic properties is strongly related to the s-d hybridization. The photoelectron study of LiAln- is consistent with theoretical predictions, which described LiAl13 as alkali-halide-like ionic entity, Li+(Al13)-. The results of CuAln- show that copper atom might occupy interior position in these clusters. The results of Nam Snn- implied that Na4Sn 4 and NaSn5- could be described as (Na +)4Sn44- and (Na +)Sn52-, respectively. The formation of these species indicates the existence of Zintl phase structure in the gas phase. Tin(Bz)n+1- clusters have multiple-decker sandwich structures with each titanium atom located between two parallel benzene rings. The structures of Fen(Bz)m - and Nin(Bz)m- are characterized with a metal cluster core caged by benzene molecules. The information for the electronic states of PtO, AuO, and TaOn (n = 1--3) were obtained from the photoelectron spectra of their corresponding negative ions. The coincidence between electron

  1. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K.

    2014-03-15

    We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

  2. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets.

    PubMed

    Hirata, K; Saitoh, Y; Chiba, A; Yamada, K; Matoba, S; Narumi, K

    2014-03-01

    We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

  3. Vibrationally resolved negative ion photoelectron spectroscopic studies of niobium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Green, S.M.E.; Alex, S.; Leopold, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy provides a means of obtaining vibrational data for atoms and small molecules {open_quotes}chemisorbed{close_quotes} on size-selected metal clusters. In the present study, Nb{sub 3}O{sup -}, Nb{sub 4}O{sup -} and Nb{sub 4}CO{sup -} were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor equipped with a metal cathode cluster source. The 488 nm photoelectron spectrum of the mass-selected Nb{sub 3}O{sup -} anions shows a vertical transition to the ground state of neutral Nb{sub 3}O, with weak progressions in the Nb{sub 3}-O stretching (710{+-}20 cm{sup -1} in Nb{sub 3}O) and Nb, bending (320{+-}15 cm{sup -1}-in both Nb{sub 3}O and Nb{sub 3}O{sup -}) vibrational modes. These results indicate that the Nb{sub 3}O{sup -} anion, like Nb{sub 3}O and Nb{sub 3}O{sup +}, has a planar Ca{sub 2v} structure with the O atom bridging two Nb atoms. The Nb{sub 4}O{sup -} spectrum shows resolved transitions to the ground state of Nb{sub 3}O and to an excited electronic state lying 3050{+-}20 cm{sup -1} higher in energy. In analogy with the Nb{sub 4}O results, the 670{+-}20 cm{sup -1} frequency observed for the Nb{sub 4}O ground state is assigned to a metal-oxygen stretching mode, and the 215{+-}15 cm{sup -1} and 195{+-}15 cm{sup -1} frequencies observed in the ground and excited states, respectively, to a bending mode of the metal cluster. The electron affinities of Nb{sub 3}O and Nb{sub 4}O are 1.402 and 1.178 ({+-}0.006) eV, respectively. Preliminary, ongoing studies of mass selected Nb{sub 4}CO{sup -} anions prepared under a variety of source conditions thus far suggest the presence of two isomers, one with a greatly weakened but intact CO bond as indicated by a very low CO stretching frequency of about 1300 cm{sup -1} and the other with the dissociated C and O atoms bound separately to the niobium cluster.

  4. Analysis of cardiac tissue by gold cluster ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosiova, M.; Chorvatova, A.; Chorvat, D.; Biro, Cs.; Velic, D.

    2006-07-01

    Specific molecules in cardiac tissue of spontaneously hypertensive rats are studied by using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The investigation determines phospholipids, cholesterol, fatty acids and their fragments in the cardiac tissue, with special focus on cardiolipin. Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid typical for cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membrane and its decrease is involved in pathologic conditions. In the positive polarity, the fragments of phosphatydilcholine are observed in the mass region of 700-850 u. Peaks over mass 1400 u correspond to intact and cationized molecules of cardiolipin. In animal tissue, cardiolipin contains of almost exclusively 18 carbon fatty acids, mostly linoleic acid. Linoleic acid at 279 u, other fatty acids, and phosphatidylglycerol fragments, as precursors of cardiolipin synthesis, are identified in the negative polarity. These data demonstrate that SIMS technique along with Au 3+ cluster primary ion beam is a good tool for detection of higher mass biomolecules providing approximately 10 times higher yield in comparison with Au +.

  5. Irradiation effect of gas-hydrate cluster ions on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, Gikan H.; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Kobayashi, Hiroki

    2014-05-01

    In our newly developed gas-hydrate cluster ion source, a vapor of water bubbling with carbon dioxide (CO2) gas was ejected through a nozzle into a vacuum region, and mixed beams of water clusters and carbon dioxide-hydrate clusters were produced by adiabatic expansion. According to time-of-flight measurements, the largest water clusters consisted of approximately 2800 molecules at a vapor pressure of 0.3 MPa. Also, the largest mixed clusters contained approximately 2000 molecules. Copper and silicon substrates were irradiated by the water cluster ions as well as carbon dioxide-hydrate cluster ions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that carbon was included in the Cu and Si substrates irradiated by the carbon dioxide-hydrate cluster ions, and a chemical shift owing to the formation of carboxyl radicals occurred on the Cu surface. Furthermore, the Cu surface was sputtered, and the sputtering depth was larger than the distance penetrated by the water cluster ion irradiation. Therefore, the formation of carboxyl radicals played an important role in the sputtering of the Cu surface, which occurred effectively in carbon dioxide-hydrate cluster ion irradiation.

  6. Production of Liquid Cluster Ions by Nozzle Beam Source with and without He Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Okada, T.; Sugiyama, K.

    2008-11-03

    We developed a new type of cluster ion source which could produce various kinds of liquid clusters such as water, methanol, ethanol and octane clusters. When the vapor pressure was larger than one atm, the water and ethanol clusters could be produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon without adding He gas. The peak size of the cluster ions increased with the increase of the vapor pressures. When the source temperature was at room temperature, the water and ethanol clusters were also produced by adding He gas. In another case of producing liquid clusters such as methanol and octane clusters, He gas was added to mix up with vapors of liquid materials. When the He gas pressure was larger than a few atms, the methanol and octane clusters were produced at a vapor pressure of two atm. The peak size increased with increase of the vapor pressure as well as the He gas pressure.

  7. Cluster Observations of Ion Dispersions near the Exterior Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C.; Grison, B.; Berchem, J.; Trattner, K. J.; Pitout, F.; Richard, R. L.; Taylor, M. G.; Laakso, H. E.; Masson, A.; Dunlop, M. W.; Dandouras, I. S.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Daly, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    The cusps are the places where the Earth's magnetic field lines, connected to the inner side of the magnetopause, converge. It is therefore the place where signatures of processes occurring near the subsolar point, in the tail lobes, as well as near the dawn and dusk flanks are observed. The main process that injects solar wind plasma into the polar cusp is now generally accepted to be magnetic reconnection. Depending on the IMF direction, this process will take place equatorward (for IMF southward), poleward (for IMF northward) or on the side (for IMF azimuthal) of the cusp. We report a Cluster crossing on 5 January 2002 near the exterior cusp on the southern dusk side. The IMF was mainly azimuthal (IMF-By around -5 nT), the solar wind speed around 280 km/s and the density around 5 cm-3. The four Cluster spacecraft were still in the "magnetotail" configuration with two perfect tetrahedra of 2000 km around apogee and turning into an elongated configuration near the magnetopause. C4 was the first spacecraft to enter the cusp around 19:52:04 UT, followed by C2 at 19:52:35 UT, C1 at 19:54:24 UT and C3 at 20:13:15 UT. C4 and C1 observed two ion energy dispersions at 20:10 UT and 20:40 UT and C3 at 20:35 UT and 21:15 UT. We will investigate the origin of the injections forming the dispersions and if these can be explained by the reconnection between the interplanetary magnetic field and the Earth's magnetic field.

  8. Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Ab Initio Calculations of Phosphoric Acid Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavanant, Hélène; Tognetti, Vincent; Afonso, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    Positive and negative ion electrospray mass spectra obtained from 50 mM phosphoric acid solutions presented a large number of phosphoric acid clusters: [(H3PO4)n + zH] z+ or [(H3PO4)n - zH] z- , with n up to 200 and z up to 4 for positively charged clusters, and n up to 270 and z up to 7 for negatively charged cluster ions. Ion mobility experiments allowed very explicit separation of the different charge states. Because of the increased pressures involved in ion mobility experiments, dissociation to smaller clusters was observed both in the trap and transfer areas. Voltages along the ion path could be optimized so as to minimize this effect, which can be directly associated with the cleavage of hydrogen bonds. Having excluded the ion mobility times that resulted from dissociated ions, each cluster ion appeared at a single drift time. These drift times showed a linear progression with the number of phosphoric atoms for cluster ions of the same charge state. Cross section calculations were carried out with MOBCAL on DFT optimized geometries with different hydrogen locations and with three types of atomic charges. DFT geometry optimizations yielded roughly spherical structures. Our results for nitrogen gas interaction cross sections showed that values were dependent on the atomic charges definition used in the MOBCAL calculation. This pinpointed the necessity to define a clear theoretical framework before any comparative interpretations can be attempted with uncharacterized compounds.

  9. Traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations of phosphoric acid clusters.

    PubMed

    Lavanant, Hélène; Tognetti, Vincent; Afonso, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    Positive and negative ion electrospray mass spectra obtained from 50 mM phosphoric acid solutions presented a large number of phosphoric acid clusters: [(H3PO4)n + zH](z+) or [(H3PO4)n - zH](z-), with n up to 200 and z up to 4 for positively charged clusters, and n up to 270 and z up to 7 for negatively charged cluster ions. Ion mobility experiments allowed very explicit separation of the different charge states. Because of the increased pressures involved in ion mobility experiments, dissociation to smaller clusters was observed both in the trap and transfer areas. Voltages along the ion path could be optimized so as to minimize this effect, which can be directly associated with the cleavage of hydrogen bonds. Having excluded the ion mobility times that resulted from dissociated ions, each cluster ion appeared at a single drift time. These drift times showed a linear progression with the number of phosphoric atoms for cluster ions of the same charge state. Cross section calculations were carried out with MOBCAL on DFT optimized geometries with different hydrogen locations and with three types of atomic charges. DFT geometry optimizations yielded roughly spherical structures. Our results for nitrogen gas interaction cross sections showed that values were dependent on the atomic charges definition used in the MOBCAL calculation. This pinpointed the necessity to define a clear theoretical framework before any comparative interpretations can be attempted with uncharacterized compounds.

  10. Enhancing Secondary Ion Yields in Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Using Water Cluster Primary Beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Low secondary ion yields from organic and biological molecules are the principal limitation on the future exploitation of time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) as a surface and materials analysis technique. On the basis of the hypothesis that increasing the density of water related fragments in the ion impact zone would enhance proton mediated reactions, a prototype water cluster ion beam has been developed using supersonic jet expansion methodologies that enable ion yields using a 10 keV (H2O)1000+ beam to be compared with those obtained using a 10 keV Ar1000+ beam. The ion yields from four standard compounds, arginine, haloperidol, DPPC, and angiotensin II, have been measured under static+ and high ion dose conditions. Ion yield enhancements relative to the argon beam on the order of 10 or more have been observed for all the compounds such that the molecular ion yield per a 1 μm pixel can be as high as 20, relative to 0.05 under an argon beam. The water beam has also been shown to partially lift the matrix effect in a 1:10 mixture of haloperidol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) that suppresses the haloperidol signal. These results provide encouragement that further developments of the water cluster beam to higher energies and larger cluster sizes will provide the ion yield enhancements necessary for the future development of TOF-SIMS. PMID:23718847

  11. Incorporation of sulfide ions into the cadmium(II) thiolate cluster of Cicer arietinum metallothionein2.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoqiong; Freisinger, Eva

    2013-01-18

    The plant metallothionein2 from Cicer arietinum (chickpea), cic-MT2, is known to coordinate five divalent metal ions such as Zn(II) or Cd(II), which are arranged in a single metal thiolate cluster. When the Zn(II) form of the protein is titrated with Cd(II) ions in the presence of sulfide ions, an increased Cd(II) binding capacity and concomitant incorporation of sulfide ions into the cluster are observed. The exact stoichiometry of this novel cluster, its spectroscopic properties, and the significantly increased pH stability are analyzed with different techniques, including UV and circular dichroism spectroscopy and colorimetric assays. Limited proteolytic digestion provides information about the spacial arrangement of the cluster within the protein. Increasing the Cd(II) scavenging properties of a metallothionein by additionally recruiting sulfide ions might be an economic and very efficient detoxification strategy for plants.

  12. Ion-molecule clustering in differential mobility spectrometry: lessons learned from tetraalkylammonium cations and their isomers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Larry; Zhu, Mabel; Hopkins, W Scott

    2014-09-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) can distinguish ions based upon the differences in their high- and low-field ion mobilities as they experience the asymmetric waveform applied to the DMS cell. These mobilities are known to be influenced by the ions' structure, m/z, and charge distribution (i.e., resonance structures) within the ions themselves, as well as by the gas-phase environment of the DMS cell. While these associations have been developed over time through empirical observations, the exact role of ion structures or their interactions with clustering molecules remains generally unknown. In this study, that relationship is explored by observing the DMS behaviors of a series of tetraalkylammonium ions as a function of their structures and the gas-phase environment of the DMS cell. To support the DMS experiments, the basin-hopping search strategy was employed to identify candidate cluster structures for density functional theory treatment. More than a million cluster structures distributed across 72 different ion-molecule cluster systems were sampled to determine global minimum structures and cluster binding energies. This joint computational and experimental approach suggests that cluster geometry, in particular ion-molecule intermolecular separation, plays a critical role in DMS. PMID:25001379

  13. Ion-molecule clustering in differential mobility spectrometry: lessons learned from tetraalkylammonium cations and their isomers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Larry; Zhu, Mabel; Hopkins, W Scott

    2014-09-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) can distinguish ions based upon the differences in their high- and low-field ion mobilities as they experience the asymmetric waveform applied to the DMS cell. These mobilities are known to be influenced by the ions' structure, m/z, and charge distribution (i.e., resonance structures) within the ions themselves, as well as by the gas-phase environment of the DMS cell. While these associations have been developed over time through empirical observations, the exact role of ion structures or their interactions with clustering molecules remains generally unknown. In this study, that relationship is explored by observing the DMS behaviors of a series of tetraalkylammonium ions as a function of their structures and the gas-phase environment of the DMS cell. To support the DMS experiments, the basin-hopping search strategy was employed to identify candidate cluster structures for density functional theory treatment. More than a million cluster structures distributed across 72 different ion-molecule cluster systems were sampled to determine global minimum structures and cluster binding energies. This joint computational and experimental approach suggests that cluster geometry, in particular ion-molecule intermolecular separation, plays a critical role in DMS.

  14. Highly Charged Ions from Laser-Cluster Interactions: Local-Field-Enhanced Impact Ionization and Frustrated Electron-Ion Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Fennel, Thomas; Ramunno, Lora; Brabec, Thomas

    2007-12-07

    Our molecular dynamics analysis of Xe{sub 147-5083} clusters identifies two mechanisms that contribute to the yet unexplained observation of extremely highly charged ions in intense laser cluster experiments. First, electron impact ionization is enhanced by the local cluster electric field, increasing the highest charge states by up to 40%; a corresponding theoretical method is developed. Second, electron-ion recombination after the laser pulse is frustrated by acceleration electric fields typically used in ion detectors. This increases the highest charge states by up to 90%, as compared to the usual assumption of total recombination of all cluster-bound electrons. Both effects together augment the highest charge states by up to 120%, in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  15. Correspondence between cluster-ion and bulk solution thermodynamic properties: on the validity of the cluster-pair-based approximation.

    PubMed

    Vlcek, Lukas; Chialvo, Ariel A; Simonson, J Michael

    2013-11-01

    Since the single-ion thermodynamic properties of bulk solutions are not directly accessible from experiments, extrapolations have been devised to estimate them from experimental measurements on small-clusters. Extrapolations based on the cluster-pair-based approximation (CPA) technique (Tissandier et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 1998, 102, 7787-7794) and its variants are currently considered one of the most reliable source of single-ion hydration thermodynamic data and have been used as a benchmark for the development of molecular and continuum solvation models. Despite its importance, the CPA has not been thoroughly tested and recent studies have indicated inconsistencies with molecular simulations. The present work challenges the key CPA assumptions that the hydration properties of single cations and anions in growing clusters rapidly converge to each other following a monotonous trend. Using a combination of simulation techniques to study the transition between alkali halide ions in small clusters and bulk solution, we show that this convergence is rather slow and involves a surprising change in trends, which can result in significant errors in the original estimated single-ion properties. When these cluster-size-dependent effects are taken into account, the inconsistencies between molecular models and experimental predictions disappear, and the value of the proton hydration enthalpy based on the CPA aligns with estimates based on other principles.

  16. How to reliably detect molecular clusters and nucleation mode particles with Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Mirme, Sander; Mirme, Aadu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-08-01

    To understand the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation and growth processes, information on the size where the atmospheric nucleation and cluster activation occurs, is crucially needed. The current understanding of the concentrations and dynamics of charged and neutral clusters and particles is based on theoretical predictions and experimental observations. This paper gives a standard operation procedure (SOP) for Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) measurements and data processing. With the NAIS data, we have improved the scientific understanding by (1) direct detection of freshly formed atmospheric clusters and particles, (2) linking experimental observations and theoretical framework to understand the formation and growth mechanisms of aerosol particles, and (3) parameterizing formation and growth mechanisms for atmospheric models. The SOP provides tools to harmonize the world-wide measurements of small clusters and nucleation mode particles and to verify consistent results measured by the NAIS users. The work is based on discussions and interactions between the NAIS users and the NAIS manufacturer.

  17. Two-dimensional cluster-state preparation with linear ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, Harald; Wunderlich, Christof; Singer, Kilian; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2009-05-15

    We present schemes to prepare two-dimensional cluster states [H. J. Briegel and R. Raussendorf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 910 (2001)] with atomic ions confined in a microstructured linear ion trap and coupled by an engineered spin-spin interaction. In particular, we show how to prepare a nx2 cluster state by creating a linear cluster state and adding third-neighbor entanglement using selective recoupling techniques. The scheme is based on the capabilities provided by segmented linear Paul traps to confine ions in local potential wells and to separate and transport ions between these wells. Furthermore, we consider creating three- and four-qubit cluster states by engineering the coupling matrix such that through the periodicity of the time evolution unwanted couplings are canceled. All entangling operations are achieved by switching of voltages and currents and do not require interaction with laser light.

  18. Cluster ion beam assisted fabrication of metallic nanostructures for plasmonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Iram; Tilakaratne, Buddhi P.; Li, Yang; Bao, Jiming; Wijesundera, Dharshana N.; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2016-08-01

    We report a high-throughput, single-step method for fabricating rippled plasmonic nanostructure arrays via self-assembly induced by oblique angle cluster ion beam irradiation of metal surfaces. This approach does not require lithographic or chemical processes and has the prominent advantage of possible large surface area coverage and applicability to different starting materials. The polarization dependent plasmonic property of the gold nano-ripple is due to their one dimension structure. The localized plasmon resonance frequency of synthesized nano-ripple arrays is tunable by changing nano-ripple dimensions that can be engineered by changing the cluster ion beam irradiation parameters. In this specific case presented, using 30 keV Ar-gas cluster ion beam, we fabricate gold nano-ripple arrays that show localized plasmon resonance in the visible range through near IR range, tunable by varying cluster ion irradiation fluence.

  19. Ab initio calculation of relative ion concentrations of protonated water clusters at equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. P. F.; Dyke, J. M.; Wilders, A. E.; Watts, P.

    Relative concentrations of protonated water clusters, H(H2O)+n, are determined for the equilibria H(H2O)+n-1 + H2O ⇌ H(H2O)+n (for n = 1, …, 5), by ab initio molecular-orbital calculations (at the MP2/6-31G* level), using standard thermodynamic and statistical-mechanical methods. The calculated relative cluster-ion concentrations, at water concentrations of between 1 and 90 ppm at 308 K, are compared with the corresponding relative ion intensities measured with an ion-mobility mass spectrometer. The comparison shows that the observed cluster-ion intensity distributions agree well with those found from ab initio calculations for an equilibrium mixture of protonated water clusters.

  20. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakirev, N.; Zhikharev, V.; Gumarov, G.

    2014-05-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field.

  1. Cluster ion beam profiling of organics by secondary ion mass spectrometry--does sodium affect the molecular ion intensity at interfaces?

    PubMed

    Green, Felicia M; Gilmore, Ian S; Seah, Martin P

    2008-12-01

    The use of cluster ion beam sputtering for depth profiling organic materials is of growing technological importance and is a very active area of research. At the 44th IUVSTA Workshop on "Sputtering and Ion Emission by Cluster Ion Beams", recent results were presented of a cluster ion beam depth profile of a thin organic molecular layer on a silicon wafer substrate. Those data showed that the intensity of molecular secondary ions is observed to increase at the interface and this was explained in terms of the higher stopping power in the substrate and a consequently higher sputtering yield and even higher secondary ion molecular sputtering yield. An alternative hypothesis was postulated in the workshop discussion which may be paraphrased as: "under primary ion bombardment of an organic layer, mobile ions such as sodium may migrate to the interface with the inorganic substrate and this enhancement of the sodium concentration increases the ionisation probability, so increasing the molecular ion yield observed at the interface". It is important to understand if measurement artefacts occur at interfaces for quantification as these are of great technological relevance - for example, the concentration of drug in a drug delivery system. Here, we evaluate the above hypothesis using a sample that exhibits regions of high and low sodium concentration at both the organic surface and the interface with the silicon wafer substrate. There is no evidence to support the hypothesis that the probability of molecular secondary ion ionisation is related to the sodium concentration at these levels. PMID:19039819

  2. A carbon-cluster laser ion source for TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz

    2009-08-01

    A new laser ablation ion source was developed and tested for the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP in order to provide carbon-cluster ions for absolute mass calibration. Ions of different cluster sizes up to C+24 were successfully produced, covering the mass range up to the heavy actinide elements. The ions were captured in a Penning trap, and their time-of-flight cyclotron resonances recorded in order to determine their cyclotron frequency. Furthermore, the same ion source was used to produce GdO+ ions from a gadolinium target in sufficient amount for mass spectrometry purposes. The design of the source and its characteristics are presented. This paper comprises partly the PhD theses of J Ketelaer and C Smorra.

  3. On the stability of ion water clusters at atmospheric conditions: Open system Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Zidi, Zouhaier S

    2012-09-28

    The formation of water clusters on Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), and I(-) ions from water vapor at atmospheric conditions have been studied using Monte Carlo simulations. The extended simple point charge model has been employed for water molecules. The polarization of ions in the field of molecules and the polarization of molecules in the field of ions have been considered explicitly in the total Hamiltonian of the molecular system. The cluster formation work and the Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of attachment reactions of one water molecule to the cluster have been calculated via the bicanonical ensemble method. Our results reveal the formation of stable clusters in equilibrium with the moist atmosphere in a wide range of vapor pressure values, with largest clusters are formed around cations. Decreasing the temperature, from 293 K to 253 K, leads to the formation of larger equilibrium clusters, and enhances the stability of systems as whole. According to clusters' molecular structures, negative ions are expected to be more active in atmospheric processes, including chemical reactions and cloud formation, than positive ones.

  4. Voltage dependence of cluster size in carbon films using plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. R.; Tarrant, R. N.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Pearce, G.; Marks, N. A.; McCulloch, D. G.; Lim, S. H. N.

    2003-05-01

    Carbon films were prepared using a cathodic arc with plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Using Raman spectroscopy to determine cluster size, a comparison is made between cluster sizes at high voltage and a low duty cycle of pulses with the cluster sizes produced at low voltage and a higher duty cycle. We find that for ion implantation in the range 2-20 kV, the cluster size depends more on implantation energy ( E) than implantation frequency ( f), unlike stress relief, which we have previously shown [M.M.M. Bilek, et al., IEEE Trans. in Plasma Sci., Proceedings 20th ISDEIV 1-5 July 2002, Tours, France, Cat. No. 02CH37331, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, p. 95] to be dependent on the product Ef. These differences are interpreted in terms of a model in which the ion impacts create thermal spikes.

  5. Ionization and fragmentation of water clusters by fast highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adoui, L.; Cassimi, A.; Gervais, B.; Grandin, J.-P.; Guillaume, L.; Maisonny, R.; Legendre, S.; Tarisien, M.; López-Tarifa, P.; Politis, M.-F.; Penhoat, M.-A. Hervé du; Vuilleumier, R.; Gaigeot, M.-P.; Tavernelli, I.; Alcamí, M.; Martín, F.

    2009-04-01

    We study the dissociative ionization of water clusters by impact of 12 MeV/u Ni25+ ions. Cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) is used to obtain information about stability, energetics and charge mobility of the ionized water clusters. An unusual stability of the H9O+4 ion is observed, which could be the signature of the so-called Eigen structure in gas-phase water clusters. From the analysis of coincidences between charged fragments, we conclude that charge mobility is very high and is responsible for the formation of protonated water clusters, (H2O)nH+, that dominate the mass spectrum. These results are supported by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory simulations, which also reveal the mechanisms of such mobility.

  6. Structure and dynamics of ion clusters in linear octupole traps: Phase diagrams, chirality, and melting mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yurtsever, E.; Onal, E. D.; Calvo, F.

    2011-05-15

    The stable structures and melting dynamics of clusters of identical ions bound by linear octupole radiofrequency traps are theoretically investigated by global optimization methods and molecular dynamics simulations. By varying the cluster sizes in the range of 10-1000 ions and the extent of trap anisotropy by more than one order of magnitude, we find a broad variety of stable structures based on multiple rings at small sizes evolving into tubular geometries at large sizes. The binding energy of these clusters is well represented by two contributions arising from isotropic linear and octupolar traps. The structures generally exhibit strong size effects, and chiral arrangements spontaneously emerge in many crystals. Sufficiently large clusters form nested, coaxial tubes with different thermal stabilities. As in isotropic octupolar clusters, the inner tubes melt at temperatures that are lower than the overall melting point.

  7. Charge Retention by Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au11L53+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is demonstrated that the Au11L53+ cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-

  8. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

    2013-07-01

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  9. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne

    2015-11-28

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D{sub 2}-tagged GlyGlyH{sup +} ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub 1−4} are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  10. Depth resolution at organic interfaces sputtered by argon gas cluster ions: the effect of energy, angle and cluster size.

    PubMed

    Seah, M P; Spencer, S J; Havelund, R; Gilmore, I S; Shard, A G

    2015-10-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of experimental parameters such as energy, angle and cluster size on the depth resolution in depth profiling organic materials using Ar gas cluster ions. The first results are presented of the incident ion angle dependence of the depth resolution, obtained at the Irganox 1010 to silicon interface, from profiles by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). By analysis of all relevant published depth profile data, it is shown that such data, from delta layers in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), correlate with the XPS data from interfaces if it is assumed that the monolayers of the Irganox 1010 adjacent to the wafer substrate surface have an enhanced sputtering rate. SIMS data confirm this enhancement. These results show that the traditional relation for the depth resolution, FWHM = 2.1Y(1/3) or slightly better, FWHM = P(X)Y(1/3)/n(0.2), where n is the argon gas cluster size, and P(X) is a parameter for each material are valid both at the 45° incidence angle of the argon gas cluster sputtering ions used in most studies and at all angles from 0° to 80°. This implies that, for optimal depth profile resolution, 0° or >75° incidence may be significantly better than the 45° traditionally used, especially for the low energy per atom settings required for the best resolved profiles in organic materials. A detailed analysis, however, shows that the FWHM requires a constant contribution added in quadrature to the above such that there are minimal improvements at 0° or greater than 75°. A critical test at 75° confirms the presence of this constant contribution.

  11. Size-restricted proton transfer within toluene-methanol cluster ions.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-Tung; Shores, Kevin S; Freindorf, Marek; Furlani, Thomas; DeLeon, Robert L; Garvey, James F

    2008-11-20

    To understand the interaction between toluene and methanol, the chemical reactivity of [(C6H5CH3)(CH3OH) n=1-7](+) cluster ions has been investigated via tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry and through calculations. Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) experiments show that the dissociated intracluster proton transfer reaction from the toluene cation to methanol clusters, forming protonated methanol clusters, only occurs for n = 2-4. For n = 5-7, CID spectra reveal that these larger clusters have to sequentially lose methanol monomers until they reach n = 4 to initiate the deprotonation of the toluene cation. Metastable decay data indicate that for n = 3 and n = 4 (CH3OH)3H(+) is the preferred fragment ion. The calculational results reveal that both the gross proton affinity of the methanol subcluster and the structure of the cluster itself play an important role in driving this proton transfer reaction. When n = 3, the cooperative effect of the methanols in the subcluster provides the most important contribution to allow the intracluster proton transfer reaction to occur with little or no energy barrier. As n >or= 4, the methanol subcluster is able to form ring structures to stabilize the cluster structures so that direct proton transfer is not a favored process. The preferred reaction product, the (CH3OH)3H(+) cluster ion, indicates that this size-restricted reaction is driven by both the proton affinity and the enhanced stability of the resulting product.

  12. Metastable dissociation of doubly charged CO/sub 2/ cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leiter, K.; Kreisle, D.; Echt, O.; Maerk, T.D.

    1987-05-07

    Multiply charged CO/sub 2/ cluster ions are produced by adiabatic nozzle expansion and subsequent ionization by electron impact. They are analyzed in a double focussing sector field mass spectrometer (reversed geometry). (CO/sub 2/)/sub n//sup 2 +/ cluster ions are only detected above an electron energy of about 30 eV and with sizes n greater than or equal to 45 in the direct mass spectrum. Metastable decay reactions of these ions occurring in the first field free region are investigated by decoupling the analyzer fields. It is shown that (CO/sub 2/)/sub n//sub 2//sup +/ with sizes of n greater than or equal to 44 lose one neutral monomer or, roughly ten times less probable, two neutral monomers in these dissociation reactions. The total effective dissociation rates for these dissociation processes are very large, e.g. approx.2 x 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/ for (CO/sub 2/)/sub 47//sup 2 +/. Conversely, no singly charged fragment ions were observed to be produced by Coulomb explosion from doubly charged clusters in the first field free region. Moreover, besides doubly charged stoichiometric ions the existence of doubly charged fragment cluster ions with n greater than or equal to 44 in observed in the mass spectra.

  13. The Catalytic Manganese Cluster: Organization of the Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, V.K.

    2007-02-09

    The light-induced oxidation of water to O{sub 2} is catalyzed by a four-manganese atom cluster associated with Photosystem II (PS II). This chapter summarizes ongoing investigations of the oxidation state, the structure and the associated cofactors calcium and chloride of the catalytic Mn cluster using X-ray and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Manganese K-edge X-ray spectroscopy, K{beta} X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies have not only determined the oxidation states and structural features, but also changes that occur in oxidation state of the Mn cluster and in its structural organization during the accumulation of oxidizing equivalents leading to O{sub 2} formation. Combining X-ray spectroscopy information with X-ray diffraction studies, and consistent with the available EPR data, we have succeeded in limiting the range of likely structures of the Mn cluster. EXAFS studies at the strontium and calcium K-edges have provided evidence that the catalytic center is a Mn/Ca heteronuclear complex. Based on the X-ray spectroscopy data, models for the structure and a mechanism for O{sub 2} evolution are presented.

  14. Solvation processes in steam: Ab initio calculations of ion solvent structures and clustering equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Kono H.; Seward, Terry M.

    2008-07-01

    Reports of the high ion content of steam and low-density supercritical fluids date back to the work of Carlon [Carlon H. R. (1980) Ion content of air humidified by boiling water. J. Appl.Phys.51, 171-173], who invoked ion and neutral-water clustering as mechanism to explain why ions partition into the low-density aqueous phase. Mass spectrometric, vibrational spectroscopic measurements and quantum chemical calculations have refined this concept by proposing strongly bound ion-solvent aggregates and water clusters such as Eigen- and Zundel-type proton clusters H 3O +·(H 2O) m and the more weakly bound water oligomers (H 2O) m. The extent to which these clusters affect fluid chemistry is determined by their abundance, however, little is known regarding the stability of such moieties in natural low-density high-temperature fluids. Here we report results from quantum chemical calculations using chemical-accuracy multi-level G3 (Curtiss-Pople) and CBS-Q theory (Peterson) to address this question. In particular, we have investigated the cluster structures and clustering equilibria for the ions HO·(HO)m(HS)n,NH4+·(HO)m(HS)n and H 3S +·(H 2O) m(H 2S) n, where m ⩽ 6 and n ⩽ 4, at 300-1000 K and 1 bar as well as under vapor-liquid equilibrium conditions between 300 and 646 K. We find that incremental hydration enthalpies and entropies derived from van't Hoff analyses for the attachment of H 2O and H 2S onto H 3O +, NH4+ and H 3S + are in excellent agreement with experimental values and that the addition of water to all three ions is energetically more favorable than solvation by H 2S. As clusters grow in size, the energetic trends of cluster hydration begin to reflect those for bulk H 2O liquids, i.e. calculated hydration enthalpies and entropies approach values characteristic of the condensation of bulk water (Δ Ho = -44.0 kJ mol -1, Δ So = -118.8 J K mol -1). Water and hydrogen sulfide cluster calculations at higher temperatures indicate that a significant

  15. Reactivity of niobium-carbon cluster ions with hydrogen molecules in relation to formation mechanism of Met-Car cluster ions.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Ken; Fukushima, Naoya; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2008-07-01

    It is known that a niobium-carbon Met-Car cluster ion (Nb 8C 12 (+)) and its intermediates (Nb 4C 4 (+), Nb 6C 7 (+), etc.) are selectively formed by the aggregation of the Nb atoms in the presence of hydrocarbons. To elucidate the formation mechanism, we prepared Nb n C m (+) with every combination of n and m in the gas phase by the laser vaporization technique. The reactivity of Nb n C m (+) with H 2 was examined under the multiple collision condition, finding that Nb n C m (+) between Nb 2C 3 (+) and Nb 8C 12 (+) are not reactive with H 2. On the basis of the H 2 affinity of Nb n C m (+) experimentally obtained, we propose a dehydrogenation-controlled formation mechanism of niobium-carbon Met-Car cluster ions.

  16. Surface Sensitivity in Cluster-Ion-Induced Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Szakal, Christopher; Kozole, Joseph; Russo, Michael F. Jr.; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2006-06-02

    The ion beam-induced removal of thin water ice films condensed onto Ag and bombarded by energetic Au, Au{sub 2}, Au{sub 3}, and C{sub 60} projectiles is examined both experimentally and with molecular dynamics computer simulations. For water overlayers of thicknesses greater than 10 A, the yields of sputtered Ag{sup +} secondary ions decay exponentially with increasing ice thickness, revealing characteristic decay lengths of 24, 20, 18, and 7.0 A ring , respectively. It is shown that these values manifest the characteristic depths of projectile energy loss, rather than escape depths of the sputtered Ag atoms through the water ice overlayer. Computer simulations show that the mechanism of ejection involves the sweeping away of overlayer water molecules, allowing for an unimpeded escape of ejected Ag atoms. The relevance of these data with respect to surface sensitivity in secondary ion mass spectrometry is discussed.

  17. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yuexing

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs{sup {minus}}. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  18. Dependence of multiply charged ions on the polarization state in nanosecond laser-benzene cluster interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiguo; Zhao, Wuduo; Hua, Lei; Hou, Keyong; Li, Haiyang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigated the dependence of multiply charged ions on the laser polarization state when benzene cluster was irradiated with 532 and 1064 nm nanosecond laser. A circle, square and flower distribution for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed with 532 nm laser respectively, while flower petals for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed at 1064 nm as the laser polarization varied. A theoretical calculation was performed to interpret the polarization state and wavelength dependence of the multiply charged ions. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental observation with considering the contribution from the cluster disintegration.

  19. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Lavoie, Christian; Alptekin, Emre; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Zhu, Frank; Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  20. Covariance images of the primary response from rare gas cluster ions to photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukes, P.; Buxey, A.; Jones, A. B.; Stace, A.

    1997-01-01

    The photoexcitation and fragmentation of rare gas cluster ions can yield large numbers of neutral products which, in turn, exhibit considerable variation in their kinetic energies. In order to interpret such events, a coincidence technique has been used to correlate the arrival times of neutral photofragments at a detector following the photoexcitation of Arn+ and Krn+, for n⩽10. By collecting data from approximately 105 photodissociation events for each type of cluster ion, covariance images have been derived which clearly demonstrate that the initial response to photoexcitation, is the ejection of a single rare gas atom which carries with it between 30% and 60% of the excess energy.

  1. Electron and Ion Emission from Clusters exposed to Strong Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiggesbämker, Josef

    2006-03-01

    When clusters interact with intense optical laser pulses energetic and highly charged atomic fragment ions e.g. are generated^1. In contrast to atoms the efficiency of the process could be enhanced by choosing a pair of optical delayed pulses instead of a single but more intense femtosecond pulse^2. In metals the stronger charging of the clusters can qualitatively be explained by a plasmon enhanced ionization process. We extended our studies and have made a compared analysis of the emission of highly charged ions and energetic electrons the interaction dynamics of intense femtosecond laser fields with nanometer-sized silver clusters. Using a pair of laser pulses with variable optical delay the time-dependent cluster response is resolved. A dramatic increase both in the atomic charge state of the ions and the maximum electron kinetic energy is observed for a certain delay of the pulses. Corresponding Vlasov calculations on a metal cluster model system indicate that enhanced cluster ionization as well as the generation of fast electrons coincide with resonant plasmon excitation.^3 *L. Köller, M. Schumacher, J. Köhn, S. Teuber, J. Tiggesbäumker, and K.-H. Meiwes-Broer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3783 (1999). *T. Döppner, Th. Fennel, Th. Diederich, J. Tiggesb äumker, and K.-H. Meiwes-Broer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 013401 (2005). *Th. Fennel, G.F. Bertsch, and K.-H. Meiwes-Broer, Eur. Phys. J. D 29, 367 (2004).

  2. Controlled Formation and Vibrational Characterization of Large Solvated Ionic Clusters in Cryogenic Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garand, Etienne; Marsh, Brett; Voss, Jonathan; Duffy, Erin M.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental approach for the formation of solvated ionic clusters and their vibrational spectroscopy will be presented. This recently developed apparatus combines an electrospray ionization source, two temperature controlled cryogenic ion traps and a time-of-flight infrared photofragmentation spectrometer, to allow for a universal and controlled formation and characterization of solvent clusters around ionic core as well as product of ion-molecule reaction. Recent results on the spectroscopy of such solvated ions, will be presented and discussed. In particular, this talk will present the structural evolution of glycylglycine as a function of stepwise solvation, and show how the presence of just a few water can modify the geometry of this model peptide. I will also present results solvation of ion that do not form hydrogen bond or strongly interactions with the solvent.

  3. Energy landscapes of ion clusters in isotropic quadrupolar and octupolar traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Yurtsever, E.; Wales, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    The energy landscapes of ion clouds confined in isotropic quadrupolar and octupolar traps are characterized for several representative cluster sizes. All clusters exhibit stable multishell structures that belong to separate funnels. Quadrupolar confinement leads to more homogeneous clusters and denser distributions of isomers than octupolar confinement. Statistical analysis of the transition states indicates that the barriers associated with intrashell motion are lower but more asymmetric and more cooperative compared to intershell motion. The relaxation between low-energy funnels with different arrangements of shells mostly exhibits Arrhenius kinetics, with a weak variation of the activation energy at higher temperatures.

  4. Energy landscapes of ion clusters in isotropic quadrupolar and octupolar traps.

    PubMed

    Calvo, F; Yurtsever, E; Wales, D J

    2012-01-14

    The energy landscapes of ion clouds confined in isotropic quadrupolar and octupolar traps are characterized for several representative cluster sizes. All clusters exhibit stable multishell structures that belong to separate funnels. Quadrupolar confinement leads to more homogeneous clusters and denser distributions of isomers than octupolar confinement. Statistical analysis of the transition states indicates that the barriers associated with intrashell motion are lower but more asymmetric and more cooperative compared to intershell motion. The relaxation between low-energy funnels with different arrangements of shells mostly exhibits Arrhenius kinetics, with a weak variation of the activation energy at higher temperatures.

  5. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  6. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-01

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O2 neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O2-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  7. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon, Choi

    1999-12-16

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O, and linear C{sub n} (n = 4--6).

  8. Investigation of polymer thin films by use of Bi-cluster-ion-supported time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Straif, Christoph J; Hutter, Herbert

    2009-04-01

    The investigation and analysis of polymer thin films with Bi(n)(+), n = 1-7 cluster ions has been demonstrated by means of static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The highly specific signal enhancement of these primary ions combined with the individual fragmentation pattern of poly(4-vinylphenol) and poly(methyl methacrylate) is the basic principle for a modified approach of data reduction derived from the well-established g-SIMS procedure. Based on mass spectra, which correspond to different cluster ion sizes, not only a clear distinction between the two polymers is feasible but also a further simplification of the data can be demonstrated. It has been successfully proven that characteristic polymer-relevant species can be refined out of the large amount of unspecific and highly fragmented secondary ions, which are usually present in SIMS spectra. Therefore, a more precise and direct interpretation of complex organic fragments becomes feasible, which consequently enables the investigation of even more sophisticated samples.

  9. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1995-12-28

    A multiyear research program investigating molecular detection methods based on multiphoton spectroscopy has been completed under DOE sponsorship. A number of new laser-based spectroscopic methods were developed and applied to a variety of aromatic hydrocarbons, including monomer and cluster species. The objectives of sensitivities approaching single molecule detection combined with high selectivity were achieved. This report references the status of the field at the beginning of this work and summarizes the significant progress during the period from 1987 onward. Detailed scientific findings from the studies are presented in the published literature referenced throughout this report.

  10. The energetics and dynamics of free radicals, ions, and clusters. Progress report, April 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.

    1993-04-01

    Structure and energetics of free radicals, ions, and clusters are being investigated by photoelectron photoion coincidence and analyzed using ab initio molecular orbital and statistical theory (RRKM). Molecules or free radicals are prepared in a molecular beam. Translational temperature is found from measured time of flight peakwidth; the vibrational temperature, from shift in dissociation onset. Free radicals are produced by pyrolysis in the nozzle; their subsequent cooling is demonstrated. Ion dissociation rates in the range from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} s{sup {minus}1} are measured from the asymmetric TOF distribution; this method was used to measure the dissociation rates of cold and warm butene ions. 2 figs.

  11. Site-Specific Fragmentation of Polystyrene Molecule Using Size-Selected Ar Gas Cluster Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Mukai, Gen; Hashinokuchi, Michihiro; Mochiji, Kozo

    2009-04-01

    The secondary ion mass spectrum (SIMS) of a polystyrene thin film was investigated using a size-selected Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). The fragmentation in the SIM spectrum varied by kinetic energy per atom (Eatom); the Eatom dependence of the secondary ion intensity of the fragment species of polystyrene can be essentially classified into three types based on the relationship between Eatom and the dissociation energy of a specific bonding site in the molecule. These results indicate that adjusting Eatom of size-selected GCIB may realize site-specific bond breaking within a molecule.

  12. Ion injection at Quasi-parallel Shocks Seen by the Cluster Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johlander, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Retinò, A.; Dandouras, I.

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasma are known to be capable of accelerating ions to very high energies through diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). This process requires an injection of suprathermal ions, but the mechanisms producing such a suprathermal ion seed population are still not fully understood. We study acceleration of solar wind ions resulting from reflection off short large-amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMSs) in the quasi-parallel bow shock of Earth using in situ data from the four Cluster spacecraft. Nearly specularly reflected solar wind ions are observed just upstream of a SLAMS. The reflected ions are undergoing shock drift acceleration (SDA) and obtain energies higher than the solar wind energy upstream of the SLAMS. Our test particle simulations show that solar wind ions with lower energy are more likely to be reflected off the SLAMS, while high-energy ions pass through the SLAMS, which is consistent with the observations. The process of SDA at SLAMSs can provide an effective way of accelerating solar wind ions to suprathermal energies. Therefore, this could be a mechanism of ion injection into DSA in astrophysical plasmas.

  13. Conical octopole ion guide: Design, focusing, and its application to the deposition of low energetic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Roettgen, Martin A.; Judai, Ken; Antonietti, Jean-Marie; Heiz, Ueli; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus

    2006-01-15

    A design of a radio-frequency (rf) octopole ion guide with truncated conical rods arranged in a conical geometry is presented. The performance is tested in a cluster deposition apparatus used for the soft-landing of size-selected clusters on well-characterized substrates used as a model system in heterogeneous catalysis in ultrahigh vacuum. This device allows us to focus 500 pA of a mass-selected Ni{sub 20}{sup +} cluster ion beam from 9 mm down to a spot size of 2 mm in diameter. The transmittance is 70%{+-}5% at a rf voltage of 420 V{sub pp} applied over an amateur radio transceiver with an interposed homemade amplifier-transformer circuit. An increase of the cluster density by a factor of 15 has been achieved. Three ion trajectories are simulated by using SIMION6, which are relevant for this focusing device: transmitted, reflected, and absorbed. The observed effects in the simulations can be successfully explained by the adiabatic approximation. The focusing behavior of the conical octopole lens is demonstrated by experiment and simulations to be a very useful technique for increasing molecule or cluster densities on a substrate and thus reducing deposition time.

  14. Photoluminescence study of self-interstitial clusters and extended defects in ion-implanted silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, P. K.

    2003-12-01

    We report on the photoluminescence (PL) studies of self-interstitial (I) clustering in ion-implanted Si at various stages of post-implantation annealing. Low-temperature PL measurements on as-implanted and low-temperature annealed (up to 450°C) samples show sharp X and W bands at 1200 and 1218 nm which are attributed to I4 and I3 clusters, respectively. Annealing at 600°C shows a drastic change in the PL spectra. In case of high-energy self-ion-implanted samples, 600°C annealing produces several peaks in the range 1250-1400 nm. For longer duration annealing, two broad bands form at 1322 and 1392 nm irrespective of the ion fluence. These PL signatures are attributed to I8 clusters and/or (1 0 0) I-chains, and they are believed to be the precursor of {3 1 1} rod-like defects. For annealing above 600°C and for fluence ⩾1×1013 cm-2, a sharp PL band is observed at 1376 nm and it is attributed to {3 1 1} rod-like defects. At higher fluences, an additional broad band appears in the PL spectrum at ∼1576 nm which is related to residual ion-damage or extended defect formation. These results illustrate the potential of silicon I-clusters as a possible source of light emission from Si.

  15. Clustering behavior of yttrium and scandium dopant ions in cubic stabilized zirconia electrolytes at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Steven Paul

    This work investigates the role that dopant clustering plays in the aging phenomena observed in scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes. Molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted on supercells containing compositions of xSc2O3 + (11 - x)Y 2O3 + 89ZrO2 for x = {0, 1, 2, 11} and also on the composition 8Y2O3 + 92ZrO2 . It was discovered that individual dopant-dopant barriers have a relatively small effect on bulk ionic conductivity when the dopants are arranged in small clusters, as the vacancies rarely migration through the small clusters. However, larger clustering of ions can have a significant impact on ionic conductivity, mostly due to localized destabilization of the high-conductivity cubic phase, which forces oxygen ions to migrate through the remaining dopant-rich cubic matrix. Part of the destabilization occurs due to vacancies becoming trapped within the dopant clusters, which forces the Zr ions in the zirconia-rich regions to assume a higher coordinated state with oxygen. However, the zirconium ions are known to abhor eight-fold coordinated states, and these regions form precipitates of low-conductivity phases. These phases have been identified as tetragonal, and their formation coincides with the simultaneous reduction in ionic conductivity. The tetragonal precipitates are found to be energetically favorable at temperatures of 1073 K, indicating that colloidal stratification of the mixture is inevitable due to cationic migration during long term annealing. However, clustering of dopants appears to reach a limiting point as the dopants exhibit a repulsive interaction that limits the thermodynamic stability of the zirconia precipitates. Therefore, the dopant clusters will reach a certain maximum size at which point clustering is expected to terminate at an equilibrium state. Scandia stabilized zirconia was observed to provide better conductivity, lower zirconium coordination and superior

  16. Enhancing ion yields in time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry: a comparative study of argon and water cluster primary beams.

    PubMed

    Sheraz née Rabbani, Sadia; Razo, Irma Berrueta; Kohn, Taylor; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2015-02-17

    Following from our previous Letter on this topic, this Article reports a detailed study of time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) positive ion spectra generated from a set of model biocompounds (arginine, trehalose, DPPC, and angiotensin II) by water cluster primary ion beams in comparison to argon cluster beams over a range of cluster sizes and energies. Sputter yield studies using argon and water beams on arginine and Irganox 1010 have confirmed that the sputter yields using water cluster beams lie on the same universal sputtering curve derived by Seah for argon cluster beams. Thus, increased ion yield using water cluster beams must arise from increased ionization. The spectra and positive ion signals observed using cluster beams in the size range from 1,000 to 10,000 and the energy range 5-20 keV are reported. It is confirmed that water cluster beams enhance proton related ionization over against argon beams to a significant degree such that enhanced detection sensitivities from 1 μm(2) in the region of 100 to 1,000 times relative to static SIMS analysis with Ar2000 cluster beams appear to be accessible. These new studies show that there is an unexpected complexity in the ionization enhancement phenomenon. Whereas optimum ion yields under argon cluster bombardment occur in the region of E/n ≥ 10 eV (where E is the beam energy and n the number of argon atoms in the cluster) and fall rapidly when E/n < 10 eV; for water cluster beams, ion yields increase significantly in this E/n regime (where n is the number of water molecules in the cluster) and peak for 20 keV beams at a cluster size of 7,000 or E/n ∼3 eV. This important result is explored further using D2O cluster beams that confirm that in this low E/n regime protonation does originate to a large extent from the water molecules. The results, encouraging in themselves, suggest that for both argon and water cluster beams, higher energy beams, e.g., 40 and 80 keV, would enable larger

  17. Enhancing ion yields in time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry: a comparative study of argon and water cluster primary beams.

    PubMed

    Sheraz née Rabbani, Sadia; Razo, Irma Berrueta; Kohn, Taylor; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2015-02-17

    Following from our previous Letter on this topic, this Article reports a detailed study of time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) positive ion spectra generated from a set of model biocompounds (arginine, trehalose, DPPC, and angiotensin II) by water cluster primary ion beams in comparison to argon cluster beams over a range of cluster sizes and energies. Sputter yield studies using argon and water beams on arginine and Irganox 1010 have confirmed that the sputter yields using water cluster beams lie on the same universal sputtering curve derived by Seah for argon cluster beams. Thus, increased ion yield using water cluster beams must arise from increased ionization. The spectra and positive ion signals observed using cluster beams in the size range from 1,000 to 10,000 and the energy range 5-20 keV are reported. It is confirmed that water cluster beams enhance proton related ionization over against argon beams to a significant degree such that enhanced detection sensitivities from 1 μm(2) in the region of 100 to 1,000 times relative to static SIMS analysis with Ar2000 cluster beams appear to be accessible. These new studies show that there is an unexpected complexity in the ionization enhancement phenomenon. Whereas optimum ion yields under argon cluster bombardment occur in the region of E/n ≥ 10 eV (where E is the beam energy and n the number of argon atoms in the cluster) and fall rapidly when E/n < 10 eV; for water cluster beams, ion yields increase significantly in this E/n regime (where n is the number of water molecules in the cluster) and peak for 20 keV beams at a cluster size of 7,000 or E/n ∼3 eV. This important result is explored further using D2O cluster beams that confirm that in this low E/n regime protonation does originate to a large extent from the water molecules. The results, encouraging in themselves, suggest that for both argon and water cluster beams, higher energy beams, e.g., 40 and 80 keV, would enable larger

  18. Secondary ion counting for surface-sensitive chemical analysis of organic compounds using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy with cluster ion impact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Narumi, K.

    2011-03-15

    We report suitable secondary ion (SI) counting for surface-sensitive chemical analysis of organic compounds using time-of-flight (TOF) SI mass spectroscopy, based on considerably higher emission yields of SIs induced by cluster ion impact ionization. A SI counting system for a TOF SI mass spectrometer was developed using a fast digital storage oscilloscope, which allows us to perform various types of analysis as all the signal pulses constituting TOF SI mass spectra can be recorded digitally in the system. Effects of the SI counting strategy on SI mass spectra were investigated for C{sub 8} and C{sub 60} cluster ion impacts on an organically contaminated silicon wafer and on polytetrafluoroethylene targets by comparing TOF SI mass spectra obtained from the same recorded signals with different SI counting procedures. Our results show that the use of a counting system, which can cope with high SI yields, is necessary for quantitative analysis of SI mass spectra obtained under high SI yield per impact conditions, including the case of cluster ion impacts on organic compounds.

  19. Intracluster Ion Molecule Reactions Following the Generation of Mg+ Within Polar Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Alsharaeh, Edreese H.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigated the intracluster ion molecule reactions following the generation of Mg+ within the polar clusters (water, methanol, ether and acetonitrile), using time of flight mass spectrometry. In the case of Mg+/water and Mg+/methanol, dehydrogenation reactions are observed after the addition of five molecules. However, no dehydrogenation reactions are observed in the case of Mg+/ether or Mg+/acetonitrile clusters. This confirms the role of the H atom in (O–H) in the dehydrogenation reaction, and rules out any contribution from the H atom in the CH3 group. In addition, the magic numbers in the time of flight (TOF) mass spectra of the Mg+Xn clusters (X = H2O, CH3OH, CH3OCH3 and CH3CN) have been investigated. Finally, the role of ground electronic magnesium ion Mg+(2S1/2), and excited electronic magnesium ion Mg+(2P1/2) in the dehydrogenation reaction were investigated using Ion Mobility Mass spectrometry. The results offer direct evidence confirming the absence of the electronically excited, Mg+(2P1/2). PMID:22272121

  20. Intracluster ion molecule reactions following the generation of Mg+ within polar clusters.

    PubMed

    Alsharaeh, Edreese H

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigated the intracluster ion molecule reactions following the generation of Mg(+) within the polar clusters (water, methanol, ether and acetonitrile), using time of flight mass spectrometry. In the case of Mg(+)/water and Mg(+)/methanol, dehydrogenation reactions are observed after the addition of five molecules. However, no dehydrogenation reactions are observed in the case of Mg(+)/ether or Mg(+)/acetonitrile clusters. This confirms the role of the H atom in (O-H) in the dehydrogenation reaction, and rules out any contribution from the H atom in the CH(3) group. In addition, the magic numbers in the time of flight (TOF) mass spectra of the Mg(+)X(n) clusters (X = H(2)O, CH(3)OH, CH(3)OCH(3) and CH(3)CN) have been investigated. Finally, the role of ground electronic magnesium ion Mg(+)((2)S(1/2)), and excited electronic magnesium ion Mg(+)((2)P(1/2)) in the dehydrogenation reaction were investigated using Ion Mobility Mass spectrometry. The results offer direct evidence confirming the absence of the electronically excited, Mg(+)((2)P(1/2)). PMID:22272121

  1. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on three areas we have made substantial new progress in over the past several months: (1) Infrared multiphoton photoinduced ion molecule reactions; (2) The use of SF[sub 6] to detect excited state metal ion behavior; and (3) Cluster ion chemistry.

  2. Ion Spectral Structures Observed by the Van Allen Probes and Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C.; Zhang, J.; Luo, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades several missions have recorded the presence of dynamic spectral features of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. Previous studies have revealed single "nose-like" structures occurring alone and simultaneous nose-like structures (up to three). In this study we also include signatures of new types of ion structure, namely "trunk-like" and "tusk-like" structures. All the ion structures are named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. They constitute the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. Multi-spacecraft analysis of these structures is important to understand their spatial distribution and temporal evolution. Mass spectrometers onboard Cluster (in a polar orbit) and the Van Allen Probes (in an equatorial orbit) measure energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet, where these ion structures are observed. We present a statistical study of the ion structures, using >1-year measurements from the two missions during the Van Allen Probes era. The results provide important details about the spatial distribution (dependence on geocentric distance and magnetic local time), spectral features of the structures (e.g., characteristic energy and differences among species), and geomagnetic and solar wind conditions under which these structures occur.

  3. Kinetic energy distribution of multiply charged ions in Coulomb explosion of Xe clusters.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua

    2011-02-21

    We report on the calculations of kinetic energy distribution (KED) functions of multiply charged, high-energy ions in Coulomb explosion (CE) of an assembly of elemental Xe(n) clusters (average size (n) = 200-2171) driven by ultra-intense, near-infrared, Gaussian laser fields (peak intensities 10(15) - 4 × 10(16) W cm(-2), pulse lengths 65-230 fs). In this cluster size and pulse parameter domain, outer ionization is incomplete∕vertical, incomplete∕nonvertical, or complete∕nonvertical, with CE occurring in the presence of nanoplasma electrons. The KEDs were obtained from double averaging of single-trajectory molecular dynamics simulation ion kinetic energies. The KEDs were doubly averaged over a log-normal cluster size distribution and over the laser intensity distribution of a spatial Gaussian beam, which constitutes either a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) profile, with the 3D profile (when the cluster beam radius is larger than the Rayleigh length) usually being experimentally realized. The general features of the doubly averaged KEDs manifest the smearing out of the structure corresponding to the distribution of ion charges, a marked increase of the KEDs at very low energies due to the contribution from the persistent nanoplasma, a distortion of the KEDs and of the average energies toward lower energy values, and the appearance of long low-intensity high-energy tails caused by the admixture of contributions from large clusters by size averaging. The doubly averaged simulation results account reasonably well (within 30%) for the experimental data for the cluster-size dependence of the CE energetics and for its dependence on the laser pulse parameters, as well as for the anisotropy in the angular distribution of the energies of the Xe(q+) ions. Possible applications of this computational study include a control of the ion kinetic energies by the choice of the laser intensity profile (2D∕3D) in the laser-cluster interaction volume.

  4. Probing Dynamics from Within in Negative Ions, Neutral Molecules and van der Waals Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrah, Nora

    2006-05-01

    We have investigated with unprecedented levels of detail, processes and phenomena involving photodetachment of negative ions and photoionization of molecules and van der Waals clusters using the brightness, spectral resolution, tunability and polarization of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Photodetachment of negative ions exhibit structure and processes differing substantially from corresponding processes in neutral and positive ions, owing to the dominance of correlation in both the initial and final states. We will report on investigations carried out in inner-valence CN^- molecules giving rise to absolute double photodetachment cross sections as well as on fragmentation of negative ions clusters. We will also present absolute inner-shell photodetachment of atoms leading to multi-Auger decay [1] and discuss threshold laws [2] and PCI effects [3]. The measurements were conducted using collinear photon-ion spectroscopy. The evolution of inner-shell photoionization of clusters, as a function of photon energy, will be presented and compared to analogous measurements in atoms. The measurements were conducted using angle resolved two-dimensional photoelectron spectroscopy. Molecular fragmentation results using an ion imaging detector will briefly be presented. [1] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, G. D. Ackerman, N. D. Gibson, C. W.Walter, A. Aguilar, G. Turri, I. Dumitriu and N. Berrah, PRA 72, 050701(R), 2005. [2] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, N. D. Gibson, C. W. Walter, G. D. Ackerman, I. Dumitriu, and N. Berrah, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 083001 (2005). [3] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, A. Agular, G. D. Ackerman, and N. Berrah, (in press PRA brief report).

  5. Enhanced performance of anion exchange membranes via crosslinking of ion cluster regions for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ao Nan; Guo, Dong; Lin, Chen Xiao; Zhang, Qiu Gen; Zhu, Ai Mei; Ye, Mei Ling; Liu, Qing Lin

    2016-09-01

    Development of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) with high hydroxide conductivity, good dimensional and alkaline stabilities is still a challenge for the practical application of AEM fuel cells. In this study, we report a new strategy to prepare high-performance AEMs with crosslinked ionic regions. A series of phenolphthalein-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s crosslinked AEMs was synthesized by grafting ion groups selectively and densely on the phenolphthalein units to form ion clusters that are further crosslinked to generate the hydrophilic ionic regions. The crosslinking reaction not only improved the dimensional stability of the AEMs, but also increased the aggregation of the ion clusters leading to the formation of hydrophilic/hydrophobic phase-separated morphology and ion-conducting channels. As a result, enhancements in both ion conductivity and dimensional stability can be achieved. The crosslinked AEMs showed high hydroxide conductivities in the range of 52.2-143.4 mS cm-1 from 30 to 80 °C and a superb ratio of relative conductivity to relative swelling at 80 °C. Furthermore, the crosslinked AEMs also exhibited good mechanical properties, thermal and alkaline stabilities and desirable single cell performance. This work presents a promising strategy for the synthesis of high-performance AEMs for fuel cells.

  6. Determining the size-dependent structure of ligand-free gold-cluster ions.

    PubMed

    Schooss, Detlef; Weis, Patrick; Hampe, Oliver; Kappes, Manfred M

    2010-03-28

    Ligand-free metal clusters can be prepared over a wide size range, but only in comparatively small amounts. Determining their size-dependent properties has therefore required the development of experimental methods that allow characterization of sample sizes comprising only a few thousand mass-selected particles under well-defined collision-free conditions. In this review, we describe the application of these methods to the geometric structural determination of Au(n)(+) and Au(n)(-) with n = 3-20. Geometries were assigned by comparing experimental data, primarily from ion-mobility spectrometry and trapped ion electron diffraction, to structural models from quantum chemical calculations.

  7. Silicon decorated cone shaped carbon nanotube clusters for lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ruiz, Isaac; Ahmed, Kazi; Bay, Hamed Hosseini; George, Aaron S; Wang, Johnny; Butler, John; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2014-08-27

    In this work, we report the synthesis of an three-dimensional (3D) cone-shape CNT clusters (CCC) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with subsequent inductively coupled plasma (ICP) treatment. An innovative silicon decorated cone-shape CNT clusters (SCCC) is prepared by simply depositing amorphous silicon onto CCC via magnetron sputtering. The seamless connection between silicon decorated CNT cones and graphene facilitates the charge transfer in the system and suggests a binder-free technique of preparing lithium ion battery (LIB) anodes. Lithium ion batteries based on this novel 3D SCCC architecture demonstrates high reversible capacity of 1954 mAh g(-1) and excellent cycling stability (>1200 mAh g(-1) capacity with ≈ 100% coulombic efficiency after 230 cycles).

  8. Structures, Hydration, and Electrical Mobilities of Bisulfate Ion-Sulfuric Acid-Ammonia/Dimethylamine Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Tsona, Narcisse T; Henschel, Henning; Bork, Nicolai; Loukonen, Ville; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2015-09-17

    Despite the well-established role of small molecular clusters in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation, their thermochemical data are still not completely available due to limitation of the experimental techniques to treat such small clusters. We have investigated the structures and the thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of clusters containing one bisulfate ion, sulfuric acid, base (ammonia or dimethylamine), and water molecules using quantum chemical methods. We found that water facilitates proton transfer from sulfuric acid or the bisulfate ion to the base or water molecules, and depending on the hydration level, the sulfate ion was formed in most of the base-containing clusters. The calculated hydration energies indicate that water binds more strongly to ammonia-containing clusters than to dimethylamine-containing and base-free clusters, which results in a wider hydrate distribution for ammonia-containing clusters. The electrical mobilities of all clusters were calculated using a particle dynamics model. The results indicate that the effect of humidity is negligible on the electrical mobilities of molecular clusters formed in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation. The combination of the results of this study with those previously published on the hydration of neutral clusters by our group provides a comprehensive set of thermochemical data on neutral and negatively charged clusters containing sulfuric acid, ammonia, or dimethylamine. PMID:26304742

  9. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) data quality indexes as a support for analysing magnetospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, Iannis; Barthe, Alain; Brunato, Sylvain; Rème, Henri; Laakso, Harri

    2016-04-01

    The Cluster Science Archive (CSA) aims at preserving the complete set of the measurements collected by the four Cluster spacecraft, so that they are usable in the long-term by the world-wide scientific community as well as by the instrument teams. This implies that the instrument data, properly calibrated, are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CSA archival includes processed raw data, moments of the ion distribution functions, and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units. The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions, 2-D pitch-angle distributions and 1-D omni-directional fluxes. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, data caveats and data quality indexes. The later constitute a novel product, which has been prepared in order to help the user asses the quality of the data acquired in different magnetospheric regions and during various operational modes. It provides information on which are in each case the issues that can affect the data quality, which are the data products affected, and gives a simple quantitative measurement of the severity of these issues. The principle of the CIS data quality indexes will be described and the various issues, that can under some conditions affect the data quality and are thus taken into account in generating the data quality indexes, will be discussed.

  10. Are clusters important in understanding the mechanisms in atmospheric pressure ionization? Part 1: Reagent ion generation and chemical control of ion populations.

    PubMed

    Klee, Sonja; Derpmann, Valerie; Wißdorf, Walter; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; Albrecht, Sascha; Bruins, Andries P; Dousty, Faezeh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; O'Brien, Rob; Robb, Damon B; Syage, Jack A

    2014-08-01

    It is well documented since the early days of the development of atmospheric pressure ionization methods, which operate in the gas phase, that cluster ions are ubiquitous. This holds true for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, as well as for more recent techniques, such as atmospheric pressure photoionization, direct analysis in real time, and many more. In fact, it is well established that cluster ions are the primary carriers of the net charge generated. Nevertheless, cluster ion chemistry has only been sporadically included in the numerous proposed ionization mechanisms leading to charged target analytes, which are often protonated molecules. This paper series, consisting of two parts, attempts to highlight the role of cluster ion chemistry with regard to the generation of analyte ions. In addition, the impact of the changing reaction matrix and the non-thermal collisions of ions en route from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the high vacuum analyzer region are discussed. This work addresses such issues as extent of protonation versus deuteration, the extent of analyte fragmentation, as well as highly variable ionization efficiencies, among others. In Part 1, the nature of the reagent ion generation is examined, as well as the extent of thermodynamic versus kinetic control of the resulting ion population entering the analyzer region.

  11. Ions colliding with clusters of fullerenes—Decay pathways and covalent bond formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Zettergren, H.; Rousseau, P.; Wang, Y.; Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Alexander, J. D.; Stockett, M. H.; Rangama, J.; Chesnel, J. Y.; Capron, M.; Poully, J. C.; Domaracka, A.; Méry, A.; Maclot, S.; Vizcaino, V.; Schmidt, H. T.; Adoui, L.; Alcamí, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Martín, F.; Huber, B. A.; Cederquist, H.

    2013-07-01

    We report experimental results for the ionization and fragmentation of weakly bound van der Waals clusters of n C60 molecules following collisions with Ar2 +, He2 +, and Xe20 + at laboratory kinetic energies of 13 keV, 22.5 keV, and 300 keV, respectively. Intact singly charged C60 monomers are the dominant reaction products in all three cases and this is accounted for by means of Monte Carlo calculations of energy transfer processes and a simple Arrhenius-type [C_{60}]_n^+ → C_{60}+ + (n-1)C_{60} evaporation model. Excitation energies in the range of only ˜0.7 eV per C60 molecule in a [C_{60}]_{13}^+ cluster are sufficient for complete evaporation and such low energies correspond to ion trajectories far outside the clusters. Still we observe singly and even doubly charged intact cluster ions which stem from even more distant collisions. For penetrating collisions the clusters become multiply charged and some of the individual molecules may be promptly fragmented in direct knock-out processes leading to efficient formations of new covalent systems. For Ar2 + and He2 + collisions, we observe very efficient C_{119}+ and C_{118}+ formation and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that they are covalent dumb-bell systems due to bonding between C_{59}+ or C_{58}+ and C60 during cluster fragmentation. In the Ar2 + case, it is possible to form even smaller C_{120-2m}+ molecules (m = 2-7), while no molecular fusion reactions are observed for the present Xe20 + collisions.

  12. Ions colliding with clusters of fullerenes-Decay pathways and covalent bond formations

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, F.; Zettergren, H.; Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Alexander, J. D.; Stockett, M. H.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Rousseau, P.; Chesnel, J. Y.; Capron, M.; Poully, J. C.; Mery, A.; Maclot, S.; Adoui, L.; Wang, Y.; Martin, F.; Rangama, J.; Domaracka, A.; Vizcaino, V. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA and others

    2013-07-21

    We report experimental results for the ionization and fragmentation of weakly bound van der Waals clusters of n C{sub 60} molecules following collisions with Ar{sup 2+}, He{sup 2+}, and Xe{sup 20+} at laboratory kinetic energies of 13 keV, 22.5 keV, and 300 keV, respectively. Intact singly charged C{sub 60} monomers are the dominant reaction products in all three cases and this is accounted for by means of Monte Carlo calculations of energy transfer processes and a simple Arrhenius-type [C{sub 60}]{sub n}{sup +}{yields}C{sub 60}{sup +}+(n-1)C{sub 60} evaporation model. Excitation energies in the range of only {approx}0.7 eV per C{sub 60} molecule in a [C{sub 60}]{sub 13}{sup +} cluster are sufficient for complete evaporation and such low energies correspond to ion trajectories far outside the clusters. Still we observe singly and even doubly charged intact cluster ions which stem from even more distant collisions. For penetrating collisions the clusters become multiply charged and some of the individual molecules may be promptly fragmented in direct knock-out processes leading to efficient formations of new covalent systems. For Ar{sup 2+} and He{sup 2+} collisions, we observe very efficient C{sub 119}{sup +} and C{sub 118}{sup +} formation and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that they are covalent dumb-bell systems due to bonding between C{sub 59}{sup +} or C{sub 58}{sup +} and C{sub 60} during cluster fragmentation. In the Ar{sup 2+} case, it is possible to form even smaller C{sub 120-2m}{sup +} molecules (m= 2-7), while no molecular fusion reactions are observed for the present Xe{sup 20+} collisions.

  13. Mass spectrometry of refractory black carbon particles from six sources: carbon-cluster and oxygenated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Sierau, B.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the major mass spectral features of different types of refractory carbonaceous particles, ionized after laser vapourization with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated with a switchable 1064 nm laser and a 600 °C thermal vapourizer, yielding respective measurements of the refractory and non-refractory particle components. Six samples were investigated, all of which were composed primarily of refractory material: fuel-rich and fuel-lean propane/air diffusion-flame combustion particles; graphite-spark-generated particles; a commercial Fullerene-enriched Soot; Regal Black, a commercial carbon black; and nascent aircraft-turbine combustion particles. All samples exhibited a spectrum of carbon-cluster ions Cxn+ in their refractory mass spectrum. Smaller clusters (x<6) were found to dominate the Cxn+ distribution. For Fullerene Soot, fuel-rich-flame particles and spark-generated particles, significant Cxn+ clusters at x≫6 were present, with significant contributions from multiply-charged ions (n>1). In all six cases, the ions C1+ and C3+ contributed over 60% to the total C1ions C1+/C3+ could be used to predict whether significant Cxn+ signals with x>5 were present. When such signals were present, C1+/C3+ was close to 1. When absent, C1+/C3+ was <0.8. This ratio may therefore serve as a proxy to distinguish between the two types of spectra in atmospheric SP-AMS measurements. Significant refractory oxygenated ions such as CO+ and CO2+ were also observed for all samples. We discuss these signals in detail for Regal Black, and describe their formation via decomposition of oxygenated moieties incorporated into the refractory carbon structure. These species may be of importance in atmospheric processes such as water uptake, aging and heterogeneous chemistry.

  14. Specific modification of polysulfone with cluster bombardment with assistance of Ar ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guochun; Hibino, Y.; Awazu, K.; Tanihara, M.; Imanishi, Y.

    2000-02-01

    Objective: To develop a rapid method for the modification of polysulfone with ammonium sulfamate with the assistance of Ar ion irradiation with a multi-source cluster deposition apparatus. These surfaces mimicking the structure of heparin, a bioactive molecule, have a high anti-thrombosis property. Experimental Design: Polysulfone film, setting on a turning holder, was irradiated by Ar ions during bombardment with ammonium sulfamate clusters. The Ar ion source serves for the activation of a polymer surface and a cluster ion source supplies ammonium sulfamate molecules to react with the activated surface. After thorough washing with de-ionized sterile water, the modified surfaces were evaluated in terms of the contact angle of water, elemental composition, and binding state on electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and platelet adhesion with platelet rich plasma. Results: The modification of polysulfone decreased the contact angle of water on surfaces from 82.6 ° down to 34.5 °. Ammonium, amine, sulfate, and thiophene combinations were formed on the modified surfaces. The adhesion numbers of the platelet were decreased to one tenth compared to the original surface. The same process was also applied to other polymers such as polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene and similar outcomes were also observed. Conclusion: The primary studies showed successful modification of polysulfone with ammonium sulfamate with the assistance of Ar ion irradiation. Since the same concept can also be applied to other materials with various substrates, combined with the features of no solvent and no topographic changes, this method might be developed into a promising way for modification of polymeric materials.

  15. The energetics and dynamics of free radicals, ions, and clusters. Progress report, August 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.

    1992-03-01

    The structure and energetics of free radicals, ions, and clusters have been investigated by photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) and analyzed with ab initio molecular orbital and statistical theory RRKM calculations. In these experiments, molecules are prepared in a molecular beam so that their internal as well as translational energies are cooled to near O K. The coincidence condition between energy analyzed electrons and their corresponding ions insures that the ions are energy selected. The primary experimental information includes ionization and fragment ion appearance energies, and the ion time of flight (TOF) distributions. The latter are obtained by using the energy selected electron as a start signal and the ion as the stop signal. These types of experiments allow us to measure the ion dissociation rates in the 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} sec {sup {minus}1} range. Such ions are commonly referred to a metastable ions. In addition, the TOF peak widths are related to the release of translational energy in the ion dissociation process. Perhaps the most important advance during the past year has been in the study of cluster photoionization. We have developed an experimental method for differentiating similar mass cluster ions based on the kinetic energy of the ions measured by TOF.

  16. Distributions of deposited energy and ionization clusters around ion tracks studied with Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Hilgers, Gerhard; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    The Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) was extended to study the patterns of energy deposition at sub-micrometer distance from individual ion tracks. Dose distributions for low-energy 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O ions measured in several experiments are well described by the model in a broad range of radial distances, from 0.5 to 3000 nm. Despite the fact that such distributions are characterized by long tails, a dominant fraction of deposited energy (∼80%) is confined within a radius of about 10 nm. The probability distributions of clustered ionization events in nanoscale volumes of water traversed by 1H, 2H, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, and 12C ions are also calculated. A good agreement of calculated ionization cluster-size distributions with the corresponding experimental data suggests that the extended MCHIT can be used to characterize stochastic processes of energy deposition to sensitive cellular structures.

  17. Molecular mass and location of the most abundant peak of the molecular ion isotopomeric cluster.

    PubMed

    Goraczko, Andrzej J

    2005-09-01

    The location of the most abundant peak of the molecular-ion pattern often differs from the molecular mass published in scientific databases. The location is also distinct from the value expected from average atomic masses. The cause of this phenomenon is a large number of atoms of carbon, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, silicon and boron. This due to the natural isotope abundances of some elements forming organic compounds. A parameter called location of the most abundant peak of an isotopometric cluster (LAPIC) denotes the location of the most abundant (the main) peak of an isotopomeric cluster, which is determined, e.g., by mass spectrometry and can be important for medium- and high-molecular mass compounds. The equations for LAPIC calculation are presented for elements usually observed in organic compounds. The LAPIC with elemental formula helps effectively, e.g., in mass spectra interpretation since the prediction of LAPIC allows the correct connection of the main peak of the investigated ion with the expected ion formula and the mass of the ion considered. This solution can be a substitute for the much more complex method of isotopometric analysis applied in mass spectra interpretation. [Figure: see text]. Differences of the most abundant peak location (Delta LAPIC(C)=f(n)) for carbon aggregates C(n).

  18. Chemistry of (and on) transition metal clusters: a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance study of the reaction of niobium cluster cations with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Harding, Daniel J; Oliver, Thomas A A; Walsh, Tiffany R; Drewello, Thomas; Woodruff, D Phil; Derrick, Peter J; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2009-01-01

    The reactions of niobium cluster cations, Nb(+)(n) (n = 2-19), with nitric oxide have been investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR). The overall reaction rate constants are found to be in reasonable agreement with collision rates calculated using the surface charge capture model. The dominant reaction for small clusters (n <9) involves reaction-induced fragmentation resulting in the loss of either NbO or NbN. By contrast, the main reaction observed for the larger clusters (n> 11) is sequential NO chemisorption. Clusters n = 9, 10 exhibit both extremes of behaviour and are the only clusters upon which there is evidence of NO decomposition with N(2) loss observed whenever multiple NO molecules are co-adsorbed. The rate constants for each process have been determined as a function of cluster size.

  19. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-09-15

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  20. Concomitant formation of different nature clusters and hardening in reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.; Hojo, T.

    2013-11-01

    Specimens of A533B steels containing 0.04, 0.09 and 0.21 wt%Cu were irradiated at 290 °C to 3 dpa with 3 MeV Fe ions and subjected to atom probe analyses, transmission electron microscopy observations and hardness measurements. The atom probe analysis results showed that two types of solute clusters were formed: Cu-enriched clusters containing Mn, Ni and Si atoms as irradiation-enhanced solute atom clusters and Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters as irradiation-induced solute atom clusters. Both cluster types occurred in the highest Cu-content steel and the ratio of Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters to Cu-enriched clusters increased with irradiation doses. It was confirmed that the cluster formation was a key factor in the microstructure evolution until the high dose irradiation was reached even in the low Cu content steels though the dislocation loops with much lower density than that of the clusters were observed as matrix damage. The difference in the hardening efficiency due to the difference in the nature of the clusters was small. The irradiation-induced clustering of undersized Si atoms suggested that a clustering driving force other than vacancy-driven diffusion, probably an interstitial mechanism, may become important at higher dose rates.

  1. Determination of the sputtering yield of cholesterol using Arn(+) and C60(+(+)) cluster ions.

    PubMed

    Rakowska, P D; Seah, M P; Vorng, J-L; Havelund, R; Gilmore, I S

    2016-08-01

    The sputtering yield of cholesterol films on silicon wafers is measured using Arn(+) and C60(+(+)) ions in popular energy (E) and cluster size (n) ranges. It is shown that the C60(+(+)) ions form a surface layer that stabilizes the film so that a well-behaved profile is obtained. On the other hand, the Arn(+) gas clusters leave the material very clean but, at room temperature, the layer readily restructures into molecular bilayers, so that, although a useful measure may be made of the sputtering yield, the profiles become much more complex. This restructuring does not occur at room temperature normally but results from the actions of the beams in the sputtering process for profiling in secondary ion mass spectrometry. Better profiles may be made by reducing the sample temperature to -100 °C. This is likely to be necessary for many lower molecular weight materials (below 1000 Da) to avoid the movement of molecules. Measurements for cholesterol films on 37 nm of amiodarone on silicon are even better behaved and show the same sputtering yields at room temperature as those films directly on silicon at -100 °C. The yields for both C60(+(+)) and Arn(+) fit the Universal Equation to a standard deviation of 11%.

  2. ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal rat neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, J. T.; Nie, H.-Y.; Taylor, A. R.; Walzak, M. J.; Chang, W. H.; MacFabe, D. F.; Lau, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the power of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) cluster ion imaging to characterize biological structures, such as that of the rat central nervous system. A large number of the studies to date have been carried out on the "structural scale" imaging several mm 2 using mounted thin sections. In this work, we present our ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging results on hippocampal rat brain neurons, at the cellular and sub-cellular levels. As a part of an ongoing investigation to examine gut linked metabolic factors in autism spectrum disorders using a novel rat model, we have observed a possible variation in hippocampal Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neuron geometry in thin, paraformaldehyde fixed brain sections. However, the fixation process alters the tissue matrix such that much biochemical information appears to be lost. In an effort to preserve as much as possible this original information, we have established a protocol using unfixed thin brain sections, along with low dose, 500 eV Cs + pre-sputtering that allows imaging down to the sub-cellular scale with minimal sample preparation.

  3. Shell Structure, Melting and Dynamics of Ion Clusters Confined in an Octupolar Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.; Yurtsever, E.

    2009-12-03

    The stable structures of clusters of identical ions trapped in an isotropic octupolar trap are investigated using global optimization methods. These clusters form well defined shells of ions that are approximately solutions of the Thomson problem. In particular, magic numbers are found to correlate with highly symmetric configurations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, finite temperature properties are also investigated. Melting proceeds from the core, and takes place through a very progressive loss of the shell structure. The hollow shape is eventually lost at very high temperatures, where the ions essentially feel the confinement but not the Coulomb repulsion. The vibrational density of states shows marked differences with the harmonic case, but also with bulk Wigner crystals. The variations of the maximal Lyapunov exponent obtained from additional molecular dynamics trajectories reveals that the dynamics becomes increasingly chaotic as the temperature increases. With the decreasing influence of the Coulomb interaction, a more regular behavior is found at very high temperatures but, contrary to the quadrupolar case, still highly chaotic.

  4. Equilibrium properties of transition-metal ion-argon clusters via simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asher, Robert L.; Micha, David A.; Brucat, Philip J.

    1992-01-01

    The geometrical structures of M(+) (Ar)n ions, with n = 1-14, have been studied by the minimization of a many-body potential surface with a simulated annealing procedure. The minimization method is justified for finite systems through the use of an information theory approach. It is carried out for eight potential-energy surfaces constructed with two- and three-body terms parametrized from experimental data and ab initio results. The potentials should be representative of clusters of argon atoms with first-row transition-metal monocations of varying size. The calculated geometries for M(+) = Co(+) and V(+) possess radial shells with small (ca. 4-8) first-shell coordination number. The inclusion of an ion-induced-dipole-ion-induced-dipole interaction between argon atoms raises the energy and generally lowers the symmetry of the cluster by promoting incomplete shell closure. Rotational constants as well as electric dipole and quadrupole moments are quoted for the Co(+) (Ar)n and V(+) (Ar)n predicted structures.

  5. Cluster multi-spacecraft observations of electron and ion holes in the Auroral Acceleration Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazakerley, A. N.; Pickett, J. S.; Berthomier, M.; Mutel, R. L.; Masson, A.; Forsyth, C.; Owen, C. J.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Andre, M.; Carr, C.

    2013-12-01

    In spring 2013, the Cluster spacecraft have visited the Auroral Acceleration Region (AAR) for the second and final time. The spacecraft constellation was arranged to produce very small separation magnetic field aligned conjunctions (~10s km) between C3 and C4, with C1 relatively nearby. The goal was to allow study of electron and ion holes, including their propagation between C3 and C4, and their roles in generating waves that may be observed locally and also at C1. Detailed planning work has tried to maximize the opportunities to use the Cluster payload effectively during these conjunctions, but the presence of auroral activity during the relatively few AAR passes cannot be guaranteed in advance. The dataset may also be valuable for other aspects of auroral science, as data is collected throughout the AAR crossings, not only at the conjunctions. We intend to present first results from this campaign.

  6. Cluster multi-spacecraft observations of electron and ion holes in the Auroral Acceleration Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazakerley, Andrew; Pickett, Jolene; Berthomier, Matthieu; Mutel, Robert; Masson, Arnaud; Forsyth, Colin; Owen, Christopher J.; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Andre, Mats; Carr, Chris

    2014-05-01

    In spring 2013, the Cluster spacecraft visited the Auroral Acceleration Region (AAR) for the second and final time. The spacecraft constellation was arranged to produce very small separation magnetic field aligned conjunctions (~10s km) between C3 and C4, with C1 relatively nearby. The goal was to allow study of electron and ion holes, including their propagation between C3 and C4, and their roles in generating waves that may be observed locally and also at C1. Detailed planning work has tried to maximize the opportunities to use the Cluster payload effectively during these conjunctions, but the presence of auroral activity during the relatively few AAR passes could be guaranteed in advance. The dataset may also be valuable for other aspects of auroral science, as data is collected throughout the AAR crossings, not only at the conjunctions. We intend to present first results from this campaign.

  7. New strategy to construct single-ion magnets: a unique Dy@Zn₆ cluster exhibiting slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Gang; Qin, Xiang-Yang; Shi, Peng-Fei; Hou, Yin-Ling; Cui, Jian-Zhong; Zhao, Bin

    2014-04-25

    Two unique heptanuclear clusters Ln@Zn6 (Ln = Dy (1), Er (2)) were structurally and magnetically characterized. Each Dy(3+)/Er(3+) is located in a nona-coordinate D(3h) coordination environment, and is encapsulated in a diamagnetic Zn6 cage. Compound 1 exhibits single-ion magnetic behavior, and is the first example of a single-ion magnet (SIM) constructed through embedding one magnetic anisotropic metal ion into a diamagnetic cage.

  8. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization--Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1990-09-01

    Carbon clusters of the form C{sub N}{sup {minus}} are observed at least out to N = 30 confirming that cluster formation is occurring in the high pressure waiting room'' of the supersonic cluster source. This can be stated unequivocally, since only up to N = 13 is observed by direct laser desorption of a carbon target in the absence of supersonic expansion. Currently underway is a systematic investigation of a wide variety of M{sup +}-C{sub n}H{sub 2n} species with n = 2--10 and M = first and second row transition metal ions. In addition we will shortly apply this methodology to doubly charged ions and metal cluster ions. All indications are that this area will be highly productive.

  9. Negative ion productions in high velocity collision between small carbon clusters and Helium atom target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Chabot; K, Béroff; T, Pino; G, Féraud; N, Dothi; Padellec A, Le; G, Martinet; S, Bouneau; Y, Carpentier

    2012-11-01

    We measured absolute double capture cross section of Cn+ ions (n=1,5) colliding, at 2.3 and 2.6 a.u velocities, with an Helium target atom and the branching ratios of fragmentation of the so formed electronically excited anions Cn-*. We also measured absolute cross section for the electronic attachment on neutral Cn clusters colliding at same velocities with He atom. This is to our knowledge the first measurement of neutral-neutral charge exchange in high velocity collision.

  10. Trapping of hydrogen atoms inside small beryllium clusters and their ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumkin, F. Y.; Wales, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    Structure, stability and electronic properties are evaluated computationally for small Ben (n = 5-9) cluster cages accommodating atomic H inside and forming core-shell species. These parameters are predicted to vary significantly upon insertion of H, for ionic derivatives, and with the system size. In particular, the energy barrier for H-atom exit from the cage changes significantly for ions compared to the neutral counterparts. The corresponding effects predicted for cage assemblies suggest the possibility of efficient charge-control of hydrogen release. This, together with a high capacity for storing hydrogen in extended such assemblies might indicate a possible way towards feasible hydrogen-storage solutions.

  11. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  12. Size-dependent stability toward dissociation and ligand binding energies of phosphine-ligated gold cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The stability of sub-nanometer size gold clusters ligated with organic molecules is of paramount importance to the scalable synthesis of monodisperse size-selected metal clusters with highly tunable chemical and physical properties. For the first time, a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) equipped with surface induced dissociation (SID) has been employed to investigate the time and collision energy resolved fragmentation behavior of cationic doubly charged gold clusters containing 7-9 gold atoms and 6-7 triphenylphosphine (TPP) ligands prepared by reduction synthesis in solution. The TPP ligated gold clusters are demonstrated to fragment through three primary dissociation pathways: (1) Loss of a neutral TPP ligand from the precursor gold cluster, (2) asymmetric fission and (3) symmetric fission and charge separation of the gold core resulting in formation of complementary pairs of singly charged fragment ions. Threshold energies and activation entropies of these fragmentation pathways have been determined employing Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental SID data. It is demonstrated that the doubly charged cluster ion containing eight gold atoms and six TPP ligands, (8,6)2+, exhibits exceptional stability compared to the other cationic gold clusters examined in this study due to its large ligand binding energy of 1.76 eV. Our findings demonstrate the dramatic effect of the size and extent of ligation on the gas-phase stability and preferred fragmentation pathways of small TPP-ligated gold clusters.

  13. Mass spectrometry of refractory black carbon particles from six sources: carbon-cluster and oxygenated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Sierau, B.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the major mass spectral features of different types of refractory carbonaceous particles, ionized after laser vaporization with an Aerodyne high-resolution soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated with a switchable 1064 nm laser and a 600 °C thermal vaporizer, yielding respective measurements of the refractory and non-refractory particle components. Six samples were investigated, all of which were composed primarily of refractory material: fuel-rich and fuel-lean propane/air diffusion-flame combustion particles; graphite-spark-generated particles; a commercial fullerene-enriched soot; Regal Black, a commercial carbon black; and nascent aircraft-turbine combustion particles. All samples exhibited a spectrum of carbon-cluster ions Cxn+ in their refractory mass spectrum. Smaller clusters (x < 6) were found to dominate the Cxn+ distribution. For fullerene soot, fuel-rich-flame particles and spark-generated particles, significant Cxn+ clusters at x ≫ 6 were present, with significant contributions from multiply charged ions (n > 1). In all six cases, the ions C1+ and C3+ contributed over 60% to the total C1ions C1+ / C3+ could be used to predict whether significant Cxn+ signals with x > 5 were present. When such signals were present, C1+ / C3+ was close to 1. When absent, C1+ / C3+ was < 0.8. This ratio may therefore serve as a proxy to distinguish between the two types of spectra in atmospheric SP-AMS measurements. Significant refractory oxygenated ions such as CO+ and CO2+ were also observed for all samples. We discuss these signals in detail for Regal Black, and describe their formation via decomposition of oxygenated moieties incorporated into the refractory carbon structure. These species may be of importance in atmospheric processes such as water uptake and heterogeneous chemistry. If atmospherically stable, these oxidized species may be useful for distinguishing

  14. Distributions of suprathermal ions near hot flow anomalies observed by RAPID aboard Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecskeméty, K.; Erdős, G.; Facskó, G.; Tátrallyay, M.; Dandouras, I.; Daly, P.; Kudela, K.

    2006-01-01

    A series of events having signatures of hot flow anomalies (HFA) observed by the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particle instruments aboard the Cluster spacecraft upstream of the Earth's bow shock in February-April 2003 are investigated. During this period, the separation of the four satellites (up to about 10,000 km) allowed determining the velocity of moving interplanetary plasma structures, which intersect the bow shock. About 50 candidates for HFA events were found and some statistical aspects are discussed. Two HFA events are analyzed in detail: one on 16 February 2003 at 10:48 UT with marked energetic ion signature and another on 7 March 2003 at 10:15 UT with a smaller increase. Both occurred in the vicinity of the bow shock, the plasma speed decreased, its flow deflected, its temperature increased, whereas a magnetic structure with rapidly changing field direction passed by and finally reached the bow shock. Both electrons and ions are accelerated; elevated fluxes of 28-68 keV ions appeared before and lasted longer than the HFA event as observed by all four RAPID instruments. The directional and pitch angle distributions of low-energy ions transformed into the plasma frame are discussed.

  15. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seah, Martin P; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S

    2016-08-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 (+) cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27106601

  16. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seah, Martin P; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S

    2016-08-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 (+) cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seah, Martin P.; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S.

    2016-08-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB ( N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)- N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 + cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8 T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature.

  18. Study of Flux Ratio of C60 to Ar Cluster Ion for Hard DLC Film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Miyauchi, K.; Toyoda, N.; Kanda, K.; Matsui, S.; Kitagawa, T.; Yamada, I.

    2003-08-26

    To study the influence of the flux ratio of C60 molecule to Ar cluster ion on (diamond like carbon) DLC film characteristics, DLC films deposited under various flux ratios were characterized with Raman spectrometry and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). From results of these measurements, hard DLC films were deposited when the flux ratio of C60 to Ar cluster ion was between 0.7 and 4. Furthermore the DLC film with constant sp2 content was obtained in the range of the ratio from 0.7 to 4, which contents are lower values than that of conventional films such as RF plasma. DLC films deposited under the ratio from 1 to 4 had hardness from 40 to 45GPa. It was shown that DLC films with stable properties of low sp2 content and high hardness were formed even when the fluxes were varied from 1 to 4 during deposition. It was indicated that this process was useful in the view of industrial application.

  19. Cluster observations of the dusk flank magnetopause near the sash: Ion dynamics and flow-through reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.; Farrugia, Charles J.; Burke, William J.; Ober, Daniel M.; Mozer, Forrest S.; Rème, Henri; Dunlop, Malcolm; Siebert, Keith D.

    2012-10-01

    Compared to the dayside, dynamics on the flanks of the magnetopause are poorly understood. To help bridge this knowledge gap we analyzed Cluster plasma and field measurements acquired during a 90-min period on 20 November 2003 when Cluster crossed the magnetopause four times in the vicinity of the sash. MHD simulations provide a context for Cluster observations. Crossings were between the magnetosheath and an S-shaped plasma sheet, rather than to the open-field lobes of the magnetotail. Cluster encountered two regions of MHD-breaking differences between perpendicular ion velocities and E × B convection. Ion adiabatic expansion parameter (δi) calculations show that ion gyrotropy was not broken during an episode of strong Alfvén wave activity in the magnetosheath. However, gyrotropy was broken (δi > 1) during the fourth magnetopause crossing. In the magnetosheath, ion guiding-center motion was maintained but inertial effects associated with temporally varying electric fields are probable sources of velocity differences. Regarding the magnetopause crossing, the generalized Ohm's law limits possible sources for breaking ion gyrotropy to inertial forces and/or electron pressure gradients associated with a nearby reconnection event. We suggest that Cluster witnessed effects of a temporally varying and spatially limited, flow-through reconnection event between open mantle field lines from the two polar caps adding new closed flux to the LLBL at the sash. Future modeling of flank dynamics must consider inertial forces as significant drivers at the magnetopause and in the adjacent magnetosheath.

  20. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Oberreit, Derek; Rawat, Vivek K.; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; McMurry, Peter H.; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2015-09-14

    The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI){sub x}M{sup +} (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measured CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model.

  1. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oberreit, Derek; Rawat, Vivek K; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; McMurry, Peter H; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-09-14

    The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI)xM(+) (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measured CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model. PMID:26374028

  2. Defect annealing in neutron and ion damaged silicon: Influence of defect clusters and doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, R. M.; Seager, C. H.; Bielejec, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Lang, D. V.; Campbell, J. M.

    2010-03-01

    We have explored defect annealing in radiation damaged silicon in a regime characterized by defect clusters and higher doping. Several types of pnp and npn Si bipolar transistors have been irradiated with ions and neutrons, then isochronally annealed from 300 to 600 K to study the evolution of deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) defect signatures. Variations in these data with radiation environment, Fermi level, annealing temperature, and doping density have been used to separate the contributions of three dominant defects to the DLTS defect spectra. We find that the normal Si divacancy and a divacancylike defect with similar properties make similar contributions to a DLTS peak normally associated with transitions from the single minus charge state of the divacancy. However the latter defect is clearly associated with the presence of defect clusters. The vacancy-donor center can also contribute to this high temperature DLTS signature, and its relative importance can be quantitatively assessed by varying doping density and the bias applied to the sample p/n junctions during annealing, and also by the observation that another, donor-related defect grows in as this center anneals. The ratio of vacancy-donor and vacancy-oxygen pairs appears to accurately follow that seen in earlier studies of gamma-irradiated Si. Discussions are presented concerning the effects of defect clustering on the structure, appearance, and evolution of the defects we have identified.

  3. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry and the temperature dependence of molecular depth profiles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta-layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C(60)(+) primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield, and topography are evaluated between 90 and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution, and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup

  4. Photodissociation of Arn + cluster ions: Kinetic energy distributions of neutral fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takashi; Kondow, Tamotsu

    1993-01-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of fragments produced in the photodissociation of Arn+ (3≤n≤24) were measured at 532 nm. Analysis of these TOF spectra provides quantitative information on the kinetic energy distributions of the neutral Ar fragments. For Arn+ with n≤14, two types of Ar fragments were distinguished according to the kinetic energy release. One having a sizable amount of kinetic energy is ascribed to the fragments directly produced via the dissociation of the chromophoric core in the cluster ions. The other carrying a smaller amount of kinetic energy can be described by ``evaporation'' of solvent atoms in Arn+. The average translational energies of the ``fast'' and the ``slow'' fragments were estimated to be 0.35-0.38 and 0.07-0.1 eV, respectively, for n=7-11. The angular distribution of the fast fragments exhibits a preferential anisotropy with 1.5≲β≲2 along the direction of the polarization vector of the excitation laser, while an almost isotropic distribution was observed for the slow fragments. A possible photodissociation mechanism was proposed based on the theoretically predicted geometries of Arn+. In the TOF spectra for the larger Arn+ with 14≤n≤24, no indication was obtained for the production of the fast fragments. The average kinetic energy of the ejected neutral atoms is ˜0.05 eV at n=24. This finding indicates that the direct core dissociation no longer takes place in the larger Arn+ clusters, suggesting that the photophysical properties of Arn+ (n≥14) differ from those of the smaller cluster ions.

  5. Magnetic tunnel junctions on magnetic shield smoothed by gas cluster ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. J.; Shimazawa, K.; Kasahara, N.; Sato, K.; Kagami, T.; Saruki, S.; Araki, S.; Matsuzaki, M.

    2001-06-01

    In this work, a technique, gas cluster ion beam (GCIB), was introduced to smooth the bottom NiFe magnetic shield for magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) read heads. The GCIB treatment can bring the surface roughness of the shield from 15 to 20 Aa to around 5 Aa, and the most of scratch marks can be removed. The efficiency of the GCIB process is dependent on the initial surface morphology. The MTJs grown on the magnetic shield smoothed by the GCIB show that the resistance area product RA is increased from 60 to {similar_to}100 {Omega}{mu}m2 with the GCIB dose up to 1{times}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, arising from a smooth insulating layer, meanwhile, the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is almost constant or slightly decreases. This GCIB process can also improve breakdown voltage (approximately 0.019 V per 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) of the MTJs, and slightly increase the ferromagnetic coupling mainly due to the change of the surface morphology. Using this technology, an RA as low as 3.5{endash}6.5 {Omega}{mu}m2 together with a TMR of 14%{endash}18% can be obtained for MTJs grown on the GCIB treated NiFe magnetic shield. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Investigation of the ArN + 2 ion by dissociative ionization of argon/nitrogen clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mähnert, Joachim; Baumgärtel, Helmut; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    1995-01-01

    The ArN+2 ion has been investigated by means of photoionization of an argon/nitrogen cluster beam in a threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence experiment. Two pathways for the formation of ArN+2 ions have been observed: (i) the nondissociative ionization of ArN2 neutrals and (ii) the dissociative ionization of Ar2N2. The two pathways are distinguished by the kinetic energy released (KER) in the dissociative ionization. The KER for the reaction Ar2N+2→ArN+2+Ar has been measured as a function of the excitation energy. The comparison of the measured KER with the statistically expected KER allows us to extrapolate to the thermochemical threshold of the reaction under investigation. A consistent picture is obtained under two assumptions: (i) the ArN+2 ion is linear and (ii) the ionization potential of ArN2 is 14.486±0.05 eV. The former assumption is confirmed by high level ab initio calculations (QCISD/6-311G*).

  7. Calculation of composition distribution of ultrafine ion-H2O-H2SO4 clusters using a modified binary ion nucleation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Smith, A. S.; Chan, L. Y.; Yue, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Thomson's ion nucleation theory was modified to include the effects of curvature dependence of the microscopic surface tension of field dependent, nonlinear, dielectric properties of the liquid; and of sulfuric acid hydrate formation in binary mixtures of water and sulfuric acid vapors. The modified theory leads to a broadening of the ion cluster spectrum, and shifts it towards larger numbers of H2O and H2SO4 molecules. Whether there is more shifting towards larger numbers of H2O or H2SO4 molecules depends on the relative humidity and relative acidity of the mixture. Usually, a broadening of the spectrum is accompanied by a lowering of the mean cluster intensity. For fixed values of relative humidity and relative acidity, a similar broadening pattern is observed when the temperature is lowered. These features of the modified theory illustrate that a trace of sulfuric acid can facilitate the formation of ultrafine, stable, prenucleation ion clusters as well as the growth of the prenucleation ion clusters towards the critical saddle point conditions, even with low values of relative humidity and relative acidity.

  8. Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Gold Clusters: Influence of Ion and Ligand on Charge Retention and Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we employ a combination of reduction synthesis in solution, soft landing of mass-selected precursor and product ions, and in situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to examine the influence of ion and the length of diphosphine ligands on the charge retention and reactivity of ligated gold clusters deposited onto self-assembled monolayer surfaces (SAMs). Product ions (Au10L42+, (10,4)2+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenyl-phosphino)propane, DPPP) were prepared through in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) and precursor ions [(8,4)2+, L = 1,6-bis(diphenylphosphino)hexane, DPPH] were synthesized in solution for comparison to (11,5)3+ precursor ions ligated with DPPP investigated previously (ACS Nano 2012, 6, 573 and J. Phys. Chem. C. 2012, 116, 24977). Similar to (11,5)3+ precursor ions, the (10,4)2+ product ions are shown to retain charge on 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol monolayers (FSAMs). Additional abundant peaks at higher m/z indicative of reactivity are observed in the TOF-SIMS spectrum of (10,4)2+ product ions that are not seen for (11,5)3+ precursor ions. The abundance of (10,4)2+ on 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (COOH-SAMs) is demonstrated to be lower than on FSAMs, consistent with partial reduction of charge. The (10,4)2+ product ion on 1-dodecanethiol (HSAMs) exhibits peaks similar to those seen on the COOH-SAM. On the HSAM, higher m/z peaks indicative of reactivity are observed similar to those on the FSAM. The (8,4)2+ DPPH precursor ions are shown to retain charge on FSAMs similar to (11,5)3+ precursor ions prepared with DPPP. An additional peak corresponding to attachment of one gold atom to (8,4)2+ is observed at higher m/z for DPPH-ligated clusters. On the COOH-SAM, (8,4)2+ is less abundant than on the FSAM consistent with partial neutralization. The results indicate that although retention of charge by product ions generated by CID is similar to precursor ions their reactivity during analysis with SIMS is different

  9. Minimal diffusion formulation of Markov chain ensembles and its application to ion channel clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Marifi

    2015-06-01

    We study ensembles of continuous-time Markov chains evolving independently under a common transition rate matrix in some finite state space. A diffusion approximation, composed of two specifically coupled Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes in stochastic differential equation representation, is formulated to deduce how the number of chains in a given particular state evolves in time. This particular form of the formulation builds upon a theoretical argument adduced here. The formulation is minimal in the sense that it is always a two-dimensional stochastic process regardless of the state space size or the transition matrix density, and that it requires no matrix square root operations. A set of criteria, put forward here as to be necessarily captured by any consistent approximation scheme, is used together with the master equation to determine uniquely the parameter values and noise variances in the formulation. The model is applied to the gating dynamics in ion channel clusters.

  10. Matrix-assisted laser ablation production of gold cluster ions from Au-coated photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Jincheng; Liu, Jian'an; Chen, Yi

    2012-05-01

    A new strategy was explored to generate pure gold cluster ions, Au(n)(+/-), from gold films deposited on solid substrates via a matrix-assisted laser ablation technique. The gold films deposited on SiO(2)-particle-assembled photonic crystals were demonstrated to be the most ideal compared with the films deposited on various glass slides. Dropped with a matrix of 2-(4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzoic acid and bombarded by nitrogen pulse laser (355 nm), they could release a series of Au(n)(+) with n more than 110 or Au(n)(-) with n more than 60 according to the data obtained by inline time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The gold-deposited photonic crystal substrates could be stored at room temperature for at least 6 months. The method is hence steady and convenient in use. PMID:22576875

  11. Measurement of sodium-argon cluster ion recombination by coherent microwave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang Zhili; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2012-03-12

    This present work demonstrates a non-intrusive measurement of the rate constant for sodium-argon cluster ions (Na{sup +}{center_dot}Ar) recombining with electrons. The measurements begin with resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization of the Na followed by coherent microwave scattering (radar) to monitor the plasma density. The Na{sup +}{center_dot}Ar adduct was formed in a three-body reaction. The plasma decay due to recombination reactions was monitored as a function of time and modeled to determine the rate constant. At 473 K, the rate constant is 1.8{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}x10{sup -6}cm{sup 3}/s in an argon buffer at 100 Torr and initial Na number density of 5.5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}.

  12. Compositions and Structures of Vanadium Oxide Cluster Ions VmOn(±) (m = 2-20) Investigated by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jenna W J; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Tahara, Hiroshi; Ohshimo, Keijiro; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2016-06-01

    Stable compositions and geometrical structures of vanadium oxide cluster ions, VmOn(±), were investigated by ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). The most stable compositions of vanadium oxide cluster cations were (V2O4)(V2O5)(m-2)/2(+) and (VO2)(V2O5)(m-1)/2(+), depending on the clusters with even and odd numbers of vanadium atoms. Compositions one-oxygen richer than the cations, such as (V2O5)m/2(-) and (VO3)(V2O5)(m-1)/2(-), were predominantly observed for cluster anions. Assignments of these stable cluster ion compositions, which were determined as a result of collision-induced dissociations in IM-MS, can partly be explained with consideration of spin density distribution. By comparing the experimental collision cross sections (CCSs) obtained from ion mobility measurement with CCSs of the theoretically calculated structures, we confirmed the patterned growth of geometrical structures partially discussed in previous theoretical and spectroscopic studies. We showed that even sized (V2O5)m/2(±) where m = 6-12 had right polygonal prism structures except for the anionic V12O30(-), and for the clusters of odd numbers of vanadium m, cations and anions can either have bridged or pyramid structures. Both of the odd sized structures proposed were derivatives from the even sized right polygonal prism structures. The exception, V12O30(-), which had a CCS almost equal to that of the neighboring smaller V11O28(-), should have a structure of higher density than the right hexagonal prism, in which it was proposed to be a captured pyramid structure, derived from V11O28(-).

  13. Compositions and Structures of Vanadium Oxide Cluster Ions VmOn(±) (m = 2-20) Investigated by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jenna W J; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Tahara, Hiroshi; Ohshimo, Keijiro; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2016-06-01

    Stable compositions and geometrical structures of vanadium oxide cluster ions, VmOn(±), were investigated by ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). The most stable compositions of vanadium oxide cluster cations were (V2O4)(V2O5)(m-2)/2(+) and (VO2)(V2O5)(m-1)/2(+), depending on the clusters with even and odd numbers of vanadium atoms. Compositions one-oxygen richer than the cations, such as (V2O5)m/2(-) and (VO3)(V2O5)(m-1)/2(-), were predominantly observed for cluster anions. Assignments of these stable cluster ion compositions, which were determined as a result of collision-induced dissociations in IM-MS, can partly be explained with consideration of spin density distribution. By comparing the experimental collision cross sections (CCSs) obtained from ion mobility measurement with CCSs of the theoretically calculated structures, we confirmed the patterned growth of geometrical structures partially discussed in previous theoretical and spectroscopic studies. We showed that even sized (V2O5)m/2(±) where m = 6-12 had right polygonal prism structures except for the anionic V12O30(-), and for the clusters of odd numbers of vanadium m, cations and anions can either have bridged or pyramid structures. Both of the odd sized structures proposed were derivatives from the even sized right polygonal prism structures. The exception, V12O30(-), which had a CCS almost equal to that of the neighboring smaller V11O28(-), should have a structure of higher density than the right hexagonal prism, in which it was proposed to be a captured pyramid structure, derived from V11O28(-). PMID:27172006

  14. Changes in cluster magnetism and suppression of local superconductivity in amorphous FeCrB alloy irradiated by Ar+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, V. D.; Samoilenko, Z. A.; Szymczak, H.; Szewczyk, A.; Szymczak, R.; Lewandowski, S. J.; Aleshkevych, P.; Malinowski, A.; Gierłowski, P.; Więckowski, J.; Wolny-Marszałek, M.; Jeżabek, M.; Varyukhin, V. N.; Antoshina, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    We show that cluster magnetism in ferromagnetic amorphous Fe67Cr18B15 alloy is related to the presence of large, D=150-250 Å, α-(Fe Cr) clusters responsible for basic changes in cluster magnetism, small, D=30-100 Å, α-(Fe, Cr) and Fe3B clusters and subcluster atomic α-(Fe, Cr, B) groupings, D=10-20 Å, in disordered intercluster medium. For initial sample and irradiated one (Φ=1.5×1018 ions/cm2) superconductivity exists in the cluster shells of metallic α-(Fe, Cr) phase where ferromagnetism of iron is counterbalanced by antiferromagnetism of chromium. At Φ=3×1018 ions/cm2, the internal stresses intensify and the process of iron and chromium phase separation, favorable for mesoscopic superconductivity, changes for inverse one promoting more homogeneous distribution of iron and chromium in the clusters as well as gigantic (twice as much) increase in density of the samples. As a result, in the cluster shells ferromagnetism is restored leading to the increase in magnetization of the sample and suppression of local superconductivity. For initial samples, the temperature dependence of resistivity ρ(T)~T2 is determined by the electron scattering on quantum defects. In strongly inhomogeneous samples, after irradiation by fluence Φ=1.5×1018 ions/cm2, the transition to a dependence ρ(T)~T1/2 is caused by the effects of weak localization. In more homogeneous samples, at Φ=3×1018 ions/cm2, a return to the dependence ρ(T)~T2 is observed.

  15. Direct imaging of rare-earth ion clusters in Yb:CaF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Genevois, C.; Doualan, J. L.; Brasse, G.; Braud, A.; Ruterana, P.; Camy, P.; Talbot, E.; Moncorgé, R.; Margerie, J.

    2014-09-01

    The existence and the identification of only one or several coparticipating luminescent Yb3+ centers in the heavily doped Yb :CaF2 laser crystals which are considered in the development of several high intensity laser chains have been examined first by using two complementary and original experimental approaches, i.e., registration of low temperature site-selective laser excitation spectra related to near-infrared and visible cooperative emission processes, on the one hand, and direct imaging at the atomic scale of isolated ions and clusters using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope in the high angle annular dark-field mode, on the other hand, and then correlating the data with simple crystal field calculations. As a consequence, and although all the experimental details could not be accounted for quantitatively, a good overall correlation was found between the experimental and the theoretical data. The results show that at the investigated dopant concentrations, Yb:CaF2 should be considered as a multisite system whose luminescent and lasing properties are dominated by a series of Yb3+ clusters ranging from dimers to tetramers. Hexameric luminescent centers may be dominant at really high dopant concentrations (likely above 20 at. %), as was originally proposed, but certainly not at the intermediate dopant concentrations which are considered for the laser application, i.e., between about 0.5 and 10 at. %.

  16. Structural Characterizations of Palladium Clusters Prepared by Polyol Reduction of [PdCl 4 ] (2-) Ions.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, Loredana; Aversa, Lucrezia; Tatti, Roberta; Verucchi, Roberto; Carotenuto, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Palladium nanoparticles are of great interest in many industrial fields, ranging from catalysis and hydrogen technology to microelectronics, thanks to their unique physical and chemical properties. In this work, palladium clusters have been prepared by reduction of [PdCl4](2-) ions with ethylene glycol, in the presence of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) as stabilizer. The stabilizer performs the important role of nucleating agent for the Pd atoms with a fast phase separation, since palladium atoms coordinated to the polymer side-groups are forced at short distances during nucleation. Quasispherical palladium clusters with a diameter of ca. 2.6 nm were obtained by reaction in air at 90°C for 2 hours. An extensive materials characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and other characterizations (TGA, SEM, EDS-SEM, and UV-Vis) has been performed in order to evaluate the structure and oxidation state of nanopalladium. PMID:27073712

  17. Cluster observations of surface waves in the ion jets from magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, C.; Dombeck, J.; Thaller, Scott; Mouikis, Chris; Balogh, A.; Rème, H.

    2011-12-01

    We present a Cluster spacecraft investigation of plasma sheet-confined waves and the associated Poynting flux in strong ion jets near a reconnection region in the geomagnetic tail at ˜-17 Re. Using phase lag analysis, we determine from multispacecraft measurements the phase front, wavelength, and phase velocity of the waves with spacecraft frame frequencies from 0.03 Hz to 1 Hz. The wave phase velocities were found to be directed nearly perpendicular to the local magnetic field laying in the plasma sheet plane. The strong evidence that the waves were driven by ion velocity shears has been provided. The waves are confined by the plasma sheet and their amplitude diminishes in the tail lobes. The δE/δB ratios are mostly on the order of the Alfven speed. The observed wave characteristics are different from plasma sheet flapping observed at the same time. The field-aligned Poynting flux was found to be directed away from the reconnection region. The values of earthward Poynting flux (100 ergs/cm2s or 0.1 W/m2) and longitudinal scales (10-100 km) mapped to the auroral ionosphere suggest that the observed waves may provide energy needed to accelerate auroral particles and may drive observed motions in auroral curls.

  18. Study of compressible coherent structures, close to ion scales, in solar wind turbulence using Cluster data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Denise; Alexandrova, Olga; Mangeney, André; Maksimovic, Milan; Rocoto, Virgile; Pantellini, Filippo; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Issautier, Karine

    2015-04-01

    The interplanetary medium, a weakly collisional and fully turbulent medium, can be considered the best natural laboratory to study the dynamical behavior of turbulent plasmas. A fundamental question in solar wind plasma physics is whether, space plasma turbulence can be considered as a mixture of quasi-linear waves or if the turbulence is strong with formation of coherent structures responsible for the dissipation. Here we present an automatic method to identify compressible coherent structures using Morlet wavelet decomposition of magnetic signal from Cluster spacecraft and reconstruction of magnetic fluctuations in a selected scale range (0.033-0.2 Hz). Different kind of coherent structures have been detected: from soliton-like compressible structures to current sheet- or vortex-like alfvenic structures. A multi-satellite analysis, in order to characterize 3D geometry and propagation in plasma rest frame, reveals that these structures propagate quasi-perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, with finite velocity. Moreover, the spatial scales of coherent structures have been estimated: for the selected frequency range, the distribution of spatial scales is picked around ~30 ion Larmor radius or ion inertial length (~1200 km). Our observations in the solar wind can provide constraints on theoretical modeling of small-scale turbulence and dissipation in collisionless magnetized plasmas.

  19. Improvement of the gas cluster ion beam-(GCIB)-based molecular secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profile with O2(+) cosputtering.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Hsuan; Liao, Hua-Yang; Lin, Kang-Yi; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Kao, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Ding-Yuan; You, Yun-Wen; Chu, Kuo-Jui; Wu, Chen-Yi; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2016-04-21

    Over the last decade, cluster ion beams have displayed their capability to analyze organic materials and biological specimens. Compared with atomic ion beams, cluster ion beams non-linearly enhance the sputter yield, suppress damage accumulation and generate high mass fragments during sputtering. These properties allow successful Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis of soft materials beyond the static limit. Because the intensity of high mass molecular ions is intrinsically low, enhancing the intensity of these secondary ions while preserving the sample in its original state is the key to highly sensitive molecular depth profiles. In this work, bulk poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was used as a model material and analyzed using Time-of-Flight SIMS (ToF-SIMS) with a pulsed Bi3(2+) primary ion. The optimized hardware of a 10 kV Ar2500(+) Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) with a low kinetic energy (200-500 V) oxygen ion (O2(+)) as a cosputter beam was employed for generating depth profiles and for examining the effect of beam parameters. The results were then quantitatively analyzed using an established erosion model. It was found that the ion intensity of the PET monomer ([M + H](+)) and its large molecular fragment ([M - C2H4O + H](+)) steadily declined during single GCIB sputtering, with distortion of the distribution information. However, under an optimized GCIB-O2(+) cosputter, the secondary ion intensity quickly reached a steady state and retained >95% intensity with respect to the pristine surface, although the damage cross-section was larger than that of single GCIB sputtering. This improvement was due to the oxidation of molecules and the formation of -OH groups that serve as proton donors to particles emitted from the surface. As a result, the ionization yield was enhanced and damage to the chemical structure was masked. Although O2(+) is known to alter the chemical structure and cause damage accumulation, the concurrently used GCIB could

  20. Multi-point observations of Ion Dispersions near the Exterior Cusp with Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C.-Philippe; Grison, Benjamin; Berchem, Jean; Trattner, Kralheinz; Pitout, Frederic; Richard, Robert; Taylor, Matt; Soucek, Jan; Laakso, Harri; Masson, Arnaud; Dunlop, Malcolm; Dandouras, Iannis; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Daly, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The exterior cusp is the most external region of the polar magnetosphere in direct contact with the plasma and the magnetic field from the solar wind. Unlike the rest of the magnetopause surface, the exterior cusp is a singular region with small and turbulent magnetic field and where large entry of plasma from solar origin takes place. The main process that injects solar wind plasma into the polar cusp is now generally accepted to be magnetic reconnection. Depending on the IMF direction, this process will take place equatorward (for IMF southward), poleward (for IMF northward) or on the dusk or dawn sides (for IMF azimuthal) of the cusp. We report a Cluster crossing on 5 January 2002 near the exterior cusp on the southern dusk side. The IMF was mainly azimuthal (IMF-By around -5 nT), the solar wind speed lower than usual around 280 km/s and the density around 5 cm-3. The four Cluster spacecraft were still in the "magnetotail" configuration with two perfect tetrahedra of 2000 km around apogee and turning into an elongated configuration near the magnetopause. C4 was the first spacecraft to enter the cusp around 19:52:04 UT, followed by C2 at 19:52:35 UT, C1 at 19:54:24 UT and C3 at 20:13:15 UT. C4 and C1 observed two ion energy dispersions at 20:10 UT and 20:40 UT and C3 at 20:35 UT and 21:15 UT. Using the time of flight technique on the upgoing and downgoing ions in the dispersions, we obtain an altitude of the sources of these ions between 14 and 20 RE. Using Tsyganenko model, these sources are located on the dusk flank, past the terminator. In addition, before entering the cusp, the magnetopause crossing was characterized by a large shear in By and bipolar plasma flows, suggesting that reconnection was taking place near the exterior cusp. We will discuss the extent of the reconnection line along the flank of the magnetopause based on these observations.

  1. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry examination of the structures, stabilities, and extents of hydration of dimethylamine-sulfuric acid clusters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jikku M; He, Siqin; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; DePalma, Joseph W; Johnston, Murray V; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-08-17

    We applied an atmospheric pressure differential mobility analyzer (DMA) coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to examine the stability, mass-mobility relationship, and extent of hydration of dimethylamine-sulfuric acid cluster ions, which are of relevance to nucleation in ambient air. Cluster ions were generated by electrospray ionization and were of the form: [H((CH3)2NH)x(H2SO4)y](+) and [(HSO4)((CH3)2NH)x(H2SO4)y](-), where 4 ≤ x ≤ 8, and 5 ≤ y ≤ 12. Under dry conditions, we find that positively charged cluster ions dissociated via loss of both multiple dimethylamine and sulfuric acid molecules after mobility analysis but prior to mass analysis, and few parent ions were detected in the mass spectrometer. Dissociation also occurred for negative ions, but to a lesser extent than for positive ions for the same mass spectrometer inlet conditions. Under humidified conditions (relative humidities up to 30% in the DMA), positively charged cluster ion dissociation in the mass spectrometer inlet was mitigated and occurred primarily by H2SO4 loss from ions containing excess acid molecules. DMA measurements were used to infer collision cross sections (CCSs) for all identifiable cluster ions. Stokes-Millikan equation and diffuse/inelastic gas molecule scattering predicted CCSs overestimate measured CCSs by more than 15%, while elastic-specular collision model predictions are in good agreement with measurements. Finally, cluster ion hydration was examined by monitoring changes in CCSs with increasing relative humidity. All examined cluster ions showed a modest amount of water molecule adsorption, with percentage increases in CCS smaller than 10%. The extent of hydration correlates directly with cluster ion acidity for positive ions. PMID:27485283

  2. Impact of metal ion's charge on the interatomic Coulombic decay widths in microsolvated clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, V.; Brunken, C.; Gokhberg, K.

    2016-09-01

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is an efficient electronic decay mechanism of electronically excited atoms and molecules embedded in an environment. For the series of isoelectronic Na+, Mg2+, and Al3+ ions in aqueous solution, ultrashort ICD lifetimes of 3.1 fs, 1.5 fs, and 0.9 fs, respectively, were observed experimentally. The magnitude of the ICD lifetimes and their variation within the series were qualitatively explained by shortening metal-oxygen equilibrium distances and the increasing polarization of the water molecules as the metal's charge grows. We carried out an extensive ab initio investigation of the variation of the ICD widths with the metal-oxygen distances and the number of water neighbors in Na+-(H2O)m (m = 1-4) and Mg2+-(H2O)n (n = 1-6) clusters including and excluding polarization effects in the decaying state. We demonstrated that the effect of the induced polarization of the water ligand and the equilibrium cation-oxygen distance are equally important in determining the ordering and ratios of the ICD lifetimes in the series. Moreover, we showed that the induced polarization of the water molecules leads to a slower than linear growth of ICD width with the number of equivalent water neighbors; the non-linearity is stronger for Mg2+. The ab initio ICD widths in microsolvated Na+-(H2O)4 and Mg2+-(H2O)6 clusters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental values.

  3. Impact of metal ion's charge on the interatomic Coulombic decay widths in microsolvated clusters.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, V; Brunken, C; Gokhberg, K

    2016-09-14

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is an efficient electronic decay mechanism of electronically excited atoms and molecules embedded in an environment. For the series of isoelectronic Na(+), Mg(2+), and Al(3+) ions in aqueous solution, ultrashort ICD lifetimes of 3.1 fs, 1.5 fs, and 0.9 fs, respectively, were observed experimentally. The magnitude of the ICD lifetimes and their variation within the series were qualitatively explained by shortening metal-oxygen equilibrium distances and the increasing polarization of the water molecules as the metal's charge grows. We carried out an extensive ab initio investigation of the variation of the ICD widths with the metal-oxygen distances and the number of water neighbors in Na(+)-(H2O)m (m = 1-4) and Mg(2+)-(H2O)n (n = 1-6) clusters including and excluding polarization effects in the decaying state. We demonstrated that the effect of the induced polarization of the water ligand and the equilibrium cation-oxygen distance are equally important in determining the ordering and ratios of the ICD lifetimes in the series. Moreover, we showed that the induced polarization of the water molecules leads to a slower than linear growth of ICD width with the number of equivalent water neighbors; the non-linearity is stronger for Mg(2+). The ab initio ICD widths in microsolvated Na(+)-(H2O)4 and Mg(2+)-(H2O)6 clusters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental values. PMID:27634259

  4. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves near the Plasmapause: A CLUSTER Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Liu, Y.; Menk, F. W.

    2011-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the Pc1 ultra-low frequency wave band (0.2-5Hz) observed in the plasmasphere and magnetosphere are generated by micro-scale instabilities associated with keV energetic protons of ring current origin. This case study presents a typical EMIC wave event with frequency 1.8-3.5 Hz observed by the four Cluster spacecraft when passing through perigee (L ~ 4:2) and moving northward on 2 November 2001 around 08 MLT. The event occurred around the magnetic equatorial plane within magnetic latitude range ±18 degrees with a short duration of 50 minutes. The associated cold electron density data show the wave power was confined within the narrow shell of the plasmapause where the electron density gradient decreased from 30-80 cm-3 to 20 cm-3. The radial scale size of the wave region is estimated at ~ 0:77 Re. The wave polarization was dominantly left-handed around the equatorial region and inner side of source region, but appeared right-handed close to the outer edge of the plasmapause and at higher latitudes. The Poynting flux and minimum variance analysis indicate that the wave energy was mainly transported towards high latitudes though oblique propagation was seen around the equatorial region. Enhanced H+, He+ and O+ particle energy fluxes were seen during the wave event over energy range ~25eV-40keV. Unfortunately the lower energy cold plasma composition data were not available. These observations suggest the waves originated around the equatorial region in the high density outer plasmasphere-plasmapause which overlaps the ring current; ideal conditions for wave generation by the ion cyclotron instability.

  5. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on three areas we have made substantial new progress in over the past several months: (1) Infrared multiphoton photoinduced ion molecule reactions; (2) The use of SF{sub 6} to detect excited state metal ion behavior; and (3) Cluster ion chemistry.

  6. Three-Dimensional Image of Cleavage Bodies in Nuclei Is Configured Using Gas Cluster Ion Beam with Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Noritaka; Ishizaki, Itsuko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Fisher, Gregory L.; Sanada, Noriaki; Yokota, Hideo; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations of DNA in nuclei are deeply related with development, aging, and diseases through transcriptional regulation. In order to bare cross sections of samples maintaining sub-micron structures, an Ar2500+-gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputter was recently engineered. By introducing GCIB sputter to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), we analyzed the 3D configuration and chemical composition of subnuclear structures of pyramidal cells in the CA2 region in mouse brain hippocampus. Depth profiles of chemicals were analyzed as 3D distributions by combining topographic analyses. Signals corresponding to anions such as CN− and PO3− were distributed characteristically in the shape of cell organelles. CN− signals overlapped DAPI fluorescence signals corresponding to nuclei. The clusters shown by PO3− and those of adenine ions were colocalized inside nuclei revealed by the 3D reconstruction. Taking into account their size and their number in each nucleus, those clusters could be in the cleavage bodies, which are a kind of intranuclear structure. PMID:25961407

  7. Three-Dimensional Image of Cleavage Bodies in Nuclei Is Configured Using Gas Cluster Ion Beam with Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Noritaka; Ishizaki, Itsuko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Fisher, Gregory L; Sanada, Noriaki; Yokota, Hideo; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2015-05-11

    Structural variations of DNA in nuclei are deeply related with development, aging, and diseases through transcriptional regulation. In order to bare cross sections of samples maintaining sub-micron structures, an Ar2500(+)-gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputter was recently engineered. By introducing GCIB sputter to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), we analyzed the 3D configuration and chemical composition of subnuclear structures of pyramidal cells in the CA2 region in mouse brain hippocampus. Depth profiles of chemicals were analyzed as 3D distributions by combining topographic analyses. Signals corresponding to anions such as CN(-) and PO3(-) were distributed characteristically in the shape of cell organelles. CN(-) signals overlapped DAPI fluorescence signals corresponding to nuclei. The clusters shown by PO3(-) and those of adenine ions were colocalized inside nuclei revealed by the 3D reconstruction. Taking into account their size and their number in each nucleus, those clusters could be in the cleavage bodies, which are a kind of intranuclear structure.

  8. Polymerization of ionized acetylene clusters into covalent bonded ions: evidence for the formation of benzene radical cation.

    PubMed

    Momoh, Paul O; Abrash, Samuel A; Mabrouki, Ridha; El-Shall, M Samy

    2006-09-27

    Since the discovery of acetylene and benzene in protoplanetary nebulae under powerful ultraviolet ionizing radiation, efforts have been made to investigate the polymerization of ionized acetylene. Here we report the efficient formation of benzene ions within gas-phase ionized acetylene clusters (C2H2)n+ with n = 3-60. The results from experiments, which use mass-selected ion mobility techniques, indicate that the (C2H2)3+ ion has unusual stability similar to that of the benzene cation; its primary fragment ions are similar to those reported from the benzene cation, and it has a collision cross section of 47.4 A2 in helium at 300 K, similar to the value of 47.9 A2 reported for the benzene cation. In other words, (C2H2)3+ structurally looks like benzene, it has stability similar to that of benzene, it fragments such as benzene, therefore, it must be benzene! PMID:16984178

  9. Lipid imaging by gold cluster time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry: application to Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Halgand, Frédéric; De La Porte, Sabine; Laprévote, Olivier

    2005-07-01

    Imaging with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has expanded very rapidly with the development of gold cluster ion sources (Au(3+)). It is now possible to acquire ion density maps (ion images) on a tissue section without any treatment and with a lateral resolution of few micrometers. In this article, we have taken advantage of this technique to study the degeneration/regeneration process in muscles of a Duchenne muscular dystrophy model mouse. Specific distribution of different lipid classes (fatty acids, triglycerides, phospholipids, tocopherol, coenzyme Q9, and cholesterol) allows us to distinguish three different regions on a mouse leg section: one is destroyed, another is degenerating (oxidative stress and deregulation of the phosphoinositol cycle), and the last one is stable. TOF-SIMS imaging shows the ability to localize directly on a tissue section a great number of lipid compounds that reflect the state of the cellular metabolism. PMID:15834124

  10. Low-damage surface smoothing of laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon using gas cluster ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokioka, H.; Yamarin, H.; Fujino, T.; Inoue, M.; Seki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2007-04-01

    Surface smoothing of laser crystallized polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films using gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) technology has been studied. It is found that both SF6-GCIB and O2-GCIB decrease the height of hillocks and reduce the surface roughness of the irradiated films. The mean surface roughness value of poly-Si films was reduced from 10.8 nm to 2.8 nm by SF6-GCIB irradiation at 80°. Ultraviolet reflectance measurement reveals that GCIB irradiation causes damage near-surface of the poly-Si films. Formation of the damage, however, can be suppressed by using GCIB irradiation at high incident angle. Effect of GCIB irradiation in a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor has also been investigated. The capacitance-voltage curves of MIS capacitor with SF6-GCIB irradiation are distorted. On the contrary, the distortion is reduced by O2-GCIB irradiation at 80, which suggests that electrical-activated damage of the films can be decreased by using O2-GCIB irradiation.

  11. Smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo: Applications to lithium ion-Stockmayer clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, H. M.; Jake, L. C.; Curotto, E.

    2016-05-01

    In a recent investigation [K. Roberts et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 074104 (2012)], we have shown that, for a sufficiently complex potential, the Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) random walk can become quasiergodic, and we have introduced smart darting-like moves to improve the sampling. In this article, we systematically characterize the bias that smart darting moves introduce in the estimate of the ground state energy of a bosonic system. We then test a simple approach to eliminate completely such bias from the results. The approach is applied for the determination of the ground state of lithium ion-n-dipoles clusters in the n = 8-20 range. For these, the smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo simulations find the same ground state energy and mixed-distribution as the traditional approach for n < 14. In larger systems we find that while the ground state energies agree quantitatively with or without smart darting moves, the mixed-distributions can be significantly different. Some evidence is offered to conclude that introducing smart darting-like moves in traditional DMC simulations may produce a more reliable ground state mixed-distribution.

  12. Cluster of differentiation antibody microarrays on plasma immersion ion implanted polycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Kosobrodova, E; Mohamed, A; Su, Y; Kondyurin, A; dos Remedios, C G; McKenzie, D R; Bilek, M M M

    2014-02-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) modifies the surface properties of polymers, enabling them to covalently immobilize proteins without using linker chemistry. We describe the use of PIII treated polycarbonate (PC) slides as a novel platform for producing microarrays of cluster of differentiation (CD) antibodies. We compare their performance to identical antibody microarrays printed on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides that are currently the industry standard. Populations of leukocytes are applied to the CD microarrays and unbound cells are removed revealing patterns of differentially immobilized cells that are detected in a simple label-free approach by scanning the slides with visible light. Intra-slide and inter-slide reproducibility, densities of bound cells, and limits of detection were determined. Compared to the nitrocellulose-coated glass slides, PIII treated PC slides have a lower background noise, better sensitivity, and comparable or better reproducibility. They require three-fold lower antibody concentrations to yield equivalent signal strength, resulting in significant reductions in production cost. The improved transparency of PIII treated PC in the near-UV and visible wavelengths combined with superior immobilization of biomolecules makes them an attractive platform for a wide range of microarray applications.

  13. Smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo: Applications to lithium ion-Stockmayer clusters.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H M; Jake, L C; Curotto, E

    2016-05-01

    In a recent investigation [K. Roberts et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 074104 (2012)], we have shown that, for a sufficiently complex potential, the Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) random walk can become quasiergodic, and we have introduced smart darting-like moves to improve the sampling. In this article, we systematically characterize the bias that smart darting moves introduce in the estimate of the ground state energy of a bosonic system. We then test a simple approach to eliminate completely such bias from the results. The approach is applied for the determination of the ground state of lithium ion-n-dipoles clusters in the n = 8-20 range. For these, the smart darting diffusion Monte Carlo simulations find the same ground state energy and mixed-distribution as the traditional approach for n < 14. In larger systems we find that while the ground state energies agree quantitatively with or without smart darting moves, the mixed-distributions can be significantly different. Some evidence is offered to conclude that introducing smart darting-like moves in traditional DMC simulations may produce a more reliable ground state mixed-distribution. PMID:27155633

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of energy-deposit clustering for ions of the same LET in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Francis, Z; Incerti, S; Ivanchenko, V; Champion, C; Karamitros, M; Bernal, M A; El Bitar, Z

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a Monte Carlo study of energy depositions due to protons, alpha particles and carbon ions of the same linear-energy-transfer (LET) in liquid water. The corresponding track structures were generated using the Geant4-DNA toolkit, and the energy deposition spatial distributions were analyzed using an adapted version of the DBSCAN clustering algorithm. Combining the Geant4 simulations and the clustering algorithm it was possible to compare the quality of the different radiation types. The ratios of clustered and single energy depositions are shown versus particle LET and frequency-mean lineal energies. The estimated effect of these types of radiation on biological tissues is then discussed by comparing the results obtained for different particles with the same LET.

  15. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  16. Competition of zinc ion for the [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site in the diabetes drug target protein mitoNEET.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guoqiang; Landry, Aaron P; Dai, Ruili; Wang, Li; Lu, Jianxin; Ding, Huangen

    2012-12-01

    Human mitochondrial protein mitoNEET is a novel target of type II diabetes drug pioglitazone, and contains a redox active [2Fe-2S] cluster that is hosted by a unique ligand arrangement of three cysteine and one histidine residues. Here we report that zinc ion can compete for the [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site in human mitoNEET and potentially modulate the physiological function of mitoNEET. When recombinant mitoNEET is expressed in Escherichia coli cells grown in M9 minimal media, purified mitoNEET contains very little or no iron-sulfur clusters. Addition of exogenous iron or zinc ion in the media produces mitoNEET bound with a [2Fe-2S] cluster or zinc, respectively. Mutations of the amino acid residues that hosting the [2Fe-2S] cluster in mitoNEET diminish the zinc binding activity, indicating that zinc ion and the [2Fe-2S] cluster may share the same binding site in mitoNEET. Finally, excess zinc ion effectively inhibits the [2Fe-2S] cluster assembly in mitoNEET in E. coli cells, suggesting that zinc ion may impede the function of mitoNEET by blocking the [2Fe-2S] cluster assembly in the protein.

  17. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  18. Stable compositions and geometrical structures of titanium oxide cluster cations and anions studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Norimasa, Naoya; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2016-05-21

    Geometrical structures of titanium oxide cluster cations and anions have been investigated by ion mobility mass spectrometry and quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory. Stable cluster compositions with respect to collision induced dissociation were also determined by changing ion injection energy to an ion drift cell for mobility measurements. The TinO2n-1 (+) cations and TinO2n (-) anions were predominantly observed at high injection energies, in addition to TinO2n (+) for cations and TinO2n+1 (-) for anions. Collision cross sections of TinO2n (+) and TinO2n+1 (-) for n = 1-7, determined by ion mobility mass spectrometry, were compared with those obtained theoretically as orientation-averaged cross sections for the optimized structures by quantum chemical calculations. All of the geometrical structures thus assigned have three-dimensional structures, which are in marked contrast with other oxides of late transition metals. One-oxygen atom dissociation processes from TinO2n (+) and TinO2n+1 (-) by collisions were also explained by analysis of spin density distributions.

  19. Stable compositions and geometrical structures of titanium oxide cluster cations and anions studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Norimasa, Naoya; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2016-05-01

    Geometrical structures of titanium oxide cluster cations and anions have been investigated by ion mobility mass spectrometry and quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory. Stable cluster compositions with respect to collision induced dissociation were also determined by changing ion injection energy to an ion drift cell for mobility measurements. The TinO2n-1+ cations and TinO2n- anions were predominantly observed at high injection energies, in addition to TinO2n+ for cations and TinO2n+1- for anions. Collision cross sections of TinO2n+ and TinO2n+1- for n = 1-7, determined by ion mobility mass spectrometry, were compared with those obtained theoretically as orientation-averaged cross sections for the optimized structures by quantum chemical calculations. All of the geometrical structures thus assigned have three-dimensional structures, which are in marked contrast with other oxides of late transition metals. One-oxygen atom dissociation processes from TinO2n+ and TinO2n+1- by collisions were also explained by analysis of spin density distributions.

  20. Vibrational and unimolecular dissociation of mixed solvent cluster ions: Na +((CH 3) 2CO) n(CH 3OH) m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinheimer, Corey J.; Lisy, James M.

    1998-12-01

    The competitive solvation of the sodium ion by acetone and methanol has been investigated by vibrational spectroscopy of the C-O and O-H stretching modes of methanol and by unimolecular dissociation of mass-selected cluster ions using a tandem mass spectrometer. The onset of hydrogen bonding was detected by substantial shifts in the C-O (+12 to +16 cm -1) and O-H (-200 cm -1) stretches, as well as by significant increases in the intensity and width of the O-H bands. These onsets were observed when a total of five molecules were present about the ion. The unimolecular dissociation rates of metastable ion clusters of composition Na +((CH 3) 2CO) 1-9 and Na +((CH 3) 2CO) 1-8(CH 3OH) 1 were also measured using the same experimental apparatus. A significant increase in rate was observed when seven or more acetone molecules were present, suggesting a solvent shell size of six.

  1. Improved mass resolution and mass accuracy in TOF-SIMS spectra and images using argon gas cluster ion beams.

    PubMed

    Shon, Hyun Kyong; Yoon, Sohee; Moon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Tae Geol

    2016-06-09

    The popularity of argon gas cluster ion beams (Ar-GCIB) as primary ion beams in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has increased because the molecular ions of large organic- and biomolecules can be detected with less damage to the sample surfaces. However, Ar-GCIB is limited by poor mass resolution as well as poor mass accuracy. The inferior quality of the mass resolution in a TOF-SIMS spectrum obtained by using Ar-GCIB compared to the one obtained by a bismuth liquid metal cluster ion beam and others makes it difficult to identify unknown peaks because of the mass interference from the neighboring peaks. However, in this study, the authors demonstrate improved mass resolution in TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB through the delayed extraction of secondary ions, a method typically used in TOF mass spectrometry to increase mass resolution. As for poor mass accuracy, although mass calibration using internal peaks with low mass such as hydrogen and carbon is a common approach in TOF-SIMS, it is unsuited to the present study because of the disappearance of the low-mass peaks in the delayed extraction mode. To resolve this issue, external mass calibration, another regularly used method in TOF-MS, was adapted to enhance mass accuracy in the spectrum and image generated by TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB in the delayed extraction mode. By producing spectra analyses of a peptide mixture and bovine serum albumin protein digested with trypsin, along with image analyses of rat brain samples, the authors demonstrate for the first time the enhancement of mass resolution and mass accuracy for the purpose of analyzing large biomolecules in TOF-SIMS using Ar-GCIB through the use of delayed extraction and external mass calibration.

  2. Examining the Critical Roles of Protons in Facilitating Oxidation of Chloride Ions by Permanganates: A Cluster Model Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Sun, Zhenrong; Wang, Xue B.

    2015-06-18

    The oxidation power of permanganates (MnO4–) is known to be strongly dependent on pH values, and is greatly enhanced in acidic solutions, in which, for example, MnO4– can even oxidize Cl– ions to produce Cl2 molecules. Although such dependence has been ascribed due to the different reduced states of Mn affordable in different pH media, a molecular level understanding and characterization of initial redox pair complexes available in different pH solutions is very limited. Herein, we report a comparative study of [MnO4]– and [MnO4•Sol]– (Sol = H2O, KCl, and HCl) anion clusters by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy (NIPES) and theoretical computations to probe chemical bonding and electronic structures of [MnO4•Sol]– clusters, aimed to obtain a microscopic understanding of how MnO4– interacts with surrounding molecules. Our study shows that H2O behaves as a solvent molecule, KCl is a spectator bound by pure electrostatic interactions, both of which do not influence the MnO4– identity in their respective clusters. In contrast, in [MnO4•HCl]–, the proton is found to interact with both MnO4– and Cl– with appreciable covalent characters, and the frontier MOs of the cluster are comprised of contributions from both MnO4– and Cl– moieties. Therefore the proton serves as a chemical bridge, bringing two negatively charged redox species together to form an intimate redox pair. By adding more H+ to MnO4–, the oxygen atom can be taken away in the form of a water molecule, leaving MnO4– as an electron deficient MnO3+ species, which can subsequently oxidize Cl– ions.

  3. Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-11-29

    The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state

  4. Sampling Depths, Depth Shifts, and Depth Resolutions for Bi(n)(+) Ion Analysis in Argon Gas Cluster Depth Profiles.

    PubMed

    Havelund, R; Seah, M P; Gilmore, I S

    2016-03-10

    Gas cluster sputter depth profiling is increasingly used for the spatially resolved chemical analysis and imaging of organic materials. Here, a study is reported of the sampling depth in secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. It is shown that effects of the sampling depth leads to apparent shifts in depth profiles of Irganox 3114 delta layers in Irganox 1010 sputtered, in the dual beam mode, using 5 keV Ar₂₀₀₀⁺ ions and analyzed with Bi(q+), Bi₃(q+) and Bi₅(q+) ions (q = 1 or 2) with energies between 13 and 50 keV. The profiles show sharp delta layers, broadened from their intrinsic 1 nm thickness to full widths at half-maxima (fwhm's) of 8-12 nm. For different secondary ions, the centroids of the measured delta layers are shifted deeper or shallower by up to 3 nm from the position measured for the large, 564.36 Da (C₃₃H₄₆N₃O₅⁻) characteristic ion for Irganox 3114 used to define a reference position. The shifts are linear with the Bi(n)(q+) beam energy and are greatest for Bi₃(q+), slightly less for Bi₅(q+) with its wider or less deep craters, and significantly less for Bi(q+) where the sputtering yield is very low and the primary ion penetrates more deeply. The shifts increase the fwhm’s of the delta layers in a manner consistent with a linearly falling generation and escape depth distribution function (GEDDF) for the emitted secondary ions, relevant for a paraboloid shaped crater. The total depth of this GEDDF is 3.7 times the delta layer shifts. The greatest effect is for the peaks with the greatest shifts, i.e. Bi₃(q+) at the highest energy, and for the smaller fragments. It is recommended that low energies be used for the analysis beam and that carefully selected, large, secondary ion fragments are used for measuring depth distributions, or that the analysis be made in the single beam mode using the sputtering Ar cluster ions also for analysis. PMID:26883085

  5. Cluster-continuum quasichemical theory calculation of the lithium ion solvation in water, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide: an absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nathalia F; Pliego, Josefredo R

    2015-10-28

    Absolute single-ion solvation free energy is a very useful property for understanding solution phase chemistry. The real solvation free energy of an ion depends on its interaction with the solvent molecules and on the net potential inside the solute cavity. The tetraphenyl arsonium-tetraphenyl borate (TATB) assumption as well as the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory (CC-QCT) approach for Li(+) solvation allows access to a solvation scale excluding the net potential. We have determined this free energy scale investigating the solvation of the lithium ion in water (H2O), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvents via the CC-QCT approach. Our calculations at the MP2 and MP4 levels with basis sets up to the QZVPP+diff quality, and including solvation of the clusters and solvent molecules by the dielectric continuum SMD method, predict the solvation free energy of Li(+) as -116.1, -120.6 and -123.6 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively (1 mol L(-1) standard state). These values are compatible with the solvation free energy of the proton of -253.4, -253.2 and -261.1 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively. Deviations from the experimental TATB scale are only 1.3 kcal mol(-1) in H2O and 1.8 kcal mol(-1) in DMSO solvents. However, in the case of CH3CN, the deviation reaches a value of 9.2 kcal mol(-1). The present study suggests that the experimental TATB scale is inconsistent for CH3CN. A total of 125 values of the solvation free energy of ions in these three solvents were obtained. These new data should be useful for the development of theoretical solvation models.

  6. Poly L-lysine (PLL)-mediated porous hematite clusters as anode materials for improved Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kun-Woo; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2015-09-01

    Porous hematite clusters were prepared as anode materials for improved Li-ion batteries. First, poly-L-lysine (PLL)-linked Fe3O4 was facilely prepared via cross-linking between the positive amine groups of PLL and carboxylate-bound Fe3O4. The subsequent calcination transformed the PLL-linked Fe3O4 into porous hematite clusters (Fe2O3@PLL) consisting of spherical α-Fe2O3 particles. Compared with standard Fe2O3, Fe3O4@PLL exhibited improved electrochemical performance as anode materials. The discharge capacity of Fe2O3@PLL was retained at 814.7 mAh g-1 after 30 cycles, which is equivalent to 80.4% of the second discharge capacity, whereas standard Fe2O3 exhibited a retention capacity of 352.3 mAh g-1. The improved electrochemical performance of Fe2O3@PLL was mainly attributed to the porous hematite clusters with mesoporosity (20-40 nm), which was beneficial for facilitating ion transport, suggesting a useful guideline for the design of porous architectures with higher retention capacity. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. IR photodissociation spectroscopy of (OCS){sub n}{sup +} and (OCS){sub n}{sup −} cluster ions: Similarity and dissimilarity in the structure of CO{sub 2}, OCS, and CS{sub 2} cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya Ebata, Takayuki

    2015-06-07

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of (OCS){sub n}{sup +} and (OCS){sub n}{sup −} (n = 2–6) cluster ions are measured in the 1000–2300 cm{sup −1} region; these clusters show strong CO stretching vibrations in this region. For (OCS){sub 2}{sup +} and (OCS){sub 2}{sup −}, we utilize the messenger technique by attaching an Ar atom to measure their IR spectra. The IRPD spectrum of (OCS){sub 2}{sup +}Ar shows two bands at 2095 and 2120 cm{sup −1}. On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, these bands are assigned to a C{sub 2} isomer of (OCS){sub 2}{sup +}, in which an intermolecular semi-covalent bond is formed between the sulfur ends of the two OCS components by the charge resonance interaction, and the positive charge is delocalized over the dimer. The (OCS){sub n}{sup +} (n = 3–6) cluster ions show a few bands assignable to “solvent” OCS molecules in the 2000–2080 cm{sup −1} region, in addition to the bands due to the (OCS){sub 2}{sup +} ion core at ∼2090 and ∼2120 cm{sup −1}, suggesting that the dimer ion core is kept in (OCS){sub 3–6}{sup +}. For the (OCS){sub n}{sup −} cluster anions, the IRPD spectra indicate the coexistence of a few isomers with an OCS{sup −} or (OCS){sub 2}{sup −} anion core over the cluster range of n = 2–6. The (OCS){sub 2}{sup −}Ar anion displays two strong bands at 1674 and 1994 cm{sup −1}. These bands can be assigned to a C{sub s} isomer with an OCS{sup −} anion core. For the n = 2–4 anions, this OCS{sup −} anion core form is dominant. In addition to the bands of the OCS{sup −} core isomer, we found another band at ∼1740 cm{sup −1}, which can be assigned to isomers having an (OCS){sub 2}{sup −} ion core; this dimer core has C{sub 2} symmetry and {sup 2}A electronic state. The IRPD spectra of the n = 3–6 anions show two IR bands at ∼1660 and ∼2020 cm{sup −1}. The intensity of the latter component relative to that of the former one becomes stronger and stronger with

  8. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  9. Monodisperse Au11 Clusters Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Wang, Chong M.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2011-11-01

    Preparation of clean monodisperse samples of clusters and nanoparticles for characterization using cutting-edge analytical techniques is essential to understanding their size-dependent properties. Herein, we report a general method for the preparation of high surface coverage samples of monodisperse clusters containing an exact number of atoms. Polydisperse solutions of diphosphine-capped gold clusters were produced by reduction synthesis. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas phase where they were filtered by mass-tocharge ratio allowing clusters of a selected size to be deposited onto carbon coated copper grids at well controlled kinetic energies. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis of the soft landed clusters confirms their monodispersity and high coverage on the substrate. The soft landing approach may be extended to other materials compatible with an array of available ionization techniques and, therefore, has widespread utility as a means for controlled preparation of monodisperse samples of nanoparticles and clusters for analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  10. Entropic clocks in the service of electrical signaling: 'Ball and chain' mechanisms for ion channel inactivation and clustering.

    PubMed

    Zandany, Nitzan; Lewin, Limor; Nirenberg, Valerie; Orr, Irit; Yifrach, Ofer

    2015-09-14

    Electrical signaling in the nervous system relies on action potential generation, propagation and transmission. Such processes are dynamic in nature and rely on precisely timed events associated with voltage-dependent ion channel conformational transitions between their primary open, closed and inactivated states and clustering at unique membrane sites. In voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels, fast inactivation and clustering processes rely on entropic clock chains as described by 'ball and chain' mechanisms, suggesting important roles for such chains in electrical signaling. Here, we consider evidence supporting the proposed 'ball and chain' mechanisms for Kv channel fast inactivation and clustering associated with intrinsically disordered N- and C-terminal regions of the protein, respectively. Based on this comparison, we delineate the requirements that argue for such a process and establish the thermodynamic signature of a 'ball and chain' mechanism. Finally, we demonstrate how 'chain'-level alternative splicing of the Kv channel gene modulates the entropic clock-based 'ball and chain' inactivation and clustering channel functions underlying changes in electrical signaling. As such, the Kv channel model system exemplifies how linkage between alternative splicing and intrinsic disorder enables functional diversity.

  11. Coulomb frustration of the multiphoton ionization of metallic clusters under intense EUV FEL evidenced by ion spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, T.; Devetta, M.; Milani, P.; Motomura, K.; Liu, X.-J.; Fukuzawa, H.; Yamada, A.; Okunishi, M.; Nagaya, K.; Iwayama, H.; Sugishima, A.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Saito, N.; Coreno, M.; Fennel, Th; Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Togashi, T.; Kimura, H.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.; Piseri, P.

    2015-12-01

    Free electron laser light sources delivering high intensity pulses of short wavelength radiation are opening novel possibilities for the investigation of matter at the nanoscale and for the discovery and understanding of new physical processes occurring at the exotic transient states they make accessible. Strong ionization of atomic constituents of a nano-sized sample is a representative example of such processes and the understanding of ionization dynamics is crucial for a realistic description of the experiments. We report here on multiple ionization experiments on free clusters of titanium, a high cohesive energy metal. The time of flight ion spectra reveal a saturation of the cluster ionization at ∼1016 photons per pulse per cm2. Our results also show a clear lack of any explosion process, opposite to what is observed for a rare-gas cluster under similar conditions. A simple and generalized multi-step ionization model including Coulomb frustration of the photoemission process effectively reproduces with a good agreement the main features of the experimental observation and points to an interpretation of the data involving a substantial energy deposition into the cluster through electronic system heating upon scattering events within photoemission.

  12. In situ encapsulation of germanium clusters in carbon nanofibers: high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Xiao, Ying; Wang, Xia; Liu, Bing; Cao, Minhua

    2014-10-01

    Alloyed anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) usually suffer from considerable capacity losses during charge-discharge process. Herein, in situ-grown germanium clusters are homogeneously encapsulated into porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) to form Ge/N-CNFs hybrids, using a facile electrospinning method followed by thermal treatment. When used as anode in LIBs, the Ge/N-CNFs hybrids exhibit excellent lithium storage performance in terms of specific capacity, cycling stability, and rate capability. The excellent electrochemical properties can be attributed to the unique structural features: the distribution of the germanium clusters, porous carbon nanofibers, and GeN chemical bonds all contribute to alleviating the large volume changes of germanium during the discharge-charge process, while at same time the unique porous N-CNFs not only increase the contact area between the electrode and the electrolyte, but also the conductivity of the hybrid.

  13. Nitriles as directionally tolerant hydrogen bond acceptors: IR-UV ion depletion spectroscopy of benzenepropanenitrile and its hydrate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Patrick A.; Lobo, Isabella A.; Wilson, David J. D.; Robertson, Evan G.

    2016-09-01

    Benzenepropanenitrile (BPN) and its hydrate clusters are studied by R2PI and IR-UV ion-depletion spectroscopy in the CH/OH stretch regions, aided by theoretical calculations. A single water molecule binds to the terminal nitrile 'lone-pair' of the anti-BPN host, but there is also evidence for a side-type structure with OH donating to the nitrile π-electrons. In the gauche-BPN cluster, water is located at an intermediate angle that facilitates O⋯HC(ortho) interaction. A wide range of attachment angles is possible, as the intrinsic preference for linear hydrogen bonding is mediated by additional CH⋯O interactions that depend on molecular geometry near the nitrile group.

  14. Electron-ion plasma dynamics in the presence of highly charged dust-clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Djebli, Mourad Benkhelifa, El-Amine

    2015-05-15

    Electron-ion plasma expansion is studied in the presence of positively (negatively) highly charged uniformly distributed dust particles, considered as impurities. For that purpose, a multi-fluid model is used, where the charged impurities characteristics are included in Poisson's equation. We found that ion acceleration is enhanced by the presence of positively charged dust. The latter leads to spiky structures in the ion front which have a higher amplitude as the charge increases. The charged impurities have a significant effect when the combination of their charge and density is greater than a critical value which depends on ion to electron temperature ratio.

  15. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization--Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Progress report, February 1, 1990--January 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1990-09-01

    Carbon clusters of the form C{sub N}{sup {minus}} are observed at least out to N = 30 confirming that cluster formation is occurring in the high pressure ``waiting room`` of the supersonic cluster source. This can be stated unequivocally, since only up to N = 13 is observed by direct laser desorption of a carbon target in the absence of supersonic expansion. Currently underway is a systematic investigation of a wide variety of M{sup +}-C{sub n}H{sub 2n} species with n = 2--10 and M = first and second row transition metal ions. In addition we will shortly apply this methodology to doubly charged ions and metal cluster ions. All indications are that this area will be highly productive.

  16. On the origin of the energetic ion events measured upstream the Earth's bow shock by STEREO, Cluster and Geotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Elena; Bucik, Radoslav; Haaland, Stein E.; Klecker, Berndt; Keika, Kunihiro; Desai, Mihir; Daly, Patrick; Yamauchi, M.; Gomez-Herrero, Raul; Lui, Anthony

    The observations of upstream events up to distance of 3800 RE from Earth's bow shock were reported during the declining phase of the solar cycle in 2007. These upstream events mainly occurred after corotating interaction region (CIR) passed the Earth's magnetosphere. We study the relation between the upstream events observed from about 70 to 1750 RE away from the Earth and observations in the vicinity of the terrestrial bow shock (up to 30 RE). For this purpose, simultaneous measurements of energetic ions from STEREO-A, STEREO-B (far upstream region), and from Cluster and Geotail (near the bow shock) are used. In almost all cases the energetic ions far upstream are associated with the upstream events near the bow shock. The latter often coincide with sunward directed electron bursts, increased AE index (¿200 nT), intermittent sunward ion flows and the presence of the O+ ions, all of which imply a magnetospheric origin. We investigate possible mechanisms of CIR -magnetosphere interactions triggering acceleration and / or release of energetic particles.

  17. Application of relativistic coupled cluster linear response theory to helium-like ions embedded in plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Madhulita; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sinha Mahapatra, Uttam; Mukherjee, P. K.

    2011-08-01

    Ionization potential and low lying 1S0\\longrightarrow1P1 excitation energies (EE) of highly stripped He-like ions C4 +, Al11 +, and Ar16 + embedded in plasma environment are calculated for the first time using the state-of-the-art coupled cluster (CC)-based linear response theory (LRT) with the four-component relativistic spinors and compared with available experimental data from laser plasma experiments. Debye's screening model is used to estimate the effect of plasma on the ions within the relativistic and non-relativistic framework. The transition energies computed at the CCLRT level using the Debye model agree well with experiment and with other available theoretical data. To our knowledge, no prior CCLRT calculations within the Dirac-Fock framework are available for these systems. Our calculated transition energies for helium-like ions are in accord with experiment; we trust that our predicted EE might be acceptably good for the systems considered. Our preliminary result indicates that CCLRT with the four-component relativistic spinors appears to be a valuable tool for studying the atomic systems where accurate treatments of correlation effects play a crucial role in shaping the spectral lines of ions subjected to plasma environment.

  18. A photoionization investigation of small, homochiral clusters of glycidol using circularly polarized radiation and velocity map electron-ion coincidence imaging.

    PubMed

    Powis, Ivan; Daly, Steven; Tia, Maurice; de Miranda, Barbara Cunha; Garcia, Gustavo A; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-01-14

    A detailed study of the valence photoionization of small homochiral glycidol (C3O2H6) clusters is carried out with the help of circularly-polarized VUV synchrotron radiation by recording photoionization-based spectroscopic data detected by velocity map electron imaging with coincidence ion selection. We show that information on the stability of cationic as well as neutral chiral clusters can be obtained with enhanced sensitivity by examining the chiral fingerprint encapsulated in Photoelectron Circular Dichroism (PECD) spectra. In particular, by varying the clustering conditions we demonstrate that the PECD signal effectively carries the signature of the neutral precursor species, prior to any fragmentation of the ion, as may be inferred from the below-threshold monomer measurements (including ion imaging). Here the monomer's direct ionization channel is closed and the monomer ion hence must result exclusively as a fragment from dissociative ionization of the dimer (or higher) clusters. At higher photon energies, the mass-selection on the electron spectroscopy data, achieved through filtering the electron images in coincidence with selected ion masses, evidently succeeds in providing a degree of size-selection on the neutral clusters being ionized with, in particular, a clear differentiation of monomer and dimer PECD, showing the strong sensitivity of this chiroptical effect to the non-local long-range molecular potential.

  19. The effect of acid–base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; et al

    2016-05-20

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted formore » in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. Furthermore, we bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.« less

  20. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-20

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  1. The effect of acid–base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    PubMed Central

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  2. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  3. Spatial-temporal characteristics of ion acceleration sites in the Current Sheet of the Earth's magnetotail. Multipoint Cluster observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, E. E.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    The processes of non-adiabatic ion acceleration occurring in the vicinity of magnetic X-line produce highly accelerated up to 2500km s field-aligned ion beams beamlets with transient appearance streaming earthward in the PSBL of magnetotail Previous studies of these phenomena based on the data from one-spacecraft missions supported a view on beamlets as of temporal transients since the typical time of beamlet observation at a given spacecraft was 1-2min Now multipoint Cluster observations brought new understanding of these phenomena as having a rather spatial than temporal structure Comparison of data from different Cluster spacecraft allows to evaluate the duration of beamlets to be at least 5-15 min and confirms their well-defined localization along Y Z directions i e across the lobe magnetic field Earlier results reporting shorter duration of beamlet observations could be understood by the invoking of an additional effect revealed by Cluster earthward propagation of kink-like perturbations along the beamlet filaments Phase velocity of these perturbations is of the order of the local Alfven velocity V 600-1000km s and related fast flappings of localized beamlet structures in Y-Z direction significantly decreases the time of their observation at a given spacecraft Such Alfvenic-type disturbances may be caused by classical fire-hose instability which develops at the moment of beamlet ejection from the CS to the lobe region of the distant magnetotail where the lobe magnetic field is not too large and the conditions for a such pressure anisotropy

  4. Diffusion Coefficient Values Obtained at Individual Diffuse Ion Events Based on Cluster Observations: What Do We Know About the Physical Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Arpad; Scholer, Manfred; Klecker, Berndt; Lucek, Elisabeth; Reme, Henry

    2010-05-01

    We present simultaneous multipoint observations of diffuse ions in front of the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. For the analysis we use data provided by the Cluster CIS-HIA particle instrument and data from FGM magnetic field instrument. Several individual diffuse ion events during various solar wind conditions are presented and analysed. The diffusion coefficients at each analysed upstream ion event present unique characteristics especially at lower diffuse ion energies (around 10 keV). We analyse in detail the reasons for the observed differences in the value of the diffusion coefficient; results are also compared with predictions of the theory and the reason for the eventual difference is explained.

  5. Clustered Conserved Cysteines in Hyaluronan Synthase Mediate Cooperative Activation by Mg(2+) Ions and Severe Inhibitory Effects of Divalent Cations.

    PubMed

    Tlapak-Simmons, Valarie L; Medina, Andria P; Baggenstoss, Bruce A; Nguyen, Long; Baron, Christina A; Weigel, Paul H

    2011-11-15

    Hyaluronan synthase (HAS) uses UDP-GlcUA and UDP-GlcNAc to make hyaluronan (HA). Streptococcus equisimilis HAS (SeHAS) contains four conserved cysteines clustered near the membrane, and requires phospholipids and Mg(2+) for activity. Activity of membrane-bound or purified enzyme displayed a sigmoidal saturation profile for Mg(2+) with a Hill coefficient of 2. To assess if Cys residues are important for cooperativity we examined the Mg(2+) dependence of mutants with various combinations of Cys-to-Ala mutations. All Cys-mutants lost the cooperative response to Mg(2+). In the presence of Mg(2+), other divalent cations inhibited SeHAS with different potencies (Cu(2+)~Zn(2+) >Co(2+) >Ni(2+) >Mn(2+) >Ba(2+) Sr(2+) Ca(2+)). Some divalent metal ions likely inhibit by displacement of Mg(2+)-UDP-Sugar complexes (e.g. Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) had apparent Ki values of 2-5 mM). In contrast, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) inhibited more potently (apparent Ki ≤ 0.2 mM). Inhibition of Cys-null SeHAS by Cu(2+), but not Zn(2+), was greatly attenuated compared to wildtype. Double and triple Cys-mutants showed differing sensitivities to Zn(2+) or Cu(2+). Wildtype SeHAS allowed to make HA prior to exposure to Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) was protected from inhibition, indicating that access of metal ions to sensitive functional groups was hindered in processively acting HA•HAS complexes. We conclude that clustered Cys residues mediate cooperative interactions with Mg(2+) and that transition metal ions inhibit SeHAS very potently by interacting with one or more of these -SH groups.

  6. Dual beam organic depth profiling using large argon cluster ion beams

    PubMed Central

    Holzweber, M; Shard, AG; Jungnickel, H; Luch, A; Unger, WES

    2014-01-01

    Argon cluster sputtering of an organic multilayer reference material consisting of two organic components, 4,4′-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl- amino]-biphenyl (NPB) and aluminium tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate) (Alq3), materials commonly used in organic light-emitting diodes industry, was carried out using time-of-flight SIMS in dual beam mode. The sample used in this study consists of a ∽400-nm-thick NPB matrix with 3-nm marker layers of Alq3 at depth of ∽50, 100, 200 and 300 nm. Argon cluster sputtering provides a constant sputter yield throughout the depth profiles, and the sputter yield volumes and depth resolution are presented for Ar-cluster sizes of 630, 820, 1000, 1250 and 1660 atoms at a kinetic energy of 2.5 keV. The effect of cluster size in this material and over this range is shown to be negligible. © 2014 The Authors. Surface and Interface Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25892830

  7. Structural analysis of the outermost hair surface using TOF-SIMS with gas cluster ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Lshikawa, Kazutaka; Okamoto, Masayuki; Aoyagi, Satoka

    2016-06-28

    A hair cuticle, which consists of flat overlapping scales that surround the hair fiber, protects inner tissues against external stimuli. The outermost surface of the cuticle is covered with a thin membrane containing proteins and lipids called the epicuticle. In a previous study, the authors conducted a depth profile analysis of a hair cuticle's amino acid composition to characterize its multilayer structure. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with a bismuth primary ion source was used in combination with the C60 sputtering technique for the analysis. It was confirmed that the lipids and cysteine-rich layer exist on the outermost cuticle surface, which is considered to be the epicuticle, though the detailed structure of the epicuticle has not been clarified. In this study, depth profile analysis of the cuticle surface was conducted using the argon gas cluster ion beam (Ar-GCIB) sputtering technique, in order to characterize the structure of the epicuticle. The shallow depth profile of the cuticle surface was investigated using an Ar-GCIB impact energy of 5 keV. Compared to the other amino acid peaks rich in the epicuticle, the decay of 18-methyleicosanic acid (18-MEA) thiolate peak was the fastest. This result suggests that the outermost surface of the hair is rich in 18-MEA. In conclusion, our results indicate that the outermost surfaces of cuticles have a multilayer (lipid and protein layers), which is consistent with the previously proposed structure.

  8. Frequency sweep rates of rising tone electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Comparison between nonlinear theory and Cluster observation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhaoguo; Zong, Qiugang Wang, Yongfu; Liu, Siqing; Lin, Ruilin; Shi, Liqin

    2014-12-15

    Resonant pitch angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been suggested to account for the rapid loss of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons. For the rising tone EMIC wave (classified as triggered EMIC emission), its frequency sweep rate strongly affects the efficiency of pitch-angle scattering. Based on the Cluster observations, we analyze three typical cases of rising tone EMIC waves. Two cases locate at the nightside (22.3 and 22.6 magnetic local time (MLT)) equatorial region and one case locates at the duskside (18MLT) higher magnetic latitude (λ = –9.3°) region. For the three cases, the time-dependent wave amplitude, cold electron density, and cold ion density ratio are derived from satellite data; while the ambient magnetic field, thermal proton perpendicular temperature, and the wave spectral can be directly provided by observation. These parameters are input into the nonlinear wave growth model to simulate the time-frequency evolutions of the rising tones. The simulated results show good agreements with the observations of the rising tones, providing further support for the previous finding that the rising tone EMIC wave is excited through the nonlinear wave growth process.

  9. Formation and Fragmentation of Protonated Molecules after Ionization of Amino Acid and Lactic Acid Clusters by Collision with Ions in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Poully, Jean-Christophe; Vizcaino, Violaine; Schwob, Lucas; Delaunay, Rudy; Kocisek, Jaroslav; Eden, Samuel; Chesnel, Jean-Yves; Méry, Alain; Rangama, Jimmy; Adoui, Lamri; Huber, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Collisions between O(3+) ions and neutral clusters of amino acids (alanine, valine and glycine) as well as lactic acid are performed in the gas phase, in order to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on these biologically relevant molecular systems. All monomers and dimers are found to be predominantly protonated, and ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on model systems indicate that for amino acids, this is due to proton transfer within the clusters after ionization. For lactic acid, which has a lower proton affinity than amino acids, a significant non-negligible amount of the radical cation monomer is observed. New fragment-ion channels observed from clusters, as opposed to isolated molecules, are assigned to the statistical dissociation of protonated molecules formed upon ionization of the clusters. These new dissociation channels exhibit strong delayed fragmentation on the microsecond time scale, especially after multiple ionization.

  10. Experimental studies of the formation of cluster ions formed by corona discharge in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, J. O.; Hvelplund, P.; Støchkel, K.; Enghoff, M. B.; Kurten, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on studies of ion induced nucleation in a corona discharge taking place in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O at standard temperature and pressure. Positive ions such as H3O+(H2O)n, NH4+(H2O)n, and H+(H2SO4)(H2O)n and negative ions such as HSO5-(H2O)n, SO4-(H2O)n, HSO4-(H2O)n and NO3-(H2O)n have been recorded. Large values of n (> 100) were observed and the experiment indicates the existence of even larger water clusters. In contrast, only clusters with a maximum of 2 sulfuric acid molecules were observed. Fragmentation studies also revealed that the negative ion HSO5-, which has been observed in many studies, in our experiments is contaminated by O2-(HNO3)(H2O) ions, and this may also have been the case in other experiments. Finally an ion with m/z = 232 (where m is the cluster mass in amu and z the charge state), capable of attaching H2O-molecules was observed and studied by fragmentation. Positive ion m/z (mass/charge) spectrum

  11. Sputtering Yields for Mixtures of Organic Materials Using Argon Gas Cluster Ions.

    PubMed

    Seah, M P; Havelund, R; Shard, A G; Gilmore, I S

    2015-10-22

    The sputtering yield volumes of binary mixtures of Irganox 1010 with either Irganox 1098 or Fmoc-pentafluoro-L-phenylalanine (FMOC) have been measured for 5 keV Ar2000(+) ions incident at 45° to the surface normal. The sputtering yields are determined from the doses to sputter through various compositions of 100 nm thick, intimately mixed, layers. Because of matrix effects, the profiles for secondary ions are distorted, and profile shifts in depth of 15 nm are observed leading to errors above 20% in the deduced sputtering yield. Secondary ions are selected to avoid this. The sputtering yield volumes for the mixtures are shown to be lower than those deduced from a linear interpolation from the pure materials. This is shown to be consistent with a simple model involving the changing energy absorbed for the sputtering of intimate mixtures. Evidence to support this comes from the secondary ion data for pairs of the different molecules. Both binary mixtures behave similarly, but matrix effects are stronger for the Irganox 1010/FMOC system.

  12. Study of cluster anions generated by laser ablation of titanium oxides: a high resolution approach based on Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barthen, Nicolas; Millon, Eric; Aubriet, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    Laser ablation of titanium oxides at 355 nm and ion-molecule reactions between [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions and H(2)O or O(2) were investigated by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) with an external ion source. The detected anions correspond to [(TiO(2))(x)(H(2)O)(y)OH](-) and [(TiO(2))(x)(H(2)O)(y)O(2)](-•) oxy-hydroxide species with x=1 to 25 and y=1, 2, or 3 and were formed by a two step process: (1) laser ablation, which leads to the formation of [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions as was previously reported, and (2) ion-molecule reactions during ion storage. Reactions of some [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions with water and dioxygen conducted in the FTICR cell confirm this assessment. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments were also performed in sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) mode. Three fragmentation pathways were observed: (1) elimination of water molecules, (2) O(2) loss for radical anions, and (3) fission of the cluster. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to explain the experimental data.

  13. The University of Bern Ion Model: Modeling the Mixed H+(H2O)m(CH_3CN)_n Clusters in the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, E.; Kazil, J.; Arijs, E.; Livesey, N.

    2001-12-01

    Methyl cyanide (CH3CN) replaces water molecules in proton hydrates H+(H2O)n at high rates in the stratosphere. Our global 2D ion model uses the latest stratospheric UARS MLS CH3CN data together with neutral input from the NCAR SOCRATES model and computes mixed ion cluster H+(H2O)n(CH_3CN) densities. The results are compared with in situ measurements from different sources.

  14. Single-ion hydration thermodynamics from clusters to bulk solutions: Recent insights from molecular modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vlcek, Lukas; Chialvo, Ariel A.

    2016-01-03

    The importance of single-ion hydration thermodynamic properties for understanding the driving forces of aqueous electrolyte processes, along with the impossibility of their direct experimental measurement, have prompted a large number of experimental, theoretical, and computational studies aimed at separating the cation and anion contributions. Here we provide an overview of historical approaches based on extrathermodynamic assumptions and more recent computational studies of single-ion hydration in order to evaluate the approximations involved in these methods, quantify their accuracy, reliability, and limitations in the light of the latest developments. Finally, we also offer new insights into the factors that influence the accuracymore » of ion–water interaction models and our views on possible ways to fill this substantial knowledge gap in aqueous physical chemistry.« less

  15. Negative ion clusters in oxygen: collision cross sections and transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Urquijo, J.; Bekstein, A.; Ducasse, O.; Ruíz-Vargas, G.; Yousfi, M.; Benhenni, M.

    2009-12-01

    Using a pulsed Townsend experiment, we have observed the formation of two negative ion species in oxygen over the pressure range 100-600 torr, and the density-normalised electric field strength, E/N, from 2 to 14 Td. The peculiar shape of these transients has led us to propose a scheme of three-body ion-molecule reactions leading to the formation of O4 - and O6 -, which is substantiated by a curve fitting procedure. The resulting mobility data of these two ionic species have been used to calculate their respective momentum transfer collision cross sections, together with the dissociation cross sections that are needed to extend the range of calculation of mobility and diffusion (transverse and longitudinal) to 1000 Td. These calculations were based on an optimised Monte Carlo algorithm, using collision cross sections obtained from a JWKB approximation (Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) or taken from literature.

  16. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; Tomson, Neil C.; Anstey, Mitchell R.

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  17. Deposition of acrylonitrile cluster ions on solid substrates: thin film formation by intracluster polymerization products.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Sato, Naoki

    2006-03-01

    Cluster anions of acrylonitrile (AN), known to give intracluster anionic polymerization products, were deposited on solid substrates. The obtained films were examined by using infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The acquired spectroscopic data are similar to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), while the normal polymerization of AN or reactions related to PAN seemed not to occur noticeably. On the contrary, the product analysis shows that most of the constituent molecules of the films are formed via cyclohexane-1,3,5-tricarbonitrile (CHTCN), a dominant product of the intracluster polymerization of AN, accompanied by fragmentation and dimerization. PMID:16509718

  18. Formation of fragments in heavy-ion collisions using a modified clusterization method

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Supriya; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2011-04-15

    We study the formation and stability of the fragments by extending the minimum spanning tree method (MST) for clusterization. In this extension, each fragment is subjected to a binding-energy check calculated using the modified Bethe-Weizsaecker formula. Earlier, a constant binding-energy cut of 4 MeV/nucleon was imposed. Our results for {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au collisions are compared with ALADiN data and also with the calculations based on the simulated annealing technique. We shall show that the present modified version improves the agreement compared to the MST method.

  19. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion.

    PubMed

    Zarkesh, Ryan A; Ichimura, Andrew S; Monson, Todd C; Tomson, Neil C; Anstey, Mitchell R

    2016-06-14

    The redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand was used to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events. PMID:26998892

  20. Interaction of nanosecond laser pulse with tetramethyl silane (Si(CH3)4) clusters: Generation of multiply charged silicon and carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badani, Purav M.; Das, Soumitra; Mundlapati, Venkateswara Rao; Sharma, Pramod; Vatsa, Rajesh K.

    2011-12-01

    Present work reports significantly high levels of ionization, eventually leading to Coulomb explosion of Tetramethyl silane (TMS) clusters, on interaction with laser pulses of intensity ˜109 W/cm2. Tetramethyl silane clusters, prepared by supersonic expansion were photoionized at 266, 355 or 532 nm and the resultant ions were detected using time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It is observed that wavelength of irradiation and the size of the cluster are crucial parameters which drastically affect the nature of charge species generated upon photoionization of cluster. The results show that clusters absorb significantly higher energy from the laser field at longer wavelengths (532 nm) and generate multiply charged silicon and carbon ions which have large kinetic energies. Further, laser-cluster interaction at different wavelengths has been quantified and charge densities at 266, 355 and 532 nm are found to be 4x 1010, 5x 1010 and 5x 1011 charges/cm3 respectively. These unusual results have been rationalized based on dominance of secondary ionization processes at 532 nm ultimately leading to Coulomb explosion of clusters. In another set of experiments, multiply charged ions of Ar (up to +5 state) and Kr (up to +6 state) were observed when TMS doped inert gas clusters were photoionized at 532 and 355 nm. The extent of energy absorption at these two wavelengths is clearly manifested from the charge state of the atomic ions generated upon Coulomb disintegration of the doped cluster. These experiments thus demonstrate a novel method for generation of multiply charged atomic ions of inert gases at laser intensity of ˜ 109 W/cm2. The average size of the cluster exhibiting Coulomb explosion phenomena under giga watt intensity conditions has been estimated to be ˜ 6 nm. Experimental results obtained in the present work agree qualitatively with the model proposed earlier [D. Niu, H. Li, F. Liang, L. Wen, X. Luo, B. Wang, and H. Qu, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 151103(2005)] and point

  1. Coupling between whistler waves and ion-scale solitary waves: cluster measurements in the magnetotail during a substorm.

    PubMed

    Tenerani, A; Le Contel, O; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F; Robert, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Sauvaud, J A

    2012-10-12

    We present a new model of self-consistent coupling between low frequency, ion-scale coherent structures with high frequency whistler waves in order to interpret Cluster data. The idea relies on the possibility of trapping whistler waves by inhomogeneous external fields where they can be spatially confined and propagate for times much longer than their characteristic electronic time scale. Here we take the example of a slow magnetosonic soliton acting as a wave guide in analogy with the ducting properties of an inhomogeneous plasma. The soliton is characterized by a magnetic dip and density hump that traps and advects high frequency waves over many ion times. The model represents a new possible way of explaining space measurements often detecting the presence of whistler waves in correspondence to magnetic depressions and density humps. This approach, here given by means of slow solitons, but more general than that, is alternative to the standard approach of considering whistler wave packets as associated with nonpropagating magnetic holes resulting from a mirror-type instability.

  2. Friction measurements of nanometer-thick lubricant films using ultra-smooth sliding pins treated with gas cluster ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Renguo; Zhang, Hedong; Mitsuya, Yasunaga; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Itoh, Shintaro

    2013-09-01

    Friction properties of nanometer-thick lubricant films confined between two ultra-smooth solid surfaces are crucial to the practical performance of technologically advanced mechanical devices such as micro-electro-mechanical systems and hard disk drives. In this work, we applied argon gas cluster ion beam (Ar-GCIB) treatments to obtain ultra-smooth sliding pins for pin-on-disk tests of nanometer-thick perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricant films coated on magnetic disk surfaces. The GCIB treatments effectively smoothed the pin surfaces, and increases in the Ar dose decreased surface roughness. An ultra-smooth surface with a maximum peak height (Rp) less the monolayer lubricant film thickness was achieved when the Ar dose was increased to 8 × 1016 ions/cm2. We observed that both surface roughness and film thickness affected the friction coefficients of the PFPE films. To quantitatively describe the interplay of surface roughness and film thickness, we introduced two roughness characteristics: the ratio of film thickness to the surface’s root-mean-square roughness (h/σ), and a surface-pattern parameter (γ), defined as the ratio of correlation lengths in two orthogonal directions. We infer that a fixed γ and higher h/σlead to lower friction coefficients, while a fixed h/σand higher γ induce higher friction coefficients.

  3. Equation-Of Coupled-Cluster Calculations of Photodetachment Cross Sections for Atomic Negative Ions across the Periodic Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichino, Takatoshi; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F.

    2016-06-01

    The innovative application of the ion-trap technique by Wester and coworkers has yielded definitive experimental values of photodetachment cross sections for the atomic oxygen radical anion (Obullet -) [Hlavenka et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 061105 (2009)]. In the present study, equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) calculations have been performed to derive theoretical values of photodetachment cross sections for the negative ions of atoms in the first two periods of the periodic table as well as of those which belong to the alkali metal and halogen groups. Two methods have been employed to derive the cross sections. One involves the Dyson orbitals obtained from EOM-CC calculations and plane wave functions for the detached electron in the transition dipole moment integrals. The other method utilizes the moment theory following EOM-CC calculations of transition dipole moments for a large number of pseudo-states. The cross sections so evaluated for Obullet - match the experimental values very well. Generally good agreement has been found between the theoretical and experimental values of the cross sections for the atoms in the first two periods, while the present calculations cast some doubt on reported experimental values for some atoms beyond the second period. Substantial relativistic effects on the cross section have been observed for heavy elements in the alkali metal and halogen groups.

  4. ToF-SIMS and laser-SNMS analysis of Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells with silver nanoparticles using an argon cluster ion beam.

    PubMed

    Nees, Ricarda; Pelster, Andreas; Körsgen, Martin; Jungnickel, Harald; Luch, Andreas; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2015-06-15

    The use of nanoparticles is one of the fastest expanding fields in industrial as well as in medical applications, owing to their remarkable characteristics. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are among the most-commercialized nanoparticles because of their antibacterial effects. Laser postionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry in combination with argon cluster ion sputtering was used for the first time to investigate the effects of AgNPs on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cells. Depth profiles and high-resolution three dimensional (3D) images of nanoparticles and organic compounds from cells were obtained using an Ar cluster ion beam for sputtering and Bi3 (+) primary ions for the analysis. The 3D distribution of AgNPs and other organic compounds in MDCK II cells could be readily detected with very high efficiency, sensitivity, and submicron lateral resolution. The argon cluster ion beam is well suited for the sputtering of biological samples. It enables a high sample removal rate along with low molecular degradation. The outer membrane, the cytoplasm, and the nuclei of the cells could be clearly visualized using the signals PO(+) and C3H8N(+) or CN(+) and C3H8N(+). The laser-SNMS images showed unambiguously that AgNPs are incorporated by MDCK II cells and often form silver aggregates with a diameter of a few micrometers, mainly close to the outside of the cell nuclei.

  5. Fluorohydrogenate Cluster Ions in the Gas Phase: Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of the [1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium+][F(HF)2.3–] Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; James E. Delmore; Michael T. Benson; Tetsuya Tsuda; Rika Hagiwara

    2013-12-01

    Electrospray ionization of the fluorohydrogenate ionic liquid [1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium][F(HF)2.3] ionic liquid was conducted to understand the nature of the anionic species as they exist in the gas phase. Abundant fluorohydrogenate clusters were produced; however, the dominant anion in the clusters was [FHF-], and not the fluoride-bound HF dimers or trimers that are seen in solution. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that HF molecules are bound to the clusters by about 30 kcal/mol. The DFT-calculated structures of the [FHF-]-bearing clusters show that the favored interactions of the anions are with the methynic and acetylenic hydrogen atoms on the imidazolium cation, forming planar structures similar to those observed in the solid state. A second series of abundant negative ions was also formed that contained [SiF5-] together with the imidazolium cation and the fluorohydrogenate anions that originate from reaction of the spray solution with silicate surfaces.

  6. Fluorohydrogenate cluster ions in the gas phase: electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the [1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium(+)][F(HF)2.3(-)] ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Groenewold, Gary S; Delmore, James E; Benson, Michael T; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Hagiwara, Rika

    2013-12-27

    Electrospray ionization of the fluorohydrogenate ionic liquid [1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium][F(HF)2.3] ionic liquid was conducted to understand the nature of the anionic species as they exist in the gas phase. Abundant fluorohydrogenate clusters were produced; however, the dominant anion in the clusters was [FHF(-)], and not the fluoride-bound HF dimers or trimers that are seen in solution. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that HF molecules are bound to the clusters by about 30 kcal/mol. The DFT-calculated structures of the [FHF(-)]-bearing clusters show that the favored interactions of the anions are with the methynic and acetylenic hydrogen atoms on the imidazolium cation, forming planar structures similar to those observed in the solid state. A second series of abundant negative ions was also formed that contained [SiF5(-)] together with the imidazolium cation and the fluorohydrogenate anions that originate from reaction of the spray solution with silicate surfaces.

  7. Ferric ion (hydr)oxo clusters in the "Venus flytrap" cleft of FbpA: Mössbauer, calorimetric and mass spectrometric studies.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arindam; Bilton, Paul R; Mackay, Logan; Janoschka, Adam; Zhu, Haizhong; Rea, Dean; Langridge-Smith, Pat R R; Campopiano, Dominic J; Teschner, Thomas; Trautwein, Alfred X; Schünemann, Volker; Sadler, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Isothermal calorimetric studies of the binding of iron(III) citrate to ferric ion binding protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae suggested the complexation of a tetranuclear iron(III) cluster as a single step binding event (apparent binding constant K(app) (ITC) = 6.0(5) × 10(5) M(-1)). High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric data supported the binding of a tetranuclear oxo(hydroxo) iron(III) cluster of formula [Fe(4)O(2)(OH)(4)(H(2)O)(cit)](+) in the interdomain binding cleft of FbpA. The mutant H9Y-nFbpA showed a twofold increase in the apparent binding constant [K(app) (ITC) = 1.1(7) × 10(6) M(-1)] for the tetranuclear iron(III) cluster compared to the wild-type protein. Mössbauer spectra of Escherichia coli cells overexpressing FbpA and cultured in the presence of added (57)Fe citrate were indicative of the presence of dinuclear and polynuclear clusters. FbpA therefore appears to have a strong affinity for iron clusters in iron-rich environments, a property which might endow the protein with new biological functions. PMID:22349975

  8. A statistical study of magnetospheric ion composition along the geomagnetic field using the Cluster spacecraft for L values between 5.9 and 9.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, J. K.; Yeoman, T. K.; Fear, R. C.; Dandouras, I.

    2016-03-01

    Using ion density data obtained by the CODIF (ion Composition and Distribution Function analyser) instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft, for the interval spanning 2001-2005, an empirical model describing the average ion mass distribution along closed geomagnetic field lines is determined. The empirical model describes the region spanning 5.9≤L < 9.5, with dependences on L shell and magnetic local time included, and represents ions in the energy range of 0.025 to 40 keV/charge. The data reduction process involves the identification and rejection of CODIF data contaminated by penetrating energetic radiation belt particles, found to frequently occur for L < 5.9. Furthermore, a comparison of data with observations of the cold plasma population in the region provides evidence that the CODIF data set is representative of the full plasma population. The variations in average ion mass along the field lines were modeled using a power law form, which maximizes toward the magnetic equatorial plane, with observed power law index values ranging between approximately -2.0 and 0.0. The resulting model illustrates some key features of the average ion mass spatial distribution, such as an average ion mass enhancement at low L in the evening sector, indicating the transport of high-latitude heavy ion outflows to the closed inner magnetosphere.

  9. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  10. Charge flow and solvent dynamics in the photodissosiation of cluster ions: a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics study of I 2-·Ar n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faeder, J.; Delaney, N.; Maslen, P. E.; Parson, R.

    1997-05-01

    Experimental studies of photodissociation in I 2-·Ar n clusters have shown a rapid onset of caging for n > 10 and bimodal photofragment distributions in both dissociation and recombination channels. We simulate and interpret these results using a Hamiltonian that accounts for the strong perturbation of the solute electronic structure by the solvent. The high-mass products in the recombination channel are identified with excited state recombination. The two classes of dissociation products are identified with ejection of either a neutral I atom or an I - ion from the cluster, with the latter mechanism driven by the negative polarizability of the excited electronic state.

  11. Clustering of Color sources and the Equation of State in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC and LHC Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharenberg, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    The initial temperature Ti, energy density ɛi, and formation time τi of the initial state of the QGP formed in the heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies are determined using the data driven Color String Percolation Model (CSPM). Multiparticle production by interacting strings stretched between projectile and target form a spanning cluster at the percolation threshold. The relativistic kinetic theory relation for η/s is evaluated as a function of T and the mean free path (λmfp) using data and CSPM. η/s(Ti, λmfp) describes the transition from a strongly interacting QGP at T/Tc ~ 1 to a weakly coupled QGP at T/Tc >= 6. We find that the reciprocal of η/s is equal to the trace anomaly Δ = ɛ - 3P/T4 which also describes the transition. We couple this initial state of the QGP to a ID Bjorken expansion to determine the sound velocity c2s of the QGP for 0.85 <= T/Tc <= 3. The bulk thermodynamic quantities and the equation of state are in excellent agreement with LQCD results.

  12. Observational Study of Ion Diffusion Region tailward of the Cusp: Polar and Cluster Observations in 1998-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzamil, F. M.; Farrugia, C. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Argall, M. R.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetries in plasma density and the presence of a guide field significantly alter the structure of the ion diffusion region (IDR) in symmetric, collisionless reconnection. These features have been shown by numerical simulations under moderate density asymmetries (~10), and theoretical analyses. However, very few studies have addressed these issues with in-situ observations. We have compiled a collection of Cluster and Polar crossings of the high-latitude magnetopause poleward of the cusp under northward interplanetary magnetic field in the years 1998-2008 when signatures of reconnection inside the IDR are observed. They encompass a wide range of density asymmetries (~10 to 1000), magnetic field asymmetries (~0.2 to 0.9), and guide fields (~10 to ~60 %). In this dedicated observational study, we target the following topics: (1) The alteration of the structure of the IDR -- i.e., its width, the non-colocation of stagnation and X-lines, jet outflow speed, and biasing of the reconnection outflow jet toward the magnetosphere -- as a function of increasing density asymmetry, and (2) the diamagnetic drift of the X-line. Further, focusing on IDR crossings during plasma flow reversals and/or near-simultaneous crossings on either side of the X-line by two spacecraft under steady ambient conditions, we report on the contrast in the Hall fields and the plasma behavior on the sunward versus the tailward sides of the X-line in its dependence on the strength of the guide field.

  13. Investigation of defect clusters in ion-irradiated Ni and NiCo using diffuse X-ray scattering and electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olsen, Raina J.; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Beland, Laurent K.; Wang, Lumin M.; Bei, Hongbin; Specht, Eliot D.; Larson, Bennett C.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of defect clusters in Ni and Nimore » $$_{50}$$Co$$_{50}$$ (NiCo) irradiated at room temperature with 2–16 MeV Ni ions is studied using asymptotic diffuse X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analysis of the scattering data provides separate size distributions for vacancy and interstitial type defect clusters, showing that both types of defect clusters have a smaller size and higher density in NiCo than in Ni. Diffuse scattering results show good quantitative agreement with TEM results for cluster sizes greater than 4 nm diameter, but find that the majority of vacancy clusters are under 2 nm in NiCo, which, if not detected, would lead to the conclusion that defect density was actually lower in the alloy. Interstitial dislocation loops and stacking fault tetrahedra are identified by TEM. Lastly comparison of diffuse scattering lineshapes to those calculated for dislocation loops and SFTs indicates that most of the vacancy clusters are SFTs.« less

  14. Investigation of defect clusters in ion-irradiated Ni and NiCo using diffuse X-ray scattering and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Raina J.; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Beland, Laurent K.; Wang, Lumin M.; Bei, Hongbin; Specht, Eliot D.; Larson, Bennett C.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of defect clusters in Ni and Ni$_{50}$Co$_{50}$ (NiCo) irradiated at room temperature with 2–16 MeV Ni ions is studied using asymptotic diffuse X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analysis of the scattering data provides separate size distributions for vacancy and interstitial type defect clusters, showing that both types of defect clusters have a smaller size and higher density in NiCo than in Ni. Diffuse scattering results show good quantitative agreement with TEM results for cluster sizes greater than 4 nm diameter, but find that the majority of vacancy clusters are under 2 nm in NiCo, which, if not detected, would lead to the conclusion that defect density was actually lower in the alloy. Interstitial dislocation loops and stacking fault tetrahedra are identified by TEM. Lastly comparison of diffuse scattering lineshapes to those calculated for dislocation loops and SFTs indicates that most of the vacancy clusters are SFTs.

  15. Long-term observations of cluster ion concentration, sources and sinks in clear sky conditions at the high-altitude site of the Puy de Dôme, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C.; Boulon, J.; Hervo, M.; Holmgren, H.; Asmi, E.; Ramonet, M.; Laj, P.; Sellegri, K.

    2013-11-01

    Cluster particles (0.8-1.9 nm) are key entities involved in nucleation and new particle formation processes in the atmosphere. Cluster ions were characterized in clear sky conditions at the Puy de Dôme station (1465 m a.s.l.). The studied data set spread over five years (February 2007-February 2012), which provided a unique chance to observe seasonal variations of cluster ion properties at high altitude. Statistical values of the cluster ion concentrations and diameters are reported for both positive and negative polarities. Cluster ions were found to be ubiquitous at the Puy de Dôme and displayed an annual variation with lower concentrations in spring. Positive cluster ions were less numerous than negative, but were larger in diameter. Negative cluster ion properties were not sensitive to the occurrence of a new particle formation (NPF) event, while positive cluster ions appeared to be significantly more numerous and larger on event days. The parameters of the balance equation for the positive cluster concentration are reported separately for the different seasons and for the NPF event days and non-event days. The steady-state assumption suggests that the ionization rate is balanced with two sinks: the ion recombination and the attachment onto background aerosol particles, referred to as "aerosol ion sink". The aerosol ion sink was predominant compared to the recombination sink. The positive ionization rates derived from the balance equation (Qcalc) were well correlated with the ionization rates obtained from radon measurement (Qmeas). When ignoring the gamma radiation contribution to the ion production, Qcalc is on average higher than Qmeas during the warm season. In contrast, when a seasonal gamma contribution is taken into account, Qmeas always exceeds Qcalc. We found that neither the aerosol ion sink nor the ionization rate (calculated or measured, with or without the gamma contribution) were significantly different on event days compared to non-event days

  16. Low energy (0-4 eV) electron impact to N(2)O clusters: Dissociative electron attachment, ion-molecule reactions, and vibrational Feshbach resonances.

    PubMed

    Vizcaino, Violaine; Denifl, Stephan; Märk, Tilmann D; Illenberger, Eugen; Scheier, Paul

    2010-10-21

    Electron attachment to clusters of N(2)O in the energy range of 0-4 eV yields the ionic complexes [(N(2)O)(n)O](-), [(N(2)O)(n)NO](-), and (N(2)O)(n) (-) . The shape of the ion yields of the three homologous series differs substantially reflecting the different formation mechanisms. While the generation of [(N(2)O)(n)O](-) can be assigned to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) of an individual N(2)O molecule in the target cluster, the formation of [(N(2)O)(n)NO](-) is interpreted via a sequence of ion molecule reactions involving the formation of O(-) via DEA in the first step. The nondecomposed complexes (N(2)O)(n) (-) are preferentially formed at very low energies (below 0.5 eV) as a result of intramolecular stabilization of a diffuse molecular anion at low energy. The ion yields of [(N(2)O)(n)O](-) and (N(2)O)(n) (-) versus electron energy show sharp peaks at the threshold region, which can be assigned to vibrational Feshbach resonances mediated by the diffuse anion state as already observed in an ultrahigh resolution electron attachment study of N(2)O clusters [E. Leber, S. Barsotti, J. Bömmels, J. M. Weber, I. I. Fabrikant, M.-W. Ruf, and H. Hotop, Chem. Phys. Lett. 325, 345 (2000)]. PMID:20969408

  17. Ion-Stockmayer clusters: Minima, classical thermodynamics, and variational ground state estimates of Li+(CH3NO2)n (n = 1-20)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curotto, E.

    2015-12-01

    Structural optimizations, classical NVT ensemble, and variational Monte Carlo simulations of ion Stockmayer clusters parameterized to approximate the Li+(CH3NO2)n (n = 1-20) systems are performed. The Metropolis algorithm enhanced by the parallel tempering strategy is used to measure internal energies and heat capacities, and a parallel version of the genetic algorithm is employed to obtain the most important minima. The first solvation sheath is octahedral and this feature remains the dominant theme in the structure of clusters with n ≥ 6. The first "magic number" is identified using the adiabatic solvent dissociation energy, and it marks the completion of the second solvation layer for the lithium ion-nitromethane clusters. It corresponds to the n = 18 system, a solvated ion with the first sheath having octahedral symmetry, weakly bound to an eight-membered and a four-membered ring crowning a vertex of the octahedron. Variational Monte Carlo estimates of the adiabatic solvent dissociation energy reveal that quantum effects further enhance the stability of the n = 18 system relative to its neighbors.

  18. Monitoring Cluster Ions Derived from Aptamer-Modified Gold Nanofilms under Laser Desorption/Ionization for the Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Jane; Ling, Tsung-Kai; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Lin, Han-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2015-04-29

    In this paper, we describe the use of pulsed laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) for the detection of tumor cells through the analysis of gold cluster ions [Aun](+) from aptamer-modified gold nanofilms (Au NFs). We observed not only the transformation of the Au NFs into gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) but also the formation of gaseous gold cluster ions ([Au(n)](+); n = 1-5) under irradiation with a nanosecond pulsed laser. The size and density of the formed Au NPs and the abundance of [Au(n)](+) ions were both highly dependent on the thickness of the Au NFs (10-100 nm). Thin Au NFs tended to form highly dense Au NPs on the substrate and favored the desorption and ionization of gold cluster ions. The signal intensities of the [Au(n)](+) species, monitoring using mass spectrometry, decreased upon increasing the thickness of the Au NF from 10 to 100 nm and after modification with thiolated DNA. Furthermore, we found that Au NFs modified with mucin1-binding aptamer (AptMUC1-Au NFs) could selectively enrich MCF-7 cells (human breast adenocarcinoma cell line) in blood samples; coupled with LDI-MS analysis of the [Au(n)](+) ions, we could detect MCF-7 cells selectively in blood samples at abundances as low as 10 cells. This approach offers the advantages of high sensitivity, selectivity, and throughput for the detection of circulating tumor cells, and has great potential for use as a powerful analytical platform for clinical diagnoses of tumor metastasis.

  19. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko

    2013-09-28

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  20. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko

    2013-09-01

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  1. Rapid flame synthesis of internal Mo6+ doped TiO2 nanocrystals in situ decorated with highly dispersed MoO3 clusters for lithium ion storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Hu, Yanjie; Shen, Jianhua; Jiang, Haibo; Min, Guoquan; Qiu, Shengjie; Song, Zhitang; Sun, Zhuo; Li, Chunzhong

    2015-11-01

    The rational design of nanoheterostructured materials has attracted much attention because of its importance for developing highly efficient LIBs. Herein, we have demonstrated that internal Mo6+ doped TiO2 nanocrystals in situ decorated with highly dispersed MoO3 clusters have been realized by a facile and rapid flame spray pyrolysis route for electrochemical energy storage. In such intriguing nanostructures, internal Mo6+ doping can improve the conductivity of electrode materials and facilitate rapid Li+ intercalation and ion transport and the heteroassembly of highly dispersed ultrafine MoO3 clusters with excellent electrochemical activity endows the TiO2 with extra Li+ ion storage ability as well as incorporates Mo6+. Thus, the as-prepared nanohybrid electrodes exhibit a high specific capacity and superior rate capability due to the maximum synergetic effect of TiO2, Mo6+ and ultrafine MoO3 clusters. Moreover, the aerosol flame process with a unique temperature gradient opens a new strategy to design novel hybrid materials by the simultaneous doping and heteroassembly engineering for next-generation LIBs.The rational design of nanoheterostructured materials has attracted much attention because of its importance for developing highly efficient LIBs. Herein, we have demonstrated that internal Mo6+ doped TiO2 nanocrystals in situ decorated with highly dispersed MoO3 clusters have been realized by a facile and rapid flame spray pyrolysis route for electrochemical energy storage. In such intriguing nanostructures, internal Mo6+ doping can improve the conductivity of electrode materials and facilitate rapid Li+ intercalation and ion transport and the heteroassembly of highly dispersed ultrafine MoO3 clusters with excellent electrochemical activity endows the TiO2 with extra Li+ ion storage ability as well as incorporates Mo6+. Thus, the as-prepared nanohybrid electrodes exhibit a high specific capacity and superior rate capability due to the maximum synergetic effect

  2. Effects of low concentrations of O2 and CO on the ion-clustering reactions in the lower ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieck, L. W.; Gorden, R., Jr.; Ausloos, P.

    1973-01-01

    It is demonstrated that under conditions which approximate those of the Martian ionosphere traces of CO and O2 can be effectively incorporated in ion clusters via ion-molecule reaction schemes initiated by the CO2(+) ion. For example, when 0.3% CO is added to CO2, (CO)2(+), and /(CO)2CO2/(+) appear as the major cations (584 A radiation, 300 K). In mixtures containing O2 in addition to CO, (CO2,O2+) and /(CO2)2O2/(+) are important species. A recently proposed mechanism to account for the low abundance of CO and O2 in the Martian atmosphere is discussed in the light of these observations.

  3. Studies on the Application of High Voltage Discharge Ionization and Ablation in Supersonic-Jets for the Generation of Intense Cluster Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Ansgar

    Glow discharge and pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in supersonic expansions were investigated for the production of intense beams of molecular cluster ions from seeded and ablated compounds. A low cost high voltage high current pulser based on a triggered spark gap switch is described as a mean for ionization and ablation. Besides, details of the molecular beam apparatus and modified pulsed valve are given. Cluster cations rm (Ar)_ {n}^+, rm (CO_2) _{n}^{+}, rm (C_6H_6)_{n}^+ and rm (H_2O)_{n }^+ were produced by pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in the expansion region of a seeded free-jet. The observed cluster mass spectra (CMS) for Ar, rm C_6H_6 and H _2O show the characteristic features (magic numbers) of electron beam and photo ionized clusters under molecular flow conditions. Indications for the presence of magic numbers in the CMS of {(CO _2)_{n}^+} cluster ions at n = 20, 26, 30 and 34 similar to those found for rare gas clusters have been found. Cationic metal ligand complexes Cu(Toluene) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Acetone) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Methanol)_{rm n}^+ , Cu(Ethylether)_{rm n }^+, Cu(Water)_{ rm n}^+, Al(Water)_ {rm n}^+ were synthesized by ablation of the metal from metallic discharge electrodes in a discharge gas mixture of helium seeded with the ligand of choice. The CMS of the expanded plasmas show little background ion signal besides the metal-ligand species. Charge exchange processes in the expansion guarantee high ionization yields of the desired species and account for low backgrounds. Changes in the successive binding energy of Cu(Water)_ {rm n}^+ clusters n = 1-4 are clearly observed in the CMS as step formation. A similar pattern found in the Cu(Acetone)_{ rm n}^+ CMS suggests the same trend in the successive binding energy as known for water. Ablation from a Cr(acac)_3 in a copper matrix was employed for the synthesis of Cr(Acetone) _{rm n}^+ and Cr(Benzene)^+ complexes demonstrating the ability to use nonconducting compounds as a metal source

  4. A myelin galactolipid, sulfatide, is essential for maintenance of ion channels on myelinated axon but not essential for initial cluster formation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Tomoko; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Hirahara, Yukie; Honke, Koichi; Peles, Elior; Popko, Brian; Suzuki, Kinuko; Nishino, Hitoo; Baba, Hiroko

    2002-08-01

    Myelinated axons are divided into four distinct regions: the node of Ranvier, paranode, juxtaparanode, and internode, each of which is characterized by a specific set of axonal proteins. Voltage-gated Na+ channels are clustered at high densities at the nodes, whereas shaker-type K+ channels are concentrated at juxtaparanodal regions. These channels are separated by the paranodal regions, where septate-like junctions are formed between the axon and the myelinating glial cells. Although oligodendrocytes and myelin sheaths are believed to play an instructive role in the local differentiation of the axon to distinct domains, the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In the present study, we have examined the distribution of axonal components in mice incapable of synthesizing sulfatide by disruption of the galactosylceramide sulfotransferase gene. These mice displayed abnormal paranodal junctions in the CNS and PNS, whereas their compact myelin was preserved. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a decrease in Na+ and K+ channel clusters, altered nodal length, abnormal localization of K+ channel clusters appearing primarily in the presumptive paranodal regions, and diffuse distribution of contactin-associated protein along the internode. Similar abnormalities have been reported previously in mice lacking both galactocerebroside and sulfatide. Interestingly, although no demyelination was observed, these channel clusters decreased markedly with age. The initial timing and the number of Na+ channel clusters formed were normal during development. These results indicate a critical role for sulfatide in proper localization and maintenance of ion channels clusters, whereas they do not appear to be essential for initial cluster formation of Na+ channels. PMID:12151530

  5. Rapid flame synthesis of internal Mo(6+) doped TiO2 nanocrystals in situ decorated with highly dispersed MoO3 clusters for lithium ion storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Hu, Yanjie; Shen, Jianhua; Jiang, Haibo; Min, Guoquan; Qiu, Shengjie; Song, Zhitang; Sun, Zhuo; Li, Chunzhong

    2015-11-28

    The rational design of nanoheterostructured materials has attracted much attention because of its importance for developing highly efficient LIBs. Herein, we have demonstrated that internal Mo(6+) doped TiO2 nanocrystals in situ decorated with highly dispersed MoO3 clusters have been realized by a facile and rapid flame spray pyrolysis route for electrochemical energy storage. In such intriguing nanostructures, internal Mo(6+) doping can improve the conductivity of electrode materials and facilitate rapid Li(+) intercalation and ion transport and the heteroassembly of highly dispersed ultrafine MoO3 clusters with excellent electrochemical activity endows the TiO2 with extra Li(+) ion storage ability as well as incorporates Mo(6+). Thus, the as-prepared nanohybrid electrodes exhibit a high specific capacity and superior rate capability due to the maximum synergetic effect of TiO2, Mo(6+) and ultrafine MoO3 clusters. Moreover, the aerosol flame process with a unique temperature gradient opens a new strategy to design novel hybrid materials by the simultaneous doping and heteroassembly engineering for next-generation LIBs. PMID:26490363

  6. Classification of biodiesel and fuel blends using gas chromatography - differential mobility spectrometry with cluster analysis and isolation of C18:3 me by dual ion filtering.

    PubMed

    Pasupuleti, Dedeepya; Eiceman, Gary A; Pierce, Karisa M

    2016-08-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters (FAAEs) were determined at 10-100mg/L in biodiesel and blends with petrodiesel without sample pre-treatment using gas chromatography with a tandem differential mobility detector. Selectivity was provided through chromatographic separations and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization reactions in the detector with mobility characterization of gas ions. Limits of detection were ~0.5ng with an average of 2.98% RSD for peak area precision, ≤1.3% RSD for retention time precision, and ≤9.2% RSD for compensation voltage precision. Biodiesel blends were classified using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Unsupervised cluster analysis captured 52.72% of variance in a single PC while supervised analysis captured 71.64% of variance using Fisher ratio feature selection. Test set predictions showed successful clustering according to source or feedstock when regressed onto the training set model. Detection of the regulated substance methyl linolenate (C18:3 me) was achieved in 6-10s with a 1m long capillary column using dual ion filtering in the tandem differential mobility detector. PMID:27216685

  7. Application of a static quadrupole deviator to the deposition of size-selected cluster ions from a laser vaporization source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alayan, R.; Arnaud, L.; Bourgey, A.; Broyer, M.; Cottancin, E.; Huntzinger, J. R.; Lermé, J.; Vialle, J. L.; Pellarin, M.; Guiraud, G.

    2004-07-01

    An electrostatic quadrupole deviator is used to separate charged from neutral clusters produced by a laser vaporization source. Because of their rather constant velocity, this device which is basically an energy selector also acts as an efficient mass filter. We have simulated and studied its capability to generate beams of size-selected charged clusters. Typical beam currents of a few tens of pA allow the formation of two-dimensional cluster deposits within a few minutes. Platinum and indium clusters are deposited on electron microscopy grids coated with an amorphous carbon film. For low-density assemblies of particles in the nanometer range, size histograms are discussed in relation with the mass selectivity of the apparatus. An upper limit for the dispersion of selected cluster diameters is found to be of the order of ±8% which is at least five times better than the dispersion of neutral species.

  8. Explosion, ion acceleration, and molecular fragmentation of methane clusters in the pulsed beam of a free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwan, B.; Andreasson, J.; Bergh, M.; Schorb, S.; Thomas, H.; Rupp, D.; Gorkhover, T.; Adolph, M.; Möller, T.; Bostedt, C.; Hajdu, J.; Tîmneanu, N.

    2012-09-01

    X-ray lasers offer new possibilities for creating and probing extreme states of matter. We used intense and short x-ray pulses from the FLASH soft x-ray laser to trigger the explosions of CH4 and CD4 molecules and their clusters. The results show that the explosion dynamics depends on cluster size and indicate a transition from Coulomb explosion to hydrodynamic expansion in larger clusters. The explosion of CH4 and CD4 clusters shows a strong isotope effect: The heavier deuterons acquire higher kinetic energies than the lighter protons. This may be due to an extended inertial confinement of deuterons vs. protons near a rapidly charging cluster core during exposure.

  9. Imaging with Mass Spectrometry: A SIMS and VUV-Photoionization Study of Ion-Sputtered Atoms and Clusters from GaAs and Au

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-05

    A new mass spectrometry surface imaging method is presented in which ion-sputtered neutrals are postionized by wavelength-tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light from a synchrotron source. Mass spectra and signal counts of the photoionized neutrals from GaAs (100) and Au are compared to those of the secondary ions. While clusters larger than dimers are more efficiently detected as secondary ions, certain species, such as As2, Au and Au2, are more efficiently detected through the neutral channel. Continuously tuning the photon wavelength allows photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves to be obtained for sputtered Asm (m=1,2) and Aun (n=1-4). From the observed ionization thresholds, sputtered neutral As and Au show no clear evidence of electronic excitation, while neutral clusters have photoionization onsets shifted to lower energies by ~;;0.3 eV. These shifts are attributed to unresolved vibrational and rotational excitations. High-spatial resolution chemical imaging with synchrotron VUV postionization is demonstrated at two different photon energies using a copper TEM grid embedded in indium. The resulting images are used to illustrate the use of tunable VUV light for verifying mass peak assignments by exploiting the unique wavelength-dependent PIE of each sputtered neutral species. This capability is valuable for identifying compounds when imaging chemically complex systems with mass spectrometry-based techniques.

  10. Soft-landing ion mobility of silver clusters for small-molecule matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and imaging of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Walton, Barbara L; Verbeck, Guido F

    2014-08-19

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging is gaining popularity, but matrix effects such as mass spectral interference and damage to the sample limit its applications. Replacing traditional matrices with silver particles capable of equivalent or increased photon energy absorption from the incoming laser has proven to be beneficial for low mass analysis. Not only can silver clusters be advantageous for low mass compound detection, but they can be used for imaging as well. Conventional matrix application methods can obstruct samples, such as fingerprints, rendering them useless after mass analysis. The ability to image latent fingerprints without causing damage to the ridge pattern is important as it allows for further characterization of the print. The application of silver clusters by soft-landing ion mobility allows for enhanced MALDI and preservation of fingerprint integrity.

  11. Low energy (0-4 eV) electron impact to N{sub 2}O clusters: Dissociative electron attachment, ion-molecule reactions, and vibrational Feshbach resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Vizcaino, Violaine; Denifl, Stephan; Maerk, Tilmann D.; Scheier, Paul; Illenberger, Eugen

    2010-10-21

    Electron attachment to clusters of N{sub 2}O in the energy range of 0-4 eV yields the ionic complexes [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -}, [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}NO]{sup -}, and (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} . The shape of the ion yields of the three homologous series differs substantially reflecting the different formation mechanisms. While the generation of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -} can be assigned to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) of an individual N{sub 2}O molecule in the target cluster, the formation of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}NO]{sup -} is interpreted via a sequence of ion molecule reactions involving the formation of O{sup -} via DEA in the first step. The nondecomposed complexes (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} are preferentially formed at very low energies (below 0.5 eV) as a result of intramolecular stabilization of a diffuse molecular anion at low energy. The ion yields of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -} and (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} versus electron energy show sharp peaks at the threshold region, which can be assigned to vibrational Feshbach resonances mediated by the diffuse anion state as already observed in an ultrahigh resolution electron attachment study of N{sub 2}O clusters [E. Leber, S. Barsotti, J. Boemmels, J. M. Weber, I. I. Fabrikant, M.-W. Ruf, and H. Hotop, Chem. Phys. Lett. 325, 345 (2000)].

  12. Trapping of Li(+) Ions by [ThFn](4-n) Clusters Leading to Oscillating Maxwell-Stefan Diffusivity in the Molten Salt LiF-ThF4.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Kidwai, Sharif; Ramaniah, Lavanya M

    2016-08-18

    A molten salt mixture of lithium fluoride and thorium fluoride (LiF-ThF4) serves as a fuel as well as a coolant in the most sophisticated molten salt reactor (MSR). Here, we report for the first time dynamic correlations, Onsager coefficients, Maxwell-Stefan (MS) diffusivities, and the concentration dependence of density and enthalpy of the molten salt mixture LiF-ThF4 at 1200 K in the composition range of 2-45% ThF4 and also at eutectic composition in the temperature range of 1123-1600 K using Green-Kubo formalism and equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We have observed an interesting oscillating pattern for the MS diffusivity for the cation-cation pair, in which ĐLi-Th oscillates between positive and negative values with the amplitude of the oscillation reducing as the system becomes rich in ThF4. Through the velocity autocorrelation function, vibrational density of states, radial distribution function analysis, and structural snapshots, we establish an interplay between the local structure and multicomponent dynamics and predict that formation of negatively charged [ThFn](4-n) clusters at a higher ThF4 mole % makes positively charged Li(+) ions oscillate between different clusters, with their range of motion reducing as the number of [ThFn](4-n) clusters increases, and finally Li(+) ions almost get trapped at a higher ThF4% when the electrostatic force on Li(+) exerted by various surrounding clusters gets balanced. Although reports on variations of density and enthalpy with temperature exist in the literature, for the first time we report variations of the density and enthalpy of LiF-ThF4 with the concentration of ThF4 (mole %) and fit them with the square root function of ThF4 concentration, which will be very useful for experimentalists to obtain data over a range of concentrations from fitting the formula for design purposes. The formation of [ThFn](4-n) clusters and the reduction in the diffusivity of the ions at a higher ThF4% may limit the

  13. Trapping of Li(+) Ions by [ThFn](4-n) Clusters Leading to Oscillating Maxwell-Stefan Diffusivity in the Molten Salt LiF-ThF4.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Kidwai, Sharif; Ramaniah, Lavanya M

    2016-08-18

    A molten salt mixture of lithium fluoride and thorium fluoride (LiF-ThF4) serves as a fuel as well as a coolant in the most sophisticated molten salt reactor (MSR). Here, we report for the first time dynamic correlations, Onsager coefficients, Maxwell-Stefan (MS) diffusivities, and the concentration dependence of density and enthalpy of the molten salt mixture LiF-ThF4 at 1200 K in the composition range of 2-45% ThF4 and also at eutectic composition in the temperature range of 1123-1600 K using Green-Kubo formalism and equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We have observed an interesting oscillating pattern for the MS diffusivity for the cation-cation pair, in which ĐLi-Th oscillates between positive and negative values with the amplitude of the oscillation reducing as the system becomes rich in ThF4. Through the velocity autocorrelation function, vibrational density of states, radial distribution function analysis, and structural snapshots, we establish an interplay between the local structure and multicomponent dynamics and predict that formation of negatively charged [ThFn](4-n) clusters at a higher ThF4 mole % makes positively charged Li(+) ions oscillate between different clusters, with their range of motion reducing as the number of [ThFn](4-n) clusters increases, and finally Li(+) ions almost get trapped at a higher ThF4% when the electrostatic force on Li(+) exerted by various surrounding clusters gets balanced. Although reports on variations of density and enthalpy with temperature exist in the literature, for the first time we report variations of the density and enthalpy of LiF-ThF4 with the concentration of ThF4 (mole %) and fit them with the square root function of ThF4 concentration, which will be very useful for experimentalists to obtain data over a range of concentrations from fitting the formula for design purposes. The formation of [ThFn](4-n) clusters and the reduction in the diffusivity of the ions at a higher ThF4% may limit the

  14. Adsorption of single Li and the formation of small Li clusters on graphene for the anode of lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Zheng, W T; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Singh, David J

    2013-08-28

    We analyzed the adsorption of Li on graphene in the context of anodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) using first-principles methods including van der Waals interactions. We found that although Li can reside on the surface of defect-free graphene under favorable conditions, the binding is much weaker than to graphite and the concentration on a graphene surface is not higher than in graphite. At low concentration, Li ions spread out on graphene because of Coulomb repulsion. With increased Li content, we found that small Li clusters can be formed on graphene. Although this result suggests that graphene nanosheets can conceivably have a higher ultimate Li capacity than graphite, it should be noted that such nanoclusters can potentially nucleate Li dendrites, leading to failure. The implications for nanostructured carbon anodes in batteries are discussed.

  15. Increased component isotropy and plasma magnetic compression at sub-ion Larmor scale turbulence in the solar wind as seen by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyani, K.; Sahraoui, F.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Fauvarque, O.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.

    2012-12-01

    The anisotropic nature of solar wind magnetic turbulence fluctuations is investigated scale-by-scale using high cadence in-situ magnetic field measurements from the Cluster and ACE spacecraft missions. The data span five decades in scales from the inertial range to the electron Larmor radius. In contrast to the inertial range, there is a successive increase towards isotropy between parallel and transverse power at scales below the ion Larmor radius, with isotropy being achieved at the electron Larmor radius. In the context of wave-mediated theories of turbulence, we show that this enhancement in magnetic fluctuations parallel to the local mean background field is qualitatively consistent with the magnetic compressibility signature of kinetic Alfvén wave solutions of the linearized Vlasov equation. More generally, we discuss how these results may arise naturally due to the prominent role of the Hall term at sub-ion Larmor scales. Furthermore, computing higher-order statistics, we show that the full statistical signature of the fluctuations at scales below the ion Larmor radius is that of a single isotropic globally scale-invariant process distinct from the anisotropic statistics of the inertial range.(Upper panel) PSD (from Cluster) of the transverse and parallel components spanning the inertial and dissipation ranges. (Lower panel) Ratio of parallel over transverse PSD. Horizontal dot-dashed line indicates a ratio of 1/3 where isotropy in power occurs. Vertical dashed and dashed-dotted lines indicate the ion and electron gyro-radii respectively, Doppler-shifted to spacecraft frequency using the Taylor hypothesis.

  16. Thermochemistry of the activation of N2 on iron cluster cations: Guided ion beam studies of the reactions of Fen+ (n=1-19) with N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lin; Liu, Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2006-02-01

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Fen+ (n=1-19) with N2 are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-15eV. In addition to collision-induced dissociation forming Fem+ ions, which dominate the product spectra, a variety of FemN2+ and FemN+ product ions, where m ⩽n, is observed. All processes are observed to exhibit thresholds. Fem+-N and Fem+-2N bond energies as a function of cluster size are derived from the threshold analysis of the kinetic energy dependences of the endothermic reactions. The trends in this thermochemistry are compared to the isoelectronic D0(Fen+-CH), and to bulk phase values. A fairly uniform barrier of 0.48±0.03eV at 0K is observed for formation of the FenN2+ product ions (n =12, 15-19) and can be related to the rate-limiting step in the Haber process for catalytic ammonia production.

  17. The influence of neutral reagents on the effective recombination energy of the ArN + 2 cluster ion in charge-transfer reactions at thermal energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Masaharu; Matsumura, Ken-ichi; Aizawa, Masato; Funatsu, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Yukio

    1995-03-01

    In order to examine the influence of neutral reagents on the effective recombination energy of a simple cluster ion in charge-transfer (CT) reactions at thermal energy, CT reactions of ArN+2 with CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CO2, and Kr are studied at near-thermal energy by using an ion-beam apparatus. Only CT channels leading to parent ion and/or fragment ions are found for all reagents. The reaction rate constants are (0.72-1.4)×10-9 cm3 s-1, which correspond to 55%-230% of the calculated values from Langevin or averaged dipole oriented theory. The effective recombination energy of ArN+2 in the CT reactions is found to depend on the ionization potentials of reagents. For CH3Cl and CH2Cl2 with lower ionization potentials of 11.27 and 11.35 eV than the effective recombination energy of ArN+2(˜13.5 eV), respectively, CT reactions occur without distortion of ArN+2. On the other hand, for CO2 and Kr with slightly higher ionization potentials of 13.78 and 14.00 eV than that, respectively, the bond length of (Ar-N2)+ slightly expands due to interactions with the reagent to increase the effective recombination energy of ArN+2 and to induce CT reaction.

  18. Three novel Cu6S6 cluster-based coordination compounds: synthesis, framework modulation and the sensing of small molecules and Fe(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Si-Zhe; Zhou, Rui-Sha; Shao, Jia; Qiu, Xiao-Min; Jia, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Three novel Cu6S6 cluster-based coordination compounds formulated as [Cu(mpymt)3]2 (1), {(CuBr4)[Cu(mpymt)6]}n (2), and {(CuI6)[Cu(mpymt)6]}n (3) (Hmpymt = 4-methylpyrimidine-2-thione), have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structural analysis reveals that compound 1 shows a distorted octahedral core of six copper atoms (Cu6S6) constructed from four α and two β type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts from six mpymt(-) anions. Compound 2 displays an interesting 3D framework constructed from Cu6S6 and Cu4Br4 Cu(i) clusters simultaneously, interestingly, six mpymt(-) with α type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts are involved in the formation of Cu6S6. Compound 3 displays an infinite 1D framework constructed from Cu6S6 and Cu6I6 Cu(i) clusters, notably, four α and two β type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts are involved in the formation of the Cu6S6 cluster, however, only mpymt(-) ligands containing α type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts form the bridged Cu6I6 cluster. The experimental results reveal that halogen ions finely modulate the structural features of compounds 1-3. The fluorescent properties of compounds 1-3 in the solid state and in various solvent emulsions were investigated in detail, the results of which indicate that compounds 1-3 are all highly sensitive naked eye colorimetric sensors for NB, 2-NT and Fe(3+) (NB = nitrobenzene and 2-NT = 2-nitrotoluene). PMID:27377475

  19. Three novel Cu6S6 cluster-based coordination compounds: synthesis, framework modulation and the sensing of small molecules and Fe(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Si-Zhe; Zhou, Rui-Sha; Shao, Jia; Qiu, Xiao-Min; Jia, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Three novel Cu6S6 cluster-based coordination compounds formulated as [Cu(mpymt)3]2 (1), {(CuBr4)[Cu(mpymt)6]}n (2), and {(CuI6)[Cu(mpymt)6]}n (3) (Hmpymt = 4-methylpyrimidine-2-thione), have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structural analysis reveals that compound 1 shows a distorted octahedral core of six copper atoms (Cu6S6) constructed from four α and two β type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts from six mpymt(-) anions. Compound 2 displays an interesting 3D framework constructed from Cu6S6 and Cu4Br4 Cu(i) clusters simultaneously, interestingly, six mpymt(-) with α type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts are involved in the formation of Cu6S6. Compound 3 displays an infinite 1D framework constructed from Cu6S6 and Cu6I6 Cu(i) clusters, notably, four α and two β type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts are involved in the formation of the Cu6S6 cluster, however, only mpymt(-) ligands containing α type N[double bond, length as m-dash]C-SH parts form the bridged Cu6I6 cluster. The experimental results reveal that halogen ions finely modulate the structural features of compounds 1-3. The fluorescent properties of compounds 1-3 in the solid state and in various solvent emulsions were investigated in detail, the results of which indicate that compounds 1-3 are all highly sensitive naked eye colorimetric sensors for NB, 2-NT and Fe(3+) (NB = nitrobenzene and 2-NT = 2-nitrotoluene).

  20. Charge transfer between alkali cluster ions and atoms in the 1 to 10 keV collisional energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, C.; Cahuzac, Ph.; Concina, B.; Leygnier, J.; Tignères, I.

    The cross-sections for collisional charge transfer between singly charged free clusters Mn+ (M = Li, Na; n=1...50) and atomic targets A (cesium, potassium) have been measured as a function of collisional relative velocity in laboratory energy range 1-10 keV. For each cluster size, the experimental values of the charge transfer cross-section are fitted with an universal parametric curve with two independent parameters and vm, the maximum cross-section and the corresponding velocity. For small size clusters ( ), the characteristic parameters show strong variations with the number of atoms in the cluster. Abrupt dips observed for n=10 and n=22 are attributed to electronic properties. Charge transfer patterns observed for various collisional systems present similarities, which appear more sensitive to cluster quantum size effects than to collision energy defects. In their whole, the and vm parameters show differences in both their size evolution and their absolute values discussed in term of projectile and target electronic structures.

  1. Vacancy defects and defect clusters in alkali metal ion-doped MgO nanocrystallites studied by positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellaiyan, S.; Uedono, A.; Sivaji, K.; Janet Priscilla, S.; Sivasankari, J.; Selvalakshmi, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pure and alkali metal ion (Li, Na, and K)-doped MgO nanocrystallites synthesized by solution combustion technique have been studied by positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy methods. Positron lifetime analysis exhibits four characteristic lifetime components for all the samples. Doping reduces the Mg vacancy after annealing to 800 °C. It was observed that Li ion migrates to the vacancy site to recover Mg vacancy-type defects, reducing cluster vacancies and micropores. For Na- and K-doped MgO, the aforementioned defects are reduced and immobile at 800 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening studies show the positron trapping sites as vacancy clusters. The decrease in the S parameter is due to the particle growth and reduction in the defect concentration at 800 °C. Photoluminescence study shows an emission peak at 445 nm and 498 nm, associated with F2 2+ and recombination of higher-order vacancy complexes. Further, annealing process is likely to dissociate F2 2+ to F+ and this F+ is converted into F centers at 416 nm.

  2. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy to probe quantum dynamics in collisions of Ar17+,18+ ions with atoms and solids, towards clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamour, E.; Prigent, C.; Ramillon, J.-M.; Rozet, J.-P.; Steydli, S.; Trassinelli, M.; Vernhet, D.

    2015-07-01

    We report on studies of projectile excited states produced by electron capture in both low and high velocity regimes, and when highly charged ions (HCIs) collide either with dilute or dense matter. Quantum effects in the interaction dynamics are probed via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy for Ar17+ at 7 keV u-1 and for Ar18+ at 13.6 MeV u-1 on Ar, N2 or CH4 gas targets and on carbon solid foils. Relevant comparison between those two collision velocity regimes, and between gaseous and solid targets reveal specific features. In particular, the effect of multiple capture process occurring within a single-collision with gaseous target can be compared with the consequence of multistep collisions arising at surfaces and in solid-bulk at low velocity. At high velocity, beside evidence for collective response of the target electrons due to the wake field induced by HCI passing through the solid-bulk, we demonstrate that excitation and ionization collision processes damp the populations of projectile excited states for long ion transit times. The evolution of the np population as a function of n in solid is at variance from the 1/n3 law found in gas, and the disagreement increases with solid target thickness. We have also tackled studies of HCIs in collision with clusters showing that x-ray spectroscopy provides a powerful tool to sign the presence of clusters in a supersonic gas jet.

  3. Clusters of α-LiFeO2 nanoparticles incorporated into multi-walled carbon nanotubes: a lithium-ion battery cathode with enhanced lithium storage properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mokhlesur; Glushenkov, Alexey M; Chen, Zhiqiang; Dai, Xiujuan J; Ramireddy, Thrinathreddy; Chen, Ying

    2013-12-14

    We report the preparation of a novel nanocomposite architecture of α-LiFeO2-MWCNT based on clusters of α-LiFeO2 nanoparticles incorporated into multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The composite represents a promising cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The preparation of the nanocomposite is achieved by combining a molten salt precipitation process and a radio frequency oxygen plasma for the first time. We demonstrate that clusters of α-LiFeO2 nanoparticles incorporated into MWCNTs are capable of delivering a stable and high reversible capacity of 147 mA h g(-1) at 1 C after 100 cycles with the first cycle Coulombic efficiency of ~95%. The rate capability of the composite is significantly improved and its reversible capacity is measured to be 101 mA h g(-1) at a high current rate of 10 C. Both rate capability and cycling stability are not simply a result of introduction of functionalized MWCNTs but most likely originate from the unique composite structure of clusters of α-LiFeO2 nanoparticles integrated into a network of MWCNTs. The excellent electrochemical performance of this new nanocomposite opens up new opportunities in the development of high-performance electrode materials for energy storage application using the radio frequency oxygen plasma technique.

  4. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g−1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g−1, superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g−1 after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g−1). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance. PMID:27181691

  5. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g-1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g-1, superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g-1 after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g-1). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance.

  6. Laser initiated reactions in N{sub 2}O clusters studied by time-sliced ion velocity imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Honma, Kenji

    2013-07-28

    Laser initiated reactions in N{sub 2}O clusters were studied by a time-sliced velocity imaging technique. The N{sub 2}O clusters, (N{sub 2}O){sub n}, generated by supersonic expansion were irradiated by an ultraviolet laser around 204 nm to convert reactant pairs, O({sup 1}D{sub 2})-(N{sub 2}O){sub n−1}. The NO molecules formed from these reactant pairs were ionized by the same laser pulse and their velocity distribution was determined by the time-sliced velocity imaging technique. At low nozzle pressure, lower than 1.5 atm, the speed distribution in the frame moving with the clusters consists of two components. These components were ascribed to the products appeared in the backward and forward directions in the center-of-mass frame, respectively. The former consists of the vibrational ground state and the latter consists of highly vibrational excited states. At higher nozzle pressure, a single broad speed distribution became dominant for the product NO. The pressure and laser power dependences suggested that this component is attributed to the product formed in the clusters larger than dimer, (N{sub 2}O){sub n} (n ≥ 3)

  7. Magnetic properties of nano-clusters lanthanum chromite powders doped with samarium and strontium ions synthesized via a novel combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Rashad, M.M.; El-Sheikh, S.M.

    2011-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanocrystalline Sm{sup 3+} and Sr{sup 2+} doped LaCrO{sub 3} powders have been synthesized through a novel gel combustion synthesis using triethanol amine (TEA). The saturation magnetization of the LaCrO{sub 3} increased with an increase Sm{sup 3+} ion and it decreased with an increase in the Sr{sup 3+} ion to 0.3 at temperature 1000 {sup o}C for 2 h due to the formation of a monodispersed uniform octahedral structure as shown in the Fig. Research highlights: {yields} Single-phase orthorhombic lanthanum chromite LaCrO{sub 3} nanoclusters have been successfully synthesized through a novel gel combustion synthesis using triethanol amine (TEA). {yields} Sr{sup 2+} ions doped LaCrO{sub 3} increased the unit cell volume and the crystallite size whereas Sm{sup 3+} ions doped LaCrO{sub 3} decreased the unit cell volume and the crystallite size. {yields} The saturation magnetization of the LaCrO{sub 3} powders increased continuously with an increase in the Sm concentration and it decreased with an increase in the Sr ion up to 0.3 at annealing temperature of 1000 {sup o}C for 2 h. -- Abstract: A novel approach to synthesize a single-phase orthorhombic perovskite lanthanum chromite LaCrO{sub 3} clusters doped with Sm{sup 3+} and Sr{sup 2+} ions via gel combustion route was reported. The producing materials were synthesized using metal nitrates as oxidizers and triethanol amine (TEA), N-butyl amine (NBA) or ethylene diamine (EDA) as a fuel. The effect of the annealing temperature, type of organic fuel and the variation of the samarium and/or strontium substitution and its impact on crystal structure, crystallite size, microstructure and magnetic properties of the LaCrO{sub 3} powders formed was systematically studied. The results revealed that a well crystalline single phase of pure LaCrO{sub 3} can be achieved at annealing temperature from 800 to 1000 {sup o}C for 2 h. Moreover, each organic carrier materials exhibited a different degree of effectiveness

  8. Absolute cross sections for the dissociation of hydrogen cluster ions in high-energy collisions with helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, S.; Tabet, J.; Samraoui, K.; Louc, S.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2006-02-15

    Absolute dissociation cross sections are reported for H{sub n}{sup +} clusters of varied mass (n=3,5,...,35) following collisions with He atoms at 60 keV/amu. Initial results have been published previously for a smaller range of cluster sizes [Ouaskit et al., Phys. Rev. A 49, 1484 (1994)]. The present extended study includes further experimental results, reducing the statistical errors associated with the absolute cross sections. The previously suggested quasilinear dependence of the H{sub n}{sup +} dissociation cross sections upon n is developed with reference to expected series of geometrical shells of H{sub 2} molecules surrounding a H{sub 3}{sup +} core. Recent calculations identify n=9 as corresponding to the first closed H{sub 2} shell [e.g., Stich et al., J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9482 (1997)]. Recurrence of the distinct characteristics observed in the dissociation-cross-section dependence upon cluster size around n=9 provides the basis for the presently proposed subsequent closed shells at n=15, 21, 27, and 33, in agreement with the calculations of Nagashima et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 96, 4294 (1992)].

  9. Solar Wind Magnetic Field Turbulence at Ion Kinetic Scales Measured by Cluster Using k-filtering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Roberts, O. W.; Jeska, L.; Li, B.; Lu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of turbulence at kinetic scales is important since turbulence energy is believed to dissipate as heat at these scales. Here we report our several work on the solar wind turbulence at ion kinetic scales using the k-filtering technique. We found evidence of ion cyclotron resonance in solar wind intervals. In the wave vector space, in addition to the commonly observed population of magnetic field fluctuations propagating at quasi-perpendicular angles to the global mean field B0, a population propagating at quasi-parallel angles are also observed with no local plasma instabilities identified. At low wavenumbers (kv_A/Omega_p <= 0.6 ) both components are present, and have similar powers, while at higher wavenumbers (kv_A/Omega_p> 0.6) only the perpendicular component can be identified. A statistical study of 52 intervals of solar wind finds that the turbulence is predominantly highly oblique to the magnetic field with perpendicular wavenumbers much greater than parallel wavenumbers, and propagates slowly in the plasma frame with most points having frequencies smaller than the proton gyrofrequency. Weak agreement is found that turbulence at the ion kinetic scales consists of kinetic Alfven waves and coherent structures advected with plasma bulk velocity plus some minor more compressible components. The results suggest that anti-sunward and sunward propagating magnetic fluctuations have similar nature in both the fast and slow solar wind. The fast wind was shown to have significantly more anti-sunward flux than sunward flux and the slow wind appears to be more balanced at ion kinetic scales. The fluctuated magnetic field and magnitude of the magnetic field are used to compute the power of incompressible and compressible turbulence for the fast solar wind. It is found that Taylor's frozen-in hypothesis may break down for compressible turbulence at the ion kinetic scales, suggesting that whistler waves may contribute to the compressible turbulence on the scales

  10. Auger electron nanoscale mapping and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with gas cluster ion beam sputtering to study an organic bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Heon Kim, Seong; Heo, Sung; Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Yun, Sungyoung; Hwan Park, Jong; Chung, Yeonji; Lee, Eunha; Park, Gyeongsu; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2014-06-16

    The lateral and vertical distributions of organic p/n bulk heterojunctions for an organic solar cell device are, respectively, investigated using nanometer-scale Auger electron mapping and using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering. The concentration of sulfur, present only in the p-type material, is traced to verify the distribution of p-type (donor) and n-type (acceptor) materials in the blended structure. In the vertical direction, a considerable change in atomic sulfur concentration is observed using XPS depth profiling with Ar GCIB sputtering. In addition, Auger electron mapping of sulfur reveals the lateral 2-dimensional distribution of p- and n-type materials. The combination of Auger electron mapping with Ar GCIB sputtering should thereby allow the construction of 3-dimensional distributions of p- and n-type materials in organic photovoltaic cells.

  11. Intact lipid imaging of mouse brain samples: MALDI, nanoparticle-laser desorption ionization, and 40 keV argon cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Phan, Nhu T N; Fletcher, John S; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the capability of nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (NP-LDI MS), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS, and gas cluster ion beam secondary ion mass spectrometry (GCIB SIMS) to provide maximum information available in lipid analysis and imaging of mouse brain tissue. The use of Au nanoparticles deposited as a matrix for NP-LDI MS is compared to MALDI and SIMS analysis of mouse brain tissue and allows selective detection and imaging of groups of lipid molecular ion species localizing in the white matter differently from those observed using conventional MALDI with improved imaging potential. We demonstrate that high-energy (40 keV) GCIB SIMS can act as a semi-soft ionization method to extend the useful mass range of SIMS imaging to analyze and image intact lipids in biological samples, closing the gap between conventional SIMS and MALDI techniques. The GCIB SIMS allowed the detection of more intact lipid compounds in the mouse brain compared to MALDI with regular organic matrices. The 40 keV GCIB SIMS also produced peaks observed in the NP-LDI analysis, and these peaks were strongly enhanced in intensity by exposure of the sample to trifluororacetic acid (TFA) vapor prior to analysis. These MS techniques for imaging of different types of lipids create a potential overlap and cross point that can enhance the information for imaging lipids in biological tissue sections. Graphical abstract Schematic of mass spectral imaging of a mouse brain tissue using GCIB-SIMS and MALDI techniques. PMID:27549796

  12. Intact lipid imaging of mouse brain samples: MALDI, nanoparticle-laser desorption ionization, and 40 keV argon cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Phan, Nhu T N; Fletcher, John S; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the capability of nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (NP-LDI MS), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS, and gas cluster ion beam secondary ion mass spectrometry (GCIB SIMS) to provide maximum information available in lipid analysis and imaging of mouse brain tissue. The use of Au nanoparticles deposited as a matrix for NP-LDI MS is compared to MALDI and SIMS analysis of mouse brain tissue and allows selective detection and imaging of groups of lipid molecular ion species localizing in the white matter differently from those observed using conventional MALDI with improved imaging potential. We demonstrate that high-energy (40 keV) GCIB SIMS can act as a semi-soft ionization method to extend the useful mass range of SIMS imaging to analyze and image intact lipids in biological samples, closing the gap between conventional SIMS and MALDI techniques. The GCIB SIMS allowed the detection of more intact lipid compounds in the mouse brain compared to MALDI with regular organic matrices. The 40 keV GCIB SIMS also produced peaks observed in the NP-LDI analysis, and these peaks were strongly enhanced in intensity by exposure of the sample to trifluororacetic acid (TFA) vapor prior to analysis. These MS techniques for imaging of different types of lipids create a potential overlap and cross point that can enhance the information for imaging lipids in biological tissue sections. Graphical abstract Schematic of mass spectral imaging of a mouse brain tissue using GCIB-SIMS and MALDI techniques.

  13. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE AT ION KINETIC SCALES USING THE K-FILTERING TECHNIQUE AND CLUSTER DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, O. W.; Li, X.; Jeska, L. E-mail: xxl@aber.ac.uk

    2015-03-20

    Plasma turbulence at ion kinetic scales in the solar wind is investigated using the multi-point magnetometer data from the Cluster spacecraft. By applying the k-filtering method, we are able to estimate the full three-dimensional power spectral density P(ω{sub sc}, k) at a certain spacecraft frequency ω{sub sc} in wavevector (k) space. By using the wavevector at the maximum power in P(ω{sub sc}, k) at each sampling frequency ω{sub sc} and the Doppler shifted frequency ω{sub pla} in the solar wind frame, the dispersion plot ω{sub pla} = ω{sub pla}(k) is found. Previous studies have been limited to very few intervals and have been hampered by large errors, which motivates a statistical study of 52 intervals of solar wind. We find that the turbulence is predominantly highly oblique to the magnetic field k >> k {sub ∥}, and propagates slowly in the plasma frame with most points having frequencies smaller than the proton gyrofrequency ω{sub pla} < Ω{sub p}. Weak agreement is found that turbulence at the ion kinetic scales consists of kinetic Alfvén waves and coherent structures advected with plasma bulk velocity plus some minor more compressible components. The results suggest that anti-sunward and sunward propagating magnetic fluctuations are of similar nature in both the fast and slow solar wind at ion kinetic scales. The fast wind has significantly more anti-sunward flux than sunward flux and the slow wind appears to be more balanced.

  14. What size of cluster is most appropriate for SIMS?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Jiro; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Nakata, Yoshihiko; Honda, Yoshiro; Ichiki, Kazuya; Seki, Toshio; Aoki, Takaaki

    2008-12-01

    Secondary ion emission with large gas cluster ion is reviewed from the point of view of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). We have proposed to use large cluster ions to realize fragment-free ionization for SIMS analysis for various organic materials, such as amino acids and peptides. When large cluster ions with optimized size and energy were incident on biomolecular samples, the relative yields of the fragment ions decreased drastically with the velocity of incident cluster ions. Molecular depth profiling capability is also demonstrated by using large gas cluster ions as the primary ion for SIMS.

  15. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  16. Supersonic metal cluster beams. Technical progress report, March 16, 1984-April 1, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  17. Metal loading determines the stabilization pathway for Co2+ in titanate nanowires: ion exchange vs. cluster formation.

    PubMed

    Madarász, D; Pótári, G; Sápi, A; László, B; Csudai, C; Oszkó, A; Kukovecz, Á; Erdőhelyi, A; Kónya, Z; Kiss, J

    2013-10-14

    Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized on protonated titanate nanowires. Co deposits were obtained after low-temperature decomposition of Co2(CO)8 on titanate nanostructures. The carbonylation was carried out by vapor-phase adsorption in a fluidized bed reactor and the decarbonylation processes were followed by FT-IR spectroscopy and microbalance combined with temperature programmed reaction mass spectrometry. The band gap of Co-decorated titanate nanostructures determined by UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectroscopy decreased sharply from 3.14 eV to 2.41 eV with increasing Co content up to 2 wt%. The Co-decorated titanate morphology was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction (ED). The chemical environment of Co deposition was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A certain amount of cobalt underwent an ion exchange process. Higher cobalt loadings led to the formation of nanosized-dispersed particles complexed to oxygen vacancies. The average sizes were found to be mostly between 2 and 6 nm. This size distribution and the measured band gap could be favorable regimes for some important low-temperature thermal- and photo-induced catalytic reactions.

  18. Cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions in photodetachment from negative ions using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster Dyson orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Oana, C. Melania; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-28

    We report total and differential cross sections for photodetachment from negative ions using Dyson orbitals calculated from equation-of-motion coupled-cluster wave functions and free wave description of the detached electron. The energy dependence of the cross sections is reproduced well, however, the accuracy of absolute values varies. For F{sup -}, C{sup -}, NH{sub 2}{sup -}, and H{sup -}, the calculated cross sections are within the error bars from the experimental values, whereas the errors for Li{sup -} and OH{sup -} are about 20%. The largest errors are observed for O{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} for which the calculated cross sections differ from the experimental ones by factors of 3 and 2, respectively. Calculated anisotropy parameters for atomic anions exhibit too slow decrease, which suggests that the diffuseness of the computed Dyson orbitals is underestimated. Moreover, in the asymptotic region, the orbitals exhibit artifactual oscillations probably due to the limitations of Gaussian basis sets. The analysis of the trends in the experimental anisotropy parameters suggests that the interaction of the detached electron with the core, which is neglected in the present model, is important.

  19. Recombination and relaxation of molecular ions in size-selected clusters: Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations of I - 2 (CO2)n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolas, John M.; Maslen, Paul E.; Parson, Robert

    1995-02-01

    The equilibrium structures and the recombination dynamics of I-2 molecular ions embedded in clusters of 3-17 CO2 molecules are studied by Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The potential model incorporates, in a self-consistent manner, a description of the I-2 electronic structure that depends on both the I-2 bond length and the solvent degrees of freedom. The influence of the solvent upon the I-2 electronic structure is treated by means of a single effective solvent coordinate, in a manner reminiscent of the theory of electron transfer reactions. This causes the electronic charge to localize on a single I atom when the I-I bond is long or when the solvent cage has become highly asymmetric. The primary focus is the I-2 vibrational relaxation that follows recombination. Simulations of I-2(CO2)16 and I-2(CO2)9 yield vibrational relaxation times of less than 3 ps, even faster than the experimentally observed absorption recovery time of 10-40 ps. It is suggested that the latter time scale is determined by electronic as well as vibrational relaxation mechanisms.

  20. Collision cross sections and swarm coefficients of water vapour ion clusters (H2O) n H+ with n = 1, 2 and 3 in N2, O2 and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekstein, A.; Benhenni, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The ion swarm transport coefficients such as reduced mobility, diffusion coefficients and reaction rates of three water vapour ion clusters (H2O) n H+ (with n = 1, 2 and 3) in N2 and O2 have been determined from a Monte Carlo simulation using calculated and measured elastic and inelastic collision cross sections. The elastic momentum transfer cross sections have been determined from a semi-classical JWKB approximation based on a rigid core interaction potential model. The inelastic cross sections have been deduced from the measured ones in the case of similar ion cluster. Then, the cross sections sets are fitted using either the measured reduced mobility at low electric field in the case of (H2O) n H+ in N2 or the zero-field mobility calculated from the Satoh's relation and the measured ones in N2. From the sets of elastic and inelastic collision cross sections thus obtained in pure N2 and O2, the ion transport and reaction coefficients for (H2O) n H+ are then calculated in dry air and also extended over a wide range of reduced electric field in N2 and O2. These ion data are very useful for modelling and simulation of non-equilibrium electrical discharges more particularly in humid gases at atmospheric pressure.

  1. Ion-Stockmayer clusters: Minima, classical thermodynamics, and variational ground state estimates of Li{sup +}(CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}){sub n} (n = 1–20)

    SciTech Connect

    Curotto, E.

    2015-12-07

    Structural optimizations, classical NVT ensemble, and variational Monte Carlo simulations of ion Stockmayer clusters parameterized to approximate the Li{sup +}(CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}){sub n} (n = 1–20) systems are performed. The Metropolis algorithm enhanced by the parallel tempering strategy is used to measure internal energies and heat capacities, and a parallel version of the genetic algorithm is employed to obtain the most important minima. The first solvation sheath is octahedral and this feature remains the dominant theme in the structure of clusters with n ≥ 6. The first “magic number” is identified using the adiabatic solvent dissociation energy, and it marks the completion of the second solvation layer for the lithium ion-nitromethane clusters. It corresponds to the n = 18 system, a solvated ion with the first sheath having octahedral symmetry, weakly bound to an eight-membered and a four-membered ring crowning a vertex of the octahedron. Variational Monte Carlo estimates of the adiabatic solvent dissociation energy reveal that quantum effects further enhance the stability of the n = 18 system relative to its neighbors.

  2. Transition and post-transition metal ions in borate glasses: Borate ligand speciation, cluster formation, and their effect on glass transition and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möncke, D.; Kamitsos, E. I.; Palles, D.; Limbach, R.; Winterstein-Beckmann, A.; Honma, T.; Yao, Z.; Rouxel, T.; Wondraczek, L.

    2016-09-01

    A series of transition and post-transition metal ion (Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Bi) binary borate glasses was studied with special consideration of the cations impact on the borate structure, the cations cross-linking capacity, and more generally, structure-property correlations. Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies were used for the structural characterization. These complementary techniques are sensitive to the short-range order as in the differentiation of tetrahedral and trigonal borate units or regarding the number of non-bridging oxygen ions per unit. Moreover, vibrational spectroscopy is also sensitive to the intermediate-range order and to the presence of superstructural units, such as rings and chains, or the combination of rings. In order to clarify band assignments for the various borate entities, examples are given from pure vitreous B2O3 to meta-, pyro-, ortho-, and even overmodified borate glass compositions. For binary metaborate glasses, the impact of the modifier cation on the borate speciation is shown. High field strength cations such as Zn2+ enhance the disproportionation of metaborate to polyborate and pyroborate units. Pb2+ and Bi3+ induce cluster formation, resulting in PbOn- and BiOn-pseudophases. Both lead and bismuth borate glasses show also a tendency to stabilize very large superstructural units in the form of diborate polyanions. Far-IR spectra reflect on the bonding states of modifier cations in glasses. The frequency of the measured cation-site vibration band was used to obtain the average force constant for the metal-oxygen bonding, FM-O. A linear correlation between glass transition temperature (Tg) and FM-O was shown for the metaborate glass series. The mechanical properties of the glasses also correlate with the force constant FM-O, though for cations of similar force constant the fraction of tetrahedral borate units (N4) strongly affects the thermal and mechanical properties. For paramagnetic Cu- and Mn-borate glasses, N4 was determined

  3. Study of the nucleation and growth of antibiotic labeled Au NPs and blue luminescent Au8 quantum clusters for Hg2+ ion sensing, cellular imaging and antibacterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Puneet; Singh, Dheeraj K.; Sadhu, Subha; Poddar, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    Herein, we report a detailed experimental study supported by DFT calculations to understand the mechanism behind the synthesis of cefradine (CFD - an antibiotic) labeled gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) by employing CFD as both a mild reducing and capping agent. The analysis of the effect of growth conditions reveals that a higher concentration of HAuCl4 results in the formation of an increasing fraction of anisotropic structures, higher temperature leads to the formation of quasi-spherical particles instead of anisotropic ones, and larger pH leads to the formation of much smaller particles. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) results show that when the pH of the reaction medium increases from 4 to 6, the reduction potential of CFD increases which leads to the synthesis of nanoparticles (in a pH 4 reaction) to quantum clusters (in a pH 6 reaction). The MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results of supernatant of the pH 6 reaction indicate the formation of [Au8(CFD)2S6] QCs which show fluorescence at ca. 432 nm with a Stokes shift of ca. 95 nm. The blue luminescence from Au8 QCs was applied for sensing of Hg2+ ions on the basis of an aggregation-induced fluorescence quenching mechanism and offers good selectivity and a high sensitivity with a limit of detection ca. 2 nM which is lower than the detection requirement of 10 nM by the U.S. EPA and 30 nM by WHO for drinking water. We have also applied the sensing probe to detect Hg2+ ions in bacterial samples. Further, we have investigated the antibacterial property of as-synthesized Au NPs using MIC, growth curve and cell survival assay. The results show that Au NPs could reduce the cell survival very efficiently rather than the cell growth in comparison to the antibiotic itself. The scanning electron microscopy study shows the degradation and blebbing of the bacterial cell wall upon exposure with Au NPs which was further supported by fluorescence microscopy results. These Au NPs did not show reactive oxygen species generation. We believe

  4. Ionization of Water Clusters is Mediated by Exciton Energy Transfer from Argon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-25

    The exciton energy deposited in an argon cluster, (Arn ,< n=20>) using VUV radiation is transferred to softly ionize doped water clusters, ((H2O)n, n=1-9) leading to the formation of non-fragmented clusters. Following the initial excitation, electronic energy is channeled to ionize the doped water cluster while evaporating the Ar shell, allowing identification of fragmented and complete water cluster ions. Examination of the photoionization efficiency curve shows that cluster evaporation from excitons located above 12.6 eV are not enough to cool the energized water cluster ion, and leads to their dissociation to (H2O)n-2H+ (protonated) clusters.

  5. Symbolic clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Clustering is the problem of finding a good organization for data. Because there are many kinds of clustering problems, and because there are many possible clusterings for any data set, clustering programs use knowledge and assumptions about individual problems to make clustering tractable. Cluster-analysis techniques allow knowledge to be expressed in the choice of a pairwise distance measure and in the choice of clustering algorithm. Conceptual clustering adds knowledge and preferences about cluster descriptions. In this study the author describes symbolic clustering, which adds representation choice to the set of ways a data analyst can use problem-specific knowledge. He develops an informal model for symbolic clustering, and uses it to suggest where and how knowledge can be expressed in clustering. A language for creating symbolic clusters, based on the model, was developed and tested on three real clustering problems. The study concludes with a discussion of the implications of the model and the results for clustering in general.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.M. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1} region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H{sub 3}O{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3 {minus}10}, ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 1 {minus}10} and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Guided ion beam studies of the reactions of Co{sub n}{sup +} (n=1-18) with N{sub 2}: Cobalt cluster mononitride and dinitride bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fuyi; Li Ming; Tan Lin; Armentrout, P. B.

    2008-05-21

    The reactions of Co{sub n}{sup +} (n=1-18) with N{sub 2} are measured as a function of kinetic energy over a range of 0-15 eV in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. A variety of Co{sub m}{sup +}, Co{sub m}N{sup +}, and Co{sub m}N{sub 2}{sup +} (m{<=}n) product ions are observed, all in endothermic processes, with collision-induced dissociation dominating the products for all clusters. Bond dissociation energies for both cobalt cluster nitrides and dinitrides are derived from threshold analysis of the energy dependence of the endothermic reactions using several different approaches. These values show only a mild dependence on cluster size over the range studied, although the Co{sub 13}{sup +}-N bond energy is relatively weak. The bond energies of Co{sub n}{sup +}-N for larger clusters suggest that a reasonable value for the desorption energy of atomic nitrogen from bulk phase cobalt is 6.3{+-}0.2 eV, which is somewhat lower than the only available value in the literature, an estimate based on the enthalpy of formation of bulk cobalt nitride. The trends in the cobalt nitride thermochemistry are also compared to previously determined metal-metal bond energies, D{sub 0}(Co{sub n}{sup +}-Co), and to D{sub 0}(Fe{sub n}{sup +}-N). Implications for catalytic ammonia production using cobalt versus iron are discussed.

  8. Coordinated bifluoride ions in the first thiofluoride molybdenum triangular cluster complex: synthesis and crystal structure of K5[Mo3S4F7(FHF)2]·2H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Yu. V.; Yarovoi, S. S.; Solodovnikov, S. F.; Fedorov, V. E.

    2003-08-01

    The first triangular thiofluoride cluster complex of molybdenum K5[Mo3S4F7(FHF)2]·2H2O with unexpected coordination of bifluoride ions has been synthesized by the reaction of Mo3S7Br4 with molten KHF2. The compound was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmc21 with four formulas in unit cell of dimensions a=15.1060(20) Å,b=8.7820(9) Å,c=14.3358(13) Å,V=1901.8(4) Å3.

  9. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  10. Thermochemistry of the activation of N{sub 2} on iron cluster cations: Guided ion beam studies of the reactions of Fe{sub n}{sup +} (n=1-19) with N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Lin; Liu Fuyi; Armentrout, P.B.

    2006-02-28

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Fe{sub n}{sup +} (n=1-19) with N{sub 2} are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-15 eV. In addition to collision-induced dissociation forming Fe{sub m}{sup +} ions, which dominate the product spectra, a variety of Fe{sub m}N{sub 2}{sup +} and Fe{sub m}N{sup +} product ions, where m{<=}n, is observed. All processes are observed to exhibit thresholds. Fe{sub m}{sup +}-N and Fe{sub m}{sup +}-2N bond energies as a function of cluster size are derived from the threshold analysis of the kinetic energy dependences of the endothermic reactions. The trends in this thermochemistry are compared to the isoelectronic D{sub 0}(Fe{sub n}{sup +}-CH), and to bulk phase values. A fairly uniform barrier of 0.48{+-}0.03 eV at 0 K is observed for formation of the Fe{sub n}N{sub 2}{sup +} product ions (n=12, 15-19) and can be related to the rate-limiting step in the Haber process for catalytic ammonia production.

  11. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Progress report, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Freiser, B.S.

    1993-09-01

    This report focuses on progress in seven areas: (1) Gas-Phase Reactions of Fe(Benzyne){sup +} with Simple Alkyl Halides; (2) Photodissociation and Collision-Induced Dissociation of Molecular Ions From Methylphenol and Chloromethylphenol; (3) Isotopomer Differentiation Using Metal Ion Chemical Ionization Reagents; (4) Multiple Excitation Collisional Activation (MECA) in Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry; (5) Chemistry of Fe{sup +}-Arene Ions with Halobenzenes; (6) Gas-Phase Photodissociaton Study of Ag(Benzene){sup +} and Ag(Toluene){sup +}; and (7) Reactivity of Ti{sup 2+} and V{sup 2+} with Small Alkanes.

  12. CuFe2O4 magnetic nanocrystal clusters as a matrix for the analysis of small molecules by negative-ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zian; Zheng, Jiangnan; Bian, Wei; Cai, Zongwei

    2015-08-01

    CuFe2O4 magnetic nanocrystal clusters (CuFe2O4 MNCs) were proposed as a new matrix for small molecule analysis by negative ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the first time. We demonstrated its advantages over conventional organic matrices in the detection of small molecules such as amino acids, peptides, nucleobases, fatty acids, and steroid hormones. A systematic comparison of CuFe2O4 MNCs with different ionization modes revealed that MS spectra obtained for the CuFe2O4 MNC matrix in the negative ion mode was only featured by deprotonated ion peaks with a free matrix background, which was different from the complicated alkali metal adducts produced in the positive ion mode. The developed method was found relatively tolerant to salt contamination and exhibited good reproducibility. A detection limit down to the subpicomolar level was achieved when testosterone was analyzed. In addition, by comparison of the MS spectra obtained from bare Fe3O4 and MFe2O4 MNC (M = Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) matrices, two main factors of MFe2O4 MNC matrices were revealed to play a vital role in assisting the negative ion desorption/ionization (D/I) process: doping transition metals into ferrite nanocrystals favoring laser absorption and energy transfer and a good match between the UV absorption of MFe2O4 MNCs and the excitation of nitrogen laser source facilitating LDI efficiency. This work creates a new branch of application for MFe2O4 MNCs and provides an alternative solution for small molecule analysis. PMID:26086699

  13. Automated analysis of organic particles using cluster SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Greg; Zeissler, Cindy; Mahoney, Christine; Lindstrom, Abigail; Fletcher, Robert; Chi, Peter; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Bright, David; Lareau, Richard T.; Boldman, Mike

    2004-06-01

    Cluster primary ion bombardment combined with secondary ion imaging is used on an ion microscope secondary ion mass spectrometer for the spatially resolved analysis of organic particles on various surfaces. Compared to the use of monoatomic primary ion beam bombardment, the use of a cluster primary ion beam (SF 5+ or C 8-) provides significant improvement in molecular ion yields and a reduction in beam-induced degradation of the analyte molecules. These characteristics of cluster bombardment, along with automated sample stage control and custom image analysis software are utilized to rapidly characterize the spatial distribution of trace explosive particles, narcotics and inkjet-printed microarrays on a variety of surfaces.

  14. Ion Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, I.

    The following sections are included: * FILM FORMATION BY ION BEAMS * Fundamental Processes in Film Formation by Low Energy Ion Beams * Comparison of ICB with Other Physical Vapor Deposition Methods * Vacuum Deposition * Sputter Deposition * Ion Plating * Ion Beam Deposition * Simultaneous Deposition and Implantation * Plasma Enhanced Deposition * Section I References * ION CLUSTER BEAM DEPOSITION AND CLUSTER BEAM FORMATION * Nucleation Process * Growth and Condensation Process * Section II References * CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLUSTER * Velocity of Clusters * Energy of Clusters * TEM Observation of Clusters * Structural Properties * Section III References * IONIZED CLUSTER BEAM DEPOSITION SYSTEM * Section IV References * FILM DEPOSITION PROCESS BY ICB * Fundamental Process * Effects of Kinetic Energy on the Film Properties * Epitaxial phenomena * Crystallographic Structure * Physical Structure of Films * Effects of the Electric Charge on the Film Properties * Section V References * APPLICATIONS * Silicon and Silicon Alloy Films * Low Temperature Epitaxy of Silicon Films * Thermally Stable a-Si Film Growth * High Quality SiO2 Film Deposition * Epitaxial A1 Films * Electromigration Resistant A1 Film * Thermally Stable Al/Si Contact * II-VI and III-V Compound Films * Thin Multiple Layered Film * CONCLUSIONS * Acknowledgements * Section VI References

  15. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  16. Bottom-up view of water network-mediated CO2 reduction using cryogenic cluster ion spectroscopy and direct dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Breen, Kristin J; DeBlase, Andrew F; Guasco, Timothy L; Voora, Vamsee K; Jordan, Kenneth D; Nagata, Takashi; Johnson, Mark A

    2012-01-26

    The transition states of a chemical reaction in solution are generally accessed through exchange of thermal energy between the solvent and the reactants. As such, an ensemble of reacting systems approaches the transition state configuration of reactant and surrounding solvent in an incoherent manner that does not lend itself to direct experimental observation. Here we describe how gas-phase cluster chemistry can provide a detailed picture of the microscopic mechanics at play when a network of six water molecules mediates the trapping of a highly reactive "hydrated electron" onto a neutral CO(2) molecule to form a radical anion. The exothermic reaction is triggered from a metastable intermediate by selective excitation of either the reactant CO(2) or the water network, which is evidenced by the evaporative decomposition of the product cluster. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of energized CO(2)·(H(2)O)(6)(-) clusters are used to elucidate the nature of the network deformations that mediate intracluster electron capture, thus revealing the detailed solvent fluctuations implicit in the Marcus theory for electron-transfer kinetics in solution.

  17. Bicontinuous Structure of Li₃V₂(PO₄)₃ Clustered via Carbon Nanofiber as High-Performance Cathode Material of Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Yan, Bo; Xu, Jing; Wang, Chunguang; Chao, Yimin; Jiang, Xuefan; Yang, Gang

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the composite structure of Li3V2(PO4)3 (LVP) nanoparticles with carbon nanofibers (CNF) is designed. The size and location of LVP particles, and the degree of graphitization and diameter of carbon nanofibers, are optimized by electrospinning and heat treatment. The bicontinuous morphologies of LVP/CNF are dependent on the carbonization of PVP and simultaneous growing of LVP, with the fibers shrunk and the LVP crystals grown toward the outside. LVP nanocystals clustered via carbon nanofibers guarantee improving the diffusion ability of Li(+), and the carbon fiber simultaneously guarantees the effective electron conductivity. Compared with the simple carbon-coated LVP and pure LVP, the particle-clustered structure guarantees high rate capability and long-life cycling stability of NF-LVP as cathode for LIBs. At 20 C rate in the range 3.0-4.3 V, NF-LVP delivers the initial capacity of 122.6 mAh g(-1) close to the theoretical value of 133 mAh g(-1), and maintains 97% of the initial capacity at the 1000th cycle. The bead-like structure of cathode material clustered via carbon nanofibers via electrospinning will be further applied to high-performance LIBs.

  18. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  19. Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katgert, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Abell clusters are the most conspicuous groupings of galaxies identified by George Abell on the plates of the first photographic survey made with the SCHMIDT TELESCOPE at Mount Palomar in the 1950s. Sometimes, the term Abell clusters is used as a synonym of nearby, optically selected galaxy clusters....

  20. Tailoring and Scaling Energetic Aluminum Clusters into Cluster Assembled Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jordan Cesar

    As matter decreases in size the importance of a single atom increases exponentially. The properties of clusters, molecules with less than 100 atoms, will change drastically with the addition or removal of a single atom. Clusters have been shown to have properties that mimic other elements and properties that are completely unique. Cluster assemblies could enable the tailoring of precise properties in materials, providing cheap replacements for expensive elements, or novel materials for new applications. Aluminum clusters show great potential use in many applications including energy and catalysis. This work is focused on gaining a better understanding of how geometry and electronic structure affect aluminum cluster reactivity and how useful clusters might be successfully assembled into materials. The effects of doping aluminum cluster ions with boron atoms are reported and show that the addition of a single boron atom usually stabilizes the cluster while adding more boron atoms results in a breaking of symmetry and destabilization. A new analytical technique, matrix isolation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (MICRDS) was developed to help bridge the gap between gas phase cluster studies and condensed phase cluster materials. Molecules are trapped in an inert matrix and studied using cavity ring-down spectroscopy. MICRDS has the potential to also combine clusters into small stable units that would maintain their advantageous gas phase properties.

  1. Argon clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; Bartl, Peter; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Märk, Tilmann D; Scheier, Paul

    2009-11-14

    Electron impact ionization of argon clusters embedded in helium droplets is investigated. Superior mass resolution makes it possible to distinguish between nominally isobaric cluster ions. An abundance maximum for ArHe(12)(+) is unambiguously confirmed; the spectra also prove the formation of Ar(2)He(n)(+) complexes that had been claimed to fragment into pure Ar(2)(+). Distributions of larger argon cluster ions containing up to 60 atoms closely resemble distributions observed upon electron impact or photoionization of bare argon clusters; caging and evaporative cooling provided by the helium matrix do not suffice to quench fragmentation of the nascent argon cluster ions. Intriguing abundance anomalies are observed in distributions of argon cluster ions that contain water, nitrogen or oxygen impurities. The strong abundance of Ar(55)H(2)O(+), Ar(54)O(2)(+) and Ar(54)N(2)(+) contrasts with the virtual absence of slightly larger cluster ions containing the corresponding impurities. The features are probably related to enhanced cluster ion stability upon closure of the second icosahedral shell but the difference in magic numbers (54 versus 55) and the well-known reactivity of charged argon-nitrogen complexes suggest structural differences. PMID:19851558

  2. Characterization of the primary hydration shell of the hydroxide ion with H2 tagging vibrational spectroscopy of the OH- ṡ (H2O)n=2,3 and OD- ṡ (D2O)n=2,3 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlova, Olga; DePalma, Joseph W.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Brathwaite, Antonio; Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; McCoy, Anne B.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2016-10-01

    We report the isotope-dependent vibrational predissociation spectra of the H2-tagged OH- ṡ (H2O)n=2,3 clusters, from which we determine the strongly coordination-dependent energies of the fundamentals due to the OH groups bound to the ion and the intramolecular bending modes of the water molecules. The HOH bending fundamental is completely missing in the delocalized OH- ṡ (H2O) binary complex but is recovered upon adding the second water molecule, thereby establishing that the dihydrate behaves as a hydroxide ion solvated by two essentially intact water molecules. The energies of the observed OH stretches are in good agreement with the values predicted by Takahashi and co-workers [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 17, 25505 (2015); 15, 114 (2013)] with a theoretical model that treats the strong anharmonicities at play in this system with explicit coupling between the bound OH groups and the O-O stretching modes on an extended potential energy surface. We highlight a surprising similarity between the spectral signatures of OH- ṡ (H2O)3 and the excess proton analogue, H3O+ ṡ (H2O)3, both of which correspond to completed hydration shells around the proton defect. We discuss the origin of the extreme solvatochromicity displayed by both OH- and H+ in the context of the anomalously large "proton polarizabilities" of the H5O2+ and H3O2- binary complexes.

  3. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  4. Direct comparative study on the energy level alignments in unoccupied/occupied states of organic semiconductor/electrode interface by constructing in-situ photoemission spectroscopy and Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering integrated analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Dong-Jin Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, Yongsu; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Heon; Heo, Sung

    2014-10-21

    Through the installation of electron gun and photon detector, an in-situ photoemission and damage-free sputtering integrated analysis system is completely constructed. Therefore, this system enables to accurately characterize the energy level alignments including unoccupied/occupied molecular orbital (LUMO/HOMO) levels at interface region of organic semiconductor/electrode according to depth position. Based on Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES), and reflective electron energy loss spectroscopy, the occupied/unoccupied state of in-situ deposited Tris[4-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]amine (TCTA) organic semiconductors on Au (E{sub LUMO}: 2.51 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.35 eV) and Ti (E{sub LUMO}: 2.19 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.69 eV) electrodes are investigated, and the variation of energy level alignments according to work function of electrode (Au: 4.81 eV and Ti: 4.19 eV) is clearly verified. Subsequently, under the same analysis condition, the unoccupied/occupied states at bulk region of TCTA/Au structures are characterized using different Ar gas cluster ion beam (Ar GCIB) and Ar ion sputtering processes, respectively. While the Ar ion sputtering process critically distorts both occupied and unoccupied states in UPS/IPES spectra, the Ar GCIB sputtering process does not give rise to damage on them. Therefore, we clearly confirm that the in-situ photoemission spectroscopy in combination with Ar GCIB sputtering allows of investigating accurate energy level alignments at bulk/interface region as well as surface region of organic semiconductor/electrode structure.

  5. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shigeki Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2014-02-15

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  6. Comparative study of the strength of Er indirect optical pumping in silicate glasses codoped with Si clusters and Er 3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebour, Youcef; Pellegrino, Paolo; García, Cristina; Moreno, José A.; Garrido, Blas

    2006-04-01

    Erbium-doped silicon-rich dielectrics are expected to lead to compact and scalable cost-effective optical amplifiers due to the high sensing of Er via nano-silicon. Different silicates glasses, namely: Aluminum-silicates, soda-lime glasses and fused silica codoped with Si and Er were used in order to explore the mechanism of energy transfer from Si nanoclusters (Si nc) to Er. Si excess of 5 and 15 at.% and different Er doses, so that the resulting Er peak concentration could vary from 2x10 19 up to 6x10 20 cm -3, were introduced in the wafers by ion implantation technique. Thermal treatments in a rapid thermal process were carried out before and after Er implantation in order to precipitate Si nc, and to find the accurate temperature to obtain the best Er emission around 1540 nm. Very intense emission, comparing to structures only doped with Er, has been detected in all co-implanted glasses. By time resolved photoluminescence experiments we measured lifetimes of the exited state of Er 3+ ions ranging from 2.5 to 12 ms and an effective excitation cross-section about 1x10 -17 - 6 x10 -17 cm2 (depending on the Er dose and Si excess). This is orders of magnitude higher than the Er direct absorption cross-section (about 10-21 cm2). By quantifying Er emission we found only 10% of the total Er concentration was effectively excited through Si nc.

  7. New Cs sputter ion source with polyatomic ion beams for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, S. F.; Palitsin, V. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Kovarsky, A. P.; Chang, R. J. H.; Adriaens, A.; Dowsett, M. G.; Adams, F.

    2007-08-01

    A simple design for a cesium sputter ion source compatible with vacuum and ion-optical systems as well as with electronics of the commercially available Cameca IMS-4f instrument is reported. This ion source has been tested with the cluster primary ions of Sin- and Cun-. Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of the analytical capabilities of the secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument due to the nonadditive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ones with the same impact energy.

  8. Label-free colorimetric detection of mercury via Hg2+ ions-accelerated structural transformation of nanoscale metal-oxo clusters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; She, Shan; Zhang, Jiangwei; Bayaguud, Aruuhan; Wei, Yongge

    2015-01-01

    Mercury and its compounds are known to be extremely toxic but widely distributed in environment. Although many works have been reported to efficiently detect mercury, development of simple and convenient sensors is still longed for quick analyzing mercury in water. In this work, a nanoscale metal-oxo cluster, (n-Bu4N)2[Mo5NaO13(OCH3)4(NO)], (MLPOM), organically-derivatized from monolacunary Lindqvist-type polyoxomolybdate, is found to specifically react with Hg2+ in methanol/water via structural transformation. The MLPOM methanol solution displays a color change from purple to brown within seconds after being mixed with an aqueous solution containing Hg2+. By comparing the structure of polyoxomolybdate before and after reaction, the color change is revealed to be the essentially structural transformation of MLPOM accelerated by Hg2+. Based on this discovery, MLPOM could be utilized as a colorimetric sensor to sense the existence of Hg2+, and a simple and label-free method is developed to selectively detect aqueous Hg2+. Furthermore, the colorimetric sensor has been applied to indicating mercury contamination in industrial sewage. PMID:26559602

  9. Ion chemistry of ferrocene. Thermochemistry of ionization and protonation and solvent clustering. Slow and entropy-driven proton-transfer kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mautner, M.M.N. )

    1989-04-12

    The ionization energy of ferrocene (Cp{sub 2}Fe) was measured by charge-transfer equilibria as 6.81 {plus minus} 0.07 eV (157.1 {plus minus} 1.6 kcal/mol). The proton affinity was obtained from equilibrium temperature studies as 207 {plus minus} 1 kcal/mol. The protonation of Cp{sub 2}Fe also involves a significant entropy change of +6.3 cal/mol{center dot}K. Deuteration experiments show that, in the protonation of Cp{sub 2}Fe, the incoming proton goes to a sterically unique position and does not exchange with the ring protons. This is consistent with protonation on iron, but ring protonation exclusively in an exo position or an agostic ring-to-iron bridged structure are also possible. The results suggest that the proton affinity at Fe is greater by at least 5 kcal/mol than for ring protonation. The solvation energies of Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +} and Cp{sub 2}FeH{sup +} by a CH{sub 3}CN molecule, 11.4 and 12.9 kcal/mol, respectively, are weaker than those of most gas-phase cations, and the attachment energies of dimethyl ether and benzene, <9 kcal/mol, are even weaker. These results support that the weak solution basicity of Cp{sub 2}Fe is due to inefficient ion solvation. The kinetics of proton transfer between Cp{sub 2}Fe and some cyclic compounds is unusually slow, with reaction efficiencies of 0.1-0.01, without significant temperature dependence. These are the first proton-transfer reactions to show such behavior, which may be due to a combination of an energy barrier and steric hindrance. Proton transfer is also observed from (RCN){sub 2}H{sup +} dimer ions to Cp{sub 2}Fe. These reactions may be direct or involve ligand switching, and in several cases either mechanism is endothermic and entropy-driven.

  10. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  11. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: Implications for the effect of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvissel, O.-K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Santee, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere and in particular upon the nitrogen family and ozone, we have modeled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces HNO3 by conversion of N2O5 upon hydrated water clusters H+·(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of the NOy family during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production and loss of HNO3 and N2O5, respectively, and ii) a cold season decrease and increase in NOx/NOy-ratio and O3, respectively, in the polar regions of both hemispheres. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modeled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOxpolar increase in spring-to-summer in the southern hemisphere, and in spring in the northern hemisphere. The springtime NOxincrease arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. We argue that the weakening of zonal-mean polar winds down to the lower stratosphere, which is statistically significant at the 0.90 level in spring months in the southern hemisphere, is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by the middle and sub-polar latitude zonal asymmetries in O3and short-wave heating.

  12. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: chemical and dynamical effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvissel, O. K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.

    2012-04-01

    In order to Improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation upon the nitrogen family (NOy) and ozone (O3), we have modelled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces nitric acid (HNO3) by conversion of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) upon hydrated water clusters H+•(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The introduced chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of NOy during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production of HNO3 with a corresponding loss of N2O5, and ii) a cold season decrease in NOx/NOy-ratio and an increase of O3, in polar regions. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modelled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3 changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the introduced pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOx polar increase in spring-to-summer in the SH, and in spring in the NH. The springtime NOx increase arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. In the southern hemisphere, a statistical significant weakening of the stratospheric jet is altered down to the lower stratosphere, and we argue that it is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by mid-latitude zonal asymmetries in O3 and short-wave heating.

  13. Observations on nocturnal growth of atmospheric clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junninen, Heikki; Hulkkonen, Mira; Riipinen, Ilona; Nieminen, Tuomo; Hirsikko, Anne; Suni, Tanja; Boy, Michael; Lee, Shan-Hu; Vana, Marko; Tammet, Hannes; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we summarize recent observations of nighttime nucleation events observed during 4 yr, from 2003 to 2006, at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, southern Finland. Formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles has been frequently observed all around the world in daytime, but similar observations in nighttime are rare. The recently developed ion spectrometers enabled us to measure charged aerosol particles and ion clusters to diameters <1 nm and are efficient tools for evaluating cluster dynamics during nighttime. We observed clear growth of cluster ions during approximately 60 nights per yr. The newly formed intermediate ions usually persisted for several hours with typical concentrations of 100-200 cm-3. The evolution of nighttime growth events is different compared with daytime events. The mechanism behind nighttime events is still unclear, but the behaviour can be described by the hypothesis of activation of clusters.

  14. Secondary ion mass spectrometry: Polyatomic and molecular ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, Richard J.; Ross, Mark M.; Kidwell, David A.

    1986-03-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has become a diverse tool for the study of many substances such as metals, semiconductors, inorganic compounds and organic compounds, including polymers and biomolecules. This paper discusses the formation and emission of polyatomic and molecular ions from surfaces of these materials. The mass, energy, and abundance distribution of cluster ions emitted from various solids — Van der Waals, molecular, metallic, ionic and covalent — are compared. Trends in their emission patterns are discussed in terms of a recombination or a direct emission mechanism. For example, the ion abundance of cluster ions sputtered from metals decreases monotonically with increasing cluster size due to a decreasing formation probability for large clusters. The emission from metal oxides, however, shows a broad distribution of M mO ±n cluster ions whose formation can be described by both recombination and direct emission mechanisms. Covalently bonded molecules tend to eject as intact species. The emission of molecular ions is also discussed with respect to the method of ionization and the various sample preparation and matrix-assisted and derivatization procedures used. For example, the emission of molecular ions from metal surfaces is strongly influenced by the nature of the adsorption site; and matrix-assisted and derivatization procedures enhance the ionization efficiency of the analyte.

  15. High-performance supercapacitor and lithium-ion battery based on 3D hierarchical NH4F-induced nickel cobaltate nanosheet-nanowire cluster arrays as self-supported electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuejiao; Qu, Baihua; Hu, Lingling; Xu, Zhi; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2013-10-21

    A facile hydrothermal method is developed for large-scale production of three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nickel cobaltate nanowire cluster arrays derived from nanosheet arrays with robust adhesion on Ni foam. Based on the morphology evolution upon reaction time, a possible formation process is proposed. The role of NH4F in formation of the structure has also been investigated based on different NH4F amounts. This unique structure significantly enhances the electroactive surface areas of the NiCo2O4 arrays, leading to better interfacial/chemical distributions at the nanoscale, fast ion and electron transfer and good strain accommodation. Thus, when it is used for supercapacitor testing, a specific capacitance of 1069 F g(-1) at a very high current density of 100 A g(-1) was obtained. Even after more than 10,000 cycles at various large current densities, a capacitance of 2000 F g(-1) at 10 A g(-1) with 93.8% retention can be achieved. It also exhibits a high-power density (26.1 kW kg(-1)) at a discharge current density of 80 A g(-1). When used as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), it presents a high reversible capacity of 976 mA h g(-1) at a rate of 200 mA g(-1) with good cycling stability and rate capability. This array material is rarely used as an anode material. Our results show that this unique 3D hierarchical porous nickel cobaltite is promising for electrochemical energy applications.

  16. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  17. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  18. Quasi-Coulomb explosion of multicomponent laser cluster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.; Nickles, P. V.; Platonov, K. Yu.

    2010-02-15

    An analytical distribution function is developed that describes the influence of a light ion component on the explosion of a spherically symmetric, charged cluster composed of two species, when the cluster is irradiated by an ultrashort, intense laser pulse. It is shown that the energy distribution of light ions can be used for diagnostics of the initial density profile of the plasma cluster. The evolution of the energy distribution of light ions is investigated as a function of their number in the cluster. It is possible to create a quasimonoenergetic distribution of the light ions at a specific proportion of the light ions and the degree of ionization of the heavier ion component. Analytical calculations of the explosion of 50 nm water clusters exposed by ultrashort and intense laser pulses are in good agreement with Particle-In-Cell simulations.

  19. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  20. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  1. Exotic shapes and exotic clusterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Algora, A.

    2011-10-28

    The interrelation of the largely elongated nuclear shapes and clusterization is discussed by applying semimicroscopic methods. {sup 36}Ar is considered as a specific example, where recent experimental heavy-ion scattering data seem to justify the theoretical predictions on the hyperdeformed states. Alpha-emitting reactions are also suggested for its population.

  2. The vibrational predissociation spectra of the H5O2+•RGn(RG=Ar,Ne) clusters: Correlation of the solvent perturbations in the free OH and shared proton transitions of the Zundel ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Nathan I.; Diken, Eric G.; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Johnson, Mark A.; Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; McCoy, Anne B.; Huang, Xinchuan; Bowman, Joel M.; Carter, Stuart

    2005-06-01

    Predissociation spectra of the H5O2+•RGn(RG=Ar,Ne) cluster ions are reported in energy regions corresponding to both the OH stretching (3350-3850cm-1) and shared proton (850-1950cm-1) vibrations. The two free OH stretching bands displayed by the Ne complex are quite close to the band origins identified earlier in bare H5O2+ [L. I. Yeh, M. Okumura, J. D. Myers, J. M. Price, and Y. T. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 91, 7319 (1989)], indicating that the symmetrical H5O2+ "Zundel" ion remains largely intact in H5O2+•Ne. The low-energy spectrum of the Ne complex is simpler than that observed previously for H5O2+•Ar, and is dominated by two sharp transitions at 928 and 1047cm-1, with a weaker feature at 1763cm-1. The H5O2+•Arn,n=1-5 spectra generally exhibit complex band structures reflecting solvent-induced symmetry breaking of the Zundel core ion. The extent of solvent perturbation is evaluated with electronic structure calculations, which predict that the rare gas atoms should attach to the spectator OH groups of H5O2+ rather than to the shared proton. In the asymmetric complexes, the shared proton resides closer to the more heavily solvated water molecule, leading to redshifts in the rare gas atom-solvated OH stretches and to blueshifts in the shared proton vibrations. The experimental spectra are compared with recent full-dimensional vibrational calculations (diffusion Monte Carlo and multimode/vibrational configuration interaction) on H5O2+. These results are consistent with assignment of the strong low-energy bands in the H5O2+•Ne spectrum to the vibration of the shared proton mostly along the O-O axis, with the 1763cm-1 band traced primarily to the out-of-phase, intramolecular bending vibrations of the two water molecules.

  3. Native tandem and ion mobility mass spectrometry highlight structural and modular similarities in clustered-regularly-interspaced shot-palindromic-repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein complexes from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Esther; Barbu, Ioana M; Barendregt, Arjan; Jore, Matthijs M; Wiedenheft, Blake; Lundgren, Magnus; Westra, Edze R; Brouns, Stan J J; Doudna, Jennifer A; van der Oost, John; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-11-01

    The CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) immune system of bacteria and archaea provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids, by a strategy analogous to RNA-interference. Key components of the defense system are ribonucleoprotein complexes, the composition of which appears highly variable in different CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Previous studies combined mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and small angle x-ray scattering to demonstrate that the E. coli Cascade complex (405 kDa) and the P. aeruginosa Csy-complex (350 kDa) are similar in that they share a central spiral-shaped hexameric structure, flanked by associating proteins and one CRISPR RNA. Recently, a cryo-electron microscopy structure of Cascade revealed that the CRISPR RNA molecule resides in a groove of the hexameric backbone. For both complexes we here describe the use of native mass spectrometry in combination with ion mobility mass spectrometry to assign a stable core surrounded by more loosely associated modules. Via computational modeling subcomplex structures were proposed that relate to the experimental IMMS data. Despite the absence of obvious sequence homology between several subunits, detailed analysis of sub-complexes strongly suggests analogy between subunits of the two complexes. Probing the specific association of E. coli Cascade/crRNA to its complementary DNA target reveals a conformational change. All together these findings provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process of the two CRISPR-associated complexes.

  4. Clusterization in Ternary Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Pyatkov, Y. V.

    This lecture notes are devoted to the new kind of ternary decay of low excited heavy nuclei called by us "collinear cluster tri-partition" (CCT) due to the features of the effect observed, namely, decay partners fly away almost collinearly and at least one of them has magic nucleon composition. At the early stage of our work the process of "true ternary fission" (fission of the nucleus into three fragments of comparable masses) was considered to be undiscovered for low excited heavy nuclei. Another possible prototype—three body cluster radioactivity—was also unknown. The most close to the CCT phenomenon, at least cinematically, stands so called "polar emission", but only very light ions (up to isotopes of Be) were observed so far.

  5. Water cluster fragmentation probed by pickup experiments.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanfu; Kresin, Vitaly V; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2016-09-14

    Electron ionization is a common tool for the mass spectrometry of atomic and molecular clusters. Any cluster can be ionized efficiently by sufficiently energetic electrons, but concomitant fragmentation can seriously obstruct the goal of size-resolved detection. We present a new general method to assess the original neutral population of the cluster beam. Clusters undergo a sticking collision with a molecule from a crossed beam, and the velocities of neat and doped cluster ion peaks are measured and compared. By making use of longitudinal momentum conservation, one can reconstruct the sizes of the neutral precursors. Here this method is applied to H2O and D2O clusters in the detected ion size range of 3-10. It is found that water clusters do fragment significantly upon electron impact: the deduced neutral precursor size is ∼3-5 times larger than the observed cluster ions. This conclusion agrees with beam size characterization by another experimental technique: photoionization after Na-doping. Abundant post-ionization fragmentation of water clusters must therefore be an important factor in the interpretation of experimental data; interestingly, there is at present no detailed microscopic understanding of the underlying fragmentation dynamics. PMID:27634257

  6. Water cluster fragmentation probed by pickup experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanfu; Kresin, Vitaly V.; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Electron ionization is a common tool for the mass spectrometry of atomic and molecular clusters. Any cluster can be ionized efficiently by sufficiently energetic electrons, but concomitant fragmentation can seriously obstruct the goal of size-resolved detection. We present a new general method to assess the original neutral population of the cluster beam. Clusters undergo a sticking collision with a molecule from a crossed beam, and the velocities of neat and doped cluster ion peaks are measured and compared. By making use of longitudinal momentum conservation, one can reconstruct the sizes of the neutral precursors. Here this method is applied to H2O and D2O clusters in the detected ion size range of 3-10. It is found that water clusters do fragment significantly upon electron impact: the deduced neutral precursor size is ˜3-5 times larger than the observed cluster ions. This conclusion agrees with beam size characterization by another experimental technique: photoionization after Na-doping. Abundant post-ionization fragmentation of water clusters must therefore be an important factor in the interpretation of experimental data; interestingly, there is at present no detailed microscopic understanding of the underlying fragmentation dynamics.

  7. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kosuga, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Diamond, P. H.; Itoh, K.; Lesur, M.

    2014-10-15

    A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

  8. Electron attachment to carbon dioxide clusters at very low electron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stamatovic, A.; Leiter, K.; Ritter, W.; Stephan, K.; Maerk, T.D.

    1985-09-15

    Electron attachment to CO/sub 2/ clusters formed by nozzle expansion was investigated in a crossed molecular-beam--electron-impact--mass spectrometer system. In addition to cluster ions previously observed at 3--4 eV electron energy we observe presently cluster ions produced at around zero electron energy. Some of these ions are likely produced by a less dissociative production mechanism allowing the probing of cluster beams with better reliability than previously.

  9. Properties of small Ar sub N-1 K/+/ ionic clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Danilowicz, R.; Dugan, J.

    1977-01-01

    A self-consistent formalism is developed that, based upon a many-body potential, dynamically determines the thermodynamic properties of ionic clusters without an a priori designation of the equilibrium structures. Aggregates consisting of a single closed shell K(+) ion and N-1 isoelectronic argon atoms were studied. The clusters form crystallites at low temperatures, and melting transitions and spontaneous dissociations are indicated. The results confirm experimental evidence that shows that ionic clusters become less stable with increasing N. The crystallite structures formed by four different clusters are isosceles triangle, skewed form, octahedron with ion in the middle, and icosahedron with the ion in the middle.

  10. Self-confinement of finite dust clusters in isotropic plasmas.

    PubMed

    Miloshevsky, G V; Hassanein, A

    2012-05-01

    Finite two-dimensional dust clusters are systems of a small number of charged grains. The self-confinement of dust clusters in isotropic plasmas is studied using the particle-in-cell method. The energetically favorable configurations of grains in plasma are found that are due to the kinetic effects of plasma ions and electrons. The self-confinement phenomenon is attributed to the change in the plasma composition within a dust cluster resulting in grain attraction mediated by plasma ions. This is a self-consistent state of a dust cluster in which grain's repulsion is compensated by the reduced charge and floating potential on grains, overlapped ion clouds, and depleted electrons within a cluster. The common potential well is formed trapping dust clusters in the confined state. These results provide both valuable insights and a different perspective to the classical view on the formation of boundary-free dust clusters in isotropic plasmas.

  11. Electron ionization study of ammonia micro-clusters

    PubMed

    Pelc; Michalak

    2000-01-01

    An electron impact ion source on a double focusing sector field mass spectrometer was used to investigate ammonia micro-clusters produced by the adiabatic free jet expansion of ammonia gas. The appearance energies for [NH(3)](n)(+), n ions have been determined. Results of measurements of appearance pressures of selected clusters are described for a range of operating conditions. An empirical formula describing the ammonia clusters production is proposed. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  13. Transmission secondary ion mass spectrometry using 5 MeV C60+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Nagano, K.; Suzuki, M.; Narumi, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Hirata, K.; Kimura, K.

    2014-03-01

    In the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), use of cluster ions has an advantage of producing a high sensitivity of intact large molecular ions over monatomic ions. This paper presents further yield enhancement of the intact biomolecular ions by measuring the secondary ions emitted in the forward direction. Phenylalanine amino acid films deposited on self-supporting thin Si3N4 films were bombarded with 5 MeV C60 ions. Secondary ions emitted in the forward and backward directions were measured. The yield of intact phenylalanine molecular ions emitted in the forward direction is significantly enhanced compared to the backward direction while fragment ions are suppressed. This suggests a large potential of using transmission cluster ion SIMS for the analysis of biological materials.

  14. Solvation at nanoscale: Alkali-halides in water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Partanen, Leena; Mikkelae, Mikko-Heikki; Huttula, Marko; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Zhang Chaofan; Andersson, Tomas; Bjoerneholm, Olle

    2013-01-28

    The solvation of alkali-halides in water clusters at nanoscale is studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The Na 2p, K 3p, Cl 2p, Br 3d, and I 4d core level binding energies have been measured for salt-containing water clusters. The results have been compared to those of alkali halide clusters and the dilute aqueous salt solutions. It is found that the alkali halides dissolve in small water clusters as ions.

  15. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The revised International Headache Society (IHS) criteria for cluster headache are: attacks of severe or very severe, strictly unilateral pain, which is orbital, supraorbital, or temporal pain, lasting 15 to 180 minutes and occurring from once every other day to eight times daily. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to abort cluster headache? What are the effects of interventions to prevent cluster headache? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 23 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: baclofen (oral); botulinum toxin (intramuscular); capsaicin (intranasal); chlorpromazine; civamide (intranasal); clonidine (transdermal); corticosteroids; ergotamine and dihydroergotamine (oral or intranasal); gabapentin (oral); greater occipital nerve injections (betamethasone plus xylocaine); high-dose and high-flow-rate oxygen; hyperbaric oxygen; leuprolide; lidocaine (intranasal); lithium (oral); melatonin; methysergide (oral); octreotide (subcutaneous); pizotifen (oral); sodium valproate (oral); sumatriptan (oral, subcutaneous, and intranasal); topiramate (oral); tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs); verapamil; and zolmitriptan (oral and intranasal). PMID:21718584

  16. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  17. Chemical ionization of clusters formed from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine or diamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to deprotonate and thus chemically ionize the clusters. In this study, we compare cluster concentrations measured using either nitrate or acetate. Clusters were formed in a flow reactor from vapors of sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine). These comparisons show that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with high base content. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe ion processes which include proton-transfer, ion-molecule clustering, and decomposition of ions. Ion decomposition upon deprotonation by acetate/nitrate was observed. More studies are needed to quantify to what extent ion decomposition affects observed cluster content and concentrations, especially those chemically ionized with acetate since it deprotonates more types of clusters than nitrate.Model calculations of the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways are also presented to better identify the cluster types that are not efficiently deprotonated by nitrate. Comparison of model and measured clusters indicate that sulfuric acid dimers with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimers with two or more base molecules are not efficiently chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that acetate CI provides better information on cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  18. Investigations of Sputtered Ion Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Stephen Nicholai

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry is based on sputtered ion emission. Although the sputtering process was observed over 100 years ago, the ion emission process is still not well understood. Ions are formed with a wide range of energies, charge states and multiplicities, and ionization efficiencies can vary by orders of magnitude, depending on the particular ion and the matrix from which it originates. A series of studies are presented here which examine ion production in several unusual areas in order to gain insight into the sputtered ion emission process. The energy of analyzed ions is usually limited to 125 eV or less. The range of the Cameca IMS-3f at Arizona State University has been extended to analyze ions with up to 4500 eV of initial kinetic energy. The use of high energy ions to eliminate cluster interferences has been developed as an analytical technique. Doubly-charged positive ions of Mg, Al and Si have been widely studied. Other doubley-charged ions have been almost ignored, mainly due to low signal intensity. Studies of doubly-charged ions of the fourth row elements are presented here. The energy distribution of these ions indicates that they are formed by an Auger process, commonly referred to as the kinetic emission process. Small gas phase doubly-charged negative ions are very rare. Reports of atomic doubly-charged negative ions have been disproved, or were unable to be confirmed. Large molecules or clusters are able to accommodate a double -negative charge, because of the large separation between the two electrons. Observations of small carbon cluster dianions are discussed. The oscillations in intensity give an indication of their structure and stability. Electron bombardment can also cause the emission of ions from surfaces. There is some controversy as to whether the ions are desorbed directly from the sample, or are desorbed as neutrals and ionized above the sample by interaction with the electron beam or secondary electrons. Measurements of

  19. Ion composition in a noctilucent cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Witt, G.

    1976-01-01

    Ion composition at mesospheric altitudes was measured and compared between high and mid-latitude sites under summer daytime conditions. Rocket-borne measurements were made with pumped quadrupole ion mass spectrometers. The mid-latitude data were obtained at Wallops Island, Virginia on June 30, 1973, at 1510 LMT. Large quantities of hydronium cluster ions were observed through 109+, with maximum concentrations at 55+ and 73+. Also, cluster ions of nitric oxide were observed through 84+. The high latitude launch occurred at Kiruna, Sweden on August 2, 1973, at 0700 LMT following visual sighting of a noctilucent cloud on the prior evening. The data near mesopause shows cluster ions, but also a preponderance of heavy ions between 90 and 145 AMU, with groupings 18 AMU apart but unrelated to the more typical cluster ions. One possible set of consistent identifications leads to iron and iron oxide hydrates. These results may suggest the presence of metallic particulates and ions which form hydrated clusters ions.

  20. Bursts of intermediate ions in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, U.; Salm, J.; Tammet, H.

    1998-06-01

    The mobility spectrum of air ions has been measured at Tahkuse Observatory in Estonia for several years. The average concentration of intermediate ions with mobilities of 0.05-0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 in atmospheric air is about 50 cm-3. On the level of this low background, high concentration bursts of intermediate air ions occur occasionally. A burst can be followed by subsequent evolution of intermediate ions into larger ones. To explain the bursts of intermediate air ions, two hypotheses can be advanced: (1)A burst of neutral particles occurs due to homogeneous nucleation, and the particles are charged by the attachment of cluster ions. (2) The cluster ions grow by ion-induced nucleation in proper environmental conditions.

  1. Blackbody-induced radiative dissociation of cationic SF6 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toker, Y.; Rahinov, I.; Schwalm, D.; Even, U.; Heber, O.; Rappaport, M. L.; Strasser, D.; Zajfman, D.

    2012-08-01

    The stability of cationic SF5+(SF6)n-1 clusters was investigated by measuring their blackbody-induced radiative dissociation (BIRD) rates. The clusters were produced in a supersonic expansion ion source and stored in an electrostatic ion-beam trap at room temperature, where their abundances and lifetimes were measured. Using the “master equation” approach, relative binding energies of an SF6 unit in the clusters could be extracted from the storage-time dependence of the survival probabilities. The results allow for a deeper insight into the effect of a localized charge on the structure and stability of SF6-based clusters.

  2. Cryogenically cooled octupole ion trap for spectroscopy of biomolecular ions.

    PubMed

    Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kopysov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a linear octupole ion trap, suitable for collisional cryogenic cooling and spectroscopy of large ions. The performance of this trap has been assessed using ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of protonated dipeptides. At the trap temperature of 6.1 K, the vibrational temperature of the ions reaches 9.1 K, although their estimated translational temperature is ~150 K. This observation suggests that, despite the significant translational heating by radio-frequency electrical field, vibrational cooling of heavy ions in the octupole is at least as efficient as in the 22-pole ion traps previously used in our laboratory. In contrast to the 22-pole traps, excellent radial confinement of ions in the octupole makes it convenient for laser spectroscopy and boosts the dissociation yield of the stored ions to 30%. Overlap of the entire ion cloud by the laser beam in the octupole also allows for efficient UV depletion spectroscopy of ion-He clusters. The measured electronic spectra of the dipeptides and the clusters differ drastically, complicating a use of UV tagging spectroscopy for structural determination of large species.

  3. Cryogenically cooled octupole ion trap for spectroscopy of biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Kopysov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a linear octupole ion trap, suitable for collisional cryogenic cooling and spectroscopy of large ions. The performance of this trap has been assessed using ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of protonated dipeptides. At the trap temperature of 6.1 K, the vibrational temperature of the ions reaches 9.1 K, although their estimated translational temperature is ˜150 K. This observation suggests that, despite the significant translational heating by radio-frequency electrical field, vibrational cooling of heavy ions in the octupole is at least as efficient as in the 22-pole ion traps previously used in our laboratory. In contrast to the 22-pole traps, excellent radial confinement of ions in the octupole makes it convenient for laser spectroscopy and boosts the dissociation yield of the stored ions to 30%. Overlap of the entire ion cloud by the laser beam in the octupole also allows for efficient UV depletion spectroscopy of ion-He clusters. The measured electronic spectra of the dipeptides and the clusters differ drastically, complicating a use of UV tagging spectroscopy for structural determination of large species.

  4. Investigation of ion-ion-recombination at atmospheric pressure with a pulsed electron gun.

    PubMed

    Heptner, Andre; Cochems, Philipp; Langejuergen, Jens; Gunzer, Frank; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    For future development of simple miniaturized sensors based on pulsed atmospheric pressure ionization as known from ion mobility spectrometry, we investigated the reaction kinetics of ion-ion-recombination to establish selective ion suppression as an easy to apply separation technique for otherwise non-selective ion detectors. Therefore, the recombination rates of different positive ion species, such as protonated water clusters H(+)(H(2)O)(n) (positive reactant ions), acetone, ammonia and dimethyl-methylphosphonate ions, all recombining with negative oxygen clusters O(2)(-)(H(2)O)(n) (negative reactant ions) in a field-free reaction region, are measured and compared. For all experiments, we use a drift tube ion mobility spectrometer equipped with a non-radioactive electron gun for pulsed atmospheric pressure ionization of the analytes. Both, ionization and recombination times are controlled by the duty cycle and repetition rate of the electron emission from the electron gun. Thus, it is possible to investigate the ion loss caused by ion-ion-recombination depending on the recombination time defined as the time delay between the end of the electron emission and the ion injection into the drift tube. Furthermore, the effect of the initial total ion density in the reaction region on the ion-ion-recombination rate is investigated by varying the density of the emitted electrons.

  5. Ionic polymer cluster energetics: Computational analysis of pendant chain stiffness and charge imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Lisa Mauck; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-06-01

    In recent years there has been considerable study of the potential mechanisms underlying the electromechanical response of ionic-polymer-metal composites. The most recent models have been based on the response of the ion-containing clusters that are formed when the material is synthesized. Most of these efforts have employed assumptions of uniform ion distribution within spherical cluster shapes. This work investigates the impact of dispensing with these assumptions in order to better understand the parameters that impact cluster shape, size, and ion transport potential. A computational micromechanics model applying Monte Carlo methodology is employed to predict the equilibrium state of a single cluster of a solvated ionomeric polymer. For a constant solvated state, the model tracks the position of individual ions within a given cluster in response to ion-ion interaction, mechanical stiffness of the pendant chain, cluster surface energy, and external electric-field loading. Results suggest that cluster surface effects play a significant role in the equilibrium cluster state, including ion distribution; pendant chain stiffness also plays a role in ion distribution but to a lesser extent. Moreover, ion pairing is rarely complete even in cation-rich clusters; this in turn supports the supposition of the formation of anode and cathode boundary layers.

  6. A new Cs sputter ion source with polyatomic ion beams for SIMS applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Belykh, S. F.; Palitsin, V. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Kovarsky, A. P.; Chang, R. J. H.; Adriaens, A.; Dowsett, M. G.; Adams, F.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Warwick; Ioffe Phys.-Tech. Inst.; Ghent Univ.; Univ. Antwerp

    2007-08-02

    A simple design for a cesium sputter ion source compatible with vacuum and ion-optical systems as well as with electronics of the commercially available Cameca IMS-4f instrument is reported. This ion source has been tested with the cluster primary ions of Si{sub n}{sup -} and Cu{sub n}{sup -}. Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of the analytical capabilities of the secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument due to the nonadditive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ones with the same impact energy.

  7. Reactivity of vinyl chloride ionic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martrenchard, S.; Dedonder-Lardeux, C.; Dimicoli, I.; Grégoire, G.; Jouvet, C.; Mons, M.; Solgadi, D.

    1998-12-01

    The reactivity of vinyl chloride ionic clusters has been investigated by the Threshold PhotoElectron PhotoIon COincidences technique. In the case of the dimer, the competition between the three reactive channels (HCl, Cl ṡ and CH 2Cl elimination) has been studied. The main reactive channel is HCl elimination which proceeds through a 0.2 eV barrier. This elimination reaction is still observed in the trimer but not in larger clusters. For these clusters, cooling by evaporation of neutral vinyl chloride monomers seems to be the favored channel that hinders the HCl elimination step.

  8. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters.

    PubMed

    Apicella, B; Li, X; Passaro, M; Spinelli, N; Wang, X

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  9. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  10. Ion desorption from frozen H 2O irradiated by MeV heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, V. M.; Farenzena, L. S.; Ponciano, C. R.; Silveira, E. F. da; Wien, K.

    2004-10-01

    Nitrogen (0.13-0.85 MeV) and 252Cf fission fragments (˜65 MeV) beams are employed to sputter positive and negative secondary ions from frozen water. Desorption yields are measured for different ice temperatures and projectile energies. Target surface is continuously refreshed by condensed water while the target temperature varies and ice thickness changes. In both projectile energy ranges, the preferentially ejected ions are H +, H2+ and (H 2O) nH +-cluster ions. The yields of the corresponding negative ions H - and (H 2O) nO - or (H 2O) nOH - are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower. The (H 2O) nH + desorption yields decrease exponentially as the cluster size, n, increases. In the low energy range, the desorption of positive ion clusters may occur in a two-step process: first, desorption of preformed H 2O clusters and, then, ionization by H + or H 3O + capture. For 0.81 MeV N + projectile ions, the cluster ion emission contributes with 0.05% to the total H 2O desorbed yield. There are indications that emission of the (H 2O) nH + disappears for an electronic energy loss lower than 20 eV/Å. For the high energy range, desorption of small ion clusters is particularly enhanced, revealing that a fragmentation process also exists.

  11. Surface Modification of Polymer Substrates by Oxygen Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Araki, R.; Yakushiji, T.

    2008-11-03

    Oxygen cluster ions and/or monomer ions were used for the sputtering and the surface modification of polymers such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). For the case of oxygen cluster ion irradiation, the sputtered depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the sputtering yield was much larger than that by the monomer ion irradiation. The sputtered particles represented the polymer structure, which indicated that the bond scission by the cluster ion irradiation resulted in an ejection of monomer molecule through the intermolecular collision. On the other hand, for the oxygen monomer ion irradiation, the implanted depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the bond scission occurred at the deep region through the binary collision with the high energetic ions. Therefore, the sputtering yield for the polymer surfaces decreased, and the sputtering effect became very small. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was more effective for oxidation of the PET surfaces rather than the monomer ion irradiation or the cluster ion irradiation. As a result, the contact angle measurement showed that the wettability of the PET surfaces irradiated by the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was much enhanced.

  12. Air ions and aerosol science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, Hannes

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4-1.8 nm.

  13. Root uptake and phytotoxicity of nanosized molybdenum octahedral clusters.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Tangi; Burel, Agnès; Esnault, Marie-Andrée; Cordier, Stéphane; Grasset, Fabien; Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco

    2012-06-15

    Here are examined the root uptake and phytotoxicity of octahedral hexamolybdenum clusters on rapeseed plants using the solid state compound Cs(2)Mo(6)Br(14) as cluster precursor. [Mo(6)Br(14)](2-) cluster units are nanosized entities offering a strong and stable emission in the near-infrared region with numerous applications in biotechnology. To investigate cluster toxicity on rapeseed plants, two different culture systems have been set up, using either a water-sorbing suspension of cluster aggregates or an ethanol-sorbing solution of dispersed nanosized clusters. Size, shape, surface area and state of clusters in both medium were analyzed by FE-SEM, BET and XPS. The potential contribution of cluster dissolution to phytotoxicity was evaluated by ICP-OES and toxicity analysis of Mo, Br and Cs. We showed that the clusters did not affect seed germination but greatly inhibited plant growth. This inhibition was much more important when plants were treated with nanosized entities than with microsized cluster aggregates. In addition, nanosized clusters affected the root morphology in a different manner than microsized cluster aggregates, as shown by FE-SEM observations. The root penetration of the clusters was followed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy with high spatial resolution (NanoSIMS) and was also found to be much more important for treatments with nanosized clusters.

  14. Ion dip spectroscopy of cold molecules and ions. Progress report and renewal proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1987-08-13

    A research program is underway with the objective of developing techniques of high resolution multiphoton spectroscopy for selective, ultrasensitive molecular detection. Methods under study include various forms of ion dip spectroscopy and new methods of ion fragmentation spectroscopy. The studies are providing a new understanding of the fundamental spectroscopy and photophysics of large molecular ions. Dimer and cluster ions of polynuclear aromatics and related species are also being investigated, with potential detection applications.

  15. Nanochemistry: Iron cluster reactions with methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    McCarter, B.E.; Bililign, S.; Feigerle, C.S.; Miller, J.C.

    1999-08-26

    Previous experiments have shown that the ionization/dissociation of iron pentacarbonyl clusters can lead to the formation of iron ions and iron cluster ions that that these species can further react with dopant molecules to yield chemically rearranged products. The present experiments characterize similar reactions with methyl iodide molecules and clusters. Heteroclusters of the form [Fe(CO){sub 5}]{sub m}(CH{sub 3}I){sub n}Ar{sub p} are created in an expanding supersonic jet of the component molecules. Following ionization by a 30 ps, 266 nm laser pulse, extensive dissociation, aggregation, and chemical rearrangement occur leading to ionic products, which are characterized by mass spectrometry. Cluster ions of the type Fe{sub m}I{sub n}{sup +}, Fe(CH{sub 3}I){sub n}{sup +} are observed as products. The stability of the binary parent ion Fe(CH{sub 3}I){sup +} is demonstrated for the first time.

  16. Cluster beam ionizer having the self-acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Be, S.H.; Yano, K.; Kodaira, K.; Kawai, S.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to describe the results of the computer simulation and the experiment on the new cluster ionizer proposed before. The gradient of the space-potential in the ionizer has an axial component that favors the cluster ion beam flow. This was ascertained from the results of the computer simulation and the experiment.

  17. Field evaporation of doubly charged ions from a polar liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, A. A.; Novikova, L. I.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of charge on field evaporation of ions from polar liquids is considered. Using the electromembrane ion source, we performed mass-spectral analysis of field evaporation of ions from the solution of sodium sulfate in a water-glycerol mixture. The composition of doubly charged cluster ions in the field evaporation from glycerol is determined. The rates of the field evaporation of doubly charged ions and singly charged ions are compared. It is shown that the ion charge as well as its localization considerably influences the efficiency of field evaporation of ions from polar liquids.

  18. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.; Romanyuk, S. N.

    2012-06-01

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60-100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102-103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method.

  19. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  20. Uranium pyrophosphate / methylenediphosphonate polyoxometalate cage clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Jie; Qiu, Jie; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Ward, Matt; Szymanowski, Jennifer E.S.; Burns, Peter C

    2010-09-29

    Despite potential applications in advanced nuclear energy systems, nanoscale control of uranium materials is in its infancy. In its hexavalent state, U occurs as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions that are coordinated by various ligands to give square, pentagonal, or hexagonal bipyramids. Creation and design of nanostructured uranyl materials requires interruption of the tendency of uranyl bipyramids to share equatorial edges to form infinite sheets that occur in extended structures. Where a bidentate peroxide group bridges uranyl bipyramids, the configuration is inherently bent, fostering formation of cage clusters. Here the bent configurations of four- and five-membered rings of uranyl peroxide hexagonal bipyramids are bridged by pyrophosphate or methylenediphosphonate, creating eight chemically complex cage clusters with specific topologies. Chemical complexity in such clusters provides opportunities for the tuning of cage sizes, pore sizes, and properties such as aqueous solubility. Several of these are topological derivatives of simpler clusters that contain only uranyl bipyramids, whereas others exhibit new topologies.

  1. Reagent Cluster Anions for Multiple Gas-Phase Covalent Modifications of Peptide and Protein Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Boone M.; Stutzman, John R.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-07-01

    Multiple gas phase ion/ion covalent modifications of peptide and protein ions are demonstrated using cluster-type reagent anions of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide acetate (sulfo-NHS acetate) and 2-formyl-benzenesulfonic acid (FBMSA). These reagents are used to selectively modify unprotonated primary amine functionalities of peptides and proteins. Multiple reactive reagent molecules can be present in a single cluster ion, which allows for multiple covalent modifications to be achieved in a single ion/ion encounter and at the `cost' of only a single analyte charge. Multiple derivatizations are demonstrated when the number of available reactive sites on the analyte cation exceeds the number of reagent molecules in the anionic cluster (e.g., data shown here for reactions between the polypeptide [K10 + 3H]3+ and the reagent cluster [5R5Na - Na]-). This type of gas-phase ion chemistry is also applicable to whole protein ions. Here, ubiquitin was successfully modified using an FBMSA cluster anion which, upon collisional activation, produced fragment ions with various numbers of modifications. Data for the pentamer cluster are included as illustrative of the results obtained for the clusters comprised of two to six reagent molecules.

  2. Hydrogen Bonding, Hydration of Species, Ion Pairing and Clusterization in H2O-NaCl-CaCl2-CO2-NaHCO3-Na2CO3 Fluids: Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Effects of Temperature, Pressure and Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinichev, A. G.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Wang, J.

    2004-12-01

    Molecular computer simulation is an especially valuable tool to study the structural and dynamic properties of carbon-bearing aqueous fluids on the fundamental atomic time- and length- scale because these fluids are not readily studied experimentally using conventional X-ray or EXAFS methods. In this case, experimental methods can produce ambiguous results, because the carbon and oxygen atoms of the solute species are not easily distinguishable from the oxygen atoms of solvent water. Systematic molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulation studies of several fluid compositions - H2O-CO2, H2O-CO2-NaCl, H2O-NaHCO3, and H2O-Na2CO3 - were performed to study the effects of temperature, pressure (fluid density) and concentration on the structural, energetic, spectroscopic and dynamic properties of these solutions characterized on the atomic scale via the statistical parameters of individual hydrogen bonds and H-bonding networks, local hydration structures of dissolved species, and ion pair formation. Similar molecular-level characteristics of pure water and H2O-NaCl and H2O-CaCl2 solutions are calculated and used for comparison with the properties of carbon-bearing fluids. H2O-rich and CO2-rich compositions of the ternary H2O-CO2-NaCl system demonstrate strikingly different structural and dynamic behavior at about the same average density. In dense CO2-rich fluids, dissolved H2O molecules exhibit a high degree of hydrogen bonding and form relatively stable H-bonded clusters structurally similar to those observed in supercritical water at a much lower density. In contrast, CO2 molecules dissolved in water-rich fluids occur in clathrate-like cages formed by surrounding H-bonded water molecules. The hydration shells of carbonate and bicarbonate ions both contain approximately 10 water molecules, but the water structure around the carbonate ion is much more pronounced due to the higher anion charge. This also leads to the formation of very stable ion pairs and larger ionic

  3. Survey on granularity clustering.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shifei; Du, Mingjing; Zhu, Hong

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of uncertain artificial intelligent and the arrival of big data era, conventional clustering analysis and granular computing fail to satisfy the requirements of intelligent information processing in this new case. There is the essential relationship between granular computing and clustering analysis, so some researchers try to combine granular computing with clustering analysis. In the idea of granularity, the researchers expand the researches in clustering analysis and look for the best clustering results with the help of the basic theories and methods of granular computing. Granularity clustering method which is proposed and studied has attracted more and more attention. This paper firstly summarizes the background of granularity clustering and the intrinsic connection between granular computing and clustering analysis, and then mainly reviews the research status and various methods of granularity clustering. Finally, we analyze existing problem and propose further research.

  4. Cluster automorphism groups of cluster algebras with coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wen; Zhu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    We study the cluster automorphism group of a skew-symmetric cluster algebra with geometric coefficients. For this, we introduce the notion of gluing free cluster algebra, and show that under a weak condition the cluster automorphism group of a gluing free cluster algebra is a subgroup of the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra (i.e. the corresponding cluster algebra without coefficients). We show that several classes of cluster algebras with coefficients are gluing free, for example, cluster algebras with principal coefficients, cluster algebras with universal geometric coefficients, and cluster algebras from surfaces (except a 4-gon) with coefficients from boundaries. Moreover, except four kinds of surfaces, the cluster automorphism group of a cluster algebra from a surface with coefficients from boundaries is isomorphic to the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra; for a cluster algebra with principal coefficients, its cluster automorphism group is isomorphic to the automorphism group of its initial quiver.

  5. Decay processes and radiative cooling of small anionic copper clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenfeldt, Christian; Blaum, Klaus; Froese, Michael W.; George, Sebastian; Guzmán-Ramírez, Gregorio; Lange, Michael; Menk, Sebastian; Schweikhard, Lutz; Wolf, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The decay of copper clusters Cun- with size n =4 -7 , produced in a metal ion sputter source, was studied in an electrostatic ion-beam trap. The neutral products after electron emission and fragmentation were monitored for ion storage times of up to a second. The observations indicated the presence of radiative cooling. The energy distributions of the remaining clusters were probed by laser irradiation up to several further seconds of storage time. This defined excitation lead to photoinduced decay signals which, again, showed signs of radiative cooling for Cu6,7 -, not, however, for Cu4,5 -.

  6. Photoionization and fragmentaton of (N2O)n clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamke, W.; Kamke, B.; Kiefl, H. U.; Hertel, I. V.

    1986-02-01

    A supersonic molecular beam and monochromatized synchrotron radiation are presently used to measure photoionization efficiency curves for (N2O)n, at n = 1-6, in the 55-110 nm wavelength region. By measuring the energy loss of cluster ions which fragment in a field free drift region of the ion source, it becomes possible to detect delayed unimolecular and collision-induced fragmentations of the cluster ions. From a study of the dependence of the 'metastable' signals on background pressure, it appears that only the removal of a single N2O molecule at a time can occur by unimolecular decay.

  7. Ion Beam Modification of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, B; de la Rubia, T D; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Rehn, L E

    2005-10-10

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier-Science Publishers as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil, and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists, and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English. IBMM 2004 was held on September 5-10, 2004. The focus was on materials science involving both basic ion-solid interaction processes and property changes occurring either during or subsequent to ion bombardment and ion beam processing in relation to materials and device applications. Areas of research included Nanostructures, Multiscale Modeling, Patterning of Surfaces, Focused Ion Beams, Defects in Semiconductors, Insulators and Metals, Cluster Beams, Radiation Effects in Materials, Photonic Devices, Ion Implantation, Ion Beams in Biology and Medicine including New Materials, Imaging, and Treatment.

  8. Comparing simulated and experimental molecular cluster distributions.

    PubMed

    Olenius, Tinja; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Franchin, Alessandro; Junninen, Heikki; Ortega, Ismael K; Kurtén, Theo; Loukonen, Ville; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Formation of secondary atmospheric aerosol particles starts with gas phase molecules forming small molecular clusters. High-resolution mass spectrometry enables the detection and chemical characterization of electrically charged clusters from the molecular scale upward, whereas the experimental detection of electrically neutral clusters, especially as a chemical composition measurement, down to 1 nm in diameter and beyond still remains challenging. In this work we simulated a set of both electrically neutral and charged small molecular clusters, consisting of sulfuric acid and ammonia molecules, with a dynamic collision and evaporation model. Collision frequencies between the clusters were calculated according to classical kinetics, and evaporation rates were derived from first principles quantum chemical calculations with no fitting parameters. We found a good agreement between the modeled steady-state concentrations of negative cluster ions and experimental results measured with the state-of-the-art Atmospheric Pressure interface Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometer (APi-TOF) in the CLOUD chamber experiments at CERN. The model can be used to interpret experimental results and give information on neutral clusters that cannot be directly measured.

  9. Comparing simulated and experimental molecular cluster distributions.

    PubMed

    Olenius, Tinja; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Franchin, Alessandro; Junninen, Heikki; Ortega, Ismael K; Kurtén, Theo; Loukonen, Ville; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Formation of secondary atmospheric aerosol particles starts with gas phase molecules forming small molecular clusters. High-resolution mass spectrometry enables the detection and chemical characterization of electrically charged clusters from the molecular scale upward, whereas the experimental detection of electrically neutral clusters, especially as a chemical composition measurement, down to 1 nm in diameter and beyond still remains challenging. In this work we simulated a set of both electrically neutral and charged small molecular clusters, consisting of sulfuric acid and ammonia molecules, with a dynamic collision and evaporation model. Collision frequencies between the clusters were calculated according to classical kinetics, and evaporation rates were derived from first principles quantum chemical calculations with no fitting parameters. We found a good agreement between the modeled steady-state concentrations of negative cluster ions and experimental results measured with the state-of-the-art Atmospheric Pressure interface Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometer (APi-TOF) in the CLOUD chamber experiments at CERN. The model can be used to interpret experimental results and give information on neutral clusters that cannot be directly measured. PMID:24600997

  10. Ab initio studies on the solvation, electronic structures and intracluster reactions in M(+)L(n), with M(+)=magnesium and calcium singly-charged ions, L=water, methanol, ammonia, and n=1-6, and the elimination of a hydrogen atom in H atom in hydrated sodium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ka Wai

    The solvation and electronic structures of M+Ln, with M+ = Mg+ and Cat, L = H2O, CH 3OH and NH3, n=1-6 were investigated by ab initio calculations using G03 package and density functional theory based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations with projector augmented-wave (PAW) method and a planewave basis set using Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP). Furthermore, ab initio studies on the intracluster reactions of Mg+ and Ca+ ions with different solvent molecules, H2O, CH3OH and NH3, were also done using G03 package. Finally, the elimination of a H atom in Na(H2O)n was studied. Such studies on the interactions and reactivity in gas clusters can provide insights into their analogies existing in condense phase. Interactions of Mg+ and Ca+ ions in different solvent molecules, H2O, CH3OH and NH3, were calculated with B3LYP and MP2 methods with basis sets 6-31+g** and 6-311+g**. A systematic comparison on the structures and reactivities of these clusters should provide a better understanding on the interplay of the ion-solvent, solvent-solvent, and electron-solvent interactions. It can provide a better understanding on the structures and bonding of complexes having analogies to those existing in condense phase. For Mg+(CH3OH)n and Ca+(CH 3OH)n, both H-elimination from OH/CH bond and CH3-elimination were investigated. H-elimination from O---H bond becomes more accessible for large cluster due to the diffusion of electron density to O---H bond. Studies on the H-elimination in Mg+(NH3)n and H-elimination from C---H bond in Mg+(CH3OH) n show that the reaction barriers flatten above 20 kcal/mol as n reaches 4 and above. These calculation results prove that the source of loss of H atom in ground state Mg+(CH3OH)n should be through the O---H bond rather than through the C---H bond. Compared to Mg+(CH3OH)n, the reaction barriers for H-elimination in Mg+(NH3)n is much larger, which is in consistent with the experimental observation of little H-elimination for Mg

  11. Letter: High-mass capabilities of positive-ion and negative-ion direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gross, Jürgen H

    2016-01-01

    Of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C(+)) tricyanomethide (A(-)) high-mass cluster ions of both positive ([C(n)A(n-1)](+)) and negative ([C(n-1)A(n)](-)) charge were generated and detected by direct analysis in real time (DART) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS). After optimization of the settings of the DART ionization source and of the mass analyzer ions of m/z values unprecedented in DART-MS were detected. Thus, the upper m/z limits of positive-ion and negative-ion DART- MS were substantially expanded. Negative-ion DART-MS delivered cluster ions up to [C(15)A(16)](-), m/z 3527 (nominal mass of monoisotopic ion), while positive-ion DART-MS even yielded ions up to [C(30)A(29)](+), m/z 6784. The identification of the cluster ions is supported by their accurate mass and exact mass differences corresponding to CA between adjacent cluster ion peaks.

  12. A pure inorganic 1D chain based on {Mo8O28} clusters and Mn(II) ions: [Mn(H2O)2Mo8O28 ] n 6 n -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofen; Yan, Yonghong; Wu, Lizhou; Yu, Chengxin; Dong, Xinbo; Hu, Huaiming; Xue, Ganglin

    2016-01-01

    A new pure inorganic polymer, (NH4)6n[Mn(H2O)2Mo8O28)]n(H2O)2n(1), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectrum, UV-vis absorption spectra, TG-DSC and electrochemical studies. In 1, [Mo8O28]8- anions act as tetradentate ligands and are alternately linked by Mn(H2O)2 2 + ions into a one-dimensional chain structure. It is interesting that 1 represents the first example of pure inorganic-inorganic hybrid based on octamolybdate and transition metal ions. Moreover, it was indicated that 1 had definite catalytic activities on the probe reaction of benzyl alcohol oxidation to benzaldehyde with H2O2.

  13. CLARIS G2: Development of Carbon Cluster Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Y.; Hamamoto, N.; Umisedo, S.; Koga, Y.; Une, H.; Asai, H.; Maehara, N.; Hashino, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Nagayama, T.; Tanjyo, M.; Onoda, H.; Horsky, T. N.; Hahto, S. K.; Sekar, K.

    2011-01-07

    Nissin's boron and carbon cluster ion implanter CLARIS G2 has been developed for the mass production of next generation CMOS devices. Development of boron cluster implant technique was presented at last IIT conference in 2008 [1]. In this paper, development of carbon cluster (C{sub 16}H{sub x}{sup +} and C{sub 7}H{sub x}{sup +}) implant technique is described. Carbon cluster implantation has been well productized in terms of throughput, beam quality and lifetime.

  14. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Sapio, Vincent De; Kegelmeyer, Philip

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. With regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.

  15. Determination of relative sensitivity factors during secondary ion sputtering of silicate glasses by Au+, Au2+ and Au3+ ions.

    PubMed

    King, Ashley; Henkel, Torsten; Rost, Detlef; Lyon, Ian C

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Au-cluster ions have been successfully used for organic analysis in secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cluster ions, such as Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+), can produce secondary ion yield enhancements of up to a factor of 300 for high mass organic molecules with minimal sample damage. In this study, the potential for using Au(+), Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) primary ions for the analysis of inorganic samples is investigated by analyzing a range of silicate glass standards. Practical secondary ion yields for both Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) ions are enhanced relative to those for Au(+), consistent with their increased sputter rates. No elevation in ionization efficiency was found for the cluster primary ions. Relative sensitivity factors for major and trace elements in the standards showed no improvement in quantification with Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) ions over the use of Au(+) ions. Higher achievable primary ion currents for Au(+) ions than for Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) allow for more precise analyses of elemental abundances within inorganic samples, making them the preferred choice, in contrast to the choice of Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) for the analysis of organic samples. The use of delayed secondary ion extraction can also boost secondary ion signals, although there is a loss of overall sensitivity.

  16. Transport of Light Ions in Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Tai, H.; Shinn, J. L.; Chun, S. Y.; Tripathi, R. K.; Sihver, L.

    1998-01-01

    A recent set of light ion experiments are analyzed using the Green's function method of solving the Boltzmann equation for ions of high charge and energy (the GRNTRN transport code) and the NUCFRG2 fragmentation database generator code. Although the NUCFRG2 code reasonably represents the fragmentation of heavy ions, the effects of light ion fragmentation requires a more detailed nuclear model including shell structure and short range correlations appearing as tightly bound clusters in the light ion nucleus. The most recent NTJCFRG2 code is augmented with a quasielastic alpha knockout model and semiempirical adjustments (up to 30 percent in charge removal) in the fragmentation process allowing reasonable agreement with the experiments to be obtained. A final resolution of the appropriate cross sections must await the full development of a coupled channel reaction model in which shell structure and clustering can be accurately evaluated.

  17. Ionized cluster beam technology for material science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Toshinori

    1997-06-01

    The most suitable kinetic energy range of ionized materials in film formation and epitaxial growth is from a few eV to a few hundreds eV, especially, less than about 100eV, when ions are used as a host. The main roles of ions in film formation are the effects due to their kinetic energy and the electronic charge effects which involve the effect to active film formation and the effect acceleration of chemical reactions. Therefore, it is important to develope the technology to transport large volume of a flux of ionized particles with an extremely low incident energy without any troubles due to the space charge effects and charge up problems on the surface. This is the exact motivation for us to have been developing the Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) technology since 1972. By ICB technology materials (actually wide varieties of materials such as metal, semiconductor, magnetic material, insulator, organic material, etc.) are vaporized and ejected through a small hole nozzle into a high vacuum, where the vaporized material condenses into clusters with loosely coupled atoms with the sizes about from 100 to a few 1000 atoms (mainly 100-2000 atoms) by supercondensation phenomena due to the adiabatic expansion in this evaporation process through a small hole nozzle. In the ICB technology an atom in each cluster is ionized by irradiated by electron shower, and the ionized clusters are accelerated by electric field onto a substrate. The ionized clusters with neutral clusters impinged onto a substrate are spreaded separately into atoms migrating over the substrate, so that the surface migration energy of the impinged atoms, that is, surface diffusion energy are controlled by an incident energy of a cluster. In this report the theoretical and also experimental results of ICB technology are summarized.

  18. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Sascha; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Derpmann, Valerie; Klee, Sonja; Brockmann, Klaus J; Stroh, Fred; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID. PMID:24517784

  19. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Sascha Stroh, Fred; Klopotowski, Sebastian Derpmann, Valerie Klee, Sonja Brockmann, Klaus J. Benter, Thorsten

    2014-01-15

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID.

  20. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  1. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  2. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  3. A new clustering strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-xin; Tang, Jia-fu; Wang, Guang-xing

    2007-04-01

    On the basis of the analysis of clustering algorithm that had been proposed for MANET, a novel clustering strategy was proposed in this paper. With the trust defined by statistical hypothesis in probability theory and the cluster head selected by node trust and node mobility, this strategy can realize the function of the malicious nodes detection which was neglected by other clustering algorithms and overcome the deficiency of being incapable of implementing the relative mobility metric of corresponding nodes in the MOBIC algorithm caused by the fact that the receiving power of two consecutive HELLO packet cannot be measured. It's an effective solution to cluster MANET securely.

  4. Industrial ion source technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to describe the development of a coned surface texture with ion bombardment and simultaneous deposition of an impurity. A mathematical model of sputter deposition rate from a beveled target was developed in conjuction with the texturing models to provide an important input to that model. The establishment of a general procedure that will allow the treatment of manay different sputtering configurations is outlined. Calculation of cross sections for energetic binary collisions was extened to Ar, Kr.. and Xe with total cross sections for viscosity and diffusion calculated for the interaction energy range from leV to 1000eV. Physical sputtering and reactive ion etching experiments provided experimental data on the operating limits of a broad beam ion source using CF4 as a working gas to produce reactive species in a sputtering beam. Magnetic clustering effects are observed when Al is seeded with Fe and sputtered with Ar(?) ions. Silicon was textured at a micron scale by using a substrate temperature of 600 C.

  5. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-28

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K(+) and SCN(-) ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  6. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  7. Unconventional methods for clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  8. Laser-driven nonlinear cluster dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fennel, Th.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.

    2010-04-15

    Laser excitation of nanometer-sized atomic and molecular clusters offers various opportunities to explore and control ultrafast many-particle dynamics. Whereas weak laser fields allow the analysis of photoionization, excited-state relaxation, and structural modifications on these finite quantum systems, large-amplitude collective electron motion and Coulomb explosion can be induced with intense laser pulses. This review provides an overview of key phenomena arising from laser-cluster interactions with focus on nonlinear optical excitations and discusses the underlying processes according to the current understanding. A general survey covers basic cluster properties and excitation mechanisms relevant for laser-driven cluster dynamics. Then, after an excursion in theoretical and experimental methods, results for single-photon and multiphoton excitations are reviewed with emphasis on signatures from time- and angular-resolved photoemission. A key issue of this review is the broad spectrum of phenomena arising from clusters exposed to strong fields, where the interaction with the laser pulse creates short-lived and dense nanoplasmas. The implications for technical developments such as the controlled generation of ion, electron, and radiation pulses will be addressed along with corresponding examples. Finally, future prospects of laser-cluster research as well as experimental and theoretical challenges are discussed.

  9. Structures of medium-sized silicon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kai-Ming; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Pan, Bicai; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Wacker, Jacob G.; Fye, James L.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1998-04-01

    Silicon is the most important semiconducting material in the microelectronics industry. If current miniaturization trends continue, minimum device features will soon approach the size of atomic clusters. In this size regime, the structure and properties of materials often differ dramatically from those of the bulk. An enormous effort has been devoted to determining the structures of free silicon clusters. Although progress has been made for Sin with n < 8, theoretical predictions for larger clusters are contradictory and none enjoy any compelling experimental support. Here we report geometries calculated for medium-sized silicon clusters using an unbiased global search with a genetic algorithm. Ion mobilities determined for these geometries by trajectory calculations are in excellent agreement with the values that we measure experimentally. The cluster geometries that we obtain do not correspond to fragments of the bulk. For n = 12-18 they are built on a structural motif consisting of a stack of Si9 tricapped trigonal prisms. For n >= 19, our calculations predict that near-spherical cage structures become the most stable. The transition to these more spherical geometries occurs in the measured mobilities for slightly larger clusters than in the calculations, possibly because of entropic effects.

  10. Electronic Structure and Geometries of Small Compound Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-14

    During the tenure of the DOE grant DE-FG05-87EI145316 we have concentrated on equilibrium geometries, stability, and the electronic structure of transition metal-carbon clusters (met-cars), clusters designed to mimic the chemistry of atoms, and reactivity of homo-nuclear metal clusters and ions with various reactant molecules. It is difficult to describe all the research the authors have accomplished as they have published 38 papers. In this report, they outline briefly the salient features of their work on the following topics: (1) Designer Clusters: Building Blocks for a New Class of Solids; (2) Atomic Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties of Metallo-Carbohedrenes; (3) Reactivity of Metal Clusters with H{sub 2} and NO; and (4) Anomalous Spectroscopy of Li{sub 4} Clusters.

  11. The structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    One metal atom surrounded by its 12 nearest neighbors is considered for both D(3d) (face-centered cubic-like) and D(3h) (hexagonal close-packed-like) geometries. For Al and Be, the neutral cluster and the positive and negative ions are considered for idealized (all bonds equal) and distorted geometries. The D(3d) geometry is found to be the lowest for Be13, while the D(3h) geometry is lower for Al13. This is the reverse of what is expected based upon the bulk metal structures, Be(hcp) and Al(fcc). Al13 is found to have only small distortions, while Be13 shows large distortions for both the D(3d) and D(3h) geometries. The ions have geometries which are similar to those found for the neutral systems. Both all-electron and effective core potential calculations were carried out on the X13 clusters; the agreement is very good.

  12. Studies of Clusters and Biomolecules in ELISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. U.; Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Lapierre, A.; M Ø ller, S. P.; Nielsen, S. B.; Pedersen, U. V.; Tomita, S.

    Application of the electrostatic ion storage ring ELISA to studies of clusters and biomolecules is discussed. Ions injected from a plasma source or a sputter source are hot, and at short times the yield of neutrals is usually dominated by decay of metastable ions. We have demonstrated that the decay function is close to a 1/t dependence when the internal energy of the ions is conserved, i.e., when photon emission can be ignored. Deviations from a 1/t distribution therefore gives information about the radiative lifetime or, for larger systems, about the intensity of the emitted radiation. Systematic measurements have been carried out for fullerene anions CN-, for even values of N from 36 to 96, to test a classical dielectric model. Recently we have installed an electrospray ion source with a Paul trap for bunching, which can be used to inject biomolecular ions from solution, and the first experiments on laser spectroscopy of biomolecules have been carried out. Also lifetimes of excited states have been measured for stored biomolecular ions excited by a laser pulse.

  13. Fragmentation pathways of tungsten hexacarbonyl clusters upon electron ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustetter, M.; Jabbour Al Maalouf, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Denifl, S.

    2016-08-01

    Electron ionization of neat tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) clusters has been investigated in a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment coupled with a mass spectrometer system. The molecule is used for nanofabrication processes through electron beam induced deposition and ion beam induced deposition techniques. Positive ion mass spectra of W(CO)6 clusters formed by electron ionization at 70 eV contain the ion series of the type W(CO)n+ (0 ≤ n ≤ 6) and W2(CO)n+ (0 ≤ n ≤ 12). In addition, a series of peaks are observed and have been assigned to WC(CO)n+ (0 ≤ n ≤ 3) and W2C(CO)n+ (0 ≤ n ≤ 10). A distinct change of relative fragment ion intensity can be observed for clusters compared to the single molecule. The characteristic fragmentation pattern obtained in the mass spectra can be explained by a sequential decay of the ionized organometallic, which is also supported by the study of the clusters when embedded in helium nanodroplets. In addition, appearance energies for the dissociative ionization channels for singly charged ions have been estimated from experimental ion efficiency curves.

  14. Fragmentation pathways of tungsten hexacarbonyl clusters upon electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Neustetter, M; Jabbour Al Maalouf, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Denifl, S

    2016-08-01

    Electron ionization of neat tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) clusters has been investigated in a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment coupled with a mass spectrometer system. The molecule is used for nanofabrication processes through electron beam induced deposition and ion beam induced deposition techniques. Positive ion mass spectra of W(CO)6 clusters formed by electron ionization at 70 eV contain the ion series of the type W(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 6) and W2(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 12). In addition, a series of peaks are observed and have been assigned to WC(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 3) and W2C(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 10). A distinct change of relative fragment ion intensity can be observed for clusters compared to the single molecule. The characteristic fragmentation pattern obtained in the mass spectra can be explained by a sequential decay of the ionized organometallic, which is also supported by the study of the clusters when embedded in helium nanodroplets. In addition, appearance energies for the dissociative ionization channels for singly charged ions have been estimated from experimental ion efficiency curves. PMID:27497555

  15. Laser ablation source for formation and deposition of size-selected metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Vucković, S; Svanqvist, M; Popok, V N

    2008-07-01

    This work describes construction of a source and optimisation of its parameters for production of cluster ion beams using material ablation by the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The influence of different source parameters such as carrier gas pressure, laser power, delay time between gas, and laser pulses as well as nozzle configuration on the cluster formation are studied. For the current experiments the laser ablation cluster source was optimized for production of Con+ cluster ions. Clusters with n up to 150 atoms are registered by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Deposition of size-selected Co50+ clusters with kinetic energies in the interval of 250-4850 eV/cluster on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite is studied. At the highest impact energies the clusters are implanted. Craters and well-like structures can be seen by scanning tunneling microscopy at impact spots. A decrease in cluster kinetic energy leads to formation of bumplike structures which probably represent damaged graphite areas with incorporated Co atoms. Further decrease in the cluster impact energy to the level of 450-250 eV/cluster creates condition for so-called cluster pinning when the cluster constituents are intact but the energy transferred to the graphite is still enough to produce radiation defects to which the cluster is bound. PMID:18681696

  16. Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  17. Cluster Observations of the Auroral Acceleration Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S.; Marklund, G.; Karlsson, R.; Lindqvist, P.; Li, B.; Nilsson, H.; Marghitu, O.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Lucek, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from Cluster satellite multi-point event studies from the auroral acceleration region (AAR). Electric potential structures associated with inverted-V aurora are investigated using electric field, magnetic field, ion and electron data from the Cluster spacecraft, crossing the auroral acceleration region (AAR) at different altitudes above the auroral oval. The spatial and temporal development of the acceleration structures is studied, given the magnetic conjunction opportunity and the short time-difference between the Cluster spacecraft crossings. The configuration allowed for estimating the characteristic times of development for the structures and estimating the parallel electric field and potential drop. For one of the negative potential structures, a growth time of 40 s and stability for more than one minute was observed and an average parallel electric field was estimated (~ 0.56 mV/m, between 1.13 and 1.3 RE of altitude).

  18. Structural evolution of small ruthenium cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Waldt, Eugen; Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Ahlrichs, Reinhart; Kappes, Manfred M.; Schooss, Detlef

    2015-01-14

    The structures of ruthenium cluster anions have been investigated using a combination of trapped ion electron diffraction and density functional theory computations in the size range from eight to twenty atoms. In this size range, three different structural motifs are found: Ru{sub 8}{sup −}–Ru{sub 12}{sup −} have simple cubic structures, Ru{sub 13}{sup −}–Ru{sub 16}{sup −} form double layered hexagonal structures, and larger clusters form close packed motifs. For Ru{sub 17}{sup −}, we find hexagonal close packed stacking, whereas octahedral structures occur for Ru{sub 18}{sup −}–Ru{sub 20}{sup −}. Our calculations also predict simple cubic structures for the smaller clusters Ru{sub 4}{sup −}–Ru{sub 7}{sup −}, which were not accessible to electron diffraction measurements.

  19. Recombination-Enhanced Surface Expansion of Clusters in Intense Soft X-Ray Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Krikunova, Maria; Müller, Jan Philippe; Müller, Maria; Oelze, Tim; Ovcharenko, Yevheniy; Röben, Benjamin; Sauppe, Mario; Schorb, Sebastian; Wolter, David; Mitzner, Rolf; Wöstmann, Michael; Roling, Sebastian; Harmand, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We studied the nanoplasma formation and explosion dynamics of single large xenon clusters in ultrashort, intense x-ray free-electron laser pulses via ion spectroscopy. The simultaneous measurement of single-shot diffraction images enabled a single-cluster analysis that is free from any averaging over the cluster size and laser intensity distributions. The measured charge state-resolved ion energy spectra show narrow distributions with peak positions that scale linearly with final ion charge state. These two distinct signatures are attributed to highly efficient recombination that eventually leads to the dominant formation of neutral atoms in the cluster. The measured mean ion energies exceed the value expected without recombination by more than an order of magnitude, indicating that the energy release resulting from electron-ion recombination constitutes a previously unnoticed nanoplasma heating process. This conclusion is supported by results from semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations.

  20. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  1. Convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Multitask clustering tries to improve the clustering performance of multiple tasks simultaneously by taking their relationship into account. Most existing multitask clustering algorithms fall into the type of generative clustering, and none are formulated as convex optimization problems. In this paper, we propose two convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering (DMTC) objectives to address the problems. The first one aims to learn a shared feature representation, which can be seen as a technical combination of the convex multitask feature learning and the convex Multiclass Maximum Margin Clustering (M3C). The second one aims to learn the task relationship, which can be seen as a combination of the convex multitask relationship learning and M3C. The objectives of the two algorithms are solved in a uniform procedure by the efficient cutting-plane algorithm and further unified in the Bayesian framework. Experimental results on a toy problem and two benchmark data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. PMID:26353206

  2. Clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlinin, A. A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Markevich, M. L.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Churazov, E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are formed via nonlinear growth of primordial density fluctuations and are the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the present Universe. Their number density at different epochs and their properties depend strongly on the properties of dark matter and dark energy, making clusters a powerful tool for observational cosmology. Observations of the hot gas filling the gravitational potential well of a cluster allows studying gasdynamic and plasma effects and the effect of supermassive black holes on the heating and cooling of gas on cluster scales. The work of Yakov Borisovich Zeldovich has had a profound impact on virtually all cosmological and astrophysical studies of galaxy clusters, introducing concepts such as the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum, the Zeldovich approximation, baryon acoustic peaks, and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Here, we review the most basic properties of clusters and their role in modern astrophysics and cosmology.

  3. Linked Supramolecular Building Blocks for Enhanced Cluster Formation

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A; Beavers, Christine M; Teat, Simon J; Piligkos, Stergios; Brechin, Euan K; Dalgarno, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures. PMID:25641542

  4. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.; Teat, Simon J.; Piligkos, Stergios; Brechin, Euan K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.

    2015-01-09

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures.

  5. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.; Teat, Simon J.; Piligkos, Stergios; Brechin, Euan K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.

    2015-01-09

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures.

  6. Composite ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amarasinghe, S.; Zook, L.; Leddy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Composite ion exchange materials can be formed by sorbing ion exchange polymers on inert, high surface area substrates. In general, the flux of ions and molecules through these composites, as measured electrochemically, increases as the ratio of the surface area of the substrate increases relative to the volume of the ion exchanger. This suggests that fields and gradients established at the interface between the ion exchanger and substrate are important in determining the transport characteristics of the composites. Here, the authors will focus on composites formed with a cation exchange polymer, Nafion, and two different types of microbeads: polystyrene microspheres and polystyrene coated magnetic microbeads. For the polystyrene microbeads, scanning electron micrographs suggest the beads cluster in a self-similar manner, independent of the bead diameter. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through the composites was studied as a function of bead fraction, bead radii, and fixed surface area with mixed bead sizes. Flux was well modeled by surface diffusion along a fractal interface. Magnetic composites were formed with columns of magnetic microbeads normal to the electrode surface. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through these composites increased exponentially with bead fraction. For electrolyses, the difference in the molar magnetic susceptibility of the products and reactants, Dcm, tends to be non-zero. For seven redox reactions, the ratio of the flux through the magnetic composites to the flux through a Nafion film increases monotonically with {vert_bar}Dcm{vert_bar}, with enhancements as large as thirty-fold. For reversible species, the electrolysis potential through the magnetic composites is 35 mV positive of that for the Nafion films.

  7. Mini-clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Bellandifilho, J.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Pamilaju, A.; Sawayanagi, K.; Shibuya, E. H.; Turtelli, A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of mini-clusters observed in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber no.19 are summarized. The study was made on 54 single core shower upper and 91 shower clusters of E(gamma) 10 TeV from 30 families which are visible energy greater than 80 TeV and penetrate through both upper and lower detectors of the two-story chamber. The association of hadrons in mini-cluster is made clear from their penetrative nature and microscopic observation of shower continuation in lower chamber. Small P sub t (gamma) of hadrons in mini-clusters remained in puzzle.

  8. Reactions of intermetallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, R. W.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1990-02-01

    Reaction of bismuth-alkali clusters with closed-shell HX acids provides insight into the structures, formation, and stabilities of these intermetallic species. HC1 and HI are observed to quantitatively strip BixNay and BixKy, respectively, of their alkali component, leaving bare bismuth clusters as the only bismuth-containing species detected. Product bismuth clusters exhibit the same distribution observed when pure bismuth is evaporated in the source. Though evaporated simultaneously from the same crucible, this suggests alkali atoms condense onto existing bismuth clusters and have negligible effect on their formation and consequent distribution. The indistinguishibility of reacted and pure bismuth cluster distributions further argues against the simple replacement of alkali atoms with hydrogen in these reactions. This is considered further evidence that the alkali atoms are external to the stable bismuth Zintl anionic structures. Reactivities of BixNay clusters with HC1 are estimated to lie between 3×10-13 for Bi4Na, to greater than 4×10-11 for clusters possessing large numbers of alkali atoms. Bare bismuth clusters are observed in separate experiments to react significantly more slowly with rates of 1-9×10-14 and exhibit little variation of reactivity with size. The bismuth clusters may thus be considered a relatively inert substrate upon which the alkali overlayer reacts.

  9. Management of cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment and prophylactic treatment. In ECH and CCH the attacks can be treated with oxygen (12 L/min) or subcutaneous sumatriptan 6 mg. For both oxygen and sumatriptan there are two randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating efficacy. In both ECH and CCH, verapamil is the prophylactic drug of choice. Verapamil 360 mg/day was found to be superior to placebo in one clinical trial. In clinical practice, daily doses of 480-720 mg are mostly used. Thus, the dose of verapamil used in cluster headache treatment may be double the dose used in cardiology, and with the higher doses the PR interval should be checked with an ECG. At the start of a cluster, transitional preventive treatment such as corticosteroids or greater occipital nerve blockade can be given. In CCH and in long-standing clusters of ECH, lithium, methysergide, topiramate, valproic acid and ergotamine tartrate can be used as add-on prophylactic treatment. In drug-resistant CCH, neuromodulation with either occipital nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus is an alternative treatment strategy

  10. The youngest globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara

    2015-11-01

    It is likely that all stars are born in clusters, but most clusters are not bound and disperse. None of the many protoclusters in our Galaxy are likely to develop into long-lived bound clusters. The super star clusters (SSCs) seen in starburst galaxies are more massive and compact and have better chances of survival. The birth and early development of SSCs takes place deep in molecular clouds, and during this crucial stage the embedded clusters are invisible to optical or UV observations but are studied via the radio-infrared supernebulae (RISN) they excite. We review observations of embedded clusters and identify RISN within 10 Mpc whose exciting clusters have ≈ 106 M⊙ or more in volumes of a few pc3 and which are likely to not only survive as bound clusters, but to evolve into objects as massive and compact as Galactic globulars. These clusters are distinguished by very high star formation efficiency η, at least a factor of 10 higher than the few percent seen in the Galaxy, probably due to the violent disturbances their host galaxies have undergone. We review recent observations of the kinematics of the ionized gas in RISN showing outflows through low-density channels in the ambient molecular cloud; this may protect the cloud from feedback by the embedded H II region.

  11. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  12. Reduced oscillator strength in the lithium atom, clusters, and the bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellert, Christoph; Schmidt, Martin; Schmitt, Christina; Haberland, Hellmut; Guet, Claude

    1999-03-01

    Absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been measured for small lithium cluster ions in the optical range and a significantly smaller oscillator strength than for sodium has been found. This reduction is reproduced in jellium type calculations only if nonlocal effects in the electron-ion interaction are included. It is shown that this reduction is an atomic property which persists throughout the cluster region and into the bulk regime, where it manifests itself as an increased effective electronic mass. The optical spectra of the closed shell clusters are in good agreement with calculations based on the nonlocal jellium model. The smallest cluster, Li+4, is well described by a quantum chemical calculation.

  13. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  14. Preface: Proceedings of the 21st International Workshop on Inelastic Ion-Surface Collisions (IISC-21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.

    2016-09-01

    This special issue contains the Proceedings of the 21st International Workshop on Inelastic Ion-Surface Collisions (IISC-21). The conference series started in 1976 and focuses on fundamental aspects of interactions of atoms, molecules, clusters and ions with surfaces. The main research themes are (a) energy loss of particles at surfaces, (b) charge exchange between particles and surfaces, (c) electron, photon and secondary ion emission due to particle impact on surfaces, (d) ion induced desorption, electronic and kinetic sputtering, (e) defect formation, surface modification and nanostructuring, (f) laser induced desorption, (g) scattering of atoms, ions, molecules and clusters, (h) sputtering, fragmentation, cluster and ion formation in SIMS and SNMS, and (i) cluster/molecular and highly charged ion beams.

  15. Cluster Features of Normal-, Super- and Hyperdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.; Kuklin, S.N.

    2005-11-21

    It is shown that an important mode of nuclear excitations in different processes like as cluster radioactivity, parity splitting in normal deformed bands, decay out phenomenon of the yrast superdeformed states in the heavy nuclei and formation of super- and hyper-deformed states in induced fission and heavy ion reactions is related to the motion in charge (mass) asymmetry coordinate. With the suggested cluster model one can try to unify all phenomena mentioned above.

  16. A nonparametric clustering technique which estimates the number of clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    In applications of cluster analysis, one usually needs to determine the number of clusters, K, and the assignment of observations to each cluster. A clustering technique based on recursive application of a multivariate test of bimodality which automatically estimates both K and the cluster assignments is presented.

  17. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-01

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  18. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-14

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  19. Caesium sputter ion source compatible with commercial SIMS instruments.

    SciTech Connect

    Belykh, S. F.; Palitsin, V. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Kovarsky, A. P.; Chang, R. J. H.; Adriaens, A.; Dowsett, M. G.; Adams, F.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Warwick; Ioffe Physical-Technical Inst.; Ghent Univ.; Univ. Antwerp

    2006-01-01

    A simple design for a caesium sputter cluster ion source compatible with commercially available secondary ion mass spectrometers is reported. This source has been tested with the Cameca IMS 4f instrument using the cluster Si{sub n}{sup -} and Cu{sub n}{sup -} ions, and will shortly be retrofitted to the floating low energy ion gun (FLIG) of the type used on the Cameca 4500/4550 quadruple instruments. Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of analytical capabilities of the SIMS instrument due to the non-additive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ions with the same impact energy.

  20. Formation and characterization of thioglycolic acid-silver cluster complexes.

    PubMed

    Bellina, Bruno; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Gell, Lars; Sanader, Željka; Mitrić, Roland; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe

    2013-06-21

    Gas phase reactivity observed in an ion trap was used to produce silver clusters protected with thioglycolic acid. Fragmentation pathways as well as optical properties were explored experimentally and theoretically. Sequential losses of SCH2 and CO2 in the ion trap lead to redox reactions with charge transfers between the metal part and the carboxylate and thiolate groups. This allows us to control the number of electrons in the metallic subunit and thus optical properties of the complexes. The presented formation process can be used as a prototype for tuning optical and chemical properties of ligated metal clusters by varying the number of confined electrons within the metallic subunit.

  1. Coulomb clusters in RETRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, B. R.; Church, D. A.; Gruber, L.; Holder, J. P.; Schneider, D.; Steiger, J.

    1998-10-22

    Storage rings and Penning traps are being used to study ions in their highest charge states. Both devices must have the capability for ion cooling in order to perform high precision measurements such as mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. This is accomplished in storage rings in a merged beam arrangement where a cold electron beam moves at the speed of the ions. In RETRAP, a Penning trap located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a sympathetic laser/ion cooling scheme has been implemented. In a first step, singly charged beryllium ions are cooled electronically by a tuned circuit and optically by a laser. Then hot, highly charged ions are merged into the cold Be plasma. By collisions, their kinetic energy is reduced to the temperature of the Be plasma. First experiments indicate that the highly charged ions form a strongly coupled plasma with a Coulomb coupling parameter.

  2. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Robinson, Errol W.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has seen increased application for high spatial chemical imaging of complex biological surfaces. The advent and commercial availability of cluster and polyatomic primary ion sources (e.g. Au and Bi cluster and buckminsterfullerene (C60)) provide improved secondary ion yield and decreased fragmentation of surface species, thus accessibility to intact molecular ions. Despite developments in primary ion sources, development of mass spectrometers to fully exploit their advantages has been limited. Tandem mass spectrometry for identification of secondary ions is highly desirable, but implementation has proven to be difficult. Similarly, high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy would greatly improve the chemical specificity of SIMS. Here we combine, for the first time, the advantages of a C60 primary ion source with the ultra-high mass resolving power and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Mass resolving power in excess of 100,000 (m/Δm50%) is demonstrated, with mass measurement accuracies below 3 parts-per-million. Imaging of mouse brain tissue at 40 μm pixel size is shown. Tandem mass spectrometry of ions from biological tissue is demonstrated and molecular formulae can be assigned to fragment ions.

  3. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  4. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-07-19

    An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

  5. Ion focusing

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  6. Theory of Nanocluster Size Distributions from Ion Beam Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.W.; Yi, D.O.; Sharp, I.D.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-06-13

    Ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters is studied via both kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and the self-consistent mean-field solution to a set of coupled rate equations. Both approaches predict the existence of a steady state shape for the cluster size distribution that depends only on a characteristic length determined by the ratio of the effective diffusion coefficient to the ion flux. The average cluster size in the steady state regime is determined by the implanted species/matrix interface energy.

  7. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  8. Cluster Interest Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Douglas

    The Cluster Interest Inventory is designed to familiarize students with representative occupations in 13 career clusters: (1) agribusiness and natural resources, (2) business marketing, and office occupations, (3) communications and media, (4) consumer and homemaker, (5) fine arts and humanities, (6) health, (7) manufacturing and processing, (8)…

  9. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. Withmore » regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.« less

  10. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  11. Blue emitting undecaplatinum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Bhat, Shridevi; Pradeep, T.

    2014-07-01

    A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents.A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures, instrumentation, chromatogram of the crude cluster; SEM/EDAX, DLS, PXRD, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS of the isolated Pt11 cluster; UV/Vis, MALDI MS and SEM/EDAX of isolated 2 and 3; and 195Pt NMR of the K2PtCl6 standard. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02778g

  12. Muster: Massively Scalable Clustering

    2010-05-20

    Muster is a framework for scalable cluster analysis. It includes implementations of classic K-Medoids partitioning algorithms, as well as infrastructure for making these algorithms run scalably on very large systems. In particular, Muster contains algorithms such as CAPEK (described in reference 1) that are capable of clustering highly distributed data sets in-place on a hundred thousand or more processes.

  13. Illinois' Career Cluster Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Kirby, Catherine L.; Bragg, Debra D.; Taylor, Jason L.; Oertle, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    This booklet provides information to multiple stakeholders on the implementation of career clusters in Illinois. The booklet is an extension of the previous edition titled "An Introduction to Illinois CTE Programs of Study" (2008), and provides a resource for partners to understand Illinois' Career Cluster Model as its own adaptation of the…

  14. Brightest Cluster Galaxy Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haarsma, D. B.; Sebald, D. A.; ACCEPT Team

    2011-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) play an important role in several fields of astronomical research. The literature includes many different methods and criteria for identifying the BCG in the cluster, such as choosing the brightest galaxy, the galaxy nearest the X-ray peak, or the galaxy with the most extended profile. Here we examine a sample of 75 clusters from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), measuring masked magnitudes and profiles for BCG candidates in each cluster. We first identified galaxies by hand; in 15% of clusters at least one team member selected a different galaxy than the others.We also applied 6 other identification methods to the ACCEPT sample; in 30% of clusters at least one of these methods selected a different galaxy than the other methods. We then developed an algorithm that weighs brightness, profile, and proximity to the X-ray peak and centroid. This algorithm incorporates the advantages of by-hand identification (weighing multiple properties) and automated selection (repeatable and consistent). The BCG population chosen by the algorithm is more uniform in its properties than populations selected by other methods, particularly in the relation between absolute magnitude (a proxy for galaxy mass) and average gas temperature (a proxy for cluster mass). This work supported by a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and a Sid Jansma Summer Research Fellowship.

  15. Marketing Occupations. Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This cluster guide, which is designed to show teachers what specific knowledge and skills qualify high school students for entry-level employment (or postsecondary training) in marketing occupations, is organized into three sections: (1) cluster organization and implementation, (2) instructional emphasis areas, and (3) assessment. The first…

  16. Probability and Cancer Clusters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton-Keene, Rachael; Lenard, Christoper T.; Mills, Terry M.

    2009-01-01

    Recently there have been several news items about possible cancer clusters in the Australian media. The term "cancer cluster" is used when an unusually large number of people in one geographic area, often a workplace, are diagnosed with cancer in a short space of time. In this paper the authors explore this important health issue using probability…

  17. Beyond Clusters: Supramolecular Networks Self-Assembled from Nanosized Silver Clusters and Inorganic Anions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Li, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Li-Wei; Yu, Si-Qi; Feng, Zhen-Yu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Sun, Di

    2016-05-10

    Assembly of small clusters into rigid bodies with precise shape and symmetry has been witnessed by the significant advances in cluster-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), however, nanosized silver cluster based MOFs remain largely unexplored. Herein, two anion-templated silver clusters, CO3 @Ag20 and SO4 @Ag22 , were ingeniously incorporated into a 2D sql lattice (1, [CO3 @Ag20 (iPrS)10 (NO3 )8 (DMF)2 ]n ) and an unprecedented 3D two-fold interpenetrated dia network (2, [SO4 @Ag22 (iPrS)12 (NO3 )6 ⋅2 NO3 ]n ), respectively, under mild solvothermal conditions. Their atomically precise structures were confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and further consolidated by IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis. Each drum-like CO3 @Ag20 cluster is extended by twelve NO3 (-) ions to form the 2D sql lattice of 1, whereas each ball-shaped SO4 @Ag22 cluster with a twisted truncated tetrahedral geometry is pillared by four [Ag6 (NO3 )3 ] triangular prisms to form the 3D interpenetrated dia network of 2. Notably, 2 is the first interpenetrated 3D MOF constructed from silver clusters. These results demonstrate the dual role of the anions, which not only internally act as anion templates to induce the formation of silver thiolate clusters but also externally extend the cluster units into the rigid networks. The photoluminescent and electrochemical properties of 2 are discussed in detail. PMID:27006096

  18. Beyond Clusters: Supramolecular Networks Self-Assembled from Nanosized Silver Clusters and Inorganic Anions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Li, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Li-Wei; Yu, Si-Qi; Feng, Zhen-Yu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Sun, Di

    2016-05-10

    Assembly of small clusters into rigid bodies with precise shape and symmetry has been witnessed by the significant advances in cluster-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), however, nanosized silver cluster based MOFs remain largely unexplored. Herein, two anion-templated silver clusters, CO3 @Ag20 and SO4 @Ag22 , were ingeniously incorporated into a 2D sql lattice (1, [CO3 @Ag20 (iPrS)10 (NO3 )8 (DMF)2 ]n ) and an unprecedented 3D two-fold interpenetrated dia network (2, [SO4 @Ag22 (iPrS)12 (NO3 )6 ⋅2 NO3 ]n ), respectively, under mild solvothermal conditions. Their atomically precise structures were confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and further consolidated by IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis. Each drum-like CO3 @Ag20 cluster is extended by twelve NO3 (-) ions to form the 2D sql lattice of 1, whereas each ball-shaped SO4 @Ag22 cluster with a twisted truncated tetrahedral geometry is pillared by four [Ag6 (NO3 )3 ] triangular prisms to form the 3D interpenetrated dia network of 2. Notably, 2 is the first interpenetrated 3D MOF constructed from silver clusters. These results demonstrate the dual role of the anions, which not only internally act as anion templates to induce the formation of silver thiolate clusters but also externally extend the cluster units into the rigid networks. The photoluminescent and electrochemical properties of 2 are discussed in detail.

  19. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Grant E; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-21

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because "each-atom-counts" toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well-defined surfaces may be explored using ion soft landing (SL) in a custom

  20. Cosmology with galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies are powerful probes to constrain parameters that describe the cosmological models and to distinguish among different models. Since, the evolution of the cluster mass function and large-scale clustering contain the informations about the linear growth rate of perturbations and the expansion history of the Universe, clusters have played an important role in establishing the current cosmological paradigm. It is crucial to know how to determine the cluster mass from observational quantities when using clusters as cosmological tools. For this, numerical simulations are helpful to define and study robust cluster mass proxies that have minimal and well understood scatter across the mass and redshift ranges of interest. Additionally, the bias in cluster mass determination can be constrained via observations of the strong and weak lensing effect, X-ray emission, the Sunyaev- Zel’dovic effect, and the dynamics of galaxies.A major advantage of X-ray surveys is that the observable-mass relation is tight. Moreover, clusters can be easily identified in X-ray as continuous, extended sources. As of today, interesting cosmological constraints have been obtained from relatively small cluster samples (~102), X-ray selected by the ROSAT satellite over a wide redshift range (0clusters, the ROSAT All-Sky Survey.The next generation of X-ray telescopes will enhance the statistics of detected clusters and enlarge their redshift coverage. In particular, eROSITA will produce a catalog of >105 clusters with photometric redshifts from multi-band optical surveys (e.g. PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST). This will vastly improve upon current cosmological constraints, especially by the synergy with other cluster surveys that

  1. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Varganov, Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2005-01-01

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  2. Observations of Auroral Broadband Emissions by CLUSTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlund, J.-E.; et al.

    2003-04-01

    We present the results of a study based on several events of auroral broadband ULF/ELF emissions observed by the CLUSTER multi-spacecraft at distances around 4-5 RE. These emissions, observed below the ion plasma frequency, have similar dispersion characteristics as the broadband emissions observed at lower altitudes (800-4000 km) by e.g. rockets (e.g. AMICIST) and satellites (e.g. FREJA and FAST). As successive passages of the four CLUSTER satellites through nearly the same regions show, the intensity of the emissions depend on the thermal properties of the plasma and gradients thereof. The total Poynting flux is downward and is comparable to energy fluxes observed at lower altitudes. We therefore believe that the broadband emissions observed by CLUSTER in the auroral region are consistent with dispersed linear polarised Alfvén waves (DAW) transporting energy downward to the ionosphere guided by the magnetic field lines. These waves are therefore an important aspect for the energy transport for the auroral processes leading to particle acceleration when dissipating part or all their energy along the propagation path by wave-particle coupling, causing ion heating, suprathermal electron bursts and higher frequency ion-mode waves and possibly also electric potential structures. Intermittent auroral arc features have been observed embedded in a larger region of broadband emissions. The multi-spacecraft measurements by CLUSTER here show the temporal development of sharp density gradients and intensified broadband waves together with the formation of electric potential structures and particle acceleration within the larger scale density cavity.

  3. Thermal and log-normal distributions of plasma in laser driven Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, M.; Warrens, M.; Bonasera, A.; Lattuada, D.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Schmidt, K.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Natowitz, J. B.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we explore the possibility that the motion of the deuterium ions emitted from Coulomb cluster explosions is highly disordered enough to resemble thermalization. We analyze the process of nuclear fusion reactions driven by laser-cluster interactions in experiments conducted at the Texas Petawatt laser facility using a mixture of D2+3He and CD4+3He cluster targets. When clusters explode by Coulomb repulsion, the emission of the energetic ions is “nearly” isotropic. In the framework of cluster Coulomb explosions, we analyze the energy distributions of the ions using a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution, a shifted MB distribution (sMB), and the energy distribution derived from a log-normal (LN) size distribution of clusters. We show that the first two distributions reproduce well the experimentally measured ion energy distributions and the number of fusions from d-d and d-3He reactions. The LN distribution is a good representation of the ion kinetic energy distribution well up to high momenta where the noise becomes dominant, but overestimates both the neutron and the proton yields. If the parameters of the LN distributions are chosen to reproduce the fusion yields correctly, the experimentally measured high energy ion spectrum is not well represented. We conclude that the ion kinetic energy distribution is highly disordered and practically not distinguishable from a thermalized one.

  4. Ionization-induced proton transfer in thymine-ammonia van der Waals clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Hyung Min; Kim, Seong Keun

    2007-03-01

    Ion intensity distribution of thymine-ammonia clusters produced in a supersonic jet was investigated using the resonant 2-photon ionization technique. The mass spectrum of Thym(NH3)n (m = 1-7) exhibited an anomalously strong ion intensity for n = 1 in contrast to the nearly negligible ion signals for n > 1. We suggest that proton transfer from the thymine radical cation to an ammonia molecule following the ionization of the clusters is responsible for the observed anomaly. It is also proposed that charge migration occurring with the proton transfer leads to an ion core switch from the thymine radical cation to the newly formed ammonium ion. The subsequent evaporation of other ammonia molecules in the cluster ion as a consequence of the energy released from the reaction results in extensive loss of ion signals for n > 1, and at their expense, an anomalously large ion intensity for n = 1. This mechanism is supported by density functional theory calculations on the thymine-ammonia 1:1 complex ion performed along the reaction coordinate of the proton transfer. The formation of the ammonium ion in the cluster is also confirmed by the fragmentation feature of metastable Thym(NH3)1+ (m = 1-4) obtained using reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  5. Water-Soluble Pentagonal-Prismatic Titanium-Oxo Clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanyun; Liu, Caiyun; Long, De-Liang; Cronin, Leroy; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-09-01

    By using solubility control to crystallize the prenucleation clusters of hydrosol, a family of titanium-oxo clusters possessing the {Ti18O27} core in which the 18 Ti(IV)-ions are uniquely connected with μ-oxo ligands into a triple-decked pentagonal prism was obtained. The cluster cores are wrapped by external sulfate and aqua ligands, showing good solubilities and stabilities in a variety of solvents including acetonitrile and water and allowing their solution chemistry being studied by means of electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy, (17)O NMR, and vibrational spectroscopy. Furthermore, this study provides new titanium oxide candidates for surface modifications and homogeneous photocatalysis. PMID:27525444

  6. Doubly charged CO2 clusters formed by ionization of doped helium nanodroplets☆

    PubMed Central

    Daxner, Matthias; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets are doped with carbon dioxide and ionized by electrons. Doubly charged cluster ions are, for the first time, identified based on their characteristic patterns of isotopologues. Thanks to the high mass resolution, large dynamic range, and a novel method to eliminate contributions from singly charged ions from the mass spectra, we are able to observe doubly charged cluster ions that are smaller than the ones reported in the past. The likely mechanism by which doubly charged ions are formed in doped helium droplets is discussed. PMID:25844051

  7. Recent Insights Into the Prenucleation Cluster Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, D.; Kellermeier, M.; Berg, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Stable calcium carbonate pre-nucleation clusters (PNCs) form in aqueous solution prior to nucleation of CaCO3 (1). Computer simulations suggest that the thermodynamic stability of PNCs is based upon strong hydration in combination with a distinct entropic contribution (2). In this way, PNCs can compete enthalpically with ion pairs and entropically with amorpous calcium carbonate (ACC). The clue is a high degree of structural disorder in highly dynamic, liquid- and chain-like polymeric structures of calcium carbonate ion pairs (2). Nucleation of solid calcium carbonate from these polymeric species proceeds via PNC aggregation rather than via ion-by-ion additions to un-/metastable nuclei (3). Owing to these basic characteristics, the pre-nucleation cluster pathway has been referred to as "non-classical nucleation" (4). Non-classical nucleation leads to distinct short-range structural features in ACC, and depending on pH they relate to the crystalline long-range order of calcite or vaterite (5). This suggests that calcium carbonate exhibits polyamorphism, and that distinct polyamorphs may play a central role during polymorph selection. In this contribution, we outline the scenario described above, and focus on recent insights into the pre-nucleation cluster pathway. 1. D. Gebauer, A. Völkel & H. Cölfen, Science 322, 1819-1822 (2008). 2. R. Demichelis, P. Raiteri, J.D. Gale, D. Quigley, D. Gebauer, Nat. Commun. 2, 590 (2011). 3. M. Kellermeier et al., Adv. Funct. Mater., DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201200953 (2012). 4. D. Gebauer, H. Cölfen, Nano Today 6, 564-584 (2011). 5. D. Gebauer et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 8889-8891 (2010).

  8. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Sanfilippo, Antonio; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  9. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  10. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition. PMID:26018140

  11. Studies in clustering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stell, George

    In recent years the properties of percolation models have been studied intensively. The purpose of our project was to develop a general theory of percolation and clustering between particles of arbitrary size and shape, with arbitrary correlations between them. The goal of such a theory includes the treatment of continuum percolation as well as a novel treatment of lattice percolation. We made substantial progress toward this goal. The quantities basic to a description of clustering, the mean cluster size, mean number of clusters, etc., were developed. Concise formulas were given for the terms in such series, and proved, at least for sufficiently low densities, that the series are absolutely convergent. These series can now be used to construct Pade approximants that will allow one to probe the percolation transition. A scaled-particle theory of percolation was developed which gives analytic approximants for the mean number of clusters in a large class of two and three dimensional percolation models. Although this quantity is essential in many applications, e.g., explaining colligative properties, and interpreting low-angle light-scattering data, no systematic studies of it have been done before this work. Recently carried out detailed computer simulations show that the mean number of clusters is given to high accuracy by several of there approximations. Extensions of this work will allow calculation of the complete cluster size distribution.

  12. Statistical characterization of air ion mobility spectra at Tahkuse Observatory: Classification of air ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, U.; Salm, J.; Tammet, H.

    2000-04-01

    A database of 8615 hourly averaged air ion mobility spectra in the range of 0.00041-3.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 was measured at Tahkuse Observatory, Estonia, during 14 months in 1993-1994. The average mobility spectrum over the whole period shows distinct peaks of small and large ions. Intermediate ions with mobilities of 0.034-0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 are of low concentration of about 50 cm-3 in the average spectrum. They experience occasional bursts of up to about 900 cm-3 during 6-10 hours at daytime. The number of burst events recorded during 14 months was 101, with maximum frequency in spring and minimum frequency in winter. Physically, large and intermediate ions can be called aerosol ions, and small ions can be called cluster ions. The principal component analysis was applied to detect the structure of an air ion mobility spectrum. As a result, the mobility spectrum in the range of 0.00041-3.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 (diameters of 0.36-79 nm) was divided into five classes: small cluster, big cluster, intermediate, light large, and heavy large ions. The boundaries between the classes are 1.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 (diameter of 0.85 nm), 0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 (1.6 nm), 0.034 cm2 V-1 s-1 (7.4 nm), and 0.0042 cm2 V-1 s-1 (22 nm). The five principal components that are closely correlated with the respective ion classes explain 92% of total variance. The classification of aerosol ions is in accord with the three-modal structure of the size spectrum of submicron aerosol particles.

  13. Extending Beowulf Clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Hamer, George

    2003-01-01

    Beowulf clusters can provide a cost-effective way to compute numerical models and process large amounts of remote sensing image data. Usually a Beowulf cluster is designed to accomplish a specific set of processing goals, and processing is very efficient when the problem remains inside the constraints of the original design. There are cases, however, when one might wish to compute a problem that is beyond the capacity of the local Beowulf system. In these cases, spreading the problem to multiple clusters or to other machines on the network may provide a cost-effective solution.

  14. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  15. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  16. Angle-Resolved Photoemission of Solvated Electrons in Sodium-Doped Clusters.

    PubMed

    West, Adam H C; Yoder, Bruce L; Luckhaus, David; Saak, Clara-Magdalena; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-04-16

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the unpaired electron in sodium-doped water, methanol, ammonia, and dimethyl ether clusters is presented. The experimental observations and the complementary calculations are consistent with surface electrons for the cluster size range studied. Evidence against internally solvated electrons is provided by the photoelectron angular distribution. The trends in the ionization energies seem to be mainly determined by the degree of hydrogen bonding in the solvent and the solvation of the ion core. The onset ionization energies of water and methanol clusters do not level off at small cluster sizes but decrease slightly with increasing cluster size.

  17. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  18. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, L.; Petäjä, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.; Paatero, J.; Hõrrak, U.; Tammet, H.; Joutsensaari, J.

    2004-07-01

    In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest are studied based on two different methods: 1) cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2) external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produce reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 cm-3s-1 and based on external radiation and radon measurements 4.5 cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3 nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. Another reason is that the possible fogs, which caused an extra sink of small ions are not taken into account in the calculations. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. A fourth possible reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions were somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days. On the other hand, not all the radiation energy is converted to ions and the possible effect of alpha recoil is also omitted.

  19. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, L.; Petäjä, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.; Paatero, J.; Hõrrak, U.; Tammet, H.; Joutsensaari, J.

    2004-09-01

    In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest were studied based on two different methods: 1) cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2) external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produced reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 ion pairs cm-3s-1, and based on external radiation and radon measurements, 4.5 ion pairs cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. Another reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions are somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days.

  20. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Fabien; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of clusters and the clustering of galaxies are two of the important cosmological probes for current and future large scale surveys of galaxies, such as the Dark Energy Survey. In order to combine them one has to account for the fact that they are not independent quantities, since they probe the same density field. It is important to develop a good understanding of their correlation in order to extract parameter constraints. We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. We employ the framework of the halo model complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD). We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions. Indeed, we show that the non-Gaussian covariance becomes dominant at small scales, low redshifts or high cluster masses. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias. We demonstrate that the SSC obeys mathematical inequalities and positivity. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeably better constraints, with improvements of order 20% on cosmological parameters compared to the best single probe, and even greater improvement on HOD parameters, with reduction of error bars by a factor 1.4-4.8. This happens in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales. We conclude that accounting for non-Gaussian effects is required for the joint analysis of these observables in galaxy surveys.

  1. Statistical properties of convex clustering

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kean Ming; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript, we study the statistical properties of convex clustering. We establish that convex clustering is closely related to single linkage hierarchical clustering and k-means clustering. In addition, we derive the range of the tuning parameter for convex clustering that yields a non-trivial solution. We also provide an unbiased estimator of the degrees of freedom, and provide a finite sample bound for the prediction error for convex clustering. We compare convex clustering to some traditional clustering methods in simulation studies.

  2. Cluster TOF-SIMS imaging as a tool for micrometric histology of lipids in tissue.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in instrumentation, ion beams or analyzers, for cluster time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging are described here. The methods which are employed to increase the sensitivity or to perform three-dimensional analyses in the organic materials are also illustrated. This review shows the improvements made for lipid imaging by cluster TOF-SIMS in various types of material and applications, and gives reasons for the expansion of its utilization.

  3. [Treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Fabre, N

    2005-07-01

    Remarkable therapeutic improvements have come forward recently for trigemino-autonomic cephalalgias. Attack treatment in cluster headache is based on sumatriptan and oxygen. Non-vasoconstrictive treatments are opening a new post-triptan era but are not yet applicable. Prophylactic treatment of cluster headache is based on verapamil and lithium. The efficacy of anti-epileptic drugs in cluster headache remains to be demonstrated. Surgical treatment aimed at the parasympathetic pathways and at the trigeminal nerve demonstrates a high rate of recurrence and adverse events and questions about the relevance of a "peripheral" target in cluster headache. The efficacy of continuous hypothalamic stimulation in patients with intractable headache constitutes a breakthrough, but must be demonstrated at a larger scale and the benefice/risk ratio must be carefully evaluated. Indomethacin still remains the gold standard in paroxysmal hemicrania treatment. Until recently SUNCT was considered an intractable condition. However there are some reports of complete relief with lamotrigine, topiramate and gabapentin.

  4. Mantis BT Cluster Support

    SciTech Connect

    Riot, V.

    2009-06-05

    The software is a modidication to the Mantis BT V1.5 open source application provided by the mantis BT group to support cluster web servers. It also provides various cosmetic modifications used a LLNL.

  5. Spotlight on Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    For the first and only time during the development and construction of Cluster, all four satellites will be together in the space testing facilities of IABG in Munich. On this unique occasion, ESA invites you, and in particular the visual media, to a joint ESA/Industry briefing on the Cluster project at 10h30 on Tuesday, 11 October at IABG, Einsteinstrasse 20, OTTOBRUNN (Germany). After the meeting, ESA and Industry representatives as well as mission specialists will be available for interviews. A detailed agenda is enclosed. If you intend to participate please return the attached registration form by fax (33.1) 42.73.76.90 to ESA Public Relations Division. CLUSTER BRIEFING Tuesday 11 October 1994 - IABG (Munich) Agenda 09h30 Welcome and first photo opportunity 10h30-10h35 Welcome by IABG Director 10h35-10h40 Introduction by Kurt-Johann Gluitz, Dornier, Vice-President Satellite Systems 10h40-10h55 The ESA science programme by Roger Bonnet, Director of the ESA Science programme 10h55-11h10 The mission overview by Rudi Schmidt, ESA, Cluster Project Scientist 11h10-11h20 The Cluster project by John Credland, ESA Cluster Project Manager 11h20-11h30 Cluster and the European Industry by Gunther Lehn, Dornier Cluster Project Manager 11h30-12h00 Question and answer session 12h00-14h00 Interviews and buffet lunch 13h00-14h00 Second photo opportunity 14h00 End

  6. Wild Duck Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On April 7, 2005, the Deep Impact spacecraft's Impactor Target Sensor camera recorded this image of M11, the Wild Duck cluster, a galactic open cluster located 6 thousand light years away. The camera is located on the impactor spacecraft, which will image comet Tempel 1 beginning 22 hours before impact until about 2 seconds before impact. Impact with comet Tempel 1 is planned for July 4, 2005.

  7. The Earth's ULF Wave Foreshock: Cluster Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Meziane, K.; Mazelle, C. X.; Gomez, D. O.; Bertucci, C.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between backstreaming ions and the incoming solar wind in the upstream region of the bow shock, gives rise to a number of plasma instabilities from which ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves can grow. The region of ULF wave activity is spatially localized in the ion foreshock. Observational evidence of the ULF wave foreshock boundary has accumulated over the last three decades. In particular, it has been shown that the geometrical characteristics of the boundary are very sensitive to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle. In the present work, we aim at investigating the statistical properties of the ULF wave foreshock boundary. For this purpose, we make use of the first three years of magnetic field data from the flux gate magnetometer (FGM), and the plasma densities and velocities from the Hot Ion Analyzer (HIA) on board Cluster (SC-1). A new identification of the ULF wave foreshock boundary is presented, using specific and accurate criteria for a correct determination of boundary crossings. In particular, the criteria are based on the degree of IMF rotation as Cluster crosses the boundary. To reconstruct the foreshock geometry, we use two different 3-D gas dynamic bow shock models. The ULF wave foreshock boundary is compared with previous results reported in the literature as well as with theoretical predictions.

  8. Radiation-induced segregation and precipitation behaviours around cascade clusters under electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the formation of cascade clusters and structural changes in them by means of electron irradiation following ion irradiation in an austenitic stainless steel. Almost all of the cascade clusters, which were introduced by the ion irradiation, grew to form interstitial-type dislocation loops or vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra after electron irradiation at 623 K, whereas a few of the dot-type clusters remained in the matrix. It was possible to recognize the concentration of Ni and Si by radiation-induced segregation around the dot-type clusters. After electron irradiation at 773 K, we found that some cascade clusters became precipitates (delta-Ni2Si) due to radiation-induced precipitation. This suggests that the cascade clusters could directly become precipitation sites during irradiation.

  9. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  10. Cluster recent highlights in magnetospheric physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C. Philippe; Laakso, Harri; Goldstein, Mevlyn; Masson, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    After more than 15 years in space, the Cluster mission is continuing to deliver groundbreaking results, thanks to its ability to move the four spacecraft with respect to each other, according to the science topic to be studied. The main goal of the Cluster mission, made of four identical spacecraft carrying each 11 complementary instruments, is to study in three dimensions the key plasma processes at work in the main regions of the Earth's environment: solar wind and bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail, and auroral zone. During the course of the mission, the relative distance between the four spacecraft has been varied more than 55 times from a few km up to 36000 km to address the various scientific objectives. The smallest distance achieved between two Cluster spacecraft was 3.1 km in December 2015, about 50 times smaller than planned at the beginning of the mission. The rate of change of separation distances has accelerated in the last few years with the Guest Investigator programme that allowed scientists in the community to propose special science programmes requiring a new spacecraft constellation. We will present recent science highlights obtained such as solar wind reconnection and bifurcated current sheet development, multi-altitude measurements of field aligned currents, reconnection efficiency in accelerating particles and effect of cold ions, motion of X-lines, speed and direction of tail reconnection events, flux transfer events evolution, new method to find magnetic nulls outside the Cluster tetrahedron, interplanetary shock waves very quick damping and origin of theta auroras. We will also present the distribution of data through the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS), and the Cluster Science Archive (CSA). CSA was implemented to provide, for the first time for a plasma physics mission, a permanent and public archive of all the high-resolution data from all instruments.

  11. Probing methanol cluster growth by vacuum ultraviolet ionization.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Kostko, Oleg; Fang, Yigang; Ahmed, Musahid

    2015-05-01

    The ability to probe the formation and growth of clusters is key to answering fundamental questions in solvation and nucleation phenomena. Here, we present a mass spectrometric study of methanol cluster dynamics to investigate these two major processes. The clusters are produced in a molecular beam and ionized by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at intermediate distances between the nozzle and the skimmer sampling different regimes of the supersonic expansion. The resulting cluster distribution is studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Experimental conditions are optimized to produce intermediate size protonated methanol and methanol-water clusters and mass spectra and photoionization onsets and obtained. These results demonstrate that intensity distributions vary significantly at various nozzle to ionization distances. Ion-molecule reactions closer to the nozzle tend to dominate leading to the formation of protonated species. The protonated trimer is found to be the most abundant ion at shorter distances because of a closed solvation shell, a larger photoionization cross section compared to the dimer, and an enhanced neutral tetramer precursor. On the other hand, the protonated dimer becomes the most abundant ion at farther distances because of low neutral density and an enhanced charged protonated monomer-neutral methanol interaction. Thomson's liquid drop model is used to qualitatively explain the observed distributions.

  12. Dynamic Clustering of the Bacterial Sensory Kinase BaeS.

    PubMed

    Koler, Moriah; Frank, Vered; Amartely, Hadar; Friedler, Assaf; Vaknin, Ady

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial sensory-kinase receptors form clusters on the cell membrane. However, the dynamics of sensory-kinase clustering are largely unclear. Using measurements of fluorescence anisotropy and time-lapse imaging of Escherichia coli cells, we demonstrate that copper ions trigger self-association of BaeS receptors and lead to rapid formation of clusters, which can be reversibly dispersed by a metal chelator. Copper ions did not trigger self-association of other fluorescently tagged sensory kinases, and other divalent metal ions could not elicit self-association of BaeS. The histidine residues in the BaeS periplasmic domain are essential for copper binding in vitro and are important for the copper-induced BaeS responses in vivo. BaeS clustering was triggered also under conditions that directly triggered BaeS-dependent transcriptional responses. Thus, clustering of sensory kinase receptors can be dynamic and context dependent and can be triggered by specific environmental cues. PMID:26950881

  13. Dynamic Clustering of the Bacterial Sensory Kinase BaeS

    PubMed Central

    Koler, Moriah; Frank, Vered; Amartely, Hadar; Friedler, Assaf; Vaknin, Ady

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial sensory-kinase receptors form clusters on the cell membrane. However, the dynamics of sensory-kinase clustering are largely unclear. Using measurements of fluorescence anisotropy and time-lapse imaging of Escherichia coli cells, we demonstrate that copper ions trigger self-association of BaeS receptors and lead to rapid formation of clusters, which can be reversibly dispersed by a metal chelator. Copper ions did not trigger self-association of other fluorescently tagged sensory kinases, and other divalent metal ions could not elicit self-association of BaeS. The histidine residues in the BaeS periplasmic domain are essential for copper binding in vitro and are important for the copper-induced BaeS responses in vivo. BaeS clustering was triggered also under conditions that directly triggered BaeS-dependent transcriptional responses. Thus, clustering of sensory kinase receptors can be dynamic and context dependent and can be triggered by specific environmental cues. PMID:26950881

  14. Rhenium ion beam for implantation into semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Seleznev, D. N.; Alyoshin, M. E.; Kraevsky, S. V.; Yakushin, P. E.; Khoroshilov, V. V.; Gerasimenko, N. N.; Smirnov, D. I.; Fedorov, P. A.; Temirov, A. A.

    2012-02-15

    At the ion source test bench in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics the program of ion source development for semiconductor industry is in progress. In framework of the program the Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc ion source for germanium and rhenium ion beam generation was developed and investigated. It was shown that at special conditions of ion beam implantation it is possible to fabricate not only homogenous layers of rhenium silicides solid solutions but also clusters of this compound with properties of quantum dots. At the present moment the compound is very interesting for semiconductor industry, especially for nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, but there is no very developed technology for production of nanostructures (for example quantum sized structures) with required parameters. The results of materials synthesis and exploration are presented.

  15. Multiple-Bit Errors Caused By Single Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Edmonds, Larry D.; Smith, Laurence S.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experimental and computer-simulation study of multiple-bit errors caused by impingement of single energetic ions on 256-Kb dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) integrated circuit. Studies illustrate effects of different mechanisms for transport of charge from ion tracks to various elements of integrated circuits. Shows multiple-bit errors occur in two different types of clusters about ion tracks causing them.

  16. Theory of Nanocluster Size Distributions from Ion Beam Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C. W.; Yi, D. O.; Shin, S. J.; Liao, C. Y.; Guzman, J.; Haller, E. E.; Chrzan, D. C.; Sharp, I. D.; Ager, J. W. III

    2009-04-10

    Ion beam synthesis of nanoclusters is studied via both kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and the self-consistent mean-field solution to a set of coupled rate equations. Both approaches predict the existence of a steady-state shape for the cluster-size distribution that depends only on a characteristic length determined by the effective diffusion coefficient, the ion solubility, and the volumetric ion flux. The average cluster size in the steady-state regime is determined by the implanted species or matrix interface energy.

  17. Oscillatory behavior in the size dependence of cluster mobility on metal surfaces: Rh on Rh(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellogg, G.L. )

    1994-09-26

    The mobility of Rh clusters containing two to twelve atoms adsorbed on the Rh(100) plane is examined by field ion microscopy. The activation energy of surface diffusion exhibits an interesting, oscillatory behavior as a function of cluster size. Compact geometric structures (squares and rectangles) have a consistently higher activation energy than structures with extra atoms at the periphery. The atomic-level mechanism involved in cluster diffusion is inferred from a comparison of the measured activation energies to previous theoretical calculations.

  18. Iron-sulfur clusters: why iron?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper P

    2006-08-01

    This communication addresses a simple question by means of density functional calculations: Why is iron used as the metal in iron-sulfur clusters? While there may be several answers to this question, it is shown here that one feature - the well-defined inner-sphere reorganization energy of self-exchange electron transfer - is very much favored in iron-sulfur clusters as opposed to metal substituted analogues of Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu. Furthermore, the conclusion holds for both 1Fe and 2Fe type iron-sulfur clusters. The results show that only iron provides a small inner-sphere reorganization energy of 21 kJ/mol in 1Fe (rubredoxin) and 46 kJ/mol in 2Fe (ferredoxin) models, whereas other metal ions exhibit values in the range 57-135 kJ/mol (1Fe) and 94-140 kJ/mol (2Fe). This simple result provides an important, although partial, explanation why iron alone is used in this type of clusters. The results can be explained by simple orbital rules of electron transfer, which state that the occupation of anti-bonding orbitals should not change during the redox reactions. This rule immediately suggests good and poor electron carriers.

  19. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision.

  20. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision. PMID:25406110